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Sample records for agoraphobic cognitions questionnaire

  1. Cognitive factors in panic disorder, agoraphobic avoidance and agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Berle, David; Starcevic, Vladan; Hannan, Anthony; Milicevic, Denise; Lamplugh, Claire; Fenech, Pauline

    2008-02-01

    There remains a lack of consensus regarding the possibility that especially high levels of panic-related cognitions characterise panic disorder with agoraphobia. We administered the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire and the Anxious Thoughts and Tendencies Scale as well as measures of agoraphobic avoidance to patients diagnosed with panic disorder with agoraphobia (n=75) and without agoraphobia (n=26). Patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia did not score significantly higher on any of the cognitive variables than did panic disorder patients without agoraphobia. However, most of the cognitive variables showed small to moderate-strength correlations with self-report measures of agoraphobic avoidance. Our findings suggest that anxiety sensitivity, catastrophising of the consequences of panic and a general anxiety-prone cognitive style, although to some extent associated with agoraphobic avoidance, do not discriminate panic disorder with agoraphobia from panic disorder without agoraphobia.

  2. Assessment of self-statements in agoraphobic situations construction and psychometric evaluation of the Agoraphobic Self-Statements Questionnaire (ASQ).

    PubMed

    van Hout, W J; Emmelkamp, P M; Koopmans, P C; Bögels, S M; Bouman, T K

    2001-01-01

    The study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of a self-report questionnaire for use in both treatment-outcome research and process studies: the Agoraphobic Self-Statements Questionnaire (ASQ). The ASQ comprises two subscales: a positive self-statements subscale and a negative self-statements subscale. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that, with the exception of one item, the proposed bidimensional structure of the ASQ reappeared in a second agoraphobic patient sample. Internal consistency of both subscales was satisfactory. Both subscales appeared to be sensitive to change in treatment and discriminated between agoraphobic patients and normal controls. Construct validity of the negative subscale was satisfactory, whilst additional validation of the positive subscale is required. Findings also revealed that positive thinking may serve as a coping device and that the occurrence of negative self-statements might be considered a sine qua non for the occurrence of positive self-statements. It is concluded that the ASQ can contribute to the understanding of cognitive processes during treatment of agoraphobia.

  3. GLRB allelic variation associated with agoraphobic cognitions, increased startle response and fear network activation: a potential neurogenetic pathway to panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Deckert, J; Weber, H; Villmann, C; Lonsdorf, T B; Richter, J; Andreatta, M; Arias-Vasquez, A; Hommers, L; Kent, L; Schartner, C; Cichon, S; Wolf, C; Schaefer, N; von Collenberg, C R; Wachter, B; Blum, R; Schümann, D; Scharfenort, R; Schumacher, J; Forstner, A J; Baumann, C; Schiele, M A; Notzon, S; Zwanzger, P; Janzing, J G E; Galesloot, T; Kiemeney, L A; Gajewska, A; Glotzbach-Schoon, E; Mühlberger, A; Alpers, G; Fydrich, T; Fehm, L; Gerlach, A L; Kircher, T; Lang, T; Ströhle, A; Arolt, V; Wittchen, H-U; Kalisch, R; Büchel, C; Hamm, A; Nöthen, M M; Romanos, M; Domschke, K; Pauli, P; Reif, A

    2017-02-07

    The molecular genetics of panic disorder (PD) with and without agoraphobia (AG) are still largely unknown and progress is hampered by small sample sizes. We therefore performed a genome-wide association study with a dimensional, PD/AG-related anxiety phenotype based on the Agoraphobia Cognition Questionnaire (ACQ) in a sample of 1370 healthy German volunteers of the CRC TRR58 MEGA study wave 1. A genome-wide significant association was found between ACQ and single non-coding nucleotide variants of the GLRB gene (rs78726293, P=3.3 × 10(-8); rs191260602, P=3.9 × 10(-8)). We followed up on this finding in a larger dimensional ACQ sample (N=2547) and in independent samples with a dichotomous AG phenotype based on the Symptoms Checklist (SCL-90; N=3845) and a case-control sample with the categorical phenotype PD/AG (Ncombined =1012) obtaining highly significant P-values also for GLRB single-nucleotide variants rs17035816 (P=3.8 × 10(-4)) and rs7688285 (P=7.6 × 10(-5)). GLRB gene expression was found to be modulated by rs7688285 in brain tissue, as well as cell culture. Analyses of intermediate PD/AG phenotypes demonstrated increased startle reflex and increased fear network, as well as general sensory activation by GLRB risk gene variants rs78726293, rs191260602, rs17035816 and rs7688285. Partial Glrb knockout mice demonstrated an agoraphobic phenotype. In conjunction with the clinical observation that rare coding GLRB gene mutations are associated with the neurological disorder hyperekplexia characterized by a generalized startle reaction and agoraphobic behavior, our data provide evidence that non-coding, although functional GLRB gene polymorphisms may predispose to PD by increasing startle response and agoraphobic cognitions.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 7 February 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.2.

  4. Internet Administration of Three Commonly Used Questionnaires in Panic Research: Equivalence to Paper Administration in Australian and Swedish Samples of People With Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, David W.; Carlbring, Per; Richards, Jeffrey C.; Andersson, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the degree of equivalence between paper and Internet administration of three measures of panic and agoraphobia-related cognition and behavior: Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ), Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ), and Mobility Inventory (MI). Participants were 110 people with panic disorder who had registered for an…

  5. Cognitive interviews to test and refine questionnaires.

    PubMed

    García, Alexandra A

    2011-01-01

    Survey data are compromised when respondents do not interpret questions in the way researchers expect. Cognitive interviews are used to detect problems respondents have in understanding survey instructions and items, and in formulating answers. This paper describes methods for conducting cognitive interviews and describes the processes and lessons learned with an illustrative case study. The case study used cognitive interviews to elicit respondents' understanding and perceptions of the format, instructions, items, and responses that make up the Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Inventory (DSSCI), a questionnaire designed to measure Mexican Americans' symptoms of type 2 diabetes and their symptom management strategies. Responses to cognitive interviews formed the basis for revisions in the format, instructions, items, and translation of the DSSCI. All those who develop and revise surveys are urged to incorporate cognitive interviews into their instrumentation methods so that they may produce more reliable and valid measurements.

  6. Performance of the Cognitive Holding Power Questionnaire in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, John

    1998-01-01

    The Cognitive Holding Power Questionnaire (J. Stevenson, 1990) measures the press for higher and lower order thinking in classroom environments. Results from 1203 Australian high school students show that it is the teacher, rather than other environmental aspects, who is central to the press for different kinds of thinking in the classroom. (SLD)

  7. Turkish Version of the Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire: Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Batmaz, Sedat; Kocbiyik, Sibel; Yuncu, Ozgur Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive distortions are interrelated with all layers of cognitions, and they may be part of the treatment once they are accessed, identified, labeled, and changed. From both a research and a clinical perspective, it is of utmost importance to disentangle cognitive distortions from similar constructs. Recently, the Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire (CD-Quest), a brief and comprehensive measure, was developed to assess both the frequency and the intensity of cognitive distortions. The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the CD-Quest in a psychiatric outpatient sample. Demographic and clinical data of the participants were analyzed by descriptive statistics. For group comparisons, Student's t-test was applied. An exploratory principal components factor analysis was performed, followed by an oblique rotation. To assess the internal consistency of the scale Cronbach's α was computed. The correlation coefficient was calculated for test-retest reliability over a 4-week period. For concurrent validity, bivariate Pearson correlation analyses were conducted with the measures of mood severity and negatively biased cognitions. The results revealed that the scale had excellent internal consistency, good test-retest reliability, unidimensional factor structure, and evidence of concurrent and discriminant validity. PMID:26351580

  8. Norming clinical questionnaires with multiple regression: the Pain Cognition List.

    PubMed

    Van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2005-09-01

    Questionnaires for measuring patients' feelings or beliefs are commonly used in clinical settings for diagnostic purposes, clinical decision making, or treatment evaluation. Raw scores of a patient can be evaluated by comparing them with norms based on a reference population. Using the Pain Cognition List (PCL-2003) as an example, this article shows how clinical questionnaires can be normed with multiple regression of raw scores on demographic and other patient variables. Compared with traditional norm tables for subgroups based on age or gender, this approach offers 2 advantages. First, multiple regression allows determination of which patient variables are relevant to the norming and which are not (validity). Second, by using information from the entire sample, multiple regression leads to continuous and more stable norms for any subgroup defined in terms of prognostic variables (reliability).

  9. [Predictive value of Ages & Stages Questionnaires for cognitive performance at early years of schooling].

    PubMed

    Schonhaut B, Luisa; Pérez R, Marcela; Castilla F, Ana María; Castro M, Sonia; Salinas A, Patricia; Armijo R, Iván

    2017-02-01

    The Ages and Stages questionnaires (ASQ) has been recently validated in our country for developmental screening. The objective of this study is evaluate the validity of ASQ to predict low cognitive performance in the early years of schooling.

  10. Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance of the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire across the Adult Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rast, Philippe; Zimprich, Daniel; Van Boxtel, Martin; Jolles, Jellemer

    2009-01-01

    The Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) is designed to assess a person's proneness to committing cognitive slips and errors in the completion of everyday tasks. Although the CFQ is a widely used instrument, its factor structure remains an issue of scientific debate. The present study used data of a representative sample (N = 1,303, 24-83 years…

  11. Cognitive Interviewing: A Qualitative Tool for Improving Questionnaires in Sport Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Hanno; Ehrlenspiel, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive models postulate that respondents to a questionnaire follow a four-stage process when answering a question: comprehension, memory retrieval, decision, and response. Cognitive interviewing is a qualitative tool to gain insight into this process by means of letting respondents think aloud or asking them specific questions (Willis, 2005).…

  12. Psychometric Properties of the Spanish Version of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez-Sanchez, Francisco J.; Lasa-Aristu, Amaia; Amor, Pedro J.; Holgado-Tello, Francisco P.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a Spanish version of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ-S), originally developed by Garnefski, Kraaij, and Spinhoven. To date, it is the only available instrument that permits a conceptually pure quantification of cognitive strategies of emotional regulation. A sample of 615 students (25…

  13. States-of-Mind Model: Cognitive Balance in the Treatment of Agoraphobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Robert M.; Michelson, Larry

    1987-01-01

    Used states-of-mind model to track therapeutic changes in cognitive balance of 39 agoraphobics. Descriptive and statistical analyses from an outcome study of graduated exposure, relaxation training, and paradoxical intention supported the model. Agoraphobics evinced negative dialogue at pretreatment, positive dialogue at mid and posttreatment, and…

  14. Developing an Informant Questionnaire for Cognitive Abilities in Down Syndrome: The Cognitive Scale for Down Syndrome (CS-DS)

    PubMed Central

    Rodger, Erin; Fodor-Wynne, Lucy; Hamburg, Sarah; Strydom, André

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID). Abilities relating to executive function, memory and language are particularly affected in DS, although there is a large variability across individuals. People with DS also show an increased risk of developing dementia. While assessment batteries have been developed for adults with DS to assess cognitive abilities, these batteries may not be suitable for those with more severe IDs, dementia, or visual / hearing difficulties. Here we report the development of an informant rated questionnaire, the Cognitive Scale for Down Syndrome (CS-DS), which focuses on everyday abilities relating to executive function, memory and language, and is suitable for assessing these abilities in all adults with DS regardless of cognitive ability. Complete questionnaires were collected about 128 individuals with DS. After final question selection we found high internal consistency scores across the total questionnaire and within the executive function, memory and language domains. CS-DS scores showed a wide range, with minimal floor and ceiling effects. We found high interrater (n = 55) and test retest (n = 36) intraclass correlations. CS-DS scores were significantly lower in those aged 41+ with significant cognitive decline compared to those without decline. Across all adults without cognitive decline, CS-DS scores correlated significantly to measures of general abilities. Exploratory factor analysis suggested five factors within the scale, relating to memory, self-regulation / inhibition, self-direction / initiation, communication, and focussing attention. The CS-DS therefore shows good interrater and test retest reliability, and appears to be a valid and suitable informant rating tool for assessing everyday cognitive abilities in a wide range of individuals with DS. Such a questionnaire may be a useful outcome measure for intervention studies to assess improvements to cognition, in addition to

  15. AD8 Informant Questionnaire for Cognitive Impairment: Pragmatic Diagnostic Test Accuracy Study.

    PubMed

    Larner, A J

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of the AD8 informant questionnaire for cognitive impairment was assessed in patients referred to a dedicated memory clinic. This pragmatic prospective study of consecutive referrals attending with an informant who completed AD8 (n = 212) lasted 12 months. Diagnosis used standard clinical diagnostic criteria for dementia and mild cognitive impairment as reference standard (prevalence of cognitive impairment = 0.62). The AD8 proved acceptable to informants, was quick, and easy to use. Using the cutoff of ≥2/8, AD8 was highly sensitive (0.97) for diagnosis of cognitive impairment but specificity was poor (0.17). Combining AD8 with either the Mini-Mental State Examination or the Six-Item Cognitive Impairment Test showed little additional diagnostic benefit. In conclusion, AD8 is very sensitive for cognitive impairment in a memory clinic but specificity may be inadequate.

  16. Qualitative Analysis of Cognitive Interviews With School Children: A Web-Based Food Intake Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Kupek, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of computers to administer dietary assessment questionnaires has shown potential, particularly due to the variety of interactive features that can attract and sustain children’s attention. Cognitive interviews can help researchers to gain insights into how children understand and elaborate their response processes in this type of questionnaire. Objective To present the cognitive interview results of children who answered the WebCAAFE, a Web-based questionnaire, to obtain an in-depth understanding of children’s response processes. Methods Cognitive interviews were conducted with children (using a pretested interview script). Analyses were carried out using thematic analysis within a grounded theory framework of inductive coding. Results A total of 40 children participated in the study, and 4 themes were identified: (1) the meaning of words, (2) understanding instructions, (3) ways to resolve possible problems, and (4) suggestions for improving the questionnaire. Most children understood questions that assessed nutritional intake over the past 24 hours, although the structure of the questionnaire designed to facilitate recall of dietary intake was not always fully understood. Younger children (7 and 8 years old) had more difficulty relating the food images to mixed dishes and foods eaten with bread (eg, jam, cheese). Children were able to provide suggestions for improving future versions of the questionnaire. Conclusions More attention should be paid to children aged 8 years or below, as they had the greatest difficulty completing the WebCAAFE. PMID:27895005

  17. Qualitative analysis of cognitive interviews with school children: A web-based food intake questionnaire

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of computers to administer dietary assessment questionnaires has shown potential, particularly due to the variety of interactive features that can attract and sustain children's attention. Cognitive interviews can help researchers to gain insights into how children understand and elaborate t...

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of pre-exercise screening questionnaire: emphasis on educational level and cognitive status.

    PubMed

    Maranhao Neto, Geraldo A; Luz, Leonardo Gomes Oliveira; Farinatti, Paulo T V

    2013-01-01

    The physical activity readiness questionnaire (PAR-Q) has been the most popular simple method of screening for people who intend to engage in exercise programs. Despite of the recommendations indicating that the instrument should be applied in the age range from 15 to 69 years, the questionnaire has been widely used in elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of PAR-Q in elderly women with respect to absolute and relative contraindications to exercise and verify the influence of educational level and cognitive status. Eighty-nine subjects (61-89 years) participated in the study and went through clinical exams and exercise testing. The influence of educational status, age and cognitive state (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE) on the PAR-Q responses was analyzed by logistic regression. The occurrences of absolute and relative contraindications were respectively 9% and 22%. The Sensitivity and Specificity were 75.0% and 19.8% (absolute) and 77.8% and 19.7% (relative). The PAR-Q results were not influenced by low educational status; age, or cognitive state. In conclusion, although the usefulness and easy applicability of the PAR-Q's questions, the responses to the questionnaire led to a high number of false positive and false negative cases, suggesting that it would not be adequate as a pre-participation screening tool in elder samples.

  19. The effect of item content overlap on organizational commitment questionnaire--turnover cognitions relationships.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, D P; Perrewé, P L

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the effect of overlapping scale content when certain items in the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ) are used to predict turnover cognition measures. Analyses of judgmental data collected from 25 subject matter experts suggested that 6 OCQ items reflected a desire or an intent to retain membership in one's organization. Confirmatory factor analyses of survey data from 172 master of business administration alumni showed that the 6 OCQ retention items shared overlapping content with turnover cognitions items. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses of survey data from 330 hotel managers showed that (a) removing the 6 OCQ retention items caused a significant decrease in the variance explained in a measure of turnover cognitions and (b) the size of this effect is larger than that suggested by previous work.

  20. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire reveals multiple phenotypes of resting-state cognition.

    PubMed

    Diaz, B Alexander; Van Der Sluis, Sophie; Moens, Sarah; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Migliorati, Filippo; Stoffers, Diederick; Den Braber, Anouk; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Hardstone, Richard; Van't Ent, Dennis; Boomsma, Dorret I; De Geus, Eco; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Van Someren, Eus J W; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Resting-state neuroimaging is a dominant paradigm for studying brain function in health and disease. It is attractive for clinical research because of its simplicity for patients, straightforward standardization, and sensitivity to brain disorders. Importantly, non-sensory experiences like mind wandering may arise from ongoing brain activity. However, little is known about the link between ongoing brain activity and cognition, as phenotypes of resting-state cognition-and tools to quantify them-have been lacking. To facilitate rapid and structured measurements of resting-state cognition we developed a 50-item self-report survey, the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ). Based on ARSQ data from 813 participants assessed after 5 min eyes-closed rest in their home, we identified seven dimensions of resting-state cognition using factor analysis: Discontinuity of Mind, Theory of Mind, Self, Planning, Sleepiness, Comfort, and Somatic Awareness. Further, we showed that the structure of cognition was similar during resting-state fMRI and EEG, and that the test-retest correlations were remarkably high for all dimensions. To explore whether inter-individual variation of resting-state cognition is related to health status, we correlated ARSQ-derived factor scores with psychometric scales measuring depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Mental health correlated positively with Comfort and negatively with Discontinuity of Mind. Finally, we show that sleepiness may partially explain a resting-state EEG profile previously associated with Alzheimer's disease. These findings indicate that the ARSQ readily provides information about cognitive phenotypes and that it is a promising tool for research on the neural correlates of resting-state cognition in health and disease.

  1. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire reveals multiple phenotypes of resting-state cognition

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, B. Alexander; Van Der Sluis, Sophie; Moens, Sarah; Benjamins, Jeroen S.; Migliorati, Filippo; Stoffers, Diederick; Den Braber, Anouk; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Hardstone, Richard; Van't Ent, Dennis; Boomsma, Dorret I.; De Geus, Eco; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Resting-state neuroimaging is a dominant paradigm for studying brain function in health and disease. It is attractive for clinical research because of its simplicity for patients, straightforward standardization, and sensitivity to brain disorders. Importantly, non-sensory experiences like mind wandering may arise from ongoing brain activity. However, little is known about the link between ongoing brain activity and cognition, as phenotypes of resting-state cognition—and tools to quantify them—have been lacking. To facilitate rapid and structured measurements of resting-state cognition we developed a 50-item self-report survey, the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ). Based on ARSQ data from 813 participants assessed after 5 min eyes-closed rest in their home, we identified seven dimensions of resting-state cognition using factor analysis: Discontinuity of Mind, Theory of Mind, Self, Planning, Sleepiness, Comfort, and Somatic Awareness. Further, we showed that the structure of cognition was similar during resting-state fMRI and EEG, and that the test-retest correlations were remarkably high for all dimensions. To explore whether inter-individual variation of resting-state cognition is related to health status, we correlated ARSQ-derived factor scores with psychometric scales measuring depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Mental health correlated positively with Comfort and negatively with Discontinuity of Mind. Finally, we show that sleepiness may partially explain a resting-state EEG profile previously associated with Alzheimer's disease. These findings indicate that the ARSQ readily provides information about cognitive phenotypes and that it is a promising tool for research on the neural correlates of resting-state cognition in health and disease. PMID:23964225

  2. Cognitive interviewing methods for questionnaire pre-testing in homeless persons with mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Adair, Carol E; Holland, Anna C; Patterson, Michelle L; Mason, Kate S; Goering, Paula N; Hwang, Stephen W

    2012-02-01

    In this study, cognitive interviewing methods were used to test targeted questionnaire items from a battery of quantitative instruments selected for a large multisite trial of supported housing interventions for homeless individuals with mental disorders. Most of the instruments had no published psychometrics in this population. Participants were 30 homeless adults with mental disorders (including substance use disorders) recruited from service agencies in Vancouver, Winnipeg, and Toronto, Canada. Six interviewers, trained in cognitive interviewing methods and using standard interview schedules, conducted the interviews. Questions and, in some cases, instructions, for testing were selected from existing instruments according to a priori criteria. Items on physical and mental health status, housing quality and living situation, substance use, health and justice system service use, and community integration were tested. The focus of testing was on relevance, comprehension, and recall, and on sensitivity/acceptability for this population. Findings were collated across items by site and conclusions validated by interviewers. There was both variation and similarity of responses for identified topics of interest. With respect to relevance, many items on the questionnaires were not applicable to homeless people. Comprehension varied considerably; thus, both checks on understanding and methods to assist comprehension and recall are recommended, particularly for participants with acute symptoms of mental illness and those with cognitive impairment. The acceptability of items ranged widely across the sample, but findings were consistent with previous literature, which indicates that "how you ask" is as important as "what you ask." Cognitive interviewing methods worked well and elicited information crucial to effective measurement in this unique population. Pretesting study instruments, including standard instruments, for use in special populations such as homeless

  3. How Is Impulsivity Related to Depression in Adolescence? Evidence from a French Validation of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Acremont, Mathieu.; Van der Linden, Martial

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a French version of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ; Garnefski, N., Kraaij, V., & Spinhoven, P., 2001. Negative life events, cognitive emotion regulation and emotional problems. "Personality and Individual Differences, 30," 1311-1327) and to explore its relationships with impulsivity and…

  4. Chinese Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Child Version of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Chen, Liang; Blue, Philip R.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to validate a Chinese’s adaption of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire for children (CERQ-Ck). This self-report instrument evaluates nine cognitive emotion regulation strategies that can be used by children after experiencing a negative life event. The CERQ-Ck was evaluated in a sample of 1403 elementary students between the ages of 9 and 11 by using cluster sampling. All the item-correlation coefficients for CERQ-Ck were above 0.30. The internal consistencies of the nine factors suggested moderate reliability (0.66 to 0.73). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated that the current version had the same structure as the original instrument (Tucker–Lewis index = 0.912, comparative fit index = 0.922, root mean square error of approximation = 0.032, standardized root mean square residual = 0.044). A second-order factor and a third-order factor structure were also found. Test–retest correlations (0.53 to 0.70, ps < 0.01) over a period of 1 month, which ranged from acceptable to moderately strong were obtained from a random and stratified subsample of elementary students (N = 76). In addition, we analyzed convergent validity in relation to CERQ-Ck and the Chinese version of the Children’s Depression Inventory model dimensions with a subsample of 1083 elementary students. Multiple-group CFA confirmed the measurement invariance for both the male and female groups (ΔCFI < 0.01, ΔRMSEA < 0.015). Overall, results indicate that CERQ-Ck has similar psychometric properties to the original instrument as well as with adequate reliability and validity to investigate the nine cognitive emotion regulation strategies during late childhood developmental periods. PMID:26925586

  5. Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of the Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire (CD-Quest) in a Sample of Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, Camila; Osório, Flávia L.; Crippa, José Alexandre S.; de Abreu, José Neander; Menezes, Igor Gomes; Pidgeon, Aileen; Sudak, Donna; Wenzel, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the initial psychometric properties of the Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire (CD-Quest) in its Brazilian Portuguese version tested in adult undergraduate students. Methods: Brazilian undergraduate medical and psychology students comprising the sample (n=184) completed the following measures: Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory. These self-report instruments were administered collectively in classrooms. Results: The Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire showed adequate internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha=0.85) and concurrent validity with Beck Depression Inventory (r=0.65, p<0.001) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (r=0.52, p<0.001). Furthermore, it was able to discriminate between groups possessing depressive (Beck Depression Inventory composite score ≥12) and anxious (Beck Anxiety Inventory composite score ≥ 11) indicators from those not possessing them (p<0.001). Principal components showed the measure was unidimensional, and it explained about 29 percent of the data variance. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that all the regression coefficients are greater than or equal to 0.40 Conclusion: The original Brazilian version of the Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire is adequate for use in the context of national undergraduate students and is able to separate different cognitive distortions. However, further studies using clinical samples are needed. PMID:26351620

  6. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Children's Negative Cognitive Error Questionnaire with a Clinically Depressed Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingery, Julie Newman; Kepley, Hayden O.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Walkup, John T.; Silva, Susan G.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Reinecke, Mark A.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The factor structure and psychometric properties of the Children's Negative Cognitive Error Questionnaire (CNCEQ) were examined with 427 adolescents ages 12 to 18 (193 boys) with current major depressive disorder. Results of confirmatory factor analysis supported a four-factor model comprised of three content area factors (i.e., social, academic,…

  7. Development and Psychometric Properties of a Condom Use and Its Cognitive Determinants Questionnaire (CUCDQ)

    PubMed Central

    Toopchian, Arezoo; Kanani, Safieh; Babazadeh, Towhid; Allahverdipour, Hamid; Nadrian, Haidar

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of Condom Use and its Cognitive Determinants Questionnaire (CUCDQ) among married women in Tabriz, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, applying multistage cluster sampling 388 married women were recruited to participate in the study. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to develop CUCDQ. Face, content, and construct validity, as well as reliability, were investigated. RESULTS: Principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation demonstrated a six factors structure as the best solution [Bartlett’s Test of Sphericity (Approx. Chi-Square= 4193.07, df= 780, p<0.001); KMO= 0.815] which explained 43.13% of all the variance between the items. CUCDQ represented a proper validity, reliability, simplicity and functionality. CONCLUSION: CUCDQ may be helpful for family health care providers and family planning decision makers in precise assessing the behavioural, psychological, and educational factors related to condom use. This scale may be useful in a various range of studies including family planning or STIs prevention studies in different communities. Future research is recommended to assess the different dimensions of the tool in different communities. PMID:28293322

  8. Validation of a questionnaire for assessing fecal impaction in the elderly: impact of cognitive impairment, and using a proxy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on the epidemiology of fecal impaction are limited by the absence of a valid and reliable instrument to identify the condition in the elderly. Our aim is to validate a questionnaire for identifying fecal impaction in the elderly and to assess the impact of cognitive impairment and the aid of a proxy on its reliability. Methods We developed a 5 questions’ questionnaire. The questionnaire was presented to twenty doctors to test its face validity. Feasibility was pre-tested with ten non institutionalized subjects who completed the questionnaire twice, once alone or with the help of a proxy, and another along with the researcher. For the validation of the questionnaire all residents in a single nursing-home were invited to participate, allowing the self-decision of using a proxy. Medical records of all subjects were abstracted without knowledge of subjects’ answers and agreement between fecal impaction according to self-reported and medical records analyzed. Physical impairment was measured with the Barthel’s test and cognitive impairment with the mini-mental test. Results In the face validity only minor changes in wording were suggested. In the feasibility pre-test all subjects were able to understand and complete the questionnaire and all questions were considered appropriate and easily understandable. One-hundred and ninety-nine of the 244 residents participated in the study (mean age 86,1 ± 6,6). One hundred and forty two subjects understood all questions; not understanding them was inversely associated with cognitive impairment score (aOR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.82-0.91). One hundred and sixty decided to use a proxy; the use of a proxy was inversely associated with educative level (0.13 (0.02-0.72), minimental’s score (0.85; 0.76-0.95) and Barthel’s score (0.96; 0.94-0.99). Agreement between medical records and self-completed questionnaire was 85.9% (kappa 0.72 (0,62- 0,82). Disagreement was unrelated to education and cognitive

  9. Measuring illness insight in patients with alcohol-related cognitive dysfunction using the Q8 questionnaire: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Walvoort, Serge JW; van der Heijden, Paul T; Kessels, Roy PC; Egger, Jos IM

    2016-01-01

    Aim Impaired illness insight may hamper treatment outcome in patients with alcohol-related cognitive deficits. In this study, a short questionnaire for the assessment of illness insight (eg, the Q8) was investigated in patients with Korsakoff’s syndrome (KS) and in alcohol use disorder (AUD) patients with mild neurocognitive deficits. Methods First, reliability coefficients were computed and internal structure was investigated. Then, comparisons were made between patients with KS and patients with AUD. Furthermore, correlations with the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX) were investigated. Finally, Q8 total scores were correlated with neuropsychological tests for processing speed, memory, and executive function. Results Internal consistency of the Q8 was acceptable (ie, Cronbach’s α =0.73). The Q8 items represent one factor, and scores differ significantly between AUD and KS patients. The Q8 total score, related to the DEX discrepancy score and scores on neuropsychological tests as was hypothesized, indicates that a higher degree of illness insight is associated with a higher level of cognitive functioning. Conclusion The Q8 is a short, valid, and easy-to-administer questionnaire to reliably assess illness insight in patients with moderate-to-severe alcohol-related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27445476

  10. Positive and Negative Thinking in Tinnitus: Factor Structure of the Tinnitus Cognitions Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Deborah A.; Shorter, Gillian W.; Hoare, Derek J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Researchers and clinicians consider thinking to be important in the development and maintenance of tinnitus distress, and altering thoughts or thinking style is an object of many forms of psychological therapy for tinnitus. Those working with people with tinnitus require a reliable, psychometrically robust means of measuring both positive and negative thinking related to it. The Tinnitus Cognitions Questionnaire (TCQ) was designed as such a measure and its authors showed it to be reliable, with good psychometric properties. However, no research teams have yet carried out independent validation. This study aimed to use the TCQ to investigate thinking amongst members of the general population with both bothersome and nonbothersome tinnitus and also to verify its factor structure. Design: Three hundred forty-two members of the public with tinnitus completed the TCQ online or on paper. They also rated their tinnitus on a scale as “not a problem,” “a small problem,” “a moderate problem,” “a big problem,” or a “very big problem.” The authors tested the original factor structure of the TCQ using confirmatory factor analysis and then calculated the mean scores for each item, comparing mean total scores across “problem categories” for the full questionnaire and for the positive and negative subscales. Results: The original two-factor structure of the TCQ was a good fit to the data when the correlation between positive and negative factors was fixed at zero (root mean square error of approximation = 0.064, 90% confidence interval = 0.058 to 0.070). Items pertaining to wishing the tinnitus would go away and despairing that it would ever get better had the highest mean scores. The mean total score for the “no problem” group (M = 31.17, SD = 16.03) was not significantly different from the mean total score for the “small problem” group (M = 34.00, SD = 12.44, p = 0.99). Differences between mean scores for all other groups were

  11. Who is stressed? A pilot study of salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase concentrations in agoraphobic patients and their novice therapists undergoing in vivo exposure.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sarah; Gaudlitz, Katharina; Plag, Jens; Miller, Robert; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Fehm, Lydia; Fydrich, Thomas; Ströhle, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    In cognitive behavioural therapy of phobic anxiety, in vivo exposure is considered as an effective treatment strategy. Apparently, it involves the experience of stress and anxiety in patients. Given the therapist's role during exposure sessions, it is conceivable that the performance is also accompanied with the experience of stress in therapists, especially when unversed in conducting psychotherapy. Studies confirmed that cognitive behavioural therapists tend to avoid therapist-guided in vivo exposure. The objective of this study was the simultaneous investigation of therapist's and patient's stress response during in vivo exposure. Therefore, 23 agoraphobic patients and their 23 treating therapists in training provided five saliva samples during an in vivo exposure and five samples during an ordinary therapy session. Before and during exposure session, subjective evaluations of stress and anxiety were assessed. Results suggested that therapists reported similar levels of perceived stress as patients before exposure. Both groups displayed significantly elevated salivary cortisol (sC) levels during exposure compared to the control session and a trend for alterations in salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) activity was found. Therapists reached peak concentrations of sC before start of the intervention followed by a decline during exposure, while patients displayed peak levels of cortisol secretion after 60 min of exposure. In vivo exposure seems to be a demanding intervention not only for the patient, but also for therapists in training. However, it was also demonstrated that physiological and subjective stress rather decrease during the intervention and that both groups rated exposure to be substantially successful. Based on the presented results, another potential factor contributing to the under-usage of exposure treatment is conceivable and needs to be addressed in future research.

  12. Assessment of Dysfunctional Cognitions in Binge-Eating Disorder: Factor Structure and Validity of the Mizes Anorectic Cognitions Questionnaire-Revised (MAC-R)

    PubMed Central

    Carrard, Isabelle; Rothen, Stephane; Kruseman, Maaike; Khazaal, Yasser

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dysfunctional cognitions regarding weight and shape and their implications for self-esteem are considered core features of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. However, they have also been associated with the severity of binge eating disorder (BED). Therefore, they should be screened with appropriate instruments to tailor treatment to individual patient needs. The Mizes Anorectic Cognitions-Revised (MAC-R) is a self-report questionnaire that lists dysfunctional cognitions related to three hypothesized core beliefs typical of the psychopathology of eating disorders: weight and eating as the basis of approval from others; the belief that rigid self-control is fundamental to self-worth; and the rigidity of weight- and eating-regulation efforts. Objectives: The goal of the study was to confirm the factor structure and to assess the validity of the MAC-R among a sample that met full-threshold and subthreshold criteria for BED. Methods: We used data of women meeting full-threshold (n = 94) and subthreshold (n = 22) criteria for BED to conduct confirmatory factor analyses and to compute Spearman's correlations, in order to assess factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity. Results: Two models having a structure of three factors with or without a total score proved to be acceptable. The MAC-R total score was correlated with questionnaires assessing dimensions related to eating disorder psychopathology, adding to the validity of the questionnaire. Conclusion: These results were similar to those found in studies on the psychometric properties of the MAC among samples with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, encouraging the use of the MAC-R as a research or clinical tool in order to further document the core beliefs underlying BED. PMID:28261139

  13. Development and Validation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Skills Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Karen L.; Christopher, Michael S.; Neuhaus, Edmund C.

    2011-01-01

    Although several theories exist to describe why patients improve in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), in only a limited number of studies has CBT skill acquisition been examined, particularly among patients with complex clinical profiles. Thus, the overarching aim of this research was to develop a tool to measure patients' use of CBT skills,…

  14. Mexican Immigrants and the Use of Cognitive Assessment Techniques in Questionnaire Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agans, Robert P.; Deeb-Sossa, Natalia; Kalsbeek, William

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to identify the measurement challenges involved in obtaining sensitive health outcomes from Mexican women in both settled and unsettled segments of the United States population and to suggest how cognitive assessment techniques might be better employed to construct culturally and linguistically appropriate survey…

  15. Contextualization and standardization of the supportive leadership behavior questionnaire based on socio- cognitive theory in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mandana; Emami, Amir Hosein; Mirmoosavi, ,Seyed Jamal; Alavinia, Seyed Mohammad; Zamanian, Hadi; Fathollahbeigi, Faezeh; Masiello, Italo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Effective leadership is of prime importance in any organization and it goes through changes based on accepted health promotion and behavior change theory. Although there are many leadership styles, transformational leadership, which emphasizes supportive leadership behaviors, seems to be an appropriate style in many settings particularly in the health care and educational sectors which are pressured by high turnover and safety demands. Iran has been moving rapidly forward and its authorities have understood and recognized the importance of matching leadership styles with effective and competent care for success in health care organizations. This study aimed to develop the Supportive Leadership Behaviors Scale based on accepted health and educational theories and to psychometrically test it in the Iranian context. Methods: The instrument was based on items from established questionnaires. A pilot study validated the instrument which was also cross-validated via re-translation. After validation, 731 participants answered the questionnaire. Results: The instrument was finalized and resulted in a 20-item questionnaire using the exploratory factor analysis, which yielded four factors of support for development, integrity, sincerity and recognition and explaining the supportive leadership behaviors (all above 0.6). Mapping these four measures of leadership behaviors can be beneficial to determine whether effective leadership could support innovation and improvements in medical education and health care organizations on the national level. The reliability measured as Cronbach’s alpha was 0.84. Conclusion: This new instrument yielded four factors of support for development, integrity, sincerity and recognition and explaining the supportive leadership behaviors which are applicable in health and educational settings and are helpful in improving self –efficacy among health and academic staff. PMID:25679004

  16. Assessing metacognitive skills in waking and sleep: a psychometric analysis of the Metacognitive, Affective, Cognitive Experience (MACE) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Tracey L; Sullivan, Kieran T

    2012-03-01

    The Metacognitive, Affective, Cognitive Experience (MACE) questionnaire was designed to assess metacognition across sleep and waking (Kahan & LaBerge, 1996). The present research evaluates the psychometric properties of the MACE. Data from two recent studies (N=185) were used to assess the inter-item consistency, test-retest reliability, and factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of the MACE. Results show that the MACE is a reliable measure with good construct validity. Exploratory factor analyses revealed one self-regulation and two monitoring factors. One monitoring factor emphasized monitoring internal conditions; the other emphasized monitoring external conditions. This factor structure is consistent with the Metacognitive Model (Nelson & Narens, 1990). Tests of convergent and discriminant validity suggest that the MACE is assessing metacognition and is appropriately related to similar constructs such as mindfulness and self-consciousness. The implication of these findings as well as suggestions for research and clinical applications of the MACE are discussed.

  17. How is impulsivity related to depression in adolescence? Evidence from a French validation of the cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire.

    PubMed

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a French version of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ; Garnefski, N., Kraaij, V., & Spinhoven, P., 2001. Negative life events, cognitive emotion regulation and emotional problems. Personality and Individual Differences, 30, 1311-1327) and to explore its relationships with impulsivity and depression. Teenagers from a junior secondary (n=107, 13-16 years) and a secondary school (n=110, 15-19 years) completed the CERQ, which assesses regulation strategies in response to negative events. The secondary school adolescents also completed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (Whiteside, S. P., & Lynam, D. R., 2001. The five factor model and impulsivity: Using a structural model of personality to understand impulsivity. Personality and Individual Differences, 30, 669-689) and the Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale (Reynolds, W. M., 1987. Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale: Professional manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources). Factor analysis for the CERQ confirmed the presence of the nine original regulation strategies. In the secondary school students, impulsivity was related to depression. A path analysis revealed that regulation strategies mediated this relationship. The role of emotion regulation in the development of adolescent psychopathology is discussed.

  18. Cognitive and Behavioral Treatments of Agoraphobia: Clinical, Behavioral, and Psychophysiological Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Larry; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Agoraphobics (N=37) were randomly assigned to one of three cognitive-behavioral treatments: paradoxical intention, graduated exposure, or progressive deep muscle relaxation training. Results of follow-up analyses revealed statistically significant differences across treatments, tripartite response systems, and assessment phases. (Author/BL)

  19. The Structure of Self-Serving Cognitive Distortions: A Validation of the "How I Think" Questionnaire in a Sample of Italian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacchini, Dario; De Angelis, Grazia; Affuso, Gaetana; Brugman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the structure of self-serving cognitive distortions (CD), evaluating the psychometric properties of the How I Think Questionnaire in a sample of Italian adolescents. A confirmatory factor analysis supported the distinction between four categories of CD and the use of a single second-order dimension of CD. Reliability…

  20. Psychometric properties of the Social Cognitive Theory questionnaire for physical activity in a sample of Iranian adolescent girl students.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, M S; Niknami, S; Hidarnia, A; Hajizadeh, E

    2016-08-18

    This research examined the validity and reliability of a researcher-developed questionnaire based on Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) to assess the physical activity behaviour of Iranian adolescent girls (SCT-PAIAGS). Psychometric properties of the SCT-PAIAGS were assessed by determining its face validity, content and construct validity as well as its reliability. In order to evaluate factor structure, cross-sectional research was conducted on 400 high-school girls in Tehran. Content validity index, content validity ratio and impact score for the SCT-PAIAGS varied between 0.97-1, 0.91-1 and 4.6-4.9 respectively. Confirmatory factor analysis approved a six-factor structure comprising self-efficacy, self-regulation, family support, friend support, outcome expectancy and self-efficacy to overcoming impediments. Factor loadings, t-values and fit indices showed that the SCT model was fitted to the data. Cronbach's α-coefficient ranged from 0.78 to 0.85 and intraclass correlation coefficient from 0.73 to 0.90.

  1. Are the results of questionnaires measuring non-cognitive characteristics during the selection procedure for medical school application biased by social desirability?

    PubMed Central

    Obst, Katrin U.; Brüheim, Linda; Westermann, Jürgen; Katalinic, Alexander; Kötter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A stronger consideration of non-cognitive characteristics in Medical School application procedures is desirable. Psychometric tests could be used as an economic supplement to face-to-face interviews which are frequently conducted during university internal procedures for Medical School applications (AdH, Auswahlverfahren der Hochschulen). This study investigates whether the results of psychometric questionnaires measuring non-cognitive characteristics such as personality traits, empathy, and resilience towards stress are vulnerable to distortions of social desirability when used in the context of selection procedures at Medical Schools. Methods: This study took place during the AdH of Lübeck University in August 2015. The following questionnaires have been included: NEO-FFI, SPF, and AVEM. In a 2x1 between-subject experiment we compared the answers from an alleged application condition and a control condition. In the alleged application condition we told applicants that these questionnaires were part of the application procedure. In the control condition applicants were informed about the study prior to completing the questionnaires. Results: All included questionnaires showed differences which can be regarded as social-desirability effects. These differences did not affect the entire scales but, rather, single subscales. Conclusion: These results challenge the informative value of these questionnaires when used for Medical School application procedures. Future studies may investigate the extent to which the differences influence the actual selection of applicants and what implications can be drawn from them for the use of psychometric questionnaires as part of study-place allocation procedures at Medical Schools. PMID:27990471

  2. More Evidence for Three Types of Cognitive Style: Validating the Object‐Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire Using Eye Tracking when Learning with Texts and Pictures

    PubMed Central

    Koć‐Januchta, Marta; Leutner, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is some indication that people differ regarding their visual and verbal cognitive style. The Object‐Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire (OSIVQ) assumes a three‐dimensional cognitive style model, which distinguishes between object imagery, spatial imagery and verbal dimensions. Using eye tracking as a means to observe actual gaze behaviours when learning with text–picture combinations, the current study aims to validate this three‐dimensional assumption by linking the OSIVQ to learning behaviour. The results largely confirm the model in that they show the expected correlations between results on the OSIVQ, visuo‐spatial ability and learning behaviour. Distinct differences between object visualizers, spatial visualizers and verbalizers could be demonstrated.© 2016 The Authors Applied Cognitive Psychology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28163372

  3. To evaluate the utility of 10 warning signs questionnaire in assessment of cognitive function among elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Sunil Kumar; Chander, Vishav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Routine screening of high-risk elderly people for early cognitive impairment using mini-mental state examination (MMSE) and its modifications may be constrained by demographic and other variables. Warning signs (as reported by family/caregivers) may be a useful alternative. The present data analysis was carried out with the aim to identify the role of 10 warning signs screen as an alternative tool for screening for cognitive impairment among elderly. Materials and Methods: For the purpose of this analysis (correlation), data available with us from a study conducted on the elderly population (60 years and above) from selected geographical areas (Migrant, Urban, Rural, and Tribal) of Himachal Pradesh was used. Results: A high statistically significant was found between scores on 10 warning signs screen and Hindi mental state examination/Bharmouri mental state examination (modifications of MMSE). Conclusions: Ten warning signs screen can be an important screening total for assessment of cognitive impairment in the elderly Indians. PMID:26933372

  4. Cognitive Correlates of Functional Abilities in Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Comparison of Questionnaire, Direct Observation and Performance-based Measures

    PubMed Central

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn M.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between and the cognitive correlates of several proxy measures of functional status were studied in a population with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants were 51 individuals diagnosed with MCI and 51 cognitively healthy older adults (OA). Participants completed performance-based functional status tests, standardized neuropsychological tests, and performed eight activities of daily living (e.g., watered plants, filled medication dispenser) while under direct observation in a campus apartment. An informant interview about everyday functioning was also conducted. Compared to the OA control group, the MCI group performed more poorly on all proxy measures of everyday functioning. The informant-report of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) did not correlate with the two performance-based measures; however, both the informant-report IADL and the performance-based everyday problem-solving test correlated with the direct observation measure. After controlling for age and education, cognitive predictors did not explain a significant amount of variance in the performance-based measures; however, performance on a delayed memory task was a unique predictor for the informant-report IADL, and processing speed predicted unique variance for the direct observation score. These findings indicate that differing methods for evaluating functional status are not assessing completely overlapping aspects of everyday functioning in the MCI population. PMID:24766574

  5. The Social Explanatory Styles Questionnaire: Assessing Moderators of Basic Social-Cognitive Phenomena Including Spontaneous Trait Inference, the Fundamental Attribution Error, and Moral Blame

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michael J.; Andreychik, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Why is he poor? Why is she failing academically? Why is he so generous? Why is she so conscientious? Answers to such everyday questions—social explanations—have powerful effects on relationships at the interpersonal and societal levels. How do people select an explanation in particular cases? We suggest that, often, explanations are selected based on the individual's pre-existing general theories of social causality. More specifically, we suggest that over time individuals develop general beliefs regarding the causes of social events. We refer to these beliefs as social explanatory styles. Our goal in the present article is to offer and validate a measure of individual differences in social explanatory styles. Accordingly, we offer the Social Explanatory Styles Questionnaire (SESQ), which measures three independent dimensions of social explanatory style: Dispositionism, historicism, and controllability. Studies 1–3 examine basic psychometric properties of the SESQ and provide positive evidence regarding internal consistency, factor structure, and both convergent and divergent validity. Studies 4–6 examine predictive validity for each subscale: Does each explanatory dimension moderate an important phenomenon of social cognition? Results suggest that they do. In Study 4, we show that SESQ dispositionism moderates the tendency to make spontaneous trait inferences. In Study 5, we show that SESQ historicism moderates the tendency to commit the Fundamental Attribution Error. Finally, in Study 6 we show that SESQ controllability predicts polarization of moral blame judgments: Heightened blaming toward controllable stigmas (assimilation), and attenuated blaming toward uncontrollable stigmas (contrast). Decades of research suggest that explanatory style regarding the self is a powerful predictor of self-functioning. We think it is likely that social explanatory styles—perhaps comprising interactive combinations of the basic dimensions tapped by the SESQ—will be

  6. The Social Explanatory Styles Questionnaire: assessing moderators of basic social-cognitive phenomena including spontaneous trait inference, the fundamental attribution error, and moral blame.

    PubMed

    Gill, Michael J; Andreychik, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Why is he poor? Why is she failing academically? Why is he so generous? Why is she so conscientious? Answers to such everyday questions--social explanations--have powerful effects on relationships at the interpersonal and societal levels. How do people select an explanation in particular cases? We suggest that, often, explanations are selected based on the individual's pre-existing general theories of social causality. More specifically, we suggest that over time individuals develop general beliefs regarding the causes of social events. We refer to these beliefs as social explanatory styles. Our goal in the present article is to offer and validate a measure of individual differences in social explanatory styles. Accordingly, we offer the Social Explanatory Styles Questionnaire (SESQ), which measures three independent dimensions of social explanatory style: Dispositionism, historicism, and controllability. Studies 1-3 examine basic psychometric properties of the SESQ and provide positive evidence regarding internal consistency, factor structure, and both convergent and divergent validity. Studies 4-6 examine predictive validity for each subscale: Does each explanatory dimension moderate an important phenomenon of social cognition? Results suggest that they do. In Study 4, we show that SESQ dispositionism moderates the tendency to make spontaneous trait inferences. In Study 5, we show that SESQ historicism moderates the tendency to commit the Fundamental Attribution Error. Finally, in Study 6 we show that SESQ controllability predicts polarization of moral blame judgments: Heightened blaming toward controllable stigmas (assimilation), and attenuated blaming toward uncontrollable stigmas (contrast). Decades of research suggest that explanatory style regarding the self is a powerful predictor of self-functioning. We think it is likely that social explanatory styles--perhaps comprising interactive combinations of the basic dimensions tapped by the SESQ--will be

  7. Dissemination of Cognitive Therapy for Panic Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Nick; Salkovskis, Paul; Quigley, Alexandra; Clark, David M.; Ehlers, Anke

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether brief training in cognitive therapy for panic disorder (Clark et al., 1994) can improve the outcomes that primary care therapists obtain with their patients. Seven primary care therapists treated 36 patients meeting DSM-IV (APA, 1994) criteria for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in general practice surgeries. Outcomes for the cohort of patients whom the therapists treated with their usual methods (treatment-as-usual) before the training (N = 12) were compared with those obtained with similar patients treated by the same therapists after brief training and ongoing supervision in cognitive therapy (CT) for panic disorder (N = 24). Treatment-as-usual led to significant improvements in panic severity, general anxiety, and depression. However, only a small proportion (17% of the intent-to-treat sample) became panic free and there was no improvement in agoraphobic avoidance. Patients treated with CT achieved significantly better outcomes on all measures of panic attacks, including panic-free rate (54%, intent-to-treat), and showed significantly greater improvements in agoraphobic avoidance and patient-rated general anxiety. In conclusion, cognitive therapy for panic disorder can be successfully disseminated in primary care with a brief therapist training and supervision programme that leads to significant improvements in patient outcomes. PMID:22661906

  8. The Believability of Anxious Feelings and Thoughts Questionnaire (BAFT): A Psychometric Evaluation of Cognitive Fusion in a Nonclinical and Highly Anxious Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzberg, Kristin N.; Sheppard, Sean C.; Forsyth, John P.; Crede, Marcus; Earleywine, Mitch; Eifert, Georg H.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive fusion--or the tendency to buy into the literal meaning of thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations--plays an important role in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders and figures prominently in third-generation behavior therapies such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Nonetheless, there is a lack of validated…

  9. Relationship between blood flow kinetics and severity of Alzheimer's disease: assessment of severity using a questionnaire-type examination, Alzheimer's disease assessment scale, cognitive sub-scale (ADAS(cog)).

