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Sample records for agouti signalling protein

  1. Structures of the agouti signaling protein.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Joseph C; Jackson, Pilgrim J; Thompson, Darren A; Chai, Biaoxin; Gantz, Ira; Barsh, Gregory S; Dawson, Philip E; Millhauser, Glenn L

    2005-03-01

    Expression of the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) during hair growth produces the red/yellow pigment pheomelanin. ASIP, and its neuropeptide homolog the agouti-related protein (AgRP) involved in energy balance, are novel, paracrine signaling molecules that act as inverse agonists at distinct subsets of melanocortin receptors. Ubiquitous ASIP expression in mice gives rise to a pleiotropic phenotype characterized by a uniform yellow coat color, obesity, overgrowth, and metabolic derangements similar to type II diabetes in humans. Here we report the synthesis and NMR structure of ASIP's active, cysteine-rich, C-terminal domain. ASIP adopts the inhibitor cystine knot fold and, along with AgRP, are the only known mammalian proteins in this structure class. Moreover, ASIP populates two distinct conformers resulting from a cis peptide bond at Pro102-Pro103 and a coexistence of cis/trans isomers of Ala104-Pro105. Pharmacologic studies of Pro-->Ala mutants demonstrate that the minor conformation with two cis peptide bonds is responsible for activity at all MCRs. The loop containing the heterogeneous Ala-Pro peptide bond is conserved in mammals, and suggests that ASIP is either trapped by evolution in this unusual configuration or possesses function outside of strict MCR antagonism. PMID:15701517

  2. Agouti signaling protein stimulates cell division in "viable yellow" (A vy/a) mouse liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced linear growth, hyperplasia, and tumorigenesis are well-known characteristics of "viable yellow" agouti Avy/- mice (1); however, the functional basis for this aspect of the phenotype is unknown. In the present study, we ascertained whether agouti signaling protein (ASIP) levels in Avy/a or a...

  3. The early origin of melanocortin receptors, agouti-related peptide, agouti signalling peptide, and melanocortin receptor-accessory proteins, with emphasis on pufferfishes, elephant shark, lampreys, and amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Västermark, Ake; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2011-06-11

    There are conflicting theories about the evolution of melanocortin MC receptors while only few studies have addressed the evolution of agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and agouti signalling peptide (ASIP), which are antagonists at the melanocortin receptors (MCRs), or the melanocortin MC(2) receptor accessory proteins (MRAP1 and MRAP2). Previously we have cloned melanocortin MC receptors (MC(a) and MC(b)) genes in river lamprey and here we identify orthologues to these melanocortin MC receptor sequences in the sea lamprey. We investigate the putative presence of the melanocortin MC receptor genes in lancelet (amphioxus; Branchiostoma floridae) but we find it unlikely that such gene exists, due to a sharp drop in sequence similarity beyond sequence clusters of known receptors. We show the presence of AgRP and ASIP in elephant shark, a cartilaginous fish belonging to the subclass of Elasmobranchii. However, we do not find any of these genes in lamprey or lancelet after detailed analysis of both targeted and whole proteome regular expression scans. We found MRAP2, but not MRAP1, to be present in elephant shark and sea lamprey while Fugu (T. rubripes) has both genes. This study shows that the most ancient presence of these melanocortin-related sequences is found in elephant shark and lampreys considering the current available sequence data. PMID:21208605

  4. Agouti signalling protein (ASIP) gene: molecular cloning, sequence characterisation and tissue distribution in domestic goose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wang, C; Liu, Y; Liu, J; Wang, H Y; Liu, A F; He, D Q

    2016-06-01

    Agouti signalling protein (ASIP) is an endogenous antagonist of melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) and is involved in the regulation of pigmentation in mammals. The objective of this study was to identify and characterise the ASIP gene in domestic goose. The goose ASIP cDNA consisted of a 44-nucleotide 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR), a 390-nucleotide open-reading frame (ORF) and a 45-nucleotide 3'-UTR. The length of goose ASIP genomic DNA was 6176 bp, including three coding exons and two introns. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the ORF encodes a protein of 130 amino-acid residues with a molecular weight of 14.88 kDa and an isoelectric point of 9.73. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis showed that the amino-acid sequence of ASIP was conserved in vertebrates, especially in the avian species. RT-qPCR showed that the goose ASIP mRNA was differentially expressed in the pigment deposition tissues, including eye, foot, feather follicle, skin of the back, as well as in skin of the abdomen. The expression level of the ASIP gene in skin of the abdomen was higher than that in skin of the back. Those findings will contribute to further understanding the functions of the ASIP gene in geese plumage colouring. PMID:26750999

  5. Elaborate color patterns of individual chicken feathers may be formed by the agouti signaling protein.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Chihiro; Fukao, Ayaka; Ando, Keita; Tashiro, Yuichi; Taniuchi, Shusuke; Takahashi, Sumio; Takeuchi, Sakae

    2012-02-01

    Hair and feather pigmentation is mainly determined by the distribution of two kinds of melanin, eumelanin and pheomelanin, which produce brown to black and yellow to red colorations, respectively. The agouti signaling protein (ASIP) acts as an antagonist or an inverse agonist of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a G protein-coupled receptor for α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH). This antagonism of the MC1R by ASIP on melanocytes initiates a switch of melanin synthesis from eumelanogenesis to pheomelanogenesis in mammals. In the present study, we isolated multiple ASIP mRNA variants generated by alternative splicing and promoters in chicken feather follicles. The mRNA variants showed a discrete tissue distribution. However, mRNAs were expressed predominantly in the feather pulp of follicles. Paralleling mRNA distribution, ASIP immunoreactivity was observed in feather pulp. Interestingly, ASIP was stained with pheomelanin but not eumelanin in pulp areas that face developing barbs. We suggest that the elaborate color pattern of individual feathers is formed in part by the antagonistic action of ASIP that is produced by multiple mRNA variants in chicken feather follicles. PMID:22202606

  6. Conserved distal promoter of the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) gene controls sexual dichromatism in chickens.

    PubMed

    Oribe, Eri; Fukao, Ayaka; Yoshihara, Chihiro; Mendori, Misa; Rosal, Karen G; Takahashi, Sumio; Takeuchi, Sakae

    2012-06-01

    Brilliant plumage is typical of male birds, thus sexual plumage dichromatism is seen in many avian species; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this remains unclear. The agouti signaling protein (ASIP) is a paracrine factor that stimulates yellow/red pigment (pheomelanin) synthesis and inhibits black/brown pigment (eumelanin) synthesis in follicular melanocytes. In mammals, the distal promoter of the ASIP gene acts exclusively on the ventral side of the body to create a countershading pigmentation pattern by stimulating pheomelanin synthesis in the ventrum. Here, we examined the role of the distal ASIP promoter in controlling estrogen-dependent sexual dichromatism in chickens. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that ASIP class 1 mRNAs transcribed by the distal promoter were expressed exclusively on the ventral side of chicks and adult females displaying countershading. In showy adult males, the ASIP class 1 mRNAs were expressed in gold-colored ornamental feathers grown on the back. In the presence of estrogen, males molted into female-like plumage and ASIP class 1 mRNAs expression was altered to female patterns. These results suggest that the distal ASIP promoter produces countershading in chicks and adult females, similar to the ventral-specific ASIP promoter in mammals. In addition, the class 1 promoter plays an important role for creating sexual plumage dichromatism controlled by estrogen. This is the first evidence for a pigmentation gene having been modified in its expression during evolution to develop phenotypic diversity between individuals of different sexes. PMID:22554923

  7. Transient Ectopic Overexpression of Agouti-Signalling Protein 1 (Asip1) Induces Pigment Anomalies in Flatfish

    PubMed Central

    Cal, Rosa; Rotllant, Josep; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel

    2012-01-01

    While flatfish in the wild exhibit a pronounced countershading of the dorso-ventral pigment pattern, malpigmentation is commonly observed in reared animals. In fish, the dorso-ventral pigment polarity is achieved because a melanization inhibition factor (MIF) inhibits melanoblast differentiation and encourages iridophore proliferation in the ventrum. A previous work of our group suggested that asip1 is the uncharacterized MIF concerned. In order to further support this hypothesis, we have characterized asip1 mRNAs in both turbot and sole and used deduced peptide alignments to analyze the evolutionary history of the agouti-family of peptides. The putative asip precursors have the characteristics of a secreted protein, displaying a putative hydrophobic signal. Processing of the potential signal peptide produces mature proteins that include an N-terminal region, a basic central domain with a high proportion of lysine residues as well as a proline-rich region that immediately precedes the C-terminal poly-cysteine domain. The expression of asip1 mRNA in the ventral area was significantly higher than in the dorsal region. Similarly, the expression of asip1 within the unpigmented patches in the dorsal skin of pseudoalbino fish was higher than in the pigmented dorsal regions but similar to those levels observed in the ventral skin. In addition, the injection/electroporation of asip1 capped mRNA in both species induced long term dorsal skin paling, suggesting the inhibition of the melanogenic pathways. The data suggest that fish asip1 is involved in the dorsal-ventral pigment patterning in adult fish, where it induces the regulatory asymmetry involved in precursor differentiation into mature chromatophore. Adult dorsal pseudoalbinism seems to be the consequence of the expression of normal developmental pathways in an inaccurate position that results in unbalanced asip1 production levels. This, in turn, generates a ventral-like differentiation environment in dorsal regions

  8. A Transgenic Mouse Assay for Agouti Protein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Perry, W. L.; Hustad, C. M.; Swing, D. A.; Jenkins, N. A.; Copeland, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    The mouse agouti gene encodes an 131 amino acid paracrine signaling molecule that instructs hair follicle melanocytes to switch from making black to yellow pigment. Expression of agouti during the middle part of the hair growth cycle in wild-type mice produces a yellow band on an otherwise black hair. The ubiquitous unregulated expression of agouti in mice carrying dominant yellow alleles is associated with pleiotropic effects including increased yellow pigment in the coat, obesity, diabetes and increased tumor susceptibility. Agouti shows no significant homology to known genes, and the molecular analysis of agouti alleles has shed little new light on the important functional elements of the agouti protein. In this paper, we show that agouti expression driven by the human β-ACTIN promoter produces obese yellow transgenic mice and that this can be used as an assay for agouti activity. We used this assay to evaluate a point mutation associated with the a(16H) allele within the region encoding agouti's putative signal sequence and our results suggest that this mutation is sufficient to cause the a(16H) phenotype. Thus, in vitro mutagenesis followed by the generation of transgenic mice should allow us to identify important functional elements of the agouti protein. PMID:7635291

  9. A polymorphism in the agouti signalling protein (ASIP) is associated with decreased levels of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Voisey, J; Gomez-Cabrera, M Del C; Smit, D J; Leonard, J H; Sturm, R A; van Daal, A

    2006-06-01

    To date, a role for agouti signalling protein (ASIP) in human pigmentation has not been well characterized. It is known that agouti plays a pivotal role in the pigment switch from the dark eumelanin to the light pheomelanin in the mouse. However, because humans do not have an agouti banded hair pattern, its role in human pigmentation has been questioned. We previously identified a single polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ASIP that was found at a higher frequency in African-Americans compared with other population groups. To compare allele frequencies between European-Australians and indigenous Australians, the g.8818A --> G polymorphism was genotyped. Significant differences were seen in allele frequencies between these groups (P < 0.0001) with carriage of the G allele highest in Australian Aborigines. In the Caucasian sample set a strong association was observed between the G allele and dark hair colour (P = 0.004) (odds ratio 4.6; 95% CI 1.4-15.27). The functional consequences of this polymorphism are not known but it was postulated that it might result in message instability and premature degradation of the transcript. To test this hypothesis, ASIP mRNA levels were quantified in melanocytes carrying the variant and non-variant alleles. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction the mean ASIP mRNA ratio of the AA genotype to the AG genotype was 12 (P < 0.05). This study suggests that the 3'-UTR polymorphism results in decreased levels of ASIP and therefore less pheomelanin production. PMID:16704456

  10. Agouti signalling protein is an inverse agonist to the wildtype and agonist to the melanic variant of the melanocortin-1 receptor in the grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis).

    PubMed

    McRobie, Helen R; King, Linda M; Fanutti, Cristina; Symmons, Martyn F; Coussons, Peter J

    2014-06-27

    The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) is a key regulator of mammalian pigmentation. Melanism in the grey squirrel is associated with an eight amino acid deletion in the mutant melanocortin-1 receptor with 24 base pair deletion (MC1RΔ24) variant. We demonstrate that the MC1RΔ24 exhibits a higher basal activity than the wildtype MC1R (MC1R-wt). We demonstrate that agouti signalling protein (ASIP) is an inverse agonist to the MC1R-wt but is an agonist to the MC1RΔ24. We conclude that the deletion in the MC1RΔ24 leads to a receptor with a high basal activity which is further activated by ASIP. This is the first report of ASIP acting as an agonist to MC1R. PMID:24879893

  11. Gene structure of the goldfish agouti-signaling protein: a putative role in the dorsal-ventral pigment pattern of fish.

    PubMed

    Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel; Haitina, Tatjana; Schiöth, Helgi Birgir; Peter, Richard Ector

    2005-03-01

    One of the most successful chromatic adaptations in vertebrates is the dorsal-ventral pigment pattern in which the dorsal skin is darkly colored, whereas the ventrum is light. In fish, the latter pattern is achieved because a melanization inhibition factor inhibits melanoblast differentiation and supports iridophore proliferation in the ventrum. In rodents, the patterned pigmentation results from regional production of the agouti-signaling protein (ASP). This peptide controls the switch between production of eumelanin and pheomelanin by antagonizing alphaMSH effects on melanocortin receptor (MCR) 1 in the melanocytes. In addition, ASP inhibits the differentiation and proliferation of melanoblast. Thus, the mammalian ASP may be homologous to the poikilotherm melanization inhibition factor. By screening of a genomic library, we deduced the amino acid sequence of goldfish ASP. The ASP gene is a four-exon gene spanning 3097 bp that encodes a 125-amino acid precursor. Northern blot analysis identified two different ASP mRNAs in ventral skin of red- and black-pigmented and albino fish, but no expression levels were observed in the dorsal skin of the same fish. The dorsal-ventral expression polarity was also detected in both black dorsally pigmented fish and albino fish. Pharmacological studies demonstrate that goldfish ASP acts as a melanocortin antagonist at Fugu MC1R and goldfish MC4R. In addition, goldfish ASP inhibited Nle4, D-Phe7-MSH-stimulated pigment dispersion in medaka melanophores. Our studies support agouti signaling protein as the melanization inhibition factor, a key factor in the development of the dorsal-ventral pigment pattern in fish. PMID:15591139

  12. Solid-Phase Peptide Head-to-Side Chain Cyclodimerization: Discovery of C2-Symmetric Cyclic Lactam Hybrid α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone (MSH)/Agouti-Signaling Protein (ASIP) Analogues with Potent Activities at the Human Melanocortin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mayorov, Alexander V.; Cai, Minying; Palmer, Erin S.; Liu, Zhihua; Cain, James P.; Vagner, Josef; Trivedi, Dev; Hruby, Victor J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel hybrid melanocortin pharmacophore was designed based on the pharmacophores of the Agouti signaling protein (ASIP), an endogenous melanocortin antagonist, and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), an endogenous melanocortin agonist. The designed hybrid ASIP/MSH pharmacophore was explored in monomeric cyclic, and cyclodimeric templates. The monomeric cyclic disulfide series yielded peptides with hMC3R-selective non-competitive binding affinities. The direct on-resin peptide lactam cyclodimerization yielded nanomolar range (25-120 nM) hMC1R-selective full and partial agonists in the cyclodimeric lactam series which demonstrates an improvement over the previous attempts at hybridization of MSH and agouti protein sequences. The secondary structure-oriented pharmacophore hybridization strategy will prove useful in development of unique allosteric and orthosteric melanocortin receptor modulators. This report also illustrates the utility of peptide cyclodimerization for the development of novel GPCR peptide ligands. PMID:20688117

  13. Overexpression of agouti protein and stress responsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, R B; Zhou, J; Shi, M; Redmann, S; Mynatt, R L; Ryan, D H

    2001-07-01

    Ectopic overexpression of agouti protein, an endogenous antagonist of melanocortin receptors' linked to the beta-actin promoter (BAPa) in mice, produces a phenotype of yellow coat color, Type II diabetes, obesity and increased somatic growth. Spontaneous overexpression of agouti increases stress-induced weight loss. In these experiments, other aspects of stress responsiveness were tested in 12-week-old male wild-type mice and BAPa mice. Two hours of restraint on three consecutive days produced greater increases in corticosterone and post-stress weight loss in BAPa than wild-type mice. In Experiment 2, anxiety-type behavior was measured immediately after 12 min of restraint. This mild stress did not produce many changes indicative of anxiety, but BAPa mice spent more time in the dark side of a light-dark box and less time in the open arms of an elevated plus maze than restrained wild-type mice. In a defensive withdrawal test, grooming was increased by restraint in all mice, but the duration of each event was substantially shorter in BAPa mice, possibly due to direct antagonism of the MC4-R by agouti protein. Thus, BAPa mice showed exaggerated endocrine and energetic responses to restraint stress with small differences in anxiety-type behavior compared with wild-type mice. These results are consistent with observations in other transgenic mice in which the melanocortin system is disrupted, but contrast with reports that acute blockade of central melanocortin receptors inhibits stress-induced hypophagia. Thus, the increased stress responsiveness in BAPa mice may be a developmental compensation for chronic inhibition of melanocortin receptors. PMID:11495665

  14. Coupled Site-Directed Mutagenesis/Transgenesis Identifies Important Functional Domains of the Mouse Agouti Protein

    PubMed Central

    Perry, W. L.; Nakamura, T.; Swing, D. A.; Secrest, L.; Eagleson, B.; Hustad, C. M.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    The agouti locus encodes a novel paracrine signaling molecule containing a signal sequence, an N-linked glycosylation site, a central lysine-rich basic domain, and a C-terminal tail containing 10 cysteine (Cys) residues capable of forming five disulfide bonds. When overexpressed, agouti causes a number of pleiotropic effects including yellow coat and adult-onset obesity. Numerous studies suggest that agouti causes yellow coat color by antagonizing the binding of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) to the α-MSH-(melanocortin-1) receptor. With the goal of identifying functional domains of agouti important for its diverse biological activities, we have generated 14 agouti mutations by in vitro site-directed mutagenesis and analyzed these mutations in transgenic mice for their effects on coat color and obesity. These studies demonstrate that the signal sequence, the N-linked glycosylation site, and the C-terminal Cys residues are important for full biological activity, while at least a portion of the lysine-rich basic domain is dispensable for normal function. They also show that the same functional domains of agouti important in coat color determination are important for inducing obesity, consistent with the hypothesis that agouti induces obesity by antagonizing melanocortin binding to other melanocortin receptors. PMID:8878691

  15. Biased signaling initiated by agouti-related peptide through human melanocortin-3 and -4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2016-09-01

    The neural melanocortin receptors (MCRs), melanocortin-3 and -4 receptors (MC3R and MC4R), have been increasingly recognized as important regulators of energy homeostasis. The orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP), initially identified as an endogenous antagonist for both neural MCRs, has been suggested to be a biased agonist of MC4R independent of its antagonizing effects. In the present study, we sought to determine the potential of AgRP to regulate the activation of intracellular kinases, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), AKT and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), through neural MCRs. We showed that AgRP acted as a biased agonist in human MC3R (hMC3R), decreasing cAMP activity of constitutively active mutant (F347A) hMC3R but stimulating ERK1/2 activation in both wide type and F347A hMC3Rs. AgRP-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation through MC3R was abolished by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 but not Rp-cAMPS, whereas AgRP-initiated ERK1/2 activation through MC4R was inhibited by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. Both NDP-MSH and AgRP treatment induced significant AKT phosphorylation in GT1-7 cells but not in MC3R- or MC4R-transfected HEK293T cells. The phosphorylated AMPK levels in both GT1-7 cells and HERK293T cells transfected with neural MCRs were significantly decreased upon stimulation with NDP-MSH but not with AgRP. In summary, we provided novel data for AgRP-initiated multiple intracellular signaling pathways, demonstrating biased agonism of AgRP in both neural MCRs, leading to a better understanding of neural MCR pharmacology. PMID:27208795

  16. Agouti polypeptide compositions

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.; Bultman, Scott J.; Michaud, Edward J.

    2001-10-30

    Disclosed are methods and compositions comprising novel agouti polypeptides and the polynucleotides which encode them. Also disclosed are DNA segments encoding these proteins derived from human and murine cell lines, and the use of these polynucleotides and polypeptides in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Methods, compositions, kits, and devices are also provided for identifying compounds which are inhibitors of agouti activity, and for altering fatty acid synthetase activity and intracellular calcium levels in transformed cells.

  17. Phosphodiesterase inhibitor-dependent inverse agonism of agouti-related protein on melanocortin 4 receptor in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Elisa; Rubio, Vera Cruz; Thompson, Darren; Metz, Juriaan; Flik, Gert; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel

    2009-01-01

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor mainly expressed in the central nervous system of vertebrates. Activation of the MC4R leads to a decrease in food intake, whereas inactivating mutations are a genetic cause of obesity. The binding of agouti-related protein (AGRP) reduces not only agonist-stimulated cAMP production (competitive antagonist) but also the basal activity of the receptor, as an inverse agonist. Transgenic zebrafish overexpressing AGRP display increased food intake and linear growth, indicative of a physiological role for the melanocortin system in the control of the energy balance in fish. We report on the cloning, pharmacological characterization, tissue distribution, and detailed brain mapping of a sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) MC4R ortholog. Sea bass MC4R is profusely expressed within food intake-controlling pathways of the fish brain. However, the activity of the melanocortin system during progressive fasting does not depend on the hypothalamic/pituitary proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and MC4R expression, which suggests that sea bass MC4R is constitutively activated and regulated by AGRP binding. We demonstrate that AGRP acts as competitive antagonist and reduces MTII-induced cAMP production. AGRP also decreases the basal activity of the receptor as an inverse agonist. This observation suggests that MC4R is constitutively active and supports the evolutionary conservation of the AGRP/MC4R interactions. The inverse agonism, but not the competitive antagonism, depends on the presence of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (IBMX). This suggests that inverse agonism and competitive antagonism operate through different intracellular signaling pathways, a view that opens up new targets for the treatment of melanocortin-induced metabolic syndrome. PMID:19225141

  18. Agouti Revisited: Transcript Quantification of the ASIP Gene in Bovine Tissues Related to Protein Expression and Localization

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Elke; Komolka, Katrin; Kuzinski, Judith; Maak, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Beside its role in melanogenesis, the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) has been related to obesity. The potentially crucial role in adipocyte development makes it a tempting candidate for economic relevant, fat related traits in farm animals. The objective of our study was to characterize the mRNA expression of different ASIP transcripts and of putative targets in different bovine tissues, as well as to study consequences on protein abundance and localization. ASIP mRNA abundance was determined by RT-qPCR in adipose and further tissues of cattle representing different breeds and crosses. ASIP mRNA was up-regulated more than 9-fold in intramuscular fat of Japanese Black cattle compared to Holstein (p<0.001). Further analyses revealed that a transposon-derived transcript was solely responsible for the increased ASIP mRNA abundance. This transcript was observed in single individuals of different breeds indicating a wide spread occurrence of this insertion at the ASIP locus in cattle. The protein was detected in different adipose tissues, skin, lung and liver, but not in skeletal muscle by Western blot with a bovine-specific ASIP antibody. However, the protein abundance was not related to the observed ASIP mRNA over-expression. Immuno-histochemical analyses revealed a putative nuclear localization of ASIP additionally to the expected cytosolic signal in different cell types. The expression of melanocortin receptors (MCR) 1 to 5 as potential targets for ASIP was analyzed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous fat. Only MC1R and MC4R were detected indicating a similar receptor expression like in human adipose tissue. Our results provide evidence for a widespread expression of ASIP in bovine tissues at mRNA and, for the first time, at protein level. ASIP protein is detectable in adipocytes as well as in further cells of adipose tissue. We generated a basis for a more detailed investigation of ASIP function in peripheral tissues of various mammalian species. PMID:22530003

  19. Agouti revisited: transcript quantification of the ASIP gene in bovine tissues related to protein expression and localization.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Elke; Komolka, Katrin; Kuzinski, Judith; Maak, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Beside its role in melanogenesis, the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) has been related to obesity. The potentially crucial role in adipocyte development makes it a tempting candidate for economic relevant, fat related traits in farm animals. The objective of our study was to characterize the mRNA expression of different ASIP transcripts and of putative targets in different bovine tissues, as well as to study consequences on protein abundance and localization. ASIP mRNA abundance was determined by RT-qPCR in adipose and further tissues of cattle representing different breeds and crosses. ASIP mRNA was up-regulated more than 9-fold in intramuscular fat of Japanese Black cattle compared to Holstein (p<0.001). Further analyses revealed that a transposon-derived transcript was solely responsible for the increased ASIP mRNA abundance. This transcript was observed in single individuals of different breeds indicating a wide spread occurrence of this insertion at the ASIP locus in cattle. The protein was detected in different adipose tissues, skin, lung and liver, but not in skeletal muscle by Western blot with a bovine-specific ASIP antibody. However, the protein abundance was not related to the observed ASIP mRNA over-expression. Immuno-histochemical analyses revealed a putative nuclear localization of ASIP additionally to the expected cytosolic signal in different cell types. The expression of melanocortin receptors (MCR) 1 to 5 as potential targets for ASIP was analyzed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous fat. Only MC1R and MC4R were detected indicating a similar receptor expression like in human adipose tissue. Our results provide evidence for a widespread expression of ASIP in bovine tissues at mRNA and, for the first time, at protein level. ASIP protein is detectable in adipocytes as well as in further cells of adipose tissue. We generated a basis for a more detailed investigation of ASIP function in peripheral tissues of various mammalian species. PMID:22530003

  20. Molecular structure and chromosomal mapping of the human homolog of the agouti gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, H.Y.; Woychik, R.P.; Bultman, S.J. |; Loeffler, C.; Hansmann, I.; Chen, W.J.; Furdon, P.J.; Wilkison, W.; Powell, J.G.; Usala, A.L.

    1994-10-11

    The agouti (a) locus in mouse chromosome 2 normally regulates coat color pigmentation. The mouse agouti gene was recently cloned and shown to encode a distinctive 131-amino acid protein with a consensus signal peptide. Here the authors describe the cloning of the human homolog of the mouse agouti gene using an interspecies DNA-hybridization approach. Sequence analysis revealed that the coding region of the human agouti gene is 85% identical to the mouse gene and has the potential to encode a protein of 132 amino acids with a consensus signal peptide. Chromosomal assignment using somatic-cell-hybrid mapping panels and fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that the human agouti gene maps to chromosome band 20q11.2. This result revealed that the human agouti gene is closely linked to several traits, including a locus called MODY (for maturity onset diabetes of the young) and another region that is associated with the development of myeloid leukemia. Initial expression studies with RNA from several adult human tissues showed that the human agouti gene is expressed in adipose tissue and testis.

  1. A novel radiofluorinated agouti-related protein for tumor angiogenesis imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han; Moore, Sarah J; Liu, Shuanglong; Liu, Hongguang; Miao, Zheng; Cochran, Frank V; Liu, Yang; Tian, Mei; Cochran, Jennifer R; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-02-01

    A novel protein scaffold based on the cystine knot domain of the agouti-related protein (AgRP) has been used to engineer mutants that can bind to the α(v)β(3) integrin receptor with high affinity and specificity. In the current study, an (18)F-labeled AgRP mutant (7C) was prepared and evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) probe for imaging tumor angiogenesis. AgRP-7C was synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis and site-specifically conjugated with 4-nitrophenyl 2-(18/19)F-fluoropropionate ((18/19)F-NFP) to produce the fluorinated peptide, (18/19)F-FP-AgRP-7C. Competition binding assays were used to measure the relative affinities of AgRP-7C and (19)F-FP-AgRP-7C to human glioblastoma U87MG cells that overexpress α(v)β(3) integrin. In addition, biodistribution, metabolic stability, and small animal PET imaging studies were conducted with (18)F-FP-AgRP-7C using U87MG tumor-bearing mice. Both AgRP-7C and (19)F-FP-AgRP-7C specifically competed with (125)I-echistatin for binding to U87MG cells with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of 9.40 and 8.37 nM, respectively. Non-invasive small animal PET imaging revealed that (18)F-FP-AgRP-7C exhibited rapid and good tumor uptake (3.24 percentage injected dose per gram [% ID/g] at 0.5 h post injection [p.i.]). The probe was rapidly cleared from the blood and from most organs, resulting in excellent tumor-to-normal tissue contrasts. Tumor uptake and rapid clearance were further confirmed with biodistribution studies. Furthermore, co-injection of (18)F-FP-AgRP-7C with a large molar excess of blocking peptide c(RGDyK) significantly inhibited tumor uptake in U87MG xenograft models, demonstrating the integrin-targeting specificity of the probe. Metabolite assays showed that the probe had high stability, making it suitable for in vivo applications. (18)F-FP-AgRP-7C exhibits promising in vivo properties such as rapid tumor targeting, good tumor uptake, and excellent tumor-to-normal tissue ratios

  2. Molecular and phenotypic analysis of 25 recessive, homozygous-viable alleles at the mouse agouti locus.

    PubMed Central

    Miltenberger, Rosalynn J; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Woychik, Richard P; Russell, Liane B; Michaud, Edward J

    2002-01-01

    Agouti is a paracrine-acting, transient antagonist of melanocortin 1 receptors that specifies the subapical band of yellow on otherwise black hairs of the wild-type coat. To better understand both agouti structure/function and the germline damage caused by chemicals and radiation, an allelic series of 25 recessive, homozygous-viable agouti mutations generated in specific-locus tests were characterized. Visual inspection of fur, augmented by quantifiable chemical analysis of hair melanins, suggested four phenotypic categories (mild, moderate, umbrous-like, severe) for the 18 hypomorphs and a single category for the 7 amorphs (null). Molecular analysis indicated protein-coding alterations in 8 hypomorphs and 6 amorphs, with mild-moderate phenotypes correlating with signal peptide or basic domain mutations, and more devastating phenotypes resulting from C-terminal lesions. Ten hypomorphs and one null demonstrated wild-type coding potential, suggesting that they contain mutations elsewhere in the > or = 125-kb agouti locus that either reduce the level or alter the temporal/spatial distribution of agouti transcripts. Beyond the notable contributions to the field of mouse germ cell mutagenesis, analysis of this allelic series illustrates that complete abrogation of agouti function in vivo occurs most often through protein-coding lesions, whereas partial loss of function occurs slightly more frequently at the level of gene expression control. PMID:11861569

  3. Electroacupuncture Improves Insulin Resistance by Reducing Neuroprotein Y/Agouti-Related Protein Levels and Inhibiting Expression of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B in Diet-induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; He, Jun-Feng; Qu, Ya-Ting; Liu, Zhi-Jun; Pu, Qing-Yang; Guo, Sheng-Tong; Du, Jia; Jiang, Peng-Fei

    2016-04-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been shown to exert beneficial effects on obesity, but the mechanism is unclear. This study investigated the effects of EA on diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into low-fat diet (LFD, 10 rats) and high-fat diet (HFD, 40 rats) groups. After the DIO models had been established, successful model rats were randomly divided into HFD, EA, and orlistat (OLST) groups. The EA group received EA at Zusanli (ST36) and Quchi (LI11) for 20 minutes once per day for 28 days. The OLST group was treated with orlistat by gavage. The body weight, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index, adipocyte diameters, and neuroprotein Y/agouti-related protein and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B levels were significantly lower in the EA group than in the HFD group. The rats of the OLST group showed watery stools and yellow hairs whereas those of the EA group had regular stools and sleek coats. The effect of EA on weight loss may be related to improved insulin resistance caused by changes in the adipocyte size and by reductions in the expressions of neuroprotein Y/agouti-related protein and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. This study indicates that EA may be a better method of alternative therapy for treating obesity and other metabolic diseases. PMID:27079226

  4. Agouti polynucleotide compositions and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.; Bultman, Scott J.; Michaud, Edward J.

    2003-02-04

    Disclosed are methods and compositions comprising novel agouti polypeptides and the polynucleotides which encode them. Also disclosed are DNA segments encoding these proteins derived from human and murine cell lines, and the use of these polynucleotides and polypeptides in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Methods, compositions, kits, and devices are also provided for identifying compounds which are inhibitors of agouti activity, and for altering fatty acid synthetase activity and intracellular calcium levels in transformed cells.

  5. Regulation of the mesocorticolimbic and mesostriatal dopamine systems by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone and agouti-related protein.

    PubMed

    Roseberry, Aaron G; Stuhrman, Katherine; Dunigan, Anna I

    2015-09-01

    The melanocortin system of the hypothalamus, including the neuropeptides α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH) and agouti-related protein (AgRP), and their receptors, the melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R), have been well-studied for their roles in the central control of feeding and body weight. In this review, we discuss the evidence demonstrating that αMSH and AgRP also act on the mesocorticolimbic and mesostriatal dopamine systems to regulate a wide variety of behaviors. In addition to the well described ability of αMSH to increase dopamine transmission and to increase grooming and rearing when injected directly into the ventral tegmental area, a growing body of evidence indicates that αMSH and AgRP can also act on dopamine pathways to regulate feeding and drug abuse, including reward-related behaviors toward food and drugs. Increasing our understanding of how αMSH and AgRP act on dopamine pathways to affect behavior may allow for identification of new strategies to combat disorders involving dysfunction of dopamine pathways, such as obesity and drug abuse. PMID:26116876

  6. Melanism in Peromyscus Is Caused by Independent Mutations in Agouti

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Evan P.; Manceau, Marie; Wiley, Christopher D.; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

    2009-01-01

    Identifying the molecular basis of phenotypes that have evolved independently can provide insight into the ways genetic and developmental constraints influence the maintenance of phenotypic diversity. Melanic (darkly pigmented) phenotypes in mammals provide a potent system in which to study the genetic basis of naturally occurring mutant phenotypes because melanism occurs in many mammals, and the mammalian pigmentation pathway is well understood. Spontaneous alleles of a few key pigmentation loci are known to cause melanism in domestic or laboratory populations of mammals, but in natural populations, mutations at one gene, the melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r), have been implicated in the vast majority of cases, possibly due to its minimal pleiotropic effects. To investigate whether mutations in this or other genes cause melanism in the wild, we investigated the genetic basis of melanism in the rodent genus Peromyscus, in which melanic mice have been reported in several populations. We focused on two genes known to cause melanism in other taxa, Mc1r and its antagonist, the agouti signaling protein (Agouti). While variation in the Mc1r coding region does not correlate with melanism in any population, in a New Hampshire population, we find that a 125-kb deletion, which includes the upstream regulatory region and exons 1 and 2 of Agouti, results in a loss of Agouti expression and is perfectly associated with melanic color. In a second population from Alaska, we find that a premature stop codon in exon 3 of Agouti is associated with a similar melanic phenotype. These results show that melanism has evolved independently in these populations through mutations in the same gene, and suggest that melanism produced by mutations in genes other than Mc1r may be more common than previously thought. PMID:19649329

  7. Proopiomelanocortin, agouti-related protein, and leptin in human cerebrospinal fluid: correlations with body weight and adiposity.