    PubMed

    Nebu, A; Ikeda, M; Fukuhara, R; Shigenobu, K; Maki, N; Hokoishi, K; Komori, K; Yasuoka, T; Tanabe, H

    2001-01-01

    We assessed hemokinetics associated with changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) severity in 90 AD patients by researching the relationship between AD Assessment Scale, cognitive sub-scale (ADAS(cog)) scores and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In the present study, we employed the questionnaire-type ADAS(cog) examination to accurately assess the severity of AD. Between five groups classified on the basis of ADAS(cog) score, significant differences were observed in parietal, lateral temporal and superior frontal rCBF. In addition, in parietal and lateral temporal regions, significant correlations were also observed between ADAS(cog) score and rCBF. In superior frontal rCBF, significant differences were noted only between group 5 (> or =40 ADAS(cog) points) and each of the other groups; there was no significant correlation between rCBF and ADAS(cog) score. Thus, we propose the following mechanism for blood flow kinetics associated with changed severity: In an early stage of AD, blood flow in the medial temporal cortex is impaired, and gradually involves the temporoparietal regions. While the medial temporal impairment of blood flow reaches a plateau, temporoparietal blood flow continues to be impaired well into a severe stage, at which point blood flow impairment in the frontal region is initiated.

  10. The Survey Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A. Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Internet-based surveys are still relatively new, and researchers are just beginning to articulate best practices for questionnaire design. Online questionnaire design has generally been guided by the principles applying to other self-administered instruments, such as paper-based questionnaires. Web-based questionnaires, however, have the potential…

  11. Examining the Factor Structure of the 39-Item and 15-Item Versions of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire Before and After Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for People With Recurrent Depression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Research into the effectiveness and mechanisms of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) requires reliable and valid measures of mindfulness. The 39-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-39) is a measure of mindfulness commonly used to assess change before and after MBIs. However, the stability and invariance of the FFMQ factor structure have not yet been tested before and after an MBI; pre to post comparisons may not be valid if the structure changes over this period. Our primary aim was to examine the factor structure of the FFMQ-39 before and after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in adults with recurrent depression in remission using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Additionally, we examined whether the factor structure of the 15-item version (FFMQ-15) was consistent with that of the FFMQ-39, and whether it was stable over MBCT. Our secondary aim was to assess the general psychometric properties of both versions. CFAs showed that pre-MBCT, a 4-factor hierarchical model (excluding the “observing” facet) best fit the FFMQ-39 and FFMQ-15 data, whereas post-MBCT, a 5-factor hierarchical model best fit the data for both versions. Configural invariance across the time points was not supported for both versions. Internal consistency and sensitivity to change were adequate for both versions. Both FFMQ versions did not differ significantly from each other in terms of convergent validity. Researchers should consider excluding the Observing subscale from comparisons of total scale/subscale scores before and after mindfulness interventions. Current findings support the use of the FFMQ-15 as an alternative measure in research where briefer forms are needed. PMID:27078186

  12. Behavioral Assessment: Questionnaires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, C. Chrisman

    1980-01-01

    This is a general discussion of the validity, reliability, function, and format of questionnaires designed to measure problem behavior, noncompliance, anxiety, social interaction, hyperactivity, drug use, and sexual behavior. Commonly used questionnaires are cited. (CP)

  13. Questionnaire Construction Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    Questionnaire Results A. Overview 8. Social De ■* ability and Acquiescence Response Sets C. Other Response Sets or Errors D. Effects of General Pretest...Attitudes of Respondents E. Effects of Demographic Characteristics of Responses XIII. Evaluating Questionnaire Results A. Overview B. Scoring...34questionnaire" refers to an ordered arrangement of items (questions, in effect ) intended to elicit the evaluations, judgments, comparisons, attitudes

  14. Change in interpersonal problems after cognitive agoraphobia and schema-focused therapy versus psychodynamic treatment as usual of inpatients with agoraphobia and Cluster C personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Gude, Tore; Hoffart, Asle

    2008-04-01

    The aim was to study whether patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia and co-occurring Cluster C traits would respond differently regarding change in interpersonal problems as part of their personality functioning when receiving two different treatment modalities. Two cohorts of patients were followed through three months' in-patient treatment programs and assessed at follow-up one year after end of treatment. The one cohort comprised 18 patients treated with "treatment as usual" according to psychodynamic principles, the second comprised 24 patients treated in a cognitive agoraphobia and schema-focused therapy program. Patients in the cognitive condition showed greater improvement in interpersonal problems than patients in the treatment as usual condition. Although this quasi-experimental study has serious limitations, the results may indicate that agoraphobic patients with Cluster C traits should be treated in cognitive agoraphobia and schema-focused programs rather than in psychodynamic treatment as usual programs in order to reduce their level of interpersonal problems.

  15. Adaptation of Panic-Related Psychopathology Measures to Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotov, Roman; Schmidt, Norman B.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Vinogradov, Alexander; Antipova, Anna V.

    2005-01-01

    The study reports results of adaptation of panic-related psychopathology measures to Russian, including the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ), and the Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia (MIA). Psychometric properties (e.g., reliability, factor structure, endorsement) and external validity of the…

  16. Validity of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intakes determined by interviewer-administrated food frequency questionnaire among older adults with mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment or dementia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological research is increasingly focused on elderly populations, many of whom exhibit mild to moderate cognitive impairments. This presents a challenge for collection and interpretation of self-reported dietary data. There are few reports on the impact of cognitive function and dementia o...

  17. Utah Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in junior and senior high school students. The 21 multiple choice items pertain to drug use practices, use history, available of drugs, main reason for drug use, and demographic data. The questionnaire is untimed, group administered, and may be given by the classroom teacher in about 10 minutes. Item…

  18. Write Your Own Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David I.

    1975-01-01

    Contends that student evaluative questionnaires should be designed by instructors themselves to help improve their classroom performance and therefore should contain only questions that students are capable of answering objectively and not, for instance, questions about the relevancy of the course. Contains a sample questionnaire. (GH)

  19. Wesleyan University Student Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen, C. Hess

    This questionnaire assesses marijuana use practices in college students. The 30 items (multiple choice or free response) are concerned with personal and demographic data, marijuana smoking practices, use history, effects from smoking marijuana, present attitude toward the substance, and use of other drugs. The Questionnaire is untimed and…

  20. Follow-Up Research on Agoraphobics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    In vivo exposure is the most commonly used and generally the most effective behavioral treatment for agoraphobia. Follow-up studies are difficult to interpret because additional treatment does not necessarily indicate relapse and non-treatment does not necessarily indicate non-relapse. Relapse rates are difficult to estimate because of lack of…

  1. Questionnaire typography and production.

    PubMed

    Gray, M

    1975-06-01

    This article describes the typographic principles and practice which provide the basis of good design and print, the relevant printing processes which can be used, and the graphic designer's function in questionnaire production. As they impose constraints on design decisions to be discussed later in the text, the various methods of printing and production are discussed first.

  2. Cognitive and somatic anxiety.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, A; Kearsley, N

    1990-01-01

    Three hundred and forty adults (including sports players, recreational exercisers, mediators and sedentary controls) completed three inventories purporting to measure cognitive and somatic aspects of anxiety. These were the Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Questionnaire (CSAQ) devised by Schwartz, Davidson & Goleman (Psychosomatic Medicine, 40, 321-328, 1978), the Worry-Emotionality Scale (WES, Morris, Davis & Hutchens, Journal of Educational Psychology, 73, 541-555, 1981) and the Lehrer-Woolfolk (1982) Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (LWASQ). Factor analysis of the CSAQ and WES identified distinct cognitive and somatic anxiety factors in both inventories. Higher somatic than cognitive ratings were recorded on the CSAQ and WES, while the pattern was reversed on the LWASQ. The CSAQ can tentatively be recommended as a useful measure of these two anxiety components. We were unable to confirm an observation made previously in the literature that practice of meditation is associated with reduced cognitive anxiety, or that exercise is linked with lower somatic anxiety.

  3. Food frequency questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen; Aranceta, Javier; Salvador, Gemma; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-26

    Food Frequency Questionnaires are dietary assessment tools widely used in epidemiological studies investigating the relationship between dietary intake and disease or risk factors since the early '90s. The three main components of these questionnaires are the list of foods, frequency of consumption and the portion size consumed. The food list should reflect the food habits of the study population at the time the data is collected. The frequency of consumption may be asked by open ended questions or by presenting frequency categories. Qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaires do not ask about the consumed portions; semi-quantitative include standard portions and quantitative questionnaires ask respondents to estimate the portion size consumed either in household measures or grams. The latter implies a greater participant burden. Some versions include only close-ended questions in a standardized format, while others add an open section with questions about some specific food habits and practices and admit additions to the food list for foods and beverages consumed which are not included. The method can be self-administered, on paper or web-based, or interview administered either face-to-face or by telephone. Due to the standard format, especially closed-ended versions, and method of administration, FFQs are highly cost-effective thus encouraging its widespread use in large scale epidemiological cohort studies and also in other study designs. Coding and processing data collected is also less costly and requires less nutrition expertise compared to other dietary intake assessment methods. However, the main limitations are systematic errors and biases in estimates. Important efforts are being developed to improve the quality of the information. It has been recommended the use of FFQs with other methods thus enabling the adjustments required.

  4. Self-statements of test-anxious children: thought-listing and questionnaire approaches.

    PubMed

    Prins, P J; Hanewald, G J

    1997-06-01

    Two methods of assessing cognition in high, moderate, and low test-anxious children, thought listing and self-statement questionnaire approaches, were investigated under naturalistic test-taking conditions. The amount of cognition, its content, and its relation to level of anxiety and task performance were examined. States of mind (SOM) analyses were performed. Furthermore, the comparability of findings from both methods was examined. Results showed that, relative to the questionnaire method, the thought-listing procedure underestimated positive and coping cognition. The benefits of the questionnaire approach were seen in the power of its scores to predict task performance. Implications for cognitive assessment and treatment of anxious children are discussed.

  5. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann

  6. The Toronto Empathy Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Spreng, R. Nathan; McKinnon, Margaret C.; Mar, Raymond A.; Levine, Brian

    2008-01-01

    In order to formulate a parsimonious tool to assess empathy, we used factor analysis on a combination of self-report measures to examine consensus and developed a brief self-report measure of this common factor. The Toronto Empathy Questionnaire (TEQ) represents empathy as a primarily emotional process. In three studies, the TEQ demonstrated strong convergent validity, correlating positively with behavioral measures of social decoding, self-report measures of empathy, and negatively with a measure of Autism symptomatology. Moreover, it exhibited good internal consistency and high test-retest reliability. The TEQ is a brief, reliable, and valid instrument for the assessment of empathy. PMID:19085285

  7. Questionnaire Translation and Questionnaire Validation: Are They the Same?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffee, Dale T.

    The purpose of this paper is to give evidence for the thesis that if teachers using a questionnaire as a data collection instrument have the questionnaire items translated from one language into another, they cannot assume that the translated items are valid simply because they were translated. Even if the original questionnaire items were…

  8. Questionnaire Surveys in Educational Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psacharopoulos, George

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses some critical issues related to the use of questionnaire surveys in educational planning. Ten brief sections discuss survey objectives, coverage, questionnaire design, administration, validity, nonresponse, cost considerations, coding, statistical analysis, and interpretation. Five illustrative questionnaire…

  9. Diet History Questionnaire: Suggested Citations

    Cancer.gov

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  10. Diet History Questionnaire: International Applications

    Cancer.gov

    ARP staff adapted the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) for use by Canadian populations in collaboration with the Alberta Cancer Board. This questionnaire takes into account the different food fortification polices of the U.S. and Canada.

  11. The Drug-Abuse Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferneau, E.; Mueller, S.

    The drug-abuse questionnaire used to survey college student attitudes on the subject is provided. It is identical to the alcoholism questionnaire except for word changes appropriate to the subject matter. The questionnaire consists of 40 statements about drug abuse and drug abusers, with 7 possible responses: (1) completely disagree; (2) mostly…

  12. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  13. The Sport Imagery Questionnaire for Children (SIQ-C)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, C. R.; Munroe-Chandler, K. J.; Fishburne, G. J.; Hall, N. D.

    2009-01-01

    Athletes of all ages report using imagery extensively to enhance their sport performance. The Sport Imagery Questionnaire (Hall, Mack, Paivio, & Hausenblas, 1998) was developed to assess cognitive and motivational imagery used by adult athletes. No such instrument currently exists to measure the use of imagery by young athletes. The aim of the…

  14. Psychometric Properties of Shortened Versions of the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netemeyer, Richard G.; Williamson, Donald A.; Burton, Scot; Biswas, Dipayan; Jindal, Supriya; Landreth, Stacy; Mills, Gregory; Primeaux, Sonya

    2002-01-01

    Derived shortened versions of the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ) (S. Hollon and P. Kendall, 1980) using samples of 434 and 419 adults. Cross-validation with samples of 163 and 91 adults showed support for the shortened versions. Overall, results suggest that these short forms are useful in measuring cognitions associated with depression.…

  15. Paper to Electronic Questionnaires: Effects on Structured Questionnaire Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of computers, paper questionnaires are being replaced by electronic questionnaires. The formats of traditional paper questionnaires have been found to effect a subject's rating. Consequently, the transition from paper to electronic format can subtly change results. The research presented begins to determine how electronic questionnaire formats change subjective ratings. For formats where subjects used a flow chart to arrive at their rating, starting at the worst and middle ratings of the flow charts were the most accurate but subjects took slightly more time to arrive at their answers. Except for the electronic paper format, starting at the worst rating was the most preferred. The paper and electronic paper versions had the worst accuracy. Therefore, for flowchart type of questionnaires, flowcharts should start at the worst rating and work their way up to better ratings.

  16. Instructional Practices of Teachers in General Education Classrooms & Gifted Resource Rooms: Development and Validation of the Instructional Practice Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; Greene, Mary T.; Higgins, Kyle

    2006-01-01

    An instrument to measure teachers' instructional practices, the Instructional Practice Questionnaire, was developed and validated in three phases. The questionnaires focused on three domains of instructional practices: cognitive, interpersonal, and interpersonal. First, an initial questionnaire was developed for a pilot study, and data were…

  17. The MPC&A Questionnaire

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    The questionnaire is the instrument used for recording performance data on the nuclear material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system at a nuclear facility. The performance information provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the MPC&A system. The goal for the questionnaire is to provide an accurate representation of the performance of the MPC&A system as it currently exists in the facility. Performance grades for all basic MPC&A functions should realistically reflect the actual level of performance at the time the survey is conducted. The questionnaire was developed after testing and benchmarking the material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) in the United States. The benchmarking exercise at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) proved extremely valuable for improving the content and quality of the early versions of the questionnaire. Members of the INL benchmark team identified many areas of the questionnaire where questions should be clarified and areas where additional questions should be incorporated. The questionnaire addresses all elements of the MC&A system. Specific parts pertain to the foundation for the facility's overall MPC&A system, and other parts pertain to the specific functions of the operational MPC&A system. The questionnaire includes performance metrics for each of the basic functions or tasks performed in the operational MPC&A system. All of those basic functions or tasks are represented as basic events in the MPC&A fault tree. Performance metrics are to be used during completion of the questionnaire to report what is actually being done in relation to what should be done in the performance of MPC&A functions.

  18. The Michigan data needs questionnaire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill-Rowley, R.

    1981-01-01

    The data needs questionnaire is an element in the project design study for the Michigan Resource Inventory Act and is aimed at gathering information on what inventory information is required by land use planners throughout the state. Analysis of questionnaire responses is discussed. Some information on current use categories was tabulated. The respondents selected a broad range of categories at all levels of detail. Those most frequently indicated were urban categories.

  19. Psychometric Validation of the "Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire" with Mexican University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez-Dorantes, Maria del Carmen; Canto y Rodriguez, Jose Enrique; Bueno-Alvarez, Jose Antonio; Echazarreta-Moreno, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The "Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire" (MSLQ) is a self-report instrument designed to assess students' motivation and learning strategies (cognitive, meta-cognitive, and resource management). In the present study, we focused on translate, adapt and validate the MSLQ to Mexican educational context. Method: The…

  20. Design of psychosocial factors questionnaires: a systematic measurement approach

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Angélica; Felknor, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    Background Evaluation of psychosocial factors requires instruments that measure dynamic complexities. This study explains the design of a set of questionnaires to evaluate work and non-work psychosocial risk factors for stress-related illnesses. Methods The measurement model was based on a review of literature. Content validity was performed by experts and cognitive interviews. Pilot testing was carried out with a convenience sample of 132 workers. Cronbach’s alpha evaluated internal consistency and concurrent validity was estimated by Spearman correlation coefficients. Results Three questionnaires were constructed to evaluate exposure to work and non-work risk factors. Content validity improved the questionnaires coherence with the measurement model. Internal consistency was adequate (α=0.85–0.95). Concurrent validity resulted in moderate correlations of psychosocial factors with stress symptoms. Conclusions Questionnaires´ content reflected a wide spectrum of psychosocial factors sources. Cognitive interviews improved understanding of questions and dimensions. The structure of the measurement model was confirmed. PMID:22628068

  1. Criterion and incremental validity of the emotion regulation questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, Christos A.; Siegling, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Although research on emotion regulation (ER) is developing, little attention has been paid to the predictive power of ER strategies beyond established constructs. The present study examined the incremental validity of the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ; Gross and John, 2003), which measures cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, over and above the Big Five personality factors. It also extended the evidence for the measure's criterion validity to yet unexamined criteria. A university student sample (N = 203) completed the ERQ, a measure of the Big Five, and relevant cognitive and emotion-laden criteria. Cognitive reappraisal predicted positive affect beyond personality, as well as experiential flexibility and constructive self-assertion beyond personality and affect. Expressive suppression explained incremental variance in negative affect beyond personality and in experiential flexibility beyond personality and general affect. No incremental effects were found for worry, social anxiety, rumination, reflection, and preventing negative emotions. Implications for the construct validity and utility of the ERQ are discussed. PMID:25814967

  2. College Student Services Accreditation Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1979-01-01

    This questionnaire is intended for use as one aspect in accrediting the "Student Personnel Services" which an institution of higher learning provides for students. Areas in question include personal development, health fostering, vocational preparation, effective personalized learning, economic viability, transpersonal offerings, and satisfactory…

  3. Diet History Questionnaire: Canadian Version

    Cancer.gov

    The Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and the DHQ nutrient database were modified for use in Canada through the collaborative efforts of Dr. Amy Subar and staff at the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch, and Dr. Ilona Csizmadi and colleagues in the Division of Population Health and Information at the Alberta Cancer Board in Canada.

  4. Questionnaires for eliciting evaluation data from users of interactive question answering

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Diane; Kantor, Paul B.; Morse, Emile; Scholtz, Jean; Sun, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluating interactive question answering (QA) systems with real users can be challenging because traditional evaluation measures based on the relevance of items returned are difficult to employ since relevance judgments can be unstable in multi-user evaluations. The work reported in this paper evaluates, in distinguishing among a set of interactive QA systems, the effectiveness of three questionnaires: a Cognitive Workload Questionnaire (NASA TLX), and Task and System Questionnaires customized to a specific interactive QA application. These Questionnaires were evaluated with four systems, seven analysts, and eight scenarios during a 2-week workshop. Overall, results demonstrate that all three Questionnaires are effective at distinguishing among systems, with the Task Questionnaire being the most sensitive. Results also provide initial support for the validity and reliability of the Questionnaires.

  5. Social cognition is not associated with cognitive reserve in older adults.

    PubMed

    Lavrencic, Louise M; Kurylowicz, Lisa; Valenzuela, Michael J; Churches, Owen F; Keage, Hannah A D

    2016-01-01

    Social and general cognitive abilities decline in late life. Those with high cognitive reserve display better general cognitive performance in old age; however, it is unknown whether this is also the case for social cognition. A total of 115 healthy older adults, aged 60-85 years (m = 44, f = 71) were assessed using The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT-R; social cognition), the Lifetime of Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ; cognitive reserve), and the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI-II; general cognitive ability). The LEQ did not predict performance on any TASIT-R subtest: Emotion Evaluation Test (β = -.097, p = .325), Social Inference - Minimal (β = -.004, p = .972), or Social Inference - Enriched (β = -.016, p = .878). Sensitivity analyses using two alternative cognitive reserve measures, years of education and the National Adult Reading Test, supported these effects. Cognitive reserve was strongly related to WASI-II performance. Unlike general cognitive ability, social cognition appears unaffected by cognitive reserve. Findings contribute to the emerging understanding that cognitive reserve differentially affects individual cognitive domains, which has implications for the theoretical understanding of cognitive reserve and its brain correlates. Cognitive measures unbiased by cognitive reserve may serve as best indicators of brain health, free of compensatory mechanisms.

  6. Concurrent and Longitudinal Relationships Between Cognitive Activity, Cognitive Performance, and Brain Volume in Older Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Espeland, Mark A.; Smith, J. Carson; Tindle, Hilary A.; Rapp, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated (a) cross-sectional associations between cognitive activity, cognitive performance, and MRI measures and (b) longitudinal associations between cognitive activity and change in cognitive performance, using structural equation modeling (SEM). Method. Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) Extension participants who continued annual neuropsychological assessments by telephone and completed a concurrent questionnaire of cognitive activities and MRI scans were included (mean age = 81.4 years; N = 393). Cognitive performance was measured by tests of attention, working memory, verbal fluency, executive function, and memory. Cognitive activity was measured by self-reported participation in a variety of cognitive activities (e.g., reading books, playing games, computer activities; N = 11 items) during the previous 12 months. MRI measures included gray and white matter normal and white matter lesion volumes. Results. SEM demonstrated a significant association between cognitive activity and baseline cognitive performance but not change over 2–3 years. Gray and white matter was associated with cognitive performance but not cognitive activity. All effects remained significant after modeling covariates (age, education, depressive symptoms, WHIMS intervention assignment, and intracranial volume). Conclusions. Cognitive activity benefits current cognitive performance but is not associated with change over 2–3 years. Cognitive activity and MRI volumes are independently associated with cognitive performance, suggesting distinct cognitive and brain reserve constructs. PMID:25209372

  7. Cognitive Coping Strategies and Stress in Parents of Children with Down Syndrome: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Veek, Shelley M. C.; Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the cross-sectional and prospective relationships between cognitive coping strategies and parental stress in parents of children with Down syndrome. A total of 621 participants filled out questionnaires, including the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire to measure cognitive coping and the Nijmeegse…

  8. Neural correlates of cognitive style and flexible cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Shin, Gyeonghee; Kim, Chobok

    2015-06-01

    Human abilities of flexible cognitive control are associated with appropriately regulating the amount of cognitive control required in response to contextual demands. In the context of conflicting situations, for instance, the amount of cognitive control increases according to the level of previously experienced conflict, resulting in optimized performance. We explored whether the amount of cognitive control in conflict resolution was related to individual differences in cognitive style that were determined with the Object-Spatial-Verbal cognitive style questionnaire. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, a version of the color-word Stroop task, which evokes conflict between color and verbal components, was employed to explore whether individual preferences for distracting information were related to the increases in neural conflict adaptation in cognitive control network regions. The behavioral data revealed that the more the verbal style was preferred, the greater the conflict adaptation effect was observed, especially when the current trial type was congruent. Consistent with the behavioral data, the imaging results demonstrated increased neural conflict adaptation effects in task-relevant network regions, including the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left fusiform gyrus, and left precuneus, as the preference for verbal style increased. These results provide new evidence that flexible cognitive control is closely associated with individuals' preference of cognitive style.

  9. Work Cognitions in Multicultural Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, John; Keats, Daphne M.

    1992-01-01

    Investigates the influence of ethnic cultural background and multicultural interaction for 120 males drawn from Aboriginal, Anglo-Saxon, Chinese, and Lebanese cultural communities in Australia. Responses to the Work Cognitions Questionnaire reveal differences in the structure of achievement goals and work values for the 4 groups of 30 subjects…

  10. The Development and Validation of the Empathy Components Questionnaire (ECQ)

    PubMed Central

    Batchelder, Laurie; Brosnan, Mark; Ashwin, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Key research suggests that empathy is a multidimensional construct comprising of both cognitive and affective components. More recent theories and research suggest even further factors within these components of empathy, including the ability to empathize with others versus the drive towards empathizing with others. While numerous self-report measures have been developed to examine empathy, none of them currently index all of these wider components together. The aim of the present research was to develop and validate the Empathy Components Questionnaire (ECQ) to measure cognitive and affective components, as well as ability and drive components within each. Study one utilized items measuring cognitive and affective empathy taken from various established questionnaires to create an initial version of the ECQ. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to examine the underlying components of empathy within the ECQ in a sample of 101 typical adults. Results revealed a five-component model consisting of cognitive ability, cognitive drive, affective ability, affective drive, and a fifth factor assessing affective reactivity. This five-component structure was then validated and confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) in an independent sample of 211 typical adults. Results also showed that females scored higher than males overall on the ECQ, and on specific components, which is consistent with previous findings of a female advantage on self-reported empathy. Findings also showed certain components predicted scores on an independent measure of social behavior, which provided good convergent validity of the ECQ. Together, these findings validate the newly developed ECQ as a multidimensional measure of empathy more in-line with current theories of empathy. The ECQ provides a useful new tool for quick and easy measurement of empathy and its components for research with both healthy and clinical populations. PMID:28076406

  11. Cognitive Distortion in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Relation to Depression and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Timothy W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the relation between cognitive distortion, as measured by the Cognitive Error Questionnaire, and both self-reported and interview-rated depression and disability in 92 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Found cognitive distortion significantly associated with depression, and also related to physical disability. Discusses the results,…

  12. Cognitive ecology.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Edwin

    2010-10-01

    Cognitive ecology is the study of cognitive phenomena in context. In particular, it points to the web of mutual dependence among the elements of a cognitive ecosystem. At least three fields were taking a deeply ecological approach to cognition 30 years ago: Gibson's ecological psychology, Bateson's ecology of mind, and Soviet cultural-historical activity theory. The ideas developed in those projects have now found a place in modern views of embodied, situated, distributed cognition. As cognitive theory continues to shift from units of analysis defined by inherent properties of the elements to units defined in terms of dynamic patterns of correlation across elements, the study of cognitive ecosystems will become an increasingly important part of cognitive science.

  13. National questionnaire survey of TMA.

    PubMed

    Ito, Naomi; Wada, Hideo; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Murata, Mitsuru; Izuno, Takashi; Sugita, Minoru; Ikeda, Yasuo

    2009-10-01

    A questionnaire survey of Japanese patients with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) was carried out to investigate the frequency, laboratory abnormalities, and outcome in 2004. Out of 185 patients, there were 13 with familial TMA and 172 with acquired TMA. In acquired TMA, there were 66 with Escherichia coli O-157 infection (O-157)-related TMA, 35 with ADAMTS13-related TMA, and 22 with other types of TMA. The frequency of TMA in O-157-related TMA was high in patients from 0- to 15-year-old, and acquired TMA without O-157 was frequently observed in patients ranging from 31 to 65 years of age. In the treatment of acquired TMA, including plasma exchange (PE), steroid, antiplatelet agent, and anticoagulant, PE was carried out in 94.3% of ADAMTS13-related TMA, 77.3% of other TMA, and 7.6% of O-157-related TMA. The efficacy of PE and steroid therapy tended to be higher in ADAMTS13 TMA than in other types of TMA. The complete remission rate is the highest in O-157 TMA. The mortality rate was the lowest for O-157 TMA, and this rate also tended to be lower in ADAMTS13-related TMA than in other types of TMA. However, the determination of ADAMTS13 was not universal in Japan at the time of this questionnaire.

  14. Development and Initial Testing of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Laura; Siderowf, Andrew; Rubright, Jonathan D.; Rick, Jacqueline; Dahodwala, Nabila; Duda, John E.; Hurtig, Howard; Stern, Matthew; Xie, Sharon X.; Rennert, Lior; Karlawish, Jason; Shea, Judy A.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to describe the development and psychometric analysis of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire. The questionnaire is an item response theory-based tool for rating cognitive instrumental activities of daily living in PD. Methods Candidate items for the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire were developed through literature review and focus groups of patients and knowledgeable informants. Item selection and calibration of item-response theory parameters were performed using responses from a cohort of PD patients and knowledgeable informants (n = 388). In independent cohorts of PD patients and knowledgeable informants, assessments of test-retest reliability (n = 50), and construct validity (n = 68) of the questionnaire were subsequently performed. Construct validity was assessed by correlating questionnaire scores with measures of motor function, cognition, an existing activities of daily living measure, and directly observed daily function. Results Fifty items were retained in the final questionnaire item bank. Items were excluded owing to redundancy, difficult reading level, and when item-response theory parameters could not be calculated. Test-retest reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.97; P < 0.001). The questionnaire correlated strongly with cognition (r = 0.68; P < 0.001) and directly observed daily function (r = 0.87; P < 0.001), but not with motor impairment (r = 0.08; P = 0.53). The questionnaire score accurately discriminated between PD patients with and without dementia (receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.91; 95% confidence interval: 0.85–0.97). Conclusions The Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire shows strong evidence of reliability and validity. Item response theory-based psychometric analysis suggests that this questionnaire can discriminate across a range of daily functions. PMID:26249849

  15. Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

  16. Factor analysis of the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Posserud, Britt; Lundervold, Astri J; Steijnen, Maaike C; Verhoeven, Sophie; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Gillberg, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the factor structure of parent and teacher Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) in a population of 7-9 years old children. For validation purposes, factors derived were correlated with results on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). A three-factor solution was identified on both parent and teacher ASSQ. Most of the variance was explained by one factor including measures of social function, validated by a high correlation with the SDQ peer problems scale. The second factor included measures of autism-associated problems. The items allocated to the third factor were more specific for a cognitive style typically found in high-functioning individuals with autism/Asperger syndrome. This factor did not correlate highly with any of the SDQ subscales. The results indicated that the screening efficiency of ASSQ could be increased by closer examination of the individual profile of factor scores.

  17. [Validation of multidimensional adherence questionnaire for liver transplantated patients (MAQ)].

    PubMed

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Barbosa, António; Mega, Inês; Monteiro, Estela

    2008-01-01

    Nonadherence is considered as determinant for the increase of morbility and mortality, reduction of quality of life, increase of medical costs and excess health services utilization in transplanted patients, and it can be direct cause of 21% of the fails of transplants and 26% of the mortality after transplantation. It was demonstrated that patient description obtained by means of an interview with a good questionnaire is the best way to access to adherence. In transplanted patients, non adherence with a more extended sense, is much more prevalent than adherence related only with medication intake, and therefore the instrument that should be used to measure adherence in this population should be a questionnaire that accesses adherence in a more extended sense. There wasn't found in literature any instrument to evaluate multidimensional adherence in liver transplanted patients. Based on an extended review of literature and with supervision of hepatologists the authors elaborated a questionnaire that mentions 3 adherence dimensions: presence in medical appointments and exams, medication intake and alcohol ingestion, with three questions to each dimension. This questionnaire has passed threw several steps to be validated: cognitive debriefing, liability tests, concept validity, construct validity, and criterium validity.

  18. Cognitive Reserve in Dementia: Implications for Cognitive Training

    PubMed Central

    Mondini, Sara; Madella, Ileana; Zangrossi, Andrea; Bigolin, Angela; Tomasi, Claudia; Michieletto, Marta; Villani, Daniele; Di Giovanni, Giuseppina; Mapelli, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive reserve (CR) is a potential mechanism to cope with brain damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CR on a cognitive training (CT) in a group of patients with dementia. Eighty six participants with mild to moderate dementia were identified by their level of CR quantified by the CR Index questionnaire (CRIq) and underwent a cycle of CT. A global measure of cognition mini mental state examination (MMSE) was obtained before (T0) and after (T1) the training. Multiple linear regression analyses highlighted CR as a significant factor able to predict changes in cognitive performance after the CT. In particular, patients with lower CR benefited from a CT program more than those with high CR. These data show that CR can modulate the outcome of a CT program and that it should be considered as a predictive factor of neuropsychological rehabilitation training efficacy in people with dementia. PMID:27199734

  19. Database of Standardized Questionnaires About Walking & Bicycling

    Cancer.gov

    This database contains questionnaire items and a list of validation studies for standardized items related to walking and biking. The items come from multiple national and international physical activity questionnaires.

  20. Surveys and questionnaires in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona

    2015-06-17

    Surveys and questionnaires are often used in nursing research to elicit the views of large groups of people to develop the nursing knowledge base. This article provides an overview of survey and questionnaire use in nursing research, clarifies the place of the questionnaire as a data collection tool in quantitative research design and provides information and advice about best practice in the development of quantitative surveys and questionnaires.

  1. 19 CFR 357.105 - Questionnaires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Questionnaires. 357.105 Section 357.105 Customs... Questionnaires. For reviews conducted under section 106(b)(2), the Secretary normally will send questionnaires to potential producers/suppliers of the product to determine whether it is in short supply....

  2. 19 CFR 357.105 - Questionnaires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Questionnaires. 357.105 Section 357.105 Customs... Questionnaires. For reviews conducted under section 106(b)(2), the Secretary normally will send questionnaires to potential producers/suppliers of the product to determine whether it is in short supply....

  3. 19 CFR 357.105 - Questionnaires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Questionnaires. 357.105 Section 357.105 Customs... Questionnaires. For reviews conducted under section 106(b)(2), the Secretary normally will send questionnaires to potential producers/suppliers of the product to determine whether it is in short supply....

  4. Visual cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of essays covering issues in visual cognition presenting experimental techniques from cognitive psychology, methods of modeling cognitive processes on computers from artificial intelligence, and methods of studying brain organization from neuropsychology. Topics considered include: parts of recognition; visual routines; upward direction; mental rotation, and discrimination of left and right turns in maps; individual differences in mental imagery, computational analysis and the neurological basis of mental imagery: componental analysis.

  5. [S-II symptom questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrowicz, J W

    2000-01-01

    "S-II" Symptom Check-list which allows for a fast diagnosis of neurotic disorders. A result of 165 points suggests the incidence of such disorders with the probability of 90%. The methodology of the construction of the check-list intends for the application of questions most common in those ill due to neurotic disorders (owing to the change in frequency) and the most possibly equal amount of questions on the symptoms common to women and men. Thanks to this the norm for women and men is identical. SCL S-II Symptom Check-list is a shortened and actualised version of the "O" Symptom Check-list, developed in 1975. It is similar to the SCL-90 and highly correlated with it, but it does not contain the variables concerning the psychotic symptoms. Thanks to this, its' accuracy (specificity) in the diagnosis of neurotic disorders is high. 4 pairs of questions allow for the judgement of answer reliability. 10 scales were singled out in the questionnaire. They are only of a helpful value and do not allow for a one-sided diagnosis of the type of the disorder, listed in the ICD-10. The scale results can, however make the correct diagnosis easier.

  6. COGNITIVE ECONOMICS.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Miles

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive economics is the economics of what is in people's minds. It is a vibrant area of research (much of it within behavioural economics, labour economics and the economics of education) that brings into play novel types of data, especially novel types of survey data. Such data highlight the importance of heterogeneity across individuals and highlight thorny issues for welfare economics. A key theme of cognitive economics is finite cognition (often misleadingly called "bounded rationality"), which poses theoretical challenges that call for versatile approaches. Cognitive economics brings a rich toolbox to the task of understanding a complex world.

  7. COGNITIVE ECONOMICS

    PubMed Central

    KIMBALL, MILES

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive economics is the economics of what is in people’s minds. It is a vibrant area of research (much of it within behavioural economics, labour economics and the economics of education) that brings into play novel types of data, especially novel types of survey data. Such data highlight the importance of heterogeneity across individuals and highlight thorny issues for welfare economics. A key theme of cognitive economics is finite cognition (often misleadingly called “bounded rationality”), which poses theoretical challenges that call for versatile approaches. Cognitive economics brings a rich toolbox to the task of understanding a complex world. PMID:28149186

  8. A catalog of biases in questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bernard C K; Pak, Anita W P

    2005-01-01

    Bias in questionnaires is an important issue in public health research. To collect the most accurate data from respondents, investigators must understand and be able to prevent or at least minimize bias in the design of their questionnaires. This paper identifies and categorizes 48 types of bias in questionnaires based on a review of the literature and offers an example of each type. The types are categorized according to three main sources of bias: the way a question is designed, the way the questionnaire as a whole is designed, and how the questionnaire is administered. This paper is intended to help investigators in public health understand the mechanism and dynamics of problems in questionnaire design and to provide a checklist for identifying potential bias in a questionnaire before it is administered.

  9. Development and Validation of the Eyelash Satisfaction Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Jeff; Cole, Jason C.; Burgess, Somali M.; Yang, Min; Daniels, Selena R.; Walt, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures have been used to assess treatment benefit in a variety of therapeutic areas and are now becoming increasingly important in aesthetic research. Objectives The objective of the current study was to develop and validate a new PRO measure (Eyelash Satisfaction Questionnaire [ESQ]) to assess satisfaction with eyelash prominence. Methods The content of the questionnaire (including conceptual framework and questionnaire items) was generated by review of literature, participant interviews, and expert opinion. Cognitive interviews were conducted to pilot test the questionnaire. Psychometric properties of the questionnaire were examined in a combined sample of participants (n = 970) completing Internet- (n = 909) and paper-based (n = 61) versions. Item- and domain-level properties were examined using modern and classical psychometrics. Results Content-based analysis of qualitative data demonstrated the presence of 3 distinct domains (Length, Fullness, Overall Satisfaction; Confidence, Attractiveness, and Professionalism; and Daily Routine). Initial confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results of 23 items revealed insufficient model-data fit (comparative fit index [CFI] of 0.86 and a non-normed fit index [NNFI] of 0.82). A revised model using 9 items (3 per domain) achieved appropriate fit (CFI of 0.99 and NNFI of 0.97). Analyses revealed measurement equivalence across the Internet- and paper-based versions. The 3 ESQ domains had strong internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α [range] = 0.919-0.976) and adequate convergent and discriminant validity. Conclusions The ESQ was found to be a reliable and valid PRO measure for assessing satisfaction with eyelash prominence. Level of Evidence: 3 Therapeutic PMID:26691738

  10. Cognitive Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    II-4 C. Metacognition ...which requires cognitive mediation. • Metacognition . Metacognition refers to the executive functions of thought, particularly those pertaining to...knowledge and regulation of one’s cognitive processes and progress toward accepted goals. Metacognitive skills can be enhanced by exercises designed to

  11. 75 FR 41876 - Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s); Complaint Intake Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s); Complaint Intake Form AGENCY: Office of the...: Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s); Complaint Intake Form. OMB Approval Number: 2501-0018....

  12. 78 FR 45259 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Questionnaire(s); Complaint Intake Form AGENCY: Office of Labor Relations, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HUD is... Standards Questionnaire; Complaint Intake Form. OMB Approval Number: 2501-0018. Type of Request: Extension... 4730SP, Federal Labor Standards Questionnaires, will be used by HUD and agencies administering...

  13. The Psychometric Properties of the Short and Long Versions of the Coach-Athlete Relationship Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Sophie Xin; Jowett, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    The Coach-Athlete Relationship Questionnaire was developed to effectively measure affective, cognitive, and behavioral aspects, represented by the interpersonal constructs of closeness, commitment, and complementarity, of the quality of the relationship within the context of sport coaching. The current study sought to determine the internal…

  14. Time Diary and Questionnaire Assessment of Factors Associated with Academic and Personal Success among University Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Darren; Dixon, Sinikka; Stansal, Emory; Gelb, Shannon Lund; Pheri, Tabitha

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: A sample of 231 students attending a private liberal arts university in central Alberta, Canada, completed a 5-day time diary and a 71-item questionnaire assessing the influence of personal, cognitive, and attitudinal factors on success. Methods: The authors used 3 success measures: cumulative grade point average (GPA),…

  15. Science Motivation Questionnaire II: Validation with Science Majors and Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Shawn M.; Brickman, Peggy; Armstrong, Norris; Taasoobshirazi, Gita

    2011-01-01

    From the perspective of social cognitive theory, the motivation of students to learn science in college courses was examined. The students--367 science majors and 313 nonscience majors--responded to the Science Motivation Questionnaire II, which assessed five motivation components: intrinsic motivation, self-determination, self-efficacy, career…

  16. Development and Validation of the Emotional Self-Awareness Questionnaire: A Measure of Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killian, Kyle D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric characteristics of the Emotional Self-Awareness Questionnaire (ESQ), a self-report measure of emotional intelligence. The ESQ, Emotional Intelligence Scale, and measures of alexithymia, positive negative affect, personality, cognitive ability, life satisfaction, and leadership aspirations were administered to…

  17. An Analysis of Questionnaire Survey on Online Evaluation of Teaching by University Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Dongyun

    2013-01-01

    This paper takes into consideration of the problems discovered in the teaching evaluation data statistics over the years in Changchun University of Science and Technology and cooperates with related departments to conduct a questionnaire survey on an online evaluation of teaching, with the purpose of detecting cognition of students in evaluation…

  18. Visual cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This collection of research papers on visual cognition first appeared as a special issue of Cognition: International Journal of Cognitive Science. The study of visual cognition has seen enormous progress in the past decade, bringing important advances in our understanding of shape perception, visual imagery, and mental maps. Many of these discoveries are the result of converging investigations in different areas, such as cognitive and perceptual psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuropsychology. This volume is intended to highlight a sample of work at the cutting edge of this research area for the benefit of students and researchers in a variety of disciplines. The tutorial introduction that begins the volume is designed to help the nonspecialist reader bridge the gap between the contemporary research reported here and earlier textbook introductions or literature reviews.

  19. Primate cognition.

    PubMed

    Seed, Amanda; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-07-01

    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already possessed by other primates. There may be differences between humans and other primates, however, in more complex cognitive skills, such as reasoning about relations, causality, time, and other minds. Of special importance, the human primate seems to possess a species-unique set of adaptations for "cultural intelligence," which are broad reaching in their effects on human cognition.

  20. Geriatrics in medical students’ curricula: questionnaire-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Demographic development is accompanied by an increasingly aging society. Concerning medical education, the treatment of older people as well as the scientific research and exploration of ageing aspects in the coming years need to be considered. Aim of the study was to ascertain medical students’ knowledge, interest, and attitudes regarding older patients and geriatric medicine. Methods Each participant completed a self-designed questionnaire. This questionnaire was based on three validated internationally recognised questionnaires (“Facts on Aging Quiz – FAQ”, “Expectations Regarding Aging – ERA” and the “Aging Semantic Differential – ASD”). The inquiry and survey were performed at the beginning of the summer term in 2012 at the University of Regensburg Medical School. Results A total of n = 184/253 (72.7%) students participated in this survey. The results of the FAQ 25+ showed that respondents were able to answer an average of M = 20.4 of 36 questions (56.7%) correctly (Median, Md = 21; SD ±6.1). The personal attitudes and expectations of ageing averaged M = 41.2 points on the Likert-scale that ranged from 0 to 100 (Md = 40.4; SD ±13.7). Respondents’ attitudes towards the elderly (ASD 24) averaged M = 3.5 points on the Likert-scale (range 1–7, Md 3.6, SD ±0.8). Conclusions In our investigation, medical students’ knowledge of ageing was comparable to previous surveys. Attitudes and expectations of ageing were more positive compared to previous studies. Overall, medical students expect markedly high cognitive capacities towards older people that can actively prevent cognitive impairment. However, medical students’ personal interest in medicine of ageing and older people seems to be rather slight. PMID:25062568

  1. The Early Motor Questionnaire (EMQ): A Parental Report Measure of Early Motor Development

    PubMed Central

    Libertus, Klaus; Landa, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Children's early motor skills are critical for development across language, social, and cognitive domains, and warrant close examination. However, examiner-administered motor assessments are time consuming and expensive. Parent-report questionnaires offer an efficient alternative, but validity of parent report is unclear and only few motor questionnaires exist. In this report, we use cross-sectional and longitudinal data to investigate the validity of parent report in comparison to two examiner-administered measures (Mullen Scales of Early Learning, MSEL; Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, PDMS-2), and introduce a new parent-report measure called the Early Motor Questionnaire (EMQ). Results indicate strong correlations between parent report on the EMQ and a child's age, robust concurrent and predictive validity of parent report with both the MSEL and PDMS-2, and good test-re-test reliability of parent report on the EMQ. Together, our findings support the conclusion that parents provide dependable accounts of early motor and cognitive development. PMID:24140841

  2. Cognitive Performance and Cognitive Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Behavioral Development, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Investigates (1) the relationships between cognitive performance and cognitive styles and predictive possibilities and (2) performance differences by sex, school, grade, and income in 92 Indian adolescents. Assessment measures included Liquid Conservation, Islands, Goat-Lion, Hanoi-Tower, Rabbits (Piagetian); Block Design (WISC-R); Paper Cutting…

  3. Cognitive anthropology is a cognitive science.

    PubMed

    Boster, James S

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive anthropology contributes to cognitive science as a complement to cognitive psychology. The chief threat to its survival has not been rejection by other cognitive scientists but by other cultural anthropologists. It will remain a part of cognitive science as long as cognitive anthropologists research, teach, and publish.

  4. Psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of Pfeffer's Functional Activities Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Luciana de Oliveira; de Paula, Jonas J.; Assis, Marcella G.; de Moraes, Edgar N.; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Pfeffer's Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ) is one of the most commonly employed tools in studies on pathological cognitive aging. Despite the different versions of the questionnaire translated for use in clinical practice, few studies have analyzed the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the FAQ (P-FAQ). Thus, the aim of the present study was to analyze the P-FAQ with regard to internal consistency, factorial structure and associations with demographic factors (age, sex, and schooling), depressive symptoms, cognitive measures and other measures of functionality. One hundred sixty-one older adults were divided into four groups (91 with dementia, 46 with mild cognitive impairment, 11 with psychiatric disorders and 13 healthy controls). All participants were evaluated by cognitive, behavioral and functional tests and scales. Their caregivers answered the P-FAQ. The questionnaire showed high internal consistency (α = 0.91). Factor analysis revealed a two-factor structure, which, accounted for 66% of the total variance. The P-FAQ was not correlated with demographic factors, was weakly correlated with depressive symptoms (ϱ = 0.271, p < 0.01, R2 = 7%) and strongly correlated with cognitive measures (Matttis Dementia Rating Scale total score: ϱ = −0.574, p < 0.01, R2 = 33%) as well as complex instrumental activities of daily living (ϱ = −0.845, p < 0.01, R2 = 71%). Cognitive performance and depression status were independent predictors of P-FAQ scores in regression models. The present findings indicate that the P-FAQ has satisfactory reliability, internal consistency, construct validity and ecological validity. Therefore, this questionnaire can be used in clinical practice and research involving the Brazilian population of older adults. PMID:25309432

  5. The Development of a Screening Questionnaire for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Emma; Hill, Catherine Mary; Evans, Hazel Jean; Tuffrey, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition which affects an estimated 50% of children with Down syndrome, particularly in their early years. It can cause serious sequelae in affected children but may not be recognized by parents or health professionals. Routine screening has been recommended in some countries, but is not standard practice. There are no validated questionnaire-based tools available to screen this population of children for this particular sleep-related disorder. Using existing validated sleep questionnaire items, we have developed a questionnaire to screen children with Down syndrome up to 6 years of age for obstructive sleep apnea, which corresponds with the recommendations made in UK national guidelines. This paper describes these first steps in demonstrating content validity for a new questionnaire, which will be subject to further in-depth psychometric analysis. Relevance, clarity, and age appropriateness were rated for 33 items using a content review questionnaire by a group of 18 health professionals with expertise in respiratory pediatrics, neurodevelopmental pediatrics, and sleep physiology. The content validity index was calculated for individual items and contributed to decisions about item inclusion. Scale level content validity index for the modified questionnaire of 14 items was at an accepted level of 0.78. Two parents of children with Down syndrome took part in cognitive interviews after completing the modified questionnaire. We describe the development of this 14 item questionnaire to screen for OSA in children with DS from infancy to 6 years. PMID:26539127

  6. Cognitive Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because chemicals can adversely affect cognitive function in humans, considerable effort has been made to characterize their effects using animal models. Information from such models will be necessary to: evaluate whether chemicals identified as potentially neurotoxic by screenin...

  7. Cognitive Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are the Alternative Treatments for Cognitive Problems? Anxiety Hallucinations/Delusions Speech and Swallowing Problems Vision Changes You ... and the Hope for a Better Drug for Hallucinations and Psychosis in Parkinson’s Disease What's Hot in ...

  8. Spatial cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary Kister; Remington, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Spatial cognition is the ability to reason about geometric relationships in the real (or a metaphorical) world based on one or more internal representations of those relationships. The study of spatial cognition is concerned with the representation of spatial knowledge, and our ability to manipulate these representations to solve spatial problems. Spatial cognition is utilized most critically when direct perceptual cues are absent or impoverished. Examples are provided of how human spatial cognitive abilities impact on three areas of space station operator performance: orientation, path planning, and data base management. A videotape provides demonstrations of relevant phenomena (e.g., the importance of orientation for recognition of complex, configural forms). The presentation is represented by abstract and overhead visuals only.

  9. Disembodying cognition

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2010-01-01

    The idea that concepts are embodied by our motor and sensory systems is popular in current theorizing about cognition. Embodied cognition accounts come in different versions and are often contrasted with a purely symbolic amodal view of cognition. Simulation, or the hypothesis that concepts simulate the sensory and motor experience of real world encounters with instances of those concepts, has been prominent in psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Here, with a focus on spatial thought and language, I review some of the evidence cited in support of simulation versions of embodied cognition accounts. While these data are extremely interesting and many of the experiments are elegant, knowing how to best interpret the results is often far from clear. I point out that a quick acceptance of embodied accounts runs the danger of ignoring alternate hypotheses and not scrutinizing neuroscience data critically. I also review recent work from my lab that raises questions about the nature of sensory motor grounding in spatial thought and language. In my view, the question of whether or not cognition is grounded is more fruitfully replaced by questions about gradations in this grounding. A focus on disembodying cognition, or on graded grounding, opens the way to think about how humans abstract. Within neuroscience, I propose that three functional anatomic axes help frame questions about the graded nature of grounded cognition. First, are questions of laterality differences. Do association cortices in both hemispheres instantiate the same kind of sensory or motor information? Second, are questions about ventral dorsal axes. Do neuronal ensembles along this axis shift from conceptual representations of objects to the relationships between objects? Third, are questions about gradients centripetally from sensory and motor cortices towards and within perisylvian cortices. How does sensory and perceptual information become more language-like and then get transformed into language

  10. Increasing Honest Responding on Cognitive Distortions in Child Molesters: The Bogus Pipeline Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Theresa A.

    2006-01-01

    Professionals conclude that child molesters (CMs) hold offense-supportive beliefs (or cognitive distortions) from CMs' questionnaire responses. Because questionnaires are easily faked, we asked 32 CMs to complete a cognitive distortion scale under standard conditions (Time 1). A week later (Time 2), the same CMs completed the scale again. This…

  11. Oxygen saturation and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jan; Berggren, Peter; Grönkvist, Mikael; Magnusson, Staffan; Svensson, Erland

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to investigate how inhalation of 100% oxygen affected cognitive performance. A test battery was developed that was designed to capture different aspects of cognitive processes, i.e., perception, attention, working memory, long-term memory and prospective memory. All tests were verbally based, thus reducing cognitive spatial processes to a minimum. In experiment 1, 48 participants volunteered in a complete factorial within-participant design. Two different conditions for type of gas were used, inhalation of 100% oxygen and inhalation of breathing air (approximately 21% oxygen balanced with nitrogen). The inhalation was performed during the 1 min prior to starting each separate test. The instructions for each test were given during the inhalation period. All participants inhaled oxygen or breathing air through a Swedish military pilot mask. Physiological (heartbeats per minute and blood oxygen saturation level) reactions were recorded continuously throughout the session. Participants also completed a mood-state questionnaire before and after the test battery. The results revealed that cognitive performance were not affected by inhalation. Hence, this experiment does not replicate previous findings that suggest that inhalation of 100% oxygen could increase cognitive performance. Another experiment was performed to control for methodological issues. Experiment 2 revealed exactly the same pattern, i.e., inhalation of oxygen did not affect cognitive functioning.

  12. Generalization of Therapeutic Changes in Agoraphobia: The Role of Perceived Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, S. Lloyd; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigated extent and mechanisms of therapeutic generalization across distinct areas of agoraphobic dysfunction among 27 severe agoraphobics. Analysis of possible cognitive mechanisms revealed that perceived self-efficacy accurately predicted treatment and transfer effects even when alternative factors were held constant. Agoraphobia appears to…

  13. Applying Learning Strategy Questionnaires: Problems and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellings, Gonny

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses measuring learning strategies by means of questionnaires. In "multi-method" research, in which think-aloud measures are compared with questionnaires, low or moderate correlations are found. A conclusion often drawn is that learners are not able to verbally report on their learning activities. Alternative explanations concern…

  14. Developing a Questionnaire on Attitude towards School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seker, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a questionnaire to assess student attitudes towards school by describing the factors that affect these attitudes. For this purpose, a sample of 362 (11-13 years-old) elementary-school students was used. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were carried out. The questionnaire consists of…

  15. PREDICTION OF RELIABILITY IN BIOGRAPHICAL QUESTIONNAIRES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STARRY, ALLAN R.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY WERE (1) TO DEVELOP A GENERAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR LIFE HISTORY ITEMS, (2) TO DETERMINE TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY ESTIMATES, AND (3) TO ESTIMATE RESISTANCE TO EXAMINEE FAKING, FOR REPRESENTATIVE BIOGRAPHICAL QUESTIONNAIRES. TWO 100-ITEM QUESTIONNAIRES WERE CONSTRUCTED THROUGH RANDOM ASSIGNMENT BY CONTENT AREA OF 200…

  16. A Nutritional Questionnaire for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanelli, Marie T.; Abernethy, Marilyn M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a questionnaire assessing nutritional knowledge and eating behaviors of older adults. The questionnaire consists of six sections: demographic and personal information, food resources, food consumption patterns, dietary practices related to health, activity patterns, and nutritional knowledge. Study results demonstrating the…

  17. A practical guide to surveys and questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Eric L; Voelker, Courtney C J; Nussenbaum, Brian; Rich, Jason T; Paniello, Randal C; Neely, J Gail

    2011-06-01

    Surveys with questionnaires play a vital role in decision and policy making in society. Within medicine, including otolaryngology, surveys with questionnaires may be the only method for gathering data on rare or unusual events. In addition, questionnaires can be developed and validated to be used as outcome measures in clinical trials and other clinical research architecture. Consequently, it is fundamentally important that such tools be properly developed and validated. Just asking questions that have not gone through rigorous design and development may be misleading and unfair at best; at worst, they can result in under- or overtreatment and unnecessary expense. Furthermore, it is important that consumers of the data produced by these instruments understand the principles of questionnaire design to interpret results in an optimal and meaningful way. This article presents a practical guide for understanding the methodologies of survey and questionnaire design, including the concepts of validity and reliability, how surveys are administered and implemented, and, finally, biases and pitfalls of surveys.

  18. [Questionnaire to assess advertising campaigns impact about HIV/AIDS prevention].

    PubMed

    Bretón-López, Juana; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2006-08-01

    Present work is concerned with a questionnaire aimed to the impact evaluation of a selection of Spanish advertising campaigns about HIV/AIDS prevention. The work objective is to determine reliability and factorial structure of the instrument. It is described the designed questionnaire and its three scales (affective impact scale, cognitive impact scale and behavioural intention impact scale). The sample was composed by 405 high school teenagers to who were projected the advertising campaigns. So, teenagers filled the designed questionnaire. From a theoretical and psychometric point of view, data show the instrument is appropriate about internal consistency and factorial structure. The final goal of the questionnaire is to become useful tool to assess the persuasive effectiveness of the advertising campaigns within the HIV/AIDS network, as an intervention of primary prevention to reduce the expansion of epidemic.

  19. Diet History Questionnaire II and Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Coding Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    A questionnaire data file is an ASCII text file containing data from completed Diet History Questionnaires. If using paper forms, this file can be created by a scanner or a data entry system. If using DHQ*Web, the questionnaire data file is created automatically.

  20. Measurement properties of the Danish version of the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised for patients with colorectal cancer symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hvidberg, Line; Jensen, Line F; Pedersen, Anette F; Aro, Arja R; Vedsted, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the measurement properties of the Danish version of the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised adapted to measure symptom representations among patients with colorectal cancer symptoms. A total of 488 colorectal cancer patients completed a questionnaire derived from the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised to retrospectively assess cognitive and emotional representations of experienced symptoms. A confirmatory factor analysis indicated no good comparative fit with the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. Using exploratory factor analysis, a 7-factor structure was conducted, which fairly supported the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. The modified Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised is a promising tool for measuring symptom representations among Danish colorectal cancer patients.

  1. Decreased Self-Reported Cognitive Failures after Memory Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preiss, Marek; Lukavsky, Jiri; Steinova, Dana

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, attention has been focused on investigating the effectiveness of composite memory intervention programs with different age and diagnostics groups. The goal of this study was to measure changes in cognitive lapses by Cognitive Failure Questionnaire (CFQ) in a large trained, dementia free group (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE]…

  2. The Role of Social Activity in Age-Cognition Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soubelet, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the current project was to examine whether engaging in social activity may moderate or mediate the relation between age and cognitive functioning. A large age range sample of adults performed a variety of cognitive tests and completed a social activities questionnaire. Results did not support the moderator hypothesis, as age…

  3. Gender Influences on Children's Computer Attitudes and Cognitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Alice S.; Noyes, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    This study considers whether technophobia is a transitory phenomenon by assessing computer attitudes and cognition of 11- and 12-year-old children in an English secondary school via self-reporting questionnaires. Results showed a low prevalence of technophobia and that gender did not significantly influence attitudes or cognition towards…

  4. Visual cognition

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Visual cognition, high-level vision, mid-level vision and top-down processing all refer to decision-based scene analyses that combine prior knowledge with retinal input to generate representations. The label “visual cognition” is little used at present, but research and experiments on mid- and high-level, inference-based vision have flourished, becoming in the 21st century a significant, if often understated part, of current vision research. How does visual cognition work? What are its moving parts? This paper reviews the origins and architecture of visual cognition and briefly describes some work in the areas of routines, attention, surfaces, objects, and events (motion, causality, and agency). Most vision scientists avoid being too explicit when presenting concepts about visual cognition, having learned that explicit models invite easy criticism. What we see in the literature is ample evidence for visual cognition, but few or only cautious attempts to detail how it might work. This is the great unfinished business of vision research: at some point we will be done with characterizing how the visual system measures the world and we will have to return to the question of how vision constructs models of objects, surfaces, scenes, and events. PMID:21329719

  5. Cognitive linguistics.

    PubMed

    Evans, Vyvyan

    2012-03-01

    Cognitive linguistics is one of the fastest growing and influential perspectives on the nature of language, the mind, and their relationship with sociophysical (embodied) experience. It is a broad theoretical and methodological enterprise, rather than a single, closely articulated theory. Its primary commitments are outlined. These are the Cognitive Commitment-a commitment to providing a characterization of language that accords with what is known about the mind and brain from other disciplines-and the Generalization Commitment-which represents a dedication to characterizing general principles that apply to all aspects of human language. The article also outlines the assumptions and worldview which arises from these commitments, as represented in the work of leading cognitive linguists. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:129-141. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1163 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  6. Images of desire: cognitive models of craving.

    PubMed

    May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie; Panabokke, Nathalie; Kavanagh, David

    2004-07-01

    Cognitive modelling of phenomena in clinical practice allows the operationalization of otherwise diffuse descriptive terms such as craving or flashbacks. This supports the empirical investigation of the clinical phenomena and the development of targeted treatment interventions. This paper focuses on the cognitive processes underpinning craving, which is recognised as a motivating experience in substance dependence. We use a high-level cognitive architecture, Interacting Cognitive Subsystems (ICS), to compare two theories of craving: Tiffany's theory, centred on the control of automated action schemata, and our own Elaborated Intrusion theory of craving. Data from a questionnaire study of the subjective aspects of everyday desires experienced by a large non-clinical population are presented. Both the data and the high-level modelling support the central claim of the Elaborated Intrusion theory that imagery is a key element of craving, providing the subjective experience and mediating much of the associated disruption of concurrent cognition.

  7. Cognitive fitness.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, Roderick; Kilts, Clint

    2007-11-01

    Recent neuroscientific research shows that the health of your brain isn't, as experts once thought, just the product of childhood experiences and genetics; it reflects your adult choices and experiences as well. Professors Gilkey and Kilts of Emory University's medical and business schools explain how you can strengthen your brain's anatomy, neural networks, and cognitive abilities, and prevent functions such as memory from deteriorating as you age. The brain's alertness is the result of what the authors call cognitive fitness -a state of optimized ability to reason, remember, learn, plan, and adapt. Certain attitudes, lifestyle choices, and exercises enhance cognitive fitness. Mental workouts are the key. Brain-imaging studies indicate that acquiring expertise in areas as diverse as playing a cello, juggling, speaking a foreign language, and driving a taxicab expands your neural systems and makes them more communicative. In other words, you can alter the physical makeup of your brain by learning new skills. The more cognitively fit you are, the better equipped you are to make decisions, solve problems, and deal with stress and change. Cognitive fitness will help you be more open to new ideas and alternative perspectives. It will give you the capacity to change your behavior and realize your goals. You can delay senescence for years and even enjoy a second career. Drawing from the rapidly expanding body of neuroscience research as well as from well-established research in psychology and other mental health fields, the authors have identified four steps you can take to become cognitively fit: understand how experience makes the brain grow, work hard at play, search for patterns, and seek novelty and innovation. Together these steps capture some of the key opportunities for maintaining an engaged, creative brain.

  8. The Challenging Experience Questionnaire: Characterization of challenging experiences with psilocybin mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Frederick S; Bradstreet, Matthew P; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Johnson, Matthew W; Griffiths, Roland R

    2016-12-01

    Acute adverse psychological reactions to classic hallucinogens ("bad trips" or "challenging experiences"), while usually benign with proper screening, preparation, and support in controlled settings, remain a safety concern in uncontrolled settings (such as illicit use contexts). Anecdotal and case reports suggest potential adverse acute symptoms including affective (panic, depressed mood), cognitive (confusion, feelings of losing sanity), and somatic (nausea, heart palpitation) symptoms. Responses to items from several hallucinogen-sensitive questionnaires (Hallucinogen Rating Scale, the States of Consciousness Questionnaire, and the Five-Dimensional Altered States of Consciousness questionnaire) in an Internet survey of challenging experiences with the classic hallucinogen psilocybin were used to construct and validate a Challenging Experience Questionnaire. The stand-alone Challenging Experience Questionnaire was then validated in a separate sample. Seven Challenging Experience Questionnaire factors (grief, fear, death, insanity, isolation, physical distress, and paranoia) provide a phenomenological profile of challenging aspects of experiences with psilocybin. Factor scores were associated with difficulty, meaningfulness, spiritual significance, and change in well-being attributed to the challenging experiences. The factor structure did not differ based on gender or prior struggle with anxiety or depression. The Challenging Experience Questionnaire provides a basis for future investigation of predictors and outcomes of challenging experiences with classic hallucinogens.

  9. Cross-Cultural Comparison of Cognitive Consistency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khokhlov, Nikolai E.; Gonzalez E. John

    1973-01-01

    A comparison of cognitive consistency was conducted across two cultural groups. Forty-five American subjects in Southern California and 45 subjects in Northern Greece responded to a questionnaire written in their native language and which contained three classical paradigms for balance theory. It was hypothesized that significant differences in…

  10. Italian neurologists' perception on cognitive symptoms in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Neri, G; Serrati, C; Zolo, P; Cataldo, N; Ripellino, C

    2016-09-01

    The assessment of cognition is an important part of major depressive disorder (MDD) evaluation and a crucial issue is the physicians' perception of cognitive dysfunction in MDD that remains nowadays a little known matter. The present study aims at investigating the understanding of neurologists' perception about cognitive dysfunction in MDD. An on-line survey addressed to 85 Italian neurologists in the period between May and June 2015 was performed. The questionnaire comprised three sections: the first section collecting information on neurologists' socio-demographic profile, the second investigating cognitive symptoms relevance in relation with different aspects and the third one explicitly focusing on cognitive symptoms in MDD. Cognitive symptoms are considered most significant among DSM-5 symptoms to define the presence of a Major Depressive Episode in a MDD, to improve antidepressant therapy adherence, patients' functionality and concurrent neurological condition, once resolved. Furthermore, an incongruity came to light from this survey: the neurologists considered cognitive symptoms a not relevant aspect to choose the antidepressant treatment in comparison with the other DSM-5 symptoms on one side, but they declared the opposite in the third part of the questionnaire focused on cognitive symptoms. Cognitive symptoms appeared to be a relevant aspect in MDD and neurologists have a clear understanding of this issue. Nevertheless, the discrepancy between neurologists' perception on cognitive symptoms and the antidepressant treatment highlights the feeling of an unmet need that could be filled increasing the awareness of existing drugs with pro-cognitive effects.

  11. Adolescents Caught between Fires: Cognitive Emotion Regulation in Response to War Experiences in Northern Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amone-P'Olak, Kennedy; Garnefski, Nadia; Kraaij, Vivian

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence of war experiences and the use of specific cognitive emotion regulation strategies in response to these experiences among 294 formerly abducted adolescents at three rehabilitation centres in Uganda. Cognitive strategies were measured by Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ). Symptoms of…

  12. Assessment of cognition in mild cognitive impairment: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Peter J.; Jackson, Colleen E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Khachaturian, Ara S.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Albert, Marilyn S.; Weintraub, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The demand for rapidly administered, sensitive, and reliable cognitive assessments that are specifically designed for identifying individuals in the earliest stages of cognitive decline (and to measure subtle change over time) has escalated as the emphasis in Alzheimer’s disease clinical research has shifted from clinical diagnosis and treatment toward the goal of developing presymptomatic neuroprotective therapies. To meet these changing clinical requirements, cognitive measures or tailored batteries of tests must be validated and determined to be fit-for-use for the discrimination between cognitively healthy individuals and persons who are experiencing very subtle cognitive changes that likely signal the emergence of early mild cognitive impairment. We sought to collect and review data systematically from a wide variety of (mostly computer-administered) cognitive measures, all of which are currently marketed or distributed with the claims that these instruments are sensitive and reliable for the early identification of disease or, if untested for this purpose, are promising tools based on other variables. The survey responses for 16 measures/batteries are presented in brief in this review; full survey responses and summary tables are archived and publicly available on the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease by 2020 Web site (http://pad2020.org). A decision tree diagram highlighting critical decision points for selecting measures to meet varying clinical trials requirements has also been provided. Ultimately, the survey questionnaire, framework, and decision guidelines provided in this review should remain as useful aids for the evaluation of any new or updated sets of instruments in the years to come. PMID:21575877

  13. Cognitive Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soni, P. Sarita, Ed.; Carmichael, Ann G., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue features five articles profiling Indiana University faculty whose work on various campuses continues to broaden and advance knowledge about cognitive science. The articles in the journal are: "A Matter of Time" (Karen Grooms) which discusses the work of Robert F. Port; "Perceiving as a Complex System" (Tom…

  14. Cognitive Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocking, Rodney R.; Mestre, Jose P.

    The focus of this paper is on cognitive science as a model for understanding the application of human skills toward effective problem-solving. Sections include: (1) "Introduction" (discussing information processing framework, expert-novice distinctions, schema theory, and learning process); (2) "Application: The Expert-Novice…

  15. Cognitive Challenges

    MedlinePlus

    ... Custom Post Type Home En Español International Request Information DONATE About TSC New treatments today. A cure tomorrow. What is TSC? How is ... questions on intellectual disability. Disabled World — Cognitive disability: information on intellectual disabilities. Healthy ... Also in this Section What is TSC? How ...

  16. [A questionnaire on Satisfaction from psychiatric Training].

    PubMed

    Giaglis, G; Angelidis, G

    2008-01-01

    In the context of the psychiatric reform, as well as of the lifelong education, a Questionnaire for the evaluation of "Satisfaction from Psychiatric Training" has been constructed. It consists of 4 subscales (Satisfaction from Materials, Trainers, Program Organization, and General Satisfaction) and a total of 19 closed-ended items, evaluated in 5-point Likert scales, and an open-ended question for general remarks. One hundred and seventy six subjects, who participated in 8 consecutive training programs in psychiatry, organized by the Vocational Training Center of the Psychiatric Hospital of Petra Olympus, Greece, completed the questionnaire anonymously. The sample was divided into two groups: group A (N=112, from the first 5 programs), for the evaluation of the questionnaire's properties, and group B (N=65, from the next 3 programs) for the validation of the results. Principal component analysis in group A showed the existence of 4 factors corresponding to the 4 subscales and accounted for 67.4% of the questionnaire's variability, which were also confirmed in group B. Internal consistency was high in both groups for the overall questionnaire (Cronbach α>0.92) and for each subscale. Test-retest reliability of every subscale was also high (Pearson's r>0.90). The answers in the open-ended remark question were graded by two independent judges in a 5-point Likert scale, in relation to the satisfaction they revealed, which was highly correlated with all questionnaire subscales but one. For the total sample, the questionnaire subscales showed moderately high correlation with one another (r from 0.629 to 0.706) and even higher with the overall score (from 0.820 to 0.892). The questionnaire's sensitivity was demonstrated by the statistically significant differences observed in the satisfaction experienced from the various programs. None of the subscales was significantly correlated with age (r<0.134), with years in work (r<0.059) or was differentiated by gender. In general

  17. Potential of Cognitive Computing and Cognitive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive computing and cognitive technologies are game changers for future engineering systems, as well as for engineering practice and training. They are major drivers for knowledge automation work, and the creation of cognitive products with higher levels of intelligence than current smart products. This paper gives a brief review of cognitive computing and some of the cognitive engineering systems activities. The potential of cognitive technologies is outlined, along with a brief description of future cognitive environments, incorporating cognitive assistants - specialized proactive intelligent software agents designed to follow and interact with humans and other cognitive assistants across the environments. The cognitive assistants engage, individually or collectively, with humans through a combination of adaptive multimodal interfaces, and advanced visualization and navigation techniques. The realization of future cognitive environments requires the development of a cognitive innovation ecosystem for the engineering workforce. The continuously expanding major components of the ecosystem include integrated knowledge discovery and exploitation facilities (incorporating predictive and prescriptive big data analytics); novel cognitive modeling and visual simulation facilities; cognitive multimodal interfaces; and cognitive mobile and wearable devices. The ecosystem will provide timely, engaging, personalized / collaborative, learning and effective decision making. It will stimulate creativity and innovation, and prepare the participants to work in future cognitive enterprises and develop new cognitive products of increasing complexity. http://www.aee.odu.edu/cognitivecomp

  18. Development of the Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ)

    PubMed Central

    PARMANTO, BAMBANG; LEWIS, ALLEN NELSON; GRAHAM, KRISTIN M.; BERTOLET, MARNIE H.

    2016-01-01

    Current telehealth usability questionnaires are designed primarily for older technologies, where telehealth interaction is conducted over dedicated videoconferencing applications. However, telehealth services are increasingly conducted over computer-based systems that rely on commercial software and a user supplied computer interface. Therefore, a usability questionnaire that addresses the changes in telehealth service delivery and technology is needed. The Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ) was developed to evaluate the usability of telehealth implementation and services. This paper addresses: (1) the need for a new measure of telehealth usability, (2) the development of the TUQ, (3) intended uses for the TUQ, and (4) the reliability of the TUQ. Analyses indicate that the TUQ is a solid, robust, and versatile measure that can be used to measure the quality of the computer-based user interface and the quality of the telehealth interaction and services. PMID:27563386

  19. Validation of the burns itch questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Van Loey, N E; Hofland, H W; Hendrickx, H; Van de Steenoven, J; Boekelaar, A; Nieuwenhuis, M K

    2016-05-01

    Itch (pruritus) is a common multidimensional complaint after burn that can persist for months to years. A questionnaire able to investigate itch and its consequences is imperative for clinical and research purposes. The current study investigated the factor structure, internal consistency and construct validity of the Burns Itch Questionnaire (BIQ), a questionnaire particularly focusing on itch in the burns population. The BIQ was completed by 195 respondents at 3 months after burn. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed to investigate the factor structure. EFA showed the BIQ comprised three latent factors: itch severity, sleep interference and daily life interference. This was re-evaluated in a confirmatory factor analysis that yielded good fit indices after removing two items. The three subscales showed to have high internal consistency (.89) and were able to distinguish between patients with severe and less severe complaints. In conclusion, the BIQ showed to be useful in persons suffering from itch following burns.

  20. Development of the Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ).

    PubMed

    Parmanto, Bambang; Lewis, Allen Nelson; Graham, Kristin M; Bertolet, Marnie H

    2016-01-01

    Current telehealth usability questionnaires are designed primarily for older technologies, where telehealth interaction is conducted over dedicated videoconferencing applications. However, telehealth services are increasingly conducted over computer-based systems that rely on commercial software and a user supplied computer interface. Therefore, a usability questionnaire that addresses the changes in telehealth service delivery and technology is needed. The Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ) was developed to evaluate the usability of telehealth implementation and services. This paper addresses: (1) the need for a new measure of telehealth usability, (2) the development of the TUQ, (3) intended uses for the TUQ, and (4) the reliability of the TUQ. Analyses indicate that the TUQ is a solid, robust, and versatile measure that can be used to measure the quality of the computer-based user interface and the quality of the telehealth interaction and services.

  1. Cognitive Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madore, Barry F.

    2012-09-01

    Cognitive Astrophysics works at the cusp between Cognitive Science and Astrophysics, drawing upon lessons learned in the Philosophy of Science, Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence. We will introduce and illustrate the concept of ``Downward Causation,'' common in philosophical discussions, but either unknown to or disdained by most physicists. A clear example operating on cosmological scales involving the origin of large-scale structure will be given. We will also make the case that on scales exceeding most laboratory experiments, self-gravitating matter can be considered to be in a ``fifth state'', characterized primarily by its negative specific heat, as first recognized by Lynden-Bell and Lynden-Bell (1977, MNRAS, 181, 405). Such systems increase their temperature as they lose energy. Numerous examples will be given and discussed.

  2. Questionnaire surveys of dentists on radiology

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, AM; Brunton, P; Horner, K

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Survey by questionnaire is a widely used research method in dental radiology. A major concern in reviews of questionnaires is non-response. The objectives of this study were to review questionnaire studies in dental radiology with regard to potential survey errors and to develop recommendations to assist future researchers. Methods A literature search with the software search package PubMed was used to obtain internet-based access to Medline through the website www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. A search of the English language peer-reviewed literature was conducted of all published studies, with no restriction on date. The search strategy found articles with dates from 1983 to 2010. The medical subject heading terms used were “questionnaire”, “dental radiology” and “dental radiography”. The reference sections of articles retrieved by this method were hand-searched in order to identify further relevant papers. Reviews, commentaries and relevant studies from the wider literature were also included. Results 53 questionnaire studies were identified in the dental literature that concerned dental radiography and included a report of response rate. These were all published between 1983 and 2010. In total, 87 articles are referred to in this review, including the 53 dental radiology studies. Other cited articles include reviews, commentaries and examples of studies outside dental radiology where they are germane to the arguments presented. Conclusions Non-response is only one of four broad areas of error to which questionnaire surveys are subject. This review considers coverage, sampling and measurement, as well as non-response. Recommendations are made to assist future research that uses questionnaire surveys. PMID:22517994

  3. Can cognitive science create a cognitive economics?

    PubMed

    Chater, Nick

    2015-02-01

    Cognitive science can intersect with economics in at least three productive ways: by providing richer models of individual behaviour for use in economic analysis; by drawing from economic theory in order to model distributed cognition; and jointly to create more powerful 'rational' models of cognitive processes and social interaction. There is the prospect of moving from behavioural economics to a genuinely cognitive economics.

  4. Development of the young spine questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Back pain in children is common and early onset of back pain has been shown to increase the risk of back pain significantly in adulthood. Consequently, preventive efforts must be targeted the young population but research relating to spinal problems in this age group is scarce. Focus has primarily been on the working age population, and therefore specific questionnaires to measure spinal pain and its consequences, specifically aimed at children and adolescents are absent. The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire for schoolchildren filling this gap. Methods The Young Spine Questionnaire (YSQ) was developed in three phases – a conceptualisation, development and testing phase. The conceptualisation phase followed the Wilson and Cleary model and included questions regarding spinal prevalence estimates, pain frequency and intensity, activity restrictions, care seeking behaviour and influence of parental back trouble. Items from existing questionnaires and the “Revised Faces Pain Scale” (rFPS) were included during the development phase. The testing phase consisted of a mixed quantitative and qualitative iterative method carried out in two pilot tests using 4th grade children and focusing on assessment of spinal area location and item validity. Results The testing phase resulted in omission of the pain drawings and the questions and answer categories were simplified in several questions. Agreement between the questionnaire prevalence estimates and the interviews ranged between 83.7% (cervical pain today) and 97.9% (thoracic pain today). To improve the understanding of the spinal boundaries we added bony landmarks to the spinal drawings after pilot test I. This resulted in an improved sense of spinal boundary location in pilot test II. Correlations between the rFPS and the interview pain score ranged between 0.67 (cervical spine) and 0.79 (lumbar spine). Conclusions The Young Spine Questionnaire contains questions that assess spinal pain

  5. Analysis of Test Takers' Metacognitive and Cognitive Strategy Use and EFL Reading Test Performance: A Multi-Sample SEM Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Limei; Goh, Christine C. M.; Kunnan, Antony John

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between test takers' metacognitive and cognitive strategy use through a questionnaire and their test performance on an English as a Foreign Language reading test. A total of 593 Chinese college test takers responded to a 38-item metacognitive and cognitive strategy questionnaire and a 50-item reading test.…

  6. Environmental education curriculum evaluation questionnaire: A reliability and validity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minner, Daphne Diane

    The intention of this research project was to bridge the gap between social science research and application to the environmental domain through the development of a theoretically derived instrument designed to give educators a template by which to evaluate environmental education curricula. The theoretical base for instrument development was provided by several developmental theories such as Piaget's theory of cognitive development, Developmental Systems Theory, Life-span Perspective, as well as curriculum research within the area of environmental education. This theoretical base fueled the generation of a list of components which were then translated into a questionnaire with specific questions relevant to the environmental education domain. The specific research question for this project is: Can a valid assessment instrument based largely on human development and education theory be developed that reliably discriminates high, moderate, and low quality in environmental education curricula? The types of analyses conducted to answer this question were interrater reliability (percent agreement, Cohen's Kappa coefficient, Pearson's Product-Moment correlation coefficient), test-retest reliability (percent agreement, correlation), and criterion-related validity (correlation). Face validity and content validity were also assessed through thorough reviews. Overall results indicate that 29% of the questions on the questionnaire demonstrated a high level of interrater reliability and 43% of the questions demonstrated a moderate level of interrater reliability. Seventy-one percent of the questions demonstrated a high test-retest reliability and 5% a moderate level. Fifty-five percent of the questions on the questionnaire were reliable (high or moderate) both across time and raters. Only eight questions (8%) did not show either interrater or test-retest reliability. The global overall rating of high, medium, or low quality was reliable across both coders and time, indicating

  7. Leicester Cough Questionnaire: translation to Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Felisbino, Manuela Brisot; Steidle, Leila John Marques; Gonçalves-Tavares, Michelle; Pizzichini, Marcia Margaret Menezes; Pizzichini, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To translate the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) to Portuguese and adapt it for use in Brazil. Methods: Cross-cultural adaptation of a quality of life questionnaire requires a translated version that is conceptually equivalent to the original version and culturally acceptable in the target country. The protocol used consisted of the translation of the LCQ to Portuguese by three Brazilian translators who were fluent in English and its back-translation to English by another translator who was a native speaker of English and fluent in Portuguese. The back-translated version was evaluated by one of the authors of the original questionnaire in order to verify its equivalence. Later in the process, a provisional Portuguese-language version was thoroughly reviewed by an expert committee. In 10 patients with chronic cough, cognitive debriefing was carried out in order to test the understandability, clarity, and acceptability of the translated questionnaire in the target population. On that basis, the final Portuguese-language version of the LCQ was produced and approved by the committee. Results: Few items were questioned by the source author and revised by the committee of experts. During the cognitive debriefing phase, the Portuguese-language version of the LCQ proved to be well accepted and understood by all of the respondents, which demonstrates the robustness of the process of translation and cross-cultural adaptation. Conclusions: The final version of the LCQ adapted for use in Brazil was found to be easy to understand and easily applied. PMID:25029643

  8. Reliability of the Conflict Resolution Questionnaire: Considerations for Using and Developing Internet-Based Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Marcus

    2004-01-01

    In the current information age, there is a growing use of and reliance on the Internet. One area of concern for educators is the communication of information using an electronic questionnaire interface. Therefore, it seems pertinent to look at the issue of dissemination of Internet questionnaire information and the integrity of this process.…

  9. Outlier Detection in Test and Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlstra, Wobbe P.; Van Der Ark, L. Andries; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2007-01-01

    Classical methods for detecting outliers deal with continuous variables. These methods are not readily applicable to categorical data, such as incorrect/correct scores (0/1) and ordered rating scale scores (e.g., 0,..., 4) typical of multi-item tests and questionnaires. This study proposes two definitions of outlier scores suited for categorical…

  10. Validation of the Child Sport Cohesion Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Luc J.; Carron, Albert V.; Eys, Mark A.; Loughead, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the validity evidence of the Child Sport Cohesion Questionnaire (CSCQ). To accomplish this task, convergent, discriminant, and known-group difference validity were examined, along with factorial validity via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Child athletes (N = 290, M[subscript age] = 10.73 plus or…

  11. Army Work Environment Questionnaire (WEQ) Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    The Work Environment Questionnaire (WEQ) was designed as a measure of organizational climate that relies on description of observable aspects of the... work environment rather than attitudes about work or job satisfaction. WEQ items were selected based on a critical incident analysis of work issues

  12. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  13. Results of Questionnaire on Faculty Work Load.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder, Rodney

    A questionnaire on faculty work load was sent to the presidents of 57 colleges selected at random except for 3 factors: universities and colleges of the City University of NY were not included; the emphasis was on private institutions; colleges selected were primarily in the south, east and midwest. Of the 39 or 68.4% replies, 35 were from private…

  14. Assessing Caregiver Information Needs: A Brief Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonton, Linda J.; Haugland, S. M.

    A diagnostic evaluation for a person with suspected Alzheimer's disease is usually initiated by family members whose concerns go beyond strictly medical issues. To determine precisely what questions families want answered, a 15-point questionnaire was developed at a multi-disciplinary geriatric assessment clinic. Caregivers were asked to rate each…

  15. The pornography craving questionnaire: psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Shane; Rosenberg, Harold

    2014-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of pornography use, and recent conceptualization of problematic use as an addiction, we could find no published scale to measure craving for pornography. Therefore, we conducted three studies employing young male pornography users to develop and evaluate such a questionnaire. In Study 1, we had participants rate their agreement with 20 potential craving items after reading a control script or a script designed to induce craving to watch pornography. We dropped eight items because of low endorsement. In Study 2, we revised both the questionnaire and cue exposure stimuli and then evaluated several psychometric properties of the modified questionnaire. Item loadings from a principal components analysis, a high internal consistency reliability coefficient, and a moderate mean inter-item correlation supported interpreting the 12 revised items as a single scale. Correlations of craving scores with preoccupation with pornography, sexual history, compulsive internet use, and sensation seeking provided support for convergent validity, criterion validity, and discriminant validity, respectively. The enhanced imagery script did not impact reported craving; however, more frequent users of pornography reported higher craving than less frequent users regardless of script condition. In Study 3, craving scores demonstrated good one-week test-retest reliability and predicted the number of times participants used pornography during the following week. This questionnaire could be applied in clinical settings to plan and evaluate therapy for problematic users of pornography and as a research tool to assess the prevalence and contextual triggers of craving among different types of pornography users.

  16. Diet History Questionnaire Paper-based Forms

    Cancer.gov

    DHQ-1 is the standard version of the NCI's Diet History Questionnaire. It was originally printed in 1998, reprinted in 2002 with minor changes to the front page and the development of a Spanish translation, and reprinted again in 2007 with changes to the Today's Date field to include the years 2007-2011.

  17. Psychometric Evaluation of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duan, Wenjie; Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Bai, Yu; Tang, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire (CVQ). The reliability, factor structure, construct validity, and temporal stability of the inventory were examined. Method: A university student sample ("n" = 878) and a working adult sample ("n" = 153) were recruited.…

  18. Caregivers feeding styles questionnaire. Establishing cutoff points

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers use the Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ) to categorize parent feeding into authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and uninvolved styles. The CFSQ assesses self-reported feeding and classifies parents using median splits which are used in a substantial body of parenting l...

  19. Faking Personality Questionnaires in Personnel Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalen, Lindy H.; Stanton, Neville A.; Roberts, Antony D.

    2001-01-01

    A personality questionnaire administered to 86 subjects contained varying amounts of information regarding job title, job description, and person specification. Participants answered once honestly and faked answers once. All groups produced similar profiles but were unable to fake responses to match the ideal profile for the job. (SK)

  20. OVERSEAS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION QUESTIONNAIRE. (TITLE SUPPLIED).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overseas Education Association, New York, NY.

    AS A BASIS FOR IMPROVING THE EDUCATION OF THE 160,000 CHILDREN OF OVERSEAS AMERICAN MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PERSONNEL, 1,639 TEACHERS IN 285 OF THE 327 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE OVERSEAS DEPENDENTS SCHOOLS IN 28 COUNTRIES RESPONDED TO A 19-ITEM QUESTIONNAIRE COVERING TEACHING EXPERIENCE, EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND, PERSONNEL PRACTICES, CLASSROOM MATERIALS,…

  1. Construct Validity of the Social Coping Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swiatek, Mary Ann; Cross, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    The Social coping Questionnaire (SCQ) measures strategies used by gifted adolescents to minimize the negative effect they believe their high ability has on their social interactions. Previous studies have supported the factor structure, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability of the SCQ. The current study provides construct validity…

  2. Rasch Based Analysis of Reading Ability Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Yuji

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the results of a questionnaire on reading ability in English by Japanese college students, which was formerly analyzed using raw scores, from the viewpoint of Rasch measured scores. In the Rasch analysis, the basic requirements for measuring are the following: (1) reduction of experience to one dimensional abstraction; (2)…

  3. Psychological Inflexibility in Childhood and Adolescence: Development and Evaluation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greco, Laurie A.; Lambert, Warren; Baer, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe the development and validation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), a child-report measure of psychological inflexibility engendered by high levels of cognitive fusion and experiential avoidance. Consistent with the theory underlying acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), items converged into a…

  4. Impaired social cognition in anorexia nervosa patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamatani, Sayo; Tomotake, Masahito; Takeda, Tomoya; Kameoka, Naomi; Kawabata, Masashi; Kubo, Hiroko; Tada, Yukio; Tomioka, Yukiko; Watanabe, Shinya; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of social cognition in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods Eighteen female patients with AN (mean age =35.4±8.6 years) and 18 female healthy controls (HC) (mean age =32.8±9.4 years) participated in the study. Their social cognition was assessed with the Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire (SCSQ). Results The results showed that total score of the SCSQ and scores of theory of mind and metacognition were significantly lower in AN group than those in HC group. Moreover, significant differences in theory of mind, metacognition, and total score of the SCSQ remained when the effects of depression, anxiety, and starvation were eliminated statistically. Conclusion These results suggest that patients with AN may have difficulty inferring other people’s intention and also monitoring and evaluating their own cognitive activities. Therefore, these features may explain some aspects of the pathology of AN. PMID:27785029

  5. 78 FR 65608 - Information Collection; Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... with revision of a currently approved information collection, Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire. DATES... INFORMATION: Title: Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire. OMB Number: 0596-0207. Expiration Date of...

  6. 77 FR 39986 - Information Collection; Health Screening Questionnaire

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Health Screening Questionnaire AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... a currently approved information collection, Health Screening Questionnaire. DATES: Comments must be...: Title: Health Screening Questionnaire. OMB Number: 0596-0164. Expiration Date of Approval: January...

  7. Neuroprotective pathways: lifestyle activity, brain pathology, and cognition in cognitively normal older adults.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Miranka; Haase, Claudia M; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Vogel, Jacob; Jagust, William J

    2014-08-01

    This study used path analysis to examine effects of cognitive activity and physical activity on cognitive functioning in older adults, through pathways involving beta-amyloid (Aβ) burden, cerebrovascular lesions, and neural injury within the brain regions affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ninety-two cognitively normal older adults (75.2 ± 5.6 years) reported lifetime cognitive activity and current physical activity using validated questionnaires. For each participant, we evaluated cortical Aβ burden (using [(11)C] labeled Pittsburgh-Compound-B positron emission tomography), cerebrovascular lesions (using magnetic resonance imaging-defined white matter lesion [WML]), and neural integrity within AD regions (using a multimodal neuroimaging biomarker). Path models (adjusted for age, gender, and education) indicated that higher lifetime cognitive activity and higher current physical activity was associated with fewer WMLs. Lower WML volumes were in turn related to higher neural integrity and higher global cognitive functioning. As shown previously, higher lifetime cognitive activity was associated with lower [(11)C] labeled Pittsburgh-Compound-B retention, which itself moderated the impact of neural integrity on cognitive functioning. Lifestyle activity may thus promote cognitive health in aging by protecting against cerebrovascular pathology and Aβ pathology thought to be relevant to AD development.

  8. Neuroprotective Pathways: Lifestyle activity, brain pathology and cognition in cognitively normal older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Miranka; Haase, Claudia M.; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Vogel, Jacob; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This study used path analysis to examine effects of cognitive activity and physical activity on cognitive functioning in older adults, through pathways involving beta-amyloid (Aβ) burden, cerebrovascular lesions, and neural injury within brain regions affected in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Ninety-two cognitively normal older adults (75.2±5.6 years) reported lifetime cognitive activity and current physical activity using validated questionnaires. For each participant, we evaluated cortical Aβ burden (using PIB-PET), cerebrovascular lesions (using MRI-defined white matter lesion (WML)), and neural integrity within AD regions (using a multimodal biomarker). Path models (adjusted for age, gender, and education) indicated that higher lifetime cognitive activity and higher current physical activity was associated with fewer WMLs. Lower WML volumes were in turn related to higher neural integrity and higher global cognitive functioning. As shown previously, higher lifetime cognitive activity was associated with lower PIB retention, which itself moderated the impact of neural integrity on cognitive functioning. Lifestyle activity may thus promote cognitive health in aging by protecting against cerebrovascular pathology and Aβ pathology thought to be relevant to AD development. PMID:24656834

  9. Cognitive Enhancement and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement--augmenting normal cognitive capacities--is not new. Literacy, numeracy, computers, and the practices of science are all cognitive enhancements. Science is now making new cognitive enhancements possible. Biomedical cognitive enhancements (BCEs) include the administration of drugs, implants of genetically engineered or…

  10. Use of Questionnaire-Based Measures in the Assessment of Listening Difficulties in School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Tomlin, Danielle; Moore, David R.; Dillon, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, the authors assessed the potential utility of a recently developed questionnaire (Evaluation of Children’s Listening and Processing Skills [ECLiPS]) for supporting the clinical assessment of children referred for auditory processing disorder (APD). Design: A total of 49 children (35 referred for APD assessment and 14 from mainstream schools) were assessed for auditory processing (AP) abilities, cognitive abilities, and symptoms of listening difficulty. Four questionnaires were used to capture the symptoms of listening difficulty from the perspective of parents (ECLiPS and Fisher’s auditory problem checklist), teachers (Teacher’s Evaluation of Auditory Performance), and children, that is, self-report (Listening Inventory for Education). Correlation analyses tested for convergence between the questionnaires and both cognitive and AP measures. Discriminant analyses were performed to determine the best combination of tests for discriminating between typically developing children and children referred for APD. Results: All questionnaires were sensitive to the presence of difficulty, that is, children referred for assessment had significantly more symptoms of listening difficulty than typically developing children. There was, however, no evidence of more listening difficulty in children meeting the diagnostic criteria for APD. Some AP tests were significantly correlated with ECLiPS factors measuring related abilities providing evidence for construct validity. All questionnaires correlated to a greater or lesser extent with the cognitive measures in the study. Discriminant analysis suggested that the best discrimination between groups was achieved using a combination of ECLiPS factors, together with nonverbal Intelligence Quotient (cognitive) and AP measures (i.e., dichotic digits test and frequency pattern test). Conclusions: The ECLiPS was particularly sensitive to cognitive difficulties, an important aspect of many children referred for

  11. User questionnaire to evaluate the radiological workspace.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Peter M A; Koesoema, Allya P; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years, an increase in digitalization of radiology departments can be seen, which has a large impact on the work of the radiologists. This impact is not only demonstrated by the increased use of digital images but also by changing demands on the whole reading environment. In this study, we evaluated the satisfaction of our radiologists with our digital Picture Archival and Communication System environment and their workspace. This evaluation was performed by distribution of a questionnaire consisting of a score sheet and some open questions to all radiologists and residents. Out of 25 questionnaires, 12 were adequately answered and returned. Results clearly showed that most problems were present in the area of reading room design and layout and comfort and ergonomics. Based on the results from this study, adaptations were made and the results were also used in the planning of the redesign of the entire department of radiology.

  12. Object-Spatial Imagery and Verbal Cognitive Styles in Children and Adolescents: Developmental Trajectories in Relation to Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazhenkova, Olesya; Becker, Michael; Kozhevnikov, Maria

    2011-01-01

    A new self-report instrument, the Children's Object-Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire (C-OSIVQ), was designed to assess cognitive styles in younger populations (8-17 years old). The questionnaire was based on the previously developed adult version of the Object-Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire (OSIVQ; Blazhenkova & Kozhevnikov,…

  13. Cognitive styles and mental rotation ability in map learning.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, Francesca; Moè, Angelica

    2013-11-01

    In inspecting, learning and reproducing a map, a wide range of abilities is potentially involved. This study examined the role of mental rotation (MR) and verbal ability, together with that of cognitive styles in map learning. As regards cognitive styles, the traditional distinction between verbalizers and visualizers has been taken into account, together with a more recent distinction between two styles of visualization: spatial and object. One hundred and seven participants filled in two questionnaires on cognitive styles: the Verbalizer-Visualizer Questionnaire (Richardson in J Ment Imag 1:109-125, 1977) and the Object-Spatial Imagery Questionnaire (Blajenkova et al. in Appl Cogn Psych 20:239-263, 2006), performed MR and verbal tests, learned two maps, and were then tested for their recall. It was found that MR ability and cognitive styles played a role in predicting map learning, with some distinctions within cognitive styles: verbal style favoured learning of one of the two maps (the one rich in verbal labels), which in turn was disadvantaged by the adoption of spatial style. Conversely, spatial style predicted learning of the other map, rich in visual features. The discussion focuses on implications for cognitive psychology and everyday cognition.

  14. Validation of questionnaire on the Spiritual Needs Assessment for Patients (SNAP) questionnaire in Brazilian Portuguese

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Toloi, Diego; Uema, Deise; Matsushita, Felipe; da Silva Andrade, Paulo Antonio; Branco, Tiago Pugliese; de Carvalho Chino, Fabiana Tomie Becker; Guerra, Raquel Bezerra; Pfiffer, Túlio Eduardo Flesch; Chiba, Toshio; Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Sulmasy, Daniel P; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Spirituality is related to the care and the quality of life of cancer patients. Thus, it is very important to assess their needs. The objective of this study was the translation and cultural adjustment of the Spiritual Needs Assessment for Patients (SNAP) questionnaire to the Brazilian Portuguese language. Methodology The translation and cultural adjustment of the SNAP questionnaire involved six stages: backtranslation, revision of backtranslation, translation to the original language and adjustments, pre-test on ten patients, and test and retest with 30 patients after three weeks. Adult patients, with a solid tumour and literate with a minimum of four years schooling were included. For analysis and consistency we used the calculation of the Cronbach alpha coefficient and the Pearson linear correlation. Results The final questionnaire had some language and content adjustments compared to the original version in English. The correlation analysis of each item with the total score of the questionnaire showed coefficients above 0.99. The calculation of the Cronbach alpha coefficient was 0.9. The calculation of the Pearson linear correlation with the test and retest of the questionnaire was equal to 0.95. Conclusion The SNAP questionnaire translated into Brazilian Portuguese is adequately reliable and consistent. This instrument allows adequate access to spiritual needs and can help patient care. PMID:28101137

  15. [Questionnaire on parental attitudes and rearing practices (FEPS)].

    PubMed

    Richter-Appelt, Hertha; Schimmelmann, Benno Graf; Tiefensee, Jutta

    2004-01-01

    A positive parent-child relationship is one of the most important determinants of a healthy cognitive, emotional and social development. The relationship from parent to child is determined by parenting styles. Parenting styles are characterised by the two dimensions parental attitudes and rearing practices. The development and the psychometric properties of a questionnaire on parental attitudes and rearing practices (FEPS), which contains an extended version of the Parental Bonding Instrument by Parker et al. (PBI, 1979) and two scales on parental reinforcement and punishment behaviour, is presented. In a sample of 457 women and 159 men factorial and item analysis revealed four scales (care, autonomy, low punishment and low material reinforcement). The care dimension contained items of immaterial reinforcement on the positive pole and items of coldness and ignorance as means of punishment on the negative pole. Based on findings from its first application in a clinical study it can be assumed that the FEPS differentiates between clinical and non-clinical populations. Additionally, varying patterns of the four scales may emerge as risk factors for the development of certain psychiatric/psychological problems.

  16. Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire-Brief Revised: psychometric replication and extension.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Dallas A; Cohen, Alex S; Matthews, Russell A; Dinzeo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The psychometric screening and detection of schizotypy through the use of concise self-report assessment instruments such as the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire-Brief Revised (SPQ-BR; Cohen, Matthews, Najolia, & Brown, 2010) enables an expeditious identification of individuals at putatively elevated risk to develop schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Using 2 large, culturally diverse, independent samples, this study expanded the psychometric evaluation of this instrument by presenting a series of confirmatory factor analyses; reviewing internal consistency reliabilities; and evaluating the construct validity of the scale by way of examining group differences in SPQ-BR scores between individuals with and without self-reported family histories of schizophrenia. The results indicate a 2-tier factor solution of the measure and indicate strong internal reliability for the scale. Findings regarding construct validity of the SPQ-BR are more variable with the Cognitive-Perceptual Deficits superordinate factor receiving the strongest evidentiary support. Limitations of this study and directions for future research are discussed.

  17. The Desire Thinking Questionnaire: development and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Gabriele; Spada, Marcantonio M

    2011-11-01

    Desire thinking is a voluntary cognitive process involving verbal and imaginal elaboration of a desired target. Recent research has highlighted the role of desire thinking in the maintenance of addictive, eating and impulse control disorders. The goal of this research project was to develop the first self-report measure of desire thinking. In Study 1 we constructed the Desire Thinking Questionnaire (DTQ) and conducted a preliminary factor analysis which identified two factors. The first factor concerned the perseveration of verbal thoughts about desire-related content and experience and was named 'Verbal Perseveration'. The second factor concerned the tendency to prefigure images about desire-related content and experience and was named 'Imaginal Prefiguration'. In Study 2 we performed a confirmatory factor analysis which provided support for this two factor solution, with both factors achieving adequate internal consistency. Divergent validity was also established through correlation analyses. In Study 3 the temporal stability of the DTQ was examined and confirmed. Finally, in Study 4, the predictive validity of the DTQ in a sample of alcohol abusers was investigated. The DTQ was shown to possess good psychometric properties, as well as divergent and predictive validity. This self-report measure may aid future research into desire thinking and craving, as well as facilitate assessment and case formulation within the context of addictive, eating and impulse control disorders.

  18. Using parent questionnaires to assess neurodevelopment in former preterm infants: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, Mandy B.; Santo, Eilann; McCormick, Marie C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Former preterm and very low birth weight (VLBW) infants require close neurodevelopmental surveillance after hospital discharge, but in-person professional testing is resource-intensive and inconvenient for families. A standardised developmental questionnaire completed by parents offers an alternative to in-person testing, but few such questionnaires have been validated. Our aim was to validate the Motor and Social Development (MSD) scale in a sample of former preterm infants. Methods We studied 321 visits to a neonatal follow-up clinic. Parents completed the MSD, which measures cognitive, motor, and social abilities. Psychologists and physical therapists administered the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 3rd edition (Bayley-III) cognitive and motor scales. Results The median (range) gestational age was 28 (23, 34) weeks and birthweight 980 (400, 2700) g. Corrected age at study participation ranged 5–35 months. The mean (standard deviation) Bayley-III motor score was 94 (16); cognitive 98 (16); and MSD 91 (18). Internal consistency of the MSD was moderate to high (Cronbach alpha of 0.65 to 0.88). The MSD was moderately correlated with the Bayley-III motor (Pearson r=0.49, P<0.001) and cognitive (r=0.45, P<0.001) scales. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81, 0.95) for the MSD to detect a low Bayley-III motor score (<70); and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82, 0.95) for a low cognitive score, indicating good discrimination. Conclusions The MSD has good internal and concurrent validity, and may be useful for neurodevelopmental assessment of former preterm and VLBW infants in clinical and research settings. PMID:23374065

  19. Cognitive Testing of Racial and Ethnic Questions in the CPS Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Ruth B.; de la Puente, Manuel

    1996-01-01

    Cognitive testing aided the development of a questionnaire for the Current Population Survey that is readily understood, does not invoke a negative image, and allows pinpointing of circumstances related to multiracial reporting. (JOW)

  20. Everyday cognitive functioning in cardiac patients: relationships between self-report, report of a significant other and cognitive test performance.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Peter C; Smith, Geoff; Ernest, Christine S; Murphy, Barbara M; Worcester, Marian U C; Higgins, Rosemary O; Le Grande, Michael R; Goble, Alan J; Andrewes, David; Tatoulis, James

    2010-01-01

    Candidates for cardiac bypass surgery often experience cognitive decline. Such decline is likely to affect their everyday cognitive functioning. The aim of the present study was to compare cardiac patients' ratings of their everyday cognitive functioning against significant others' ratings and selected neuropsychological tests. Sixty-nine patients completed a battery of standardised cognitive tests. Patients and significant others also completed the Everyday Function Questionnaire independently of each other. Patient and significant other ratings of patients' everyday cognitive difficulties were found to be similar. Despite the similarities in ratings of difficulties, some everyday cognitive tasks were attributed to different processes. Patients' and significant others' ratings were most closely associated with the neuropsychological test of visual memory. Tests of the patients' verbal memory and fluency were only related to significant others' ratings. Test scores of attention and planning were largely unrelated to ratings by either patients or their significant others.