    PubMed

    Page-Wilson, Gabrielle; Meece, Kana; White, Anne; Rosenbaum, Michael; Leibel, Rudolph L; Smiley, Richard; Wardlaw, Sharon L

    2015-09-01

    Leptin and its neuronal targets, which produce proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP), regulate energy balance. This study characterized leptin, POMC, and AgRP in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 47 healthy human subjects, 23 lean and 24 overweight/obese (OW/OB), as related to BMI, adiposity, plasma leptin, soluble leptin receptor (s-OB-R), and insulin. POMC was measured since the POMC prohormone is the predominant POMC peptide in CSF and correlates with hypothalamic POMC in rodents. Plasma AgRP was similarly characterized. CSF leptin was 83-fold lower than in plasma and correlated strongly with BMI, body fat, and insulin. The relative amount of leptin transported into CSF declined with increasing BMI, ranging from 4.5 to 0.52%, consistent with a saturable transport mechanism. CSF sOB-R was 78-fold lower than in plasma and correlated negatively with plasma and CSF leptin. CSF POMC was higher in lean vs. OW/OB subjects (P < 0.001) and correlated negatively with CSF leptin (r = -0.60, P < 0.001) and with plasma leptin, insulin, BMI, and adiposity. CSF AgRP was not different in lean vs. OW/OB; however, plasma AgRP was higher in lean subjects (P = 0.001) and correlated negatively with BMI, adiposity, leptin, insulin, and HOMA (P < 0.005). Thus, CSF measurements may provide useful biomarkers for brain leptin and POMC activity. The striking negative correlation between CSF leptin and POMC could be secondary to leptin resistance and/or neuronal changes associated with obesity but may also indicate that POMC plays a primary role in regulating body weight and adiposity. The role of plasma AgRP as a neuroendocrine biomarker deserves further study. PMID:26152765

  8. Liver-specific expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice promotes liver carcinogenesis in the absence of obesity and diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuklin, Alexander; Mynatt, Randall; Klebig, Mitch; Kiefer, Laura; Wilkison, William O; Woychik, Richard P; Michaud III, Edward J

    2004-01-01

    Background: The agouti protein is a paracrine factor that is normally present in the skin of many species of mammals. Agouti regulates the switch between black and yellow hair pigmentation by signalling through the melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) on melanocytes. Lethal yellow (Ay) and viable yellow (Avy) are dominant regulatory mutations in the mouse agouti gene that cause the wild- ype protein to be produced at abnormally high levels throughout the body. Mice harboring these mutations exhibit a pleiotropic syndrome characterized by yellow coat color, obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and increased susceptibility to hyperplasia and carcinogenesis in numerous tissues, including the liver. The goal of this research was to determine if ectopic expression of the agouti gene in the liver alone is sufficient to recapitulate any aspect of this syndrome. For this purpose, we generated lines of transgenic mice expressing high levels of agouti in the liver under the regulatory control of the albumin promoter. Expression levels of the agouti transgene in the liver were quantified by Northern blot analysis. Functional agouti protein in the liver of transgenic mice was assayed by its ability to inhibit binding of the -melanocyte stimulating hormone ( MSH) to the Mc1r. Body weight, plasma insulin and blood glucose levels were analyzed in control and transgenic mice. Control and transgenic male mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection (10 mg/kg) of the hepatocellular carcinogen, diethylnitrosamine (DEN), at 15 days of age. Mice were euthanized at 36 or 40 weeks after DEN injection and the number of tumors per liver and total liver weights were recorded. Results: The albumin-agouti transgene was expressed at high levels in the livers of mice and produced a functional agouti protein. Albumin-agouti transgenic mice had normal body weights and normal levels of blood glucose and plasma insulin, but responded to chemical initiation of the liver with an increased number

  9. Splenic melanosis in agouti and black mice.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk-Wetula, Dominika; Wieczorek, Justyna; Płonka, Przemysław M

    2015-01-01

    An interesting example of extradermal deposition of melanin in vertebrates, notably in mammals, is splenic melanosis. In particular, if the phenomenon of splenic melanosis is correlated with hair or skin pigmentation, it must reflect the amount and perhaps the quality of pigment produced in hair follicle melanocytes. The present paper is our first study on splenic pigmentation in mice of phenotype agouti. We used untreated mixed background mice C57BL/6;129/SvJ (black - a/a, agouti - A/a, A/A), and as a control - black C57BL/6 and agouti fur from 129/SvJ mice, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) and golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). After euthanasia skin and spleen was evaluated macroscopically, photographed and collected for further analysis using Fontana-Masson and hematoxylin-eosin staining and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at X-band. Spleens of the agouti mice revealed splenic melanosis but were slightly weaker pigmented than their black counterparts, while the presence of pheomelanin was difficult to determine. The fur of both phenotypes was of similar melanin content, with the same tendency as in the spleens. The contribution of pheomelanin in the agouti fur was on the border of detectability by EPR. Histological and EPR analysis confirmed the presence of melanin in the melanotic spleens. The shape of the EPR signal showed a dominance of eumelanin in fur and in melanized spleens in both phenotypes of mice. Therefore, splenic melanosis does reflect the hair follicle pigmentation not only in black, but also in agouti mice. PMID:26291042

  10. Analysis of the function of the agouti gene in obesity and diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Mynatt, R.L.; Miltenberger, R.J.; Klebig, M.L.

    1996-09-01

    This chapter discusses the agouti gene and dominant mutations in that gene that lead to agouti-induced obesity, and recent work with transgenic mice to elucidate the role of agouti in obesity. Agouti was cloned in 1992 by the lab of Rick Woychik at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, making it the first of many recently cloned mouse obesity genes. Sequence analysis predicted that mouse agouti is a secreted protein of 131 amino acids. The mature protein has a basic central region (lys57-arg85), a proline-rich domain (pro86-pro91) and a C-terminal region (cys 92-cys 13 1) containing 10 cysteine residues which form 5 disulfide bonds. The human homologue of agouti has also been cloned by the Woychik lab and maps to human chromosome 20q 11.2. Human agouti is 132 amino acids long and is 85% similar to the mouse agouti protein and is normally expressed in adipose tissue. The researchers have been able to recapitulate obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperglycemia with the ubiquitous expression of agouti. Agouti expression in either liver and adipose tissue alone does not cause obesity, and there`s a dose-dependent effect of agouti on body weight, food efficiency, body temperature, and insulin and glucose levels.

  11. Ablation of neurons expressing agouti-related protein, but not melanin concentrating hormone, in leptin-deficient mice restores metabolic functions and fertility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Whiddon, Benjamin B.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Leptin-deficient (Lepob/ob) mice are obese, diabetic, and infertile. Ablation of neurons that make agouti-related protein (AgRP) in moderately obese adult Lepob/ob mice caused severe anorexia. The mice stopped eating for 2 wk and then gradually recovered. Their body weight fell to within a normal range for WT mice, at which point food intake and glucose tolerance were restored to that of WT mice. Remarkably, both male and female Lepob/ob mice became fertile. Ablation of neurons that express melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in adult Lepob/ob mice had no effect on food intake, body weight, or fertility, but resulted in improved glucose tolerance. We conclude that AgRP-expressing neurons play a critical role in mediating the metabolic syndrome and infertility of Lepob/ob mice, whereas MCH-expressing neurons have only a minor role. PMID:22232663

  12. Strain differences in cytochrome P450 mRNA and protein expression, and enzymatic activity among Sprague Dawley, Wistar, Brown Norway and Dark Agouti rats

    PubMed Central

    NISHIYAMA, Yoshihiro; NAKAYAMA, Shouta M.M.; WATANABE, Kensuke P.; KAWAI, Yusuke K.; OHNO, Marumi; IKENAKA, Yoshinori; ISHIZUKA, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Rat cytochrome P450 (CYP) exhibits inter-strain differences, but their analysis has been scattered across studies under different conditions. To identify these strain differences in CYP more comprehensively, mRNA expression, protein expression and metabolic activity among Wistar (WI), Sprague Dawley (SD), Dark Agouti (DA) and Brown Norway (BN) rats were compared. The mRNA level and enzymatic activity of CYP1A1 were highest in SD rats. The rank order of Cyp3a2 mRNA expression mirrored its protein expression, i.e., DA>BN>SD>WI, and was similar to the CYP3A2-dependent warfarin metabolic activity, i.e., DA>SD>BN>WI. These results suggest that the strain differences in CYP3A2 enzymatic activity are caused by differences in mRNA expression. Cyp2b1 mRNA levels, which were higher in DA rats, did not correlate with its protein expression or enzymatic activity. This suggests that the strain differences in enzymatic activity are not related to Cyp2b1 mRNA expression. In conclusion, WI rats tended to have the lowest CYP1A1, 2B1 and 3A2 mRNA expression, protein expression and enzymatic activity among the strains. In addition, SD rats had the highest CYP1A1 mRNA expression and activity, while DA rats had higher CYP2B1 and CYP3A2 mRNA and protein expression. These inter-strain differences in CYP could influence pharmacokinetic considerations in preclinical toxicological studies. PMID:26806536

  13. Hypothalamic agouti-related protein expression is affected by both acute and chronic experience of food restriction and re-feeding in chickens.

    PubMed

    Dunn, I C; Wilson, P W; Smulders, T V; Sandilands, V; D'Eath, R B; Boswell, T

    2013-10-01

    The central melanocortin system is conserved across vertebrates. However, in birds, little is known about how energy balance influences orexigenic agouti-related protein (AGRP) and anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) expression, despite the fact that commercial food restriction is critical to the efficient production of poultry meat. To enable contrasts to be made, in broiler-breeder chickens, between levels of food restriction, between birds with the same body weight but different feeding experience, and between birds moved from restricted feeding to ad lib. feeding for different periods, five groups of hens were established between 6 and 12 weeks of age with different combinations of food restriction and release from restriction. AGRP and neuropeptide Y expression in the basal hypothalamus was significantly increased by chronic restriction but only AGRP mRNA levels reflected recent feeding experience: hens at the same body weight that had recently been on ad lib. feeding showed lower expression than restricted birds. AGRP expression also distinguished between hens released from restriction to ad lib. feeding for different periods. By contrast, POMC and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript mRNA levels were not different. These results showed that AGRP mRNA not only reflected differences between a bird's weight and its potential weight or set point, but also discriminated between differing feeding histories of birds at the same body weight. Therefore, AGRP expression potentially provides an integrated measure of food intake experience and an objective tool to assess a bird's perception of satiety in feeding regimes for improved poultry welfare. PMID:23957836

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Controls Ingestive Behavior, Agouti-Related Protein, and Neuropeptide Y mRNA in the Arcuate Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Garretson, John T.; Teubner, Brett J.W.; Grove, Kevin L.; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. PMID:25788674

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ controls ingestive behavior, agouti-related protein, and neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Garretson, John T; Teubner, Brett J W; Grove, Kevin L; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-03-18

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. PMID:25788674

  16. Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone and Agouti-Related Protein: Do They Play a Role in Appetite Regulation in Childhood Obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Vehapoğlu, Aysel; Türkmen, Serdar; Terzioğlu, Şule

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The hypothalamus plays a crucial role in the regulation of feeding behavior. The anorexigenic neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and the orexigenic neuropeptide agouti-related protein (AgRP) are among the major peptides produced in the hypothalamus. This study investigated the plasma concentrations of α-MSH and AgRP in underweight and obese children and their healthy peers. The associations between α-MSH and AgRP levels and anthropometric and nutritional markers of malnutrition and obesity were also assessed. Methods: Healthy sex-matched subjects aged 2 to 12 years were divided into 3 groups, as underweight (n=57), obese (n=61), and of normal weight (n=57). Plasma fasting concentrations of α-MSH and AgRP were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The differences between the three groups as to the relationships between plasma concentrations of α-MSH and AgRP and anthropometric data, serum biochemical parameters and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were evaluated. Results: Obese children had significantly lower α-MSH levels than underweight (1194±865 vs. 1904±1312 ng/mL, p=0.006) and normal weight (1194±865 vs. 1762±1463 ng/mL, p=0.036) children; there were no significant differences in the α-MSH levels between the underweight and normal weight children (p=0.811). Also, no significant differences were observed between the underweight and obese children regarding the AgRP levels (742±352 vs. 828±417 ng/mL, p=0.125). We found a significant positive correlation between plasma α-MSH and AgRP levels across the entire sample. Conclusion: This study is the first to demonstrate body weight-related differences in α-MSH and AgRP levels in children. Circulating plasma α-MSH levels in obese children were markedly lower than those of underweight and normal-weight children. This suggests that α-MSH could play a role in appetite regulation. PMID:26758700

  17. Protein Regulation in Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Yaffe, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYCells must respond to a diverse, complex, and ever-changing mix of signals, using a fairly limited set of parts. Changes in protein level, protein localization, protein activity, and protein-protein interactions are critical aspects of signal transduction, allowing cells to respond highly specifically to a nearly limitless set of cues and also to vary the sensitivity, duration, and dynamics of the response. Signal-dependent changes in levels of gene expression and protein synthesis play an important role in regulation of protein levels, whereas posttranslational modifications of proteins regulate their degradation, localization, and functional interactions. Protein ubiquitylation, for example, can direct proteins to the proteasome for degradation or provide a signal that regulates their interactions and/or location within the cell. Similarly, protein phosphorylation by specific kinases is a key mechanism for augmenting protein activity and relaying signals to other proteins that possess domains that recognize the phosphorylated residues. PMID:27252361

  18. Molecular analysis of the mouse agouti gene and the role of dominant agouti-locus mutations in obesity and insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P.; Wilkinson, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    The lethal yellow (A{sup y/-}) and viable yellow (A{sup vy/-}) mouse agouti mutants have a predominantly yellow pelage and display a complex syndrome that includes obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance, hallmark features of obesity-associated noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in humans. A new dominant agouti allele, A{sup iapy}, has recently been identified; like the A{sup vy} allele, it is homozygous viable and confers obesity and yellow fur in heterozygotes. The agouti gene was cloned and characterized at the molecular level. The gene is expressed in the skin during hair growth and is predicted to encode a 131 amino acid protein, that is likely to be a secreted factor. In both Ay/- and A{sup iapy}/- mice, the obesity and other dominant pleiotropic effects are associated with an ectopic expression of agouti in many tissues where the gene product is normally not produced. In Ay, a 170-kb deletion has occurred that causes an upstream promoter to drive the ectopic expression of the wild-type agouti coding exons. In A{sup iapy}, the coding region of the gene is expressed from a cryptic promoter within the LTR of an intracisternal A-particle (IAP), which has integrated within the region just upstream of the first agouti coding exon. Transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing the cloned agouti gene under the influence of the beta-actin and phosphoglycerate kinase promoters display obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and yellow coat color. This demonstrates unequivocally that ectopic expression of agouti is responsible for the yellow obese syndrome.

  19. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Six Recessive Viable Alleles of the Mouse Agouti Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hustad, C. M.; Perry, W. L.; Siracusa, L. D.; Rasberry, C.; Cobb, L.; Cattanach, B. M.; Kovatch, R.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    The agouti locus on mouse chromosome 2 encodes a secreted cysteine-rich protein of 131 amino acids that acts as a molecular switch to instruct the melanocyte to make either yellow pigment (phaeomelanin) or black pigment (eumelanin). Mutations that up-regulate agouti expression are dominant to those causing decreased expression and result in yellow coat color. Other associated effects are obesity, diabetes, and increased susceptibility to tumors. To try to define important functional domains of the agouti protein, we have analyzed the molecular defects present in a series of recessive viable agouti mutations. In total, six alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(da), a(16H), a(18H), a(e)) were examined at both the RNA and DNA level. Two of the alleles, a(16H) and a(e), result from mutations in the agouti coding region. Four alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(18H), and a(da)) appear to represent regulatory mutations that down-regulate agouti expression. Interestingly, one of these mutations, a(18H), also appears to cause an immunological defect in the homozygous condition. This immunological defect is somewhat analogous to that observed in motheaten (me) mutant mice. Short and long-range restriction enzyme analyses of homozygous a(18H) DNA are consistent with the hypothesis that a(18H) results from a paracentric inversion where one end of the inversion maps in the 5' regulatory region of agouti and the other end in or near a gene that is required for normal immunological function. Cloning the breakpoints of this putative inversion should allow us to identify the gene that confers this interesting immunological disorder. PMID:7635290

  20. A combination of probiotics and whey proteins enhances anti-obesity effects of calcium and dairy products during nutritional energy restriction in aP2-agouti transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Kazutoyo; Sun, Xiaocum; Kawase, Manabu; Kubota, Akira; Miyazawa, Kenji; Harata, Gaku; Hosoda, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Masaru; He, Fang; Zemel, Michael B

    2015-06-14

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus paracasei TMC0409, Streptococcus thermophilus TMC1543 and whey proteins were used to prepare fermented milk. For the experiment aP2- agouti transgenic mice were pre-treated with a high-sucrose/high-fat diet for 6 weeks to induce obesity. The obese mice were fed a diet containing 1·2% Ca and either non-fat dried milk (NFDM) or probiotic-fermented milk (PFM) with nutritional energy restriction for 6 weeks. The animals were examined after the treatment for changes in body weight, fat pad weight, fatty acid synthase (FAS) activity, lypolysis, the expression levels of genes related to lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and skeletal muscle and the presence of biomarkers for oxidative and inflammatory stress in plasma. It was found that the PFM diet significantly reduced body weight, fat accumulation, and adipocyte FAS activity, and increased adipocyte lipolysis as compared with the effects of the NFDM diet (P<0·05). The adipose tissue gene expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) was significantly suppressed in mice that were fed PFM as compared with those that were fed NFDM (P<0·05). PFM caused a greater up-regulation of skeletal muscle PPARα, PPARδ, uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) and GLUT4 expression and a significant decrease in the plasma concentration of insulin, malondialdehyde, TNF-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and C-reactive protein as compared with the effects of NFDM (P<0·05). Fermentation of milk with selected probiotics and supplementation of milk with whey proteins may thus enhance anti-obesity effects of Ca and dairy products by the suppression of adipose tissue lipogenesis, activation of fat oxidation in skeletal muscle and reduction of oxidative and inflammatory stress. PMID:25871498

  1. Who's behind that mask and cape? The Asian leopard cat's Agouti (ASIP) allele likely affects coat colour phenotype in the Bengal cat breed.

    PubMed

    Gershony, L C; Penedo, M C T; Davis, B W; Murphy, W J; Helps, C R; Lyons, L A

    2014-12-01

    Coat colours and patterns are highly variable in cats and are determined mainly by several genes with Mendelian inheritance. A 2-bp deletion in agouti signalling protein (ASIP) is associated with melanism in domestic cats. Bengal cats are hybrids between domestic cats and Asian leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis), and the charcoal coat colouration/pattern in Bengals presents as a possible incomplete melanism. The complete coding region of ASIP was directly sequenced in Asian leopard, domestic and Bengal cats. Twenty-seven variants were identified between domestic and leopard cats and were investigated in Bengals and Savannahs, a hybrid with servals (Leptailurus serval). The leopard cat ASIP haplotype was distinguished from domestic cat by four synonymous and four non-synonymous exonic SNPs, as well as 19 intronic variants, including a 42-bp deletion in intron 4. Fifty-six of 64 reported charcoal cats were compound heterozygotes at ASIP, with leopard cat agouti (A(P) (be) ) and domestic cat non-agouti (a) haplotypes. Twenty-four Bengals had an additional unique haplotype (A2) for exon 2 that was not identified in leopard cats, servals or jungle cats (Felis chaus). The compound heterozygote state suggests the leopard cat allele, in combination with the recessive non-agouti allele, influences Bengal markings, producing a darker, yet not completely melanistic coat. This is the first validation of a leopard cat allele segregating in the Bengal breed and likely affecting their overall pelage phenotype. Genetic testing services need to be aware of the possible segregation of wild felid alleles in all assays performed on hybrid cats. PMID:25143047

  2. Genetic organization of the agouti region of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Siracusa, L.D.; Russell, L.B.; Eicher, E.M.; Corrow, D.J.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1987-09-01

    The agouti locus on mouse chromosome 2 acts via the hair follicle to control the melanic type and distribution of hair pigments. The diverse phenotypes associated with various agouti mutations have led to speculation about the organization of the agouti locus. Earlier studies indicated that two presumed agouti alleles, lethal yellow (A/sup y/) and lethal light-bellied nonagouti (a/sup x/), are pseudoallelic. The authors present genetic data showing probable recombination between A/sup y/ and three agouti mutations (a/sup t/, a, and a/sup x/), which suggest that A/sup y/ is a pseudoallele of the agouti locus. The close linkage of an endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia provirus, Emv-15, to A/sup y/ provides a molecular access to genes at or near the agouti locus. However, previous studies suggested that the Emv-15 locus can recombine with some agouti alleles and therefore they analyzed mice from recombinant inbred strains and backcrosses to measure the genetic distance between various agouti alleles and the Emv-15 locus. The data indicate that the Emv-15 locus is less the 0.3 cM from the agouti locus. These experiments provide a conceptual framework for initiating chromosome walking experiments designed to retrieve sequences from the agouti locus and give new insight into the genetic organization of the agouti region.

  3. Protein modules and signalling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawson, Tony

    1995-02-01

    Communication between cells assumes particular importance in multicellular organisms. The growth, migration and differentiation of cells in the embryo, and their organization into specific tissues, depend on signals transmitted from one cell to another. In the adult, cell signalling orchestrates normal cellular behaviour and responses to wounding and infection. The consequences of breakdowns in this signalling underlie cancer, diabetes and disorders of the immune and cardiovascular systems. Conserved protein domains that act as key regulatory participants in many of these different signalling pathways are highlighted.

  4. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P.; Wilkinson, J.E.; Geisler, J.G. |

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (A{sup y}) or viable yellow (A{sup vy}) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant {open_quotes}obese yellow{close_quotes} a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Role of regulator of G protein signaling proteins in bone

    PubMed Central

    Keinan, David; Yang, Shuying; Cohen, Robert E.; Yuan, Xue; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are a family with more than 30 proteins that all contain an RGS domain. In the past decade, increasing evidence has indicated that RGS proteins play crucial roles in the regulation of G protein coupling receptors (GPCR), G proteins, and calcium signaling during cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in a variety of tissues. In bone, those proteins modulate bone development and remodeling by influencing various signaling pathways such as GPCR-G protein signaling, Wnt, calcium oscillations and PTH. This review summarizes the recent advances in the understanding of the regulation of RGS genes expression, as well as the functions and mechanisms of RGS proteins, especially in regulating GPCR-G protein signaling, Wnt signaling, calcium oscillations signaling and PTH signaling during bone development and remodeling. This review also highlights the regulation of different RGS proteins in osteoblasts, chondrocytes and osteoclasts. The knowledge from the recent advances of RGS study summarized in the review would provide the insights into new therapies for bone diseases. PMID:24389209

  6. SENTRA, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, M.; Romine, M. F.; Maltsev, N.; Mathematics and Computer Science; PNNL

    2000-01-01

    SENTRA, available via URL http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/Sentra/, is a database of proteins associated with microbial signal transduction. The database currently includes the classical two-component signal transduction pathway proteins and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, but will be expanded to also include other classes of signal transduction systems that are modulated by phosphorylation or methylation reactions. Although the majority of database entries are from prokaryotic systems, eukaroytic proteins with bacterial-like signal transduction domains are also included. Currently SENTRA contains signal transduction proteins in 34 complete and almost completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, as well as sequences from 243 organisms available in public databases (SWISS-PROT and EMBL). The analysis was carried out within the framework of the WIT2 system, which is designed and implemented to support genetic sequence analysis and comparative analysis of sequenced genomes.

  7. Sentra, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Maltsev, N.; Marland, E.; Yu, G. X.; Bhatnagar, S.; Lusk, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-01-01

    Sentra (http://www-wit.mcs.anl.gov/sentra) is a database of signal transduction proteins with the emphasis on microbial signal transduction. The database was updated to include classes of signal transduction systems modulated by either phosphorylation or methylation reactions such as PAS proteins and serine/threonine kinases, as well as the classical two-component histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Currently, Sentra contains signal transduction proteins from 43 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes as well as sequences from SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL. Signal transduction proteins are annotated with information describing conserved domains, paralogous and orthologous sequences, and conserved chromosomal gene clusters. The newly developed user interface supports flexible search capabilities and extensive visualization of the data.

  8. The effects of calcium channel blockade on agouti-induced obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung Han; Moustaid, N.; Zemel, M.B.

    1996-12-01

    We have previously observed that obese viable yellow (A{sup vy}/a) mice exhibit increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]i) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expression; further, recombinant agouti protein increases in cultured adipocytes and these effects are inhibited by Ca{sup 2+} channel blockade. Accordingly, we determined the effect of Ca{sup 2+} channel blockade (nifedipine for 4 wk) on FAS and obesity in transgenic mice expressing the agouti gene in a ubiquitous manner. The transgenic mice initially were significantly heavier (30.5 {+-} 0.6 vs. 27.3 {+-} 0.3 g; P<0.001) and exhibited a 0.81{degrees}C lower initial core temperature (P<0.0005), an approximately twofold increase in fat pad weights (P=0.002), a sevenfold increase in adipose FAS activity (P=0.009), and a twofold increase in plasma insulin level (P<0.05) compared to control mice. Nifedipine treatment resulted in an 18% decrease in fat pad weights (P<0.007) and a 74% decrease in adipose FAS activity (P=0.03), normalized circulating insulin levels and insulin sensitivity (P,0.05), and transiently elevated core temperature in the transgenic mice, but was without effect in the control mice. These data suggest that agouti regulates FAS, fat storage, and possibly thermogenesis, at least partially, via a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent mechanism, and that Ca{sup 2+} channel blockade may partially attenuate agouti-induced obesity. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Characterization of the dog agouti gene and a nonagouti mutation in german shepherd dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Julie A.; Newton, J.; Berryere, Tom G.; Rubin, Edward M.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Schmutz, Sheila M.; Barsh, Gregory S.

    2004-07-08

    The interaction between two genes, Agouti and Melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r), produces diverse pigment patterns in mammals by regulating the type, amount, and distribution pattern of the two pigment types found in mammalian hair: eumelanin (brown/black) and pheomelanin (yellow/red). In domestic dogs (Canis familiaris), there is a tremendous variation in coat color patterns between and within breeds; however, previous studies suggest that the molecular genetics of pigment-type switching in dogs may differ from that of other mammals. Here we report the identification and characterization of the Agouti gene from domestic dogs, predicted to encode a 131-amino-acid secreted protein 98 percent identical to the fox homolog, and which maps to chromosome CFA24 in a region of conserved linkage. Comparative analysis of the Doberman Pinscher Agouti cDNA, the fox cDNA, and 180 kb of Doberman Pinscher genomic DNA suggests that, as with laboratory mice, different pigment-type-switching patterns in the canine family are controlled by alternative usage of different promoters and untranslated first exons. A small survey of Labrador Retrievers, Greyhounds, Australian Shepherds, and German Shepherd Dogs did not uncover any polymorphisms, but we identified a single nucleotide variant in black German Shepherd Dogs predicted to cause an Arg-to-Cys substitution at codon 96, which is likely to account for recessive inheritance of a uniform black coat.

  10. Characterization of the dog Agouti gene and a nonagoutimutation in German Shepherd Dogs.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Julie A; Newton, J; Berryere, Tom G; Rubin, Edward M; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Schmutz, Sheila M; Barsh, Gregory S

    2004-10-01

    The interaction between two genes, Agouti and Melanocortin-1 receptor ( Mc1r), produces diverse pigment patterns in mammals by regulating the type, amount, and distribution pattern of the two pigment types found in mammalian hair: eumelanin (brown/black) and pheomelanin (yellow/red). In domestic dogs ( Canis familiaris), there is a tremendous variation in coat color patterns between and within breeds; however, previous studies suggest that the molecular genetics of pigment-type switching in dogs may differ from that of other mammals. Here we report the identification and characterization of the Agouti gene from domestic dogs, predicted to encode a 131-amino-acid secreted protein 98% identical to the fox homolog, and which maps to chromosome CFA24 in a region of conserved linkage. Comparative analysis of the Doberman Pinscher Agouti cDNA, the fox cDNA, and 180 kb of Doberman Pinscher genomic DNA suggests that, as with laboratory mice, different pigment-type-switching patterns in the canine family are controlled by alternative usage of different promoters and untranslated first exons. A small survey of Labrador Retrievers, Greyhounds, Australian Shepherds, and German Shepherd Dogs did not uncover any polymorphisms, but we identified a single nucleotide variant in black German Shepherd Dogs predicted to cause an Arg-to-Cys substitution at codon 96, which is likely to account for recessive inheritance of a uniform black coat. PMID:15520882

  11. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  12. Signaling through G protein coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (Gα, Gβ/Gγ subunits) constitute one of the most important components of cell signaling cascade. G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) perceive many extracellular signals and transduce them to heterotrimeric G proteins, which further transduce these signals intracellular to appropriate downstream effectors and thereby play an important role in various signaling pathways. GPCRs exist as a superfamily of integral membrane protein receptors that contain seven transmembrane α-helical regions, which bind to a wide range of ligands. Upon activation by a ligand, the GPCR undergoes a conformational change and then activate the G proteins by promoting the exchange of GDP/GTP associated with the Gα subunit. This leads to the dissociation of Gβ/Gγ dimer from Gα. Both these moieties then become free to act upon their downstream effectors and thereby initiate unique intracellular signaling responses. After the signal propagation, the GTP of Gα-GTP is hydrolyzed to GDP and Gα becomes inactive (Gα-GDP), which leads to its re-association with the Gβ/Gγ dimer to form the inactive heterotrimeric complex. The GPCR can also transduce the signal through G protein independent pathway. GPCRs also regulate cell cycle progression. Till to date thousands of GPCRs are known from animal kingdom with little homology among them, but only single GPCR has been identified in plant system. The Arabidopsis GPCR was reported to be cell cycle regulated and also involved in ABA and in stress signaling. Here I have described a general mechanism of signal transduction through GPCR/G proteins, structure of GPCRs, family of GPCRs and plant GPCR and its role. PMID:19826234

  13. STIM proteins: dynamic calcium signal transducers

    PubMed Central

    Soboloff, Jonathan; Rothberg, Brad S.; Madesh, Muniswamy; Gill, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Stromal interaction molecule (STIM) proteins function in cells as dynamic coordinators of cellular calcium (Ca2+) signals. Spanning the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, they sense tiny changes in the levels of Ca2+ stored within the ER lumen. As ER Ca2+ is released to generate primary Ca2+ signals, STIM proteins undergo an intricate activation reaction and rapidly translocate into junctions formed between the ER and the plasma membrane. There, STIM proteins tether and activate the highly Ca2+-selective Orai channels to mediate finely controlled Ca2+ signals and to homeostatically balance cellular Ca2+. Details are emerging on the remarkable organization within these STIM-induced junctional microdomains and the identification of new regulators and alternative target proteins for STIM. PMID:22914293

  14. Signal transduction by guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A M

    1987-01-01

    High affinity binding of guanine nucleotides and the ability to hydrolyze bound GTP to GDP are characteristics of an extended family of intracellular proteins. Subsets of this family include cytosolic initiation and elongation factors involved in protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin (Hughes, S.M. (1983) FEBS Lett. 164, 1-8). A distinct subset of guanine nucleotide binding proteins is membrane-associated; members of this subset include the ras gene products (Ellis, R.W. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 506-511) and the heterotrimeric G-proteins (also termed N-proteins) (Gilman, A.G. (1984) Cell 36, 577-579). Substantial evidence indicates that G-proteins act as signal transducers by coupling receptors (R) to effectors (E). A similar function has been suggested but not proven for the ras gene products. Known G-proteins include Gs and Gi, the G-proteins associated with stimulation and inhibition, respectively, of adenylate cyclase; transducin (TD), the G-protein coupling rhodopsin to cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors (Bitensky, M.W. et al. (1981) Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. 15, 237-271; Stryer, L. (1986) Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 9, 87-119), and Go, a G-protein of unknown function that is highly abundant in brain (Sternweis, P.C. and Robishaw, J.D. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13806-13813; Neer, E.J. et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14222-14229). G-proteins also participate in other signal transduction pathways, notably that involving phosphoinositide breakdown. In this review, I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the structure, function, and diversity of G-proteins. PMID:2435586

  15. Osmotic stress signaling via protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiroaki; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2012-10-01

    Plants face various kinds of environmental stresses, including drought, salinity, and low temperature, which cause osmotic stress. An understanding of the plant signaling pathways that respond to osmotic stress is important for both basic biology and agriculture. In this review, we summarize recent investigations concerning the SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK) 2 kinase family, which play central roles in osmotic stress responses. SnRK2s are activated by osmotic stress, and a mutant lacking SnRK2s is hypersensitive to osmotic stress. Many questions remain about the signaling pathway upstream and downstream of SnRK2s. Because some SnRK2s also functions in the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway, which has recently been well clarified, study of SnRK2s in ABA signaling can provide clues regarding their roles in osmotic stress signaling. PMID:22828864

  16. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling.

    PubMed

    Londino, James D; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-12-25

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling. PMID:26534964

  17. Discovery of a β-Hairpin Octapeptide, c[Pro-Arg-Phe-Phe-Dap-Ala-Phe-DPro], Mimetic of Agouti-Related Protein(87-132) [AGRP(87-132)] with Equipotent Mouse Melanocortin-4 Receptor (mMC4R) Antagonist Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Mark D; Wilczynski, Andrzej; Sorensen, Nicholas B; Xiang, Zhimin; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2015-06-11

    Agouti-related protein (AGRP) is a potent orexigenic peptide that antagonizes the melanocortin-3 and -4 receptors (MC3R and MC4R). While the C-terminal domain of AGRP, AGRP(87-132), is equipotent to the full-length peptide, further truncation decreases potency at the MC3R and MC4R. Herein, we report AGRP-derived peptides designed to mimic the active β-hairpin secondary structure that contains the hypothesized Arg-Phe-Phe pharmacophore. The most potent scaffold, c[Pro-Arg-Phe-Phe-Asn-Ala-Phe-DPro], comprised the hexa-peptide β-hairpin loop from AGRP cyclized through a DPro-Pro motif. A 20 compound library was synthesized from this scaffold for further structure-activity relationship studies. The most potent peptide from this library was an asparagine to diaminopropionic acid substitution that possessed sub-nanomolar antagonist activity at the mMC4R and was greater than 160-fold selective for the mMC4R versus the mMC3R. The reported ligands may serve as probes to characterize the melanocortin receptors in vivo and leads in the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:25898270

  18. Physical signals for protein-DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zeng, Jia; Yan, Hong

    2009-09-01

    This paper discovers consensus physical signals around eukaryotic splice sites, transcription start sites, and replication origin start and end sites on a genome-wide scale based on their DNA flexibility profiles calculated by three different flexibility models. These salient physical signals are localized highly rigid and flexible DNAs, which may play important roles in protein-DNA recognition by the sliding search mechanism. The found physical signals lead us to a detailed hypothetical view of the search process in which a DNA-binding protein first finds a genomic region close to the target site from an arbitrary starting location by three-dimensional (3D) hopping and intersegment transfer mechanisms for long distances, and subsequently uses the one-dimensional (1D) sliding mechanism facilitated by the localized highly rigid DNAs to accurately locate the target flexible binding site within 30 bp (base pair) short distances. Guided by these physical signals, DNA-binding proteins rapidly search the entire genome to recognize a specific target site from the 3D to 1D pathway. Our findings also show that current promoter prediction programs (PPPs) based on DNA physical properties may suffer from lots of false positives because other functional sites such as splice sites and replication origins have similar physical signals as promoters do.

  19. Prion protein induced signaling cascades in monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, Bjarne; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia; Vassallo, Neville; Herms, Jochen; Kretzschmar, Hans A. . E-mail: Hans.Kretzschmar@med.uni-muenchen.de

    2006-02-03

    Prion proteins play a central role in transmission and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}), whose physiological function remains elusive, is anchored to the surface of a variety of cell types including neurons and cells of the lymphoreticular system. In this study, we investigated the response of a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line to exposure with PrP{sup C} fusion proteins synthesized with a human Fc-tag. PrP{sup C} fusion proteins showed an attachment to the surface of monocyte/macrophages in nanomolar concentrations. This was accompanied by an increase of cellular tyrosine phosphorylation as a result of activated signaling pathways. Detailed investigations exhibited activation of downstream pathways through a stimulation with PrP fusion proteins, which include phosphorylation of ERK{sub 1,2} and Akt kinase. Macrophages opsonize and present antigenic structures, contact lymphocytes, and deliver cytokines. The findings reported here may become the basis of understanding the molecular function of PrP{sup C} in monocytes and macrophages.

  20. TGF-beta signaling proteins and the Protein Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Arighi, Cecilia N; Liu, Hongfang; Natale, Darren A; Barker, Winona C; Drabkin, Harold; Blake, Judith A; Smith, Barry; Wu, Cathy H

    2009-01-01

    Background The Protein Ontology (PRO) is designed as a formal and principled Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) Foundry ontology for proteins. The components of PRO extend from a classification of proteins on the basis of evolutionary relationships at the homeomorphic level to the representation of the multiple protein forms of a gene, including those resulting from alternative splicing, cleavage and/or post-translational modifications. Focusing specifically on the TGF-beta signaling proteins, we describe the building, curation, usage and dissemination of PRO. Results PRO is manually curated on the basis of PrePRO, an automatically generated file with content derived from standard protein data sources. Manual curation ensures that the treatment of the protein classes and the internal and external relationships conform to the PRO framework. The current release of PRO is based upon experimental data from mouse and human proteins wherein equivalent protein forms are represented by single terms. In addition to the PRO ontology, the annotation of PRO terms is released as a separate PRO association file, which contains, for each given PRO term, an annotation from the experimentally characterized sub-types as well as the corresponding database identifiers and sequence coordinates. The annotations are added in the form of relationship to other ontologies. Whenever possible, equivalent forms in other species are listed to facilitate cross-species comparison. Splice and allelic variants, gene fusion products and modified protein forms are all represented as entities in the ontology. Therefore, PRO provides for the representation of protein entities and a resource for describing the associated data. This makes PRO useful both for proteomics studies where isoforms and modified forms must be differentiated, and for studies of biological pathways, where representations need to take account of the different ways in which the cascade of events may depend on specific protein

  1. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  2. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jeffrey K; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-08-18

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  3. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to the cloning and expression of the Agouti gene and analogous genes in transformed, transfected and transgenic mice. The present invention provides an animal model for the study of diabetes, obesity and tumors for the testing of potential therapeutic agents. The present invention provides oligonucleotide probes for the detection of the Agouti gene and mutations in the gene. The present invention also relates to the isolation and recombinant production of the Agouti gene product, production of antibodies to the Agouti gene product and their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  4. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.

    2000-06-27

    The present invention relates to the cloning and expression of the Agouti gene and analogous genes in transformed, transfected and transgenic mice. The present invention provides an animal model for the study of diabetes, obesity and tumors for the testing of potential therapeutic agents. The present invention provides oligonucleotide probes for the detection of the Agouti gene and mutations in the gene. The present invention also relates to the isolation and recombinant production of the Agouti gene product, production of antibodies to the Agouti gene product and their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  5. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  6. Age-related changes in spleen of Dark Agouti rats immunized for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Djikić, Jasmina; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Pilipović, Ivan; Kosec, Duško; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2015-01-15

    The study was undertaken considering age-related changes in susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and a putative role of spleen in pathogenesis of this disease. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of T splenocytes were examined in young (3-month-old), middle-aged (8-month-old) and aged (26-month-old) Dark Agouti rats immunized for EAE with rat spinal cord in complete Freund's adjuvant. The rat susceptibility to EAE induction, as well as the number of activated CD4+CD134+ lymphocytes retrieved from their spinal cords progressively decreased with aging. To the contrary, in rats immunized for EAE the number of activated CD4+ splenocytes, i.e., CD4+CD134+, CD4+CD25+FoxP3- and CD4+CD40L+ cells, progressively increased with aging. This was associated with age-related increase in (i) CD4+ splenocyte surface expression of CD44, the molecule suggested to be involved in limiting emigration of encephalitogenic CD4+ cells from spleen into blood and (ii) frequency of regulatory T cells, including CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells, which are also shown to control encephalitogenic cell migration from spleen into the central nervous system. In favor of expansion of T-regulatory cell pool in aged rats was the greater concentration of IL-10 in unstimulated, Concanavalin A (ConA)- and myelin basic protein (MBP)-stimulated splenocyte cultures from aged rats compared with the corresponding cultures from young ones. Consistent with the age-related increase in the expression of CD44, which is shown to favor Th1 effector cell survival by interfering with CD95-mediated signaling, the frequency of apoptotic cells among CD4+ splenocytes, despite the greater frequency of CD95+ cells, was diminished in splenocyte cultures from aged compared with young rats. In addition, in control, as well as in ConA- and MBP-stimulated splenocyte cultures from aged rats, despite of impaired CD4+ cell proliferation, IFN-γ concentrations were greater than in corresponding cultures

  7. Exposure to Soy Protein Isolate From Conception Fails to Induce Epigenetic Changes in Viable Yellow Agouti (Avy/a) Mice, But Partially Blocks Hepatosteatosis and Altered Body Composition in Mice and Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both beneficial and adverse health effects have been attributed to soy food consumption. Epigenetic programming through hypermethlylation of CpG sites on promoter regions may be a potential mechanism. Virgin a/a female and Avy/a male mice were fed AIN-93G diets made with either casein or soy protein...

  8. Control of Striatal Signaling by G Protein Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Keqiang; Martemyanov, Kirill A.

    2011-01-01

    Signaling via heterotrimeric G proteins plays a crucial role in modulating the responses of striatal neurons that ultimately shape core behaviors mediated by the basal ganglia circuitry, such as reward valuation, habit formation, and movement coordination. Activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by extracellular signals activates heterotrimeric G proteins by promoting the binding of GTP to their α subunits. G proteins exert their effects by influencing the activity of key effector proteins in this region, including ion channels, second messenger enzymes, and protein kinases. Striatal neurons express a staggering number of GPCRs whose activation results in the engagement of downstream signaling pathways and cellular responses with unique profiles but common molecular mechanisms. Studies over the last decade have revealed that the extent and duration of GPCR signaling are controlled by a conserved protein family named regulator of G protein signaling (RGS). RGS proteins accelerate GTP hydrolysis by the α subunits of G proteins, thus promoting deactivation of GPCR signaling. In this review, we discuss the progress made in understanding the roles of RGS proteins in controlling striatal G protein signaling and providing integration and selectivity of signal transmission. We review evidence on the formation of a macromolecular complex between RGS proteins and other components of striatal signaling pathways, their molecular regulatory mechanisms and impacts on GPCR signaling in the striatum obtained from biochemical studies and experiments involving genetic mouse models. Special emphasis is placed on RGS9-2, a member of the RGS family that is highly enriched in the striatum and plays critical roles in drug addiction and motor control. PMID:21852966

  9. Placentation in the paca (Agouti paca L)

    PubMed Central

    Bonatelli, Marina; Carter, Anthony M; Machado, Marcia R Fernandes; De Oliveira, Moacir F; de Lima, Marcelo Cardoso; Miglino, Maria Angelica

    2005-01-01

    Background The paca is a South American rodent with potential as a commercial food animal. We examined paca placenta as part of a wider effort to understand the reproductive biology of this species. Methods Thirteen specimens between midgestation and term of pregnancy were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. Results The placenta is divided into several lobes separated by interlobular trophoblast. Maternal arterial channels and fetal veins are found at the centre of each lobe. In the labyrinth, maternal blood flows through trophoblast-lined lacunae in close proximity to the fetal capillaries. The interhaemal barrier is of the haemomonochorial type with a single layer of syncytiotrophoblast. Caveolae occur in the apical membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast and recesses in the basal membrane, but there is no evidence of transtrophoblastic channels. The interlobular areas consist of cords of syncytiotrophoblast defining maternal blood channels that drain the labyrinth. Yolk sac endoderm covers much of the fetal surface of the placenta. The subplacenta comprises cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast. There are dilated intercellular spaces between the cytotrophoblasts and lacunae lined by syncytiotrophoblast. In the junctional zone between subplacenta and decidua, there are nests of multinucleated giant cells with vacuolated cytoplasm. The entire placenta rests on a pedicle of maternal tissue. An inverted yolk sac placenta is also present. The presence of small vesicles and tubules in the apical membrane of the yolk sac endoderm and larger vesicles in the supranuclear region suggest that the yolk sac placenta participates in maternal-fetal transfer of protein. Conclusion The paca placenta closely resembles that of other hystricomorph rodents. The lobulated structure allows for a larger exchange area and the development of precocial young. PMID:15737234

  10. Regulator of G-protein signaling - 5 (RGS5) is a novel repressor of hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, William M; Gunaje, Jagadambika; Daum, Guenter; Dong, Xiu Rong; Majesky, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo). Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS) proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh)-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases. PMID:23637832

  11. Role of signal peptides in targeting of proteins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Mackle, M M; Zilinskas, B A

    1994-01-01

    Proteins of cyanobacteria may be transported across one of two membrane systems: the typical eubacterial cell envelope (consisting of an inner membrane, periplasmic space, and an outer membrane) and the photosynthetic thylakoids. To investigate the role of signal peptides in targeting in cyanobacteria, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was transformed with vectors carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene fused to coding sequences for one of four different signal peptides. These included signal peptides of two proteins of periplasmic space origin (one from Escherichia coli and the other from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942) and two other signal peptides of proteins located in the thylakoid lumen (one from a cyanobacterium and the other from a higher plant). The location of the gene fusion products expressed in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was determined by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of subcellular fractions. The distribution pattern for gene fusions with periplasmic signal peptides was different from that of gene fusions with thylakoid lumen signal peptides. Primary sequence analysis revealed conserved features in the thylakoid lumen signal peptides that were absent from the periplasmic signal peptides. These results suggest the importance of the signal peptide in protein targeting in cyanobacteria and point to the presence of signal peptide features conserved between chloroplasts and cyanobacteria for targeting of proteins to the thylakoid lumen. Images PMID:8144451

  12. Dual degradation signals control Gli protein stability and tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Huntzicker, Erik G.; Estay, Ivette S.; Zhen, Hanson; Lokteva, Ludmila A.; Jackson, Peter K.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2006-01-01

    Regulated protein destruction controls many key cellular processes with aberrant regulation increasingly found during carcinogenesis. Gli proteins mediate the transcriptional effects of the Sonic hedgehog pathway, which is implicated in up to 25% of human tumors. Here we show that Gli is rapidly destroyed by the proteasome and that mouse basal cell carcinoma induction correlates with Gli protein accumulation. We identify two independent destruction signals in Gli1, DN and DC, and show that removal of these signals stabilizes Gli1 protein and rapidly accelerates tumor formation in transgenic animals. These data argue that control of Gli protein accumulation underlies tumorigenesis and suggest a new avenue for antitumor therapy. PMID:16421275

  13. G-protein signaling: back to the future.

    PubMed

    McCudden, C R; Hains, M D; Kimple, R J; Siderovski, D P; Willard, F S

    2005-03-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are intracellular partners of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs act on inactive Galpha.GDP/Gbetagamma heterotrimers to promote GDP release and GTP binding, resulting in liberation of Galpha from Gbetagamma. Galpha.GTP and Gbetagamma target effectors including adenylyl cyclases, phospholipases and ion channels. Signaling is terminated by intrinsic GTPase activity of Galpha and heterotrimer reformation - a cycle accelerated by 'regulators of G-protein signaling' (RGS proteins). Recent studies have identified several unconventional G-protein signaling pathways that diverge from this standard model. Whereas phospholipase C (PLC) beta is activated by Galpha(q) and Gbetagamma, novel PLC isoforms are regulated by both heterotrimeric and Ras-superfamily G-proteins. An Arabidopsis protein has been discovered containing both GPCR and RGS domains within the same protein. Most surprisingly, a receptor-independent Galpha nucleotide cycle that regulates cell division has been delineated in both Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we revisit classical heterotrimeric G-protein signaling and explore these new, non-canonical G-protein signaling pathways. PMID:15747061

  14. Sensory properties of the PII signalling protein family.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Karl; Lüddecke, Jan

    2016-02-01

    PII signalling proteins constitute one of the largest families of signalling proteins in nature. An even larger superfamily of trimeric sensory proteins with the same architectural principle as PII proteins appears in protein structure databases. Large surface-exposed flexible loops protrude from the intersubunit faces, where effector molecules are bound that tune the conformation of the loops. Via this mechanism, PII proteins control target proteins in response to cellular ATP/ADP levels and the 2-oxoglutarate status, thereby coordinating the cellular carbon/nitrogen balance. The antagonistic (ATP versus ADP) and synergistic (2-oxoglutarate and ATP) mode of effector molecule binding is further affected by PII -receptor interaction, leading to a highly sophisticated signalling network organized by PII . Altogether, it appears that PII is a multitasking information processor that, depending on its interaction environment, differentially transmits information on the energy status and the cellular 2-oxoglutarate level. In addition to the basic mode of PII function, several bacterial PII proteins may transmit a signal of the cellular glutamine status via covalent modification. Remarkably, during the evolution of plant chloroplasts, glutamine signalling by PII proteins was re-established by acquisition of a short sequence extension at the C-terminus. This plant-specific C-terminus makes the interaction of plant PII proteins with one of its targets, the arginine biosynthetic enzyme N-acetyl-glutamate kinase, glutamine-dependent. PMID:26527104

  15. Diet-induced hypermethylation at agouti viable yellow is not inherited transgenerationally through the female

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of nonmutagenic environmental exposures can sometimes be transmitted for several generations, suggesting transgenerational inheritance of induced epigenetic variation. Methyl donor supplementation of female mice during pregnancy induces CpG hypermethylation at the agouti viable yellow (A...

  16. ERM proteins: from cellular architecture to cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Louvet-Vallée, S

    2000-08-01

    ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins, concentrated in actin rich cell-surface structures, cross-link actin filaments with the plasma membrane. They are involved in the formation of microvilli, cell-cell adhesion, maintenance of cell shape, cell motility and membrane trafficking. Recent analyses reveal that they are not only involved in cytoskeleton organization but also in signaling pathway. They play an important role in the activation of members of the Rho family by recruiting their regulators. The functions of ERM proteins are regulated by their conformational charges: the intramolecular interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains of ERM proteins charges masks several binding sites, leading to a dormant protein. Different activation signals regulate ERM proteins functions by modulating these intramolecular interactions. The involvement of ERM proteins in many signaling pathways has led to study their role during development of different species. PMID:11071040

  17. Agouti regulation of intracellular calcium: Role in the insulin resistance of viable yellow mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zemel, M.B.; Kim, J.H.; Woychik, R.P.; Michaud, E.J.; Hadwell, S.H.; Patel, I.R.; Wilkison, W.O.

    1995-05-23

    Several dominant mutations at the agouti locus in the mouse cause a syndrome of marked obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Although it is known that the agouti gene is expressed in an ectopic manner in these mutants, the precise mechanism by which the agouti gene product mediates these effects is unclear. Since intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is believed to play a role in mediating insulin action and dysregulation of Ca{sup 2+} flux is observed in diabetic animals and humans, we examined the status of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in mice carrying the dominant agouti allele, viable yellow (A{sup vy}). We show here that in mice carrying this mutation, the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is elevated in skeletal muscle, and the degree of elevation is closely correlated with the degree to which the mutant traits are expressed in individual animals. Moreover, we demonstrate that the agouti gene product is capable of inducing increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in cultured and freshly isolated skeletal muscle myocytes from wild-type mice. Based on these findings, we present a model in which we propose that the agouti polypeptide promotes insulin resistance in mutant animals through its ability to increase [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Optogenetic pharmacology for control of native neuronal signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Richard H; Mourot, Alexandre; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    The optical neuroscience revolution is transforming how we study neural circuits. By providing a precise way to manipulate endogenous neuronal signaling proteins, it also has the potential to transform our understanding of molecular neuroscience. Recent advances in chemical biology have produced light-sensitive compounds that photoregulate a wide variety of proteins underlying signaling between and within neurons. Chemical tools for optopharmacology include caged agonists and antagonists and reversibly photoswitchable ligands. These reagents act on voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors, enabling control of neuronal signaling with a high degree of spatial and temporal precision. By covalently attaching photoswitch molecules to genetically tagged proteins, the newly emerging methodology of optogenetic pharmacology allows biochemically precise control in targeted subsets of neurons. Now that the tools for manipulating endogenous neuronal signaling proteins are available, they can be implemented in vivo to enhance our understanding of the molecular bases of brain function and dysfunctions. PMID:23799474

  19. Optogenetic pharmacology for control of native neuronal signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Richard H; Mourot, Alexandre; Adesnik, Hillel

    2013-07-01

    The optical neuroscience revolution is transforming how we study neural circuits. By providing a precise way to manipulate endogenous neuronal signaling proteins, it also has the potential to transform our understanding of molecular neuroscience. Recent advances in chemical biology have produced light-sensitive compounds that photoregulate a wide variety of proteins underlying signaling between and within neurons. Chemical tools for optopharmacology include caged agonists and antagonists and reversibly photoswitchable ligands. These reagents act on voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors, enabling control of neuronal signaling with a high degree of spatial and temporal precision. By covalently attaching photoswitch molecules to genetically tagged proteins, the newly emerging methodology of optogenetic pharmacology allows biochemically precise control in targeted subsets of neurons. Now that the tools for manipulating endogenous neuronal signaling proteins are available, they can be implemented in vivo to enhance our understanding of the molecular bases of brain function and dysfunctions. PMID:23799474

  20. Serotonin signaling mediates protein valuation and aging

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Jennifer; Pak, Gloria; Malec, Paige A; Lyu, Yang; Allison, David B; Kennedy, Robert T; Pletcher, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Research into how protein restriction improves organismal health and lengthens lifespan has largely focused on cell-autonomous processes. In certain instances, however, nutrient effects on lifespan are independent of consumption, leading us to test the hypothesis that central, cell non-autonomous processes are important protein restriction regulators. We characterized a transient feeding preference for dietary protein after modest starvation in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and identified tryptophan hydroxylase (Trh), serotonin receptor 2a (5HT2a), and the solute carrier 7-family amino acid transporter, JhI-21, as required for this preference through their role in establishing protein value. Disruption of any one of these genes increased lifespan up to 90% independent of food intake suggesting the perceived value of dietary protein is a critical determinant of its effect on lifespan. Evolutionarily conserved neuromodulatory systems that define neural states of nutrient demand and reward are therefore sufficient to control aging and physiology independent of food consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16843.001 PMID:27572262

  1. Serotonin signaling mediates protein valuation and aging.

    PubMed

    Ro, Jennifer; Pak, Gloria; Malec, Paige A; Lyu, Yang; Allison, David B; Kennedy, Robert T; Pletcher, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Research into how protein restriction improves organismal health and lengthens lifespan has largely focused on cell-autonomous processes. In certain instances, however, nutrient effects on lifespan are independent of consumption, leading us to test the hypothesis that central, cell non-autonomous processes are important protein restriction regulators. We characterized a transient feeding preference for dietary protein after modest starvation in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and identified tryptophan hydroxylase (Trh), serotonin receptor 2a (5HT2a), and the solute carrier 7-family amino acid transporter, JhI-21, as required for this preference through their role in establishing protein value. Disruption of any one of these genes increased lifespan up to 90% independent of food intake suggesting the perceived value of dietary protein is a critical determinant of its effect on lifespan. Evolutionarily conserved neuromodulatory systems that define neural states of nutrient demand and reward are therefore sufficient to control aging and physiology independent of food consumption. PMID:27572262

  2. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  3. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  4. Transmitter and receiver modules in bacterial signaling proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kofoid, E C; Parkinson, J S

    1988-01-01

    Prokaryotes are capable of sophisticated sensory behaviors. We have detected sequence motifs in bacterial signaling proteins that may act as transmitter or receiver modules in mediating protein-protein communication. These modules appear to retain their functional identities in many protein hosts, implying that they are structurally independent elements. We propose that the fundamental activity characterizing these domains is specific recognition and association of matched modules, accompanied by conformational changes in one or both of the interacting elements. Signal propagation is a natural consequence of this behavior. The versatility of this information-processing strategy is evident in the chemotaxis machinery of Escherichia coli, where proteins containing transmitters or receivers are linked in "dyadic relays" to form complex signaling networks. Images PMID:3293046

  5. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase.

    PubMed

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G; Economou, Anastassios

    2009-11-19

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as 'preproteins' carrying amino-terminal, cleavable signal peptides and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides and chaperones like SecB. Here we show that signal peptides have a new role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. On docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, 'triggering' that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; second, 'trapping' that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus; and third, 'secretion' during which trapped mature domains undergo several turnovers of translocation in segments. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  6. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Catrina M; Bialas, Nathan J; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Walker, Denise S; Grundy, Laura J; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R

    2016-07-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon-associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan. PMID:27193298

  7. Aberrant expression of signaling proteins in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wuhan; Ye, Fei; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Congyan; Cui, Miao; Li, Wei; Xu, Juan; Zhang, David Y

    2013-09-01

    Dysregulated expression of signaling proteins may contribute to the pathophysiology of essential thrombocythemia (ET). This study aimed to characterize protein expression in ET and to correlate the dysregulated proteins with phenotypes and prognosis of ET patients. The expression of 128 proteins in peripheral blood neutrophils from 74 ET patients was assessed and compared with those from 29 healthy subjects and 35 polycythemia vera (PV) patients using protein pathway array. Fifteen proteins were differentially expressed between ET patients and normal controls. These dysregulated proteins were involved in the signaling pathways related with apoptosis and inflammation. Our results showed a significant overlap in protein expression between ET patients with JAK2V617F mutation and PV patients. In addition, nine proteins were associated with JAK2V617F mutation status in ET patients. Furthermore, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and Stat3 were independent risk factors for subsequent thrombosis during follow-up on multivariable analysis. Our study shows a broad dysregulation of signaling protein in ET patients, suggesting their roles in ET pathogenesis. The expression levels of ERβ and Stat3 could be promising predictors of subsequent thrombosis in ET patients. PMID:23639951

  8. Activators of G Protein Signaling in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a crucial role in regulating signal processing to maintain normal cellular homeostasis, and subtle perturbations in its activity can potentially lead to the pathogenesis of renal disorders or diseases. Cell-surface receptors and accessory proteins, which normally modify and organize the coupling of individual G protein subunits, contribute to the regulation of heterotrimeric G protein activity and their convergence and/or divergence of downstream signaling initiated by effector systems. Activators of G protein signaling (AGS) are a family of accessory proteins that intervene at multiple distinct points during the activation–inactivation cycle of G proteins, even in the absence of receptor stimulation. Perturbations in the expression of individual AGS proteins have been reported to modulate signal transduction pathways in a wide array of diseases and disorders within the brain, heart, immune system, and more recently, the kidney. This review will provide an overview of the expression profile, localization, and putative biologic role of the AGS family in the context of normal and diseased states of the kidney. PMID:25628392

  9. Notum deacylates Wnt proteins to suppress signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Kakugawa, Satoshi; Langton, Paul F; Zebisch, Matthias; Howell, Steven A; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O'Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Jones, E Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-12

    Signalling by Wnt proteins is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnt proteins from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity, as glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which probably help Notum to co-localize with Wnt proteins. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnt proteins and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  10. Protein import into plant mitochondria: signals, machinery, processing, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Murcha, Monika W; Kmiec, Beata; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Teixeira, Pedro F; Glaser, Elzbieta; Whelan, James

    2014-12-01

    The majority of more than 1000 proteins present in mitochondria are imported from nuclear-encoded, cytosolically synthesized precursor proteins. This impressive feat of transport and sorting is achieved by the combined action of targeting signals on mitochondrial proteins and the mitochondrial protein import apparatus. The mitochondrial protein import apparatus is composed of a number of multi-subunit protein complexes that recognize, translocate, and assemble mitochondrial proteins into functional complexes. While the core subunits involved in mitochondrial protein import are well conserved across wide phylogenetic gaps, the accessory subunits of these complexes differ in identity and/or function when plants are compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), the model system for mitochondrial protein import. These differences include distinct protein import receptors in plants, different mechanistic operation of the intermembrane protein import system, the location and activity of peptidases, the function of inner-membrane translocases in linking the outer and inner membrane, and the association/regulation of mitochondrial protein import complexes with components of the respiratory chain. Additionally, plant mitochondria share proteins with plastids, i.e. dual-targeted proteins. Also, the developmental and cell-specific nature of mitochondrial biogenesis is an aspect not observed in single-celled systems that is readily apparent in studies in plants. This means that plants provide a valuable model system to study the various regulatory processes associated with protein import and mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25324401

  11. Protein kinase A signalling in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and schistosomules.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Natasha L; Lawton, Scott P; Walker, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A regulates multiple processes in eukaryotes by phosphorylating diverse cellular substrates, including metabolic and signalling enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors. Here we provide insight into protein kinase A signalling in cercariae and 24h in vitro cultured somules of the blood parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, which causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. Functional mapping of activated protein kinase A using anti-phospho protein kinase A antibodies and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed activated protein kinase A in the central and peripheral nervous system, oral-tip sensory papillae, oesophagus and excretory system of intact cercariae. Cultured 24h somules, which biologically represent the skin-resident stage of the parasite, exhibited similar activation patterns in oesophageal and nerve tissues but also displayed striking activation at the tegument and activation in a region resembling the germinal 'stem' cell cluster. The adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, stimulated somule protein kinase A activation and produced a hyperkinesia phenotype. The biogenic amines, serotonin and dopamine known to be present in skin also induced protein kinase A activation in somules, whereas neuropeptide Y or [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y attenuated protein kinase A activation. However, neuropeptide Y did not block the forskolin-induced somule hyperkinesia. Bioinformatic investigation of potential protein associations revealed 193 medium confidence and 59 high confidence protein kinase A interacting partners in S. mansoni, many of which possess putative protein kinase A phosphorylation sites. These data provide valuable insight into the intricacies of protein kinase A signalling in S. mansoni and a framework for further physiological investigations into the roles of protein kinase A in schistosomes, particularly in the context of interactions between the parasite and the host. PMID:26777870

  12. The Signaling State of Orange Carotenoid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maksimov, Eugene G.; Shirshin, Evgeny A.; Sluchanko, Nikolai N.; Zlenko, Dmitry V.; Parshina, Evgenia Y.; Tsoraev, Georgy V.; Klementiev, Konstantin E.; Budylin, Gleb S.; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Friedrich, Thomas; Fadeev, Victor V.; Paschenko, Vladimir Z.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Orange carotenoid protein (OCP) is the photoactive protein that is responsible for high light tolerance in cyanobacteria. We studied the kinetics of the OCP photocycle by monitoring changes in its absorption spectrum, intrinsic fluorescence, and fluorescence of the Nile red dye bound to OCP. It was demonstrated that all of these three methods provide the same kinetic parameters of the photocycle, namely, the kinetics of OCP relaxation in darkness was biexponential with a ratio of two components equal to 2:1 independently of temperature. Whereas the changes of the absorption spectrum of OCP characterize the geometry and environment of its chromophore, the intrinsic fluorescence of OCP reveals changes in its tertiary structure, and the fluorescence properties of Nile red indicate the exposure of hydrophobic surface areas of OCP to the solvent following the photocycle. The results of molecular-dynamics studies indicated the presence of two metastable conformations of 3′-hydroxyechinenone, which is consistent with characteristic changes in the Raman spectra. We conclude that rotation of the β-ionylidene ring in the C-terminal domain of OCP could be one of the first conformational rearrangements that occur during photoactivation. The obtained results suggest that the photoactivated form of OCP represents a molten globule-like state that is characterized by increased mobility of tertiary structure elements and solvent accessibility. PMID:26244741

  13. Identification of Distant Agouti-Like Sequences and Re-Evaluation of the Evolutionary History of the Agouti-Related Peptide (AgRP)

    PubMed Central

    Västermark, Åke; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Houle, Michael E.; Fredriksson, Robert; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2012-01-01

    The Agouti-like peptides including AgRP, ASIP and the teleost-specific A2 (ASIP2 and AgRP2) peptides have potent and diverse functional roles in feeding, pigmentation and background adaptation mechanisms. There are contradictory theories about the evolution of the Agouti-like peptide family as well the nomenclature. Here we performed comprehensive mining and annotation of vertebrate Agouti-like sequences. We identified A2 sequences from salmon, trout, seabass, cod, cichlid, tilapia, gilt-headed sea bream, Antarctic toothfish, rainbow smelt, common carp, channel catfish and interestingly also in lobe-finned fish. Moreover, we surprisingly found eight novel homologues from the kingdom of arthropods and three from fungi, some sharing the characteristic C-x(6)-C-C motif which are present in the Agouti-like sequences, as well as approximate sequence length (130 amino acids), positioning of the motif sequence and sharing of exon-intron structures that are similar to the other Agouti-like peptides providing further support for the common origin of these sequences. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the AgRP sequences cluster basally in the tree, suggesting that these sequences split from a cluster containing both the ASIP and the A2 sequences. We also used a novel approach to determine the statistical evidence for synteny, a sinusoidal Hough transform pattern recognition technique. Our analysis shows that the teleost AgRP2 resides in a chromosomal region that has synteny with Hsa 8, but we found no convincing synteny between the regions that A2, AgRP and ASIP reside in, which would support that the Agouti-like peptides were formed by whole genome tetraplodization events. Here we suggest that the Agouti-like peptide genes were formed through classical subsequent gene duplications where the AgRP is the most distantly related to the three other members of that group, first splitting from a common ancestor to ASIP and A2, and then later the A2 split from ASIP followed by a

  14. Heterotrimeric G protein signalling in the plant kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Chen, Jin-Gui; Botella, José Ramón; Jones, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In animals, heterotrimeric G proteins, comprising α-, β-and γ-subunits, perceive extracellular stimuli through cell surface receptors, and transmit signals to ion channels, enzymes and other effector proteins to affect numerous cellular behaviours. In plants, G proteins have structural similarities to the corresponding molecules in animals but transmit signals by atypical mechanisms and effector proteins to control growth, cell proliferation, defence, stomate movements, channel regulation, sugar sensing and some hormonal responses. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular regulation of plant G proteins, their effectors and the physiological functions studied mainly in two model organisms: Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also look at recent progress on structural analyses, systems biology and evolutionary studies. PMID:23536550

  15. PRDM Proteins: Molecular Mechanisms in Signal Transduction and Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Di Zazzo, Erika; De Rosa, Caterina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing) protein family members are characterized by the presence of a PR domain and a variable number of Zn-finger repeats. Experimental evidence has shown that the PRDM proteins play an important role in gene expression regulation, modifying the chromatin structure either directly, through the intrinsic methyltransferase activity, or indirectly through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. PRDM proteins have a dual action: they mediate the effect induced by different cell signals like steroid hormones and control the expression of growth factors. PRDM proteins therefore have a pivotal role in the transduction of signals that control cell proliferation and differentiation and consequently neoplastic transformation. In this review, we describe pathways in which PRDM proteins are involved and the molecular mechanism of their transcriptional regulation. PMID:24832654

  16. PRDM Proteins: Molecular Mechanisms in Signal Transduction and Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Di Zazzo, Erika; De Rosa, Caterina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing) protein family members are characterized by the presence of a PR domain and a variable number of Zn-finger repeats. Experimental evidence has shown that the PRDM proteins play an important role in gene expression regulation, modifying the chromatin structure either directly, through the intrinsic methyltransferase activity, or indirectly through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. PRDM proteins have a dual action: they mediate the effect induced by different cell signals like steroid hormones and control the expression of growth factors. PRDM proteins therefore have a pivotal role in the transduction of signals that control cell proliferation and differentiation and consequently neoplastic transformation. In this review, we describe pathways in which PRDM proteins are involved and the molecular mechanism of their transcriptional regulation. PMID:24832654

  17. Regulation of Latent Membrane Protein 1 Signaling through Interaction with Cytoskeletal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Holthusen, Kirsten; Talaty, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induces constitutive signaling in EBV-infected cells to ensure the survival of the latently infected cells. LMP1 is localized to lipid raft domains to induce signaling. In the present study, a genome-wide screen based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was performed to identify LMP1-binding proteins. Several actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins were identified in the screen. Overexpression of these proteins affected LMP1-induced signaling. BiFC between the identified proteins and LMP1 was localized to lipid raft domains and was dependent on LMP1-induced signaling. Proximity biotinylation assays with LMP1 induced biotinylation of the actin-associated proteins, which were shifted in molecular mass. Together, the findings of this study suggest that the association of LMP1 with lipid rafts is mediated at least in part through interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. IMPORTANCE LMP1 signaling requires oligomerization, lipid raft partitioning, and binding to cellular adaptors. The current study utilized a genome-wide screen to identify several actin-associated proteins as candidate LMP1-binding proteins. The interaction between LMP1 and these proteins was localized to lipid rafts and dependent on LMP1 signaling. This suggests that the association of LMP1 with lipid rafts is mediated through interactions with actin-associated proteins. PMID:25948738

  18. Rap G protein signal in normal and disordered lymphohematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Minato, Nagahiro

    2013-09-10

    Rap proteins (Rap1, Rap2a, b, c) are small molecular weight GTPases of the Ras family. Rap G proteins mediate diverse cellular events such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and gene activation through various signaling pathways. Activation of Rap signal is regulated tightly by several specific regulatory proteins including guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins. Beyond cell biological studies, increasing attempts have been made in the past decade to define the roles of Rap signal in specific functions of normal tissue systems as well as in cancer. In the immune and hematopoietic systems, Rap signal plays crucial roles in the development and function of essentially all lineages of lymphocytes and hematopoietic cells, and importantly, deregulated Rap signal may lead to unique pathological conditions depending on the affected cell types, including various types of leukemia and autoimmunity. The phenotypical studies have unveiled novel, even unexpected functional aspects of Rap signal in cells from a variety of tissues, providing potentially important clues for controlling human diseases, including malignancy.