  1. Illness denial questionnaire for patients and caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Ferrario, Silvia; Giorgi, Ines; Baiardi, Paola; Giuntoli, Laura; Balestroni, Gianluigi; Cerutti, Paola; Manera, Marina; Gabanelli, Paola; Solara, Valentina; Fornara, Roberta; Luisetti, Michela; Omarini, Pierangela; Omarini, Giovanna; Vidotto, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Interest in assessing denial is still present, despite the criticisms concerning its definition and measurement. We tried to develop a questionnaire (Illness Denial Questionnaire, IDQ) assessing patients’ and caregivers’ denial in relation to their illness/disturbance. Patients and methods After a preliminary study, a final version of 24 dichotomous items (true/false) was selected. We hypothesized a theoretical model with three dimensions: denial of negative emotions, resistance to change, and conscious avoidance, the first two composing the actual Denial and the last representing an independent component of the illness denial behavior. The IDQ was administered to 400 subjects (219 patients and 181 caregivers) together with the Anxiety–Depression Questionnaire – Reduced form (AD-R), in order to assess concurrent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α and McDonald’s ω), and test–retest analysis were performed. Results CFA and internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α: 0.87–0.96) indicated a clear and meaningful three-factor structure of IDQ, for both patients and caregivers. Further analyses showed good concurrent validity, with Denial and its subscale negatively associated with anxiety and depression and avoidance positively associated with anxiety and depression. The IDQ also showed a good stability (r from 0.71 to 0.87). Conclusion The IDQ demonstrated good psychometric properties. Denial of negative emotions and resistance to change seem to contribute to a real expression of denial, and conscious avoidance seems to constitute a further step in the process of cognitive–affective elaboration of the illness. PMID:28356745

  2. Dimensional structure of the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Loas, Gwenolé; Yon, Valérie; Brien, Denis

    2002-01-01

    The Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ) was designed to evaluate the subjective symptoms of schizophrenics. Several validation studies of the FCQ using principal components analyses (PCA) have shown one-, two-, or four-factor solutions. The present study was conducted using FCQ data on 310 schizophrenics who met the ICD-10 criteria for F20 (schizophrenia) disorder. Using several guidelines to select the number of factors, the PCA yielded one factor. This result suggests a unidimensionality underlying FCQ items. A new scale comprising 24 items was derived from those items with higher weights in the first factor.

  3. Assessing Adult Leisure Activities: An Extension of a Self-Report Activity Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Jopp, Daniela; Hertzog, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, we enhanced the content validity of the Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire by adding items on physical and social activities, and validated a shortened version of the questionnaire. Our proposed leisure activity model included 11 activity categories: three types of social activities (i.e., activities with close social partners, group-centered public activity, religious activities), physical, developmental, and experiential activities, crafts, game playing, TV watching, travel, and technology use. Confirmatory factor analyses validated the proposed factor structure in two independent samples. A higher-order model with a general activity factor fitted the activity factor correlations with relatively little loss of fit. Convergent and discriminant validity for the activity scales were supported by patterns of their correlations with education, health, depression, cognition, and personality. In sum, the scores derived from of the augmented VLS activity questionnaire demonstrate good reliability, and validity evidence supports their use as measure of leisure activities in young, middle-aged, and older individuals. PMID:20230157

  4. Assessing adult leisure activities: an extension of a self-report activity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Jopp, Daniela S; Hertzog, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value, as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, the authors enhanced the content validity of the Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire by adding items on physical and social activities and validated a shortened version of the questionnaire. The proposed leisure activity model included 11 activity categories: 3 types of social activities (i.e., activities with close social partners, group-centered public activity, religious activities), physical activities, developmental activities, experiential activities, crafts, game playing, TV watching, travel, and technology use. Confirmatory factor analyses validated the proposed factor structure in 2 independent samples. A higher order model with a general activity factor fitted the activity factor correlations with relatively little loss of fit. Convergent and discriminant validity for the activity scales were supported by patterns of their correlations with education, health, depression, cognition, and personality. In sum, the scores derived from of the augmented Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire demonstrate good reliability, and validity evidence supports their use as measures of leisure activities in young, middle-aged, and older individuals.

  5. Validation of a questionnaire on behaviour academic competence among Chinese preschool children.

    PubMed

    Leung, Cynthia; Lo, S K; Leung, Shirley S L

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a questionnaire on academic competence behaviour for use with Chinese preschool children in Hong Kong. A parent version and a teacher version were developed and evaluated. The participants included 457 children (230 boys and 227 girls) aged four and five years old, their preschool teachers and their parents. Besides, 44 children (39 boys and 5 girls) with developmental disabilities were recruited. The children were assessed on the cognitive domain of the Preschool Development Assessment Scale (PDAS). Their parents completed a questionnaire on academic competence behaviour, as well as the Strength and Difficulty Scale (SDQ). Their teachers completed the questionnaire on academic competence behaviour. Rasch analysis results provided support for the unidimensionality of the parent and teacher versions of the scale, with one item deleted. The parent and teacher versions of the revised scale correlated positively with the cognitive domain of the PDAS and the prosocial scale of the SDQ and negatively with SDQ total problem behaviour score. Children with developmental delay were assigned lower scores by their parents and teachers, compared with preschool children, on the revised versions of the academic competence behaviour scale. Reliability estimates (Cronbach's alpha) of the parent and teacher versions of this revised scale were above .80. The results suggested that the two versions of academic competence behaviour scales were promising instruments for the assessment of academic competence behaviour among Chinese preschool children.

  6. Assessing the significant others of chronic pain patients: the psychometric properties of significant other questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Sharp, T J; Nicholas, M K

    2000-11-01

    Contemporary reviews of psychological models of chronic pain have favoured behavioural and cognitive-behavioural formulations. These have often assumed that pain behaviours are maintained by environmental reinforcers. One of the most commonly hypothesized sources of reinforcement has been patients' significant others. Further, it has often been recognized that significant others may also be affected by pain behaviours and that they may experience changes in their lifesyles and in their mood as a consequence of living with someone who has pain. Somewhat surprisingly, relatively little clinical research has been published investigating significant others and their relationships with pain patients. Among other things, one of the limiting factors has been the lack of measurement tools available for assessing the relevant variables thought to be important with regards to significant others (such as their responses to, and perceptions of, chronic pain). This study attempted to remedy this situation by developing and testing the psychometric properties of a number of questionnaires specifically designed for significant others of chronic pain patients. The questionnaires have been selected to assess both significant others' (behavioural and cognitive) responses to pain as well as the extent to which pain impacts on their lives. Although not all of the questionnaires were found to possess equally strong psychometric properties, the availability of several solid measures opens the way for more empirical analyses of significant others and their interactions with chronic pain patients.

  7. Relation between cognitive impairment and early death in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Eagles, J M; Beattie, J A; Restall, D B; Rawlinson, F; Hagen, S; Ashcroft, G W

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To study the association between cognitive impairment and early death in elderly patients living in the community. DESIGN--Case-control study of 410 patients assessed by the mental status questionnaire and followed up after three years. SETTING--A general practice in Inverurie, Aberdeenshire, with 14,000 patients. PATIENTS--205 Patients aged greater than or equal to 65 with cognitive impairment according to the mental status questionnaire (score less than or equal to 8) and 205 patients scoring greater than 8 on the questionnaire matched for age and sex. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death. RESULTS--The relative risk of death in the cognitively impaired patients overall was 3.5. Those patients who scored less than or equal to 7 on the mental status questionnaire were five times more likely to die than their controls. There was no difference in risk of death between those with severe or moderate cognitive impairment. CONCLUSIONS--Cognitive impairment is associated with early death. PMID:2106935

  8. Academic Achievement in Early Adolescence: The Influence of Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Variables.

    PubMed

    Veas, Alejandro; Castejón, Juan-Luis; Gilar, Raquel; Miñano, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the predictive effects of intellectual ability, self-concept, goal orientations, learning strategies, popularity and parent involvement on academic achievement. Hierarchical regression analysis and path analysis were performed among a sample of 1398 high school students (mean age = 12.5; SD =.67) from eight education centers from the province of Alicante (Spain). Cognitive and non-cognitive variables were measured using validated questionnaires, whereas academic achievement was assessed using end-of-term grades obtained by students in nine subjects. The results revealed significant predictive effects of all of the variables. The model proposed had a satisfactory fit, and all of the hypothesized relationships were significant. These findings support the importance of including non-cognitive variables along with cognitive variables when predicting a model of academic achievement.

  9. Poker mania and problem gambling: a study of distorted cognitions, motivation and alexithymia.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, Dana V; Brown, Jac

    2009-12-01

    This study examines the relationships between distorted cognitions, motivation, and alexithymia on problem gambling in poker players (n = 96). Respondents completed questionnaires containing the Canadian Problem Gambling Index, Gambling Motivation Scale, Gambler's Beliefs Questionnaire, and Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20. The results suggest that problem gambling is significantly related to distorted cognitions, non-self-determined motivation, and difficulty identifying feelings. Implications are drawn for the development of more relevant intervention, prevention, and treatment strategies.

  10. Development of an Everyday Spatial Behavioral Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Eliot, John; Czarnolewski, Mark Y

    2007-07-01

    The authors developed a 12-category, 116-item critical incident questionnaire of spatial behavior. The authors administered the Everyday Spatial Behavioral Questionnaire (ESBQ) to volunteer undergraduates (114 women, and 31 men) and tests of spatial ability to establish both the reliability and construct validity of the instrument. The authors found that Cronbach's alpha across the subscale scores was .92, and that 8 of the 12 subscales had alphas of .70 or greater. The authors found validity of the ESBQ through canonical correlation analysis. Specifically, spatial tests, gender, and age variables, jointly with the ESBQ subscales, identified 2 apparent continua of spatial skills. The authors labeled the first continuum movement through space (from moving a vehicle at one end of the continuum, to moving one's own body through space at the other end of the continuum). The authors labeled the second identified continuum drawing/perceiving perspective/path finding, and it appeared to represent a continuum of 3-dimensional visualization or redirection. Another suggested label was dimensional discernment. Thus, the ESBQ is a first step toward identifying new ways to think about and quantify people's spatial experience.

  11. Influence of 5-HTT variation, childhood trauma and self-efficacy on anxiety traits: a gene-environment-coping interaction study.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Miriam A; Ziegler, Christiane; Holitschke, Karoline; Schartner, Christoph; Schmidt, Brigitte; Weber, Heike; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Pauli, Paul; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Environmental vulnerability factors such as adverse childhood experiences in interaction with genetic risk variants, e.g., the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), are assumed to play a role in the development of anxiety and affective disorders. However, positive influences such as general self-efficacy (GSE) may exert a compensatory effect on genetic disposition, environmental adversity, and anxiety traits. We, thus, assessed childhood trauma (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, CTQ) and GSE in 678 adults genotyped for 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 and their interaction on agoraphobic cognitions (Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire, ACQ), social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, LSAS), and trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI-T). The relationship between anxiety traits and childhood trauma was moderated by self-efficacy in 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 LALA genotype carriers: LALA probands maltreated as children showed high anxiety scores when self-efficacy was low, but low anxiety scores in the presence of high self-efficacy despite childhood maltreatment. Our results extend previous findings regarding anxiety-related traits showing an interactive relationship between 5-HTT genotype and adverse childhood experiences by suggesting coping-related measures to function as an additional dimension buffering the effects of a gene-environment risk constellation. Given that anxiety disorders manifest already early in childhood, this insight could contribute to the improvement of psychotherapeutic interventions by including measures strengthening self-efficacy and inform early targeted preventive interventions in at-risk populations, particularly within the crucial time window of childhood and adolescence.

  12. Clinical Relevance of Specific Cognitive Complaints in Determining Mild Cognitive Impairment from Cognitively Normal States in a Study of Healthy Elderly Controls.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Villanueva, Marina; Rebollo-Vázquez, Ana; Ruiz-Sánchez de León, José M; Valentí, Meritxell; Medina, Miguel; Fernández-Blázquez, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Subjective memory complaints (SMC) in the elderly have been suggested as an early sign of dementia. This study aims at investigating whether specific cognitive complaints are more useful than others to discriminate Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) by examining the dimensional structure of the Everyday Memory Questionnaire (EMQ). Materials and Methods: A sample of community-dwelling elderly individuals was recruited (766 controls and 78 MCI). The EMQ was administered to measure self-perception of cognitive complaints. All participants also underwent a comprehensive clinical and neuropsychological battery. Combined exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and Item Response Theory (IRT) were performed to identify the underlying structure of the EMQ. Furthermore, logistic regression analyses were conducted to study whether single cognitive complaints were able to predict MCI. Results: A suitable five-factor solution was found. Each factor focused on a different cognitive domain. Interestingly, just three of them, namely Forgetfulness of Immediate Information (FII), Executive Functions (EF) and Prospective Memory (PM) proved to be effective in distinguishing between cognitively healthy individuals and MCI. Based on these results we propose a shortened EMQ version comprising 10 items (EMQ-10). Discussion: Not all cognitive complaints have the same clinical relevance. Only subjective complaints on specific cognitive domains are able to discriminate MCI. We encourage clinicians to use the EMQ-10 as a useful tool to quantify and monitor the progression of individuals who report cognitive complaints.

  13. Clinical Relevance of Specific Cognitive Complaints in Determining Mild Cognitive Impairment from Cognitively Normal States in a Study of Healthy Elderly Controls

    PubMed Central

    Ávila-Villanueva, Marina; Rebollo-Vázquez, Ana; Ruiz-Sánchez de León, José M.; Valentí, Meritxell; Medina, Miguel; Fernández-Blázquez, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Subjective memory complaints (SMC) in the elderly have been suggested as an early sign of dementia. This study aims at investigating whether specific cognitive complaints are more useful than others to discriminate Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) by examining the dimensional structure of the Everyday Memory Questionnaire (EMQ). Materials and Methods: A sample of community-dwelling elderly individuals was recruited (766 controls and 78 MCI). The EMQ was administered to measure self-perception of cognitive complaints. All participants also underwent a comprehensive clinical and neuropsychological battery. Combined exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and Item Response Theory (IRT) were performed to identify the underlying structure of the EMQ. Furthermore, logistic regression analyses were conducted to study whether single cognitive complaints were able to predict MCI. Results: A suitable five-factor solution was found. Each factor focused on a different cognitive domain. Interestingly, just three of them, namely Forgetfulness of Immediate Information (FII), Executive Functions (EF) and Prospective Memory (PM) proved to be effective in distinguishing between cognitively healthy individuals and MCI. Based on these results we propose a shortened EMQ version comprising 10 items (EMQ-10). Discussion: Not all cognitive complaints have the same clinical relevance. Only subjective complaints on specific cognitive domains are able to discriminate MCI. We encourage clinicians to use the EMQ-10 as a useful tool to quantify and monitor the progression of individuals who report cognitive complaints. PMID:27757082

  14. STOP-Bang questionnaire: translation to Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Lorena Barbosa de Moraes; Silveira, Erika Aparecida; Lima, Nathalia Meireles; Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To translate and perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Snoring, Tiredness, Observed apnea, high blood Pressure, Body mass index, Age, Neck circumference, and Gender (STOP-Bang) questionnaire so that it can be used as a screening tool for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in Brazil. Methods: Based on the principles of good practice for the translation and cross-cultural adaptation of such instruments, the protocol included the following steps: acquisition of authorization from the lead author of the original questionnaire; translation of the instrument to Brazilian Portuguese, carried out by two translators; reconciliation; back-translation to English, carried out by two English teachers who are fluent in Portuguese; review of the back-translation; harmonization; review and approval of the questionnaire by the original author; cognitive debriefing involving 14 patients who completed the questionnaire; analysis of the results; and review and preparation of the final version of the instrument approved by the review committee. Results: The final version of the STOP-Bang questionnaire for use in Brazil showed a clarity score > 9 (on a scale of 1-10) for all of the questions. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.62, demonstrating the internal consistency of the instrument. The means and standard deviations of the age, body mass index, and neck circumference of the patients studied were 46.8 ± 11.2 years, 43.7 ± 8.5 kg/m2, and 41.3 ± 3.6 cm, respectively. Conclusions: The STOP-Bang questionnaire proved to be understandable, clear, and applicable. The original instrument and the translated version, cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil, were consistently equivalent. Therefore, it can become a widely used screening tool for patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:27832234

  15. A questionnaire to assess social stigma.

    PubMed

    Tavormina, Maurilio Giuseppe Maria; Tavormina, Romina; Nemoianni, Eugenio; Tavormina, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Psychiatric patients often suffer for two reasons: due to the illness and due to the social stigma of mental illness, that increases the uneasiness and psychic pain of the person suffering from serious psychiatric disorder. This unwell person is often the object of stigma because he is "different" from others, and he also can be margenalised by society. In this study we intend to assess whether these margenalising attitudes might be also present among mental health professionals who have presented psychic problems in a previous period of their life, against sick persons suffering of the same illness even if he is a mental health professional. Two questionnaires have been developed, one for professionals and another for the patients, with the aim of identifying these marginalising attitudes. We intend that this study shall be a multicenter, observational and international study, promoted by the Mental Health Dept. of Naples (ASL Naples 3 South, Italy).

  16. Predicting running speed from a simple questionnaire.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, M J

    1985-01-01

    Of 221 competitors in a University half marathon in 1983, 98 replied to a questionnaire before the race which asked for details of training, age, height, weight and resting pulse rate. Finishing times of all competitors were recorded. In a multiple regression analysis significant predictors of running speed were: amount of training, expressed as distance run per week and number of weeks training for the event, the Body Mass Index (weight/height) and resting pulse rate. We conclude that for assessing running speed amongst competitors with similar amounts of training, the Body Mass Index and the resting pulse rate are useful substitutes for more elaborate and expensive measures. Images p142-a PMID:4075062

  17. Junior Electronics Workshops and Their Questionnaires Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Cosy; Maruta, Shuichiro; Noyori, Kazumasa; Yanaida, Masashi

    In this paper, a trial to educate electronics for both elementary pupils and junior-high students is reported. A “making your own radio” workshop for elementary kids features a paper-craft resonator made of toilet paper cores and an empty box of tissue papers as well as solder-less main radio circuit. For elder elementary and junior-high pupils, a workshop making a bat detector (an ultra-sonic receiver) is provided to help their summer vacation research. Both workshops are planned to enlarge students wishing to knock the door of electronics. Also, we report questionnaires results for those workshops and follow up research results for bat detector workshop. Those results show that both children and parents long for good experiences on science/electronics materials and these experiences are important for future human resources in scientific fields including analog electronics.

  18. Systematic review: questionnaires for assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bolier, E A; Kessing, B F; Smout, A J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-01-01

    Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Four well-defined dimensions are noticeable in these GERD questionnaires, which are symptoms, response to treatment, diagnosis, and burden on the quality of life of GERD patients. The aim of this review is to develop a complete overview of all available questionnaires, categorized per dimension of the assessment of GERD. A systematic search of the literature up to January 2013 using the Pubmed database and the Embase database, and search of references and conference abstract books were conducted. A total number of 65 questionnaires were extracted and evaluated. Thirty-nine questionnaires were found applicable for the assessment of GERD symptoms, three of which are generic gastrointestinal questionnaires. For the assessment of response to treatment, 14 questionnaires were considered applicable. Seven questionnaires with diagnostic purposes were found. In the assessment of quality of life in GERD patients, 18 questionnaires were found and evaluated. Twenty questionnaires were found to be used for more than one assessment dimension, and eight questionnaires were found for GERD assessment in infants and/or children. A wide variety of GERD questionnaires is available, of which the majority is used for assessment of GERD symptoms. Questionnaires differ in aspects such as design, validation and translations. Also, numerous multidimensional questionnaires are available, of which the Reflux Disease Questionnaire is widely applicable. We provided an overview of GERD questionnaires to aid investigators and clinicians in their search for the most appropriate questionnaire for their specific purposes.

  19. Clinical COPD Questionnaire score (CCQ) and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sundh, Josefin; Janson, Christer; Lisspers, Karin; Montgomery, Scott; Ställberg, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) measures health status and can be used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQL). We investigated whether CCQ is also associated with mortality. Methods Some 1111 Swedish primary and secondary care chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were randomly selected. Information from questionnaires and medical record review were obtained in 970 patients. The Swedish Board of Health and Welfare provided mortality data. Cox regression estimated survival, with adjustment for age, sex, heart disease, and lung function (for a subset with spirometry data, n = 530). Age and sex-standardized mortality ratios were calculated. Results Over 5 years, 220 patients (22.7%) died. Mortality risk was higher for mean CCQ ≥ 3 (37.8% died) compared with mean CCQ < 1 (11.4%), producing an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) (and 95% confidence interval [CI]) of 3.13 (1.98 to 4.95). After further adjustment for 1 second forced expiratory volume (expressed as percent of the European Community for Steel and Coal reference values ), the association remained (HR 2.94 [1.42 to 6.10]). The mortality risk was higher than in the general population, with standardized mortality ratio (and 95% CI) of 1.87 (1.18 to 2.80) with CCQ < 1, increasing to 6.05 (4.94 to 7.44) with CCQ ≥ 3. Conclusion CCQ is predictive of mortality in COPD patients. As HRQL and mortality are both important clinical endpoints, CCQ could be used to target interventions. PMID:23277739

  20. Music cognition and the cognitive sciences.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Marcus; Rohrmeier, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Why should music be of interest to cognitive scientists, and what role does it play in human cognition? We review three factors that make music an important topic for cognitive scientific research. First, music is a universal human trait fulfilling crucial roles in everyday life. Second, music has an important part to play in ontogenetic development and human evolution. Third, appreciating and producing music simultaneously engage many complex perceptual, cognitive, and emotional processes, rendering music an ideal object for studying the mind. We propose an integrated status for music cognition in the Cognitive Sciences and conclude by reviewing challenges and big questions in the field and the way in which these reflect recent developments.

  1. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire in Turkish Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Tuğba; Özen, Şükrü; Kutlutürkan, Sevinç

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ) in Turkish cancer patients. Methods: This methodological study involved 135 cancer patients. Statistical methods included confirmatory or exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach alpha coefficients for internal consistency. Results: The values of fit indices are within the acceptable range. The alpha coefficients for emotional illness representations, cognitive illness representations, and total scale are 0.83, 0.80, and 0.85, respectively. Conclusions: The results confirm the two-factor structure of the Turkish BIPQ and demonstrate its reliability and validity. PMID:28217734

  2. An emotion-differentiated perspective on empathy with the emotion specific empathy questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Olderbak, Sally; Sassenrath, Claudia; Keller, Johannes; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Empathy refers to the thoughts and feelings of one individual in response to the observed (emotional) experiences of another individual. Empathy, however, can occur toward persons experiencing a variety of emotions, raising the question of whether or not empathy can be emotion specific. This paper discusses theoretical and empirical support for the emotion specificity of empathy. We present a new measure, the Emotion Specific Empathy questionnaire, which assesses affective and cognitive empathy for the six basic emotions. This paper presents the measure's psychometric qualities and demonstrates, through a series of models, the discriminant validity between emotion specific empathies suggesting empathy is emotion specific. Results and implications are discussed. PMID:25071632

  3. Diet History Questionnaire II & Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Web-based DHQ

    Cancer.gov

    The Web-based versions of DHQ II and C-DHQ II are identical in content to the paper forms. By automating the DHQ II and providing versions on the Web for public use, researchers have another tool to collect and analyze food frequency questionnaire data.

  4. Development of a cohesion questionnaire for youth: the Youth Sport Environment Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Eys, Mark; Loughead, Todd; Bray, Steven R; Carron, Albert V

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to initiate the development of a psychometrically sound measure of cohesion for youth sport groups. A series of projects were undertaken in a four-phase research program. The initial phase was designed to garner an understanding of how youth sport group members perceived the concept of cohesion through focus groups (n = 56), open-ended questionnaires (n = 280), and a literature review. In Phase 2, information from the initial projects was used in the development of 142 potential items and content validity was assessed. In Phase 3, 227 participants completed a revised 87-item questionnaire. Principal components analyses further reduced the number of items to 17 and suggested a two-factor structure (i.e., task and social cohesion dimensions). Finally, support for the factorial validity of the resultant questionnaire was provided through confirmatory factor analyses with an independent sample (n = 352) in Phase 4. The final version of the questionnaire contains 16 items that assess task and social cohesion in addition to 2 negatively worded spurious items. Specific issues related to assessing youth perceptions of cohesion are discussed and future research directions are suggested.

  5. Understanding Knowledge Sharing between IT Professionals--An Integration of Social Cognitive and Social Exchange Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Ming-Tien; Cheng, Nai-Chang

    2012-01-01

    The research includes various constructs based on social exchange theory and social cognitive theory. This study mainly explored the relationships among organisational justice, trust, commitment and knowledge-sharing cognition and verified their mediating effects through two variables of trust and commitment. A survey utilising a questionnaire was…

  6. Associations between Private Speech, Behavioral Self-Regulation, and Cognitive Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aro, Tuija; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Laakso, Marja-Leena; Tolvanen, Asko; Ahonen, Timo

    2015-01-01

    We examined the associations between 5-year-old children's private speech, behavioural self-regulation, and cognitive abilities. Behavioural self-regulation was assessed using parental and preschool teacher questionnaires. Cognitive abilities (i.e., language, inhibition, planning and fluency, and memory) were assessed with neurocognitive tests,…

  7. Everyday Cognitive Failures and Memory Problems in Parkinson's Patients without Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakoff, Ellen; Smith-Spark, James H.

    2008-01-01

    There is growing evidence that Parkinson's disease patients without dementia exhibit cognitive deficits in some executive, memory and selective attention tasks. However, the impact of these deficits on their everyday cognitive functioning remains largely unknown. This issue was explored using self-report questionnaires. Twenty-four Parkinson's…

  8. Cultural Predictors of the Parenting Cognitions of Immigrant Chinese Mothers and Fathers in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costigan, Catherine; Su, Tina F.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the predictors of parenting cognitions among 94 married immigrant Chinese couples with early-adolescent children in Canada. Mothers and fathers separately completed questionnaires assessing their culturally based parenting cognitions (interdependent childrearing goals, family obligation expectations and Chinese parent role…

  9. Validation of Self-Reported Cognitive Problems with Objective Neuropsychological Performance in Manganese-Exposed Residents

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a lack of validation of self-reported cognitive problems with objective neuropsychological measures. The validity of four self-reported cognitive items from a health questionnaire (HQ) and the Symptoms Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) was examined with objective clinical ...

  10. Student Teacher Challenges: Using the Cognitive Load Theory as an Explanatory Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Daniel C.; Pitton, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive load theory (CLT) can explain the challenges faced by student teachers. This study, guided by the CLT, included 26 pre-service teachers. Participants completed a cognitive load self-report questionnaire and were interviewed at two points during their student teaching. Results revealed that student teachers decreased mental effort related…

  11. Exploring Cognitive Diversity: Anthropological Perspectives on Cognition.

    PubMed

    Beller, Sieghard; Bender, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Anthropology and the other cognitive sciences currently maintain a troubled relationship (Beller, Bender, & Medin, ). What could rapprochement look like, and how could it be achieved? The seven main articles of this topic present anthropological or anthropologically inspired cross-cultural research on a diverse set of cognitive domains. They serve as an existence proof that not only do synergies abound across anthropology and the other cognitive sciences, but that they are worth achieving.

  12. Polish adaptation of Bad Sobernheim Stress Questionnaire-Brace and Bad Sobernheim Stress Questionnaire-Deformity.

    PubMed

    Misterska, Ewa; Głowacki, Maciej; Harasymczuk, Jerzy

    2009-12-01

    Bad Sobernheim Stress Questionnaire-Brace and Bad Sobernheim Stress Questionnaire-Deformity are relatively new tools aimed at facilitating the evaluation of long-term results of therapy in persons with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing conservative treatment. To use these tools properly in Poland, they must be translated into Polish and adapted to the Polish cultural settings. The process of cultural adaptation of the questionnaires was compliant with the guidelines of International Quality of Life Assessment (IQOLA) Project. In the first stage, two independent translators converted the originals into Polish. Stage two, consisted of a comparison of the originals and two translated versions. During that stage, the team of two translators and authors of the project identified differences in those translations and created a combination of the two. In the third stage, two independent translators, who were native speakers of German, translated the adjusted version of the Polish translation into the language of the original document. At the last stage, a commission composed of: specialists in orthopedics, translators, a statistician and a psychologist reviewed all translations and drafted a pre-final version of the questionnaires. Thirty-five adolescent girls with idiopathic scoliosis who were treated with Cheneau brace were subjected to the questionnaire assessment. All patients were treated in an out-patient setting by a specialist in orthopedics at the Chair and Clinic of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Median age of patients was 14.8 SD 1.5, median value of the Cobb's angle was 27.8 degrees SD 7.4. 48.6% of patients had thoracic scoliosis, 31.4% had thoracolumbar scoliosis, and 20% patients had lumbar scoliosis. Median results obtained by means of the Polish version of BSSQ-Brace and BSSQ-Deformity questionnaires were 17.9 SD 5.0 and 11.3 SD 4.7, respectively. Internal consistency of BSSQ-Brace and BSSQ-Deformity was at the level of 0.80 and 0.87, whereas the value of

  13. Usual Dietary Intakes: NHANES Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI developed a new instrument called the NHANES Food Frequency Questionnaire (formerly called Food Propensity Questionnaire) and supported its application in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

  14. Estimates of Fakeability on the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Robert; Wudel, Pam

    1979-01-01

    The fakeability of scales on the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire was estimated with a homogeneous sample of female undergraduates. The Questionnaire appeared to be moderately susceptible to faking, at least in the fake good condition. (Author)

  15. Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... back pain - cognitive behavioral; Backache - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Lumbar pain - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Pain - back - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Chronic back pain - low - cognitive behavioral

  16. 75 FR 79009 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Questionnaire Cognitive Interview and Pretesting (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget... agencies, as well as by academic and commercial survey organizations. There are no costs to respondents other than their time. The total estimated annualized burden hours are 600. Frequency of Response:...

  17. 76 FR 12979 - Submission for OMB Review: Comment Request; Questionnaire Cognitive Interviewing and Pretesting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ...), has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the.... Similar methodology has been adopted by other federal agencies, as well as by academic and commercial survey organizations. There are no costs to respondents other than their time. Frequency of...

  18. Development of the Seasonal Beliefs Questionnaire: A Measure of Cognitions Specific to Seasonal Affective Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Early studies indicated that SAD symptoms improved with exposure to bright light (i.e., light therapy; Lewy , Kern, Rosenthal, & Wehr, 1982...al., 1995; Terman et al., 1989). In a quantitative synthesis of the literature, Terman et al. (1989) conducted a pooled analysis from 14 research...light therapy ( Terman et al., 1989). Only 43% of participants experiencing moderate to severe SAD symptoms remitted with light therapy ( Terman et al

  19. 7 CFR 550.31 - Questionnaires and survey plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Questionnaires and survey plans. 550.31 Section 550.31... Agreements Program Management § 550.31 Questionnaires and survey plans. The Cooperator is required to submit to the REE Agency copies of questionnaires and other forms for clearance in accordance with...

  20. 78 FR 47749 - Submission of Questionnaire for OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... COMMISSION Submission of Questionnaire for OMB Review AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... request for approval of a questionnaire to the Office of Management and Budget for review. Purpose of Information Collection: The information requested by the questionnaire is for use by the Commission...

  1. Assessment of lifetime participation in cognitively stimulating activities.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert; Barnes, Lisa; Bennett, David

    2003-08-01

    Cognitively stimulating experience is thought to contribute to cognitive reserve. We constructed a questionnaire consisting of 25 items about frequency of participation in cognitive activities across the life span and administered it to two groups of older persons. The total score on the scale had high internal consistency (coefficient alpha = 0.88) and temporal stability over a 4-week re-test interval (r = 0.79), and it was positively correlated with education. In analyses controlling for age, sex, and education, more frequent cognitive activity was related to better perceptual speed, visuospatial ability, and semantic memory but not to episodic memory or working memory. The results suggest that the scale provides a psychometrically sound measure of frequency of cognitive activity across the life span.

  2. Cognitive Functioning and Work Success in Adults with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leather, Carol; Hogh, Henriette; Seiss, Ellen; Everatt, John

    2011-01-01

    Dyslexic adults completed questionnaires designed to investigate relationships between cognitive functioning, especially executive aspects, and work success. The study was designed to determine whether quantitative support could be provided for the model of adult dyslexic success derived from the work of Gerber and his colleagues (Gerber,…

  3. Hemispheric Cognitive Style: A Comparison of Three Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genovese, Jeremy E. C.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the author tested the reliability, concurrent validity, and predictive validity of three hemispheric cognitive style instruments: (a) the Preference Test (PT; R. Zenhausern, 1978), (b) the Polarity Questionnaire (PQ; B. E. Morton, 2002), and (c) the Wagner Preference Inventory II (WAPI II; R. F. Wagner & K. A. Wells, 1985).…

  4. Cognitive Presence in a Virtual Learning Community: An EFL Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad; Taghizadeh, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the existence of cognitive presence as one of the elements of the Community of Inquiry framework in virtual centers for undergraduate students of science and technology. To achieve the purpose of this study, first a questionnaire was uniquely developed on the basis of the suggestions made in the literature reviewing…

  5. Measurement of Psychological Disorders Using Cognitive Diagnosis Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Jonathan L.; Henson, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive diagnosis models are constrained (multiple classification) latent class models that characterize the relationship of questionnaire responses to a set of dichotomous latent variables. Having emanated from educational measurement, several aspects of such models seem well suited to use in psychological assessment and diagnosis. This article…

  6. Cognitive Measures of Adolescent Depression: Unique or Unitary Constructs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Silva, Susan G.; Jacobs, Rachel H.; Tonev, Simon; Hoyle, Rick H.; Kingery, Julie Newman; Reinecke, Mark A.; Curry, John F.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The factor structure of several self-report questionnaires assessing depression-relevant cognitions frequently employed in clinical research was examined in a sample of 390 adolescents (M age = 14.54; 216 girls; 74% Caucasian) with current major depressive disorder enrolled in the Treatment of Adolescents with Depression Study. A four-factor…

  7. Social-Cognitive Correlates of Aggression and Victimization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Elizabeth; Perry, David G.

    The goal of this study was to investigate the social-cognitive functioning of aggressive and victimized elementary school children. A total of 149 fourth- through seventh-graders responded to a peer nomination inventory designed to assess children's tendencies toward aggression and victimization. Self-report questionnaires were then administered…

  8. Cognition, functional status, education, and the diagnosis of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Spanish-speaking elderly.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Silvia; Gutiérrez, Luis Miguel; Villa, Antonio R; Ostrosky-Solís, Feggy

    2004-01-01

    A group of 314 Spanish-speaking elders were classified in 55 participants with mild to moderate dementia, 74 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 185 control participants, according to clinical evaluation derived. Sensitivity, specificity, and detection characteristics of frequently cognitive and functional tests were calculated in comparison with the clinical evaluation: Minimental State Examination, Brief Neuropsychological Test Battery, Short Blessed test, Pfeffer Functional Activities Questionnaire, and Blessed Dementia Scale. Influence of education on sensitivity and specificity values varied along the tests. For all the cognitive and functional measures, a great number of MCI participants who fulfilled Mayo's (Mayo's Clinical School) clinical criteria (Petersen et al., 1999) were misclassified as controls and a few were misclassified as demented. Level of education plays a very important role in both cognitive and functional assessment. The cognitive tests that are commonly used to screen demented patients may fail to detect MCI particularly in high-functioning individuals as well as those who are well educated.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Violent Experiences Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    King, Alan R; Russell, Tiffany D

    2017-02-24

    The Violent Experiences Questionnaire-Revised (VEQ-R) is a brief retrospective self-report inventory which provides estimates of annual frequencies of childhood physical abuse, sibling physical abuse, exposure to parental violence, peer bullying, and corporal punishment as they were experienced from ages 5 to 16. The VEQ-R indices rely on a frequency metric that estimates the number of days on average per year a specified class of behavior occurred over a 12year retrospective period. All scores range from a frequency of 0 to a high of 104. Scale normative data was generated from both a college (N=1266) and national (N=1290) sample to expand the research applicability of this relatively new inventory. Subscales were added to estimate the frequency of victimization during childhood, the pre-teen years, and adolescence. Four "hostility" component indices were derived from perpetrator source (parent, sibling, peer, or domestic). Thresholds were established to for High, Moderate, Low, and No Risk classifications. Subscales dimensions were found to have both adequate internal and temporal consistency. Evidence of concurrent and discriminant validity was generated using the Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scale-Short-Form(©), LONGSCAN Physical Abuse Self-Report scale, and Physical Punishment scale of the Assessing Environments III inventory.

  10. Social Reward Questionnaire (SRQ): development and validation

    PubMed Central

    Foulkes, Lucy; Viding, Essi; McCrory, Eamon; Neumann, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    Human beings seek out social interactions as a source of reward. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify different forms of social reward, and little is known about how the value of social rewards might vary between individuals. This study aimed to address both these issues by developing the Social Reward Questionnaire (SRQ), a measure of individual differences in the value of different social rewards. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was run on an initial set of 75 items (N = 305). Based on this analysis, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was then conducted on a second sample (N = 505) with a refined 23-item scale. This analysis was used to test a six-factor structure, which resulted in good model fit (CFI = 0.96, RSMEA = 0.07). The factors represent six subscales of social reward defined as follows: Admiration; Negative Social Potency; Passivity; Prosocial Interactions; Sexual Reward; and Sociability. All subscales demonstrated good test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Each subscale also showed a distinct pattern of associations with external correlates measuring personality traits, attitudes, and goals, thus demonstrating construct validity. Taken together, the findings suggest that the SRQ is a reliable, valid measure that can be used to assess individual differences in the value experienced from different social rewards. PMID:24653711

  11. Social Reward Questionnaire (SRQ): development and validation.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Lucy; Viding, Essi; McCrory, Eamon; Neumann, Craig S

    2014-01-01

    Human beings seek out social interactions as a source of reward. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify different forms of social reward, and little is known about how the value of social rewards might vary between individuals. This study aimed to address both these issues by developing the Social Reward Questionnaire (SRQ), a measure of individual differences in the value of different social rewards. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was run on an initial set of 75 items (N = 305). Based on this analysis, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was then conducted on a second sample (N = 505) with a refined 23-item scale. This analysis was used to test a six-factor structure, which resulted in good model fit (CFI = 0.96, RSMEA = 0.07). The factors represent six subscales of social reward defined as follows: Admiration; Negative Social Potency; Passivity; Prosocial Interactions; Sexual Reward; and Sociability. All subscales demonstrated good test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Each subscale also showed a distinct pattern of associations with external correlates measuring personality traits, attitudes, and goals, thus demonstrating construct validity. Taken together, the findings suggest that the SRQ is a reliable, valid measure that can be used to assess individual differences in the value experienced from different social rewards.

  12. Methamphetamine and paranoia: the methamphetamine experience questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Leamon, Martin H; Flower, Keith; Salo, Ruth E; Nordahl, Thomas E; Kranzler, Henry R; Galloway, Gantt P

    2010-01-01

    Paranoia in methamphetamine (MA) users is not well characterized or understood. To investigate this phenomenon, we created the Methamphetamine Experience Questionnaire (MEQ), and tested its reliability and validity in assessing MA-induced paranoia. We administered the MEQ to 274 MA-dependent subjects. Of the total subjects, 45% (123) first experienced paranoia with MA use; 55% did not. Obtaining or using a weapon while paranoid was common (37% and 11% of subjects with MA-induced paranoia, respectively). Test-retest and inter-rater reliability for MA-induced paranoia showed substantial agreement (kappa = .77, p < .05 and kappa = .80, p < .05, respectively). First episodes of paranoia occurred more often with intravenous use of MA, and subsequent episodes at higher doses. There was modest correlation between paranoia on the MEQ and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) paranoid ideation scale (rho = .27, p < .05). As expected, there was a poor correlation between paranoia on the MEQ and the BSI depression scale (rho = .14, p = .07). The MEQ provides useful information on drug use variables that contribute to paranoia commonly associated with MA use. (Am J Addict 2010;00:1-14).

  13. Leisure Activities and Change in Cognitive Stability: A Multivariate Approach.

    PubMed

    Mella, Nathalie; Grob, Emmanuelle; Döll, Salomé; Ghisletta, Paolo; de Ribaupierre, Anik

    2017-03-01

    Aging is traditionally associated with cognitive decline, attested by slower reaction times and poorer performance in various cognitive tasks, but also by an increase in intraindividual variability (IIV) in cognitive performance. Results concerning how lifestyle activities protect from cognitive decline are mixed in the literature and all focused on how it affects mean performance. However, IIV has been proven to be an index more sensitive to age differences, and very little is known about the relationships between lifestyle activities and change in IIV in aging. This longitudinal study explores the association between frequency of physical, social, intellectual, artistic, or cultural activities and age-related change in various cognitive abilities, considering both mean performance and IIV. Ninety-six participants, aged 64-93 years, underwent a battery of cognitive tasks at four measurements over a seven-year period, and filled out a lifestyle activity questionnaire. Linear multilevel models were used to analyze the associations between change in cognitive performance and five types of activities. Results showed that the practice of leisure activities was more strongly associated with IIV than with mean performance, both when considering overall level and change in performance. Relationships with IIV were dependent of the cognitive tasks considered and overall results showed protective effects of cultural, physical and intellectual activities on IIV. These results underline the need for considering IIV in the study of age-related cognitive change.

  14. Leisure Activities and Change in Cognitive Stability: A Multivariate Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mella, Nathalie; Grob, Emmanuelle; Döll, Salomé; Ghisletta, Paolo; de Ribaupierre, Anik

    2017-01-01

    Aging is traditionally associated with cognitive decline, attested by slower reaction times and poorer performance in various cognitive tasks, but also by an increase in intraindividual variability (IIV) in cognitive performance. Results concerning how lifestyle activities protect from cognitive decline are mixed in the literature and all focused on how it affects mean performance. However, IIV has been proven to be an index more sensitive to age differences, and very little is known about the relationships between lifestyle activities and change in IIV in aging. This longitudinal study explores the association between frequency of physical, social, intellectual, artistic, or cultural activities and age-related change in various cognitive abilities, considering both mean performance and IIV. Ninety-six participants, aged 64–93 years, underwent a battery of cognitive tasks at four measurements over a seven-year period, and filled out a lifestyle activity questionnaire. Linear multilevel models were used to analyze the associations between change in cognitive performance and five types of activities. Results showed that the practice of leisure activities was more strongly associated with IIV than with mean performance, both when considering overall level and change in performance. Relationships with IIV were dependent of the cognitive tasks considered and overall results showed protective effects of cultural, physical and intellectual activities on IIV. These results underline the need for considering IIV in the study of age-related cognitive change. PMID:28257047

  15. Examination of Variables That May Affect the Relationship Between Cognition and Functional Status in Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mcalister, Courtney; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Lamb, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to improve understanding of the heterogeneity in the relationship between cognition and functional status in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Demographic, clinical, and methodological moderators were examined. Cognition explained an average of 23% of the variance in functional outcomes. Executive function measures explained the largest amount of variance (37%), whereas global cognitive status and processing speed measures explained the least (20%). Short- and long-delayed memory measures accounted for more variance (35% and 31%) than immediate memory measures (18%), and the relationship between cognition and functional outcomes was stronger when assessed with informant-report (28%) compared with self-report (21%). Demographics, sample characteristics, and type of everyday functioning measures (i.e., questionnaire, performance-based) explained relatively little variance compared with cognition. Executive functioning, particularly measured by Trails B, was a strong predictor of everyday functioning in individuals with MCI. A large proportion of variance remained unexplained by cognition.

  16. Cognitive problems following hematopoietic stem cell transplant: relationships with sleep, depression and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Ghazikhanian, S E; Dorfman, C S; Somers, T J; O'Sullivan, M L; Fisher, H M; Edmond, S N; Wren, A A; Kelleher, S A; Rowe Nichols, K A; Chao, N; Shelby, R A

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive problems are a significant, persistent concern for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Sleep is important for many cognitive tasks; however, the relationship between sleep and cognitive problems for HSCT patients is unknown. This study examined the relationship between sleep and cognitive problems for HSCT patients from pre to post transplant. Patients undergoing HSCT (N=138) completed questionnaires at pre-transplant and during the 12 months following transplant. Questionnaires assessed sleep and cognitive problems as well as commonly co-occurring symptoms: depressive symptoms, fatigue and pain. Post hoc analyses examined the relationship of specific sleep problems with cognitive problems. Sleep problems covaried with cognitive problems even after controlling for depressive symptoms, fatigue and pain. Depressive symptoms and fatigue were also uniquely related to cognitive problems. Post hoc analyses suggest that sleep somnolence, shortness of breath, snoring and perceptions of inadequate sleep may contribute to the association found between sleep and cognitive problems. Findings suggest that sleep problems are associated with and may contribute to cognitive problems for HSCT patients. However, sleep problems are rarely screened for or discussed during clinic visits. Assessing and treating specific sleep problems in addition to depressive symptoms and fatigue may have implications for improving cognitive problems for HSCT patients.

  17. Cognitive Levels Matching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Martin; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The Cognitive Levels Matching Project trains teachers to guide students' skill acquisition and problem-solving processes by assessing students' cognitive levels and adapting their teaching materials accordingly. (MLF)

  18. Developing questionnaires for educational research: AMEE Guide No. 87.

    PubMed

    Artino, Anthony R; La Rochelle, Jeffrey S; Dezee, Kent J; Gehlbach, Hunter

    2014-06-01

    In this AMEE Guide, we consider the design and development of self-administered surveys, commonly called questionnaires. Questionnaires are widely employed in medical education research. Unfortunately, the processes used to develop such questionnaires vary in quality and lack consistent, rigorous standards. Consequently, the quality of the questionnaires used in medical education research is highly variable. To address this problem, this AMEE Guide presents a systematic, seven-step process for designing high-quality questionnaires, with particular emphasis on developing survey scales. These seven steps do not address all aspects of survey design, nor do they represent the only way to develop a high-quality questionnaire. Instead, these steps synthesize multiple survey design techniques and organize them into a cohesive process for questionnaire developers of all levels. Addressing each of these steps systematically will improve the probabilities that survey designers will accurately measure what they intend to measure.

  19. Cognitive psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, P. K.; Sivakumar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive deficits have been shown to exist in various psychiatric disorders. Though most Indian studies pertaining to cognition have been replication studies, well designed original studies have also been conducted. This article traces the evolution of cognitive psychiatry in India. Cognitive research has huge potential in India and can help us unravel mysteries of the human mind, identify etiopathogenesis and facilitate treatment of psychiatric disorders. PMID:21836668

  20. Mapping Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Rosen, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Cognitive functions are fundamental to being human. Although tremendous progress has been made in the science of cognition using neuroimaging, the clinical applications of neuroimaging are just beginning to be realized. A unifying theme of this chapter is the concept that a more complete understanding of cognition only comes through integration of multimodal structural and functional imaging technologies. PMID:17983964

  1. The Cognitive Doppler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozoil, Micah E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the learning needs of students in the concrete operational stage in mathematics. Identifies the phenomenon of reduced cognitive performance in an out-of-class environment as the "Cognitive Doppler." Suggests methods of reducing the pronounced effects of the Cognitive Doppler by capitalizing on the students' ability to memorize…

  2. Interactive Team Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team…

  3. The Tractable Cognition Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooij, Iris

    2008-01-01

    The recognition that human minds/brains are finite systems with limited resources for computation has led some researchers to advance the "Tractable Cognition thesis": Human cognitive capacities are constrained by computational tractability. This thesis, if true, serves cognitive psychology by constraining the space of computational-level theories…

  4. Handbook of Spatial Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, David, Ed.; Nadel, Lynn, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial cognition is a branch of cognitive psychology that studies how people acquire and use knowledge about their environment to determine where they are, how to obtain resources, and how to find their way home. Researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including neuroscience, cognition, and sociology, have discovered a great deal about how…

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Social Anxiety - Acceptance and Action Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Esmail; Bahrainian, Seyed Abdolmajid; Masjedi Arani, Abbas; Farhoudian, Ali; Gachkar, Latif

    2016-01-01

    Background Social anxiety disorder is often related to specific impairment or distress in different areas of life, including occupational, social and family settings. Objective The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the persian version of the social anxiety-acceptance and action questionnaire (SA-AAQ) in university students. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 324 students from Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences participated via the cluster sampling method during year 2015. Factor analysis by the principle component analysis method, internal consistency analysis, and convergent and divergent validity were conducted to examine the validity of the SA-AAQ. To calculate the reliability of the SA-AAQ, Cronbach’s alpha and test-retest reliability were used. Results The results from factor analysis by principle component analysis method yielded three factors that were named acceptance, action and non-judging of experience. The three-factor solution explained 51.82% of the variance. Evidence for the internal consistency of SA-AAQ was obtained via calculating correlations between SA-AAQ and its subscales. Support for convergent and discriminant validity of the SA-AAQ via its correlations with the acceptance and action questionnaire - II, social interaction anxiety scale, cognitive fusion questionnaire, believability of anxious feelings and thoughts questionnaire, valued living questionnaire and WHOQOL- BREF was obtained. The reliability of the SA-AAQ via calculating Cronbach’s alpha and test-retest coefficients yielded values of 0.84 and 0.84, respectively. Conclusions The Iranian version of the SA-AAQ has acceptable levels of psychometric properties in university students. The SA-AAQ is a valid and reliable measure to be utilized in research investigations and therapeutic interventions. PMID:27803719

  6. Parents' job insecurity affects children's academic performance through cognitive difficulties.

    PubMed

    Barling, J; Zacharatos, A; Hepburn, C G

    1999-06-01

    The authors developed and tested a model in which children who perceive their parents to be insecure about their jobs are distracted cognitively, which in turn affects their academic performance negatively. Participants were 102 female and 18 male undergraduates (mean age = 18 years), their fathers (mean age = 49 years), and their mothers (mean age = 47 years). Students completed questionnaires measuring perceived parental job insecurity, identification with parents, and cognitive difficulties; 3 months later, they also reported their midyear grades. Fathers and mothers each completed questionnaires assessing their job insecurity. Support for the model was obtained using LISREL 8, and as predicted, children's identification with their mothers and fathers moderated the relationship between their perceptions of their mothers' and fathers' job insecurity and their own cognitive difficulties.