  19. Revisiting Apoplastic Auxin Signaling Mediated by AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mingxiao; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 (ABP1) functions as an apoplastic auxin receptor, and is known to be involved in the post-transcriptional process, and largely independent of the already well-known SKP-cullin-F-box-transport inhibitor response (TIR1) /auxin signaling F-box (AFB) (SCFTIR1/AFB) pathway. In the past 10 years, several key components downstream of ABP1 have been reported. After perceiving the auxin signal, ABP1 interacts, directly or indirectly, with plasma membrane (PM)-localized transmembrane proteins, transmembrane kinase (TMK) or SPIKE1 (SPK1), or other unidentified proteins, which transfer the signal into the cell to the Rho of plants (ROP). ROPs interact with their effectors, such as the ROP interactive CRIB motif-containing protein (RIC), to regulate the endocytosis/exocytosis of the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins to mediate polar auxin transport across the PM. Additionally, ABP1 is a negative regulator of the traditional SCFTIR1/AFB auxin signaling pathway. However, Gao et al. (2015) very recently reported that ABP1 is not a key component in auxin signaling, and the famous abp1-1 and abp1-5 mutant Arabidopsis lines are being called into question because of possible additional mutantion sites, making it necessary to reevaluate ABP1. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the history of ABP1 research. PMID:26467289

  20. Giardia mitosomal protein import machinery differentially recognizes mitochondrial targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Estraño, Carlos E

    2014-01-01

    Giardia lamblia mitosomes are believed to be vestigial mitochondria which lack a genome. Similar to higher eukaryotes, mitosomal proteins possess either N-terminal or internal mitosomal targeting sequences. To date, some components of the higher eukaryote archetypal mitochondrial protein import apparatus have been identified and characterized in Giardia mitosomes; therefore, it is expected that mitochondrial signals will be recognized by the mitosomal protein import system. To further determine the level of conservation of the Giardia mitosome protein import apparatus, we expressed mitochondrial proteins from higher eukaryotes in Giardia. These recombinant proteins include Tom20 and Tom22; two components of the mitochondrial protein import machinery. Our results indicate that N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence is recognized by the mitosomal protein import machinery; however, interestingly the internal mitochondrial targeting sequences of higher eukaryotes are not recognized by the mitosome. Our results indicate that Giardia mitosome protein transport machinery shows differential recognition of higher eukaryotic mitochondria transfer signals, suggesting a divergence of the transport system in G. lamblia. Therefore, our data support the hypothesis that the protein import machinery in Giardia lamblia mitosome is an incomplete vestigial derivative of mitochondria components. PMID:25159305

  1. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-06-10

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  2. Cell signaling through protein kinase C oxidation and activation.

    PubMed

    Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Due to the growing importance of cellular signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteins that are reversibly modulated by these reactant molecules are of high interest. In this context, protein kinases and phosphatases, which act coordinately in the regulation of signal transduction through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of target proteins, have been described to be key elements in ROS-mediated signaling events. The major mechanism by which these proteins may be modified by oxidation involves the presence of key redox-sensitive cysteine residues. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in a variety of cellular signaling pathways. These proteins have been shown to contain a unique structural feature that is susceptible to oxidative modification. A large number of scientific studies have highlighted the importance of ROS as a second messenger in numerous cellular processes, including cell proliferation, gene expression, adhesion, differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis. In this context, the goal of this review is to discuss the mechanisms by which PKCs are modulated by ROS and how these processes are involved in the cellular response. PMID:23109817

  3. A spatial focusing model for G protein signals. Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) protien-mediated kinetic scaffolding.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Huailing; Wade, Susan M; Woolf, Peter J; Linderman, Jennifer J; Traynor, John R; Neubig, Richard R

    2003-02-28

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) are GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs), which can inhibit heterotrimeric G protein pathways. In this study, we provide experimental and theoretical evidence that high concentrations of receptors (as at a synapse) can lead to saturation of GDP-GTP exchange making GTP hydrolysis rate-limiting. This results in local depletion of inactive heterotrimeric G-GDP, which is reversed by RGS GAP activity. Thus, RGS enhances receptor-mediated G protein activation even as it deactivates the G protein. Evidence supporting this model includes a GTP-dependent enhancement of guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS) binding to G(i) by RGS. The RGS domain of RGS4 is sufficient for this, not requiring the NH(2)- or COOH-terminal extensions. Furthermore, a kinetic model including only the GAP activity of RGS replicates the GTP-dependent enhancement of GTPgammaS binding observed experimentally. Finally in a Monte Carlo model, this mechanism results in a dramatic "spatial focusing" of active G protein. Near the receptor, G protein activity is maintained even with RGS due to the ability of RGS to reduce depletion of local Galpha-GDP levels permitting rapid recoupling to receptor and maintained G protein activation near the receptor. In contrast, distant signals are suppressed by the RGS, since Galpha-GDP is not depleted there. Thus, a novel RGS-mediated "kinetic scaffolding" mechanism is proposed which narrows the spatial range of active G protein around a cluster of receptors limiting the spill-over of G protein signals to more distant effector molecules, thus enhancing the specificity of G(i) protein signals. PMID:12446706

  4. Emerging Role of Protein-Protein Transnitrosylation in Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Protein S-nitrosylation, a covalent reaction of a nitric oxide (NO) group with a critical protein thiol (or more properly thiolate anion), mediates an important form of redox-related signaling as well as aberrant signaling in disease states. Recent Advances: A growing literature suggests that over 3000 proteins are S-nitrosylated in cell systems. Our laboratory and several others have demonstrated that protein S-nitrosylation can regulate protein function by directly inhibiting catalytically active cysteines, by reacting with allosteric sites, or via influencing protein-protein interaction. For example, S-nitrosylation of critical cysteine thiols in protein-disulfide isomerase and in parkin alters their activity, thus contributing to protein misfolding in Parkinson's disease. Critical Issues: However, the mechanism by which specific protein S-nitrosylation occurs in cell signaling pathways is less well investigated. Interestingly, the recent discovery of protein-protein transnitrosylation reactions (transfer of an NO group from one protein to another) has revealed a unique mechanism whereby NO can S-nitrosylate a particular set of protein thiols, and represents a major class of nitrosylating/denitrosylating enzymes in mammalian systems. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence for transnitrosylation reactions between (i) hemoglobin/anion exchanger 1, (ii) thioredoxin/caspase-3, (iii) X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis/caspase-3, (iv) GAPDH-HDAC2/SIRT1/DNA-PK, and (v) Cdk5/dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1). This review also discusses experimental techniques useful in characterizing protein-protein transnitrosylations. Future Directions: Elucidation of additional transnitrosylation cascades will further our understanding of the enzymes that catalyze nitrosation, thereby contributing to NO-mediated signaling pathways. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 239–249. PMID:22657837

  5. Fatal anemia and dermatitis in captive agoutis (Dasyprocta mexicana) infested with Echidnophaga fleas.

    PubMed

    Cucchi-Stefanoni, Karina; Juan-Sallés, Carles; Parás, Alberto; Garner, Michael M

    2008-08-17

    Two captive agoutis (Dasyprocta mexicana) died of anemia with centrilobular hepatocellular necrosis (2/2), severe flea ectoparasitism (2/2), and cardiomegaly attributed to anemia (1/2). Other agoutis were similarly parasitized and one had anemia. Fleas were manually removed and all agoutis treated topically with propoxur and selamectin and moved to another enclosure. No additional cases of fatal anemia were seen. Cutaneous lesions suggestive of hypersensitivity were observed in three additional agoutis with dorsal alopecia (3/3), a penetrating wound associated with pruritus and self-mutilation in the flank (2/3), flea ectoparasitism at the time of morphologic diagnosis (1/3), and hyperplastic perivascular dermatitis (3/3). One of these died of bacterial infection of the wound. Similar but milder skin disease was seen in 3 out of over 30 maras (Dolichotis patagonum) housed in the same exhibit. Fleas collected from all the fatal agouti cases and maras were classified in the genus Echidnophaga based on the angular front margin of head, contracted thorax, absence of genal and pronotal combs, and the fact that fleas did not jump. These findings suggest that flea ectoparasitism may be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in captive rodents. PMID:18556127

  6. Information transfer by leaky, heterogeneous, protein kinase signaling systems

    PubMed Central

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Perrett, Rebecca M.; McWilliams, Chris; McArdle, Craig A.; Bowsher, Clive G.

    2014-01-01

    Cells must sense extracellular signals and transfer the information contained about their environment reliably to make appropriate decisions. To perform these tasks, cells use signal transduction networks that are subject to various sources of noise. Here, we study the effects on information transfer of two particular types of noise: basal (leaky) network activity and cell-to-cell variability in the componentry of the network. Basal activity is the propensity for activation of the network output in the absence of the signal of interest. We show, using theoretical models of protein kinase signaling, that the combined effect of the two types of noise makes information transfer by such networks highly vulnerable to the loss of negative feedback. In an experimental study of ERK signaling by single cells with heterogeneous ERK expression levels, we verify our theoretical prediction: In the presence of basal network activity, negative feedback substantially increases information transfer to the nucleus by both preventing a near-flat average response curve and reducing sensitivity to variation in substrate expression levels. The interplay between basal network activity, heterogeneity in network componentry, and feedback is thus critical for the effectiveness of protein kinase signaling. Basal activity is widespread in signaling systems under physiological conditions, has phenotypic consequences, and is often raised in disease. Our results reveal an important role for negative feedback mechanisms in protecting the information transfer function of saturable, heterogeneous cell signaling systems from basal activity. PMID:24395805

  7. Identification of Protein Interactions Involved in Cellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Westermarck, Jukka; Ivaska, Johanna; Corthals, Garry L.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions drive biological processes. They are critical for all intra- and extracellular functions, and the technologies to analyze them are widely applied throughout the various fields of biological sciences. This study takes an in-depth view of some common principles of cellular regulation and provides a detailed account of approaches required to comprehensively map signaling protein-protein interactions in any particular cellular system or condition. We provide a critical review of the benefits and disadvantages of the yeast two-hybrid method and affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometric procedures for identification of signaling protein-protein interactions. In particular, we emphasize the quantitative and qualitative differences between tandem affinity and one-step purification (such as FLAG and Strep tag) methods. Although applicable to all types of interaction studies, a special section is devoted in this review to aspects that should be considered when attempting to identify signaling protein interactions that often are transient and weak by nature. Finally, we discuss shotgun and quantitative information that can be gleaned by MS-coupled methods for analysis of multiprotein complexes. PMID:23481661

  8. Heterotrimeric G protein signaling in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hama, Taketsugu; Park, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a signalopathy of renal tubular epithelial cells caused by naturally occurring mutations in two distinct genes, polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) and 2 (PKD2). Genetic variants in PKD1, which encodes the polycystin-1 (PC-1) protein, remain the predominant factor associated with the pathogenesis of nearly two-thirds of all patients diagnosed with PKD. Although the relationship between defective PC-1 with renal cystic disease initiation and progression remains to be fully elucidated, there are numerous clinical studies that have focused upon the control of effector systems involving heterotrimeric G protein regulation. A major regulator in the activation state of heterotrimeric G proteins are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are defined by their seven transmembrane-spanning regions. PC-1 has been considered to function as an unconventional GPCR, but the mechanisms by which PC-1 controls signal processing, magnitude, or trafficking through heterotrimeric G proteins remains to be fully known. The diversity of heterotrimeric G protein signaling in PKD is further complicated by the presence of non-GPCR proteins in the membrane or cytoplasm that also modulate the functional state of heterotrimeric G proteins within the cell. Moreover, PC-1 abnormalities promote changes in hormonal systems that ultimately interact with distinct GPCRs in the kidney to potentially amplify or antagonize signaling output from PC-1. This review will focus upon the canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways that have been described in PKD with specific emphasis on which heterotrimeric G proteins are involved in the pathological reorganization of the tubular epithelial cell architecture to exacerbate renal cystogenic pathways. PMID:27199453

  9. Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling in development and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Richard N.; Green, Jordan; Wang, Zhongliang; Deng, Youlin; Qiao, Min; Peabody, Michael; Zhang, Qian; Ye, Jixing; Yan, Zhengjian; Denduluri, Sahitya; Idowu, Olumuyiwa; Li, Melissa; Shen, Christine; Hu, Alan; Haydon, Rex C.; Kang, Richard; Mok, James; Lee, Michael J.; Luu, Hue L.; Shi, Lewis L.

    2014-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a group of signaling molecules that belongs to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins. Initially discovered for their ability to induce bone formation, BMPs are now known to play crucial roles in all organ systems. BMPs are important in embryogenesis and development, and also in maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Mouse knockout models of various components of the BMP signaling pathway result in embryonic lethality or marked defects, highlighting the essential functions of BMPs. In this review, we first outline the basic aspects of BMP signaling and then focus on genetically manipulated mouse knockout models that have helped elucidate the role of BMPs in development. A significant portion of this review is devoted to the prominent human pathologies associated with dysregulated BMP signaling. PMID:25401122

  10. Decoding signals for membrane protein assembly using alkaline phosphatase fusions.

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, K; Ehrmann, M; Beckwith, J

    1991-01-01

    We have used genetic methods to investigate the role of the different domains of a bacterial cytoplasmic membrane protein, MalF, in determining its topology. This was done by analyzing the effects of MalF topology of deleting various domains of the protein using MalF-alkaline phosphatase fusion proteins. Our results show that the cytoplasmic domains of the protein are the pre-eminent topogenic signals. These domains contain information that determines their cytoplasmic location and, thus, the orientation of the membrane spanning segments surrounding them. Periplasmic domains do not appear to have equivalent information specifying their location and membrane spanning segments do not contain information defining their orientation in the membrane. The strength of cytoplasmic domains as topogenic signals varies, correlated with the density of positively charged amino acids within them. Images PMID:1915262

  11. Isoelectric focusing technology quantifies protein signaling in 25 cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Roger A.; Bhamidipati, Arunashree; Bi, Xiahui; Deb-Basu, Debabrita; Cahill, Linda; Ferrante, Jason; Gentalen, Erik; Glazer, Marc; Gossett, John; Hacker, Kevin; Kirby, Celeste; Knittle, James; Loder, Robert; Mastroieni, Catherine; MacLaren, Michael; Mills, Thomas; Nguyen, Uyen; Parker, Nineveh; Rice, Audie; Roach, David; Suich, Daniel; Voehringer, David; Voss, Karl; Yang, Jade; Yang, Tom; Vander Horn, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    A previously undescribed isoelectric focusing technology allows cell signaling to be quantitatively assessed in <25 cells. High-resolution capillary isoelectric focusing allows isoforms and individual phosphorylation forms to be resolved, often to baseline, in a 400-nl capillary. Key to the method is photochemical capture of the resolved protein forms. Once immobilized, the proteins can be probed with specific antibodies flowed through the capillary. Antibodies bound to their targets are detected by chemiluminescence. Because chemiluminescent substrates are flowed through the capillary during detection, localized substrate depletion is overcome, giving excellent linearity of response across several orders of magnitude. By analyzing pan-specific antibody signals from individual resolved forms of a protein, each of these can be quantified, without the problems associated with using multiple antibodies with different binding avidities to detect individual protein forms. PMID:17053065

  12. G protein signaling in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Dustin E; Siderovski, David P

    2013-01-01

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic colitis and systemic amebiasis. Among the known amebic factors contributing to pathogenesis are signaling pathways involving heterotrimeric and Ras superfamily G proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge of the roles of heterotrimeric G protein subunits, Ras, Rho and Rab GTPase families in E. histolytica pathogenesis, as well as of their downstream signaling effectors and nucleotide cycle regulators. Heterotrimeric G protein signaling likely modulates amebic motility and attachment to and killing of host cells, in part through activation of an RGS-RhoGEF (regulator of G protein signaling–Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor) effector. Rho family GTPases, as well as RhoGEFs and Rho effectors (formins and p21-activated kinases) regulate the dynamic actin cytoskeleton of E. histolytica and associated pathogenesis-related cellular processes, such as migration, invasion, phagocytosis and evasion of the host immune response by surface receptor capping. A remarkably large family of 91 Rab GTPases has multiple roles in a complex amebic vesicular trafficking system required for phagocytosis and pinocytosis and secretion of known virulence factors, such as amebapores and cysteine proteases. Although much remains to be discovered, recent studies of G protein signaling in E. histolytica have enhanced our understanding of parasitic pathogenesis and have also highlighted possible targets for pharmacological manipulation. PMID:23519208

  13. Science Signaling Podcast for 12 July 2016: Adaptor proteins limit signaling.

    PubMed

    Wiley, H Steven; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Steven Wiley, senior author of a Research Article that appears in the 12 July 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about how the abundance of adaptor proteins and feedback regulators affect the flow of information downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Information flows through a signaling pathway by sequential interactions between core components of the pathway, many of which have enzymatic activity. Adaptor proteins do not directly participate in relaying the signal and do not have enzymatic activity, but are important for signaling because they facilitate interactions between the core components. Using quantitative methods, Shi et al demonstrated that core components of the EGFR pathway were highly abundant in both normal cells and cancer cells. However, adaptor proteins were present in much lower abundance in both cell types, indicating that it is the abundance of these proteins that limit signaling downstream of EGFR. The authors also found that differences in EGFR signaling between different cell types likely resulted from the variable abundance of feedback regulators.Listen to Podcast. PMID:27405978

  14. Regulation of Phagocyte Migration by Signal Regulatory Protein-Alpha Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Zarate, Julian; Matlung, Hanke L.; Matozaki, Takashi; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the inhibitory receptor signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRPα) controls effector functions in phagocytes. However, there are also indications that interactions between SIRPα and its ligand CD47 are involved in phagocyte transendothelial migration. We have investigated the involvement of SIRPα signaling in phagocyte migration in vitro and in vivo using mice that lack the SIRPα cytoplasmic tail. During thioglycolate-induced peritonitis in SIRPα mutant mice, both neutrophil and macrophage influx were found to occur, but to be significantly delayed. SIRPα signaling appeared to be essential for an optimal transendothelial migration and chemotaxis, and for the amoeboid type of phagocyte migration in 3-dimensional environments. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that SIRPα signaling can directly control phagocyte migration, and this may contribute to the impaired inflammatory phenotype that has been observed in the absence of SIRPα signaling. PMID:26057870

  15. Phosphoinositides Regulate Ciliary Protein Trafficking to Modulate Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Elle C.; Garcia, Galo; Abedin, Monika; Schurmans, Stéphane; Inoue, Takanari; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary cilia interpret vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signals. Why cilia are essential for signaling is unclear. One possibility is that some forms of signaling require a distinct membrane lipid composition, found at cilia. We found that the ciliary membrane contains a particular phosphoinositide, PI(4)P, whereas a different phosphoinositide, PI(4,5)P2, is restricted to the membrane of the ciliary base. This distribution is created by Inpp5e, a ciliary phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase. Without Inpp5e, ciliary PI(4,5)P2 levels are elevated and Hh signaling is disrupted. Inpp5e limits the ciliary levels of inhibitors of Hh signaling, including Gpr161 and the PI(4,5)P2-binding protein Tulp3. Increasing ciliary PI(4,5)P2 levels or conferring the ability to bind PI(4)P on Tulp3 increases the ciliary localization of Tulp3. Lowering Tulp3 in cells lacking Inpp5e reduces ciliary Gpr161 levels and restores Hh signaling. Therefore, Inpp5e regulates ciliary membrane phosphoinositide composition, and Tulp3 reads out ciliary phosphoinositides to control ciliary protein localization, enabling Hh signaling. PMID:26305592

  16. Dietary proteins and food-related reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Peuhkuri, Katri; Sihvola, Nora; Korpela, Riitta

    2011-01-01

    Proteins play a crucial role in almost all biological processes. Dietary proteins are generally considered as energy yielding nutrients and as a source of amino acids for various purposes. In addition, they may have a role in food-related reward signals. The purpose of this review was to give an overview of the role of dietary proteins in food-related reward and possible mechanisms behind such effects. Dietary proteins may elicit food-related reward by several different postprandial mechanisms, including neural and humoral signals from the gastrointestinal tract to the brain. In order to exert rewarding effects, protein have to be absorbed from the intestine and reach the target cells in sufficient concentrations, or act via receptors ad cell signalling in the gut without absorption. Complex interactions between different possible mechanisms make it very difficult to gain a clear view on the role and intesity of each mechanism. It is concluded that, in principle, dietary proteins may have a role in food-related reward. However, the evidence is based mostly on experiments with animal models and one should be careful in drawing conclusions of clinical relevance. PMID:21909291

  17. [RGS proteins (regulators of G protein signaling) and their roles in regulation of immune response].

    PubMed

    Lewandowicz, Anna M; Kowalski, Marek L; Pawliczak, Rafał

    2004-01-01

    RGS proteins (Regulators of G-protein Signaling) comprise a protein family responsible for regulating G proteins. By enhancing the GTPase activity of the a subunit, they speed up the reconstruction of the heterotrimeric structure of G protein, thus inhibiting its signal transduction. Sst2 protein in yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae, FlbA in fungus Aspergillus nidulans, and Egl-10 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are the first native G regulators with GTPase activity (GAPs:--GTPase-activating proteins). The existence of over 30 RGS human proteins has been confirmed thus far, and they have been grouped and classified into six subfamilies. In immunocompetent cells, RGS proteins are entangled in a complicate net of different interrelating signal pathways. They are connected with B- and T-cell chemokine susceptibility, efficient T cell proliferation, and the regulation of B cell maturation. They also take an essential part in inflammation. High hopes are held for drugs, which handle would be RGS proteins and which would further provide the possibility of modifying the pharmacokinetics of drugs acting through G protein- coupled receptors. The aim of this review is to discuss the new RGS protein family and explain the potential involvement of RGS proteins in the modulation of the immune response PMID:15459549

  18. Investigation of Protein-Protein Interactions and Conformational Changes in Hedgehog Signaling Pathway by FRET.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Lv, Xiangdong; Xiong, Yue; Zhao, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions and signal-induced protein conformational changes are fundamental molecular events that are considered as essential in modern life sciences. Among various techniques developed to study such phenomena, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a widely used method with many advantages in detecting these molecular events. Here, we describe the application of FRET in the mechanistic investigation of cell signal transduction, taking the example of the Hh signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. A number of general guidelines as well as some key notes have been summarized as a protocol for reader's reference. PMID:26179039

  19. Structural Reconstruction of Protein-Protein Complexes Involved in Intracellular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Klára; Sok, Péter; Reményi, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Signaling complexes within the cell convert extracellular cues into physiological outcomes. Their assembly involves signaling enzymes, allosteric regulators and scaffold proteins that often contain long stretches of disordered protein regions, display multi-domain architectures, and binding affinity between individual components is low. These features are indispensable for their central roles as dynamic information processing hubs, on the other hand they also make reconstruction of structurally homogeneous complex samples highly challenging. In this present chapter we discuss protein machinery which influences extracellular signal reception, intracellular pathway activity, and cytoskeletal or transcriptional activity. PMID:27165334

  20. PDZ Protein Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Trafficking and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Henry A; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contribute to the regulation of every aspect of human physiology and are therapeutic targets for the treatment of numerous diseases. As a consequence, understanding the myriad of mechanisms controlling GPCR signaling and trafficking is essential for the development of new pharmacological strategies for the treatment of human pathologies. Of the many GPCR-interacting proteins, postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons, disc large, zona occludens-1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins appear most abundant and have similarly been implicated in disease mechanisms. PDZ proteins play an important role in regulating receptor and channel protein localization within synapses and tight junctions and function to scaffold intracellular signaling protein complexes. In the current study, we review the known functional interactions between PDZ domain-containing proteins and GPCRs and provide insight into the potential mechanisms of action. These PDZ domain-containing proteins include the membrane-associated guanylate-like kinases [postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 97 kilodaltons; postsynaptic density protein of 93 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 102 kilodaltons; discs, large homolog 5; caspase activation and recruitment domain and membrane-associated guanylate-like kinase domain-containing protein 3; membrane protein, palmitoylated 3; calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase; membrane-associated guanylate kinase protein (MAGI)-1, MAGI-2, and MAGI-3], Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor proteins (NHERFs) (NHERF1, NHERF2, PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 1, and PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 2), Golgi-associated PDZ proteins (Gα-binding protein interacting protein, C-terminus and CFTR-associated ligand), PDZ domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) 1 and 2, regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-homology-RhoGEFs (PDZ domain-containing RhoGEF and

  1. Role of Regulators of G Protein Signaling Proteins in Bone Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jules, Joel; Yang, Shuying; Chen, Wei; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins enhance the intrinsic GTPase activity of α subunits of the heterotrimeric G protein complex of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and thereby inactivate signal transduction initiated by GPCRs. The RGS family consists of nearly 37 members with a conserved RGS homology domain which is critical for their GTPase accelerating activity. RGS proteins are expressed in most tissues, including heart, lung, brain, kidney, and bone and play essential roles in many physiological and pathological processes. In skeletal development and bone homeostasis as well as in many bone disorders, RGS proteins control the functions of various GPCRs, including the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 and calcium-sensing receptor and also regulate various critical signaling pathways, such as Wnt and calcium oscillations. This chapter will discuss the current findings on the roles of RGS proteins in regulating signaling of key GPCRs in skeletal development and bone homeostasis. We also will examine the current updates of RGS proteins’ regulation of calcium oscillations in bone physiology and highlight the roles of RGS proteins in selected bone pathological disorders. Despite the recent advances in bone and mineral research, RGS proteins remain understudied in the skeletal system. Further understanding of the roles of RGS proteins in bone should not only provide great insights into the molecular basis of various bone diseases but also generate great therapeutic drug targets for many bone diseases. PMID:26123302

  2. Proteins move! Protein dynamics and long-range allostery in cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Bu, Zimei; Callaway, David J E

    2011-01-01

    An emerging point of view in protein chemistry is that proteins are not the static objects that are displayed in textbooks but are instead dynamic actors. Protein dynamics plays a fundamental role in many diseases, and spans a large hierarchy of timescales, from picoseconds to milliseconds or even longer. Nanoscale protein domain motion on length scales comparable to protein dimensions is key to understanding how signals are relayed through multiple protein-protein interactions. A canonical example is how the scaffolding proteins NHERF1 and ezrin work in coordination to assemble crucial membrane complexes. As membrane-cytoskeleton scaffolding proteins, these provide excellent prototypes for understanding how regulatory signals are relayed through protein-protein interactions between the membrane and the cytoskeleton. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the structure and dynamics of the interaction. We describe recent novel applications of neutron spin echo spectroscopy to reveal the dynamic propagation of allosteric signals by nanoscale protein motion, and present a guide to the future study of dynamics and its application to the cure of disease. PMID:21570668

  3. Dopamine signaling promotes the xenobiotic stress response and protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kishore K; Matlack, Tarmie L; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Multicellular organisms encounter environmental conditions that adversely affect protein homeostasis (proteostasis), including extreme temperatures, toxins, and pathogens. It is unclear how they use sensory signaling to detect adverse conditions and then activate stress response pathways so as to offset potential damage. Here, we show that dopaminergic mechanosensory neurons in C. elegans release the neurohormone dopamine to promote proteostasis in epithelia. Signaling through the DA receptor DOP-1 activates the expression of xenobiotic stress response genes involved in pathogenic resistance and toxin removal, and these genes are required for the removal of unstable proteins in epithelia. Exposure to a bacterial pathogen (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) results in elevated removal of unstable proteins in epithelia, and this enhancement requires DA signaling. In the absence of DA signaling, nematodes show increased sensitivity to pathogenic bacteria and heat-shock stress. Our results suggest that dopaminergic sensory neurons, in addition to slowing down locomotion upon sensing a potential bacterial feeding source, also signal to frontline epithelia to activate the xenobiotic stress response so as to maintain proteostasis and prepare for possible infection. PMID:27261197

  4. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins as intracellular signaling intermediates.

    PubMed

    Kocab, Andrew J; Duckett, Colin S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins have often been considered inhibitors of cell death due to early reports that described their ability to directly bind and inhibit caspases, the primary factors that implement apoptosis. However, a greater understanding is evolving regarding the vital roles played by IAPs as transduction intermediates in a diverse set of signaling cascades associated with functions ranging from the innate immune response to cell migration to cell-cycle regulation. In this review, we discuss the functions of IAPs in signaling, focusing primarily on the cellular IAP (c-IAP) proteins. The c-IAPs are important components in tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily signaling cascades, which include activation of the NF-κB transcription factor family. As these receptors modulate cell proliferation and cell death, the involvement of the c-IAPs in these pathways provides an additional means of controlling cellular fate beyond simply inhibiting caspase activity. Additionally, IAP-binding proteins, such as Smac and caspases, which have been described as having cell death-independent roles, may affect c-IAP activity in intracellular signaling. Collectively, the multi-faceted functions and complex regulation of the c-IAPs illustrate their importance as intracellular signaling intermediates. PMID:26462035

  5. 14-3-3 Proteins in Guard Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cotelle, Valérie; Leonhardt, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells are specialized cells located at the leaf surface delimiting pores which control gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. To optimize the CO2 uptake necessary for photosynthesis while minimizing water loss, guard cells integrate environmental signals to adjust stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is regulated by movements of the guard cells driven by variations in their volume and turgor. As guard cells perceive and transduce a wide array of environmental cues, they provide an ideal system to elucidate early events of plant signaling. Reversible protein phosphorylation events are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of stomatal movements. However, in some cases, phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to achieve complete protein regulation, but is necessary to mediate the binding of interactors that modulate protein function. Among the phosphopeptide-binding proteins, the 14-3-3 proteins are the best characterized in plants. The 14-3-3s are found as multiple isoforms in eukaryotes and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about 14-3-3 roles in the regulation of their binding partners in guard cells: receptors, ion pumps, channels, protein kinases, and some of their substrates. Regulation of these targets by 14-3-3 proteins is discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements in response to abiotic or biotic stresses. PMID:26858725

  6. Structural basis of a rationally rewired protein-protein interface critical to bacterial signaling

    PubMed Central

    Podgornaia, Anna I.; Casino, Patricia; Marina, Alberto; Laub, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Two-component signal transduction systems typically involve a sensor histidine kinase that specifically phosphorylates a single, cognate response regulator. This protein-protein interaction relies on molecular recognition via a small set of residues in each protein. To better understand how these residues determine the specificity of kinase-substrate interactions, we rationally rewired the interaction interface of a Thermotoga maritima two-component system, HK853-RR468, to match that found in a different two-component system, E. coli PhoR-PhoB. The rewired proteins interacted robustly with each other, but no longer interacted with the parent proteins. Analysis of the crystal structures of the wild-type and mutant protein complexes, along with a systematic mutagenesis study, reveals how individual mutations contribute to the rewiring of interaction specificity. Our approach and conclusions have implications for studies of other protein-protein interactions, protein evolution, and the design of novel protein interfaces. PMID:23954504

  7. Structural basis of a rationally rewired protein-protein interface critical to bacterial signaling.

    PubMed

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Casino, Patricia; Marina, Alberto; Laub, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems typically involve a sensor histidine kinase that specifically phosphorylates a single, cognate response regulator. This protein-protein interaction relies on molecular recognition via a small set of residues in each protein. To better understand how these residues determine the specificity of kinase-substrate interactions, we rationally rewired the interaction interface of a Thermotoga maritima two-component system, HK853-RR468, to match that found in a different two-component system, Escherichia coli PhoR-PhoB. The rewired proteins interacted robustly with each other, but no longer interacted with the parent proteins. Analysis of the crystal structures of the wild-type and mutant protein complexes and a systematic mutagenesis study reveal how individual mutations contribute to the rewiring of interaction specificity. Our approach and conclusions have implications for studies of other protein-protein interactions and protein evolution and for the design of novel protein interfaces. PMID:23954504

  8. Wnt signalling: the case of the 'missing' G-protein.

    PubMed

    Malbon, Craig C

    2011-02-01

    Wnt signalling remains a hot topic for cell signalling sleuthhounds. The trail of signalling downstream of the seven-transmembrane segment Frizzleds, which bind Wnt ligands, is replete of clues [e.g. LPR5/6 (lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5/6), G-proteins or Dishevelled] and yet remains the 'final problem'. Although the heptahelical nature of Frizzleds places them well within a populous family of G-protein-coupled receptors, resistance to this theme has waxed and waned amid increasing demands for 'proof'. The Wnt Homepage (http://www.stanford.edu/group/nusselab/cgi-bin/wnt/) has acted as a dynamic real-time arbiter of the controversy, highlighted by the appearance and later the disappearance of the G-protein from its central diagramming and tabulations. A recent publication in this issue of the Biochemical Journal offers a solution to the 'final problem', demonstrating under native conditions that Frizzleds expressed in mammalian brain preparations act functionally to catalyse guanine-nucleotide exchange in response to stimulation with Wnt3a. Lensed from the fictional character of Sherlock Holmes, The Case of the Missing G-Protein is investigated. PMID:21235522

  9. Protein and Signaling Networks in Vertebrate Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Karl-Wilhelm; Dell’Orco, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptor cells are exquisite light detectors operating under very dim and bright illumination. The photoexcitation and adaptation machinery in photoreceptor cells consists of protein complexes that can form highly ordered supramolecular structures and control the homeostasis and mutual dependence of the secondary messengers cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and Ca2+. The visual pigment in rod photoreceptors, the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is organized in tracks of dimers thereby providing a signaling platform for the dynamic scaffolding of the G protein transducin. Illuminated rhodopsin is turned off by phosphorylation catalyzed by rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) under control of Ca2+-recoverin. The GRK1 protein complex partly assembles in lipid raft structures, where shutting off rhodopsin seems to be more effective. Re-synthesis of cGMP is another crucial step in the recovery of the photoresponse after illumination. It is catalyzed by membrane bound sensory guanylate cyclases (GCs) and is regulated by specific neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins called guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). At least one GC (ROS-GC1) was shown to be part of a multiprotein complex having strong interactions with the cytoskeleton and being controlled in a multimodal Ca2+-dependent fashion. The final target of the cGMP signaling cascade is a cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel that is a hetero-oligomeric protein located in the plasma membrane and interacting with accessory proteins in highly organized microdomains. We summarize results and interpretations of findings related to the inhomogeneous organization of signaling units in photoreceptor outer segments. PMID:26635520

  10. The Roles of NDR Protein Kinases in Hippo Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hergovich, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo tumour suppressor pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of tissue growth through controlling cellular processes such as cell proliferation, death, differentiation and stemness. Traditionally, the core cassette of the Hippo pathway includes the MST1/2 protein kinases, the LATS1/2 protein kinases, and the MOB1 scaffold signal transducer, which together regulate the transcriptional co-activator functions of the proto-oncoproteins YAP and TAZ through LATS1/2-mediated phosphorylation of YAP/TAZ. Recent research has identified additional kinases, such as NDR1/2 (also known as STK38/STK38L) and MAP4Ks, which should be considered as novel members of the Hippo core cassette. While these efforts helped to expand our understanding of Hippo core signalling, they also began to provide insights into the complexity and redundancy of the Hippo signalling network. Here, we focus on summarising our current knowledge of the regulation and functions of mammalian NDR kinases, discussing parallels between the NDR pathways in Drosophila and mammals. Initially, we provide a general overview of the cellular functions of NDR kinases in cell cycle progression, centrosome biology, apoptosis, autophagy, DNA damage signalling, immunology and neurobiology. Finally, we put particular emphasis on discussing NDR1/2 as YAP kinases downstream of MST1/2 and MOB1 signalling in Hippo signalling. PMID:27213455

  11. Redox and zinc signalling pathways converging on protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Zinc ions, though redox-inert, have either pro-antioxidant or pro-oxidant functions at critical junctures in redox metabolism and redox signalling. They are released from cells and in cells, e.g. from metallothionein, a protein that transduces redox signals into zinc signals (1). The released zinc ions inhibit enzymes such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), key regulatory enzymes of cellular phosphorylation signalling. The Ki(Zn) value for inhibition of receptor PTPB is 21pM (2). The binding is about as tight as the binding of zinc to zinc metalloenzymes and suggests tonic zinc inhibition. PTP1-B (PTPN1), an enzyme regulating the insulin and leptin receptors and involved in cancer and diabetes pathobiochemistry, has a Ki(Zn) value of about 5nM (3). Zinc ions bind to the enzyme in the closed conformation when additional metal-binding ligands are brought into the vicinity of the active site. In contrast, redox reactions target cysteines in the active sites of PTPs in the open conformation. This work provides a molecular basis how hydrogen peroxide and free zinc ions generated by growth factor signalling stimulate phosphorylation signalling differentially. (Supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council UK, grant BB/K001442/1.). PMID:26461422

  12. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  13. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    PubMed

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  14. Retinoic acid signaling regulates sonic hedgehog and bone morphogenetic protein signalings during genital tubercle development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liqing; Suzuki, Kentaro; Nakagata, Naomi; Mihara, Kenichiro; Matsumaru, Daisuke; Ogino, Yukiko; Yashiro, Kenta; Hamada, Hiroshi; Liu, Zhonghua; Evans, Sylvia M; Mendelsohn, Cathy; Yamada, Gen

    2012-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays pivotal roles in organogenesis, and both excessive and reduced amounts of RA cause developmental abnormalities. Reproductive organs are susceptible to teratogen toxigenicity, and the genital tubercle (GT) is one such representative organ. The physiological function of endogenous RA signaling and the mechanisms of RA-induced teratogenicity are poorly understood during the GT development. The objective of this study is to understand the developmental and teratogenic roles of RA during GT development by analyzing genetically modified mouse models. We found dynamic patterns of gene expression for the RA-synthesizing enzyme, Raldh2, and for the RA-catabolizing enzyme, Cyp26b1, during GT development. Rarb, an indicator gene for RA signaling, starts its expression in the prospective corpus cavernosum penis and in the urethral plate epithelium (UE), which plays central roles during GT development. Excessive RA signaling in Cyp26b1(-/-) mutants leads to abnormal extents of cell proliferation and differentiation during GT development, and also upregulates expression of growth factor signalings. They include Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling, which are expressed in the UE and its bilateral mesenchyme. RA signaling positively regulatesShh and Bmp4 expression during GT development as testified also by the experiment of RA administration and analyses of loss-of-function of RA signaling mutants. Thus, RA signaling is involved in the developmental cascade necessary for UE formation and GT development. PMID:22127979

  15. Hemojuvelin and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Core, Amanda B; Canali, Susanna; Babitt, Jodie L

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in hemojuvelin (HJV) are the most common cause of the juvenile-onset form of the iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis. The discovery that HJV functions as a co-receptor for the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of signaling molecules helped to identify this signaling pathway as a central regulator of the key iron hormone hepcidin in the control of systemic iron homeostasis. This review highlights recent work uncovering the mechanism of action of HJV and the BMP-SMAD signaling pathway in regulating hepcidin expression in the liver, as well as additional studies investigating possible extra-hepatic functions of HJV. This review also explores the interaction between HJV, the BMP-SMAD signaling pathway and other regulators of hepcidin expression in systemic iron balance. PMID:24860505

  16. Control of protein trafficking by reversible masking of transport signals.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Omer; Gotliv, Karnit; Parnis, Anna; Boncompain, Gaelle; Perez, Franck; Cassel, Dan

    2016-04-15

    Systems that allow the control of protein traffic between subcellular compartments have been valuable in elucidating trafficking mechanisms. Most current approaches rely on ligand or light-controlled dimerization, which results in either retardation or enhancement of the transport of a reporter. We developed an alternative approach for trafficking regulation that we term "controlled unmasking of targeting elements" (CUTE). Regulated trafficking is achieved by reversible masking of the signal that directs the reporter to its target organelle, relying on the streptavidin-biotin system. The targeting signal is generated within or immediately after a 38-amino acid streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP) that is appended to the reporter. The binding of coexpressed streptavidin to SBP causes signal masking, whereas addition of biotin causes complex dissociation and triggers protein transport to the target organelle. We demonstrate the application of this approach to the control of nuclear and peroxisomal protein import and the generation of biotin-dependent trafficking through the endocytic and COPI systems. By simultaneous masking of COPI and endocytic signals, we were able to generate a synthetic pathway for efficient transport of a reporter from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:26941332

  17. Molecular signaling involving intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Anna; Manna, Sara La; Novellino, Ettore; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Marasco, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on cellular protein interaction networks (PINs) reveal that proteins that constitute hubs in a PIN are notably enriched in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) compared to proteins that constitute edges, highlighting the role of IDPs in signaling pathways. Most IDPs rapidly undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their biological targets to perform their function. Conformational dynamics enables IDPs to be versatile and to interact with a broad range of interactors under normal physiological conditions where their expression is tightly modulated. IDPs are involved in many cellular processes such as cellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, and splicing; thus, their high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases including cancer. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in men worldwide. Therefore, identifying molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic signaling pathways that are involved in prostate carcinogenesis is crucial. In this review, we focus on the aspects of cellular pathways leading to PCa in which IDPs exert a primary role. PMID:27212129

  18. Oxidative Modification of Proteins: An Emerging Mechanism of Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Stephanie B.; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Diers, Anne R.; Landar, Aimee

    2012-01-01

    There are a wide variety of reactive species which can affect cell function, including reactive oxygen, nitrogen, and lipid species. Some are formed endogenously through enzymatic or non-enzymatic pathways, and others are introduced through diet or environmental exposure. Many of these reactive species can interact with biomolecules and can result in oxidative post-translational modification of proteins. It is well documented that some oxidative modifications cause macromolecular damage and cell death. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that certain classes of reactive species initiate cell signaling by reacting with specific side chains of peptide residues without causing cell death. This process is generally termed “redox signaling,” and its role in physiological and pathological processes is a subject of active investigation. This review will give an overview of oxidative protein modification as a mechanism of redox signaling, including types of reactive species and how they modify proteins, examples of modified proteins, and a discussion about the current concepts in this area. PMID:23049513

  19. Molecular signaling involving intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Anna; Manna, Sara La; Novellino, Ettore; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Marasco, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on cellular protein interaction networks (PINs) reveal that proteins that constitute hubs in a PIN are notably enriched in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) compared to proteins that constitute edges, highlighting the role of IDPs in signaling pathways. Most IDPs rapidly undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to their biological targets to perform their function. Conformational dynamics enables IDPs to be versatile and to interact with a broad range of interactors under normal physiological conditions where their expression is tightly modulated. IDPs are involved in many cellular processes such as cellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, and splicing; thus, their high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases including cancer. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in men worldwide. Therefore, identifying molecular mechanisms of the oncogenic signaling pathways that are involved in prostate carcinogenesis is crucial. In this review, we focus on the aspects of cellular pathways leading to PCa in which IDPs exert a primary role. PMID:27212129

  20. Using melanopsin to study G protein signaling in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    McGregor, K M; Bécamel, C; Marin, P; Andrade, R

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the central nervous system (CNS) has been hampered by the limited availability of tools allowing for the study of their signaling with precise temporal control. To overcome this, we tested the utility of the bistable mammalian opsin melanopsin to examine G protein signaling in CNS neurons. Specifically, we used biolistic (gene gun) approaches to transfect melanopsin into cortical pyramidal cells maintained in organotypic slice culture. Whole cell recordings from transfected neurons indicated that application of blue light effectively activated the transfected melanopsin to elicit the canonical biphasic modulation of membrane excitability previously associated with the activation of GPCRs coupling to Gαq-11 Remarkably, full mimicry of exogenous agonist concentration could be obtained with pulses as short as a few milliseconds, suggesting that their triggering required a single melanopsin activation-deactivation cycle. The resulting temporal control over melanopsin activation allowed us to compare the activation kinetics of different components of the electrophysiological response. We also replaced the intracellular loops of melanopsin with those of the 5-HT2A receptor to create a light-activated GPCR capable of interacting with the 5-HT2A receptor interacting proteins. The resulting chimera expressed weak activity but validated the potential usefulness of melanopsin as a tool for the study of G protein signaling in CNS neurons. PMID:27306679

  1. Protein sensing by nanofluidic crystal and its signal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jianming; Du, Hongtan; Wang, Wei; Chu, Ming; Wang, Yuedan; Li, Haichao; Alice Zhang, Haixia; Wu, Wengang; Li, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Nanofluidics has a unique property that ionic conductance across a nanometer-sized confined space is strongly affected by the space surface charge density, which can be utilized to construct electrical read-out biosensor. Based on this principle, this work demonstrated a novel protein sensor along with a sandwich signal enhancement approach. Nanoparticles with designed aptamer onside are assembled in a suspended micropore to form a 3-dimensional network of nanometer-sized interstices, named as nanofluidic crystal hereafter, as the basic sensing unit. Proteins captured by aptamers will change the surface charge density of nanoparticles and thereby can be detected by monitoring the ionic conductance across this nanofluidic crystal. Another aptamer can further enlarge the variations of the surface charge density by forming a sandwich structure (capturing aptamer/protein/signal enhancement aptamer) and the read-out conductance as well. The preliminary experimental results indicated that human α-thrombin was successfully detected by the corresponding aptamer modified nanofluidic crystal with the limit of detection of 5 nM (0.18 μg/ml) and the read-out signal was enhanced up to 3 folds by using another thrombin aptamer. Being easy to graft probe, facile and low-cost to prepare the nano-device, and having an electrical read-out, the present nanofluidic crystal scheme is a promising and universal strategy for protein sensing. PMID:24404017

  2. FGF21 is an endocrine signal of protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Laeger, Thomas; Henagan, Tara M; Albarado, Diana C; Redman, Leanne M; Bray, George A; Noland, Robert C; Münzberg, Heike; Hutson, Susan M; Gettys, Thomas W; Schwartz, Michael W; Morrison, Christopher D

    2014-09-01

    Enhanced fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) production and circulation has been linked to the metabolic adaptation to starvation. Here, we demonstrated that hepatic FGF21 expression is induced by dietary protein restriction, but not energy restriction. Circulating FGF21 was increased 10-fold in mice and rats fed a low-protein (LP) diet. In these animals, liver Fgf21 expression was increased within 24 hours of reduced protein intake. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels increased dramatically following 28 days on a LP diet. LP-induced increases in FGF21 were associated with increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) in the liver, and both baseline and LP-induced serum FGF21 levels were reduced in mice lacking the eIF2α kinase general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2). Finally, while protein restriction altered food intake, energy expenditure, and body weight gain in WT mice, FGF21-deficient animals did not exhibit these changes in response to a LP diet. These and other data demonstrate that reduced protein intake underlies the increase in circulating FGF21 in response to starvation and a ketogenic diet and that FGF21 is required for behavioral and metabolic responses to protein restriction. FGF21 therefore represents an endocrine signal of protein restriction, which acts to coordinate metabolism and growth during periods of reduced protein intake. PMID:25133427

  3. Post-translational modification of PII signal transduction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins in nature. They are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. Quite remarkably PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and in all known cases they achieve their regulatory effect by direct interaction with their target. PII proteins in the Proteobacteria and the Actinobacteria are subject to post-translational modification by uridylylation or adenylylation respectively, whilst in some Cyanobacteria they can be modified by phosphorylation. In all these cases the protein’s modification state is influenced by the cellular nitrogen status and is thought to regulate its activity. However, in many organisms there is no evidence for modification of PII proteins and indeed the ability of these proteins to respond to the cellular nitrogen status is fundamentally independent of post-translational modification. In this review we explore the role of post-translational modification in PII proteins in the light of recent studies. PMID:25610437

  4. Light-regulated translocation of signaling proteins in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Frechter, Shahar; Minke, Baruch

    2007-01-01

    Illumination of Drosophila photoreceptor cells induces multi-facet responses, which include generation of the photoreceptor potential, screening pigment migration and translocation of signaling proteins which is the focus of recent extensive research. Translocation of three signaling molecules is covered in this review: (1) Light-dependent translocation of arrestin from the cytosol to the signaling membrane, the rhabdomere, determines the lifetime of activated rhodopsin. Arrestin translocates in PIP3 and NINAC myosin III dependent manner, and specific mutations which disrupt the interaction between arrestin and PIP3 or NINAC also impair the light-dependant translocation of arrestin and the termination of the response to light. (2) Activation of Drosophila visual G protein, DGq, causes a massive and reversible, translocation of the α subunit from the signaling membrane to the cytosol, accompanied by activity-dependent architectural changes. Analysis of the translocation and the recovery kinetics of DGqα in wild-type flies and specific visual mutants indicated that DGqα is necessary but not sufficient for the architectural changes. (3) The TRP-like (TRPL) but not TRP channels translocate in a light-dependent manner between the rhabdomere and the cell body. As a physiological consequence of this light-dependent modulation of the TRP/TRPL ratio, the photoreceptors of dark-adapted flies operate at a wider dynamic range, which allows the photoreceptors enriched with TRPL to function better in darkness and dim background illumination. Altogether, signal-dependent movement of signaling proteins plays a major role in the maintenance and function of photoreceptor cells. PMID:16458490

  5. Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions and Signaling by Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the core of cell signaling pathways as well as many bacterial and viral infection processes. As such, they define critical targets for drug development against diseases such as cancer, arthritis, obesity, AIDS and many others. Until now, the clinical inhibition of protein-protein interactions and signaling has been accomplished with the use of antibodies or soluble versions of receptor molecules. Small molecule replacements of these therapeutic agents have been extremely difficult to develop; either the necessary potency has been hard to achieve or the expected biological effect has not been obtained. In this presentation, we show that a rigorous thermodynamic approach that combines differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a unique platform for the identification and optimization of small molecular weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Recent advances in the development of cell entry inhibitors of HIV-1 using this approach will be discussed.

  6. Endocytosis of Seven-Transmembrane RGS Protein Activates G- protein Coupled Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Phan, Nguyen; Jones, Janice C.; Yang, Jing; Huang, Jirong; Grigston, Jeffrey; Taylor, J. Philip; Jones, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction typically begins by ligand-dependent activation of a concomitant partner which is otherwise in its resting state. However, in cases where signal activation is constitutive by default, the mechanism of regulation is unknown. The Arabidopsis thaliana heterotrimeric Gα protein self-activates without accessory proteins, and is kept in its resting state by the negative regulator, AtRGS1 (Regulator of G protein Signaling 1), which is the prototype of a seven transmembrane receptor fused with an RGS domain. Endocytosis of AtRGS1 by ligand-dependent endocytosis physically uncouples the GTPase accelerating activity of AtRGS1 from the Gα protein, permitting sustained activation. Phosphorylation of AtRGS1 by AtWNK8 kinase causes AtRGS1 endocytosis, required both for G protein-mediated sugar signaling and cell proliferation. In animals, receptor endocytosis results in signal desensitization, whereas in plants, endocytosis results in signal activation. These findings reveal how different organisms rearrange a regulatory system to result in opposite outcomes using similar phosphorylation-dependent endocytosis. PMID:22940907

  7. Biased and G Protein-Independent Signaling of Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2014-01-01

    Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM-receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand–receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of “classic” redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor-, or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the solution

  8. Transduction of Redox Signaling by Electrophile-Protein Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Tanja K.; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, the posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins has emerged as a central mechanism for cells to regulate metabolism, growth, differentiation, cell-cell interactions, and immune responses. By influencing protein structure and function, PTM leads to a multiplication of proteome diversity. Redox-dependent PTMs, mediated by environmental and endogenously generated reactive species, induce cell signaling responses and can have toxic effects in organisms. PTMs induced by the electrophilic by-products of redox reactions most frequently occur at protein thiols; other nucleophilic amino acids serve as less favorable targets. Advances in mass spectrometry and affinity-chemistry strategies have improved the detection of electrophile-induced protein modifications both in vitro and in vivo and have revealed a high degree of amino acid and protein selectivity of electrophilic PTM. The identification of biological targets of electrophiles has motivated further study of the functional impact of various PTM reactions on specific signaling pathways and how this might affect organisms. PMID:19797270

  9. Integration of G Protein α (Gα) Signaling by the Regulator of G Protein Signaling 14 (RGS14)*

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nicole E.; Goswami, Devrishi; Branch, Mary Rose; Ramineni, Suneela; Ortlund, Eric A.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Hepler, John R.

    2015-01-01

    RGS14 contains distinct binding sites for both active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) forms of Gα subunits. The N-terminal regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain binds active Gαi/o-GTP, whereas the C-terminal G protein regulatory (GPR) motif binds inactive Gαi1/3-GDP. The molecular basis for how RGS14 binds different activation states of Gα proteins to integrate G protein signaling is unknown. Here we explored the intramolecular communication between the GPR motif and the RGS domain upon G protein binding and examined whether RGS14 can functionally interact with two distinct forms of Gα subunits simultaneously. Using complementary cellular and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that RGS14 forms a stable complex with inactive Gαi1-GDP at the plasma membrane and that free cytosolic RGS14 is recruited to the plasma membrane by activated Gαo-AlF4−. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer studies showed that RGS14 adopts different conformations in live cells when bound to Gα in different activation states. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry revealed that RGS14 is a very dynamic protein that undergoes allosteric conformational changes when inactive Gαi1-GDP binds the GPR motif. Pure RGS14 forms a ternary complex with Gαo-AlF4− and an AlF4−-insensitive mutant (G42R) of Gαi1-GDP, as observed by size exclusion chromatography and differential hydrogen/deuterium exchange. Finally, a preformed RGS14·Gαi1-GDP complex exhibits full capacity to stimulate the GTPase activity of Gαo-GTP, demonstrating that RGS14 can functionally engage two distinct forms of Gα subunits simultaneously. Based on these findings, we propose a working model for how RGS14 integrates multiple G protein signals in host CA2 hippocampal neurons to modulate synaptic plasticity. PMID:25666614

  10. Chapter Two - Heterotrimeric G Protein Ubiquitination as a Regulator of G Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Torres, M

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated regulation of G proteins has been known for over 20 years as a result of discoveries made independently in yeast and vertebrate model systems for pheromone and photoreception, respectively. Since that time, several details underlying the cause and effect of G protein ubiquitination have been determined-including the initiating signals, responsible enzymes, trafficking pathways, and their effects on protein structure, function, interactions, and cell signaling. The collective body of evidence suggests that Gα subunits are the primary targets of ubiquitination. However, longstanding and recent results suggest that Gβ and Gγ subunits are also ubiquitinated, in some cases impacting cell polarization-a process essential for chemotaxis and polarized cell growth. More recently, evidence from mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics coupled with advances in PTM bioinformatics have revealed that protein families representing G protein subunits contain several structural hotspots for ubiquitination-most of which have not been investigated for a functional role in signal transduction. Taken together, our knowledge and understanding of heterotrimeric G protein ubiquitination as a regulator of G protein signaling-despite 20 years of research-is still emerging. PMID:27378755

  11. Intramolecular conformational changes optimize protein kinase C signaling.

    PubMed

    Antal, Corina E; Violin, Jonathan D; Kunkel, Maya T; Skovsø, Søs; Newton, Alexandra C

    2014-04-24

    Optimal tuning of enzyme signaling is critical for cellular homeostasis. We use fluorescence resonance energy transfer reporters in live cells to follow conformational transitions that tune the affinity of a multidomain signal transducer, protein kinase C (PKC), for optimal response to second messengers. This enzyme comprises two diacylglycerol sensors, the C1A and C1B domains, that have a sufficiently high intrinsic affinity for ligand so that the enzyme would be in a ligand-engaged, active state if not for mechanisms that mask its domains. We show that both diacylglycerol sensors are exposed in newly synthesized PKC and that conformational transitions following priming phosphorylations mask the domains so that the lower affinity sensor, the C1B domain, is the primary diacylglycerol binder. The conformational rearrangements of PKC serve as a paradigm for how multimodule transducers optimize their dynamic range of signaling. PMID:24631122

  12. Modular architecture of protein structures and allosteric communications: potential implications for signaling proteins and regulatory linkages

    PubMed Central

    del Sol, Antonio; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Amoros, Dolors; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Background Allosteric communications are vital for cellular signaling. Here we explore a relationship between protein architectural organization and shortcuts in signaling pathways. Results We show that protein domains consist of modules interconnected by residues that mediate signaling through the shortest pathways. These mediating residues tend to be located at the inter-modular boundaries, which are more rigid and display a larger number of long-range interactions than intra-modular regions. The inter-modular boundaries contain most of the residues centrally conserved in the protein fold, which may be crucial for information transfer between amino acids. Our approach to modular decomposition relies on a representation of protein structures as residue-interacting networks, and removal of the most central residue contacts, which are assumed to be crucial for allosteric communications. The modular decomposition of 100 multi-domain protein structures indicates that modules constitute the building blocks of domains. The analysis of 13 allosteric proteins revealed that modules characterize experimentally identified functional regions. Based on the study of an additional functionally annotated dataset of 115 proteins, we propose that high-modularity modules include functional sites and are the basic functional units. We provide examples (the Gαs subunit and P450 cytochromes) to illustrate that the modular architecture of active sites is linked to their functional specialization. Conclusion Our method decomposes protein structures into modules, allowing the study of signal transmission between functional sites. A modular configuration might be advantageous: it allows signaling proteins to expand their regulatory linkages and may elicit a broader range of control mechanisms either via modular combinations or through modulation of inter-modular linkages. PMID:17531094

  13. Hipk proteins dually regulate Wnt/Wingless signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Esther M; Swarup, Sharan; Lee, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling system that is used reiteratively, both spatially and temporally, to control the development of multicellular animals. The stability of cytoplasmic β-catenin/Armadillo, the transcriptional effector of the pathway, is controlled by sequential N-terminal phosphorylation and ubiquitination that targets it for proteasome-mediated degradation. Orthologous members of the Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase family from Drosophila to vertebrates have been implicated in the regulation of Wnt/Wingless signaling. In Drosophila, as a consequence of Hipk activity, cells accumulate stabilized Armadillo that directs the expression of Wg-specific target genes. Hipk promotes the stabilization of Armadillo by inhibiting its ubiquitination (and hence subsequent degradation) by the SCF(Slimb) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Vertebrate Hipk2 impedes β-catenin ubiquitination to promote its stability and the Wnt signal in a mechanism that is functionally conserved. Moreover, we describe here that Hipk proteins have a role independent of their effect on β-catenin/Armadillo stability to enhance Wnt/Wingless signaling. PMID:22634475

  14. Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 and Its Regulatory Protein Inhibitor 2 Negatively Regulate ABA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Xie, Shaojun; Batelli, Giorgia; Wang, Bangshing; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xing, Lu; Lei, Mingguang; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core ABA signaling pathway consists of three major components: ABA receptor (PYR1/PYLs), type 2C Protein Phosphatase (PP2C) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Nevertheless, the complexity of ABA signaling remains to be explored. To uncover new components of ABA signal transduction pathways, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for SnRK2-interacting proteins. We found that Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 (TOPP1) and its regulatory protein, At Inhibitor-2 (AtI-2), physically interact with SnRK2s and also with PYLs. TOPP1 inhibited the kinase activity of SnRK2.6, and this inhibition could be enhanced by AtI-2. Transactivation assays showed that TOPP1 and AtI-2 negatively regulated the SnRK2.2/3/6-mediated activation of the ABA responsive reporter gene RD29B, supporting a negative role of TOPP1 and AtI-2 in ABA signaling. Consistent with these findings, topp1 and ati-2 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivities to ABA and salt treatments, and transcriptome analysis of TOPP1 and AtI-2 knockout plants revealed an increased expression of multiple ABA-responsive genes in the mutants. Taken together, our results uncover TOPP1 and AtI-2 as negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:26943172

  15. Systematic identification of signal integration by protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Filteau, Marie; Diss, Guillaume; Dubé, Alexandre K.; Schraffl, Andrea; Bachmann, Verena A.; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Chrétien, Andrée-Ève; Steunou, Anne-Lise; Dionne, Ugo; Bisson, Nicolas; Stefan, Eduard; Landry, Christian R.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular processes and homeostasis control in eukaryotic cells is achieved by the action of regulatory proteins such as protein kinase A (PKA). Although the outbound signals from PKA directed to processes such as metabolism, growth, and aging have been well charted, what regulates this conserved regulator remains to be systematically identified to understand how it coordinates biological processes. Using a yeast PKA reporter assay, we identified genes that influence PKA activity by measuring protein–protein interactions between the regulatory and the two catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in 3,726 yeast genetic-deletion backgrounds grown on two carbon sources. Overall, nearly 500 genes were found to be connected directly or indirectly to PKA regulation, including 80 core regulators, denoting a wide diversity of signals regulating PKA, within and beyond the described upstream linear pathways. PKA regulators span multiple processes, including the antagonistic autophagy and methionine biosynthesis pathways. Our results converge toward mechanisms of PKA posttranslational regulation by lysine acetylation, which is conserved between yeast and humans and that, we show, regulates protein complex formation in mammals and carbohydrate storage and aging in yeast. Taken together, these results show that the extent of PKA input matches with its output, because this kinase receives information from upstream and downstream processes, and highlight how biological processes are interconnected and coordinated by PKA. PMID:25831502

  16. Text mining for metabolic pathways, signaling cascades, and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Robert; Krallinger, Martin; Andres, Eduardo; Tamames, Javier; Blaschke, Christian; Valencia, Alfonso

    2005-05-10

    The complexity of the information stored in databases and publications on metabolic and signaling pathways, the high throughput of experimental data, and the growing number of publications make it imperative to provide systems to help the researcher navigate through these interrelated information resources. Text-mining methods have started to play a key role in the creation and maintenance of links between the information stored in biological databases and its original sources in the literature. These links will be extremely useful for database updating and curation, especially if a number of technical problems can be solved satisfactorily, including the identification of protein and gene names (entities in general) and the characterization of their types of interactions. The first generation of openly accessible text-mining systems, such as iHOP (Information Hyperlinked over Proteins), provides additional functions to facilitate the reconstruction of protein interaction networks, combine database and text information, and support the scientist in the formulation of novel hypotheses. The next challenge is the generation of comprehensive information regarding the general function of signaling pathways and protein interaction networks. PMID:15886388

  17. Extra-Large G Proteins Expand the Repertoire of Subunits in Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, David; Gookin, Timothy E; Milner, Matthew J; Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are a conserved signal transduction mechanism in eukaryotes. However, G protein subunit numbers in diploid plant genomes are greatly reduced as compared with animals and do not correlate with the diversity of functions and phenotypes in which heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated. In addition to GPA1, the sole canonical Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gα subunit, Arabidopsis has three related proteins: the extra-large GTP-binding proteins XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3. We demonstrate that the XLGs can bind Gβγ dimers (AGB1 plus a Gγ subunit: AGG1, AGG2, or AGG3) with differing specificity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid assays. Our in silico structural analysis shows that XLG3 aligns closely to the crystal structure of GPA1, and XLG3 also competes with GPA1 for Gβγ binding in yeast. We observed interaction of the XLGs with all three Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Bioinformatic and localization studies identified and confirmed nuclear localization signals in XLG2 and XLG3 and a nuclear export signal in XLG3, which may facilitate intracellular shuttling. We found that tunicamycin, salt, and glucose hypersensitivity and increased stomatal density are agb1-specific phenotypes that are not observed in gpa1 mutants but are recapitulated in xlg mutants. Thus, XLG-Gβγ heterotrimers provide additional signaling modalities for tuning plant G protein responses and increase the repertoire of G protein heterotrimer combinations from three to 12. The potential for signal partitioning and competition between the XLGs and GPA1 is a new paradigm for plant-specific cell signaling. PMID:26157115

  18. S-Glutathionylation and Redox Protein Signaling in Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Womersley, Jacqueline S.; Uys, Joachim D.