  7. Screening for cognitive impairment in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, C.; Kozak, J.; Elmslie, T.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the extent and type of screening for cognitive impairment primary care physicians use for their elderly patients, to identify perceived barriers to screening, and to explore whether physicians would be willing to use the clock drawing test as a cognitive screening tool. DESIGN: Mailed questionnaire. SETTING: Primary care practices in the Ottawa-Carleton region. PARTICIPANTS: Family physicians and general practitioners culled from the Yellow Pages and Canadian Medical Directory; 368 of 568 questionnaires were returned for a response rate of 70%. Six respondents had fewer than 30 patients weekly and two responded too late to be included in the analysis; 360 cases were included in the analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Responses to 10 questions on cognitive screening and five on demographics and the nature of respondents' practices. RESULTS: About 80% of respondents reported doing at least one mental status examination during the past year. Only 24% routinely screened patients, although 82% believed screening was needed. Major barriers to cognitive screening were lack of time, risk of offending patients, and possible negative consequences of follow up. Clock drawing was perceived as an acceptable method of screening, if it were proven effective. CONCLUSIONS: Most primary care physicians believe cognitive screening is needed, but few routinely screen their elderly patients. Lack of time is the most important perceived barrier to screening. Primary care physicians are receptive to using the clock drawing test, and, because it is not time-consuming, are less likely to consider lack of time a barrier to testing. The clock test might help bridge the gap between perceived need for screening and actual screening. PMID:9356757

  8. Validation of the Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Grudell, A B M; Alexander, J A; Enders, F B; Pacifico, R; Fredericksen, M; Wise, J L; Locke, G R; Arora, A; Zais, T; Talley, N J; Romero, Y

    2007-01-01

    While multiple instruments characterize upper gastrointestinal symptoms, a validated instrument devoted to the measurement of a spectrum of esophageal dysphagia attributes is not available. Therefore, we constructed and validated the Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire (MDQ). The 27 items of the MDQ underwent content validity, feasibility, concurrent validity, reproducibility, internal consistency, and construct validity testing. To assess content validity, five esophageal subspecialty gastroenterologists reviewed the items to ensure inclusion of pertinent domains. Feasibility testing was done with eight outpatients who refined problematic items. To assess concurrent validity, 70 patient responses on the MDQ were compared to responses gathered in a structured patient-physician interview. A separate group of 70 outpatients completed the MDQ twice to assess the reproducibility of each item. A total of 148 patients participated in the validation process (78 [53%] men; mean age 62). On average, the MDQ took 6 minutes to complete. A single item (odynophagia) tested poorly with a kappa value of <0.4. Otherwise, the majority of concurrent validity kappa values were in the good to excellent range with a mean of 0.63 (95% CI 0.22-0.89). The majority of reproducibility kappa values were also in the good to excellent range with a median kappa value of 0.76 (interquartile range: 0.67-0.81). Cronbach's alpha values were excellent in the range of 0.86-0.88. Spearman rank correlation coefficients to assess construct validity were also excellent in the range of 0.87-0.98. Thus, the MDQ is a concise instrument that demonstrates overall excellent concurrent validity, reproducibility, internal consistency, and construct validity for the features of esophageal dysphagia.

  9. Dysautonomia in Narcolepsy: Evidence by Questionnaire Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gilles; Vaillant, Michel; Pieri, Vannina; Fink, Gereon R.; Diederich, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Excessive daytime sleepiness and sudden sleep attacks are the main features of narcolepsy, but rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), hyposmia, and depression can also occur. The latter symptoms are nonmotor features in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). In the present study, IPD-proven diagnostic tools were tested to determine whether they are also applicable in the assessment of narcolepsy. Methods This was a case-control study comparing 15 patients with narcolepsy (PN) and 15 control subjects (CS) using the Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Autonomic Test (SCOPA-AUT), Parkinson's Disease Nonmotor Symptoms (PDNMS), University of Pennsylvania Smell Test, Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue test, Beck Depression Inventory, and the RBD screening questionnaire. Results Both the PN and CS exhibited mild hyposmia and no deficits in visual tests. Frequent dysautonomia in all domains except sexuality was found for the PN. The total SCOPA-AUT score was higher for the PN (18.47±10.08, mean±SD) than for the CS (4.40±3.09), as was the PDNMS score (10.53±4.78 and 1.80±2.31, respectively). RBD was present in 87% of the PN and 0% of the CS. The PN were more depressed than the CS. The differences between the PN and CS for all of these variables were statistically significant (all p<0.05). Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence for the presence of dysautonomia and confirm the comorbidities of depression and RBD in narcolepsy patients. The spectrum, which is comparable to the nonmotor complex in IPD, suggests wide-ranging, clinically detectable dysfunction beyond the narcoleptic core syndrome. PMID:25324880

  10. Translation and adaptation of an international questionnaire to measure usage of complementary and alternative medicine (I-CAM-G)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The growing body of data on prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) usage means there is a need to standardize measurement on an international level. An international team has published a questionnaire (I-CAM-Q), but no validation has yet been provided. The aim of the present study was to provide a German measurement instrument for CAM usage (I-CAM-G) which closely resembles the original English version, and to assess it’s performance in two potential samples for measuring CAM usage. Methods The English I-CAM-Q questionnaire was translated into German, and adapted slightly. The resulting I-CAM-G questionnaire was then pre-tested on 16 healthy volunteers, and 12 cognitive interviews were carried out. The questionnaire was employed in a sample of breast cancer patients (N = 92, paper and pencil), and a sample from the general population (N = 210, internet survey). Descriptive analyses of items and missing data, as well as results from the cognitive interviews, are presented in this paper. Results The translated questionnaire had to be adapted to be consistent with the German health care system. All items were comprehensible, whereby some items were unambiguous (e.g. CAM use yes/no, helpfulness), while others gave rise to ambiguous answers (e.g. reasons for CAM use), or high rates of missing data (e.g. number of times the CAM modality had been used during the last 3 months). 78% of the breast cancer patients and up to 85% of a sample of the general population had used some form of CAM. Conclusions Following methodologically sound and comprehensive translation, adaptation and assessment processes using recognized translation procedures, cognitive interviews, and studying the performance of the questionnaire in two samples, we arrived at a German questionnaire for measuring CAM use which is comparable with the international (English) version. The questionnaire appropriately measures CAM use, with some items being more appropriate

  11. Validation of a questionnaire to measure mastery motivation among Chinese preschool children.

    PubMed

    Leung, Cynthia; Lo, S K

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a questionnaire on mastery motivation (task and effort) for use with Chinese preschool children in Hong Kong. A parent version and a teacher version were developed and evaluated. Participants included 457 children (230 boys and 227 girls) aged four and five years old, their preschool teachers and their parents. Further, 44 children (39 boys and 5 girls) with developmental disabilities were recruited. The children were assessed on the cognitive sub-test of the Preschool Development Assessment Scale (PDAS). Their parents completed the task and effort motivation scales, as well as the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Their teachers also completed the task and effort motivation scales. Rasch analysis results provided support for the unidimensionality of the parent and teacher versions of the two motivation scales. The parent and teacher versions of the two motivation scales correlated positively with the PDAS cognitive sub-test and the SDQ prosocial scale scores, and negatively with the SDQ total problem behavior scores. Children with developmental disabilities were assigned lower scores by their teachers and parents on the two motivation scales, compared with children with typical development. Reliability (Cronbach's Alpha) of the parent and teacher versions of the two motivation scales were above .70. The results suggested that the task and effort motivation scales were promising instruments for the assessment of motivation among Chinese preschool children.

  12. Translation into Portuguese of questionnaires to assess knee injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Guilherme; de Castro, Lisaura Veiga; Wageck, Bruna; Kume, Vanessa; Chiesa, Gabriela Sulzbach; de Noronha, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to review the quality of the translation and the measurement properties from questionnaires that assess injuries of the knee. We included questionnaires that were developed in foreign language and have been translated and validated into Portuguese. The databases used were CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, LILACS, PUBMED and SCIELO and the final search resulted in a total of 868 studies included, from which 16 were eligible. Most included questionnaires presented all steps expected in a translation process; however there were some deficiencies in measurement properties among the questionnaires. The VISA-P Brazil was the best questionnaire when analyzing translation process and measurement properties tested. It was the only questionnaire that tested all measurement properties investigated and presented adequate values for all of them. KOS-ADLS was the best questionnaire translated to Portuguese from Portugal. Among all, the VISA-P Brazil is the best questionnaire to be used with Brazilian Portuguese speakers when the condition is related to patellar tendinopathy and the LEFS is the best questionnaire for other general conditions of the knee. For Portuguese from Portugal, the best questionnaire is the KOS-ADLS, and like the LEFS it does not target any specific injury. PMID:24453685

  13. Measuring asthma control. Clinic questionnaire or daily diary?

    PubMed

    Juniper, E F; O'Byrne, P M; Ferrie, P J; King, D R; Roberts, J N

    2000-10-01

    Daily symptom, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), and medication diaries are often used in clinical trials of treatments for asthma on the assumption that they provide a better estimate of clinical status than does a questionnaire completed in the clinic. We conducted a study with the aim of comparing the measurement properties of the clinic-completed Asthma Control Questionnaire with those of the Asthma Control Diary. The diary is composed of questions and response options almost identical to those of the questionnaire, but uses PEFR instead of FEV(1) as the measure of airway caliber. In an observational study, 50 adults with symptomatic asthma attended a McMaster University asthma clinic at 0, 1, 5, and 9 wk to complete the Asthma Control Questionnaire and other measures of asthma status. For 1 wk before each follow-up visit, patients completed the Asthma Control Diary every morning and evening. Concordance between the questionnaire and diary was high (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.87). Both reliability (ICC: questionnaire = 0.90; diary = 0.86) and responsiveness (responsiveness index: questionnaire = 1.06; diary = 0.90; p = 0.005) were better with the questionnaire than with the diary. Correlations between the two instruments and other measures of clinical asthma status were similar and close to a priori predictions. Both the Asthma Control Questionnaire and the Asthma Control Diary are valid instruments for measuring asthma control, but the questionnaire has slightly better discriminative and evaluative measurement properties than does the diary.

  14. Methodology Series Module 8: Designing Questionnaires and Clinical Record Forms

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2017-01-01

    As researchers, we often collect data on a clinical record form or a questionnaire. It is an important part of study design. If the questionnaire is not well designed, the data collected will not be useful. In this section of the module, we have discussed some practical aspects of designing a questionnaire. It is useful to make a list of all the variables that will be assessed in the study before preparing the questionnaire. The researcher should review all the existing questionnaires. It may be efficient to use an existing standardized questionnaire or scale. Many of these scales are freely available and may be used with an appropriate reference. However, some may be under copyright protection and permissions may be required to use the same questionnaire. While designing their own questionnaire, researchers may use open- or close-ended questions. It is important to design the responses appropriately as the format of responses will influence the analysis. Sometimes, one can collect the same information in multiple ways - continuous or categorical response. Besides these, the researcher can also use visual analog scales or Likert's scale in the questionnaire. Some practical take-home points are: (1) Use specific language while framing the questions; (2) write detailed instructions in the questionnaire; (3) use mutually exclusive response categories; (4) use skip patterns; (5) avoid double-barreled questions; and (6) anchor the time period if required.

  15. Extended spider cognition.

    PubMed

    Japyassú, Hilton F; Laland, Kevin N

    2017-02-07

    There is a tension between the conception of cognition as a central nervous system (CNS) process and a view of cognition as extending towards the body or the contiguous environment. The centralised conception requires large or complex nervous systems to cope with complex environments. Conversely, the extended conception involves the outsourcing of information processing to the body or environment, thus making fewer demands on the processing power of the CNS. The evolution of extended cognition should be particularly favoured among small, generalist predators such as spiders, and here, we review the literature to evaluate the fit of empirical data with these contrasting models of cognition. Spiders do not seem to be cognitively limited, displaying a large diversity of learning processes, from habituation to contextual learning, including a sense of numerosity. To tease apart the central from the extended cognition, we apply the mutual manipulability criterion, testing the existence of reciprocal causal links between the putative elements of the system. We conclude that the web threads and configurations are integral parts of the cognitive systems. The extension of cognition to the web helps to explain some puzzling features of spider behaviour and seems to promote evolvability within the group, enhancing innovation through cognitive connectivity to variable habitat features. Graded changes in relative brain size could also be explained by outsourcing information processing to environmental features. More generally, niche-constructed structures emerge as prime candidates for extending animal cognition, generating the selective pressures that help to shape the evolving cognitive system.

  16. The tractable cognition thesis.

    PubMed

    Van Rooij, Iris

    2008-09-01

    The recognition that human minds/brains are finite systems with limited resources for computation has led some researchers to advance the Tractable Cognition thesis: Human cognitive capacities are constrained by computational tractability. This thesis, if true, serves cognitive psychology by constraining the space of computational-level theories of cognition. To utilize this constraint, a precise and workable definition of "computational tractability" is needed. Following computer science tradition, many cognitive scientists and psychologists define computational tractability as polynomial-time computability, leading to the P-Cognition thesis. This article explains how and why the P-Cognition thesis may be overly restrictive, risking the exclusion of veridical computational-level theories from scientific investigation. An argument is made to replace the P-Cognition thesis by the FPT-Cognition thesis as an alternative formalization of the Tractable Cognition thesis (here, FPT stands for fixed-parameter tractable). Possible objections to the Tractable Cognition thesis, and its proposed formalization, are discussed, and existing misconceptions are clarified.

  17. [Normal aging and cognition].

    PubMed

    Ska, Bernadette; Joanette, Yves

    2006-03-01

    It is now well documented that normal aging modifies the cognitive functioning and most observations suggest that cognition evolves in the direction of deterioration. The more frequently impaired functions are memory, attention and visual-spatial abilities. On the other hand, some abilities seem to increase, such as vocabulary. Considering the aging effect on cognition, questions remain regarding directionality, universality and reversibility. A great variability in aged related impacts is observed among subjects and among cognitive domains. Some individuals evolved more rapidly than others. Some cognitive functions are more affected by aging than others. General and specific factors are hypothesized to explain the aged related cognitive decline. Among them, educational level, health, cognitive style, life style, personality, are likely to modulate the aged related cognitive evolution by influencing attentional resources and cerebral plasticity. Cognitive resources are essential to develop adaptative strategies. During the life span, resources are activated and increased by learning and training. Considering the role of cognitive resources, successful aging is dependent on several conditions : absence of disease leading to a loss of autonomy, maintenance of cognitive and physical activities, and active and social engaged lifestyle.

  18. Poor cognitive flexibility, and the experience thereof, in a subclinical sample of female students with obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sternheim, Lot; van der Burgh, Maureen; Berkhout, Lotte J; Dekker, Maria R; Ruiter, Channah

    2014-12-01

    Research indicates that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have poor cognitive flexibility. However, studies have largely focused on actual abilities and while individuals' emotional responses may be just as important, little is known about how those with OCD experience a situation that requires cognitive flexibility. It is furthermore largely unknown whether cognitive flexibility may also be important for people with OCD symptoms, rather than only to those with full blown disorders. This study investigates the relationship between cognitive flexibility, and the experience thereof in female students with and without OCD symptoms. It was expected that poor cognitive flexibility would be positively associated to OCD symptoms, and that those with OCD symptoms would display poor cognitive flexibility, and experience situations requiring cognitive flexibility as more difficult, than those without OCD symptoms. Participants completed a measure for OCD symptoms, a neuropsychological task to measure cognitive flexibility, and a self-report measure assessing emotional experience of situations requiring cognitive flexibility. Positive associations between OCD symptoms and both poor cognitive flexibility and negative experience of situations requiring cognitive flexibility were found. Furthermore, those with OCD symptoms performed poorer on the cognitive flexibility task than those without OCD symptoms, and reported higher scores on the cognitive inflexibility questionnaire. Results confirm a relation between OCD symptoms and poor cognitive flexibility in a subclinical sample and identify a relation between OCD symptoms and a negative experience of situations that require cognitive flexibility. Overall findings suggest that poor cognitive flexibility may be an important part of OCD symptomatology.

  19. Comparative cognition for conservationists

    PubMed Central

    Greggor, Alison L.; Clayton, Nicola S.; Phalan, Ben; Thornton, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Every animal occupies a unique cognitive world based on its sensory capacities, and attentional and learning biases. Behaviour results from the interaction of this cognitive world with the environment. As humans alter environments, cognitive processes ranging from perceptual processes to learned behaviour govern animals’ reactions. By harnessing animals’ perceptual biases and applying insights from cognitive theory, we can purposefully alter cues to reduce maladaptive responses and shape behaviour. Despite the fundamental connection between cognition and behaviour, the breadth of cognitive theory is underutilised in conservation practice. Bridging these disciplines could augment existing conservation efforts targeting animal behaviour. We outline relevant principles of perception and learning, and develop a step-by-step process for applying aspects of cognition towards specific conservation issues. PMID:25043737

  20. Predicting Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Subtypes Using Cognitive Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Zahra; Mohammadi, Nourollah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies have emphasized the important role of cognitive beliefs in etiology and maintenance of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). OCD has different subtypes, but the specific role of cognitive beliefs in OCD symptomatology is not clear. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the cognitive factors proposed by Obsessive Compulsive Cognitions Working Group (OCCWG) could specifically predict subtypes of OCD. Method: The question was investigated in a sample of 208 university students (mean age = 21, SD = 1.6). The target population was selected by cluster sampling. All participants completed two questionnaires including Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire (OBQ-44) and Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. Results: Regression analysis demonstrated that “responsibility/ threat over estimation” was a significant predictor of obsessive and compulsive behaviors and predicted washing, checking, obsessing, hoarding, and neutralizing subtypes of OCD. Furthermore, “perfectionism and intolerance of uncertainty” was the most significant predictor of ordering and hoarding while “importance/ control of thought” predicted ordering only. Conclusion: This study found evidence in support of Salkovskis’ cognitive theory about the central role of inflated responsibility beliefs in developing different subtypes of OCD. Besides, the results revealed those other cognitive beliefs had less important role in the development of OCD symptoms. PMID:27437003

  1. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Laura; Jenkinson, Crispin; Dummett, Sarah; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Morley, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13) were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and to assess its psychometric properties. The final instrument is intended for use in clinical trials and interventions targeted at maintaining or improving activity and participation. PMID:26056503

  2. Diagnostic accuracy for major depression in multiple sclerosis using self-report questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Anja; Fischer, Marcus; Nicholls, Robert A; Lau, Stephanie; Poettgen, Jana; Patas, Kostas; Heesen, Christoph; Gold, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis and major depressive disorder frequently co-occur but depression often remains undiagnosed in this population. Self-rated depression questionnaires are a good option where clinician-based standardized diagnostics are not feasible. However, there is a paucity of data on diagnostic accuracy of self-report measures for depression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Moreover, head-to-head comparisons of common questionnaires are largely lacking. This could be particularly relevant for high-risk patients with depressive symptoms. Here, we compare the diagnostic accuracy of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and 30-item version of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Rated (IDS-SR30) for major depressive disorder (MSS) against diagnosis by a structured clinical interview. Methods Patients reporting depressive symptoms completed the BDI, the IDS-SR30 and underwent diagnostic assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, M.I.N.I.). Receiver-Operating Characteristic analyses were performed, providing error estimates and false-positive/negative rates of suggested thresholds. Results Data from n = 31 MS patients were available. BDI and IDS-SR30 total score were significantly correlated (r = 0.82). The IDS-SR30total score, cognitive subscore, and BDI showed excellent to good accuracy (area under the curve (AUC) 0.86, 0.91, and 0.85, respectively). Conclusion Both the IDS-SR30 and the BDI are useful to quantify depressive symptoms showing good sensitivity and specificity. The IDS-SR30 cognitive subscale may be useful as a screening tool and to quantify affective/cognitive depressive symptomatology. PMID:26445703

  3. Utility of brief questionnaires of health-related quality of life (Airways Questionnaire 20 and Clinical COPD Questionnaire) to predict exacerbations in patients with asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is some evidence that quality of life measured by long disease-specific questionnaires may predict exacerbations in asthma and COPD, however brief quality of life tools, such as the Airways Questionnaire 20 (AQ20) or the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), have not yet been evaluated as predictors of hospital exacerbations. Objectives To determine the ability of brief specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires (AQ20 and CCQ) to predict emergency department visits (ED) and hospitalizations in patients with asthma and COPD, and to compare them to longer disease-specific questionnaires, such as the St George´s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ) and the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). Methods We conducted a two-year prospective cohort study of 208 adult patients (108 asthma, 100 COPD). Baseline sociodemographic, clinical, functional and psychological variables were assessed. All patients completed the AQ20 and the SGRQ. COPD patients also completed the CCQ and the CRQ, while asthmatic patients completed the AQLQ. We registered all exacerbations that required ED or hospitalizations in the follow-up period. Differences between groups (zero ED visits or hospitalizations versus ≥ 1 ED visits or hospitalizations) were tested with Pearson´s X2 or Fisher´s exact test for categorical variables, ANOVA for normally distributed continuous variables, and Mann–Whitney U test for non-normally distributed variables. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the predictive ability of each HRQoL questionnaire. Results In the first year of follow-up, the AQ20 scores predicted both ED visits (OR: 1.19; p = .004; AUC 0.723) and hospitalizations (OR: 1.21; p = .04; AUC 0.759) for asthma patients, and the CCQ emerged as independent predictor of ED visits in COPD patients (OR: 1.06; p = .036; AUC 0.651), after adjusting for sociodemographic, clinical, and

  4. Comparison of questionnaires determining patient satisfaction with medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J G; Tugwell, P

    1987-01-01

    This study compares the results of previously developed patient satisfaction questionnaires which quantitatively assessed the personal attitudes of 59 patients toward their medical care. These patients, hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction, were admitted to the intensive care unit of a community hospital in southern Ontario, Canada. The questionnaires were completed by these patients at four and six months post-myocardial infarction. This quantitative assessment of patient satisfaction, as indicated by Hulka and Ware questionnaires, provided data to compare the relative effectiveness of these questionnaires in measuring satisfaction. Generally, these questionnaires were reliable (r = .64, r = .59) and evidence of criterion concurrent validity was noted (r = .75-.81). Both questionnaires have comparable results concerning the prevalence of dissatisfaction (0-7 percent). PMID:3692863

  5. Different Dimensions of Cognitive Style in Typical and Atypical Cognition: New Evidence and a New Measurement Tool

    PubMed Central

    Mealor, Andy D.; Simner, Julia; Rothen, Nicolas; Carmichael, Duncan A.; Ward, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    We developed the Sussex Cognitive Styles Questionnaire (SCSQ) to investigate visual and verbal processing preferences and incorporate global/local processing orientations and systemising into a single, comprehensive measure. In Study 1 (N = 1542), factor analysis revealed six reliable subscales to the final 60 item questionnaire: Imagery Ability (relating to the use of visual mental imagery in everyday life); Technical/Spatial (relating to spatial mental imagery, and numerical and technical cognition); Language & Word Forms; Need for Organisation; Global Bias; and Systemising Tendency. Thus, we replicate previous findings that visual and verbal styles are separable, and that types of imagery can be subdivided. We extend previous research by showing that spatial imagery clusters with other abstract cognitive skills, and demonstrate that global/local bias can be separated from systemising. Study 2 validated the Technical/Spatial and Language & Word Forms factors by showing that they affect performance on memory tasks. In Study 3, we validated Imagery Ability, Technical/Spatial, Language & Word Forms, Global Bias, and Systemising Tendency by issuing the SCSQ to a sample of synaesthetes (N = 121) who report atypical cognitive profiles on these subscales. Thus, the SCSQ consolidates research from traditionally disparate areas of cognitive science into a comprehensive cognitive style measure, which can be used in the general population, and special populations. PMID:27191169

  6. Psychometric assessment of the Chinese version of the brief illness perception questionnaire in breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Inda; Chan, Karen K. K.; Lee, Conrad; Ng, Alice; Sze, Wing Kin; Tsang, Janice; Lee, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Objective The eight-item Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) supposedly evaluates cognitive and emotional representations of illness. This study examined the validity and reliability of a traditional Chinese version of the B-IPQ in Hong Kong Chinese breast cancer survivors. Methods 358 Chinese breast cancer survivors who had recently ended their primary treatment completed this B-IPQ Chinese version. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) tested the factor structure. The internal consistency, construct, predictive and convergent validities of the scale were assessed. Results CFA revealed that the original three-factor (cognitive-emotional representations and illness comprehensibility) structure of the B-IPQ poorly fitted our sample. After deleting one item measuring illness coherence, seven-item gave an optimal two-factor (cognitive-emotional representations) structure for the B-IPQ (B-IPQ-7). Cronbach’s alpha for the two subscales were 0.653 and 0.821, and for the overall seven-item scale of B-IPQ was 0.783. Correlations of illness perception and physical symptom distress, anxiety, depression and known-group comparison between different treatment status suggested acceptable construct validity. The association between baseline illness perception and psychological distress at 3-month follow up supported predictive validity. Conclusions B-IPQ-7 appears to be a moderately valid measure of illness perception in cancer population, potentially useful for assessing illness representations in Chinese women with breast cancer. PMID:28319160

  7. Development and validation of the Emotional Self-Awareness Questionnaire: a measure of emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Killian, Kyle D

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the psychometric characteristics of the Emotional Self-Awareness Questionnaire (ESQ), a self-report measure of emotional intelligence. The ESQ, Emotional Intelligence Scale, and measures of alexithymia, positive negative affect, personality, cognitive ability, life satisfaction, and leadership aspirations were administered to 1,406 undergraduate psychology students. The ESQ was reduced from 118 to 60 items via factor and reliability analyses, retaining 11 subscales and a normal score distribution with a reliability of .92. The ESQ had significant positive correlations with the Emotional Intelligence Test and positive affect, significant negative correlations with alexithymia and negative affect, and an insignificant correlation with cognitive ability. The ESQ accounted for 35% of the variance in life satisfaction over and above the Big Five, cognitive ability, and self-esteem, and demonstrated incremental validity in explaining GPA and leadership aspirations. The significance of emotional intelligence as a unique contributor to psychological well-being and performance, and applications for the ESQ in assessment and outcome research in couple and family therapy are discussed.

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Questionnaire Measure of Managerial Stigma Towards Employee Depression.

    PubMed

    Martin, Angela J; Giallo, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    Managers' attitudes play a key role in how organizations respond to employees with depression. We examine the measurement properties of a questionnaire designed to assess managerial stigma towards employees with depression. Using data from a sample of 469 Australian managers representing a wide range of industries and work settings, we conducted a confirmatory factor analysis to assess three proposed subscales representing affective, cognitive and behavioural forms of stigma. Results were equivocal indicating acceptable fit for two-factor (affective and cognitive + behavioural), three-factor (affective, cognitive and behavioural) and higher order models. Failure to demonstrate the discriminant validity of the cognitive and behavioural dimensions, even though they are theoretically distinct, suggests that further work on the scale is warranted. These results provide an extension to the psychometric profile of this measure (exploratory factor analysis; Martin, ). Development of strategies to operationalize this construct will benefit occupational health research and practice, particularly in interventions that aim to reduce the stigma of mental health issues in the workplace or where managers' attitudes are a key mechanism in intervention efficacy. We encourage future research on this measure pertaining in particular to further enhancing all aspects of its construct validity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Cognitive complaints in cancer: The French version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function (FACT-Cog), normative data from a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Lange, Marie; Heutte, Natacha; Morel, Nastassja; Eustache, Francis; Joly, Florence; Giffard, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Cancer patients often report cognitive changes after chemotherapy. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function (FACT-Cog) is a self-report questionnaire that assesses these changes. The aims of the present study were (1) to establish normative data, and (2) to compare the scores of patients and healthy controls to assess whether or not the questionnaire is able to discriminate between these populations. The normative sample included 213 healthy participants. The patient group included 63 cancer patients treated with chemotherapy, who were compared to a subsample of 63 matched healthy controls. The questionnaire had good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alphas = .74-.91). The oldest patients had significantly more cognitive complaints (p < .001). Cognitive complaints were significantly related with Trail Making Test scores (p < .001). Furthermore, the FACT-Cog subscales correlated significantly with anxiety and depression. Patients had more complaints than matched controls on the subscales Perceived Cognitive Impairments (p = .01), Impact on Quality of Life (p = .001) and Perceived Cognitive Abilities (p = .027). The reference values from the healthy population reported here could be used for comparison with the values measured in French-speaking cancer patients. The values provide a benchmark against which clinicians can evaluate the impact of the disease and/or the treatments on cognitive complaints and help to improve quality of life by providing appropriate care.

  10. Development and validation of the Eating Maturity Questionnaire: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Potocka, Adrianna; Najder, Anna

    2016-10-01

    This article describes the development of the Eating Maturity Questionnaire, a self-reported measurement of eating maturity that initiates and gives direction to human eating behaviors. The Eating Maturity Questionnaire was designed to study individuals' biological and psychosocial motives for eating. The Eating Maturity Questionnaire is a 21-item tool with satisfactory psychometric values (Cronbach's α coefficients between 0.83 and 0.88) consisting of two subscales: Rational Eating and Psychosocial Maturity Eating Maturity Questionnaire results may be used to design programs that target eating behaviors and body mass modification.

  11. Syntax for calculation of discounting indices from the monetary choice questionnaire and probability discounting questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua C; Amlung, Michael T; Palmer, Abraham A; MacKillop, James

    2016-09-01

    The 27-item Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ; Kirby, Petry, & Bickel, 1999) and 30-item Probability Discounting Questionnaire (PDQ; Madden, Petry, & Johnson, 2009) are widely used, validated measures of preferences for immediate versus delayed rewards and guaranteed versus risky rewards, respectively. The MCQ measures delayed discounting by asking individuals to choose between rewards available immediately and larger rewards available after a delay. The PDQ measures probability discounting by asking individuals to choose between guaranteed rewards and a chance at winning larger rewards. Numerous studies have implicated these measures in addiction and other health behaviors. Unlike typical self-report measures, the MCQ and PDQ generate inferred hyperbolic temporal and probability discounting functions by comparing choice preferences to arrays of functions to which the individual items are preconfigured. This article provides R and SPSS syntax for processing the MCQ and PDQ. Specifically, for the MCQ, the syntax generates k values, consistency of the inferred k, and immediate choice ratios; for the PDQ, the syntax generates h indices, consistency of the inferred h, and risky choice ratios. The syntax is intended to increase the accessibility of these measures, expedite the data processing, and reduce risk for error.

  12. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2014-01-01

    Background With an ageing population and increasing demands on health and social care services, there is growing importance attached to the management of long-term conditions, including maximizing the cost-effectiveness of treatments. In line with this, there is increasing emphasis on the need to keep people both active and participating in daily life. Consequently, it is essential that well developed and validated instruments that can meaningfully assess levels of participation and activity are widely available. Current measures, however, are largely focused on disability and rehabilitation, and there is no measure of activity or participation for generic use that fully meets the standards set by regulatory bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration. Here we detail a protocol for the development and validation of a new patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for assessment of participation and activity in people experiencing a variety of health conditions, ie, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ). The stages incorporated in its development are entirely in line with current regulations and represent best practice in the development of PROMs. Methods Development of the Ox-PAQ is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The project incorporates a new strategy of engaging with stakeholders from the outset in an attempt to identify those characteristics of PROMs considered most important to a range of potential users. Items will be generated through interviews with patients from a range of conditions. Pretesting of the instrument will be via cognitive interviews and focus groups. A postal survey will be conducted, with data subject to factor and Rasch analysis in order to identify appropriate dimensions and redundant items. Reliability will be assessed by Cronbach’s alpha and item-total correlations. A second, large-scale postal survey will follow

  13. Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Dichgans, Martin; Leys, Didier

    2017-02-03

    Cerebrovascular disease typically manifests with stroke, cognitive impairment, or both. Vascular cognitive impairment refers to all forms of cognitive disorder associated with cerebrovascular disease, regardless of the specific mechanisms involved. It encompasses the full range of cognitive deficits from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. In principle, any of the multiple causes of clinical stroke can cause vascular cognitive impairment. Recent work further highlights a role of microinfarcts, microhemorrhages, strategic white matter tracts, loss of microstructural tissue integrity, and secondary neurodegeneration. Vascular brain injury results in loss of structural and functional connectivity and, hence, compromise of functional networks within the brain. Vascular cognitive impairment is common both after stroke and in stroke-free individuals presenting to dementia clinics, and vascular pathology frequently coexists with neurodegenerative pathology, resulting in mixed forms of mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Vascular dementia is now recognized as the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, and there is increasing awareness that targeting vascular risk may help to prevent dementia, even of the Alzheimer type. Recent advances in neuroimaging, neuropathology, epidemiology, and genetics have led to a deeper understanding of how vascular disease affects cognition. These new findings provide an opportunity for the present reappraisal of vascular cognitive impairment. We further briefly address current therapeutic concepts.

  14. Explaining embodied cognition results.

    PubMed

    Lakoff, George

    2012-10-01

    From the late 1950s until 1975, cognition was understood mainly as disembodied symbol manipulation in cognitive psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and the nascent field of Cognitive Science. The idea of embodied cognition entered the field of Cognitive Linguistics at its beginning in 1975. Since then, cognitive linguists, working with neuroscientists, computer scientists, and experimental psychologists, have been developing a neural theory of thought and language (NTTL). Central to NTTL are the following ideas: (a) we think with our brains, that is, thought is physical and is carried out by functional neural circuitry; (b) what makes thought meaningful are the ways those neural circuits are connected to the body and characterize embodied experience; (c) so-called abstract ideas are embodied in this way as well, as is language. Experimental results in embodied cognition are seen not only as confirming NTTL but also explained via NTTL, mostly via the neural theory of conceptual metaphor. Left behind more than three decades ago is the old idea that cognition uses the abstract manipulation of disembodied symbols that are meaningless in themselves but that somehow constitute internal "representations of external reality" without serious mediation by the body and brain. This article uniquely explains the connections between embodied cognition results since that time and results from cognitive linguistics, experimental psychology, computational modeling, and neuroscience.

  15. Improving clinical cognitive testing

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Seth A.; Barrett, A.M.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Chatterjee, Anjan; Coslett, H. Branch; D'Esposito, Mark; Finney, Glen R.; Gitelman, Darren R.; Hart, John J.; Lerner, Alan J.; Meador, Kimford J.; Pietras, Alison C.; Voeller, Kytja S.; Kaufer, Daniel I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the evidence basis of single-domain cognitive tests frequently used by behavioral neurologists in an effort to improve the quality of clinical cognitive assessment. Methods: Behavioral Neurology Section members of the American Academy of Neurology were surveyed about how they conduct clinical cognitive testing, with a particular focus on the Neurobehavioral Status Exam (NBSE). In contrast to general screening cognitive tests, an NBSE consists of tests of individual cognitive domains (e.g., memory or language) that provide a more comprehensive diagnostic assessment. Workgroups for each of 5 cognitive domains (attention, executive function, memory, language, and spatial cognition) conducted evidence-based reviews of frequently used tests. Reviews focused on suitability for office-based clinical practice, including test administration time, accessibility of normative data, disease populations studied, and availability in the public domain. Results: Demographic and clinical practice data were obtained from 200 respondents who reported using a wide range of cognitive tests. Based on survey data and ancillary information, between 5 and 15 tests in each cognitive domain were reviewed. Within each domain, several tests are highlighted as being well-suited for an NBSE. Conclusions: We identified frequently used single-domain cognitive tests that are suitable for an NBSE to help make informed choices about clinical cognitive assessment. Some frequently used tests have limited normative data or have not been well-studied in common neurologic disorders. Utilizing standardized cognitive tests, particularly those with normative data based on the individual's age and educational level, can enhance the rigor and utility of clinical cognitive assessment. PMID:26163433

  16. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of Nursing Low Back Pain Predictor Questionnaire Focusing on Nurses Suffering from Chronic Low Back Pain in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghadyani, Leila; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Wagner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Development and psychometric evaluation. Purpose Design and psychometric assessment of the Nursing Low Back Pain Predictor Questionnaire addressing nurses suffering from chronic low back pain in Iran. Overview of Literature Low back pain is the most prevalent behavior-related health problem among nurses, and it needs to be assessed through a validated multi-factorial questionnaire, using the premises of the social cognitive theory. Methods This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Tehran, Iran from April 17, 2014 to July 16, 2014. A 50-item questionnaire based on the social cognitive theory was generated. The questionnaire was distributed among 500 nurses working in hospitals located in different geographically areas in Tehran. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the factors and their related items. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to assess reliability. Results The exploratory factor analysis loaded six factors, named observational learning, outcome expectations, self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-efficacy in overcoming impediments in the working environment and emotional coping. All factors were jointly accounted for 67.12% of behavior change variance. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient showed excellent internal consistency (alpha=0.91). Test and retest analysis with 2-week intervals indicated an appropriate stability for the questionnaire (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.94). Conclusions According the results, the developed questionnaire is a reliable and validated theory-based instrument, which can be used to predict the work, related factors for low back pain among nurses. PMID:27559450

  17. Visualizer cognitive style enhances visual creativity.

    PubMed

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Nori, Raffaella; Piccardi, Laura

    2016-02-26

    In the last two decades, interest towards creativity has increased significantly since it was recognized as a skill and as a cognitive reserve and is now always more frequently used in ageing training. Here, the relationships between visual creativity and Visualization-Verbalization cognitive style were investigated. Fifty college students were administered the Creative Synthesis Task aimed at measuring the ability to construct creative objects and the Visualization-Verbalization Questionnaire (VVQ) aimed at measuring the attitude to preferentially use either imagery or verbal strategy while processing information. Analyses showed that only the originality score of inventions was positively predicted by the VVQ score: higher VVQ score (indicating the preference to use imagery) predicted originality of inventions. These results showed that the visualization strategy is involved especially in the originality dimension of creative objects production. In light of neuroimaging results, the possibility that different strategies, such those that involve motor processes, affect visual creativity is also discussed.

  18. Cognitive impairment after sudden cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jaszke-Psonka, Magdalena; Piegza, Magdalena; Pudlo, Robert; Piegza, Jacek; Badura-Brzoza, Karina; Leksowska, Aleksandra; Hese, Robert T.; Gorczyca, Piotr W.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the incidence and severity of the impairment of selected cognitive functions in patients after sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in comparison to patients after myocardial infarction without SCA and healthy subjects and to analyze the influence of sociodemographic and clinical parameters and the duration of cardiac arrest on the presence and severity of the described disorders. Material and methods The study group comprised 30 cardiac arrest survivors, the reference group comprised 31 survivors of myocardial infarction without cardiac arrest, and the control group comprised 30 healthy subjects. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Digit Span test from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Lauretta Bender’s Visual-Motor Gestalt Test, and the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) were used to assess the presence of cognitive impairment. An original questionnaire developed by the author was used for overall mental state assessment. Results The Bender test demonstrated a significant difference in the presence and severity of visual-motor skills between the study group and the control group, while BVRT and MMSE revealed increased incidence of cognitive impairment in the study group. The Bender and BVRT (D/D)/SS (version D, method D, scaled score) scales indicated cognitive impairment in 53.3% of these patients, while the BVRT (C/A)/SS test indicated cognitive impairment in 40%. For the reference group, the values were 32.3% and 12.9%, respectively. No correlation was found between the severity of cognitive impairment and the duration of cardiac arrest. Conclusions Impairment of visual-motor skills, short-term visual memory, concentration, and visual-motor coordination occurs much more frequently and is more severe in individuals after SCA than in healthy individuals. Impairment of memory trace storage and recall after delay occurs more frequently in patients after SCA than in patients after myocardial infarction without cardiac arrest and in healthy

  19. The Association of Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms with Cognitive Performance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Beaudreau, Sherry A.; O’Hara, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    We examined the association of anxiety, depressive symptoms, and their co-occurrence on cognitive processes in 102 community-dwelling older adults. Participants completed anxiety and depression questionnaires, and measures of episodic and semantic memory, word fluency, processing speed/shifting attention, and inhibition. Participants with only increased anxiety had poorer processing speed/shifting attention, and inhibition, but depressive symptoms alone were not associated with any cognitive deficits. Although co-existing anxiety and depressive symptoms was associated with deficits in 3 cognitive domains, reductions in inhibition were solely attributed to anxiety. Findings suggest an excess cognitive load on inhibitory ability in normal older adults reporting mild anxiety. PMID:19485667

  20. Subjective cognitive dysfunction associated with drug-induced parkinsonism in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Youn; Byun, Hee-Jung

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the subjective cognitive dysfunction associated with drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) among 58 stabilized schizophrenic outpatients. Subjective cognitive dysfunction was comprehensively assessed using the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ). Multivariate analysis revealed that the DIP group scored significantly higher on the total FCQ score than the non-DIP group. In phenomenological subscale scores, the DIP group had significantly higher scores on "deterioration of discrimination", "psychomotor disorder", and "perceptual disorder" than the non-DIP group. These results suggest that DIP is significantly associated with subjective cognitive-perceptual dysfunction, reflecting the complex nature of DIP that includes motor and cognitive aspects.

  1. Is playing video games related to cognitive abilities?

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Nash; Redick, Thomas S; McMillan, Brittany D; Hambrick, David Z; Kane, Michael J; Engle, Randall W

    2015-06-01

    The relations between video-game experience and cognitive abilities were examined in the current study. In two experiments, subjects performed a number of working memory, fluid intelligence, and attention-control measures and filled out a questionnaire about their video-game experience. In Experiment 1, an extreme-groups analysis indicated that experienced video-game players outperformed nonplayers on several cognitive-ability measures. However, in Experiments 1 and 2, when analyses examined the full range of subjects at both the task level and the latent-construct level, nearly all of the relations between video-game experience and cognitive abilities were near zero. These results cast doubt on recent claims that playing video games leads to enhanced cognitive abilities. Statistical and methodological issues with prior studies of video-game experience are discussed along with recommendations for future studies.

  2. Cognitive predictors of balance in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ângela; Mendes, Andreia; Rocha, Nuno; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-06-01

    Postural instability is one of the most incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and appears to be related to cognitive deficits. This study aims to determine the cognitive factors that can predict deficits in static and dynamic balance in individuals with PD. A sociodemographic questionnaire characterized 52 individuals with PD for this work. The Trail Making Test, Rule Shift Cards Test, and Digit Span Test assessed the executive functions. The static balance was assessed using a plantar pressure platform, and dynamic balance was based on the Timed Up and Go Test. The results were statistically analysed using SPSS Statistics software through linear regression analysis. The results show that a statistically significant model based on cognitive outcomes was able to explain the variance of motor variables. Also, the explanatory value of the model tended to increase with the addition of individual and clinical variables, although the resulting model was not statistically significant The model explained 25-29% of the variability of the Timed Up and Go Test, while for the anteroposterior displacement it was 23-34%, and for the mediolateral displacement it was 24-39%. From the findings, we conclude that the cognitive performance, especially the executive functions, is a predictor of balance deficit in individuals with PD.

  3. A Mobile Platform for Administering Questionnaires and Synchronizing Their Answers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginardi, Maria Germana; Lanzola, Giordano

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a platform for administering questionnaires on smart-phones and tablets. The project arises from the need of acquiring data for monitoring the outcomes of different homecare interventions. First a model has been defined for representing questionnaires, able to support adaptivity in the dialog with the user and enforce some…

  4. Mixing Interview and Questionnaire Methods: Practical Problems in Aligning Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lois R.; Brown, Gavin T. L.

    2010-01-01

    Structured questionnaires and semi-structured interviews are often used in mixed method studies to generate confirmatory results despite differences in methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation. A review of 19 questionnaire-interview comparison studies found that consensus and consistency statistics were generally weak between…

  5. 7 CFR 550.31 - Questionnaires and survey plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Questionnaires and survey plans. 550.31 Section 550.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Agreements Program Management § 550.31 Questionnaires and survey plans. The Cooperator is required to...

  6. 7 CFR 550.31 - Questionnaires and survey plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Questionnaires and survey plans. 550.31 Section 550.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Agreements Program Management § 550.31 Questionnaires and survey plans. The Cooperator is required to...

  7. 7 CFR 550.31 - Questionnaires and survey plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Questionnaires and survey plans. 550.31 Section 550.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Agreements Program Management § 550.31 Questionnaires and survey plans. The Cooperator is required to...

  8. 7 CFR 550.31 - Questionnaires and survey plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Questionnaires and survey plans. 550.31 Section 550.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Agreements Program Management § 550.31 Questionnaires and survey plans. The Cooperator is required to...

  9. Development and Initial Validation of the Environmental Restriction Questionnaire (ERQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Limor; Ratzon, Nava Z.; Jarus, Tal; Bart, Orit

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Environmental Restriction Questionnaire (ERQ) a parent-reported questionnaire for measuring perceived environmental restrictions for young children participation. Reliability and homogeneity were tested by Cronbach's alpha and inter-item correlations.…

  10. Factor Analysis of the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posserud, Britt; Lundervold, Astri J.; Steijnen, Maaike C.; Verhoeven, Sophie; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Gillberg, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the factor structure of parent and teacher Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) in a population of 7-9 years old children. For validation purposes, factors derived were correlated with results on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). A three-factor solution was identified on both parent and…

  11. Validated Questionnaires heighten detection of Difficult Asthma Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishna, Naghmeh; Tay, Tunn Ren; Hore-Lacy, Fiona; Stirling, Robert; Hoy, R; Dabscheck, Eli; Hew, Mark

    2016-10-07

    Objective Multiple extra-pulmonary comorbidities contribute to difficult asthma, but their diagnosis can be challenging and time consuming. Previous data on comorbidity detection have focused on clinical assessment, which may miss certain conditions. We aimed to locate relevant validated screening questionnaires to identify extra-pulmonary comorbidities that contribute to difficult asthma, and evaluate their performance during a difficult asthma evaluation. Methods MEDLINE was searched to identify key extra-pulmonary comorbidities that contribute to difficult asthma. Screening questionnaires were chosen based on ease of use, presence of a cut off score, and adequate validation to help systematically identify comorbidities. In a consecutive series of 86 patients referred for systematic evaluation of difficult asthma, questionnaires were administered prior to clinical consultation. Results Six difficult asthma comorbidities and corresponding screening questionnaires were found: sinonasal disease (allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis), vocal cord dysfunction, dysfunctional breathing, obstructive sleep apnea, anxiety and depression, and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. When the questionnaires were added to the referring clinician's impression, the detection of all six comorbidities was significantly enhanced. The average time for questionnaire administration was approximately 40 minutes. Conclusions The use of validated screening questionnaires heightens detection of comorbidities in difficult asthma. The availability of data from a battery of questionnaires prior to consultation can save time and allow clinicians to systematically assess difficult asthma patients and to focus on areas of particular concern. Such an approach would ensure that all contributing comorbidities have been addressed before significant treatment escalation is considered.

  12. The Reliability and Validity of the Career Decision Difficulties Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Brian P.; Rudolph, Charles E.; Perkins, T. Scott; Patten, Thomas G.

    1999-01-01

    Scores on the Career Decision Difficulties Questionnaire for 268 college students (86 classified as undecided) showed convergence with the Career Decision Scale. The questionnaire's discriminant validity was confirmed in the areas of social desirability and anxiety. There were statistically significant differences between decided and undecided…

  13. Study Process Questionnaire Manual. Student Approaches to Learning and Studying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John B.

    This manual describes the theory behind the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) and explains what the subscale and scale scores mean. The SPQ is a 42-item self-report questionnaire used in Australia to assess the extent to which a tertiary student at a college or university endorses different approaches to learning and the motives and strategies…

  14. Learning Process Questionnaire Manual. Student Approaches to Learning and Studying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John B.