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that comes at a high cost to individuals and society. Therefore understanding the mechanisms by which drugs exert their effects is of prime importance. Drugs of abuse increase the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species resulting in oxidative stress. This change in redox homeostasis increases the conjugation of glutathione to protein cysteine residues; a process called S-glutathionylation. Although traditionally regarded as a protective mechanism against irreversible protein oxidation, accumulated evidence suggests a more nuanced role for S-glutathionylation, namely as a mediator in redox-sensitive protein signaling. The reversible modification of protein thiols leading to alteration in function under different physiologic/pathologic conditions provides a mechanism whereby change in redox status can be translated into a functional response. As such, S-glutathionylation represents an understudied means of post-translational protein modification that may be important in the mechanisms underlying drug addiction. This review will discuss the evidence for S-glutathionylation as a redox-sensing mechanism and how this may be involved in the response to drug-induced oxidative stress. The function of S-glutathionylated proteins involved in neurotransmission, dendritic spine structure, and drug-induced behavioral outputs will be reviewed with specific reference to alcohol, cocaine, and heroin. PMID:26809999

  19. S-Glutathionylation and Redox Protein Signaling in Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Uys, Joachim D

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that comes at a high cost to individuals and society. Therefore understanding the mechanisms by which drugs exert their effects is of prime importance. Drugs of abuse increase the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species resulting in oxidative stress. This change in redox homeostasis increases the conjugation of glutathione to protein cysteine residues; a process called S-glutathionylation. Although traditionally regarded as a protective mechanism against irreversible protein oxidation, accumulated evidence suggests a more nuanced role for S-glutathionylation, namely as a mediator in redox-sensitive protein signaling. The reversible modification of protein thiols leading to alteration in function under different physiologic/pathologic conditions provides a mechanism whereby change in redox status can be translated into a functional response. As such, S-glutathionylation represents an understudied means of post-translational protein modification that may be important in the mechanisms underlying drug addiction. This review will discuss the evidence for S-glutathionylation as a redox-sensing mechanism and how this may be involved in the response to drug-induced oxidative stress. The function of S-glutathionylated proteins involved in neurotransmission, dendritic spine structure, and drug-induced behavioral outputs will be reviewed with specific reference to alcohol, cocaine, and heroin. PMID:26809999

  20. Heparan sulfate is required for bone morphogenetic protein-7 signaling.

    PubMed

    Irie, Atsushi; Habuchi, Hiroko; Kimata, Koji; Sanai, Yutaka

    2003-09-01

    Although genetic studies have suggested that heparan sulfate (HS) is involved in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-mediated embryonic morphogenesis, it is unclear whether HS is directly involved in BMP-mediated signaling. Here, we investigate the involvement of HS in BMP-7 signaling. We show that HS and heparin chains specifically bind to BMP-7. Digestion of cell-surface HS with heparitinase interferes with BMP-7-mediated Smad phosphorylation in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. Inhibiting sulfation of cell-surface HS with chlorate also causes interruption of Smad phosphorylation. Addition of exogenous heparin to ROS 17/2.8 cells prevents BMP-7-mediated Smad phosphorylation rather than enhances the BMP-7 signal, suggesting that HS should be anchored on the plasma membrane for BMP signaling. Moreover, BMP-7 binding to ROS 17/2.8 cells is inhibited by chlorate treatment and exogenous application of heparin. These results demonstrate that BMP-7 specifically binds to cell-surface HS and the BMP-7-HS interaction is required for BMP-7 signaling. PMID:12927798

  1. Established and emerging fluorescence-based assays for G-protein function: heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Jones, Miller B; Shutes, Adam; Yerxa, Benjamin R; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2003-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that couple serpentine receptors to intracellular effector pathways and the regulation of cell physiology. Ligand-bound receptors cause G-protein alpha subunits to bind guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and activate effector pathways. Signal termination is facilitated by the intrinsic GTPase activity of G-protein alpha subunits. Regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate the GTPase activity of the G-protein alpha subunit, and thus negatively regulate G-protein-mediated signal transduction. In vitro biochemical assays of heterotrimeric G-proteins commonly include measurements of nucleotide binding, GTPase activity, and interaction with RGS proteins. However, the conventional assays for most of these processes involve radiolabeled guanine nucleotide analogues and scintillation counting. In this article, we focus on fluorescence-based methodologies to study heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunit regulation in vitro. Furthermore, we consider the potential of such techniques in high-throughput screening and drug discovery. PMID:12769684

  2. Promotion of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by Tetraspanins and Glycosphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Lindsey C.; Aydin, Taner; Yun, Sijung; Constas, Katharine; Schaeffer, Arielle; Ranjan, Sinthu; Kubba, Saad; Alam, Emad; McMahon, Devin E.; He, Jingpeng; Shwartz, Neta; Tian, Chenxi; Plavskin, Yevgeniy; Lindy, Amanda; Dad, Nimra Amir; Sheth, Sunny; Amin, Nirav M.; Zimmerman, Stephanie; Liu, Dennis; Schwarz, Erich M.; Smith, Harold; Krause, Michael W.; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of secreted molecules. BMPs play essential roles in multiple developmental and homeostatic processes in metazoans. Malfunction of the BMP pathway can cause a variety of diseases in humans, including cancer, skeletal disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Identification of factors that ensure proper spatiotemporal control of BMP signaling is critical for understanding how this pathway is regulated. We have used a unique and sensitive genetic screen to identify the plasma membrane-localized tetraspanin TSP-21 as a key new factor in the C. elegans BMP-like “Sma/Mab” signaling pathway that controls body size and postembryonic M lineage development. We showed that TSP-21 acts in the signal-receiving cells and genetically functions at the ligand-receptor level. We further showed that TSP-21 can associate with itself and with two additional tetraspanins, TSP-12 and TSP-14, which also promote Sma/Mab signaling. TSP-12 and TSP-14 can also associate with SMA-6, the type I receptor of the Sma/Mab pathway. Finally, we found that glycosphingolipids, major components of the tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, are required for Sma/Mab signaling. Our findings suggest that the tetraspanin-enriched membrane microdomains are important for proper BMP signaling. As tetraspanins have emerged as diagnostic and prognostic markers for tumor progression, and TSP-21, TSP-12 and TSP-14 are all conserved in humans, we speculate that abnormal BMP signaling due to altered expression or function of certain tetraspanins may be a contributing factor to cancer development. PMID:25978409

  3. Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response by Constitutive G-protein Signaling in Rod Photoreceptor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Chen, Jeannie

    2014-01-01

    Phototransduction is a G-protein signal transduction cascade that converts photon absorption to a change in current at the plasma membrane. Certain genetic mutations affecting the proteins in the phototransduction cascade cause blinding disorders in humans. Some of these mutations serve as a genetic source of “equivalent light” that activates the cascade, whereas other mutations lead to amplification of the light response. How constitutive phototransduction causes photoreceptor cell death is poorly understood. We showed that persistent G-protein signaling, which occurs in rod arrestin and rhodopsin kinase knock-out mice, caused a rapid and specific induction of the PERK pathway of the unfolded protein response. These changes were not observed in the cGMP-gated channel knock-out rods, an equivalent light condition that mimics light-stimulated channel closure. Thus transducin signaling, but not channel closure, triggers rapid cell death in light damage caused by constitutive phototransduction. Additionally, we show that in the albino light damage model cell death was not associated with increase in global protein ubiquitination or unfolded protein response induction. Taken together, these observations provide novel mechanistic insights into the cell death pathway caused by constitutive phototransduction and identify the unfolded protein response as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25183010

  4. Signal Activation and Inactivation by the Gα Helical Domain: A Long-Neglected Partner in G Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Henrik G.; Jones, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins) are positioned at the top of many signal transduction pathways. The G protein α subunit is composed of two domains, one that resembles Ras and another that is composed entirely of α helices. Historically, most attention has focused on the Ras-like domain, but emerging evidence reveals that the helical domain is an active participant in G protein signaling. PMID:22649098

  5. Retrograde signalling at the synapse: a role for Wnt proteins.

    PubMed

    Salinas, P C

    2005-12-01

    The formation of functional synapses requires a proper dialogue between incoming axons and their future synaptic targets. As axons approach their target, they are instructed to slow down and remodel to form proper presynaptic terminals. Although significant progress has been made in the identification of the mechanisms that control axon guidance, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the conversion of actively growing axon into a presynaptic terminal. We found that Wnt secreted proteins are retrograde signals that regulate the terminal arborization of axons and synaptic differentiation. Wnts released from postsynaptic neurons induce extensive remodelling on incoming axons. This remodelling is manifested by a decrease in axon extension with a concomitant increase in growth-cone size. This morphological change is correlated with changes in the dynamics and organization of microtubules. Studies of a vertebrate synapse and the Drosophila neuromuscular junction suggest that a conserved Wnt signalling pathway modulates presynaptic microtubules as axons remodel during synapse formation. In this paper I discuss the role of the Wnt-Dvl (Dishevelled protein)-GSK-3beta (glycogen synthase kinase-3beta) signalling pathway in axon remodelling during synapse formation in the central nervous system. PMID:16246102

  6. Nerve ending "signal" proteins GAP-43, MARCKS, and BASP1.

    PubMed

    Mosevitsky, Mark I

    2005-01-01

    Mechanisms of growth cone pathfinding in the course of neuronal net formation as well as mechanisms of learning and memory have been under intense investigation for the past 20 years, but many aspects of these phenomena remain unresolved and even mysterious. "Signal" proteins accumulated mainly in the axon endings (growth cones and the presynaptic area of synapses) participate in the main brain processes. These proteins are similar in several essential structural and functional properties. The most prominent similarities are N-terminal fatty acylation and the presence of an "effector domain" (ED) that dynamically binds to the plasma membrane, to calmodulin, and to actin fibrils. Reversible phosphorylation of ED by protein kinase C modulates these interactions. However, together with similarities, there are significant differences among the proteins, such as different conditions (Ca2+ contents) for calmodulin binding and different modes of interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. In light of these facts, we consider GAP-43, MARCKS, and BASP1 both separately and in conjunction. Special attention is devoted to a discussion of apparent inconsistencies in results and opinions of different authors concerning specific questions about the structure of proteins and their interactions. PMID:16125549

  7. Regulator of G-Protein Signaling – 5 (RGS5) Is a Novel Repressor of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, William M.; Gunaje, Jagadambika; Daum, Guenter; Dong, Xiu Rong; Majesky, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo). Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS) proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh)-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases. PMID:23637832

  8. Protein kinase A signaling during bidirectional axenic differentiation in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Bachmaier, Sabine; Witztum, Ronit; Tsigankov, Polina; Koren, Roni; Boshart, Michael; Zilberstein, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic protozoa of the genus Leishmania are obligatory intracellular parasites that cycle between the phagolysosome of mammalian macrophages, where they proliferate as intracellular amastigotes, and the midgut of female sand flies, where they proliferate as extracellular promastigotes. Shifting between the two environments induces signaling pathway-mediated developmental processes that enable adaptation to both host and vector. Developmentally regulated expression and phosphorylation of protein kinase A subunits in Leishmania and in Trypanosoma brucei point to an involvement of protein kinase A in parasite development. To assess this hypothesis in Leishmania donovani, we determined proteome-wide changes in phosphorylation of the conserved protein kinase A phosphorylation motifs RXXS and RXXT, using a phospho-specific antibody. Rapid dephosphorylation of these motifs was observed upon initiation of promastigote to amastigote differentiation in culture. No phosphorylated sites were detected in axenic amastigotes. To analyse the kinetics of (re)phosphorylation during axenic reverse differentiation from L. donovani amastigotes to promastigotes, we first established a map of this process with morphological and molecular markers. Upon initiation, the parasites rested for 6-12h before proliferation of an asynchronous population resumed. After early changes in cell shape, the major changes in molecular marker expression and flagella biogenesis occurred between 24 and 33h after initiation. RXXS/T re-phosphorylation and expression of the regulatory subunit PKAR1 correlated with promastigote maturation, indicating a promastigote-specific function of protein kinase A signaling. This is supported by the localization of PKAR1 to the flagellum, an organelle reduced to a remnant in amastigote forms. We conclude that a significant increase in protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation is part of the ordered changes that characterise the amastigote to promastigote differentiation

  9. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C.

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  10. G Protein Activation Stimulates Phospholipase D Signaling in Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Munnik, T.; Arisz, S. A.; De Vrije, T.; Musgrave, A.

    1995-01-01

    We provide direct evidence for phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in plants by showing that this enzyme is stimulated by the G protein activators mastoparan, ethanol, and cholera toxin. An in vivo assay for PLD activity in plant cells was developed based on the use of a "reporter alcohol" rather than water as a transphosphatidylation substrate. The product was a phosphatidyl alcohol, which, in contrast to the normal product phosphatidic acid, is a specific measure of PLD activity. When 32P-labeled cells were treated with 0.1% n-butanol, 32P-phosphatidyl butanol (32P-PtdBut) was formed in a time-dependent manner. In cells treated with any of the three G protein activators, the production of 32P-PtdBut was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The G protein involved was pertussis toxin insensitive. Ethanol could activate PLD but was itself consumed by PLD as transphosphatidylation substrate. In contrast, secondary alcohols (e.g., sec-butyl alcohol) activated PLD but did not function as substrate, whereas tertiary alcohols did neither. Although most of the experiments were performed with the green alga Chlamydomonas eugametos, the relevance for higher plants was demonstrated by showing that PLD in carnation petals could also be activated by mastoparan. The results indicate that PLD activation must be considered as a potential signal transduction mechanism in plants, just as in animals. PMID:12242371

  11. Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Signaling Proteins by Cytokinin

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, J.J.

    2010-05-01

    Cytokinins are a class of mitogenic plant hormones that play an important role in most aspects of plant development, including shoot and root growth, vascular and photomorphogenic development and leaf senescence. A model for cytokinin perception and signaling has emerged that is similar to bacterial two-component phosphorelays. In this model, binding of cytokinin to the extracellular domain of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase (AHKs) receptors induces autophosphorylation within the intracellular histidine-kinase domain. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to cytosolic Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), which have been suggested to translocate to the nucleus in response to cytokinin treatment, where they then transfer the phosphoryl group to nuclear-localized response regulators (Type-A and Type-B ARRs). We examined the effects of cytokinin on AHP subcellular localization in Arabidopsis and, contrary to expectations, the AHPs maintained a constant nuclear/cytosolic distribution following cytokinin treatment. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved phosphoacceptor histidine residue of the AHP, as well as disruption of multiple cytokinin signaling elements, did not affect the subcellular localization of the AHP proteins. Finally, we present data indicating that AHPs maintain a nuclear/cytosolic distribution by balancing active transport into and out of the nucleus. Our findings suggest that the current models indicating relocalization of AHP protein into the nucleus in response to cytokinin are incorrect. Rather, AHPs actively maintain a consistent nuclear/cytosolic distribution regardless of the status of the cytokinin response pathway.

  12. Regulation of amyloid precursor protein processing by serotonin signaling.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anna A; Thathiah, Amantha; De Strooper, Bart; Tesseur, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the β- and γ-secretases releases the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which deposits in senile plaques and contributes to the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The α-secretase cleaves APP in the Aβ peptide sequence to generate soluble APPα (sAPPα). Upregulation of α-secretase activity through the 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 (5-HT4) receptor has been shown to reduce Aβ production, amyloid plaque load and to improve cognitive impairment in transgenic mouse models of AD. Consequently, activation of 5-HT4 receptors following agonist stimulation is considered to be a therapeutic strategy for AD treatment; however, the signaling cascade involved in 5-HT4 receptor-stimulated proteolysis of APP remains to be determined. Here we used chemical and siRNA inhibition to identify the proteins which mediate 5-HT4d receptor-stimulated α-secretase activity in the SH-SY5Y human neuronal cell line. We show that G protein and Src dependent activation of phospholipase C are required for α-secretase activity, while, unexpectedly, adenylyl cyclase and cAMP are not involved. Further elucidation of the signaling pathway indicates that inositol triphosphate phosphorylation and casein kinase 2 activation is also a prerequisite for α-secretase activity. Our findings provide a novel route to explore the treatment of AD through 5-HT4 receptor-induced α-secretase activation. PMID:24466315

  13. Two R7 regulator of G-protein signaling proteins shape retinal bipolar cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Mojumder, Deb Kumar; Qian, Yan; Wensel, Theodore G

    2009-06-17

    RGS7, RGS11, and their binding partner Gbeta5 are localized to the dendritic tips of retinal ON bipolar cells (ON-BPC), where mGluR6 responds to glutamate released from photoreceptor terminals by activation of the RGS7/RGS11 substrate, Galphao. To determine their functions in retinal signaling, we investigated cell-specific expression patterns of RGS7 and RGS11 by immunostaining, and measured light responses by electroretinography in mice with targeted disruptions of the genes encoding them. RGS7 staining is present in dendritic tips of all rod ON-BPC, but missing in those for subsets of cone ON-BPC, whereas the converse was true for RGS11 staining. Genetic disruption of either RGS7 or RGS11 produced delays in the ON-BPC-derived electroretinogram b-wave, but no changes in the photoreceptor-derived a-wave. Homozygous RGS7 mutant mice had delays in rod-driven b-waves, whereas RGS11 mutant mice had delays in rod-driven, and especially in cone-driven b-waves. The b-wave delays were further enhanced in mice homozygous for both RGS7 and RGS11 gene disruptions. Thus, RGS7 and RGS11 act in parallel to regulate the kinetics of ON bipolar cell responses, with differential impacts on the rod and cone pathways. PMID:19535587

  14. JNK Signaling: Regulation and Functions Based on Complex Protein-Protein Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Zeke, András; Misheva, Mariya; Reményi, Attila; Bogoyevitch, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), as members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, mediate eukaryotic cell responses to a wide range of abiotic and biotic stress insults. JNKs also regulate important physiological processes, including neuronal functions, immunological actions, and embryonic development, via their impact on gene expression, cytoskeletal protein dynamics, and cell death/survival pathways. Although the JNK pathway has been under study for >20 years, its complexity is still perplexing, with multiple protein partners of JNKs underlying the diversity of actions. Here we review the current knowledge of JNK structure and isoforms as well as the partnerships of JNKs with a range of intracellular proteins. Many of these proteins are direct substrates of the JNKs. We analyzed almost 100 of these target proteins in detail within a framework of their classification based on their regulation by JNKs. Examples of these JNK substrates include a diverse assortment of nuclear transcription factors (Jun, ATF2, Myc, Elk1), cytoplasmic proteins involved in cytoskeleton regulation (DCX, Tau, WDR62) or vesicular transport (JIP1, JIP3), cell membrane receptors (BMPR2), and mitochondrial proteins (Mcl1, Bim). In addition, because upstream signaling components impact JNK activity, we critically assessed the involvement of signaling scaffolds and the roles of feedback mechanisms in the JNK pathway. Despite a clarification of many regulatory events in JNK-dependent signaling during the past decade, many other structural and mechanistic insights are just beginning to be revealed. These advances open new opportunities to understand the role of JNK signaling in diverse physiological and pathophysiological states. PMID:27466283

  15. The origins of the evolutionary signal used to predict protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The correlation of genetic distances between pairs of protein sequence alignments has been used to infer protein-protein interactions. It has been suggested that these correlations are based on the signal of co-evolution between interacting proteins. However, although mutations in different proteins associated with maintaining an interaction clearly occur (particularly in binding interfaces and neighbourhoods), many other factors contribute to correlated rates of sequence evolution. Proteins in the same genome are usually linked by shared evolutionary history and so it would be expected that there would be topological similarities in their phylogenetic trees, whether they are interacting or not. For this reason the underlying species tree is often corrected for. Moreover processes such as expression level, are known to effect evolutionary rates. However, it has been argued that the correlated rates of evolution used to predict protein interaction explicitly includes shared evolutionary history; here we test this hypothesis. Results In order to identify the evolutionary mechanisms giving rise to the correlations between interaction proteins, we use phylogenetic methods to distinguish similarities in tree topologies from similarities in genetic distances. We use a range of datasets of interacting and non-interacting proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the signal of correlated evolution between interacting proteins is predominantly a result of shared evolutionary rates, rather than similarities in tree topology, independent of evolutionary divergence. Conclusions Since interacting proteins do not have tree topologies that are more similar than the control group of non-interacting proteins, it is likely that coevolution does not contribute much to, if any, of the observed correlations. PMID:23217198

  16. Retinal Cone Photoreceptors Require Phosducin-Like Protein 1 for G Protein Complex Assembly and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Christopher M.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Blake, Devon R.; Chen, Ching-Kang; Baehr, Wolfgang; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Willardson, Barry M.

    2015-01-01

    G protein β subunits (Gβ) play essential roles in phototransduction as part of G protein βγ (Gβγ) and regulator of G protein signaling 9 (RGS9)-Gβ5 heterodimers. Both are obligate dimers that rely on the cytosolic chaperone CCT and its co-chaperone PhLP1 to form complexes from their nascent polypeptides. The importance of PhLP1 in the assembly process was recently demonstrated in vivo in a retinal rod-specific deletion of the Phlp1 gene. To test whether this is a general mechanism that also applies to other cell types, we disrupted the Phlp1 gene specifically in mouse cones and measured the effects on G protein expression and cone visual signal transduction. In PhLP1-deficient cones, expression of cone transducin (Gt2) and RGS9-Gβ5 subunits was dramatically reduced, resulting in a 27-fold decrease in sensitivity and a 38-fold delay in cone photoresponse recovery. These results demonstrate the essential role of PhLP1 in cone G protein complex formation. Our findings reveal a common mechanism of Gβγ and RGS9-Gβ5 assembly in rods and cones, highlighting the importance of PhLP1 and CCT-mediated Gβ complex formation in G protein signaling. PMID:25659125

  17. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors: resolving spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling

    PubMed Central

    DiPilato, Lisa M.; Zhang, Jin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cellular processes are orchestrated by the precise coordination and regulation of molecular events in the cell. Fluorescent protein-based biosensors coupled with live-cell imaging have enabled the visualization of these events in real time and helped shape some of the current concepts of signal transduction, such as spatial compartmentation. The quantitative information produced by these tools has been incorporated into mathematical models that are capable of predicting highly complex and dynamic behaviors of cellular signaling networks, thus providing a systems level understanding of how pathways interact to produce a functional response. Finally, with technological advances in high throughput and in vivo imaging, these molecular tools promise to continually engender significant contributions to our understanding of cellular processes under normal and diseased conditions. PMID:19910237

  18. Uridine Affects Liver Protein Glycosylation, Insulin Signaling, and Heme Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Urasaki, Yasuyo; Pizzorno, Giuseppe; Le, Thuc T.

    2014-01-01

    Purines and pyrimidines are complementary bases of the genetic code. The roles of purines and their derivatives in cellular signal transduction and energy metabolism are well-known. In contrast, the roles of pyrimidines and their derivatives in cellular function remain poorly understood. In this study, the roles of uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, in liver metabolism are examined in mice. We report that short-term uridine administration in C57BL/6J mice increases liver protein glycosylation profiles, reduces phosphorylation level of insulin signaling proteins, and activates the HRI-eIF-2α-ATF4 heme-deficiency stress response pathway. Short-term uridine administration is also associated with reduced liver hemin level and reduced ability for insulin-stimulated blood glucose removal during an insulin tolerance test. Some of the short-term effects of exogenous uridine in C57BL/6J mice are conserved in transgenic UPase1−/− mice with long-term elevation of endogenous uridine level. UPase1−/− mice exhibit activation of the liver HRI-eIF-2α-ATF4 heme-deficiency stress response pathway. UPase1−/− mice also exhibit impaired ability for insulin-stimulated blood glucose removal. However, other short-term effects of exogenous uridine in C57BL/6J mice are not conserved in UPase1−/− mice. UPase1−/− mice exhibit normal phosphorylation level of liver insulin signaling proteins and increased liver hemin concentration compared to untreated control C57BL/6J mice. Contrasting short-term and long-term consequences of uridine on liver metabolism suggest that uridine exerts transient effects and elicits adaptive responses. Taken together, our data support potential roles of pyrimidines and their derivatives in the regulation of liver metabolism. PMID:24918436

  19. Neuropeptide Y and Agouti-Related Peptide Mediate Complementary Functions of Hyperphagia and Reduced Energy Expenditure in Leptin Receptor Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Na; Marcelin, Genevieve; Liu, Shun Mei; Schwartz, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AGRP) can produce hyperphagia, reduce energy expenditure, and promote triglyceride deposition in adipose depots. As these two neuropeptides are coexpressed within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and mediate a major portion of the obesity caused by leptin signaling deficiency, we sought to determine whether the two neuropeptides mediated identical or complementary actions. Because of separate neuropeptide receptors and signal transduction mechanisms, there is a possibility of distinct encoding systems for the feeding and energy expenditure aspects of leptin-regulated metabolism. We have genetically added NPY deficiency and/or AGRP deficiency to LEPR deficiency isolated to AGRP cells. Our results indicate that the obesity of LEPR deficiency in AGRP/NPY neurons can produce obesity with either AGRP or NPY alone with AGRP producing hyperphagia while NPY promotes reduced energy expenditure. The absence of both NPY and AGRP prevents the development of obesity attributable to isolated LEPR deficiency in AGRP/NPY neurons. Operant behavioral testing indicated that there were no alterations in the reward for a food pellet from the AGRP-specific LEPR deficiency. PMID:21285324

  20. Signal Recognition Particle: An essential protein targeting machine

    PubMed Central

    Akopian, David; Shen, Kuang; Zhang, Xin; Shan, Shu-ou

    2013-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor comprise a universally conserved and essential cellular machinery that couples the synthesis of nascent proteins to their proper membrane localization. The past decade has witnessed an explosion in in-depth mechanistic investigations of this targeting machine at increasingly higher resolution. In this review, we summarize recent work that elucidates how the SRP and SRP receptor interact with the cargo protein and the target membrane, respectively, and how these interactions are coupled to a novel GTPase cycle in the SRP•SRP receptor complex to provide the driving force and enhance the fidelity of this fundamental cellular pathway. We also discuss emerging frontiers where important questions remain to be addressed. PMID:23414305

  1. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 signaling regulates mammalian lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Selman, Colin; Tullet, Jennifer M.A.; Wieser, Daniela; Irvine, Elaine; Lingard, Steven J.; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Claret, Marc; Al-Qassab, Hind; Carmignac, Danielle; Ramadani, Faruk; Woods, Angela; Robinson, Iain C.A.; Schuster, Eugene; Batterham, Rachel L.; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Carling, David; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Thornton, Janet M.; Partridge, Linda; Gems, David; Withers, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) protects against aging and disease but the mechanisms by which this affects mammalian lifespan are unclear. We show in mice that deletion of the nutrient-responsive mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling pathway component ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) led to increased lifespan and resistance to age-related pathologies such as bone, immune and motor dysfunction and loss of insulin sensitivity. Deletion of S6K1 induced gene expression patterns similar to those seen in CR or with pharmacological activation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a conserved regulator of the metabolic response to CR. Our results demonstrate that S6K1 influences healthy mammalian lifespan, and suggest therapeutic manipulation of S6K1 and AMPK might mimic CR and provide broad protection against diseases of aging. PMID:19797661

  2. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Paul D; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Koul, Hari K

    2004-01-01

    The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy. PMID:15219238

  3. Desired Alteration of Protein Affinities: Competitive Selection of Protein Variants Using Yeast Signal Transduction Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kaishima, Misato; Fukuda, Nobuo; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Molecules that can control protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have recently drawn attention as new drug pipeline compounds. Here, we report a technique to screen desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. We previously constructed a screening system based on a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking membrane localization ability. This ability, required for signal transmission, is restored by recruiting Gγcyto into the membrane only when the target protein interacts with an artificially membrane-anchored candidate protein, thereby allowing interacting partners (Gγ recruitment system) to be searched and identified. In the present study, the Gγ recruitment system was altered by integrating the cytosolic expression of a third protein as a competitor to set a desirable affinity threshold. This enabled the reliable selection of both affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated protein variants. The presented approach may facilitate the development of therapeutic proteins that allow the control of PPIs. PMID:25244640

  4. Protein kinase A activity and Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Tomoya

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a well-known kinase that plays fundamental roles in a variety of biological processes. In Hedgehog-responsive cells, PKA plays key roles in proliferation and fate specification by modulating the transduction of Hedgehog signaling. In the absence of Hedgehog, a basal level of PKA activity represses the transcription of Hedgehog target genes. The main substrates of PKA in this process are the Ci/Gli family of bipotential transcription factors, which activate and repress Hedgehog target gene expression. PKA phosphorylates Ci/Gli, promoting the production of the repressor forms of Ci/Gli and thus repressing Hedgehog target gene expression. In contrast, the activation of Hedgehog signaling in response to Hedgehog increases the active forms of Ci/Gli, resulting in Hedgehog target gene expression. Because both decreased and increased levels of PKA activity cause abnormal cell proliferation and alter cell fate specification, the basal level of PKA activity in Hedgehog-responsive cells should be precisely regulated. However, the mechanism by which PKA activity is regulated remains obscure and appears to vary between cell types, tissues, and organisms. To date, two mechanisms have been proposed. One is a classical mechanism in which PKA activity is regulated by a small second messenger, cAMP; the other is a novel mechanism in which PKA activity is regulated by a protein, Misty somites. PMID:22391308

  5. Signal Propagation in Proteins and Relation to Equilibrium Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Chennubhotla, Chakra; Bahar, Ivet

    2007-01-01

    Elastic network (EN) models have been widely used in recent years for describing protein dynamics, based on the premise that the motions naturally accessible to native structures are relevant to biological function. We posit that equilibrium motions also determine communication mechanisms inherent to the network architecture. To this end, we explore the stochastics of a discrete-time, discrete-state Markov process of information transfer across the network of residues. We measure the communication abilities of residue pairs in terms of hit and commute times, i.e., the number of steps it takes on an average to send and receive signals. Functionally active residues are found to possess enhanced communication propensities, evidenced by their short hit times. Furthermore, secondary structural elements emerge as efficient mediators of communication. The present findings provide us with insights on the topological basis of communication in proteins and design principles for efficient signal transduction. While hit/commute times are information-theoretic concepts, a central contribution of this work is to rigorously show that they have physical origins directly relevant to the equilibrium fluctuations of residues predicted by EN models. PMID:17892319

  6. Engineering spatial gradients of signaling proteins using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bonnemay, L; Hostachy, S; Hoffmann, C; Gautier, J; Gueroui, Z

    2013-11-13

    Intracellular biochemical reactions are often localized in space and time, inducing gradients of enzymatic activity that may play decisive roles in determining cell's fate and functions. However, the techniques available to examine such enzymatic gradients of activity remain limited. Here, we propose a new method to engineer a spatial gradient of signaling protein concentration within Xenopus egg extracts using superparamagnetic nanoparticles. We show that, upon the application of a magnetic field, a concentration gradient of nanoparticles with a tunable length extension is established within confined egg extracts. We then conjugate the nanoparticles to RanGTP, a small G-protein controlling microtubule assembly. We found that the generation of an artificial gradient of Ran-nanoparticles modifies the spatial positioning of microtubule assemblies. Furthermore, the spatial control of the level of Ran concentration allows us to correlate the local fold increase in Ran-nanoparticle concentration with the spatial positioning of the microtubule-asters. Our assay provides a bottom-up approach to examine the minimum ingredients generating polarization and symmetry breaking within cells. More generally, these results show how magnetic nanoparticles and magnetogenetic tools can be used to control the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling pathways. PMID:24111679

  7. The protein kinase LKB1 negatively regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erna; Edlund, Karolina; Kahata, Kaoru; Zieba, Agata; Morén, Anita; Watanabe, Yukihide; Voytyuk, Iryna; Botling, Johan; Söderberg, Ola; Micke, Patrick; Pyrowolakis, George; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase LKB1 regulates cell metabolism and growth and is implicated in intestinal and lung cancer. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates cell differentiation during development and tissue homeostasis. We demonstrate that LKB1 physically interacts with BMP type I receptors and requires Smad7 to promote downregulation of the receptor. Accordingly, LKB1 suppresses BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation and affects BMP signaling in Drosophila wing longitudinal vein morphogenesis. LKB1 protein expression and Smad1 phosphorylation analysis in a cohort of non-small cell lung cancer patients demonstrated a negative correlation predominantly in a subset enriched in adenocarcinomas. Lung cancer patient data analysis indicated strong correlation between LKB1 loss-of-function mutations and high BMP2 expression, and these two events further correlated with expression of a gene subset functionally linked to apoptosis and migration. This new mechanism of BMP receptor regulation by LKB1 has ramifications in physiological organogenesis and disease. PMID:26701726

  8. [Contractile proteins in chemical signal transduction in plant microspores].

    PubMed

    Roshchina, V V

    2005-01-01

    Involvement of contractile components in chemical signal transduction from the cell surface to the organelles was studied using unicellular systems. Neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin as well as active forms of oxygen hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl peroxide were used as chemical signals. Experiments were carried out on vegetative microspores of field horsetail Equisetum arvense and generative microspores (pollen) of amaryllis Hippeastrum hybridum treated with cytochalasin B (an inhibitor of actin polymerization in microfilaments), colchicine, and vinblastine (inhibitors of tubulin polymerization in microtubules). Both types of thus treated microspores demonstrated suppressed development, particularly, for cytochalasin B treatment. At the same time, an increased typical blue fluorescence of certain cell regions (along the cell wall and around nuclei and chloroplasts) where the corresponding contractile proteins could reside was observed. In contrast to anticontractile agents, dopamine, serotonin B, and the peroxides stimulated microspore germination. Microspore pretreatment with cytochalasin B and colchicine followed by the treatment with serotonin, dopamine, or the peroxides decreased the germination rate. Involvement of actin and tubulin in chemical signal transduction from the cell surface to the nucleus is proposed. PMID:16004258

  9. Agouti C57BL/6N embryonic stem cells for mouse genetic resources

    PubMed Central

    Pettitt, Stephen J.; Liang, Qi; Rairdan, Xin Y.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Prosser, Haydn M.; Beier, David R.; Lloyd, Kent; Bradley, Allan; Skarnes, William C.

    2010-01-01

    We report the characterization of a highly germline competent C57BL/6N mouse embryonic stem cell line, JM8. To simplify breeding schemes, the dominant Agouti coat color gene was restored in JM8 cells by targeted repair of the C57BL/6 nonagouti mutation. These cells provide a robust foundation for large-scale mouse knockout programs that aim to provide a public resource of targeted mutations in the C57BL/6 genetic background. PMID:19525957

  10. Morphological and morphometric characterization of agoutis' peripheral blood cells (Dasyprocta prymnolopha, Wagler, 1831) raised in captivity.