    This manual describes the theory behind the Learning Process Questionnaire (LPQ) used in Australia and defines what the subscale and scale scores mean. The LPQ is a 36-item self-report questionnaire that yields scores on three basic motives for learning and three learning strategies, and on the approaches to learning that are formed by these…

  15. Construct Validity of the Children's Music-Related Behavior Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valerio, Wendy H.; Reynolds, Alison M.; Morgan, Grant B.; McNair, Anne A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the construct validity of the Children's Music-Related Behavior Questionnaire (CMRBQ), an instrument designed for parents to document music-related behaviors about their children and themselves. The research problem was to examine the hypothesized factorial structure of the questionnaire. From a…

  16. Self-Rated Competences Questionnaires from a Design Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Edith; Woodley, Alan; Richardson, John T. E.; Leidner, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a theoretical review of self-rated competences questionnaires. This topic is influenced by the ongoing world-wide reform of higher education, which has led to a focus on the learner outcomes of higher education. Consequently, questionnaires on self-rated competences have increasingly been employed. However, self-ratings are…

  17. Assessing the Efficacy of a Student Expectations Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This article uses Rasch analysis to explore the efficacy of a questionnaire designed to assist university teaching staff in identifying those Level 4 students most in need of mathematics support. The students were all taking a mathematics module as part of their first year Computing curriculum, and the questionnaire explores the students' previous…

  18. Detecting Careless Responses to Self-Reported Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kountur, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: The use of self-report questionnaires may lead to biases such as careless responses that distort the research outcomes. Early detection of careless responses in self-report questionnaires may reduce error, but little guidance exists in the literature regarding techniques for detecting such careless or random responses in…

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Preschool Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clerkin, Suzanne M.; Marks, David J.; Policaro, Katia L.; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Preschool Revision (APQ-PR) were explored in a sample of hyperactive-inattentive preschool children (N = 47) and nonimpaired controls (N = 113). A subset of parents completed the questionnaire on 2 occasions, approximately 1 year apart. Factor analysis revealed a 3-factor solution,…

  20. Learning Probe: Benchmarking for Excellence. Questionnaire. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jane; Yarrow, David; Appleby, Alex

    This document is a questionnaire designed for work-based learning providers. It is a diagnostic benchmarking tool developed to give organizations a snapshot of their current state. Following a brief introduction, there are instructions for filling in the questionnaire, which includes both open-ended response and scoring according to a…

  1. Evaluation of the Intermittent Exotropia Questionnaire Using Rasch Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leske, David A.; Holmes, Jonathan M.; Melia, B. Michele

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Intermittent Exotropia Questionnaire (IXTQ) is a patient, proxy, and parental report of quality of life specific to children with intermittent exotropia. We refine the IXTQ using Rasch analysis to improve reliability and validity. OBSERVATION Rasch analysis was performed on responses of 575 patients with intermittent exotropia enrolled from May 15, 2008, through July 24, 2013, and their parents from each of the 4 IXTQ health-related quality-of-life questionnaires (child 5 through 7 years of age and child 8 through 17 years of age, proxy, and parent questionnaires). Questionnaire performance and structure were confirmed in a separate cohort of 379 patients with intermittent exotropia. One item was removed from the 12-item child and proxy questionnaires, and response options in the 8- to 17-year-old child IXTQ and proxy IXTQ were combined into 3 response options for both questionnaires. Targeting was relatively poor for the child and proxy questionnaires. For the parent questionnaire, 3 subscales (psychosocial, function, and surgery) were evident. One item was removed from the psychosocial subscale. Resulting subscales had appropriate targeting. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The Rasch-revised IXTQ may be a useful instrument for determining how intermittent exotropia affects health-related quality of life of children with intermittent exotropia and their parents, particularly for cohort studies. PMID:25634146

  2. EDUFORM--A Tool for Creating Adaptive Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miettinen, Miikka; Nokelainen, Petri; Kurhila, Jaakko; Silander, Tomi; Tirri, Henry

    2005-01-01

    Questionnaire data have many important uses, but is laborious for the subjects to provide. EDUFORM tries to alleviate this problem by enabling the creation of adaptive online questionnaires. The idea is to build a probabilistic model from previously gathered data, and employ it for predicting the profiles of new users on the basis of a subset of…

  3. Development and Validation of an Attributional Style Questionnaire for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Naranjo, Carmen; Cano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development and psychometric characteristics of a new version of the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ; Seligman, Abramson, Semmell, & Von Baeyer, 1979)--a version called the Attributional Style Questionnaire for Adolescents (ASQ-A)--using 3 samples (Ns = 547, 438, and 240) of Spanish secondary school students. In Study 1,…

  4. Measuring Experiential Avoidance in Adults: The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Jonathan E.; Murrell, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    To date, general levels of experiential avoidance are primarily measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), but it includes items of questionable comprehensibility. The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), previously validated as a measure of experiential avoidance with children and adolescents, was…

  5. Investigation of Multiple Imputation in Low-Quality Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ginkel, Joost R.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of multiple imputation in questionnaire data has been studied in various simulation studies. However, in practice, questionnaire data are usually more complex than simulated data. For example, items may be counterindicative or may have unacceptably low factor loadings on every subscale, or completely missing subscales may…

  6. Interrelations among University Students' Approaches to Learning, Regulation of Learning, and Cognitive and Attributional Strategies: A Person Oriented Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkila, Annamari; Niemivirta, Markku; Nieminen, Juha; Lonka, Kirsti

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships among approaches to learning, regulation of learning, cognitive and attributional strategies, stress, exhaustion, and study success. University students (N = 437) from three faculties filled in a questionnaire concerning their self-reported study behaviour, cognitive strategies, and well-being. Their…

  7. Motivational Beliefs and Cognitive Processes in Mathematics Achievement, Analyzed in the Context of Cultural Differences: A Korean Elementary School Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Daeryong; Taherbhai, Husein

    2009-01-01

    The relations among students' motivational beliefs, cognitive processes, and academic achievement were investigated. A 51-item questionnaire together with a mathematics achievement test was administered to 459 fifth graders in Korean elementary school mathematics classrooms. Results indicated that, in general, students' cognitive processes related…

  8. Impact of Training on Cognitive Representation of Challenging Behaviour in Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Martin; Hogg, James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cognitive representations of challenging behaviour among staff may influence therapeutic outcomes. This study looked at how cognitive dimensions of Identity, Cause, Consequences, Emotional Reaction and Treatment/Control are affected by training. Materials and Methods: A theoretically derived questionnaire was used to measure the impact…

  9. Parents' Cognitions and Expectations about Their Pre-School Children: The Contribution of Parental Anxiety and Child Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatcroft, Rebecca; Creswell, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relative associations between parent and child anxiety and parents' cognitions about their children. One hundred and four parents of children aged 3-5 years completed questionnaires regarding their own anxiety level, their child's anxiety level and their cognitions about the child, specifically parents' expectations…

  10. Social cognition according to cognitive impairment in different clinical phenotypes of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dulau, Cecile; Deloire, Mathilde; Diaz, Helene; Saubusse, Aurore; Charre-Morin, Julie; Prouteau, Antoinette; Brochet, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the relationship between social cognition (SC) and cognitive impairment in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). A prospective study was conducted in 60 PwMS, 30 with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), 15 with secondary progressive MS (SPMS) and 15 with primary progressive MS (PPMS), and in healthy subjects (HS). All subjects were assessed by the Bordeaux Social Cognition Evaluation Protocol (PECS-B) (facial emotion recognition, theory of mind, emotional awareness and cognitive and affective alexithymia), by a large neuropsychological battery and by questionnaires (depression and anxiety). 43.3% of PwMS were impaired for at least one SC test. The proportion of PwMS with at least two impaired SC tests was similar in all three phenotypes (20%). Mean scores differed significantly between PwMS and HS only for the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test, a test of Theory of Mind (ToM). ANOVA analyses showed an effect of phenotype on emotional awareness scores with lower scores in PPMS as compared to RRMS. ToM performance was significantly correlated (r (2) = 0.56) with executive functions, working memory and episodic memory scores. SC impairment was found in all phenotypes and was more prominent in cognitively impaired MS patients. Executive functions, and working and episodic memory performance accounts for approximately 50% of ToM performance. Emotional awareness is more impaired in progressive MS.

  11. Mapping cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Stufflebeam, Steven M; Rosen, Bruce R

    2007-11-01

    Cognitive functions are fundamental to being human. Although tremendous progress has been made in the science of cognition using neuroimaging, the clinical applications of neuroimaging are just beginning to be realized. This article focuses on selected technologies, analysis techniques, and applications that have, or will soon have, direct clinical impact. The authors discuss how cognition can be imaged using MR imaging, functional MR imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography, and MR imaging diffusion tensor imaging. A unifying theme of this article is the concept that a more complete understanding of cognition only comes through integration of multimodal structural and functional imaging technologies.

  12. Smoking and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Campos, Marcela Waisman; Serebrisky, Debora; Castaldelli-Maia, João Mauricio

    2016-08-03

    Given the large availability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) throughout the brain, and the wide range of neurotransmitter systems affected (norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine), nicotine influences a wide variety of cognitive domains such as sensorial, motor, attentional, executive function, learning and memory. This article reviews current state of the art research on the effects of nicotine upon cognition. There are different neurobiological mechanisms involved in acute/chronic smoking and nicotine abstinence. Smoking reinforcement could be due to the initial cognitive improvement, that is, individuals can learn that smoking temporarily increases cognitive functioning (improving some components of attention and memory). These acute nicotine effects improve (i) cognitive performance above smokers' normal levels, and (ii) cognitive disruption resulting from nicotine abstinence. Both neurobiological effects act as reinforcers to nicotine use, greatly contributing to the development of nicotine dependence. However, heavy smoking is associated with cognitive impairment and cognitive decline in middle age. Future clinical research should investigate the role of positive and negative cognitive effects of nicotine in smoking cessation treatment. This is clearly an important scientific issue, with insufficient current data from which to draw definitive conclusions.

  13. Embodied cognition of aging

    PubMed Central

    Vallet, Guillaume T.

    2015-01-01

    Embodiment is revolutionizing the way we consider cognition by incorporating the influence of our body and of the current context within cognitive processing. A growing number of studies which support this view of cognition in young adults stands in stark contrast with the lack of evidence in favor of this view in the field of normal aging and neurocognitive disorders. Nonetheless, the validation of embodiment assumptions on the whole spectrum of cognition is a mandatory step in order for embodied cognition theories to become theories of human cognition. More pragmatically, aging populations represent a perfect target to test embodied cognition theories due to concomitant changes in sensory, motor and cognitive functioning that occur in aging, since these theories predict direct interactions between them. Finally, the new perspectives on cognition provided by these theories might also open new research avenues and new clinical applications in the field of aging. The present article aims at showing the value and interest to explore embodiment in normal and abnormal aging as well as introducing some potential theoretical and clinical applications. PMID:25932019

  14. Simulating motivated cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, William B.

    1991-01-01

    A research effort to develop a sophisticated computer model of human behavior is described. A computer framework of motivated cognition was developed. Motivated cognition focuses on the motivations or affects that provide the context and drive in human cognition and decision making. A conceptual architecture of the human decision-making approach from the perspective of information processing in the human brain is developed in diagrammatic form. A preliminary version of such a diagram is presented. This architecture is then used as a vehicle for successfully constructing a computer program simulation Dweck and Leggett's findings that relate how an individual's implicit theories orient them toward particular goals, with resultant cognitions, affects, and behavior.

  15. Is social cognition embodied?

    PubMed

    Goldman, Alvin; de Vignemont, Frederique

    2009-04-01

    Theories of embodied cognition abound in the literature, but it is often unclear how to understand them. We offer several interpretations of embodiment, the most interesting being the thesis that mental representations in bodily formats (B-formats) have an important role in cognition. Potential B-formats include motoric, somatosensory, affective and interoceptive formats. The literature on mirroring and related phenomena provides support for a limited-scope version of embodied social cognition under the B-format interpretation. It is questionable, however, whether such a thesis can be extended. We show the limits of embodiment in social cognition.

  16. [Questionnaire for the mobbing risk: CDL2.0].

    PubMed

    Gilioli, R; Cassitto, M G; Campanini, P; Punzi, S; Consonni, D; Rengo, C; Fattorini, E; Foá, V

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop and validate a questionnaire able to evaluate the risk of mobbing at the workplace. A multiple-choice questionnaire has been developed which contains, among the different items, only one revealing a mobbing situation. The questionnaire has been administered to two groups (group A--243 subjects in a mobbing situation and group B--63 subjects without exposure to mobbing) and the differences in the scores obtained have been analysed. The questionnaire has proved to be valid and reliable. The results show that the presence of five mobbing actions is sufficient to define the workplace situation as potentially at risk for mobbing. The study reveals some limits in the selection of the two samples thus needing some adjustment. However, the questionnaire, also in the present form, can be considered a tool able to detect the mobbing situations.

  17. Validation of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaires for Arabic-speaking Populations.

    PubMed

    Awad, Manal A; Denic, Srdjan; El Taji, Hakam

    2008-09-01

    Information about quality of life in patients with cancer in Arab populations in 21 countries is inadequate. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) general quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and of the breast cancer-specific questionnaire (QLQ-BR23) in Arab breast cancer patients. The questionnaires were administered to 87 breast cancer patients 3 months after surgery. The mean age of patients was 48.6 years (SD: 9.9), 76% were married, all had staged disease (I, 9%; II, 46%; III, 44%; IV, 1%). The percentage of patients who underwent mastectomy and lumpectomy were 49% and 51%, respectively. Questionnaire reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, in which the values were all >0.7, with the exception of cognitive function and pain in the QLQ-C30 (Cronbach's alpha 0.67 and 0.51, respectively) and breast symptoms in the QLQ-BR23 (Cronbach's alpha 0.50). The questionnaires' validity was confirmed using "known group comparisons," which showed that the QLQ-C30 discriminated between mastectomy and lumpectomy patients on the emotional and cognitive function scales (P < 0.001) and QLQ-BR23 discriminated as well on the function scales and for systemic side effects (P < 0.001). For the most part, QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 distinguished clearly between subgroups of patients differing in their Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. In summary, the Arabic versions of the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 are reliable and valid tools for assessment of quality of life in Arab patients with cancer.

  18. Validation of the Italian Version of the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire for Adolescents by A. Lancry and Th. Arbault

    PubMed Central

    Cavallera, Guido M.; Boari, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to validate the Italian version of the Morningness-Eveningness questionnaire for adolescents by Lancry and Arbault. Material/Methods The Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire by Lancry and Arbault was translated from French into Italian by using forward-backward translation. Students aged 11–15 years old were enrolled from two schools in Milan (Italia). Validation of the questionnaire was performed in subsequent phases. A pre-test was given to 66 students aged 11–15 years (males 57.4%, females 42.6%) from a convenience sample. Syntactic aspects of the pre-test were improved, and the questionnaire in a revised version was re-administered to 292 students of same age (males 43.8%, females 54.1%) from a convenience sample. Results Factor analysis was performed on pre-test data, using the principal component method accounting for Morningness-Eveningness. Problematic items possibly uncorrelated with the extracted factor were identified, and reliability produced a Cronbach’s Alpha close to 0.7. In the test phase factor analysis was performed using the principal component method. Based on reliability analyses, we excluded a number of items because of their low performance, giving rise to a Cronbach’s Alpha of 0.819. Pearson product-moment external correlations between Morningness-Eveningness disposition and temperament, behavioral, and cognitive aspects were evaluated. Conclusions A factor analysis, Cronbach’s alpha and concurrent validity coefficients with disposition, behavior, and cognition, were performed, suggesting potential reliability and validity. The questionnaire is a useful and relevant tool for measuring Morningness-Eveningness disposition in adolescents, which has seldom been investigated with adequate psychometric instruments. PMID:26354147

  19. Stress and Cognition: A Cognitive Psychological Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourne, Lyle E., Jr.; Yaroush, Rita A.

    2003-01-01

    Research in cognitive psychology has made a significant contribution to our understanding of how acute and chronic stress affect performance. It has done so by identifying some of the factors that contribute to operator error and by suggesting how operators might be trained to respond more effectively in a variety of circumstances. The major purpose of this paper was to review the literature of cognitive psychology as it relates to these questions and issues. Based on the existence of earlier reviews (e.g., Hamilton, & Warburton, 1979; Hockey, 1983) the following investigation was limited to the last 15 years (1988-2002) and restricted to a review of the primary peer-reviewed literature. The results of this examination revealed that while cognitive psychology has contributed in a substantive way to our understanding of stress impact on various cognitive processes, it has also left many questions unanswered. Concerns about how we define and use the term stress and the gaps that remain in our knowledge about the specific effects of stressors on cognitive processes are discussed in the text.

  20. Transition to motherhood in type 1 diabetes: design of the pregnancy and postnatal well-being in transition questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Life transitions are associated with high levels of stress affecting health behaviours among people with Type 1 diabetes. Transition to motherhood is a major transition with potential complications accelerated by pregnancy with risks of adverse childbirth outcomes and added anxiety and worries about pregnancy outcomes. Further, preparing and going through pregnancy requires vigilant attention to a diabetes management regimen and detailed planning of everyday activities with added stress on women. Psychological and social well-being during and after pregnancy are integral for good pregnancy outcomes for both mother and baby. The aim of this study is to establish the face and content validity of two novel measures assessing the well-being of women with type 1 diabetes in their transition to motherhood, 1) during pregnancy and 2) during the postnatal period. Methods The approach to the development of the Pregnancy and Postnatal Well-being in T1DM Transition questionnaires was based on a four-stage pre-testing process; systematic overview of literature, items development, piloting testing of questionnaire and refinement of questionnaire. The questionnaire was reviewed at every stage by expert clinicians, researchers and representatives from consumer groups. The cognitive debriefing approach confirmed relevance of issues and identified additional items. Results The literature review and interviews identified three main areas impacting on the women’s postnatal self-management; (1) psychological well-being; (2) social environment, (3) physical (maternal and fetal) well-being. The cognitive debriefing in pilot testing of the questionnaire identified that immediate postnatal period was difficult, particularly when the women were breastfeeding and felt depressed. Conclusions The questionnaires fill an important gap by systematically assessing the psychosocial needs of women with type 1 diabetes during pregnancy and in the immediate postnatal period. The

  1. Changes in Cognitive Content During and Following Cognitive Therapy for Recurrent Depression: Substantial and Enduring, but Not Predictive of Change in Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Robin B.; Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Doyle, Kimberly; Clark, Lee Anna

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the amount and durability of change in the cognitive content of 156 adult outpatients with recurrent major depressive disorder after treatment with cognitive therapy. The pre–post magnitude of change was large for the Attributional Style Questionnaire Failure composite (d = 0.79), Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (d = 1.05), and Self-Efficacy Scale (d = 0.83), and small for the Attributional Style Questionnaire Success composite (d = 0.30). Changes in cognitive content were clinically significant, as defined by their 64%–87% scores overlapping with score distributions from community dwellers. Improvement was durable over a 2-year follow-up. Changes in negative cognitive content could be detected early and distinguished responders from nonresponders. In responders, continuation-phase cognitive therapy was associated with further improvements on only 1 measure of cognitive content. Early changes in negative cognitive content did not predict later changes in depressive symptoms, which the authors discuss in the context of methodological challenges and the cognitive theory of depression. PMID:17563160

  2. Increasing response rates to postal questionnaires: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Phil; Roberts, Ian; Clarke, Mike; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Pratap, Sarah; Wentz, Reinhard; Kwan, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Objective To identify methods to increase response to postal questionnaires. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of any method to influence response to postal questionnaires. Studies reviewed 292 randomised controlled trials including 258 315 participants Intervention reviewed 75 strategies for influencing response to postal questionnaires. Main outcome measure The proportion of completed or partially completed questionnaires returned. Results The odds of response were more than doubled when a monetary incentive was used (odds ratio 2.02; 95% confidence interval 1.79 to 2.27) and almost doubled when incentives were not conditional on response (1.71; 1.29 to 2.26). Response was more likely when short questionnaires were used (1.86; 1.55 to 2.24). Personalised questionnaires and letters increased response (1.16; 1.06 to 1.28), as did the use of coloured ink (1.39; 1.16 to 1.67). The odds of response were more than doubled when the questionnaires were sent by recorded delivery (2.21; 1.51 to 3.25) and increased when stamped return envelopes were used (1.26; 1.13 to 1.41) and questionnaires were sent by first class post (1.12; 1.02 to 1.23). Contacting participants before sending questionnaires increased response (1.54; 1.24 to 1.92), as did follow up contact (1.44; 1.22 to 1.70) and providing non-respondents with a second copy of the questionnaire (1.41; 1.02 to 1.94). Questionnaires designed to be of more interest to participants were more likely to be returned (2.44; 1.99 to 3.01), but questionnaires containing questions of a sensitive nature were less likely to be returned (0.92; 0.87 to 0.98). Questionnaires originating from universities were more likely to be returned than were questionnaires from other sources, such as commercial organisations (1.31; 1.11 to 1.54). Conclusions Health researchers using postal questionnaires can improve the quality of their research by using the strategies shown to be effective in this systematic review

  3. Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement in Healthy Individuals: A Compensation for Cognitive Deficits or a Question of Personality?

    PubMed

    Maier, Larissa J; Wunderli, Michael D; Vonmoos, Matthias; Römmelt, Andreas T; Baumgartner, Markus R; Seifritz, Erich; Schaub, Michael P; Quednow, Boris B

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing bioethical debate on pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) in healthy individuals is often legitimated by the assumption that PCE will widely spread and become desirable for the general public in the near future. This assumption was questioned as PCE is not equally save and effective in everyone. Additionally, it was supposed that the willingness to use PCE is strongly personality-dependent likely preventing a broad PCE epidemic. Thus, we investigated whether the cognitive performance and personality of healthy individuals with regular nonmedical methylphenidate (MPH) use for PCE differ from stimulant-naïve controls. Twenty-five healthy individuals using MPH for PCE were compared with 39 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls regarding cognitive performance and personality assessed by a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery including social cognition, prosocial behavior, decision-making, impulsivity, and personality questionnaires. Substance use was assessed through self-report in an interview and quantitative hair and urine analyses. Recently abstinent PCE users showed no cognitive impairment but superior strategic thinking and decision-making. Furthermore, PCE users displayed higher levels of trait impulsivity, novelty seeking, and Machiavellianism combined with lower levels of social reward dependence and cognitive empathy. Finally, PCE users reported a smaller social network and exhibited less prosocial behavior in social interaction tasks. In conclusion, the assumption that PCE use will soon become epidemic is not supported by the present findings as PCE users showed a highly specific personality profile that shares a number of features with illegal stimulant users. Lastly, regular MPH use for PCE is not necessarily associated with cognitive deficits.

  4. Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement in Healthy Individuals: A Compensation for Cognitive Deficits or a Question of Personality?

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Larissa J.; Wunderli, Michael D.; Vonmoos, Matthias; Römmelt, Andreas T.; Baumgartner, Markus R.; Seifritz, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing bioethical debate on pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) in healthy individuals is often legitimated by the assumption that PCE will widely spread and become desirable for the general public in the near future. This assumption was questioned as PCE is not equally save and effective in everyone. Additionally, it was supposed that the willingness to use PCE is strongly personality-dependent likely preventing a broad PCE epidemic. Thus, we investigated whether the cognitive performance and personality of healthy individuals with regular nonmedical methylphenidate (MPH) use for PCE differ from stimulant-naïve controls. Twenty-five healthy individuals using MPH for PCE were compared with 39 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls regarding cognitive performance and personality assessed by a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery including social cognition, prosocial behavior, decision-making, impulsivity, and personality questionnaires. Substance use was assessed through self-report in an interview and quantitative hair and urine analyses. Recently abstinent PCE users showed no cognitive impairment but superior strategic thinking and decision-making. Furthermore, PCE users displayed higher levels of trait impulsivity, novelty seeking, and Machiavellianism combined with lower levels of social reward dependence and cognitive empathy. Finally, PCE users reported a smaller social network and exhibited less prosocial behavior in social interaction tasks. In conclusion, the assumption that PCE use will soon become epidemic is not supported by the present findings as PCE users showed a highly specific personality profile that shares a number of features with illegal stimulant users. Lastly, regular MPH use for PCE is not necessarily associated with cognitive deficits. PMID:26107846

  5. Is the Gambling Motives Questionnaire really three-dimensional? A proposition of a four-dimensional Gambling Motives Questionnaire - Revised.

    PubMed

    Myrseth, Helga; Notelaers, Guy

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve the weaknesses of the three-dimensional Gambling Motives Questionnaire and to examine the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Revised. The Gambling Motives Questionnaire was administered to a sample of 418 gamblers (92% men, mean age 19.5years). Participants completed the Gambling Motives Questionnaire and an additional item tapping boredom, as well as a variety of measures of gambling behavior and gambling problems as criterion measures. Results showed that the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Revised is better represented as a four-factor structure tapping the following four gambling motives factors; enhancement, coping, social, and self-gratification, Δχ(2) Δ(df)=24.76 (3), p<0.001. Removing two problematic items from the Gambling Motives Questionnaire and adding an extra item tapping boredom also improved the fit of the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Revised. The subscales enhancement, social, and coping were all significant predictors of variety of gambling behaviors (p<0.05), whereas enhancement, coping, and self-gratification predicted frequency of gambling behaviors (p<0.01). Coping and self-gratification predicted loss of control (p<0.01), whereas self-gratification predicted gambling problems (p<0.001). The Gambling Motives Questionnaire - Revised, consisting of the four dimensions enhancement motives, social motives, coping motives and self-gratification motives, is a reliable and valid instrument to measuring gambling motives.

  6. Validation of Online Versions of Tinnitus Questionnaires Translated into Swedish

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Karolina; Edvall, Niklas K.; Idrizbegovic, Esma; Huhn, Robert; Cima, Rilana; Persson, Viktor; Leineweber, Constanze; Westerlund, Hugo; Langguth, Berthold; Schlee, Winfried; Canlon, Barbara; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to the lack of objective measures for assessing tinnitus, its clinical evaluation largely relies on the use of questionnaires and psychoacoustic tests. A global assessment of tinnitus burden would largely benefit from holistic approaches that not only incorporate measures of tinnitus but also take into account associated fears, emotional aspects (stress, anxiety, and depression), and quality of life. In Sweden, only a few instruments are available for assessing tinnitus, and the existing tools lack validation. Therefore, we translated a set of questionnaires into Swedish and evaluated their reliability and validity in a group of tinnitus subjects. Methods: We translated the English versions of the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI), the Fear of Tinnitus Questionnaire (FTQ), the Tinnitus Catastrophizing Scale (TCS), the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ-30), and the Tinnitus Sample Case History Questionnaire (TSCHQ) into Swedish. These translations were delivered via the internet with the already existing Swedish versions of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Hyperacusis Questionnaire (HQ), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQoL-BREF). Psychometric properties were evaluated by means of internal consistency [Cronbach's alpha (α)] and test–retest reliability across a 9-week interval [Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), Cohen's kappa] in order to establish construct as well as clinical validity using a sample of 260 subjects from a population-based cohort. Results: Internal consistency was acceptable for all questionnaires (α > 0.7) with the exception of the “social relationships” subscale of the WHOQoL-BREF. Test–retest reliability was generally acceptable (ICC > 0.70, Cohens kappa > 0.60) for the tinnitus-related questionnaires, except for the TFI “sense of control” subscale and 15 items of the TSCHQ. Spearmen rank correlations showed that

  7. PIRLS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 1: International Version of the PIRLS 2011, Background Questionnaires and Curriculum Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Drucker, Kathleen T., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The PIRLS 2011 international database includes data for all questionnaires administered as part of the PIRLS 2011 assessment. This supplement contains the international version of the PIRLS 2011 background questionnaires and curriculum questionnaires in the following 5 sections: (1) Student Questionnaire; (2) Home Questionnaire (Learning to Read…

  8. Early Maladaptive Schemas and Cognitive Distortions in Adults with Morbid Obesity: Relationships with Mental Health Status.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Felipe Q; Sainsbury, Amanda; Hay, Phillipa; Roekenes, Jessica A; Swinbourne, Jessica; da Silva, Dhiordan C; da S Oliveira, Margareth

    2017-02-28

    Dysfunctional cognitions may be associated with unhealthy eating behaviors seen in individuals with obesity. However, dysfunctional cognitions commonly occur in individuals with poor mental health independently of weight. We examined whether individuals with morbid obesity differed with regard to dysfunctional cognitions when compared to individuals of normal weight, when mental health status was controlled for. 111 participants-53 with morbid obesity and 58 of normal weight-were assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination, Young Schema Questionnaire, Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, and a Demographic and Clinical Questionnaire. Participants with morbid obesity showed higher scores in one (insufficient self-control/self-discipline) of 15 early maladaptive schemas and in one (labeling) of 15 cognitive distortions compared to participants of normal weight. The difference between groups for insufficient self-control/self-discipline was not significant when mental health status was controlled for. Participants with morbid obesity showed more severe anxiety than participants of normal weight. Our findings did not show clinically meaningful differences in dysfunctional cognitions between participants with morbid obesity or of normal weight. Dysfunctional cognitions presented by individuals with morbid obesity are likely related to their individual mental health and not to their weight.

  9. Early Maladaptive Schemas and Cognitive Distortions in Adults with Morbid Obesity: Relationships with Mental Health Status

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Felipe Q.; Sainsbury, Amanda; Hay, Phillipa; Roekenes, Jessica A.; Swinbourne, Jessica; da Silva, Dhiordan C.; da S. Oliveira, Margareth

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunctional cognitions may be associated with unhealthy eating behaviors seen in individuals with obesity. However, dysfunctional cognitions commonly occur in individuals with poor mental health independently of weight. We examined whether individuals with morbid obesity differed with regard to dysfunctional cognitions when compared to individuals of normal weight, when mental health status was controlled for. 111 participants—53 with morbid obesity and 58 of normal weight—were assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination, Young Schema Questionnaire, Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, and a Demographic and Clinical Questionnaire. Participants with morbid obesity showed higher scores in one (insufficient self-control/self-discipline) of 15 early maladaptive schemas and in one (labeling) of 15 cognitive distortions compared to participants of normal weight. The difference between groups for insufficient self-control/self-discipline was not significant when mental health status was controlled for. Participants with morbid obesity showed more severe anxiety than participants of normal weight. Our findings did not show clinically meaningful differences in dysfunctional cognitions between participants with morbid obesity or of normal weight. Dysfunctional cognitions presented by individuals with morbid obesity are likely related to their individual mental health and not to their weight. PMID:28264484

  10. Effect of estrogen and testosterone replacement therapy on cognitive fatigue.

    PubMed

    Möller, Marika Christina; Rådestad, Angelique Flöter; von Schoultz, Bo; Bartfai, Aniko

    2013-02-01

    Both estrogen and testosterone insufficiency has been associated with reduced psychological well-being including fatigue. However, hormonal replacement studies on fatigue are rare. Therefore, we wanted to study the effect of testosterone and estrogen replacement therapy on cognitive fatigue and the relation between sex hormone levels and cognitive fatigue in oophorectomized women. Fifty women with surgically induced menopause (mean age: 54.0 ± 2.9 years) were randomly assigned to treatment with estradiol valerate in combination with testosterone undecanoate or placebo for 24 weeks in a double-blind cross-over study. Neuropsychological tests and questionnaires were used to assess cognitive fatigue and psychological well-being. Cognitive fatigue was significantly associated to poor self-rated health and higher body mass index but not to general psychological well-being or sex hormone levels. Treatment with testosterone + estrogen had no significant effect on cognitive fatigue but the results indicated a curvilinear relation for hormonal levels. The estrogen/testosterone ratio was more related to functions rather than high or low hormone levels per se. We found that cognitive fatigue is frequent in oophorectomized women and negatively associated to self-perceived health and positively associated to BMI. A well-balanced ratio between estrogen and testosterone levels may be important for cognitive fatigue.

  11. Occupational cognitive failures and safety performance in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Allahyari, Teimour; Rangi, Narmin Hassanzadeh; Khalkhali, Hamidreza; Khosravi, Yahya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The majority of industrial accidents occur because of human errors. Human error has different causes, however, in all cases cognitive abilities and limitations of human play an important role. Occupational cognitive failures are cognitively-based human errors that occur at work. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between occupational cognitive failures and safety consequences. Method. Personnel of a large industrial company in Iran filled out an occupational cognitive failure questionnaire (OCFQ) and answered questions on accidents. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to determine the relationship between cognitive failures and safety consequences. Results. According to developed regression models, personnel with a high rate of cognitive failure, in comparison to low rate, have a high risk of minor injury involvement (OR 5.1, 95% CI [2.62, 10.3]); similar results were for major injury and near miss. Discussion. The results of this study revealed usefulness of the OCFQ as a tool of predicting safety- related consequences and planning preventive actions.

  12. Validation of Self-Reported Cognitive Problems with Objective ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is a lack of validation of self-reported cognitive problems with objective neuropsychological measures. The validity of four self-reported cognitive items from a health questionnaire (HQ) and the Symptoms Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) was examined with objective clinical neuropsychological test performance in 147 manganese (Mn) exposed residents. These residents were from two Ohio towns exposed to ambient air-Mn from an industrial source with modeled average air-Mn concentrations of 0.54 µg/m3 (range: 0.01-4.58) and were part of a larger study of cognitive, motor, tremor abnormalities and their relationship to Mn exposure.The primarily white (94.6%) participants (aged 30-64) lived in the towns for at least 10 years (range: 10-64) and had 13.9 years of education, on average. In the last 7 days before testing, 94 (64.4%) participants self-reported concentration problems and 105 (71.8%) self-reported memory problems. After adjusting for age and education, participants who self-reported cognitive problems did not perform worse on the objective neuropsychological measures than those who reported not having problems, except on 1 of 17 neuropsychological tests (Stroop Color). Greater levels of depression and female sex predicted having more self-reported cognitive problems. Higher education was associated with fewer self-reported cognitive problems. Measures of Mn in air, blood, hair, and toenails were not associated with subjective cognitive self-reported p

  13. Questionnaires Measuring Patients’ Spiritual Needs: A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Seddigh, Ruohollah; Keshavarz-Akhlaghi, Amir-Abbas; Azarnik, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Context The objective of the present review was to collect published spiritual needs questionnaires and to present a clear image of the research condition of this domain. Evidence Acquisition First, an electronic search was conducted with no limits on time span (until June 2015) or language in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Ovid, ProQuest and Google Scholar. All derivations of the keywords religion and spiritual alongside need and its synonyms were included in the search. Researches that introduced new tools was then selected and included in the study. Due to the limited quantity of questionnaires in this domain and with no consideration given to the existence or lack of exact standardization information, all of the questionnaires were included in the final report. Results Eight questionnaires were found: patients spiritual needs assessment scale (PSNAS), spiritual needs inventory (SNI), spiritual interests related to illness tool (SpIRIT), spiritual needs questionnaire (SpNQ), spiritual needs assessment for patients (SNAP), spiritual needs scale (SNS), spiritual care needs inventory (SCNI), and spiritual needs questionnaire for palliative care. Conclusions These questionnaires have been designed from a limited medical perspective and often involve cultural concepts which complicate their cross-cultural applicability. PMID:27284281

  14. Effectiveness of cognitive training for Chinese elderly in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Timothy; Wong, Anita; Chan, Grace; Shiu, YY; Lam, Ko-Chuen; Young, Daniel; Ho, Daniel WH; Ho, Florence

    2013-01-01

    In Hong Kong, the evidence for cognitive-training programs in fighting against memory complaints is lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Active Mind cognitive-training program in improving the cognitive function and quality of life (QoL) for local community-dwelling Chinese older adults. A total of 200 subjects were recruited from 20 different district elderly community centers (DECCs). Centers were randomly assigned into either the intervention group or control group. The intervention group underwent eight 1-hour sessions of cognitive training, while the control group were included in the usual group activities provided by the DECCs. Standardized neuropsychological tests (the Chinese version of Mattis Dementia Rating Scale [CDRS] and the Cantonese version of the Mini-Mental State Examination) and the QoL questionnaire SF12 were used to assess participants’ cognitive function and QoL before and after the trial. A total of 176 subjects completed the study. The intervention group showed greater improvement in the cognitive function measured by total CDRS score (treatment: 12.24 ± 11.57 vs control: 4.37 ± 7.99; P < 0.001) and QoL measured by total SF12 score (treatment: 7.82 ± 13.19 vs control: 3.18 ± 11.61; P = 0.014). Subjects with lower education level were associated with better cognitive response to the cognitive-training program. The current findings indicated that the Active Mind cognitive-training program was effective in improving the cognitive function and QoL for community-dwelling Chinese older adults in Hong Kong. PMID:23440076

  15. New Views on Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Jerome

    1976-01-01

    Reviews recent empirical findings toward three cognitive developmental perspectives: the fears of infancy, the discontinuous quality of stages in cognitive functioning, and the capacity for resilience in cognitive development. (DEP)

  16. The social life of cognition.

    PubMed

    Korman, Joanna; Voiklis, John; Malle, Bertram F

    2015-02-01

    We begin by illustrating that long before the cognitive revolution, social psychology focused on topics pertaining to what is now known as social cognition: people's subjective interpretations of social situations and the concepts and cognitive processes underlying these interpretations. We then examine two questions: whether social cognition entails characteristic concepts and cognitive processes, and how social processes might themselves shape and constrain cognition. We suggest that social cognition relies heavily on generic cognition but also on unique concepts (e.g., agent, intentionality) and unique processes (e.g., projection, imitation, joint attention). We further suggest that social processes play a prominent role in the development and unfolding of several generic cognitive processes, including learning, attention, and memory. Finally, we comment on the prospects of a recently developing approach to the study of social cognition (social neuroscience) and two potential future directions (computational social cognition and social-cognitive robotics).

  17. Cognitive Network Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Medaglia, John D.; Lynall, Mary-Ellen; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    Network science provides theoretical, computational, and empirical tools that can be used to understand the structure and function of the human brain in novel ways using simple concepts and mathematical representations. Network neuroscience is a rapidly growing field that is providing considerable insight into human structural connectivity, functional connectivity while at rest, changes in functional networks over time (dynamics), and how these properties differ in clinical populations. In addition, a number of studies have begun to quantify network characteristics in a variety of cognitive processes and provide a context for understanding cognition from a network perspective. In this review, we outline the contributions of network science to cognitive neuroscience. We describe the methodology of network science as applied to the particular case of neuroimaging data and review its uses in investigating a range of cognitive functions including sensory processing, language, emotion, attention, cognitive control, learning, and memory. In conclusion, we discuss current frontiers and the specific challenges that must be overcome to integrate these complementary disciplines of network science and cognitive neuroscience. Increased communication between cognitive neuroscientists and network scientists could lead to significant discoveries under an emerging scientific intersection known as cognitive network neuroscience. PMID:25803596

  18. Cognition-Enhancing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mehlman, Maxwell J

    2004-01-01

    New drugs that enhance cognition in cognitively healthy individuals present difficult public policy challenges. While their use is not inherently unethical, steps must be taken to ensure that they are safe, that they are widely available to promote equality of opportunity, and that individuals are free to decide whether or not to use them. PMID:15330974

  19. Is Cognitive Style Bipolar?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, David H.

    This study assessed the bipolarity of cognitive style for 970 clients of the Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation, a vocational guidance service. The 462 male and 508 female examinees were aged 14 to 65 years, with a median age of 24 years. Three cognitive style tests were investigated: (1) the Kagan Matching Familiar Figures Test (KMFFT); (2) the…

  20. Cognitive Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Robert; And Others

    The Cognitive Education Project centered at the University of Alberta undertook a 3-year longitudinal evaluation of two cognitive education programs aimed at teaching thinking skills. The critical difference between the two experimental programs was that one, Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment (IE) method was taught out of curricular content,…

  1. Learning and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gr ver Aukrust, Vibeke, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection of 58 articles from the recently-published third edition of the International Encyclopedia of Education focuses on learning, memory, attention, problem solving, concept formation, and language. Learning and cognition is the foundation of cognitive psychology and encompasses many topics including attention, memory, categorization,…

  2. Transcending Cognitive Individualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerubavel, Eviatar; Smith, Eliot R.

    2010-01-01

    Advancing knowledge in many areas of psychology and neuroscience, underlined by dazzling images of brain scans, appear to many professionals and to the public to show that people are on the way to explaining cognition purely in terms of processes within the individual's head. Yet while such cognitive individualism still dominates the popular…

  3. Sex and Cognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    This book describes the major differences between men and women in cognitive or problem-solving abilities and discusses the possible biological contributions to such differences. The book argues that sex differences in cognitive patterns and in motor skills arose out of complementary evolutionary histories of men and women and that evidence for…

  4. Cognitive and Social Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machamer, Peter; Douglas, Heather

    1999-01-01

    Criticizes Hugh Lacey's separation of cognitive values and social values in discussions of the nature of science. Claims that attempting to distinguish between cognitive and social ignores crucial complexities in the development and use of knowledge. Proposes that the proper distinction be between legitimate and illegitimate reasons in science as…

  5. Comparative Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to compare cognitive development in humans and chimpanzees to illuminate the evolutionary origins of human cognition. Comparison of morphological data and life history strongly highlights the common features of all primate species, including humans. The human mother-infant relationship is characterized by the physical separation of…

  6. Cognitive network neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Medaglia, John D; Lynall, Mary-Ellen; Bassett, Danielle S

    2015-08-01

    Network science provides theoretical, computational, and empirical tools that can be used to understand the structure and function of the human brain in novel ways using simple concepts and mathematical representations. Network neuroscience is a rapidly growing field that is providing considerable insight into human structural connectivity, functional connectivity while at rest, changes in functional networks over time (dynamics), and how these properties differ in clinical populations. In addition, a number of studies have begun to quantify network characteristics in a variety of cognitive processes and provide a context for understanding cognition from a network perspective. In this review, we outline the contributions of network science to cognitive neuroscience. We describe the methodology of network science as applied to the particular case of neuroimaging data and review its uses in investigating a range of cognitive functions including sensory processing, language, emotion, attention, cognitive control, learning, and memory. In conclusion, we discuss current frontiers and the specific challenges that must be overcome to integrate these complementary disciplines of network science and cognitive neuroscience. Increased communication between cognitive neuroscientists and network scientists could lead to significant discoveries under an emerging scientific intersection known as cognitive network neuroscience.

  7. [Some psychometric attributes of the Family Assessment Questionnaires].

    PubMed

    Beauvale, Andrzej; de Barbaro, Bogdan; Namysłowska, Irena; Furgał, Mariusz

    2002-01-01

    In this article we present some of the more important findings from research aimed at the validation and normalisation of the Family Assessment Questionnaire (Dyadic Questionnaire, Family Questionnaire, Self-Estimation Questionnaire), which is the Polish adaptation of Manfred Cierpka's and Gabriele Frevert's "Familienboegen". In the presented study 1511 individuals from 557 families took part. Of these 658 individuals (including 162 children) came from 248 families which had no clinical health or adjustment problems, while 853 individuals (including 305 children) came from 309 families with problems due to schizophrenia, anorexia nervosa, coronary heart disease or family crisis. A new method of analysing raw results from the questionnaire scales was formulated and verified. This method was based on the criterium of sufficient satisfaction regarding the aspect of family life measured by the scale. The original scales of all the questionnaires (Task Completion, Role Performance, Communication, Emotionality, Affective Involvement, Control, and Values and norms) were characterised by average or low reliability; the general scales were characterised by high reliability (the Dyadic Questionnaire with very high reliability). As a result of factor analysis new scales were created with acceptable or high reliability. These were the scale of Positive statements, the scale of Negative statements in the dyadic and family questionnaires, and the scales of kindness, care and resentment in the Self-Estimation Questionnaire. The general scales and the factor scales generally significantly differentiated between the sub-samples selected due to the type of family problems present and relationship. On the other hand the 7 original scales did so only sporadically or weakly. Better results were obtained by families without health or adjustment problems while the worst results were obtained by families in crisis.

  8. Uncertainty and Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Faisal; Bland, Amy R.; Schaefer, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    A growing trend of neuroimaging, behavioral, and computational research has investigated the topic of outcome uncertainty in decision-making. Although evidence to date indicates that humans are very effective in learning to adapt to uncertain situations, the nature of the specific cognitive processes involved in the adaptation to uncertainty are still a matter of debate. In this article, we reviewed evidence suggesting that cognitive control processes are at the heart of uncertainty in decision-making contexts. Available evidence suggests that: (1) There is a strong conceptual overlap between the constructs of uncertainty and cognitive control; (2) There is a remarkable overlap between the neural networks associated with uncertainty and the brain networks subserving cognitive control; (3) The perception and estimation of uncertainty might play a key role in monitoring processes and the evaluation of the “need for control”; (4) Potential interactions between uncertainty and cognitive control might play a significant role in several affective disorders. PMID:22007181

  9. Chimpanzee Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive control processes are a feature of human cognition. Recent comparative tests have shown that some nonhuman animals also might share aspects of cognitive control with humans. Two of the executive processes that constitute cognitive control are metacognition and self-control, and recent experiments with chimpanzees are described that demonstrate metacognitive monitoring and control when these animals engage in an information-seeking task. Chimpanzees also show strategic responding in a self-control task by exhibiting self-distraction as an aid to delay of gratification. These demonstrations indicate continuity with similar human cognitive capacities, and the performances of chimpanzees in these kinds of tests have implications for considering the nature of the intelligence of these animals. PMID:26478660

  10. Cognitive regulatory control therapies.

    PubMed

    Bowins, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive regulatory control processes play an essential but typically unappreciated role in maintaining mental health. The purpose of the current paper is to identify this role and demonstrate how cognitive-behavioral and related techniques can compensate for impairments. Impaired cognitive regulation contributes to the overly intense emotional states present in anxiety disorders, depression, and personality disorders; progression of adaptive hypomania to mania; expression of psychosis in the conscious and awake state; dominance of immature defense mechanisms in borderline and other personality disorders. A wide variety of standard (monitoring, reappraisal, response inhibition, relaxation training) and more novel (suppression therapy, willful detachment, cost-benefit analysis, normalization, mature defense mechanism training) cognitive-behavioral and related techniques can be applied to compensate for cognitive regulatory control impairments, and their success probably aligns with this capacity.

  11. [Questionnaire methods used in the psychosomatic evaluation of tinnitus].

    PubMed

    Eğilmez, Oğuz Kadir; Kalcıoğlu, M Tayyar; Kökten, Numan

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus is a common disorder in ear, nose and throat practice. Not only muscular, vascular, neuronal, odiologic and ear pathologies, also psychological parameters contribute to the formation of tinnitus. Scales which evaluate patients' perception of tinnitus and how they are affected from tinnitus psychosomatically have gained increasing importance. Questionnaire studies are very assisting in terms of showing the degree of anxiety and depression experienced by the patients, diagnosis of the disease, evaluation of treatment efficacy, and patient follow-up. In this study, we reviewed the visual analog scale which measures the level of subjective perception in tinnitus, tinnitus evaluation questionnaires, and questionnaires measuring the level of quality of life and depression.

  12. African primary care research: performing surveys using questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Govender, Indiran; Mabuza, Langalibalele H; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A; Mash, Bob

    2014-04-25

    The aim of this article is to provide practical guidance on conducting surveys and the use of questionnaires for postgraduate students at a Masters level who are undertaking primary care research. The article is intended to assist with writing the methods section of the research proposal and thinking through the relevant issues that apply to sample size calculation, sampling strategy, design of a questionnaire and administration of a questionnaire. The articleis part of a larger series on primary care research, with other articles in the series focusing on the structure of the research proposal and the literature review, as well as quantitative data analysis.

  13. [Validation of a job expectancy questionnaire with secondary students].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Alonso, Angel; Manassero Mas, María Antonia

    2008-11-01

    This study presents the validity and reliability analysis of a questionnaire that assesses the importance of some general job features, for the diagnosis of youths' expectations and priorities concerning a future job. The results show an 8-factor structure with a very good fit to the theoretical structure of the questionnaire, and reliability for the entire questionnaire and for the factor sub-scales is also quite satisfactory. The analysis of the sub-scale scores reveals that youths' most important factor is Self-actualization, whereas the Manual dimension is the least important one.

  14. Test-retest reliability of the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Loas, Gwenolé; Yon, Valerie; Monestès, Jean Louis; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2011-04-01

    Long-term reliability of the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ) was investigated in two follow-up studies of participants with psychosis using a test-retest method. In the first study (N = 56), the duration of the follow-up ranged from 6 months to 2 years; Spearman rho was .62 for the abridged (18 items) Spanish version of the questionnaire. In Study 2 (N = 21), in participants with stable schizophrenia, the follow-up ranged from 8 to 11 years; test-retest Spearman rho was .83 for the French version of the questionnaire. Subjective experiences could constitute, in psychosis-prone people, traits or markers of psychotic vulnerability.

  15. Cognitive reserve and Aβ1-42 in mild cognitive impairment (Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Paula; Fernandez Suarez, Marcos; Surace, Ezequiel I; Chrem Méndez, Patricio; Martín, María Eugenia; Clarens, María Florencia; Tapajóz, Fernanda; Russo, Maria Julieta; Campos, Jorge; Guinjoan, Salvador M; Sevlever, Gustavo; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive reserve and concentration of Aβ1-42 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with mild cognitive impairment, those with Alzheimer’s disease, and in control subjects. Methods Thirty-three participants from the Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database completed a cognitive battery, the Cognitive Reserve Questionnaire (CRQ), and an Argentinian accentuation reading test (TAP-BA) as a measure of premorbid intelligence, and underwent lumbar puncture for CSF biomarker quantification. Results The CRQ significantly correlated with TAP-BA, education, and Aβ1-42. When considering Aβ1-42 levels, significant differences were found in CRQ scores; higher levels of CSF Aβ1-42 were associated with higher CRQ scores. Conclusion Reduced Aβ1-42 in CSF is considered as evidence of amyloid deposition in the brain. Previous results suggest that individuals with higher education, higher occupational attainment, and participation in leisure activities (cognitive reserve) have a reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Our results support the notion that enhanced neural activity has a protective role in mild cognitive impairment, as evidenced by higher CSF Aβ1-42 levels in individuals with more cognitive reserve. PMID:26504392

  16. Why dissociation and schizotypy overlap: the joint influence of fantasy proneness, cognitive failures, and childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Timo; Merckelbach, Harald; Kater, Maartje; Sluis, Anne Fetsje

    2007-10-01

    A number of studies have noted that dissociative symptoms (e.g., feelings of derealization, depersonalization, memory complaints, absorption) overlap with the tendency to report psychotic-like experiences (i.e., schizotypy). The question arises as to what may account for the shared variance between dissociation and schizotypy. The present study investigated whether fantasy proneness, cognitive failures, and childhood trauma may jointly explain the dissociation-schizotypy link. To this end, we administered the Dissociative Experiences Scale, the Schizotypal Personality Scale, the Creative Experiences Questionnaire, the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire to a sample of undergraduates (N = 185). Fantasy proneness, cognitive failures, and childhood trauma together explained substantial part (58%) of the dissociation-schizotypy link. The present study succeeded in explaining a considerate part of the shared variance between dissociation and schizotypy.

  17. Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire: validation of a parent-report screening measure.

    PubMed

    Willcutt, Erik G; Boada, Richard; Riddle, Margaret W; Chhabildas, Nomita; DeFries, John C; Pennington, Bruce F

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated the internal structure and convergent and discriminant evidence for the Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire (CLDQ), a 20-item parent-report rating scale that was developed to provide a brief screening measure for learning difficulties. CLDQ ratings were obtained from parents of children in 2 large community samples and 2 samples from clinics that specialize in the assessment of learning disabilities and related disorders (total N = 8,004). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed 5 correlated but separable dimensions that were labeled reading, math, social cognition, social anxiety, and spatial difficulties. Results revealed strong convergent and discriminant evidence for the CLDQ Reading scale, suggesting that this scale may provide a useful method to screen for reading difficulties in both research studies and clinical settings. Results are also promising for the other 4 CLDQ scales, but additional research is needed to refine each of these measures.

  18. Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire:Validation of a parent-report screening measure

    PubMed Central

    Willcutt, Erik G.; Boada, Richard; Riddle, Margaret W.; Chhabildas, Nomita; DeFries, John C.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the internal structure and convergent and discriminant evidence for the Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire (CLDQ), a 20-item parent-report rating scale that was developed to provide a brief screening measure for learning difficulties. CLDQ ratings were obtained from parents of children in two large community samples and two samples from clinics that specialize in the assessment of learning disabilities and related disorders (total N = 8,004). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed five correlated but separable dimensions that were labeled reading, math, social cognition, social anxiety, and spatial difficulties. Results revealed strong convergent and discriminant evidence for the CLDQ Reading scale, suggesting that this scale may provide a useful method to screen for reading difficulties in both research studies and clinical settings. Results are also promising for the other four CLDQ scales, but additional research is needed to refine each of these measures. PMID:21574721

  19. ADAPTING A PARENT-COMPLETED, SOCIOEMOTIONAL QUESTIONNAIRE IN CHINA: THE AGES & STAGES QUESTIONNAIRES: SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiaoyan; Xie, Huichao; Squires, Jane; Chen, Chieh-Yu

    2017-03-01

    The Ages & Stages Questionnaire: Social-Emotional (ASQ:SE; Squires, Bricker, & Twombly, 2002a), developed in the United States, was translated and adapted for use in China. Lack of valid and reliable instruments for identifying social and emotional delays in young children is a worldwide issue. Professionals in China have recently focused efforts on developing methods for early identification of social, emotional, and behavioral issues in the birth-to-5 population. Following the guidelines of the International Test Commission, the ASQ:SE was translated into Simplified Chinese (ASQ:SE-C) to collect a normative sample of 2,528 children across China. Data were analyzed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the ASQ:SE-C, using both classical test theory and item response theory, including generating cutoff points appropriate for the Chinese sample. A panel of Chinese experts was surveyed to assess face validity and estimated utility of the newly adapted tool. Discussions of research findings and implications for future studies are provided.

  20. Translation and validation of the Turkish version of the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQOL) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Duruöz, M T; Doward, L; Turan, Y; Cerrahoglu, L; Yurtkuran, M; Calis, M; Tas, N; Ozgocmen, S; Yoleri, O; Durmaz, B; Oncel, S; Tuncer, T; Sendur, O; Birtane, M; Tuzun, F; Bingol, U; Kirnap, M; Celik Erturk, G; Ardicoglu, O; Memis, A; Atamaz, F; Kizil, R; Kacar, C; Gurer, G; Uzunca, K; Sari, H

    2013-11-01

    The Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire is a disease-specific measure of needs-based quality of life developed in the UK and the Netherlands. This study describes translation, validation, and reliability of the scale into Turkish population. The ASQoL was translated into Turkish using the dual-panel process. Content validity was assessed via cognitive debriefing interviews with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Patients with AS according to modified New York criteria were recruited into the study from 12 hospitals of all part of Turkey. Psychometric and scaling properties were assessed via a two administration survey involving the ASQoL, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Classical psychometrics assessed reliability, convergent validity (correlation of ASQoL with NHP, BASFI, and BASDAI) and discriminative validity (correlation of ASQoL with perceived AS-severity and general health). Cognitive debriefing showed the new Turkish ASQoL to be clear, relevant, and comprehensive. Completed survey questionnaires were received from 277 AS patients (80% Male, mean age 42.2/SD 11.6, mean AS duration 9.4 years/SD 9.4). Test-retest reliability was excellent (0.96), indicating low random measurement error for the scale. Correlations of ASQoL with NHP sections were low to moderate (NHP Sleep 0.34; NHP Emotional Reactions 0.83) suggesting the measures assess related but distinct constructs. The measure was able to discriminate between patients based on their perceived disease severity (p < 0.0001) and self-reported general health (p < 0.0001). The Turkish version of ASQoL has good reliability and validity properties. It is practical and useful scale to assess the quality of life in AS patients in Turkish population.

  1. Cognitive factors associated with facial pain.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S M; Gramling, S E

    1997-07-01

    Most well-accepted etiological models of facial pain (e.g., temporomandibular disorders and headache) implicate emotional distress as an important factor in the development and maintenance of pain. Data exists to support the notion that some facial pain sufferers are more emotionally distressed than no pain controls. However, many of these dependent measures of emotional distress are either lengthy assessment batteries, lack clear cut psychotherapeutic treatment implications, or focus exclusively on pain related sequela. As cognitive-behavioral interventions become more integrated into the treatment of chronic pain conditions, including various facial pain conditions, it becomes more imperative that the tools used to assess psychological functioning provide the clinician with specific cognitive/behavioral targets for change. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which symptomatic treatment seeking facial pain sufferers (N = 25), symptomatic non-treatment seeking facial pain sufferers (N = 48), and healthy pain-free controls (N = 70) differed on the Rational Beliefs Inventory (RBI). The RBI is a reliable, valid questionnaire assessing rational beliefs that are operationalized within a Rational Emotive Therapy (RET) framework. RET is a cognitive-behavioral treatment paradigm that focuses on how an individual's maladaptive cognitive errors or distortions exacerbate emotional distress. Group differences were assessed using a oneway Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) with the total RBI score serving as the dependent measure, and a Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA) using individual RBI belief subscales as dependent measures. These results indicated that groups differed significantly on the total score and several of the individual belief subscales. These findings indicated that facial pain sufferers generally hold maladaptive beliefs that may be of clinical significance for cognitive/behavioral treatment approaches.

  2. Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crişan, Alexandru F.; Oancea, Cristian; Timar, Bogdan; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Crişan, Alexandru; Tudorache, Voicu

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with multiple cognitive problems. Montreal Cognitive Assessment test (MoCA) is used to detect cognitive impairment evaluating several areas: visuospatial, memory, attention and fluency. Our study aim was to evaluate the impact of stable COPD and exacerbation (AECOPD) phases on cognitive status using MoCA questionnaire. Methods We enrolled 39 patients (pts), smokers with COPD group D (30 stable and 9 in AECOPD) and 13 healthy subjects (control group), having similar level of education and no significant differences regarding the anthropometric measurements. We analyzed the differences in MoCA score between these three groups and also the correlation between this score and inflammatory markers. Results Patients with AECOPD had a significant (p<0.001) decreased MoCA score (14.6±3.4) compared to stable COPD (20.2±2.4) and controls (24.2±5.8). The differences between groups were more accentuated for the language abstraction and attention (p<0.001) and delayed recall and orientation (p<0.001) sub-topics. No significant variance of score was observed between groups regarding visuospatial and naming score (p = 0.095). The MoCA score was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume (r = 0.28) and reverse correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = −0.57), fibrinogen (r = −0.58), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (r = −0.55) and with the partial pressure of CO2 (r = −0.47). Conclusions According to this study, COPD significantly decreases the cognitive status in advanced and acute stages of the disease. PMID:25033379

  3. Cognitive reserve and the risk for Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Serra, Laura; Musicco, Massimo; Cercignani, Mara; Torso, Mario; Spanò, Barbara; Mastropasqua, Chiara; Giulietti, Giovanni; Marra, Camillo; Bruno, Giuseppe; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bozzali, Marco

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates how cognitive reserve (CR) interacts with neurodegeneration (quantified by medial temporal atrophy, MTA) and macroscopic white matter lesions (WMLs) in delaying the conversion from amnestic mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Forty-two amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients were consecutively recruited. They underwent magnetic resonance imaging and a comprehensive questionnaire to classify them as individuals with low or high CR. Patients were then clinically followed-up for 2 years. The patients' risk for conversion to AD because of CR was estimated by controlling for cognitive efficiency, MTA, and WMLs at baseline. Global cognition was the best predictor of conversion to AD in low CR patients. Conversely, in high CR patients only, WMLs (but not MTA) highly contributed in increasing the risk for conversion to AD. In conclusion, CR interacts with both patients' cognitive features and WMLs in modulating the impact of AD pathology. This seems relevant for clinical prognosis and therapeutic strategies.

  4. Assessing the effect of cognitive styles with different learning modes on learning outcome.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chechen; Chuang, Shu-Hui

    2007-08-01

    In this study, similarities and differences in learning outcome associated with individual differences in cognitive styles are examined using the traditional (face-to-face) and web-based learning modes. 140 undergraduate students were categorized as having analytic or holistic cognitive styles by their scores on the Style of Learning and Thinking questionnaire. Four different conditions were studies; students with analytic cognitive style in a traditional learning mode, analytic cognitive style in a web-based learning mode, holistic cognitive style in a traditional learning mode, and holistic cognitive style in a web-based learning mode. Analysis of the data show that analytic style in traditional mode lead to significantly higher performance and perceived satisfaction than in other conditions. Satisfaction did not differ significantly between students with analytic style in web-based learning and those with holistic style in traditional learning. This suggest that integrating different learning modes into the learning environment may be insufficient to improve learners' satisfaction.

  5. Callous-unemotional traits and antisocial behavior among adolescents: the role of self-serving cognitions.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Nikki; Rodgers, Rachel F; Gibbs, John C; Chabrol, Henri

    2014-02-01

    Self-serving cognitions and callous-unemotional traits play important roles in adolescent antisocial behavior. The objective of this study was to cross-sectionally explore the mediating role of self-serving cognitions in the relationship between callous-unemotional traits and antisocial behavior. A sample of 972 high-school students completed self-report questionnaires assessing callous-unemotional traits, self-serving cognitive distortions and antisocial behavior. Two competing models exploring indirect effects accounting for the relationships between self-serving cognitive distortions, callous-unemotional traits and antisocial behaviors were tested. Both models revealed significant indirect effects, suggesting both pathways are possible. Gender was found to moderate these models. These findings suggest the importance of targeting self-serving cognitions in therapeutic interventions and increase our understanding of the role of self-serving cognitions in antisocial behavior.

  6. The Busier the Better: Greater Busyness Is Associated with Better Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Festini, Sara B.; McDonough, Ian M.; Park, Denise C.

    2016-01-01

    Sustained engagement in mentally challenging activities has been shown to improve memory in older adults. We hypothesized that a busy schedule would be a proxy for an engaged lifestyle and would facilitate cognition. Here, we examined the relationship between busyness and cognition in adults aged 50–89. Participants (N = 330) from the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study (DLBS) completed a cognitive battery and the Martin and Park Environmental Demands Questionnaire (MPED), an assessment of busyness. Results revealed that greater busyness was associated with better processing speed, working memory, episodic memory, reasoning, and crystallized knowledge. Hierarchical regressions also showed that, after controlling for age and education, busyness accounted for significant additional variance in all cognitive constructs—especially episodic memory. Finally, an interaction between age and busyness was not present while predicting cognitive performance, suggesting that busyness was similarly beneficial in adults aged 50–89. Although correlational, these data demonstrate that living a busy lifestyle is associated with better cognition. PMID:27242510

  7. Similarities and differences between dreaming and waking cognition: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Kahan, T L; LaBerge, S; Levitan, L; Zimbardo, P

    1997-03-01

    Thirty-eight "practiced" dreamers (Study 1) and 50 "novice" dreamers (Study 2) completed questionnaires assessing the cognitive, metacognitive, and emotional qualities of recent waking and dreaming experiences. The present findings suggest that dreaming cognition is more similar to waking cognition than previously assumed and that the differences between dreaming and waking cognition are more quantitative than qualitative. Results from the two studies were generally consistent, indicating that high-order cognition during dreaming is not restricted to individuals practiced in dream recall or self-observation. None of the measured features was absent or infrequent in reports of either dreaming or waking experiences. Recollections of dreaming and waking experiences were similar for some cognitive features (e.g., attentional processes, internal commentary, and public self-consciousness) and different for other features (e.g., choice, event-related self-reflection, and affect).

  8. Cognitive autonomy among adolescents with and without hearing loss: Associations with perceived social support.

    PubMed

    Michael, Rinat; Attias, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive autonomy is a skill which may help adolescents prepare for important decisions in adulthood. The current study examined the associations between cognitive autonomy and perceived social support among adolescents with and without hearing loss. Participants were 177 students: 55 were deaf and hard of hearing (dhh) and 122 were hearing. They completed the Cognitive Autonomy and Self-Evaluation Inventory, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and a demographic questionnaire. Significant positive correlations were found between some of the cognitive autonomy variables and some of the perceived social support variables. However, among the dhh group, they were fewer and weaker. Family support was found to be a significant predictor of three out of the five cognitive autonomy variables. In addition, significant differences were found between the dhh and hearing participants in some of the cognitive autonomy variables, but not in perceived social support. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  9. Altered Brain Connectivity in Early Postmenopausal Women with Subjective Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Jennifer N.; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Albert, Kimberly; Melo, Alyssa; Boyd, Brian; Dumas, Julie; Woodward, Neil; McDonald, Brenna C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Park, Joon H.; Naylor, Magdalena; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive changes after menopause are a common complaint, especially as the loss of estradiol at menopause has been hypothesized to contribute to the higher rates of dementia in women. To explore the neural processes related to subjective cognitive complaints, this study examined resting state functional connectivity in 31 postmenopausal women (aged 50–60) in relationship to cognitive complaints following menopause. A cognitive complaint index was calculated using responses to a 120-item questionnaire. Seed regions were identified for resting state brain networks important for higher-order cognitive processes and for areas that have shown differences in volume and functional activity associated with cognitive complaints in prior studies. Results indicated a positive correlation between the executive control network and cognitive complaint score, weaker negative functional connectivity within the frontal cortex, and stronger positive connectivity within the right middle temporal gyrus in postmenopausal women who report more cognitive complaints. While longitudinal studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis, these data are consistent with previous findings suggesting that high levels of cognitive complaints may reflect changes in brain connectivity and may be a potential marker for the risk of late-life cognitive dysfunction in postmenopausal women with otherwise normal cognitive performance. PMID:27721740

  10. A Questionnaire to Measure Children's Awareness of Strategic Reading Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Maribeth Cassidy

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Metacomprehension Strategy Index, a multiple-choice questionnaire, and its supporting validity and reliability data. Discusses how teachers can use and interpret this information to evaluate middle and upper elementary students' knowledge of strategic reading processes. (MG)

  11. Preliminary reliability of the five item physical activity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min-Haeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to design a physical activity questionnaire reflecting on the basic principles and recommendations of exercise and to examine its reliability. [Subjects and Methods] 342 males and 374 females from the community centers (senior center, residential culture center, sport center, and YWCA center) participated in this study. [Results] The test-retest reliability of the physical activity questionnaire, measured with an interval of three months, being between 0.61 and 0.91 signifies that the questionnaire was useful instrument for assessing physical activity levels. [Conclusion] This study found that the simple physical activity questionnaire containing the frequency, duration, intensity, overall length, and type of activities that the person performed during their leisure time was reliable. PMID:28174459

  12. Preliminary reliability of the five item physical activity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min-Haeng

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to design a physical activity questionnaire reflecting on the basic principles and recommendations of exercise and to examine its reliability. [Subjects and Methods] 342 males and 374 females from the community centers (senior center, residential culture center, sport center, and YWCA center) participated in this study. [Results] The test-retest reliability of the physical activity questionnaire, measured with an interval of three months, being between 0.61 and 0.91 signifies that the questionnaire was useful instrument for assessing physical activity levels. [Conclusion] This study found that the simple physical activity questionnaire containing the frequency, duration, intensity, overall length, and type of activities that the person performed during their leisure time was reliable.

  13. Which kind of psychometrics is adequate for patient satisfaction questionnaires?

    PubMed Central

    Konerding, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The construction and psychometric analysis of patient satisfaction questionnaires are discussed. The discussion is based upon the classification of multi-item questionnaires into scales or indices. Scales consist of items that describe the effects of the latent psychological variable to be measured, and indices consist of items that describe the causes of this variable. Whether patient satisfaction questionnaires should be constructed and analyzed as scales or as indices depends upon the purpose for which these questionnaires are required. If the final aim is improving care with regard to patients’ preferences, then these questionnaires should be constructed and analyzed as indices. This implies two requirements: 1) items for patient satisfaction questionnaires should be selected in such a way that the universe of possible causes of patient satisfaction is covered optimally and 2) Cronbach’s alpha, principal component analysis, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and analyses with models from item response theory, such as the Rasch Model, should not be applied for psychometric analyses. Instead, multivariate regression analyses with a direct rating of patient satisfaction as the dependent variable and the individual questionnaire items as independent variables should be performed. The coefficients produced by such an analysis can be applied for selecting the best items and for weighting the selected items when a sum score is determined. The lower boundaries of the validity of the unweighted and the weighted sum scores can be estimated by their correlations with the direct satisfaction rating. While the first requirement is fulfilled in the majority of the previous patient satisfaction questionnaires, the second one deviates from previous practice. Hence, if patient satisfaction is actually measured with the final aim of improving care with regard to patients’ preferences, then future practice should be changed so that the second

  14. Development of the Comprehensive General Parenting Questionnaire for caregivers of 5-13 year olds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    borderline significant. Parents with a high level of education were less likely to use overly forms of controlling parenting (i.e., coercive control and overprotection) and more likely to have children with lower BMI. Based on several author review meetings and cognitive interviews the questionnaire was further modified to an 85-item questionnaire. Conclusions The GCPQ may facilitate research exploring how parenting influences children’s weight-related behaviors. The contextual influence of general parenting is likely to be more profound than its direct relationship with weight status. PMID:24512450

  15. Towards Tailored Patient's Management Approach: Integrating the Modified 2010 ACR Criteria for Fibromyalgia in Multidimensional Patient Reported Outcome Measures Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; Ahmed, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change of a patient self-reported questionnaire combining the Widespread Pain Index and the Symptom Severity Score as well as construct outcome measures and comorbidities assessment in fibromyalgia patients. Methods. The PROMs-FM was conceptualized based on frameworks used by the WHO Quality of Life tool and the PROMIS. Initially, cognitive interviews were conducted to identify item pool of questions. Item selection and reduction were achieved based on patients as well as an interdisciplinary group of specialists. Rasch and internal consistency reliability analyses were implemented. The questionnaire included the modified ACR criteria main items (Symptom Severity Score and Widespread Pain Index), in addition to assessment of functional disability, quality of life (QoL), review of the systems, and comorbidities. Every patient completed HAQ and EQ-5D questionnaires. Results. A total of 146 fibromyalgia patients completed the questionnaire. The PROMs-FM questionnaire was reliable as demonstrated by a high standardized alpha (0.886-0.982). Content construct assessment of the functional disability and QoL revealed significant correlation (p < 0.01) with both HAQ and EQ-5D. Changes in functional disability and QoL showed significant (p < 0.01) variation with diseases activity status in response to therapy. There was higher prevalence of autonomic symptoms, CVS risk, sexual dysfunction, and falling. Conclusions. The developed PROMs-FM questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for assessment of fibromyalgia patients. A phased treatment regimen depending on the severity of FMS as well as preferences and comorbidities of the patient is the best approach to tailored patient management.

  16. Towards Tailored Patient's Management Approach: Integrating the Modified 2010 ACR Criteria for Fibromyalgia in Multidimensional Patient Reported Outcome Measures Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; Ahmed, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change of a patient self-reported questionnaire combining the Widespread Pain Index and the Symptom Severity Score as well as construct outcome measures and comorbidities assessment in fibromyalgia patients. Methods. The PROMs-FM was conceptualized based on frameworks used by the WHO Quality of Life tool and the PROMIS. Initially, cognitive interviews were conducted to identify item pool of questions. Item selection and reduction were achieved based on patients as well as an interdisciplinary group of specialists. Rasch and internal consistency reliability analyses were implemented. The questionnaire included the modified ACR criteria main items (Symptom Severity Score and Widespread Pain Index), in addition to assessment of functional disability, quality of life (QoL), review of the systems, and comorbidities. Every patient completed HAQ and EQ-5D questionnaires. Results. A total of 146 fibromyalgia patients completed the questionnaire. The PROMs-FM questionnaire was reliable as demonstrated by a high standardized alpha (0.886–0.982). Content construct assessment of the functional disability and QoL revealed significant correlation (p < 0.01) with both HAQ and EQ-5D. Changes in functional disability and QoL showed significant (p < 0.01) variation with diseases activity status in response to therapy. There was higher prevalence of autonomic symptoms, CVS risk, sexual dysfunction, and falling. Conclusions. The developed PROMs-FM questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for assessment of fibromyalgia patients. A phased treatment regimen depending on the severity of FMS as well as preferences and comorbidities of the patient is the best approach to tailored patient management. PMID:27190648

  17. A test of the cognitive content specificity hypothesis in depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lamberton, Anna; Oei, Tian P S

    2008-03-01

    The present study tested the cognitive content specificity hypothesis (CCSH) to assess whether anxiety and depression can be differentiated on the basis of cognitive disturbance. One hundred and thirty five depressed participants were administered the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI), the automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ) and the anxious self-statements questionnaire (ASSQ). It was hypothesised that depressive cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, depressive (but not anxiety) symptoms in a depressed sample. Conversely, it was predicted that anxiety cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, anxiety (but not depressive) symptoms in a depressed sample. Results revealed that the ATQ was the sole predictor of the BDI and similarly, the ASSQ was the sole predictor of the BAI. These findings support the CCSH in depression and provide an integrative framework for a greater understanding of the relationship between anxiety and depression.

  18. The role of core beliefs in the specific cognitions of bulimic patients.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Vanesa C; Derksen, Jan J L; van Der Staak, Cees P F

    2004-04-01

    Cognitive models of bulimia nervosa have stressed the importance of self-beliefs in the maintenance of the disorder. However, new findings show a deeper and more general level of beliefs also to play a role in eating disorders. These beliefs are long-standing, absolute, and unconditional. In the present study, the relations between such core beliefs and specific cognitions regarding eating, shape, and weight were examined. The sample consisted of 75 bulimic outpatients who started treatment. The patients completed the Schema Questionnaire, the Eating Disorders Inventory-2, the SCL-90-R, and the Mizes Anorectic Cognitions Questionnaire at intake. Strong relations between some core beliefs and the specific cognitions regarding shape, weight, and eating were found. The modification of core beliefs appears to be a very important issue to incorporate into treatment.

  19. Translation to Portuguese and cultural adaptation of Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire - Parent Form (FAQLQ-PF).

    PubMed

    Couto, M; Silva, D; Piedade, S; Borrego, Lm; Flokstra-de Blok, B; Dunn Galvin, A; Morais-Almeida, M

    2016-05-01

    Food allergy is a health problem with significant negative impact in Quality of Life (QoL). We aimed to translate into Portuguese and culturally adapt to our population the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire - Parent Form (FAQLQ-PF). Cross-cultural translation was performed according to guidelines. Linguistic validation consisted in 3 steps: forward translation, backward translation and comprehensibility testing. A consensual version was obtained and tested in parents of food allergic children by cognitive debriefing. Twelve questionnaires were fulfilled, all completed in ≤ 15 min. No comments, doubts or suggestions were posed, except for 2 parents regarding a question about the number of food their children had to avoid. Two gave special positive feedback about the utility of FAQLQ-PF. Changes have been included after this pre-test in accordance to doubts and suggestions of participants, and the Portuguese version is now able to be used in clinics and research.

  20. Where Is Cognition? Emotion and Cognition in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, John H.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that the brain is the seat of cognition, that cognitive processes are neutral processes, and that, in the brain, affect and cognition are distinguishable but inseparable. This perspective allows a reconceptualization of the affective filter in terms of the brain's stimulus appraisal system, which interacts with cognition to promote or…

  1. Cognitive and Academic Gains as a Result of Cognitive Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckey, Alicia J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test Feuersetein's Structural Cognitive Modifiability model by evaluating changes in cognitive skills and reading scores after participation in one of two cognitive skills training programs. The Woodcock Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Tests of Achievement, 3 rd editions were used as evaluation tools.…

  2. Development and Validation of a Personality Assessment Instrument for Traditional Korean Medicine: Sasang Personality Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Han; Lee, Siwoo; Park, Soo Hyun; Jang, Eunsu; Lee, Soo Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Sasang typology is a traditional Korean medicine based on the biopsychosocial perspectives of Neo-Confucianism and utilizes medical herbs and acupuncture for type-specific treatment. This study was designed to develop and validate the Sasang Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) for future use in the assessment of personality based on Sasang typology. Design and Methods. We selected questionnaire items using internal consistency analysis and examined construct validity with explorative factor analysis using 245 healthy participants. Test-retest reliability as well as convergent validity were examined. Results. The 14-item SPQ showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .817) and test-retest reliability (r = .837). Three extracted subscales, SPQ-behavior, SPQ-emotionality, and SPQ-cognition, were found, explaining 55.77% of the total variance. The SPQ significantly correlated with Temperament and Character Inventory novelty seeking (r = .462), harm avoidance (r = −.390), and NEO Personality Inventory extraversion (r = .629). The SPQ score of the So-Eum (24.43 ± 4.93), Tae-Eum (27.33 ± 5.88), and So-Yang (30.90 ± 5.23) types were significantly different from each other (P < .01). Conclusion. Current results demonstrated the reliability and validity of the SPQ and its subscales that can be utilized as an objective instrument for conducting personalized medicine research incorporating the biopsychosocial perspective. PMID:22567034

  3. Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire: Psychometric analysis in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeremy P.; Carson, Cody S.; Shrestha, Srijana; Kunik, Mark E.; Armento, Maria E.; Stanley, Melinda A.; Amspoker, Amber B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assist researchers and clinicians considering using the Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire (SCSRFQ) with older-adult samples, the current study analyzed the psychometrics of SCSRFQ scores in two older-adult samples. Method Adults age 55 or older who had formerly participated in studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety and/or depression were recruited to complete questionnaires. In Study 1 (N = 66), the authors assessed the relations between the SCSRFQ and other measures of religiousness/spirituality, mental health, and demographic variables, using bivariate correlations and nonparametric tests. In Study 2 (N = 223), the authors also conducted confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses of the SCSRFQ, as well as an Item Response Theory analysis. Results The SCSRFQ was moderately to highly positively correlated with all measures of religiousness/spirituality. Relations with mental health were weak and differed across samples. Ethnic minorities scored higher than White participants on the SCSRFQ, but only in Study 2. Factor analyses showed that a single-factor model fit the SCSRFQ best. According to Item Response Theory analysis, SCSRFQ items discriminated well between participants with low-to-moderate levels of the construct but provided little information at higher levels. Conclusion Although the SCSRFQ scores had adequate psychometric characteristics, the measure’s usefulness may be limited in samples of older adults. PMID:24892461

  4. Therapeutics for cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Shineman, Diana W; Salthouse, Timothy A; Launer, Lenore J; Hof, Patrick R; Bartzokis, George; Kleiman, Robin; Luine, Victoria; Buccafusco, Jerry J; Small, Gary W; Aisen, Paul S; Lowe, David A; Fillit, Howard M

    2010-04-01

    This review summarizes the scientific talks presented at the conference "Therapeutics for Cognitive Aging," hosted by the New York Academy of Sciences and the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation on May 15, 2009. Attended by scientists from industry and academia, as well as by a number of lay people-approximately 200 in all-the conference specifically tackled the many aspects of developing therapeutic interventions for cognitive impairment. Discussion also focused on how to define cognitive aging and whether it should be considered a treatable, tractable disease.

  5. Mutually Augmented Cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesdorf, Florian; Pangercic, Dejan; Bubb, Heiner; Beetz, Michael

    In mac, an ergonomic dialog-system and algorithms will be developed that enable human experts and companions to be integrated into knowledge gathering and decision making processes of highly complex cognitive systems (e.g. Assistive Household as manifested further in the paper). In this event we propose to join algorithms and methodologies coming from Ergonomics and Artificial Intelligence that: a) make cognitive systems more congenial for non-expert humans, b) facilitate their comprehension by utilizing a high-level expandable control code for human experts and c) augment representation of such cognitive system into “deep representation” obtained through an interaction with human companions.

  6. Preliminary validity of the barriers to treatment adherence questionnaire in fibromyalgia: combining quantitative and focus group data.

    PubMed

    Dobkin, Patricia L; De Civita, Mirella; Bernatsky, Sasha; Filipski, Marta; Sita, Aurelio; Baron, Murray

    2009-10-01

    The goals of this study were to (1) provide preliminary reliability and validity of the Barriers to Treatment Adherence Questionnaire, developed for patients with fibromyalgia, and (2) examine barriers to adherence and general adherence to multimodal treatment during a 3-mo. period. A secondary goal was to explore in a focus discussion group format patients' perceptions of the adherence process and ways of managing the treatment program. 39 fibromyalgia patients were followed while participating in a combined outpatient program of physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, and cognitive behavioral therapy. The Barriers to Treatment Adherence Questionnaire demonstrated good reliability. Construct validity of the Barriers to Treatment Adherence Questionnaire was supported through significant positive correlations with the General Adherence Scale at Months 1 and 3. In addition, a significant change was observed in scores on the Barriers to Treatment Adherence Questionnaire for the physiotherapy component of treatment, with scores decreasing between Months 2 and 3. Addressing barriers to improve adherence may maximize the benefit of treatment programs.

  7. HIV risk behaviors, intentions, and perceptions among Namibian youth as assessed by a theory-based questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Stanton, B F; Fitzgerald, A M; Li, X; Shipena, H; Ricardo, I B; Galbraith, J S; Terreri, N; Strijdom, J; Hangula-Ndlovu, V; Kahihuata, J

    1999-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the United States and Europe regarding HIV risk prevention efforts targeting adolescents. However, in Africa less progress has been made to date. This article address three questions: Can risk assessment questionnaires developed in Western countries be modified so as to be appropriate for use in African countries? Are social cognitive models appropriate in African settings? Does covariation among risk behaviors occur among youth residing in African countries? The data was obtained from a cross-sectional survey conducted among 922 youth ages 12 to 18 years living in school-based hostels in Namibia. Data were collected using a theory-based risk assessment questionnaire. One third of the youth were sexually experienced, three quarters of whom had engaged in sexual intercourse in the previous 6 months. Over one third of these youth had had more that one sexual partner in the previous 6 months and over one half had not used a condom at last episode of intercourse. The psychometric properties of the questionnaire and the relationship between perceptions and behaviors provide evidence that theory-based questionnaires developed in Western countries can be modified for use in different cultural settings. The data also provide strong evidence of covariation between risk behaviors among Namibian youth.

  8. Association of Lifetime Intellectual Enrichment with Cognitive Decline in the Older Population

    PubMed Central

    Vemuri, Prashanthi; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Machulda, Mary; Knopman, David S.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Geda, Yonas E.; Rocca, Walter A.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Intellectual lifestyle enrichment throughout life is increasingly viewed as a protective strategy against commonly observed cognitive decline in the elderly. OBJECTIVE To investigate the association of lifetime intellectual enrichment with baseline cognitive performance and rate of cognitive decline in a non-demented elderly population and to estimate difference (in years) associated with lifetime intellectual enrichment to the onset of cognitive impairment. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS Prospective analysis of subjects enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA), a longitudinal population-based study of cognitive aging in Olmsted County, Minnesota. We studied 1995 non-demented (1718 cognitively normal, 277 MCI) participants in MCSA who completed intellectual lifestyle measures at baseline and underwent at least one follow-up visit. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We studied the effect of lifetime intellectual enrichment by separating the variables into two non-overlapping principal components: education/occupation-score and mid/late-life cognitive activity measure based on self-report questionnaires. A global cognitive Z-score served as our summary cognition measure. We used linear mixed-effects models to investigate the associations of demographic and intellectual enrichment measures with global cognitive Z-score trajectories. RESULTS Baseline cognitive performance was lower in older subjects and in those with lower education/occupation, lower mid/late-life cognitive activity, apolipoprotein E4 (APOE) genotype, and in men. The interaction between the two intellectual enrichment measures was significant such that the beneficial effect of mid/late-life cognitive activity on baseline cognitive performance was reduced with increasing education/occupation. Only baseline age, mid/late-life cognitive activity, and APOE4 genotype were significantly associated with longitudinal change in cognitive performance from baseline. For APOE4 carriers with high

  9. Assessing Patients' Cognitive Therapy Skills: Initial Evaluation of the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Daniel R; Hollars, Shannon N; Adler, Abby D; Goldstein, Lizabeth A; Braun, Justin D

    2014-10-01

    In Cognitive Therapy (CT), therapists work to help patients develop skills to cope with negative affect. Most current methods of assessing patients' skills are cumbersome and impractical for clinical use. To address this issue, we developed and conducted an initial psychometric evaluation of self and therapist reported versions of a new measure of CT skills: the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale (CCTS). We evaluated the CCTS at intake and post-treatment in a sample of 67 patients participating in CT. The CCTS correlated with a preexisting measure of CT skills (the Ways of Responding Questionnaire) and was also related to concurrent depressive symptoms. Across CT, self-reported improvements in CT competencies were associated with greater changes in depressive symptoms. These findings offer initial evidence for the validity of the CCTS. We discuss the CCTS in comparison with other measures of CT skills and suggest future research directions.

  10. [French translation of the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (Frankfurter Beschwerde-Fragebogen, FBF, Süllwold, 1986)].

    PubMed

    Loas, G; Berner, P; Rein, W; Yon, V; Boyer, P; Lecrubier, Y

    1997-01-01

    Observable behaviors play the predominant role in the clinical assessment of schizophrenia, while only secondary emphasis is placed on exclusively subjective complaints. Huber employed the phenomenological approach to obtain subjective symptoms that he named "basic symptoms". Subjective symptoms constitute an important component of the schizophrenic symptomatology. They may play a predominant role during the prodromal or early phases of the disease, they may be useful in elucidating cognitive and perceptual disturbances in schizophrenia. In the last decade, the assessment of patients' subjective experiences has acquired significance with the development of several instruments for their specific evaluation. The Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ, Süllwold, 1986) is the instrument most widely used in Europe for assessing subjective experiences. It covers a wide range of complaints of cognitive deficits that Süllwold compiled from the complaints of schizophrenic patients. We present the French translation of the FCQ. The availability of the FCQ in French could be an important step in promoting the study of subjective experiences in research and clinical activities.

  11. Development of a Korean Version of the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire-Depression for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Min; Hong, Jin-Pyo; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kang, Hee-Ju; Lee, Yong-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cognitive symptoms are an important component of depression and the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire-Depression is one of only a few instruments available for the subjective assessment of cognitive dysfunction in depression. Thus, the present study aimed to validate a Korean version of the PDQ-D (K-PDQ-D) using patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods This study included 128 MDD patients who were assessed at study entry and 86 of these patients were then completed 12 weeks of antidepressant monotherapy. All subjects were assessed with the K-PDQ-D, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), the EuroQol-5 dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D), and the number of sick leave days taken in the previous week. The internal consistency, Guttman’s split-half and test-retest reliabilities, factorial analyses, and concurrent and predictive validities of the K-PDQ-D were investigated. Results The K-PDQ-D exhibited excellent internal consistency and reliabilities, and was composed of four factors with high coefficients of determination. The concurrent validity analyses revealed that the K-PDQ-D scores were significantly correlated with the MADRS, SDS, and EQ-5D scores and the number of sick leave days taken. The K-PDQ-D scores at study entry significantly predicted changes in sick leave days and EQ-5D score from study entry to the 12-week endpoint. Conclusion The newly developed K-PDQ-D is a reliable and valid instrument for the evaluation of subjective cognitive symptoms in MDD patients. The K-PDQ-D may assist in the gathering of unique information regarding subjective cognitive complaints, which is important for the comprehensive evaluation of patients with MDD. PMID:26792037

  12. Japanese version of the ALS-FTD-Questionnaire (ALS-FTD-Q-J).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Beeldman, Emma; Raaphorst, Joost; Izumi, Yuishin; Yoshino, Hiide; Masuda, Michihito; Atsuta, Naoki; Ito, Satoru; Adachi, Tadashi; Adachi, Yoshiki; Yokota, Osamu; Oda, Masaya; Hanashima, Ritsuko; Ogino, Mieko; Ichikawa, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Kimura, Hideki; Shimizu, Toshio; Aiba, Ikuko; Yabe, Hayato; Kanba, Makoto; Kusumi, Kimiyoshi; Aoki, Tetsuya; Hiroe, Yu; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Nomoto, Masahiro; Sobue, Gen; Nakashima, Kenji

    2016-08-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) share common clinical, genetic and neuropathological features. Some ALS patients have behavioral/personality changes, which could result in significant obstacles in the care provided by family members and caregivers. An easy screening tool would contribute greatly to the evaluation of these symptoms. We translated the ALS-FTD-Questionnaire, developed in the Netherlands, into Japanese (ALS-FTD-Q-J) and examined the clinimetric properties (internal consistency, construct and clinical validity). Patients with ALS and/or behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) were evaluated alongside healthy controls in this multicenter study. All ALS patients, regardless of bvFTD status, were further evaluated by the frontal behavioral inventory (FBI) and for frontal/executive function, cognition, anxiety/depression, and motor functions. Data from 146 subjects were analyzed: ALS (92), ALS-bvFTD (6), bvFTD (16), and healthy controls (32). The internal consistency of the ALS-FTD-Q-J was good (Cronbach α=0.92). The ALS-FTD-Q-J showed construct validity as it exhibited a high correlation with the FBI (r=0.79). However, correlations were moderate with anxiety/depression and low with cognitive scales, in contrast to the original report, i.e. a moderate correlation with cognition and a low correlation with anxiety/depression. The ALS-FTD-Q-J discriminated ALS patients from (ALS-)bvFTD patients and controls. Thus, the ALS-FTD-Q-J is useful for evaluating Japanese ALS/FTD patients.

  13. Mild Cognitive Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... noticeable and measurable decline in cognitive abilities, including memory and thinking skills. A person with MCI is ... independent function. People with MCI, especially MCI involving memory problems, are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease ...

  14. Curriculum and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    Paper presented at the Summer Meeting of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf held in Philadelphia, June 24-27, 1970. Discussed are concepts of curriculum development, cognitive development, and educational methods with implications for the handicapped. (CB)

  15. Creativity and Cognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1980-01-01

    The article focuses on research on improving creativity, including early efforts to enhance, operationalize, and define creativity. Studies dealing with behavioral management of creativity are discussed, as are those concerning the effects of self-statements and cognition. (CL)

  16. Advances in Animal Cognition.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Jennifer

    2016-11-30

    This editorial endorses a diverse approach to the study of animal cognition and emphasizes the theoretical and applied gains that can be made by embracing this approach. This diversity emerges from cross-talk among scientists trained in a variety of backgrounds and theoretical approaches, who study a variety of topics with a range of species. By shifting from an anthropocentric focus on humans and our closest living relatives, and the historic reliance on the lab rat or pigeon, modern students of animal cognition have uncovered many fascinating facets of cognition in species ranging from insects to carnivores. Diversity in both topic and species of study will allow researchers to better understand the complex evolutionary forces giving rise to widely shared and unique cognitive processes. Furthermore, this increased understanding will translate into more effective strategies for managing wild and captive populations of nonhuman species.

  17. Cognitive Computing for Security.

    SciTech Connect

    Debenedictis, Erik; Rothganger, Fredrick; Aimone, James Bradley; Marinella, Matthew; Evans, Brian Robert; Warrender, Christina E.; Mickel, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Final report for Cognitive Computing for Security LDRD 165613. It reports on the development of hybrid of general purpose/ne uromorphic computer architecture, with an emphasis on potential implementation with memristors.

  18. Advances in Animal Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Vonk, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This editorial endorses a diverse approach to the study of animal cognition and emphasizes the theoretical and applied gains that can be made by embracing this approach. This diversity emerges from cross-talk among scientists trained in a variety of backgrounds and theoretical approaches, who study a variety of topics with a range of species. By shifting from an anthropocentric focus on humans and our closest living relatives, and the historic reliance on the lab rat or pigeon, modern students of animal cognition have uncovered many fascinating facets of cognition in species ranging from insects to carnivores. Diversity in both topic and species of study will allow researchers to better understand the complex evolutionary forces giving rise to widely shared and unique cognitive processes. Furthermore, this increased understanding will translate into more effective strategies for managing wild and captive populations of nonhuman species. PMID:27916874

  19. Acromegaly Quality of Life Questionnaire (AcroQoL)

    PubMed Central

    Badia, Xavier; Webb, Susan M; Prieto, Luis; Lara, Nuria

    2004-01-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic disease with an important impact on patients, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The ability to effectively measure Health Related Quality of Life is central to describing the impacts of disease or treatment upon the patient, therefore the importance of having a disease specific questionnaire for acromegaly. For the development of the AcroQoL questionnaire different sources of information were used: first a literature search was performed to identify relevant papers describing the impact of acromegaly in HRQoL, second the main domains of impact on HRQoL were identified by 10 experts endocrinologists, and third ten in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted in acromegalic patients to identify domains and items related to the self-perceived impact of acromegaly in patients' life. After a proper qualitative analysis a preliminary 38 item questionnaire was obtained. Rasch analysis concluded with a final 22 item questionnaire. The measurement properties (validity and reliability) of the resulting final questionnaire were tested and compared using standard procedures (Cronbach's Alpha and item-total correlation). The evaluation of the item parameters confirmed the construct validity of the new instrument. Responsiveness to change was assessed in a small sample of 32 acromegalic patients with active disease in Spain who were administered the AcroQoL and the generic questionnaire EuroQoL 5-D. The results showed a statistically significant relationship between all the dimensions of AcroQoL and the VAS (visual analogic scale) of EQ-5D. An improvement in the global score of AcroQoL was related to a global improvement in the VAS of the EQ-5D. Following the current recommended standard methodology the Spanish questionnaire was translated into eleven other languages. PMID:14987332

  20. Development and Preliminary Validation of Chinese Preschoolers’ Eating Behavior Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhai; Wang, Baoxi; Sun, Lijun; Shang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop a questionnaire for caregivers to assess the eating behavior of Chinese preschoolers. Methods To assess children’s eating behaviors, 152 items were derived from a broad review of the literature related to epidemiology surveys and the assessment of children’s eating behaviors. All of these items were reviewed by 50 caregivers of preschoolers and 10 experienced pediatricians. Seventy-seven items were selected for use in a primary questionnaire. After conducting an exploratory factor analysis and a variability analysis on the data from 313 preschoolers used to evaluate this primary questionnaire, we deleted 39 of these 77 items. A Chinese Preschoolers’ Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CPEBQ) was finally established from the remaining 38 items. The structure of this questionnaire was explored by factor analysis, and its reliability, validity and discriminative ability were evaluated with data collected from caregivers of 603 preschoolers. Results The CPEBQ consisted of 7 dimensions and 38 items. The 7 dimensions were food fussiness, food responsiveness, eating habit, satiety responsiveness, exogenous eating, emotional eating and initiative eating. The Cronbach’s α coefficient for the questionnaire was 0.92, and the test-retest reliability was 0.72. There were significant differences between the scores of normal-weight, overweight and obese preschoolers when it was referred to food fussiness, food responsiveness, eating habits, satiety responsiveness and emotional eating (p<0.05). Differences in caregiver’s education levels also had significant effects on scores for food fussiness, eating habits and exogenous eating (p<0.05). Conclusions The CPEBQ satisfies the conditions of reliability and validity, in accordance with psychometric demands. The questionnaire can be employed to evaluate the characteristics of Chinese preschoolers’ eating behaviors; therefore, it can be used in child health care practice and

  1. Cognitive Processing Hardware Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-31

    approach . It is too early now to decide on final cognitive memory architecture. We must have a great deal more experi- ence with applications and know of...system is contemplated, a memory system that may also serve as a model for many aspects of human memory. The cognitive memory design would be able to store...correlates with or relates to the present real-time sensory inputs. The search would be done by a retrieval system that makes use of autoassociative

  2. Cognitive aspects of performance.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The study of cognitive structures and processes in the control of skilled performance is considered and reviewed with special reference to a proposed hierarchical system incorporating levels of motor integration. Cognitive styles and dispositions of general behaviour are suggested as factors which may determine performance levels. The relative importance of these personal factors and stronger personality traits in accounting for variance in performance is considered in the light of a critique of the current interactional controversy. PMID:444808

  3. Emotion, Cognition, and Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, R. J.

    2002-11-01

    Emotion is central to the quality and range of everyday human experience. The neurobiological substrates of human emotion are now attracting increasing interest within the neurosciences motivated, to a considerable extent, by advances in functional neuroimaging techniques. An emerging theme is the question of how emotion interacts with and influences other domains of cognition, in particular attention, memory, and reasoning. The psychological consequences and mechanisms underlying the emotional modulation of cognition provide the focus of this article.

  4. Flavonol Intake and Cognitive Decline in Middle-Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Root, Martin; Ravine, Erin; Harper, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive decline occurs with age and may be slowed by dietary measures, including increased intake of dietary phytochemicals. However, evidence from large and long-term studies of flavonol intake is limited. Dietary intakes of flavonols were assessed from a large biracial study of 10,041 subjects, aged 45-64, by analysis of a food frequency questionnaire administered at visit 1 of triennial visits. Cognitive function was assessed at visits 2 and 4 with the following three cognitive performance tests: the delayed word recall test, the revised Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale digit symbol subtest, and the word fluency test of the Multilingual Aphasia Examination. The change in each score over 6 years was calculated, and a combined standardized change score was calculated. Generalized linear models controlled for age, ethnicity, gender, education level, energy intake, current smoking, physical activity, body mass index, diabetes, and vitamin C intake. Total flavonols across quintiles of intake were positively associated with preserved combined cognitive function (P<.001). This pattern with preserved combined cognitive function was consistent for the three major individual flavonols in the diet, myricetin, kaempferol, and quercetin (each P<.001). The positive association with total flavonols was strongest for the digit symbol subtest (P<.001). In this cohort, flavonol intake was correlated with protected cognitive function over time.

  5. Does caregiving stress affect cognitive function in older women?

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunmin; Kawachi, Ichiro; Grodstein, Francine

    2004-01-01

    Increasing numbers of women provide care to their ill spouses; however, no studies have examined possible effects of caregiving stress on cognitive function. We administered 6 tests of cognitive function to 13740 Nurses' Health Study participants aged 70-79 years. We collected information on caregiving and numerous potential confounding variables via biennial mailed questionnaires. After adjustment for potential confounders (age, education, mental health index, vitality index, use of antidepressants, and history of high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease), we found modest but significantly increased risks of low cognitive function on three of the cognitive tests among women who provided care to a disabled or ill spouse compared with women who did not provide any care. For example, on the TICS, a test of general cognition, the risk of a low score was 31% higher in women who provided care compared with women who did not (RR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10, 1.56). We found a moderately increased risk of poor performance on several cognitive tests among women who provided care to their disabled or ill husbands.

  6. Cognitive self-regulation, social functioning and psychopathology in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Santosh, Shivani; Roy, Debdulal Dutta; Kundu, Partha Sarathi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To explore relation between cognitive self-regulation, social functioning, and psychopathology in schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 were taken from Department of Psychiatry of two postgraduate hospitals of Kolkata, India. All subjects gave informed consent. After recording sociodemographic and clinical details, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia (PANSS), Schizophrenia Research Foundation India-Social Functioning Index (SCARF-SFI), and specially designed questionnaire on cognitive self-regulation was administered. Results: All the four subtests of SCARF-SFI, that is, self-concern, occupational role, social role and family role, and symptoms scale of PANSS were significantly correlated with cognitive self-regulation. Cognitive self-regulation along with positive and negative symptoms was able to predict social functioning. Conclusion: Cognitive self-regulation is significantly and positively correlated to social functioning. Cognitive self-regulation along with positive and negative symptoms is a significant predictor of social functioning. PMID:27212815

  7. Coffee consumption and cognitive function among older adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Kozlow, Marilyn; Kritz-Silverstein, Donna; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Morton, Deborah

    2002-11-01

    This study examined the association of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake with cognitive function in a community-based sample of older adults in 1988-1992. Participants were 890 women with a mean age of 72.6 years and 638 men with a mean age of 73.3 years from the Rancho Bernardo Study. Cognitive function was assessed by 12 standardized tests, and lifetime consumption and current coffee consumption were obtained by questionnaire. After adjustment for confounders, higher lifetime coffee consumption in women was associated with better (p < or = 0.05) performance on six of 12 tests, with a trend (p < or = 0.10) on two other cognitive function tests; current caffeinated coffee intake was associated with better performance on two tests (p < 0.05), with a trend (p < 0.10) on one other test. Among women aged 80 or more years, lifetime coffee intake was nonsignificantly associated with better performance on 11 of the 12 tests. No relation was found between coffee intake and cognitive function among men or between decaffeinated coffee intake and cognitive function in either sex. Lifetime and current exposure to caffeine may be associated with better cognitive performance among women, especially among those aged 80 or more years.

  8. Cognitive framing in action.

    PubMed

    Huhn, John M; Potts, Cory Adam; Rosenbaum, David A

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive framing effects have been widely reported in higher-level decision-making and have been ascribed to rules of thumb for quick thinking. No such demonstrations have been reported for physical action, as far as we know, but they would be expected if cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. To test for such effects, we asked participants to reach for a horizontally-oriented pipe to move it from one height to another while turning the pipe 180° to bring one end (the "business end") to a target on the left or right. From a physical perspective, participants could have always rotated the pipe in the same angular direction no matter which end was the business end; a given participant could have always turned the pipe clockwise or counter-clockwise. Instead, our participants turned the business end counter-clockwise for left targets and clockwise for right targets. Thus, the way the identical physical task was framed altered the way it was performed. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. A tantalizing possibility is that higher-level decision heuristics have roots in the control of physical action, a hypothesis that accords with embodied views of cognition.

  9. Mario Becomes Cognitive.

    PubMed

    Schrodt, Fabian; Kneissler, Jan; Ehrenfeld, Stephan; Butz, Martin V

    2017-02-07

    In line with Allen Newell's challenge to develop complete cognitive architectures, and motivated by a recent proposal for a unifying subsymbolic computational theory of cognition, we introduce the cognitive control architecture SEMLINCS. SEMLINCS models the development of an embodied cognitive agent that learns discrete production rule-like structures from its own, autonomously gathered, continuous sensorimotor experiences. Moreover, the agent uses the developing knowledge to plan and control environmental interactions in a versatile, goal-directed, and self-motivated manner. Thus, in contrast to several well-known symbolic cognitive architectures, SEMLINCS is not provided with production rules and the involved symbols, but it learns them. In this paper, the actual implementation of SEMLINCS causes learning and self-motivated, autonomous behavioral control of the game figure Mario in a clone of the computer game Super Mario Bros. Our evaluations highlight the successful development of behavioral versatility as well as the learning of suitable production rules and the involved symbols from sensorimotor experiences. Moreover, knowledge- and motivation-dependent individualizations of the agents' behavioral tendencies are shown. Finally, interaction sequences can be planned on the sensorimotor-grounded production rule level. Current limitations directly point toward the need for several further enhancements, which may be integrated into SEMLINCS in the near future. Overall, SEMLINCS may be viewed as an architecture that allows the functional and computational modeling of embodied cognitive development, whereby the current main focus lies on the development of production rules from sensorimotor experiences.