    PubMed

    Conde Júnior, Airton Mendes; De Moura Fortes, Eunice Anita; De Menezes, Danilo José Ayres; De Oliveira Lopes, Luana; De Carvalho, Maria Acelina Martins

    2012-03-01

    Thirty adult agoutis (Dasyprocta primnolopha) from the Nucleus of Study and Preservation of Wild Animals at the Federal University of Piauí were used. Blood scrubs of these animals were colored by the Leishman method and analyzed in light microscopy. The cells had been measured using programs that analyze images (Leica QWin - Image Processing and Analysis Software). Mature erythrocytes, basophil reticulocytes, lymphocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes, and thrombocytes were identified. Agoutis' erythrocytes presented elliptical form, without nucleus with an average diameter of 5.64 micromeres ± 0.38. The lymphocytes are spherical cells with scarce cytoplasm, dense and with a very centralized rounded nucleus measuring an average diameter of 13.20 micromeres ± 0.35. The monocytes are slightly basophilic, with a spherical nucleus, central constriction, and an average diameter of 20.59 micromeres ± 0.32. The neutrophils are spherical, with a polymorphic lobulated nucleus, with an average diameter of 11.2 micromeres ± 0.20. The eosinophils are spherical with lobulated nucleus and with an average diameter of 14.25 micromeres ± 0.36. Only five basophils were observed, with abundance of cytoplasmic granules with 9.8 micrometers of diameter ± 0.30. Thrombocytopenic pleomorphism was frequent. There were similarities in the cellular constituents in peripheral blood of agoutis and of other rodents and humans. The cellular types from the peripheral blood, the morphology, and morphometry of the blood's cells did not vary according to sex. PMID:21898666

  11. Role of PDZ Proteins in Regulating Trafficking, Signaling, and Function of GPCRs: Means, Motif, and Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Guillermo; von Zastrow, Mark; Friedman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    PDZ proteins, named for the common structural domain shared by the postsynaptic density protein (PSD95), Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor (DlgA), and zonula occludens-1 protein (ZO-1), constitute a family of 200–300 recognized members. These cytoplasmic adapter proteins are capable of assembling a variety of membrane-associated proteins and signaling molecules in short-lived functional units. Here, we review PDZ proteins that participate in the regulation of signaling, trafficking, and function of G protein-coupled receptors. Salient structural features of PDZ proteins that allow them to recognize targeted GPCRs are considered. Scaffolding proteins harboring PDZ domains may contain single or multiple PDZ modules and may also include other protein–protein interaction modules. PDZ proteins may impact receptor signaling by diverse mechanisms that include retaining the receptor at the cell membrane, thereby increasing the duration of ligand binding, as well as importantly influencing GPCR internalization, trafficking, recycling, and intracellular sorting. PDZ proteins are also capable of modifying the assembled complex of accessory proteins such as β-arrestins that themselves regulate GPCR signaling. Additionally, PDZ proteins may modulate GPCR signaling by altering the G protein to which the receptor binds, or affect other regulatory proteins that impact GTPase activity, protein kinase A, phospholipase C, or modify downstream signaling events. Small molecules targeting the PDZ protein-GPCR interaction are being developed and may become important and selective drug candidates. PMID:21907913

  12. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 6 (RGS6) Protein Ensures Coordination of Motor Movement by Modulating GABAB Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; Yang, Jianqi; Loo, Lipin; Sheff, David; Shepherd, Andrew J.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2012-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons located within the cerebellar cortex limits the extent of neuronal excitation in part through activation of metabotropic GABAB receptors. Stimulation of these receptors triggers a number of downstream signaling events, including activation of GIRK channels by the Gβγ dimer resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and inhibition of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic sites. Here, we identify RGS6, a member of the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins, as a key regulator of GABABR signaling in cerebellum. RGS6 is enriched in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum along with neuronal GIRK channel subunits 1 and 2 where RGS6 forms a complex with known binding partners Gβ5 and R7BP. Mice lacking RGS6 exhibit abnormal gait and ataxia characterized by impaired rotarod performance improved by treatment with a GABABR antagonist. RGS6−/− mice administered baclofen also showed exaggerated motor coordination deficits compared with their wild-type counterparts. Isolated cerebellar neurons natively expressed RGS6, GABABR, and GIRK channel subunits, and cerebellar granule neurons from RGS6−/− mice showed a significant delay in the deactivation kinetics of baclofen-induced GIRK channel currents. These results establish RGS6 as a key component of GABABR signaling and represent the first demonstration of an essential role for modulatory actions of RGS proteins in adult cerebellum. Dysregulation of RGS6 expression in human patients could potentially contribute to loss of motor coordination and, thus, pharmacological manipulation of RGS6 levels might represent a viable means to treat patients with ataxias of cerebellar origin. PMID:22179605

  13. Regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6) protein ensures coordination of motor movement by modulating GABAB receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; Yang, Jianqi; Loo, Lipin; Sheff, David; Shepherd, Andrew J; Mohapatra, Durga P; Fisher, Rory A

    2012-02-10

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons located within the cerebellar cortex limits the extent of neuronal excitation in part through activation of metabotropic GABA(B) receptors. Stimulation of these receptors triggers a number of downstream signaling events, including activation of GIRK channels by the Gβγ dimer resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and inhibition of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic sites. Here, we identify RGS6, a member of the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins, as a key regulator of GABA(B)R signaling in cerebellum. RGS6 is enriched in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum along with neuronal GIRK channel subunits 1 and 2 where RGS6 forms a complex with known binding partners Gβ(5) and R7BP. Mice lacking RGS6 exhibit abnormal gait and ataxia characterized by impaired rotarod performance improved by treatment with a GABA(B)R antagonist. RGS6(-/-) mice administered baclofen also showed exaggerated motor coordination deficits compared with their wild-type counterparts. Isolated cerebellar neurons natively expressed RGS6, GABA(B)R, and GIRK channel subunits, and cerebellar granule neurons from RGS6(-/-) mice showed a significant delay in the deactivation kinetics of baclofen-induced GIRK channel currents. These results establish RGS6 as a key component of GABA(B)R signaling and represent the first demonstration of an essential role for modulatory actions of RGS proteins in adult cerebellum. Dysregulation of RGS6 expression in human patients could potentially contribute to loss of motor coordination and, thus, pharmacological manipulation of RGS6 levels might represent a viable means to treat patients with ataxias of cerebellar origin. PMID:22179605

  14. Structure of the signal transduction protein TRAP (target of RNAIII-activating protein)

    PubMed Central

    Henrick, Kim; Hirshberg, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the signal transduction protein TRAP is reported at 1.85 Å resolution. The structure of TRAP consists of a central eight-stranded β-­barrel flanked asymmetrically by helices and is monomeric both in solution and in the crystal structure. A formate ion was found bound to TRAP identically in all four molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:22750855

  15. Biological implications of SNPs in signal peptide domains of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Savas, Sevtap; Pabalan, Noel; Dennis, James W; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2008-02-01

    Proteins destined for secretion or membrane compartments possess signal peptides for insertion into the membrane. The signal peptide is therefore critical for localization and function of cell surface receptors and ligands that mediate cell-cell communication. About 4% of all human proteins listed in UniProt database have signal peptide domains in their N terminals. A comprehensive literature survey was performed to retrieve functional and disease associated genetic variants in the signal peptide domains of human proteins. In 21 human proteins we have identified 26 disease associated mutations within their signal peptide domains, 14 mutations of which have been experimentally shown to impair the signal peptide function and thus influence protein transportation. We took advantage of SignalP 3.0 predictions to characterize the signal peptide prediction score differences between the mutant and the wild-type alleles of each mutation, as well as 189 previously uncharacterized single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found to be located in the signal peptide domains of 165 human proteins. Comparisons of signal peptide prediction outcomes of mutations and SNPs, have implicated SNPs potentially impacting the signal peptide function, and thus the cellular localization of the human proteins. The majority of the top candidate proteins represented membrane and secreted proteins that are associated with molecular transport, cell signaling and cell to cell interaction processes of the cell. This is the first study that systematically characterizes genetic variation occurring in the signal peptides of all human proteins. This study represents a useful strategy for prioritization of SNPs occurring within the signal peptide domains of human proteins. Functional evaluation of candidates identified herein may reveal effects on major cellular processes including immune cell function, cell recognition and adhesion, and signal transduction. PMID:17680692

  16. Interleukin 2 signaling involves the phosphorylation of Stat proteins.

    PubMed

    Frank, D A; Robertson, M J; Bonni, A; Ritz, J; Greenberg, M E

    1995-08-15

    One of the most important cytokines involved in immune response regulation is interleukin 2 (IL-2), a potent activator of the proliferation and function of T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. The mechanisms by which the effects of IL-2 are propagated within cells are not understood. While the binding of IL-2 to its receptor was recently shown to lead to the activation of two kinases, Jak-1 and Jak-3, subsequent steps in the signaling pathway to the nucleus that lead to the activation of specific genes had not been characterized. Since many cytokines that activate Jak kinases also lead to the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of members of the Stat family of transcription factors, the ability of IL-2 to trigger Stat phosphorylation was examined. Exposure of activated human T lymphocytes or of a natural killer cell line (NKL) to IL-2 leads to the phosphorylation of Stat1 alpha, Stat1 beta, and Stat3, as well as of two Stat-related proteins, p94 and p95. p94 and p95 share homology with Stat1 at the phosphorylation site and in the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain, but otherwise are immunologically distinct from Stat1. These Stat proteins were found to translocate to the nucleus and to bind to a specific DNA sequence. These findings suggest a mechanism by which IL-2 binding to its receptor may activate specific genes involved in immune cell function. PMID:7544001

  17. Competing G protein-coupled receptor kinases balance G protein and β-arrestin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heitzler, Domitille; Durand, Guillaume; Gallay, Nathalie; Rizk, Aurélien; Ahn, Seungkirl; Kim, Jihee; Violin, Jonathan D; Dupuy, Laurence; Gauthier, Christophe; Piketty, Vincent; Crépieux, Pascale; Poupon, Anne; Clément, Frédérique; Fages, François; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Reiter, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are involved in nearly all aspects of chemical communications and represent major drug targets. 7TMRs transmit their signals not only via heterotrimeric G proteins but also through β-arrestins, whose recruitment to the activated receptor is regulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this paper, we combined experimental approaches with computational modeling to decipher the molecular mechanisms as well as the hidden dynamics governing extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation by the angiotensin II type 1A receptor (AT1AR) in human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells. We built an abstracted ordinary differential equations (ODE)-based model that captured the available knowledge and experimental data. We inferred the unknown parameters by simultaneously fitting experimental data generated in both control and perturbed conditions. We demonstrate that, in addition to its well-established function in the desensitization of G-protein activation, GRK2 exerts a strong negative effect on β-arrestin-dependent signaling through its competition with GRK5 and 6 for receptor phosphorylation. Importantly, we experimentally confirmed the validity of this novel GRK2-dependent mechanism in both primary vascular smooth muscle cells naturally expressing the AT1AR, and HEK293 cells expressing other 7TMRs. PMID:22735336

  18. Regulators of G-protein signaling accelerate GPCR signaling kinetics and govern sensitivity solely by accelerating GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Nevin A; Johnston, Christopher A; Cappell, Steven D; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Kimple, Adam J; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2010-04-13

    G-protein heterotrimers, composed of a guanine nucleotide-binding G alpha subunit and an obligate G betagamma dimer, regulate signal transduction pathways by cycling between GDP- and GTP-bound states. Signal deactivation is achieved by G alpha-mediated GTP hydrolysis (GTPase activity) which is enhanced by the GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity of "regulator of G-protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. In a cellular context, RGS proteins have also been shown to speed up the onset of signaling, and to accelerate deactivation without changing amplitude or sensitivity of the signal. This latter paradoxical activity has been variably attributed to GAP/enzymatic or non-GAP/scaffolding functions of these proteins. Here, we validated and exploited a G alpha switch-region point mutation, known to engender increased GTPase activity, to mimic in cis the GAP function of RGS proteins. While the transition-state, GDP x AlF(4)(-)-bound conformation of the G202A mutant was found to be nearly identical to wild-type, G alpha(i1)(G202A) x GDP assumed a divergent conformation more closely resembling the GDP x AlF(4)(-)-bound state. When placed within Saccharomyces cerevisiae G alpha subunit Gpa1, the fast-hydrolysis mutation restored appropriate dose-response behaviors to pheromone signaling in the absence of RGS-mediated GAP activity. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) readout of heterotrimer activation with high temporal resolution revealed that fast intrinsic GTPase activity could recapitulate in cis the kinetic sharpening (increased onset and deactivation rates) and blunting of sensitivity also engendered by RGS protein action in trans. Thus G alpha-directed GAP activity, the first biochemical function ascribed to RGS proteins, is sufficient to explain the activation kinetics and agonist sensitivity observed from G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in a cellular context. PMID:20351284

  19. Interactions of signaling proteins, growth factors and other proteins with heparan sulfate: mechanisms and mysteries.

    PubMed

    Billings, Paul C; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans (HSPGs) that, collectively, play crucial roles in many physiologic processes including cell differentiation, organ morphogenesis and cancer. A key function of HS is to bind and interact with signaling proteins, growth factors, plasma proteins, immune-modulators and other factors. In doing so, the HS chains and HSPGs are able to regulate protein distribution, bio-availability and action on target cells and can also serve as cell surface co-receptors, facilitating ligand-receptor interactions. These proteins contain an HS/heparin-binding domain (HBD) that mediates their association and contacts with HS. HBDs are highly diverse in sequence and predicted structure, contain clusters of basic amino acids (Lys and Arg) and possess an overall net positive charge, most often within a consensus Cardin-Weintraub (CW) motif. Interestingly, other domains and residues are now known to influence protein-HS interactions, as well as interactions with other glycosaminoglycans, such as chondroitin sulfate. In this review, we provide a description and analysis of HBDs in proteins including amphiregulin, fibroblast growth factor family members, heparanase, sclerostin and hedgehog protein family members. We discuss HBD structural and functional features and important roles carried out by other protein domains, and also provide novel conformational insights into the diversity of CW motifs present in Sonic, Indian and Desert hedgehogs. Finally, we review progress in understanding the pathogenesis of a rare pediatric skeletal disorder, Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME), characterized by HS deficiency and cartilage tumor formation. Advances in understanding protein-HS interactions will have broad implications for basic biology and translational medicine as well as for the development of HS-based therapeutics. PMID:26076122

  20. HBV X protein interacts with cytoskeletal signaling proteins through SH3 binding.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huixing; Tan, Tuan Lin; Niu, Dandan; Chen, Wei Ning

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between cellular SH3-containing proteins and the proline-rich domain in Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) The proline-rich domain of HBx (amino acids 19-58) as well as the relevant site-directed mutagenesis (proline to alanine residues) were cloned into pGEX-5X-1 and expressed as GST-PXXP and GST-AXXA probes. Panomics SH3 domain arrays were probed using both GST-PXXP and GST-AXXA to identify potential interacting SH3 domain containing proteins. The specific interactions were confirmed by the immunoprecipitation of the full-length SH3 domain-containing protein. We report here the binding assay which demonstrated interaction between PXXP domain in HBx and the SH3-domain containing proteins, in particular various signaling proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization. Our findings were consistent with similar virus-host interactions via SH3 binding for other viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Further characterization of the proline-rich binding to SH3 domains could yield important information for the design of novel therapeutic measures against downstream disease causative effects of HBx in the liver cells. PMID:20036864

  1. Maternal epigenetics and methyl supplements affect agouti gene expression in A{sup vy}/a mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, G.L.

    1998-08-01

    Viable yellow (A{sup vy}/a) mice are larger, obese, hyperinsulinemic, more susceptible to cancer, and, on average, shorter lived than their non-yellow siblings. They are epigenetic mosaics ranging from a yellow phenotype with maximum ectopic agouti overexpression, through a continuum of mottled agouti/yellow phenotypes with partial agouti overexpression, to a pseudoagouti phenotype with minimal ectopic expression. Pseudoagouti A{sup vy}/a mice are lean, healthy, and longer lived than their yellow siblings. Here the authors report that feeding pregnant black a/a dams methyl-supplemented diets alters epigenetic regulation of agouti expression in their offspring, as indicated by increased agouti/black mottling in the direction of the pseudoagouti phenotype. They also present confirmatory evidence that epigenetic phenotypes are maternally heritable. Thus A{sup vy} expression, already known to be modulated by imprinting, strain-specific modification, and maternal epigenetic inheritance, is also modulated by maternal diet. These observations suggest, at least in this special case, that maternal dietary supplementation may positively affect health and longevity of the offspring. Therefore, this experimental system should be useful for identifying maternal factors that modulate epigenetic mechanisms, especially DNA methylation, in developing embryos.

  2. Sequential processing of hepatitis C virus core protein by host cell signal peptidase and signal peptide peptidase: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Pène, V; Hernandez, C; Vauloup-Fellous, C; Garaud-Aunis, J; Rosenberg, A R

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is believed to play critical roles in the virus morphogenesis and pathogenesis. In HCV polyprotein, core protein terminates with a signal peptide followed by E1 envelope protein. It has remained unclear whether cleavage by host cell signal peptidase (SP) at the core-E1 junction to generate the complete form of core protein, which is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, is absolutely required for cleavage within the signal peptide by host cell signal peptide peptidase (SPP) to liberate the mature form of core protein, which is then free for trafficking to lipid droplets. In this study, the possible sources of disagreement in published reports have been examined, and we conclude that a product generated upon inhibition of SP-catalysed cleavage at the core-E1 junction in heterologous expression systems was incorrectly identified as mature core protein. Moreover, inhibition of this cleavage in the most relevant model of human hepatoma cells replicating a full-length HCV genome was shown to abolish interaction of core protein with lipid droplets and production of infectious progeny virus. These results firmly establish that SPP-catalysed liberation of mature core protein is absolutely dependent on prior cleavage by SP at the correct core-E1 site to generate the complete form of core protein, consistent with this obligatory order of processing playing a role in HCV infectious cycle. PMID:19281487

  3. Mechanism of 2-oxoglutarate signaling by the Synechococcus elongatus PII signal transduction protein

    PubMed Central

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Chellamuthu, Vasuki-Ranjani; Forchhammer, Karl; Zeth, Kornelius

    2010-01-01

    PII proteins control key processes of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria, archaea, and plants in response to the central metabolites ATP, ADP, and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), signaling cellular energy and carbon and nitrogen abundance. This metabolic information is integrated by PII and transmitted to regulatory targets (key enzymes, transporters, and transcription factors), modulating their activity. In oxygenic phototrophs, the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-glutamate kinase (NAGK), is a major PII target, whose activity responds to 2-OG via PII. Here we show structures of the Synechococcus elongatus PII protein in complex with ATP, Mg2+, and 2-OG, which clarify how 2-OG affects PII–NAGK interaction. PII trimers with all three sites fully occupied were obtained as well as structures with one or two 2-OG molecules per PII trimer. These structures identify the site of 2-OG located in the vicinity between the subunit clefts and the base of the T loop. The 2-OG is bound to a Mg2+ ion, which is coordinated by three phosphates of ATP, and by ionic interactions with the highly conserved residues K58 and Q39 together with B- and T-loop backbone interactions. These interactions impose a unique T-loop conformation that affects the interactions with the PII target. Structures of PII trimers with one or two bound 2-OG molecules reveal the basis for anticooperative 2-OG binding and shed light on the intersubunit signaling mechanism by which PII senses effectors in a wide range of concentrations. PMID:21041661

  4. Mechanism of 2-oxoglutarate signaling by the Synechococcus elongatus PII signal transduction protein.

    PubMed

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Chellamuthu, Vasuki-Ranjani; Forchhammer, Karl; Zeth, Kornelius

    2010-11-16

    P(II) proteins control key processes of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria, archaea, and plants in response to the central metabolites ATP, ADP, and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), signaling cellular energy and carbon and nitrogen abundance. This metabolic information is integrated by P(II) and transmitted to regulatory targets (key enzymes, transporters, and transcription factors), modulating their activity. In oxygenic phototrophs, the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-glutamate kinase (NAGK), is a major P(II) target, whose activity responds to 2-OG via P(II). Here we show structures of the Synechococcus elongatus P(II) protein in complex with ATP, Mg(2+), and 2-OG, which clarify how 2-OG affects P(II)-NAGK interaction. P(II) trimers with all three sites fully occupied were obtained as well as structures with one or two 2-OG molecules per P(II) trimer. These structures identify the site of 2-OG located in the vicinity between the subunit clefts and the base of the T loop. The 2-OG is bound to a Mg(2+) ion, which is coordinated by three phosphates of ATP, and by ionic interactions with the highly conserved residues K58 and Q39 together with B- and T-loop backbone interactions. These interactions impose a unique T-loop conformation that affects the interactions with the P(II) target. Structures of P(II) trimers with one or two bound 2-OG molecules reveal the basis for anticooperative 2-OG binding and shed light on the intersubunit signaling mechanism by which P(II) senses effectors in a wide range of concentrations. PMID:21041661

  5. Molecular basis of the pleiotropic phenotype of mice carrying the hypervariable yellow (A{sup hvy}) mutation at the agouti locus

    SciTech Connect

    Argeson, A.C.; Nelson, K.K.; Siracusa, L.D.

    1996-02-01

    The murine agouti locus regulates a switch in pigment synthesis between eumelanin (black/brown pigment) and phaeomelanin (yellow/red pigment) by hair bulb melanocytes. We recently described a spontaneous mutation, hypervariable yellow (A{sup hvy}) and demonstrated that A{sup hvy} is responsible for the largest range of phenotypes yet identified at the agouti locus, producing mice that are obese with yellow coats to mice that are of normal weight with black coats. Here, we show that agouti expression is altered both temporally and spatially in A{sup hvy} mutants. Agouti expression levels are positively correlated with the degree of yellow pigmentation in individual A{sup hvy} mice, consistent with results from other dominant yellow agouti mutations. Sequencing of 5{prime} RACE and genomic PCR products revealed that A{sup hvy} resulted from the integration of an intracisternal A particle (IAP) in an antisense orientation within the 5{prime} untranslated agouti exon 1C. This retrovirus-like element is responsible for deregulating agouti expression in A{sup hvy} mice; agouti expression is correlated with the methylation state of CpG residues in the IAP long terminal repeat as well as in host genomic DNA. In addition, the data suggest that the variable phenotype of A{sup hvy} offspring is influenced in part by the phenotype of their A{sup hvy} female parent. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Signal Recognition Particle and SecA Cooperate during Export of Secretory Proteins with Highly Hydrophobic Signal Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufan; Ueda, Takuya; Müller, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The Sec translocon of bacterial plasma membranes mediates the linear translocation of secretory proteins as well as the lateral integration of membrane proteins. Integration of many membrane proteins occurs co-translationally via the signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent targeting of ribosome-associated nascent chains to the Sec translocon. In contrast, translocation of classical secretory proteins across the Sec translocon is a post-translational event requiring no SRP but the motor protein SecA. Secretory proteins were, however, reported to utilize SRP in addition to SecA, if the hydrophobicity of their signal sequences exceeds a certain threshold value. Here we have analyzed transport of this subgroup of secretory proteins across the Sec translocon employing an entirely defined in vitro system. We thus found SecA to be both necessary and sufficient for translocation of secretory proteins with hydrophobic signal sequences, whereas SRP and its receptor improved translocation efficiency. This SRP-mediated boost of translocation is likely due to the early capture of the hydrophobic signal sequence by SRP as revealed by site-specific photo cross-linking of ribosome nascent chain complexes. PMID:24717922

  7. Signal-transducing protein phosphorylation cascades mediated by Ras/Rho proteins in the mammalian cell: the potential for multiplex signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Denhardt, D T

    1996-01-01

    The features of three distinct protein phosphorylation cascades in mammalian cells are becoming clear. These signalling pathways link receptor-mediated events at the cell surface or intracellular perturbations such as DNA damage to changes in cytoskeletal structure, vesicle transport and altered transcription factor activity. The best known pathway, the Ras-->Raf-->MEK-->ERK cascade [where ERK is extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and MEK is mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase/ERK kinase], is typically stimulated strongly by mitogens and growth factors. The other two pathways, stimulated primarily by assorted cytokines, hormones and various forms of stress, predominantly utilize p21 proteins of the Rho family (Rho, Rac and CDC42), although Ras can also participate. Diagnostic of each pathway is the MAP kinase component, which is phosphorylated by a unique dual-specificity kinase on both tyrosine and threonine in one of three motifs (Thr-Glu-Tyr, Thr-Phe-Tyr or Thr-Gly-Tyr), depending upon the pathway. In addition to activating one or more protein phosphorylation cascades, the initiating stimulus may also mobilize a variety of other signalling molecules (e.g. protein kinase C isoforms, phospholipid kinases, G-protein alpha and beta gamma subunits, phospholipases, intracellular Ca2+). These various signals impact to a greater or lesser extent on multiple downstream effectors. Important concepts are that signal transmission often entails the targeted relocation of specific proteins in the cell, and the reversible formation of protein complexes by means of regulated protein phosphorylation. The signalling circuits may be completed by the phosphorylation of upstream effectors by downstream kinases, resulting in a modulation of the signal. Signalling is terminated and the components returned to the ground state largely by dephosphorylation. There is an indeterminant amount of cross-talk among the pathways, and many of the proteins in the pathways belong to families

  8. Structural and ultrastructural features of the agouti tongue (Dasyprocta aguti Linnaeus, 1766)

    PubMed Central

    Ciena, Adriano Polican; Bolina, Cristina de Sousa; de Almeida, Sonia Regina Yokomizo; Rici, Rose Eli Grassi; de Oliveira, Moacir Franco; da da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Watanabe, Ii-sei

    2013-01-01

    The agouti (Dasyprocta aguti Linnaeus, 1766) is a wild rodent belonging to the family Dasyproctidae that is found throughout Brazil and feeds on fruits and seeds. The aim of the present study was to describe the following features of the tongue of agouti: its morphological structures, the three-dimensional characteristics of the lingual papillae surface, the connective tissue cores (CTCs) and the epithelial cell ultrastructure. Four types of papillae were observed on the dorsal surface of the tongue with a triangular shape: filiform, fungiform, foliate and vallate. Filiform papillae were distributed throughout the tongue surface, and removal of the epithelial surface revealed conical CTCs and multifilaments. Fungiform papillae were observed in the rostral and middle regions, whereas foliate papillae developed in pairs on the lateral margin of the caudal region. Removal of the epithelium in these regions revealed CTCs with parallel laminar conformation. Vallate papillae were arranged in a V-shape in the caudal region, and their CTCs ranged in shape from elongate to ovoid. The ultrastructural components of the dorsal epithelium were the basal, spinous, granular and keratinised layers. A broad area with cytoplasmic projections was identified in the interface region between the lamina propria and the basal layer. Flattened cells with intermediate filaments were observed in the transitional region between spinous and granular layers. The keratinised layer was composed of superimposed epithelial cells where desmosomes and cell-surface microridges were observed. These structural features, including the three-dimensional aspects of the lingual papillae, the CTCs and the epithelial ultrastructure, indicate that when compared with other animals, particularly other rodent species, the morphological features of the tongue of agouti are relatively well developed, especially regarding foliate and vallate papillae. PMID:23701183

  9. MECHANISTIC PATHWAYS AND BIOLOGICAL ROLES FOR RECEPTOR-INDEPENDENT ACTIVATORS OF G-PROTEIN SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Blumer, Joe B.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Lanier, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Signal processing via heterotrimeric G-proteins in response to cell surface receptors is a central and much investigated aspect of how cells integrate cellular stimuli to produce coordinated biological responses. The system is a target of numerous therapeutic agents, plays an important role in adaptive processes of organs, and aberrant processing of signals through these transducing systems is a component of various disease states. In addition to GPCR-mediated activation of G-protein signaling, nature has evolved creative ways to manipulate and utilize the Gαβγ heterotrimer or Gα and Gαβγ subunits independent of the cell surface receptor stimuli. In such situations, the G-protein subunits (Gα and Gαβγ) may actually be complexed with alternative binding partners independent of the typical heterotrimeric Gαβγ. Such regulatory accessory proteins include the family of RGS proteins that accelerate the GTPase activity of Gα and various entities that influence nucleotide binding properties and/or subunit interaction. The latter group of proteins includes receptor independent activators of G-protein signaling or AGS proteins that play surprising roles in signal processing. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge regarding AGS proteins. AGS proteins are indicative of a growing number of accessory proteins that influence signal propagation, facilitate cross talk between various types of signaling pathways and provide a platform for diverse functions of both the heterotrimeric Gαβγ and the individual Gα and Gαβγ subunits. PMID:17240454

  10. [Methyl-containing diet of mothers affects the AGOUTI gene expression in the offspring of rats with various behavioral types].

    PubMed

    Prasolova, L A; Os'kina, I N; Pliusnina, I Z; Trut, L N

    2009-05-01

    The effects of selection of agouti rats (with genotype AAHH) on the tame and aggressive behavior and dietary methyl given to females from the eighth day of pregnancy to the fifth day after the birth of the offspring on the intensity of the agouti coat color in the offspring have been studied. The morphometric parameters of hair determining the darkness of the agouti color (the total length of guard hairs, the lengths of their eumelanin end and pheomelanin band, the ratio between the lengths of the eumelanin and pheomelanin portions of the hair, the total length of the awn hairs, and the relative length of their widened "lanceolate" upper end) have been compared. It has been found that selection of agouti rats for aggressive behavior is accompanied by darkening of the coat color compared to tame rats due to an increase in the ratio of the length of the black eumelanin end of the guard hairs to the length of the yellow pheomelanin band. Methyl-containing additives to the diet of females affect the intensity of the agouti coat color in the offsprings with both types of behavior, but to different extents. Aggressive offspring is more sensitive to the mother's methyl-containing diet: the percentage of animals that are darker than control rats is higher among aggressive animals than among tame ones due to a greater increase in the ratio between dark and light portions of hairs. The possible mechanisms of differences in the phenotypic modifications of coat color in control and experimental agouti rats with different types of behavior are discussed. PMID:19534427

  11. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. PMID:26691180

  12. Functional Reconstitution of an Atypical G Protein Heterotrimer and Regulator of G Protein Signaling Protein (RGS1) from Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Janice C.; Temple, Brenda R. S.; Jones, Alan M.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that animal heterotrimeric Gαβγ proteins are activated by cell-surface receptors that promote GTP binding to the Gα subunit and dissociation of the heterotrimer. In contrast, the Gα protein from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtGPA1) can activate itself without a receptor or other exchange factor. It is unknown how AtGPA1 is regulated by Gβγ and the RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) protein AtRGS1, which is comprised of an RGS domain fused to a receptor-like domain. To better understand the cycle of G protein activation and inactivation in plants, we purified and reconstituted AtGPA1, full-length AtRGS1, and two putative Gβγ dimers. We show that the Arabidopsis Gα protein binds to its cognate Gβγ dimer directly and in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Although animal Gβγ dimers inhibit GTP binding to the Gα subunit, AtGPA1 retains fast activation in the presence of its cognate Gβγ dimer. We show further that the full-length AtRGS1 protein accelerates GTP hydrolysis and thereby counteracts the fast nucleotide exchange rate of AtGPA1. Finally, we show that AtGPA1 is less stable in complex with GDP than in complex with GTP or the Gβγ dimer. Molecular dynamics simulations and biophysical studies reveal that altered stability is likely due to increased dynamic motion in the N-terminal α-helix and Switch II of AtGPA1. Thus, despite profound differences in the mechanisms of activation, the Arabidopsis G protein is readily inactivated by its cognate RGS protein and forms a stable, GDP-bound, heterotrimeric complex similar to that found in animals. PMID:21325279

  13. A sweet cycle for Arabidopsis G-proteins: Recent discoveries and controversies in plant G-protein signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher A; Willard, Melinda D; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2008-12-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are a class of signal transduction proteins highly conserved throughout evolution that serve as dynamic molecular switches regulating the intracellular communication initiated by extracellular signals including sensory information. This property is achieved by a guanine nucleotide cycle wherein the inactive, signaling-incompetent Galpha subunit is normally bound to GDP; activation to signaling-competent Galpha occurs through the exchange of GDP for GTP (typically catalyzed via seven-transmembrane domain G-protein coupled receptors [GPCRs]), which dissociates the Gbetagamma dimer from Galpha-GTP and initiates signal transduction. The hydrolysis of GTP, greatly accelerated by "Regulator of G-protein Signaling" (RGS) proteins, returns Galpha to its inactive GDP-bound form and terminates signaling. Through extensive characterization of mammalian Galpha isoforms, the rate-limiting step in this cycle is currently considered to be the GDP/GTP exchange rate, which can be orders of magnitude slower than the GTP hydrolysis rate. However, we have recently demonstrated that, in Arabidopsis, the guanine nucleotide cycle appears to be limited by the rate of GTP hydrolysis rather than nucleotide exchange. This finding has important implications for the mechanism of sugar sensing in Arabidopsis. We also discuss these data on Arabidopsis G-protein nucleotide cycling in relation to recent reports of putative plant GPCRs and heterotrimeric G-protein effectors in Arabidopsis. PMID:19513240

  14. Regulation of the LPA2 Receptor Signaling through the Carboxyl-Terminal Tail-Mediated Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fang-Tsyr; Lai, Yun-Ju

    2008-01-01

    While it is well known that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediates diverse physiological and pathophysiological responses through the activation of G protein-coupled LPA receptors, the specificity and molecular mechanisms by which different LPA receptors mediate these biological responses remain largely unknown. Recent identification of several PDZ proteins and zinc finger proteins that interact with the carboxyl-terminal tail of the LPA2 receptor provides a considerable progress towards the understanding of the mechanisms how the LPA2 receptor specifically mediates LPA signaling pathways. These findings have led to the proposal that there are at least two distinct protein interaction motifs present in the carboxyl terminus of the LPA2 receptor. Together, these data provide a new concept that the efficiency and specificity of the LPA2 receptor-mediated signal transduction can be achieved through the cross-regulation between the classical G protein-activated signaling cascades and the interacting partner-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:18501721

  15. Harmine promotes osteoblast differentiation through bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Lee, Ji-Won; Hibino, Ayaka; Asai, Midori; Hojo, Hironori; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Nagai, Kazuo; Chung, Ung-Il; Yagasaki, Kazumi; and others

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Harmine promotes the activity and mRNA expression of ALP. {yields} Harmine enhances the expressions of osteocalcin mRNA and protein. {yields} Harmine induces osteoblastic mineralization. {yields} Harmine upregulates the mRNA expressions of BMPs, Runx2 and Osterix. {yields} BMP signaling pathways are involved in the actions of harmine. -- Abstract: Bone mass is regulated by osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. We previously reported that harmine, a {beta}-carboline alkaloid, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of harmine on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. Harmine promoted alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in MC3T3-E1 cells without affecting their proliferation. Harmine also increased the mRNA expressions of the osteoblast marker genes ALP and Osteocalcin. Furthermore, the mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells was enhanced by treatment with harmine. Harmine also induced osteoblast differentiation in primary calvarial osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 cells. Structure-activity relationship studies using harmine-related {beta}-carboline alkaloids revealed that the C3-C4 double bond and 7-hydroxy or 7-methoxy group of harmine were important for its osteogenic activity. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist noggin and its receptor kinase inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 attenuated harmine-promoted ALP activity. In addition, harmine increased the mRNA expressions of Bmp-2, Bmp-4, Bmp-6, Bmp-7 and its target gene Id1. Harmine also enhanced the mRNA expressions of Runx2 and Osterix, which are key transcription factors in osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, BMP-responsive and Runx2-responsive reporters were activated by harmine treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that harmine enhances osteoblast differentiation probably by inducing the expressions of

  16. Predicting Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Signaling Propagation Interference on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyunghyun; Kim, Docyong; Ha, Suhyun; Lee, Doheon

    2015-01-01

    As pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (PD DDIs) could lead to severe adverse effects in patients, it is important to identify potential PD DDIs in drug development. The signaling starting from drug targets is propagated through protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. PD DDIs could occur by close interference on the same targets or within the same pathways as well as distant interference through cross-talking pathways. However, most of the previous approaches have considered only close interference by measuring distances between drug targets or comparing target neighbors. We have applied a random walk with restart algorithm to simulate signaling propagation from drug targets in order to capture the possibility of their distant interference. Cross validation with DrugBank and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG shows that the proposed method outperforms the previous methods significantly. We also provide a web service with which PD DDIs for drug pairs can be analyzed at http://biosoft.kaist.ac.kr/targetrw. PMID:26469276

  17. Alteration of Antiviral Signalling by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signalling Protein (MAVS)

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation is associated with diseases. As a type of genetic variation occurring with certain regularity and frequency, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is attracting more and more attention because of its great value for research and real-life application. Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a common adaptor molecule for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), which can recognize foreign RNA, including viral RNA, leading to the induction of type I interferons (IFNs). Therefore, MAVS is thought to be a crucial molecule in antiviral innate immunity. We speculated that genetic variation of MAVS may result in susceptibility to infectious diseases. To assess the risk of viral infection based on MAVS variation, we tested the effects of twelve non-synonymous MAVS coding-region SNPs from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database that result in amino acid substitutions. We found that five of these SNPs exhibited functional alterations. Additionally, four resulted in an inhibitory immune response, and one had the opposite effect. In total, 1,032 human genomic samples obtained from a mass examination were genotyped at these five SNPs. However, no homozygous or heterozygous variation was detected. We hypothesized that these five SNPs are not present in the Japanese population and that such MAVS variations may result in serious immune diseases. PMID:26954674

  18. Sorting and targeting of melanosomal membrane proteins: signals, pathways, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Setaluri, V

    2000-06-01

    Newly synthesized melanosomal proteins, like many other cellular proteins, traverse through a series of intracellular compartments en route to melanosomes. Entry and exit of proteins through these compartments is orchestrated by cellular sorting machinery that recognize specific sorting signals. Melanosomal membrane proteins begin their intracellular journey upon co-translational importation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The biosynthetic output of tyrosinase, the key melanogenic enzyme, appears to be regulated by quality-control events at the ER, the 'port of entry' to the secretory pathway. Following maturation in the ER and through the Golgi, the sorting of these proteins in the trans-Golgi network for intracellular retention and transport along endosome/lysosome pathway requires cytoplasmically exposed signals. A di-leucine motif, present in the cytoplasmic tails of most melanosomal proteins, and its interaction with adaptor protein (AP) complexes, specifically AP-3, are critical for these events. Defects in sorting signals and the cytosolic components that interact with these signals result in a number of murine coat color phenotypes and cause human pigmentary disorders. Thus, missense or frame-shift mutations that produce truncated tyrosinase lacking the melanosomal sorting signal(s) appear to be responsible for murine platinum coat color phenotypes and a proportion of human oculocutaneous albinism-1; mutations in AP-3 appear to be responsible for the mocha phenotype in mice and Hermansky-Pudlak-like syndrome in man. Additional signals and sorting steps downstream of AP-3 appear to be required for endosomal sorting and targeting proteins to melanosomes. Signals and mechanisms that sequester melanosomal proteins from endosomes/lysosomes are not understood. Potential candidates that mediate such processes include proteins encoded by lyst and pallid genes. The common occurrence of abnormalities in melanosomes in many storage-pool disorders suggests that

  19. Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) assembles with substrates and misfolded membrane proteins into distinct oligomeric complexes

    PubMed Central

    Schrul, Bianca; Kapp, Katja; Sinning, Irmgard; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    SPP (signal peptide peptidase) is an aspartyl intramembrane cleaving protease, which processes a subset of signal peptides, and is linked to the quality control of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) membrane proteins. We analysed SPP interactions with signal peptides and other membrane proteins by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We found that SPP interacts specifically and tightly with a large range of newly synthesized membrane proteins, including signal peptides, preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins, but not with all co-expressed type II membrane proteins. Signal peptides are trapped by the catalytically inactive SPP mutant SPPD/A. Preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins interact with both SPP and the SPPD/A mutant, and are not substrates for SPP-mediated intramembrane proteolysis. Proteins interacting with SPP are found in distinct complexes of different sizes. A signal peptide is mainly trapped in a 200 kDa SPP complex, whereas a preprotein is predominantly found in a 600 kDa SPP complex. A misfolded membrane protein is detected in 200, 400 and 600 kDa SPP complexes. We conclude that SPP not only processes signal peptides, but also collects preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins that are destined for disposal. PMID:20196774

  20. Identifying transient protein-protein interactions in EphB2 signaling by Blue Native PAGE and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Darie, Costel C.; Deinhardt, Katrin; Zhang, Guoan; Cardasis, Helene S.; Chao, Moses V.; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are proteins that upon ligand stimulation undergo dimerization and autophosphorylation. Eph receptors (EphRs) are RTKs that are found in different cell types, from both tissues that are developing and from mature tissues and play important roles in the development of the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system. EphRs also play roles in synapse formation, neural crest formation, angiogenesis and in remodeling the vascular system. Interaction of EphRs with their ephrin ligands leads to activation of signal transduction pathways and to formation of many transient protein-protein interactions that ultimately leads to cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the sequence of events at the molecular level is not well-understood. We used Blue Native PAGE (BN-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS) to analyze the transient protein-protein interactions that resulted from stimulation of EphB2 receptors by their ephrinB1-Fc ligands. We analyzed the phosphotyrosine-containing protein complexes immunoprecipitated (pY-IPs) from the cell lysates of both unstimulated (−) and ephrinB1-Fc-stimulated (+) NG108 cells. Our experiments allowed us to identify many signaling proteins, either known to be part of EphB2 signaling or new for this pathway, which are involved in transient protein-protein interactions upon ephrinB1-Fc stimulation. These data led us to investigate the roles in EphB2 signaling of proteins such as FAK, WAVEs, and Nischarin. PMID:21932443

  1. Interactions Among Different Devices and Electrical Stimulus on the Electroejaculation of Captive Agoutis (Dasyprocta leporina).