  10. Language and cognition.

    PubMed

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2009-04-01

    What is the role of language in cognition? Do we think with words, or do we use words to communicate made-up decisions? The paper briefly reviews ideas in this area since 1950s. Then we discuss mechanisms of cognition, recent neuroscience experiments, and corresponding mathematical models. These models are interpreted in terms of a biological drive for cognition. Based on the Grossberg-Levine theory of drives and emotions, we identify specific emotions associated with the need for cognition. We demonstrate an engineering application of the developed technique, which significantly improves detection of patterns in noise over the previous state-of-the-art. The developed mathematical models are extended toward language. Then we consider possible brain-mind mechanisms of interaction between language and cognition. A mathematical analysis imposes restrictions on possible mechanisms. The proposed model resolves some long-standing language-cognition issues: how the mind learns correct associations between words and objects among an astronomical number of possible associations; why kids can talk about almost everything, but cannot act like adults, what exactly are the brain-mind differences; why animals do not talk and think like people. Recent brain imaging experiments indicate support for the proposed model. We discuss future theoretical and experimental research.

  11. Development and Validation of the Bicultural Youth Acculturation Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Kukaswadia, Atif; Janssen, Ian; Pickett, William; Bajwa, Jasmine; Georgiades, Katholiki; Lalonde, Richard N.; Quon, Elizabeth C.; Safdar, Saba; Pike, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Acculturation is a multidimensional process involving changes in behaviour and beliefs. Questionnaires developed to measure acculturation are typically designed for specific ethnic populations and adult experiences. This study developed a questionnaire that measures acculturation among ethnically diverse populations of youth that can be included as a module in population surveys. Methods Questionnaires measuring acculturation in youth were identified in the literature. The importance of items from the existing questionnaires was determined using a Delphi process and this informed the development of our questionnaire. The questionnaire was then pilot tested using a sample of 248 Canadians aged 18–25 via an online system. Participants identified as East and South East Asian (27.8%), South Asian (17.7%) and Black (13.7%). The majority were 1st (33.5%) or 2nd generation immigrants (52.0%). After redundant items were eliminated, exploratory factor analysis grouped items into domains, and, for each domain, internal consistency, and convergent validity with immigrant generation then age at immigration estimated. A subset of participants re-completed the questionnaire for reliability estimation. Results The literature review yielded 117 articles that used 13 questionnaires with a total of 440 questions. The Delphi process reduced these to 32 questions. Pilot testing occurred in 248 Canadians aged 18–25. Following item reduction, 16 questions in three domains remained: dominant culture, heritage language, and heritage culture. All had good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alphas > .75). The mean dominant domain score increased with immigrant generation (1st generation: 3.69 (95% CI: 3.49–3.89), 2nd: 4.13 (4.00–4.26), 3rd: 4.40 (4.19–4.61)), and mean heritage language score was higher among those who immigrated after age 12 than before (p = .0001), indicative of convergent validity. Conclusions This Bicultural Youth Acculturation Questionnaire has

  12. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2013: transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The nephrology quiz and questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. As in past years, the conference hall was overflowing with interested audience members. Topics covered by expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared by a panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs answered questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. A new addition to the nephrology quiz and questionnaire was participation in the questionnaire by nephrology fellows. To review the process, members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. Their answers are compared in real time using audience response devices with the answers of nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers are then briefly discussed after the audience responds, and the results of the questionnaire are displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  13. Examining the ecological validity of the Talent Development Environment Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Russell J J; Collins, Dave; Douglas, Carl; Whike, Ally

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that high class expertise and effective practice exists within many talent development environments across the world. However, there is also a general consensus that widespread evidence-based policy and practice is lacking. As such, it is crucial to develop solutions which can facilitate effective dissemination of knowledge and promotion of evidence-based talent development systems. While the Talent Development Environment Questionnaire (Martindale et al., 2010 ) provides a method through which this could be facilitated, its ecological validity has remained untested. As such, this study aimed to investigate the real world applicability of the questionnaire through discriminant function analysis. Athletes across ten distinct regional squads and academies were identified and separated into two broad levels, 'higher quality' (n = 48) and 'lower quality' (n = 51) environments, based on their process quality and productivity. Results revealed that the Talent Development Environment Questionnaire was able to discriminate with 77.8% accuracy. Furthermore, in addition to the questionnaire as a whole, two individual features, 'quality preparation' (P < 0.01) and 'understanding the athlete' (P < 0.01), were found to be significant discriminators. In conclusion, the results indicate robust structural properties and sound ecological validity, allowing the questionnaire to be used with more confidence in applied and research settings.

  14. The Relationship between Negative Affect and Reported Cognitive Failures.

    PubMed

    Payne, Tabitha W; Schnapp, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand our understanding of the range of negative affect associated with reported problems with everyday functions and activities, measured by the cognitive failures questionnaire (CFQ). Evidence from previous research indicates that individuals meeting criteria for mood disorders, such as major depression or seasonal affective disorder, experience cognitive deficits in memory and attention that can lead to problems with everyday activities reported in the CFQ. The Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) was used to assess potential correlations with a wider range of negative emotions. Findings for a sample of 129 college students revealed that negative affective experiences were significantly correlated with failures of memory and attention on the CFQ (fear = .41, hostility = .38, sadness = .28, and guilt = .43). Conversely, positive affect was negatively correlated with distractibility (r = -.21). Additional affective scales on the PANAS (e.g., shyness and fatigue) were also associated with higher reports of cognitive failures. The results provide converging evidence of a relationship between negative affective experiences and reported frequency of problems on the cognitive failures questionnaire.

  15. Social cognition and brain morphology: implications for developmental brain dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Evans, David W; Lazar, Steven M; Boomer, K B; Mitchel, Aaron D; Michael, Andrew M; Moore, Gregory J

    2015-06-01

    The social-cognitive deficits associated with several neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders have been linked to structural and functional brain anomalies. Given the recent appreciation for quantitative approaches to behavior, in this study we examined the brain-behavior links in social cognition in healthy young adults from a quantitative approach. Twenty-two participants were administered quantitative measures of social cognition, including the social responsiveness scale (SRS), the empathizing questionnaire (EQ) and the systemizing questionnaire (SQ). Participants underwent a structural, 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure that yielded both volumetric (voxel count) and asymmetry indices. Model fitting with backward elimination revealed that a combination of cortical, limbic and striatal regions accounted for significant variance in social behavior and cognitive styles that are typically associated with neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Specifically, as caudate and amygdala volumes deviate from the typical R > L asymmetry, and cortical gray matter becomes more R > L asymmetrical, overall SRS and Emotion Recognition scores increase. Social Avoidance was explained by a combination of cortical gray matter, pallidum (rightward asymmetry) and caudate (deviation from rightward asymmetry). Rightward asymmetry of the pallidum was the sole predictor of Interpersonal Relationships and Repetitive Mannerisms. Increased D-scores on the EQ-SQ, an indication of greater systemizing relative to empathizing, was also explained by deviation from the typical R > L asymmetry of the caudate.These findings extend the brain-behavior links observed in neurodevelopmental disorders to the normal distribution of traits in a healthy sample.

  16. Reciprocal Relations Between Cognitive Neuroscience and Cognitive Models: Opposites Attract?

    PubMed Central

    Forstmann, Birte U.; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Eichele, Tom; Brown, Scott; Serences, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscientists study how the brain implements particular cognitive processes such as perception, learning, and decision-making. Traditional approaches in which experiments are designed to target a specific cognitive process have been supplemented by two recent innovations. First, formal models of cognition can decompose observed behavioral data into multiple latent cognitive processes, allowing brain measurements to be associated with a particular cognitive process more precisely and more confidently. Second, cognitive neuroscience can provide additional data to inform the development of cognitive models, providing greater constraint than behavioral data alone. We argue that these fields are mutually dependent: not only can models guide neuroscientific endeavors, but understanding neural mechanisms can provide critical insights into formal models of cognition. PMID:21612972

  17. Athletes' assessment of the coach--the coach evaluation questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Rushall, B S; Wiznuk, K

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an assessment tool to judge coaching performance that was appropriate for completion by athletes. The questionnaire underwent a variety of developmental stages. In its final form, it contained 36 items. The tool was shown to be a valid, reliable, and standardized questionnaire. It demonstrated discriminability and provoked honest, accurate responding in subjects. The test was capable of providing immediate feedback to coaches seeking information about athletes' perceptions of their coaching performance. Responses on the developed scale were weighted to reflect the desirability of the coaching characteristics of a good coach. The questionnaire provides a total score which can be interpreted by the coach as a measure of how much of an "ideal" coach exists in him/her.

  18. Testing psychometric properties of the 30-item general health questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; He, Hong-Gu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) given conflicting findings in the literature. A cross-sectional, nonexperimental research was used with a convenience sample of 271 American female health care professionals. Data were collected by using self-reported questionnaires. A series of exploratory factor analyses (EFAs), confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs), and structural equation modeling (SEM) were performed to examine underlying dimensions of the GHQ-30. Results from EFAs and CFAs revealed the three-factor composition (positive affect, anxiety, and depressed mood). All factor loadings were statistically significant, and one pair of error variance was allowed to be correlated. All factors contained questionnaire items with acceptable face validity and demonstrated good internal consistency reliability. Results from SEM further confirmed underlying constructs of the scale. To our knowledge, this is the first study that extensively tested the psychometric properties of the GHQ-30, taking both statistical and substantive issues into consideration.

  19. Haemangioma family burden: creation of a specific questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Olivia; Méni, Cecile; Léauté-Labreze, Christine; Bodemer, Christine; Voisard, Jean-Jacques; Dufresne, Hélène; Brauchoux, Sébastien; Taieb, Charles

    2015-01-01

    To develop and validate a specific questionnaire to assess burden on families of children with infantile haemangioma (IH): the Haemangioma Family Burden questionnaire (HFB). Items were generated from a literature review and a verbatim report from parents. Subsequently, a study was implemented at the Necker Hospital and the Pellegrin Children's Hospital for psychometric analysis. The HFB was refined via item reduction according to inter-question correlations, consensus among experts and exploratory factor analysis. A 20-item questionnaire, grouped into 5 dimensions, was obtained. Construct validity was demonstrated and HFB showed good internal coherence (Cronbach's α: 0.93). The HFB was significantly correlated with the mental dimension of the Short-Form-12 (r = -0.75), and the Psychological General Well-Being Index (r = -0.61). HFB scores differed significantly according to the size and localization of the IH. A validated tool for assessing the burden on families of children with IH is now available.

  20. Short cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive training for adults with ADHD – a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Virta, Maarit; Salakari, Anita; Antila, Mervi; Chydenius, Esa; Partinen, Markku; Kaski, Markus; Vataja, Risto; Kalska, Hely; Iivanainen, Matti

    2010-01-01

    In clinical practice, a growing need exists for effective non-pharmacological treatments of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here, we present the results of a pilot study of 10 adults with ADHD participating in short-term individual cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT), 9 adults participating in cognitive training (CT), and 10 controls. Self-report questionnaires, independent evaluations, and computerized neurocognitive testing were collected before and after the treatments to evaluate change. There were distinctive pre-hypotheses regarding the treatments, and therefore the statistical comparisons were conducted in pairs: CBT vs control, CT vs control, and CBT vs CT. In a combined ADHD symptom score based on self-reports, 6 participants in CBT, 2 in CT and 2 controls improved. Using independent evaluations, improvement was found in 7 of the CBT participants, 2 of CT participants and 3 controls. There was no treatment-related improvement in cognitive performance. Thus, in the CBT group, some encouraging improvement was seen, although not as clearly as in previous research with longer interventions. In the CT group, there was improvement in the trained tasks but no generalization of the improvement to the tasks of the neurocognitive testing, the self- report questionnaires, or the independent evaluations. These preliminary results warrant further studies with more participants and with more elaborate cognitive testing. PMID:20856608

  1. Validation of a questionnaire measuring the regulation of autonomic function

    PubMed Central

    Kröz, M; Feder, G; von Laue, HB; Zerm, R; Reif, M; Girke, M; Matthes, H; Gutenbrunner, C; Heckmann, C

    2008-01-01

    Background To broaden the range of outcomes that we can measure for patients undergoing treatment for oncological and other chronic conditions, we aimed to validate a questionnaire measuring self-reported autonomic regulation (aR), i.e. to characterise a subject's autonomic functioning by questions on sleeping and waking, vertigo, morningness-eveningness, thermoregulation, perspiration, bowel movements and digestion. Methods We administered the questionnaire to 440 participants (♀: N = 316, ♂: N = 124): 95 patients with breast cancer, 49 with colorectal cancer, 60 with diabetes mellitus, 39 with coronary heart disease, 28 with rheumatological conditions, 32 with Hashimoto's disease, 22 with multiple morbidities and 115 healthy people. We administered the questionnaire a second time to 50.2% of the participants. External convergence criteria included the German version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), a short questionnaire on morningness-eveningness, the Herdecke Quality of Life Questionnaire (HLQ) and a short version questionnaire on self-regulation. Results A principal component analysis yielded a three dimensional 18-item inventory of aR. The subscales orthostatic-circulatory, rest/activity and digestive regulation had internal consistency (Cronbach-α: rα = 0.65 – 0.75) and test-retest reliability (rrt = 0.70 – 85). AR was negatively associated with anxiety, depression, and dysmenorrhoea but positively correlated to HLQ, self-regulation and in part to morningness (except digestive aR) (0.49 – 0.13, all p < 0.05). Conclusion An internal validation of the long-version scale of aR yielded consistent relationships with health versus illness, quality of life and personality. Further studies are required to clarify the issues of external validity, clinical and physiological relevance. PMID:18533043

  2. Validation of Iranian Version of Pregnancy Related Anxiety Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Askarizadeh, Ghasem; Karamoozian, Mahsa; Darekordi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy is an acute period in the lifetime of women, during which numerous excitatory physical and social changes occur. The purpose of this study is confirmatory factor analysis of Pregnancy Related Anxiety Questionnaire (PRAQ) that is designed in Iranian pregnant women population. Methods: A total of 170 pregnant women in health centers of Kerman city were chosen through random sampling method and completed PRAQ questionnaire and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). In this study, confirmatory factor analysis and concurrent validity are used to evaluate the validity of models; and to test-retest and Cronbach alpha were used for evaluating external and internal reliability in SPSS-19 and the AMOS software to evaluate reliability of models. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis gave an acceptable value for the latent PRAQ in the question scale and 5 micro-scale level. Furthermore, significant correlation between the components and the overall scale of the PRAQ questionnaire with the BAI confirmed concurrent validity of questionnaire. The reliability of questionnaire is confirmed based on Cronbach's alpha coefficient value of 0.78 that calculated 0.69–0.76 for the five-factors. A month later, reliability coefficient amplitude of test-retest on forty pregnant women was between 0.65 and 0.72 which shows the reliability of PRAQ over time. Conclusions: The short form of anxiety during pregnancy questionnaire has the essential psychometric properties. In this study, five-factors extracted in the PRAQ were adapted with the factors extracted from the original version. This study introduces an instrument that can be benefit in measuring anxiety and concerns of women during pregnancy. PMID:28382193

  3. Validation of a persian version of motorcycle rider behavior questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Motevalian, Seyed Abbas; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Rahimi, Habibollah; Eftekhar, Mehrdad

    2011-01-01

    In Iran, road traffic injuries are the first cause of burden of disease and motorcyclists are the most vulnerable road users. Elliot and colleagues developed the "Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire" (MRBQ), on the basis of Reason's "Driver Behavior Questionnaire" (DBQ) in 2007. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of a Persian version of MRBQ. The 43-item MRBQ was adapted to Persian according to translation-back translation method. The questionnaire was significantly revised after assessment of content validity. In the revised version, 10 items of original MRBQ were deleted and 15 new items were added. The revised MRBQ was used in a survey of 518 motorcyclists. To assess the construct validity of MRBQ, we used Buss-Perry Aggression questionnaire concurrently on all of the subjects. After three weeks, we carried out the retest study on 119 out of 518 subjects. The mean age of the subjects was 32.5 years (SD=8.8). All of the participants were male with mean of 9.3 years of motorcycle riding experience (SD=7.3). Principal Components Analysis (PCA) showed six subscales: "Speed Violations", "Traffic Errors", "Safety Violations", "Traffic Violations", "Stunts" and "Control Errors", which accounted for 36.44% of total variance together. For each of these subscales, Cronbach's Alpha was between 0.79 to 0.91. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient for six subscales and total questionnaire were from 0.73 to 0.91. There were significant correlations between MRBQ subscales and subscales of Buss-Perry aggression questionnaire. The results indicated that the 48-item Persian version of MRBQ is a suitable measure for studying motorcyclists' behavior.

  4. [Mokken scaling of the Cognitive Screening Test].

    PubMed

    Diesfeldt, H F A

    2009-10-01

    The Cognitive Screening Test (CST) is a twenty-item orientation questionnaire in Dutch, that is commonly used to evaluate cognitive impairment. This study applied Mokken Scale Analysis, a non-parametric set of techniques derived from item response theory (IRT), to CST-data of 466 consecutive participants in psychogeriatric day care. The full item set and the standard short version of fourteen items both met the assumptions of the monotone homogeneity model, with scalability coefficient H = 0.39, which is considered weak. In order to select items that would fulfil the assumption of invariant item ordering or the double monotonicity model, the subjects were randomly partitioned into a training set (50% of the sample) and a test set (the remaining half). By means of an automated item selection eleven items were found to measure one latent trait, with H = 0.67 and item H coefficients larger than 0.51. Cross-validation of the item analysis in the remaining half of the subjects gave comparable values (H = 0.66; item H coefficients larger than 0.56). The selected items involve year, place of residence, birth date, the monarch's and prime minister's names, and their predecessors. Applying optimal discriminant analysis (ODA) it was found that the full set of twenty CST items performed best in distinguishing two predefined groups of patients of lower or higher cognitive ability, as established by an independent criterion derived from the Amsterdam Dementia Screening Test. The chance corrected predictive value or prognostic utility was 47.5% for the full item set, 45.2% for the fourteen items of the standard short version of the CST, and 46.1% for the homogeneous, unidimensional set of selected eleven items. The results of the item analysis support the application of the CST in cognitive assessment, and revealed a more reliable 'short' version of the CST than the standard short version (CST14).

  5. Quality of life and mild cognitive impairment in early Parkinson's disease: does subtype matter?

    PubMed

    Lawson, Rachael A; Yarnall, Alison J; Duncan, Gordon W; Khoo, Tien K; Breen, David P; Barker, Roger A; Collerton, Daniel; Taylor, John-Paul; Burn, David J

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the association between mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subtypes and quality of life (QoL) in 219 newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) patients without dementia. Participants completed neuropsychological tests of attention, executive function, visuospatial function, memory, and language, and reported QoL using the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire. Impairments were most common in executive function, memory and attention. MCI subtypes were classified according to Movement Disorder Society Task Force criteria. More severe cognitive impairment was associated with poorer quality of life (p = 0.01), but subtype of impairment was not (p > 0.10), suggesting that the nature of cognitive impairment is less significant than its severity.

  6. The role of pain, perseverative cognition and goal adjustment in vasculitis-associated fatigue.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Helen; Reidy, John

    2016-06-14

    Fatigue is a common symptom associated with vasculitis and contributes significantly to impaired quality of life. Motivational control theory suggests a role for perseverative cognition and goal adjustment in fatigue. Therefore, this study investigated these potential predictors of fatigue in individuals with vasculitis. A total of 249 participants completed online questionnaires assessing fatigue, perseverative cognition, goal disengagement and goal reengagement, in addition to demographic and disease-related variables. Hierarchical regression analysis found only pain, sleep disturbance, disease activity and perseverative cognition to significantly predict fatigue. This highlights the importance of psychological factors in determining fatigue in those with vasculitis.

  7. The mediating role of interpersonal cognition on the relationships between personality and adolescent ego development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The author investigated whether interpersonal cognition mediated the relationships between defense, social sensitivity, and ego development. Participants (N = 616; M age = 15.66 years, SD = .52 year; 276 boys) from northwestern Taiwan completed a battery of questionnaires. Structural equation modeling and mediation analyses supported the hypothesis that interpersonal cognition would mediate the path between defense and ego development, and the path between social sensitivity and ego development. Defense and social sensitivity were found to have direct effects on ego development. The study provides evidence of the mediating effect of interpersonal cognition on the association between personality and ego development.

  8. The Effects of Relaxation Training with Cognitive or Nondirective Therapy and the Role of Relaxation-Induced Anxiety in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkovec, T. D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provided 30 volunteers with generalized anxiety disorder with training in progressive muscle relaxation. Clients were also given cognitive or nondirective therapy. All showed substantial reductions in anxiety measured by psychiatric assessor ratings, questionnaires, and daily self-monitoring. Relaxation plus cognitive therapy produced…

  9. Lifetime antecedents of cognitive reserve.

    PubMed

    Richards, Marcus; Sacker, Amanda

    2003-08-01

    We used path analysis on data from the British 1946 birth cohort to model lifetime antecedents of cognitive reserve, represented by the NART at 53 years, and compared this model for verbal memory and psychomotor function at this age, cognitive outcomes that are sensitive to age-associated decline. We showed independent paths from childhood cognition, educational attainment and adult occupation to cognitive reserve, with that from childhood cognition the strongest, and that from adult occupation the weakest. A similar pattern was found for the verbal memory and psychomotor outcomes, although the pathways were weaker than those to the NART. The pattern was also mirrored by the paths from paternal occupation to childhood cognition, educational attainment and adult occupation, with that to childhood cognition the strongest, and that to adult occupation the weakest. The direct influence of paternal occupation on cognitive reserve was negligible, and almost entirely mediated by childhood cognitive ability and educational attainment.

  10. Estimating Premorbid Cognitive Abilities in Low-Educated Populations

    PubMed Central

    Apolinario, Daniel; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi; Ferretti, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Farfel, José Marcelo; Magaldi, Regina Miksian; Busse, Alexandre Leopold; Jacob-Filho, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop an informant-based instrument that would provide a valid estimate of premorbid cognitive abilities in low-educated populations. Methods A questionnaire was drafted by focusing on the premorbid period with a 10-year time frame. The initial pool of items was submitted to classical test theory and a factorial analysis. The resulting instrument, named the Premorbid Cognitive Abilities Scale (PCAS), is composed of questions addressing educational attainment, major lifetime occupation, reading abilities, reading habits, writing abilities, calculation abilities, use of widely available technology, and the ability to search for specific information. The validation sample was composed of 132 older Brazilian adults from the following three demographically matched groups: normal cognitive aging (n = 72), mild cognitive impairment (n = 33), and mild dementia (n = 27). The scores of a reading test and a neuropsychological battery were adopted as construct criteria. Post-mortem inter-informant reliability was tested in a sub-study with two relatives from each deceased individual. Results All items presented good discriminative power, with corrected item-total correlation varying from 0.35 to 0.74. The summed score of the instrument presented high correlation coefficients with global cognitive function (r = 0.73) and reading skills (r = 0.82). Cronbach's alpha was 0.90, showing optimal internal consistency without redundancy. The scores did not decrease across the progressive levels of cognitive impairment, suggesting that the goal of evaluating the premorbid state was achieved. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.96, indicating excellent inter-informant reliability. Conclusion The instrument developed in this study has shown good properties and can be used as a valid estimate of premorbid cognitive abilities in low-educated populations. The applicability of the PCAS, both as an estimate of premorbid intelligence and cognitive

  11. Sociolinguistic variables and cognition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Erik R

    2011-11-01

    Sociolinguistics has examined mental organization of language only sporadically. Meanwhile, areas of linguistics that deal with cognitive organization seldom delve deeply into language variation. Variation is essential for understanding how language is structured cognitively, however. Three kinds of evidence are discussed to illustrate this point. First, style shifting demonstrates that language users develop detailed associations of when to produce specific linguistic forms, depending on the pragmatic context. Second, variation in fine-grained phonetic cues shows that cognitive organization applies to linguistic forms not otherwise known to be under speakers' control. Finally, experiments on dialect comprehension and identification demonstrate that listeners have detailed cognitive associations of language variants with groups of people, whether or not they can produce the same variants themselves. A model is presented for how sociolinguistic knowledge can be viewed in relation to other parts of language with regard to cognitive and neural representations. WIREs Cogni Sci 2011 2 701-716 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.152 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  12. Archaeology and cognitive evolution.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Thomas

    2002-06-01

    Archaeology can provide two bodies of information relevant to the understanding of the evolution of human cognition--the timing of developments, and the evolutionary context of these developments. The challenge is methodological. Archaeology must document attributes that have direct implications for underlying cognitive mechanisms. One example of such a cognitive archaeology is found in spatial cognition. The archaeological record documents an evolutionary sequence that begins with ape-equivalent spatial abilities 2.5 million years ago and ends with the appearance of modern abilities in the still remote past of 400,000 years ago. The timing of these developments reveals two major episodes in the evolution in spatial ability, one, 1.5 million years ago and the other, one million years later. The two episodes of development in spatial cognition had very different evolutionary contexts. The first was associated with the shift to an open country adaptive niche that occurred early in the time range of Homo erectus. The second was associated with no clear adaptive shift, though it does appear to have coincided with the invasion of more hostile environments and the appearance of systematic hunting of large mammals. Neither, however, occurred in a context of modern hunting and gathering.

  13. Cognitive aspects of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip D

    2013-11-01

    Cognitive impairments are a central feature of schizophrenia and are present in most, if not all, cases. There are multiple domains of impairment seen and the level of severity of impairment is considerable. Impairments can be detected prior to the onset of clinical symptoms and the course of impairments involves some subtle early worsening followed by stability in most cases. Cognitive impairments are associated with functional disability, particularly in domains of vocational functioning and independence of residence. Both pharmacological and cognitive remediation interventions have been employed for the treatment of these impairments, with greater progress to date being made in cognitive remediation interventions. While much is known about cognitive impairments, treatment efforts are still in an early stage of development. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:599-608. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1253 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: Dr. Harvey has received consulting fees from Abbott Labs, Amgen, Boehringer Ingelheim, Genentech, Johnson and Johnson, Pharma Neuroboost, Roche Parma, Sunovion Pharma, and Takeda Pharma during the past year. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  14. Subjective cognitive failures in patients with hypertension are related to cognitive performance and cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Uiterwijk, Renske; Huijts, Marjolein; Staals, Julie; Duits, Annelien; Gronenschild, Ed; Kroon, Abraham A; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies on the relationship between subjective cognitive failures (SCF) and objective cognitive function have shown inconsistent results. In addition, research on the association between SCF and imaging markers of cerebral small vessel disease is limited. We investigated whether SCF in patients with essential hypertension, who are at high risk of cerebral small vessel disease, are associated with objective cognitive function and magnetic resonance imaging manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease. We included 109 patients with hypertension who underwent extensive neuropsychological assessment, including questionnaires measuring SCF and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed to rate the presence of lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces, as well as white matter hyperintensities volume. Results showed significant associations between SCF and objectively measured overall cognition (B=-0.02; 95% confidence interval=-0.03 to -0.005), memory (B=0.02; 95% confidence interval=-0.03 to -0.004), and information processing speed (B=-0.02; 95% confidence interval=-0.03 to -0.001) after adjustment for patient characteristics and vascular risk factors. In addition, SCF were associated with the presence of cerebral microbleeds (odds ratio=1.12; 95% confidence interval=1.02-1.23) after adjustment for patient characteristics and vascular risk factors but not with other imaging markers of cerebral small vessel disease. Our study demonstrates that attention for SCF in patients with hypertension is needed because these may point to lower objective cognitive function, which might be as a result of the presence of cerebral microbleeds. Accordingly, this study emphasizes that neuropsychological assessment and brain imaging need to be considered when patients with hypertension report SCF.

  15. Addenbrooke's cognitive examination test for brief cognitive assessment of adolescents suffering from migraine with aura.

    PubMed

    Petrusic, Igor; Pavlovski, Vera; Savkovic, Zorica; Vucinic, Dragana; Filipovic, Branislav; Jancic, Jasna

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of the Addenbrooke's cognitive examination test (ACE-R) in the evaluation of cognitive status in migraineurs interictally. A total of 44 adolescent patients and 44 healthy controls, matched by age and gender, have undergone ACE-R testing. Migraineurs were additionally questioned about migraine aura features and presence of higher cortical dysfunctions (HCD) during an aura. According to the questionnaire results, patients were subsequently divided into HCD and Non-HCD group. ACE-R scores of migraine patients were significantly lower than in healthy controls (93.68 ± 3.64 vs 96.91 ± 2.49; t = 4.852, p < 0.001). Also, subscores of memory and verbal fluency were significantly higher in the control population. There was no correlation of HCD occurrence with cognitive examination score, although Non-HCD subgroup achieved better score (93.13 ± 3.91 vs 94.29 ± 3.30; t = 1.053, p = 0.298). Findings have shown that migraineurs get lower ACE-R test scores, with a tendency to have a poorer outcome in more complex aura. Also, our study has revealed that the ACE-R test is an easily administered test for brief assessment of cognitive status in migraineurs. Future perspectives could be further evaluation of ACE-R test in larger sample size and the impact of migraine with aura on cognitive function in adolescents.

  16. Current Perspectives on Cognitive Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard

    2016-01-01

    To what extent is cognition influenced by a person’s cultural background? This question has remained controversial in large fields of the cognitive sciences, including cognitive psychology, and is also underexplored in anthropology. In this perspective article, findings from a recent wave of cross-cultural studies will be outlined with respect to three aspects of cognition: perception and categorization, number representation and counting, and explanatory frameworks and beliefs. Identifying similarities and differences between these domains allows for general conclusions regarding cognitive diversity and helps to highlight the importance of culturally shaped content for a comprehensive understanding of cognition. PMID:27148118

  17. Connecting cognition and consumer choice.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Daniel M; Johnson, Eric J

    2015-02-01

    We describe what can be gained from connecting cognition and consumer choice by discussing two contexts ripe for interaction between the two fields. The first-context effects on choice-has already been addressed by cognitive science yielding insights about cognitive process but there is promise for more interaction. The second is learning and representation in choice where relevant theories in cognitive science could be informed by consumer choice, and in return, could pose and answer new questions. We conclude by discussing how these two fields of research stand to benefit from more interaction, citing examples of how interfaces of cognitive science with other fields have been illuminating for theories of cognition.

  18. Understanding Physical Educators' Perceptions of Mattering Questionnaire--Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, K. Andrew R.; Gaudreault, Karen Lux; Woods, Amelia Mays

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has illustrated that physical educators feel their subject is valued less than others in the context of schools. However, to date, no instruments have been developed to measure physical education teachers' perceptions of mattering. This study sought to propose and validate the Perceived Mattering Questionnaire--Physical Education…

  19. Measurement Invariance of the Pay Satisfaction Questionnaire across Three Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lievens, Filip; Anseel, Frederik; Harris, Michael M.; Eisenberg, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, pay satisfaction has been increasingly studied in an international context, prompting the importance of examining whether the Pay Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ) is invariant across countries other than the United States. This study investigated the measurement invariance across three countries, namely, the United States (N =…

  20. Religious Occupations and Stress Questionnaire (ROS): Instrument Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birk, Janice M.; Rayburn, Carole A.; Richmond, Lee J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of the Religious Occupations and Stress Questionnaire (ROS), which attempts to fill the need for an appropriate measure of the stress experienced by individuals in religious occupations. Results of reliability and validity studies indicate high internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity.…

  1. Bladder cancer documentation of causes: multilingual questionnaire, 'bladder cancer doc'.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Abreu-Villaca, Yael; Anbari Attar, Rowshanak; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Aslam, Muhammad; Basaran, Nursen; Belik, Rouslana; Butryee, Chaniphun; Dalpiaz, Orietta; Dzhusupov, Keneshbek; Ecke, Thorsten H; Galambos, Henrieta; Galambos, Henrieta; Gerilovica, Helena; Gerullis, Holger; Gonzalez, Patricia Casares; Goossens, Maria E; Gorgishvili-Hermes, Lela; Heyns, Chris F; Hodzic, Jasmin; Ikoma, Fumihiko; Jichlinski, Patrice; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Martinova, Irina; Mittal, Rama Devi; Ravichandran, Beerappa; Romics, Imre; Roy, Bidyut; Rungkat-Zakaria, Fransiska; Rydzynski, Konrad; Scutaru, Cristian; Shen, Jianhua; Soufi, Maria; Toguzbaeva, Karlygash; Vu Duc, Trinh; Widera, Agata; Wishahi, Mohamed; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-06-01

    There is a considerable discrepancy between the number of identified occupational-related bladder cancer cases and the estimated numbers particularly in emerging nations or less developed countries where suitable approaches are less or even not known. Thus, within a project of the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health, a questionnaire of the Dortmund group, applied in different studies, was translated into more than 30 languages (Afrikaans, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Korean, Latvian, Malay, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese/Brazilian, Romanian, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, Spanish, Spanish/Mexican, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Vietnamese). The bipartite questionnaire asks for relevant medical information in the physician's part and for the occupational history since leaving school in the patient's part. Furthermore, this questionnaire is asking for intensity and frequency of certain occupational and non-occupational risk factors. The literature regarding occupations like painter, hairdresser or miner and exposures like carcinogenic aromatic amines, azo dyes, or combustion products is highlighted. The questionnaire is available on www.ifado.de/BladderCancerDoc.

  2. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  3. Caregiver’s feeding styles questionnaire - new factors and correlates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Study objectives were to conduct exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of Caregiver’s Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ) and evaluate correlations between factors and maternal feeding practices, attitudes, and perceptions. Mothers (N = 144) were 43% minority race/ethnicity, 24% full-time employed, 54% ...

  4. Measurement of Dietary Restraint: Validity Tests of Four Questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Donald A.; Martin, Corby K.; York-Crowe, Emily; Anton, Stephen D.; Redman, Leanne M.; Han, Hongmei; Ravussin, Eric

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the validity of four measures of dietary restraint: Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire, Eating Inventory (EI), Revised Restraint Scale (RS), and the Current Dieting Questionnaire. Dietary restraint has been implicated as a determinant of overeating and binge eating. Conflicting findings have been attributed to different methods for measuring dietary restraint. The validity of four self-report measures of dietary restraint and dieting behavior was tested using: 1) factor analysis, 2) changes in dietary restraint in a randomized controlled trial of different methods to achieve calorie restriction, and 3) correlation of changes in dietary restraint with an objective measure of energy balance, calculated from the changes in fat mass and fat-free mass over a six-month dietary intervention. Scores from all four questionnaires, measured at baseline, formed a dietary restraint factor, but the RS also loaded on a binge eating factor. Based on change scores, the EI Restraint scale was the only measure that correlated significantly with energy balance expressed as a percentage of energy require d for weight maintenance. These findings suggest that that, of the four questionnaires tested, the EI Restraint scale was the most valid measure of the intent to diet and actual caloric restriction. PMID:17101191

  5. Psychometric Characteristics of the Modified World Affairs Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    1988-01-01

    Subjected Modified World Affairs Questionnaire (MWAQ) to comparable common factor analysis which identified five factors: civil defense, escalation, nuclear war outcome, probability/worry, and patriotic. Alpha coefficients and test-retest reliability were determined to be adequate for the first four subscales. Acceptable discriminant validity and…

  6. Extreme Samples on the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Psychoticism Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Robert; Shiomi, Kunio

    1983-01-01

    Examined the P scale of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire in three samples of normal Canadian and Japanese students who obtained either very high or very low means on the P scale. Psychometric problems were identified in the sample with a low P mean. Recommended that the scale be renamed. (JAC)

  7. Further Evaluation of the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Suh, Hanna; Ege, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Data from clinical and nonclinical samples ("Ns" = 2,096, 618) were used to evaluate and replicate the measurement structure of the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Different measurement models and invariance tests were evaluated and the best psychometric support was found for a shortened measure of two factors: overall maladjustment and…

  8. Development and Initial Psychometrics of Counseling Supervisor's Behavior Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ahram; Park, Eun Hye; Byeon, Eunji; Lee, Sang Min

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development and psychometric properties of the Counseling Supervisor's Behavior Questionnaire, designed to assess the specific behaviors of supervisors, which can be observed by supervisees during supervision sessions. Factor structure, construct and concurrent validity, and internal consistency reliability of the…

  9. Methods to Assess Measurement Error in Questionnaires of Sedentary Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Joshua N; Matthews, Charles E; Freedman, Laurence; Carroll, Raymond J.; Kipnis, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary behavior has already been associated with mortality, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Questionnaires are an affordable tool for measuring sedentary behavior in large epidemiological studies. Here, we introduce and evaluate two statistical methods for quantifying measurement error in questionnaires. Accurate estimates are needed for assessing questionnaire quality. The two methods would be applied to validation studies that measure a sedentary behavior by both questionnaire and accelerometer on multiple days. The first method fits a reduced model by assuming the accelerometer is without error, while the second method fits a more complete model that allows both measures to have error. Because accelerometers tend to be highly accurate, we show that ignoring the accelerometer’s measurement error, can result in more accurate estimates of measurement error in some scenarios. In this manuscript, we derive asymptotic approximations for the Mean-Squared Error of the estimated parameters from both methods, evaluate their dependence on study design and behavior characteristics, and offer an R package so investigators can make an informed choice between the two methods. We demonstrate the difference between the two methods in a recent validation study comparing Previous Day Recalls (PDR) to an accelerometer-based ActivPal. PMID:27340315

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Positive Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Rick E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Original data and other studies using the Positive Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATP-Q) show that the reliability and norms of the instrument appear stable and that the ATP-Q is inversely associated with negative affective states but unrelated to conditions such as medical condition not accompanied by psychological distress. (SLD)

  11. The Eating and Exercise Behavior Questionnaire: A Validity Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Jeffrey E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Three studies assessing the Eating and Exercise Behavior Questionnaire indicated that it is reliable and useful in studying the eating patterns of the obese, differences in behavioral cue responses to eating, and multiple and single session weight loss training effectiveness.The research utility of the instrument is discussed. (CB)

  12. Structural and Convergent Validity of the Homework Performance Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendergast, Laura L.; Watkins, Marley W.; Canivez, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    Homework is a requirement for most school-age children, but research on the benefits and drawbacks of homework is limited by lack of psychometrically sound measurement of homework performance. This study examined the structural and convergent validity of scores from the newly developed Homework Performance Questionnaire -- Teacher Scale (HPQ-T).…

  13. A Psychometric Investigation of the Suicide Opinion Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Amy L.; Lester, David; Rogers, James R.

    2008-01-01

    The factor structure of the Suicide Opinion Questionnaire (SOQ) was investigated in 2 studies. In the first study, the SOQ was administered to 568 participants to investigate the relative strength of 3 competing latent structure models previously identified in the literature. Confirmatory factor analyses provided no support for any of the prior…

  14. American Society of Nephrology quiz and questionnaire 2013: glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Fervenza, Fernando C; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQ&Q) remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. As in past years, the conference hall of the 2013 meeting was overflowing with interested audience members. Topics covered by expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories, along with single best answer questions, were prepared by a panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs answered questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. A new addition to the NQ&Q was participation in the questionnaire by nephrology fellows. To review the process, members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. Their answers are compared in real time using audience response devices with the answers of nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers are then briefly discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire are displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for CJASN readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  15. Racial Differences in Responses to the Caregiver Strain Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Eunjeong; Brannan, Ana Maria; Heflinger, Craig Anne

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in responses to the Caregiver Strain Questionnaire (CGSQ) between African American and White caregivers of children with emotional and behavioral challenges. Significant item- and scale-level differences were detected across groups with African Americans consistently reporting less strain. We…

  16. Blocked versus Randomized Format of Questionnaires: A Confirmatory Multigroup Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparfeldt, Jorn R.; Schilling, Susanne R.; Rost, Detlef H.; Thiel, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    The notion of item context effects implies that psychometric properties of an item or scale are altered by the presentation format, for example, blocked versus randomized. In an experimental study with high school students, the experimental group (n = 407) answered a four-dimensional academic self-concept questionnaire, in which the items were…

  17. Exploratory and Confirmatory Analysis of the Trauma Practices Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Carlton D.; Sprang, Ginny

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study provides psychometric data for the Trauma Practices Questionnaire (TPQ). Method: A nationally randomized sample of 2,400 surveys was sent to self-identified trauma treatment specialists, and 711 (29.6%) were returned. Results: An exploratory factor analysis (N = 319) conducted on a randomly split sample (RSS) revealed…

  18. Trends in Teacher Education as Reported on the Institutional Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galluzzo, Gary R.; And Others

    This paper reports on the degree to which teacher educators have addressed the current calls for reform in teacher education. The data were taken from the Institutional Questionnaire of the Research about Teacher Education (RATE) Project of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE). The 90 respondents, each representing…

  19. The Validity of the Interpersonal Behaviors Questionnaire (IBQ) in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocchi, Meredith; Pelletier, Luc; Desmarais, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    According to Self-Determination Theory (SDT), basic psychological needs will be influenced by other individuals' interpersonal behaviors. The objective of the present research is to extend the validity of the Interpersonal Behaviors Questionnaire (IBQ and IBQ-Self) to the sport context. The measure was designed to assess perceptions of…

  20. Assessing Academic Potential for University Admission: The Biographical Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enslin, P. A.; Button, A.; Chakane, M.; de Groot, M.; Dison, L.

    2006-01-01

    A Biographical Questionnaire (BQ) has been used in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of the Witwatersrand since the mid-80s, to identify potential to succeed at university among applicants who have not met the requirements for automatic admission. As the key instrument in a special admissions process, the BQ's history and assumptions are…

  1. Development and Initial Validation of the Performance Skills Questionnaire (PSQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, Orit; Rosenberg, Limor; Ratzon, Navah Z.; Jarus, Tal

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Performance Skills Questionnaire (PSQ), addressed to measure performance skills of preschoolers, as reported by their parents. Participants included 231 children ranging in age from 4 to 6 years old, with mild to moderate developmental disabilities and 240…

  2. Development and Validation of the Self-Harm Reasons Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Stephen P.; Santor, Darcy A.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the reasons for self-harm (SH) may be paramount for the identification and treatment of SH behavior. Presently, the psychometric properties for SH reason questionnaires are generally unknown or tested only in non-inpatient samples. Existing inpatient measures may have limited generalizability and do not examine SH apart from an…

  3. Validation of the French version of the Bournemouth Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Johanne; Dugas, Claude; Lafond, D.; Descarreaux, M.

    2009-01-01

    Self questionnaires are an important aspect of the management of neck pain patients. The Bournemouth Questionnaire (BQ), based on the biopsychosocial model, is designed to evaluate patients with neck pain. The validated English version of this questionnaire (BQc-English) has psychometric properties that range from moderate to excellent. The goal of this study is to translate and validate a French version of the Bournemouth Questionnaire for neck pain patients (BQc-f). Its translation and adaptation are performed using the translation back-translation method, generating a consensus among the translators. This validation study was performed on 68 subjects (mean age 41 years old) who participated in a randomized controlled trial regarding the efficiency of manual therapy for neck pain patients. This experimental protocol was designed to generate data in order to evaluate the construct validity, longitudinal validity, test-retest reliability and responsiveness. The BQc-f psychometric properties of construct validity (r = 0.67, 0.61, 0.42) for pre treatment, post treatment and longitudinal validity, respectively), test-retest reliability (r = 0.97) and responsiveness (effect size = 0.56 and mean standardized response = 0.61) are sufficient to suggest it could be used in the management of patients with neck pain. PMID:19506700

  4. Questionnaire Response Scales: Design Factors That Influence Respondent Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Eric S.; Rife, Frank N.

    The goal of this study was to assess the relative merit of various ranges and types of response scales in terms of respondent satisfaction and comfort and the nature of the elicited information in a population of seventh grade students. Three versions of an attitudinal questionnaire, each containing the same items but employing a different…

  5. Assessing the Psychometric Properties of Kember and Leung's Reflection Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lethbridge, Kristen; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll; Laschinger, Heather K. S.; Fernando, Rajulton

    2013-01-01

    Reflective thinking is often stated as a learning outcome of baccalaureate nursing education, and as a characteristic of a competent professional; however, no consistent method exists to assess the extent to which students engage in reflective thinking. To address this need, Kember and Leung developed and tested a self-report questionnaire based…

  6. Development of the Dimensions of Adult Mastery Motivation Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty-Bigara, Jacqueline; Gilmore, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Mastery motivation is an important developmental construct that has implications for development across the lifespan. Research to date has focused predominantly on infants and children, with the Dimensions of Mastery Questionnaire (DMQ) being the most widely used measure of mastery motivation. This article reports on the development and initial…

  7. Revisiting the Factor Structure of the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toll, Benjamin A.; McKee, Sherry A.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; O'Malley, Stephanie S.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the factor structure of the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges (QSU), a commonly used assessment of cravings for cigarettes, with a sample of smokers presenting for treatment in a smoking cessation trial. On the basis of previous research, three confirmatory factor analytic models were tested. Model 1 hypothesized a 26-item,…

  8. The Structure and Validity of the Multidimensional Social Support Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Patrick H.; Richardson, George B.

    2012-01-01

    The factor structure and concurrent validity of the Multidimensional Social Support Questionnaire, a brief measure of perceived social support for use with adolescents, was examined. Findings suggest that four dimensions of perceived social support may yield more information than assessments of the unitary construct of support. (Contains 8 tables…

  9. Occupant feedback questionnaire producing a fingerprint and a score

    SciTech Connect

    Levermore, G.J.; Lowe, D.J.; Ure, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    In order to ensure that buildings and HVAC plans are truly for people and actually satisfy the occupants, it is necessary to obtain feedback from the occupants. This can be done by a novel questionnaire that produces a readily understandable fingerprint and score to indicate occupants' liking of their environments. The questionnaire uses a double-Likert section rating the liking and importance of up to 24 environmental, organizational, and human factors. To date it has been used primarily in U.K. offices, including modern deep-plan, naturally ventilated buildings. Comparison is made to previous results from 1,400 occupants in 12 offices that are air conditioned and naturally ventilated, where scores ranged from +17% (greatly liked by the occupants) to {minus}15% (greatly disliked). However, four U.K. offices with 1,300 occupants, which are discussed in detail, produced very low scores, {minus}14% to {minus}39%, the latter for a building with no windows. The fingerprints and scores were supported by an independent consultant's survey of the buildings and plant and also detailed factor analysis. The latter indicated that the 18 factors used in the questionnaire could be reduced to 5 general factors. The most important factors for the occupants for their ideal office were temperature, health, ventilation, and heating control, and the least important were the appearance of the building, distance to a window, humidity, and glare. It is proposed that this questionnaire is a useful management tool and suitable for use as a final commissioning tool.

  10. On Farmers’ Ground: Wisconsin Dairy Farm Nutrient Management Survey Questionnaire

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This questionnaire was used during quarterly, face-to-face interviews with the fifty-four Wisconsin dairy farmers who participated in the ‘On Farmers’ Ground’ nutrient management research project. It was designed to systematically and consistently compile information on herd size and composition, l...

  11. An Educator's Guide to Questionnaire Development. REL 2016-108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlacher, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Educators have many decisions to make and it's important that they have the right data to inform those decisions and access to questionnaires that can gather that data. This guide, developed by REL Central and based on work done through separate projects with the Wyoming Office of Public Instruction and the Nebraska Department of Education,…

  12. Assessing Dimensions of Single Parenting: The Single Parenting Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolberg, Arnold L.; Ullman, Ann J.

    1984-01-01

    Developed and validated an instrument that assesses five dimensions of single parenting: problem solving skills, parental warmth, discipline procedures, parent rules, enthusiasm for parenting and parent support systems. Results gave statistical support for the Single Parenting Questionnaire, suggesting it may be useful in both clinical and…

  13. A Rasch Analysis of the Academic Self-Concept Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Tan Bei Yu; Yates, Shirley M.

    2007-01-01

    This study used the Rasch model to assess the unidimensionality and item-person fit of an Academic Self-Concept Questionnaire (ASCQ) that is based on the Confucian Heritage Culture (CHC) perspective. Knowledge of the relationship between academic achievement and academic self-concept is particularly useful because academic achievement is…

  14. The Therapist Personal Reaction Questionnaire: A Cluster Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tryon, Georgiana Shick

    1989-01-01

    Analyzed Therapist Personal Reaction Questionnaire. Participants consisted of 6 practicum trainee graduate students and 208 undergraduate clients. Found two clusters--one related to counselor feelings toward client, one related to counselor feelings toward interview. Results indicated that more attractive clients were seen more frequently and for…

  15. A Structural Examination of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokar, David M.; Buchanan, Taneisha S.; Subich, Linda M.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Williams, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    The underlying factor structure of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ; Schaub, 2004) was examined using data from 742 male and female college-age respondents. The LEQ items reflect a variety of learning experiences (generated based on Bandura's (1986, 1997) four sources of self-efficacy perceptions) that might occur in each of Holland's…

  16. Reported Voice Difficulties in Student Teachers: A Questionnaire Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfield, Carol; Richards, Brian

    2007-01-01

    As professional voice users, teachers are particularly at risk of abusing their voices and developing voice disorders during their career. In spite of this, attention paid to voice care in the initial training and further professional development of teachers is unevenly spread and insufficient. This article describes a questionnaire survey of 171…

  17. Motivational Distortion Scales for the Children's Personality Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.; Prichard, Karen K.

    1989-01-01

    Developed and cross-validated motivational distortion scales (fake bad and fake good) for the Children's Personality Questionnaire (CPQ). Findings from 12-year-old seventh- and eighth-grade students (n=58) suggest that children are sophisticated enough to respond to the CPQ in a socially desirable and socially undesirable way when asked to do so.…

  18. Item Response Modeling of Forced-Choice Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anna; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Multidimensional forced-choice formats can significantly reduce the impact of numerous response biases typically associated with rating scales. However, if scored with classical methodology, these questionnaires produce ipsative data, which lead to distorted scale relationships and make comparisons between individuals problematic. This research…

  19. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  20. Social Support Questionnaire for Children: Development and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon-Hollingsworth, Arlene T.; Thompson, Julia E.; Geary, Meghan A.; Schexnaildre, Mark A.; Lai, Betty S.; Kelley, Mary Lou

    2016-01-01

    The Social Support Questionnaire for Children (SSQC) is a 50-item scale that assesses children's social support from parents, relatives, nonrelative adults, siblings, and peers. The SSQC demonstrates good psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency, factorial validity). Furthermore, the SSQC appears to be an ethnically sensitive measure of…