    PubMed

    Castelo, T S; Souza, A L P; Lima, G L; Peixoto, G C X; Campos, L B; Oliveira, M F; Silva, A R

    2015-06-01

    The interactions among different electroejaculation devices associated with serial or continuous stimuli were investigated to improve the efficiency of the electroejaculation for semen collection in agoutis. Ten sexually matured male Dasyprocta leporina were restrained by the intramuscular administration of xylazine-ketamine association. Each individual was randomly subjected to four electroejaculation protocols, by combining two devices (one presenting longitudinal electrodes emitting square waves and other presenting ring electrodes emitting sine waves) and two electrical stimuli protocols (serial or continuous). A total of 40 attempts for electroejaculation were conducted in agoutis, being 10 per treatment. The most efficient treatment in providing ejaculates containing sperm (p < 0.05) was that using and electroejaculator connected to a probe with ring electrodes and associated with serial stimuli (4/7; 57%). In spite of semen parameters obtained by sine waves were adequate for using the samples for assisted reproduction, higher values for sperm motility and functional membrane integrity were obtained in the use of the square wave, independently of the electric stimulation protocol used (p < 0.05). In conclusion, we verified that the use of a device presenting a probe with ring electrodes and emitting sine waves, associated with a serial stimuli protocol, improves the efficiency for semen obtaining by electroejaculation in adults D. leporina. PMID:25800458

  2. Comparison among different cryoprotectants for cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from agouti (Dasyprocta leporina).

    PubMed

    Castelo, T S; Silva, A M; Bezerra, L G P; Costa, C Y M; Lago, A E A; Bezerra, J A B; Campos, L B; Praxedes, E C G; Silva, A R

    2015-12-01

    We verify the effects of different cryoprotectants on the cryopreservation of agouti (Dasyprocta leporina) epididymal sperm. We used 16 pairs of testes-epididymis complexes of sexually mature animals. We immediately evaluated epididymal sperm obtained by retrograde flushing for concentration, motility, vigor, viability, osmotic response, and morphology. Samples were extended in a coconut water extender plus 20% egg yolk, containing glycerol, ethylene glycol, dimethylsulfoxide - DMSO, or dimethylformamide. Finally, samples were stored in 0.25 mL straws, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and thawed after one week, being reevaluated and assessed for membrane integrity using fluorescent probes. The higher values for postthawing sperm motility, vigor, and membrane integrity were achieved by the usage of glycerol, when compared to ethylene glycol and dimethylformamide (P < 0.05); however, no differences were found between glycerol and DMSO (P > 0.05). All cryoprotectants provided a similar effect on the preservation of sperm morphology, osmotic response, and viability (P > 0.05). Therefore, here onwards, there was testing of glycerol and DMSO at 3 and 6% concentrations using the same freezing-thawing protocol reported previously. As the main result, DMSO at 6% concentration provided a decrease in sperm parameters, as well as in the chromatin integrity and in the binding capability of sperm. In conclusion, glycerol 3 or 6% and DMSO 3% can be used as alternative cryoprotectants for agouti epididymal sperm cryopreservation. PMID:26408846

  3. Spatial and Temporal Aspects of Signaling by G-Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Martin J; Hofmann, Klaus Peter

    2015-09-01

    Signaling by G-protein-coupled receptors is often considered a uniform process, whereby a homogeneously activated proportion of randomly distributed receptors are activated under equilibrium conditions and produce homogeneous, steady-state intracellular signals. While this may be the case in some biologic systems, the example of rhodopsin with its strictly local single-quantum mode of function shows that homogeneity in space and time cannot be a general property of G-protein-coupled systems. Recent work has now revealed many other systems where such simplicity does not prevail. Instead, a plethora of mechanisms allows much more complex patterns of receptor activation and signaling: different mechanisms of protein-protein interaction; temporal changes under nonequilibrium conditions; localized receptor activation; and localized second messenger generation and degradation-all of which shape receptor-generated signals and permit the creation of multiple signal types. Here, we review the evidence for such pleiotropic receptor signaling in space and time. PMID:26184590

  4. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 17 as a Negative Modulator of GPCR Signaling in Multiple Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael P; Roman, David L

    2016-05-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins modulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling networks by terminating signals produced by active Gα subunits. RGS17, a member of the RZ subfamily of RGS proteins, is typically only expressed in appreciable amounts in the human central nervous system, but previous works have shown that RGS17 expression is selectively upregulated in a number of malignancies, including lung, breast, prostate, and hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, this upregulation of RGS17 is associated with a more aggressive cancer phenotype, as increased proliferation, migration, and invasion are observed. Conversely, decreased RGS17 expression diminishes the response of ovarian cancer cells to agents commonly used during chemotherapy. These somewhat contradictory roles of RGS17 in cancer highlight the need for selective, high-affinity inhibitors of RGS17 to use as chemical probes to further the understanding of RGS17 biology. Based on current evidence, these compounds could potentially have clinical utility as novel chemotherapeutics in the treatment of lung, prostate, breast, and liver cancers. Recent advances in screening technologies to identify potential inhibitors coupled with increasing knowledge of the structural requirements of RGS-Gα protein-protein interaction inhibitors make the future of drug discovery efforts targeting RGS17 promising. This review highlights recent findings related to RGS17 as both a canonical and atypical RGS protein, its role in various human disease states, and offers insights on small molecule inhibition of RGS17. PMID:26928451

  5. METHIONINE OXIDATION AND PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION: INTERACTIVE PARTNERS IN SIGNALING?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein phosphorylation can affect the activity, stability or localization of a protein and as result plays a broad role in regulation of processes ranging from metabolism to control of plant growth and development. One aspect of current interest in our lab is how protein kinases target their substr...

  6. Hypothalamic Agouti-Related Peptide mRNA is Elevated During Natural and Stress-Induced Anorexia.

    PubMed

    Dunn, I C; Wilson, P W; D'Eath, R B; Boswell, T

    2015-09-01

    As part of their natural lives, animals can undergo periods of voluntarily reduced food intake and body weight (i.e. animal anorexias) that are beneficial for survival or breeding, such as during territorial behaviour, hibernation, migration and incubation of eggs. For incubation, a change in the defended level of body weight or 'sliding set point' appears to be involved, although the neural mechanisms reponsible for this are unknown. We investigated how neuropeptide gene expression in the arcuate nucleus of the domestic chicken responded to a 60-70% voluntary reduction in food intake measured both after incubation and after an environmental stressor involving transfer to unfamiliar housing. We hypothesised that gene expression would not change in these circumstances because the reduced food intake and body weight represented a defended level in birds with free access to food. Unexpectedly, we observed increased gene expression of the orexigenic peptide agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in both incubating and transferred animals compared to controls. Also pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA was higher in incubating hens and significantly increased 6 days after exposure to the stressor. Conversely expression of neuropeptide Y and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene was unchanged in both experimental situations. We conclude that AgRP expression remains sensitive to the level of energy stores during natural anorexias, which is of adaptive advantage, although its normal orexigenic effects are over-ridden by inhibitory signals. In the case of stress-induced anorexia, increased POMC may contribute to this inhibitory role, whereas, for incubation, reduced feeding may also be associated with increased expression in the hypothalamus of the anorexigenic peptide vasoactive intestinal peptide. PMID:26017156

  7. New protein kinase and protein phosphatase families mediate signal transduction in bacterial catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Galinier, A; Kravanja, M; Engelmann, R; Hengstenberg, W; Kilhoffer, M C; Deutscher, J; Haiech, J

    1998-02-17

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is the prototype of a signal transduction mechanism. In enteric bacteria, cAMP was considered to be the second messenger in CCR by playing a role reminiscent of its actions in eukaryotic cells. However, recent results suggest that CCR in Escherichia coli is mediated mainly by an inducer exclusion mechanism. In many Gram-positive bacteria, CCR is triggered by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, which activates HPr kinase, presumed to be one of the most ancient serine protein kinases. We here report cloning of the Bacillus subtilis hprK and hprP genes and characterization of the encoded HPr kinase and P-Ser-HPr phosphatase. P-Ser-HPr phosphatase forms a new family of phosphatases together with bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatase, yeast glycerol-3-phosphatase, and 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase whereas HPr kinase represents a new family of protein kinases on its own. It does not contain the domain structure typical for eukaryotic protein kinases. Although up to now the HPr modifying/demodifying enzymes were thought to exist only in Gram-positive bacteria, a sequence comparison revealed that they also are present in several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. PMID:9465101

  8. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Martin H; Yang, Jae-Seong; Serrano, Luis; Kiel, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors) and the output (transcription factors) layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types. PMID:24922536

  9. Putative signal peptides of two BURP proteins can direct proteins to their destinations in tobacco cell system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulin; Ou, Zhonghua; Qiu, Jianbin; Mi, Zilan

    2014-11-01

    Plant-specific BURP family proteins have a diverse subcellular localization with different functions. However, only limited studies have investigated the functions of their different domains. In the present study, the role of the N-terminal putative signal peptide in protein subcellular localization was investigated using a tobacco cell system. The results showed that SALI3-2 was present in vacuoles, whereas AtRD22 was directed to the apoplast. The N-terminal putative signal peptides of both proteins were confirmed to be the essential and critical domains for targeting the proteins to their destinations. We also demonstrate that the expression and accumulation of mGFP in tobacco cells was increased when mGFP was fused to the putative signal peptide of SALI3-2. The findings offer the potential application of this short peptide in protein production in plants. PMID:25048229

  10. An obesity-dependent lactation defect in the viable yellow agouti mouse is associated with mammary inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal obesity is known to delay lactogenesis in breast-feeding women, as well as negatively impact lactation in other species. Obesity is also understood to be associated with inflammation. Work with the viable yellow agouti (Avy) mouse in our laboratory has documented a lactation defect in obese...

  11. Signals fly when kinases meet Rho-of-plants (ROP) small G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Attila; Lajkó, Dézi Bianka

    2015-08-01

    Rho-type small GTP-binding plant proteins function as two-state molecular switches in cellular signalling. There is accumulating evidence that Rho-of-plants (ROP) signalling is positively controlled by plant receptor kinases, through the ROP guanine nucleotide exchange factor proteins. These signalling modules regulate cell polarity, cell shape, hormone responses, and pathogen defence, among other things. Other ROP-regulatory proteins might also be subjected to protein phosphorylation by cellular kinases (e.g., mitogen-activated protein kinases or calcium-dependent protein kinases), in order to integrate various cellular signalling pathways with ROP GTPase-dependent processes. In contrast to the role of kinases in upstream ROP regulation, much less is known about the potential link between ROP GTPases and downstream kinase signalling. In other eukaryotes, Rho-type G-protein-activated kinases are widespread and have a key role in many cellular processes. Recent data indicate the existence of structurally different ROP-activated kinases in plants, but their ROP-dependent biological functions still need to be validated. In addition to these direct interactions, ROPs may also indirectly control the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases or calcium-dependent protein kinases. These kinases may therefore function as upstream as well as downstream kinases in ROP-mediated signalling pathways, such as the phosphatidylinositol monophosphate kinases involved in cell polarity establishment. PMID:26089155

  12. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TWO F-BOX PROTEINS, SLEEPY1 AND SNEEZY IN GA SIGNALING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SNEEZY (SNE) is a homolog of SLEEPY1 (SLY1), encoding an F-box protein subunit of an SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex in Arabidopsis. SLY1 plays a central role in destruction of DELLA negative family proteins via 26S proteasome pathway in GA signaling pathway. DELLA proteins consist of five memb...

  13. Comparison of tertiary structures of proteins in protein-protein complexes with unbound forms suggests prevalence of allostery in signalling proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most signalling and regulatory proteins participate in transient protein-protein interactions during biological processes. They usually serve as key regulators of various cellular processes and are often stable in both protein-bound and unbound forms. Availability of high-resolution structures of their unbound and bound forms provides an opportunity to understand the molecular mechanisms involved. In this work, we have addressed the question “What is the nature, extent, location and functional significance of structural changes which are associated with formation of protein-protein complexes?” Results A database of 76 non-redundant sets of high resolution 3-D structures of protein-protein complexes, representing diverse functions, and corresponding unbound forms, has been used in this analysis. Structural changes associated with protein-protein complexation have been investigated using structural measures and Protein Blocks description. Our study highlights that significant structural rearrangement occurs on binding at the interface as well as at regions away from the interface to form a highly specific, stable and functional complex. Notably, predominantly unaltered interfaces interact mainly with interfaces undergoing substantial structural alterations, revealing the presence of at least one structural regulatory component in every complex. Interestingly, about one-half of the number of complexes, comprising largely of signalling proteins, show substantial localized structural change at surfaces away from the interface. Normal mode analysis and available information on functions on some of these complexes suggests that many of these changes are allosteric. This change is largely manifest in the proteins whose interfaces are altered upon binding, implicating structural change as the possible trigger of allosteric effect. Although large-scale studies of allostery induced by small-molecule effectors are available in literature, this is, to our

  14. Identification of a bipartite nuclear localization signal in the silkworm Masc protein.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yudai; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Ueda, Masamichi; Fujimoto, Masaru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Shimada, Toru; Kiuchi, Takashi; Katsuma, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    The silkworm Masculinizer (Masc) gene encodes a CCCH-tandem zinc finger protein that controls both masculinization and dosage compensation. Masc protein is a nuclear protein, but the mechanism underlying the transport of this protein into the nucleus has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identified a functional bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) located between residues 274 and 290 of the Masc protein. Sequence comparison revealed that this bipartite NLS is evolutionarily conserved in Masc proteins from other lepidopteran insects. Furthermore, we showed that the degree of nuclear localization is not associated with the masculinizing activity of the Masc protein. PMID:27277067

  15. Use of synthetic signal sequences to explore the protein export machinery.

    PubMed

    Clérico, Eugenia M; Maki, Jenny L; Gierasch, Lila M

    2008-01-01

    The information for correct localization of newly synthesized proteins in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes resides in self-contained, often transportable targeting sequences. Of these, signal sequences specify that a protein should be secreted from a cell or incorporated into the cytoplasmic membrane. A central puzzle is presented by the lack of primary structural homology among signal sequences, although they share common features in their sequences. Synthetic signal peptides have enabled a wide range of studies of how these "zipcodes" for protein secretion are decoded and used to target proteins to the protein machinery that facilitates their translocation across and integration into membranes. We review research on how the information in signal sequences enables their passenger proteins to be correctly and efficiently localized. Synthetic signal peptides have made possible binding and crosslinking studies to explore how selectivity is achieved in recognition by the signal sequence-binding receptors, signal recognition particle, or SRP, which functions in all organisms, and SecA, which functions in prokaryotes and some organelles of prokaryotic origins. While progress has been made, the absence of atomic resolution structures for complexes of signal peptides and their receptors has definitely left many questions to be answered in the future. PMID:17918185

  16. Inositol 1,4,5‐trisphosphate receptors and their protein partners as signalling hubs

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Colin W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Inositol 1,4,5‐trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) are expressed in nearly all animal cells, where they mediate the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. The complex spatial and temporal organization of the ensuing intracellular Ca2+ signals allows selective regulation of diverse physiological responses. Interactions of IP3Rs with other proteins contribute to the specificity and speed of Ca2+ signalling pathways, and to their capacity to integrate information from other signalling pathways. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of the proteins proposed to interact with IP3Rs and the functional effects that these interactions produce. Interacting proteins can determine the activity of IP3Rs, facilitate their regulation by multiple signalling pathways and direct the Ca2+ that they release to specific targets. We suggest that IP3Rs function as signalling hubs through which diverse inputs are processed and then emerge as cytosolic Ca2+ signals. PMID:26830355

  17. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation-Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks.

    PubMed

    White, Forest M; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-12

    Protein phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks. PMID:27049636

  18. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation–Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Forest M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation–mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks.

  19. The network of P(II) signalling protein interactions in unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    P(II) signalling proteins constitute a large superfamily of signal perception and transduction proteins, which is represented in all domains of life and whose members play central roles in coordinating nitrogen assimilation. Generally, P(II) proteins act as sensors of the cellular adenylylate energy charge and 2-oxoglutarate level, and in response to these signals, they regulate central nitrogen assimilatory processes at various levels of control (from nutrient transport to gene expression) through protein-protein interactions with P(II) receptor proteins. An examination of the phylogeny of cyanobacteria reveals that specific functions of P(II) signalling evolved in this microbial lineage, which are not found in other prokaryotes. At least one of these functions, regulation of arginine biosynthesis by controlling the key enzyme N-acetyl-L: -glutamate kinase (NAGK), was transmitted by the ancestral cyanobacterium, which gave rise to chloroplasts, into the eukaryotic domain and was conserved during the evolution of planta. We have investigated in some detail the P(II) signalling protein, its signal perception and its interactions with receptors in the unicellular cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 and Synechocystis PCC 6803 and have performed comparative analysis with Arabidopsis thaliana P(II)-NAGK interaction. This chapter will summarize these studies and will describe the emerging picture of a complex network of P(II) protein interactions in the unicellular cyanobacteria. PMID:20532736

  20. Ras protein/cAMP-dependent protein kinase signaling is negatively regulated by a deubiquitinating enzyme, Ubp3, in yeast.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wang, Yuqi

    2013-04-19

    Ras proteins and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A, PKA) are important components of a nutrient signaling pathway that mediates cellular responses to glucose in yeast. The molecular mechanisms that regulate Ras/PKA-mediated signaling remain to be fully understood. Here, we provide evidence that Ras/PKA signaling is negatively regulated by a deubiquitinating enzyme, Ubp3. Disrupting the activity of Ubp3 leads to hyperactivation of PKA, as evidenced by much enhanced phosphorylation of PKA substrates, decreased accumulation of glycogen, larger cell size, and increased sensitivity to heat shock. Levels of intracellular cAMP and the active forms of Ras proteins are also elevated in the ubp3Δ mutant. Consistent with a possibility that the increased cAMP is responsible for the abnormal signaling behavior of the ubp3Δ mutant, overexpressing PDE2, which encodes a phosphodiesterase that hydrolyzes cAMP, significantly relieves the cell size increase and heat shock sensitivity of the mutant. Further analysis reveals that Ubp3 interacts with a Ras GTPase-accelerating protein, Ira2, and regulates its level of ubiquitination. Together, our data indicate that Ubp3 is a new regulator of the Ras/PKA signaling pathway and suggest that Ubp3 regulates this pathway by controlling the ubiquitination of Ras GTPase-accelerating protein Ira2. PMID:23476013

  1. The ribosomal protein L10/QM-like protein is a component of the NIK-mediated antiviral signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Carolina S.; Santos, Anesia A.; Machado, Joao Paulo B.; Fontes, Elizabeth P.B.

    2008-10-25

    The NIK (NSP-interacting kinase)-mediated antiviral signaling pathway was identified as a virulence target of the begomovirus nuclear shuttle protein (NSP). Here, we further characterized this layer of plant innate defense by identifying the ribosomal protein L10 (rpL10), a QM-like protein, as a downstream effector of the antiviral signaling. Although both ribosomal proteins rpL10 and rpL18 were found to associate with NIK1 through yeast two-hybrid screening, the NIK receptors specifically phosphorylated rpL10 in vitro. Furthermore, loss of rpL10 function significantly increased susceptibility to begomovirus infection, recapitulating the phenotype of nik knockout lines. Our results genetically linked rpL10 to the NIK-mediated antiviral signaling.

  2. Signalling functions and biochemical properties of pertussis toxin-resistant G-proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, T A; Casey, P J

    1997-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) has been widely used as a reagent to characterize the involvement of heterotrimeric G-proteins in signalling. This toxin catalyses the ADP-ribosylation of specific G-protein alpha subunits of the Gi family, and this modification prevents the occurrence of the receptor-G-protein interaction. This review focuses on the biochemical properties and signalling of those G-proteins historically classified as 'PTX-resistant' due to the inability of the toxin to influence signalling through them. These G-proteins include members of the Gq and G12 families and one Gi family member, i.e. Gz. Signalling pathways controlled by these G-proteins are well characterized only for Gq family members, which activate specific isoforms of phospholipase C, resulting in increases in intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C (PKC), among other responses. While members of the G12 family have been implicated in processes that regulate cell growth, and Gz has been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase, the specific downstream targets to these G-proteins in vivo have not been clearly established. Since two of these proteins, G12 alpha and Gz alpha, are excellent substrates for PKC, there is the potential for cross-talk between their signalling and Gq-dependent processes leading to activation of PKC. In tissues that express these G-proteins, a number of guanine-nucleotide-dependent, PTX-resistant, signalling pathways have been defined for which the G-protein involved has not been identified. This review summarizes these pathways and discusses the evidence both for the participation of specific PTX-resistant G-proteins in them and for the regulation of these processes by PKC. PMID:9032437

  3. Folding and signaling share the same pathway in a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter D.

    2002-03-01

    The photoreceptor photoactive yellow protein (PYP) was used as a model system to study receptor activation and protein folding. Refolding was studied by stopped-flow absorbance spectroscopy for PYP with either a trans or a cis chromophore. Chromophore trans to cis isomerization, the mechanism of light detection by PYP, greatly affects the protein folding process. When the cis chromophore is present, the unfolded state refolding proceeds through the putative signaling state of PYP as an on-pathway intermediate. In addition, moderate denaturant concentrations result in the specific unfolding of the signaling state of PYP. Thus, the signaling state is common to the pathways of folding and signaling. This provides a novel avenue for the study of protein folding. We demonstrate how this approach can be used to establish whether a folding intermediate is on-pathway or off-pathway. The results also reveal transient partial unfolding as a molecular mechanism for signaling. The signaling intermediate of PYP exhibits properties characteristic of a molten globule, providing a challenge for the current paradigm for the relay of signals along a signal transduction chain by highly specific interactions between fully folded proteins.

  4. Tools used to study how protein complexes are assembled in signaling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Dwane, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Most proteins do not function on their own but as part of large signaling complexes that are arranged in every living cell in response to specific environmental cues. Proteins interact with each other either constitutively or transiently and do so with different affinity. When identifying the role played by a protein inside a cell, it is essential to define its particular cohort of binding partners so that the researcher can predict what signaling pathways the protein is engaged in. Once identified and confirmed, the information might allow the interaction to be manipulated by pharmacological inhibitors to help fight disease. PMID:22002082

  5. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways.

  6. Brown coat color in Icelandic cattle produced by the loci Extension and Agouti.

    PubMed

    Adalsteinsson, S; Bjarnadottir, S; Vage, D I; Jonmundsson, J V

    1995-01-01

    Inheritance of the colors black, brown, and red in Icelandic cattle was studied. The three colors are produced by two loci, Extension (E) and Agouti (A), with three alleles at the E locus: E(d) for dominant black; E+, intermediate, which allows expression of A locus alleles; and e for recessive red color. Two alleles are postulated at the A locus: A+, producing brown, and a, producing recessive black (nonagouti) when homozygous in E+/- animals. The dominant and recessive types of black are indistinguishable from each other phenotypically. The A alleles are only able to express their effect in E+/- genotypes. The E and A loci in cattle are postulated to be homologous to the E and A loci in the mouse. PMID:7560875

  7. The neuropilin-like protein ESDN regulates insulin signaling and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Jung, Jae-Joon; Nie, Lei; Razavian, Mahmoud; Zhang, Jiasheng; Samuel, Varman; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-05-01

    Insulin effects on cell metabolism, growth, and survival are mediated by its binding to, and activation of, insulin receptor. With increasing prevalence of insulin resistance and diabetes there is considerable interest in identifying novel regulators of insulin signal transduction. The transmembrane protein endothelial and smooth muscle cell-derived neuropilin-like protein (ESDN) is a novel regulator of vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. Here, we investigate a potential role of ESDN in insulin signaling, demonstrating that Esdn gene deletion promotes insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. This is associated with enhanced protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation as well as insulin receptor phosphorylation. Likewise, insulin signaling in the liver, muscle, and adipose tissue is enhanced in Esdn(-/-) mice, and these animals exhibit improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in vivo. The effect of ESDN on insulin signaling is traced back to its interaction with insulin receptor, which alters the receptor interaction with regulatory adaptor protein-E3 ubiquitin ligase pairs, adaptor protein with pleckstrin homology and Src homology 2 domain-c-Cbl and growth factor receptor bound protein 10-neuronal precursor cell-expressed developmentally downregulated 4. In conclusion, our findings establish ESDN as an inhibitor of insulin receptor signal transduction through a novel regulatory mechanism. Loss of ESDN potentiates insulin's metabolic and mitotic effects and provides insights into a novel therapeutic avenue. PMID:26921437

  8. Solution structure of the human signaling protein RACK1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The adaptor protein RACK1 (receptor of activated kinase 1) was originally identified as an anchoring protein for protein kinase C. RACK1 is a 36 kDa protein, and is composed of seven WD repeats which mediate its protein-protein interactions. RACK1 is ubiquitously expressed and has been implicated in diverse cellular processes involving: protein translation regulation, neuropathological processes, cellular stress, and tissue development. Results In this study we performed a biophysical analysis of human RACK1 with the aim of obtaining low resolution structural information. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments demonstrated that human RACK1 is globular and monomeric in solution and its low resolution structure is strikingly similar to that of an homology model previously calculated by us and to the crystallographic structure of RACK1 isoform A from Arabidopsis thaliana. Both sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation techniques showed that RACK1 is predominantly a monomer of around 37 kDa in solution, but also presents small amounts of oligomeric species. Moreover, hydrodynamic data suggested that RACK1 has a slightly asymmetric shape. The interaction of RACK1 and Ki-1/57 was tested by sedimentation equilibrium. The results suggested that the association between RACK1 and Ki-1/57(122-413) follows a stoichiometry of 1:1. The binding constant (KB) observed for RACK1-Ki-1/57(122-413) interaction was of around (1.5 ± 0.2) × 106 M-1 and resulted in a dissociation constant (KD) of (0.7 ± 0.1) × 10-6 M. Moreover, the fluorescence data also suggests that the interaction may occur in a cooperative fashion. Conclusion Our SAXS and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments indicated that RACK1 is predominantly a monomer in solution. RACK1 and Ki-1/57(122-413) interact strongly under the tested conditions. PMID:20529362

  9. Oncogenic transformation by the signaling adaptor proteins insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin receptor substrates (IRSs) are adaptor proteins that link signaling from upstream activators to multiple downstream effectors to modulate normal growth, metabolism, survival, and differentiation. Recent cell culture studies have shown that IRSs can interact with, and are functionally require...

  10. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 2: A Versatile Regulator of Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Blumer, Kendall J.

    2016-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins of the B/R4 family are widely expressed in the cardiovascular system where their role in fine tuning G protein signaling is critical to maintaining homeostasis. Among members of this family, RGS2 and RGS5 have been shown to play key roles in cardiac and smooth muscle function by tightly regulating signaling pathways that are activated through Gq/11 and Gi/o classes of heterotrimeric G proteins. This chapter reviews accumulating evidence supporting a key role for RGS2 in vascular function and the implication of changes in RGS2 function and/or expression in the pathogenesis of blood pressure disorders, particularly hypertension. With such understanding, RGS2 and the signaling pathways it controls may emerge as novel targets for developing next-generation anti-hypertensive drugs/agents. PMID:26123303

  11. The impact of RGS and other G-protein regulatory proteins on Gαi-mediated signaling in immunity.

    PubMed

    Kehrl, John H

    2016-08-15

    Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors are members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Signaling downstream of these receptors directs the localization, positioning and homeostatic trafficking of leukocytes; as well as their recruitment to, and their retention at, inflammatory sites. Ligand induced changes in the molecular conformation of chemoattractant receptors results in the engagement of heterotrimeric G-proteins, which promotes α subunits to undergo GTP/GDP exchange. This results in the functional release of βγ subunits from the heterotrimers, thereby activating downstream effector molecules, which initiate leukocyte polarization, gradient sensing, and directional migration. Pertussis toxin ADP ribosylates Gαi subunits and prevents chemoattractant receptors from triggering Gαi nucleotide exchange. The use of pertussis toxin revealed the essential importance of Gαi subunit nucleotide exchange for chemoattractant receptor signaling. More recent studies have identified a range of regulatory mechanisms that target these receptors and their associated heterotrimeric G-proteins, thereby helping to control the magnitude, kinetics, and duration of signaling. A failure in these regulatory pathways can lead to impaired receptor signaling and immunopathology. The analysis of mice with targeted deletions of Gαi isoforms as well as some of these G-protein regulatory proteins is providing insights into their roles in chemoattractant receptor signaling. PMID:27071343

  12. Regulator of G protein signalling 14 attenuates cardiac remodelling through the MEK-ERK1/2 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Tang, Xiao-Hong; Li, Xiao-Hui; Dai, Hai-Jiang; Miao, Ru-Jia; Cai, Jing-Jing; Huang, Zhi-Jun; Chen, Alex F; Xing, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Yao; Yuan, Hong

    2016-07-01

    In the past 10 years, several publications have highlighted the role of the regulator of G protein signalling (RGS) family in multiple diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. As one of the multifunctional family members, RGS14 is involved in various biological processes, such as synaptic plasticity, cell division, and phagocytosis. However, the role of RGS14 in cardiovascular diseases remains unclear. In the present study, we used a genetic approach to examine the role of RGS14 in pathological cardiac remodelling in vivo and in vitro. We observed that RGS14 was down-regulated in human failing hearts, murine hypertrophic hearts, and isolated hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Moreover, the extent of aortic banding-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis was exacerbated in RGS14 knockout mice, whereas RGS14 transgenic mice exhibited a significantly alleviated response to pressure overload. Furthermore, research of the underlying mechanism revealed that the RGS14-dependent rescue of cardiac remodelling was attributed to the abrogation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 signalling. The results showed that constitutive activation of MEK1 nullified the cardiac protection in RGS14 transgenic mice, and inhibition of MEK-ERK1/2 by U0126 reversed RGS14 deletion-related hypertrophic aggravation. These results demonstrated that RGS14 attenuated the development of cardiac remodelling through MEK-ERK1/2 signalling. RGS14 exhibited great potential as a target for the treatment of pathological cardiac remodelling. PMID:27298141

  13. Macromolecular Composition Dictates Receptor and G Protein Selectivity of Regulator of G Protein Signaling (RGS) 7 and 9-2 Protein Complexes in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Masuho, Ikuo; Xie, Keqiang; Martemyanov, Kirill A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins play essential roles in the regulation of signaling via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). With hundreds of GPCRs and dozens of G proteins, it is important to understand how RGS regulates selective GPCR-G protein signaling. In neurons of the striatum, two RGS proteins, RGS7 and RGS9-2, regulate signaling by μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and are implicated in drug addiction, movement disorders, and nociception. Both proteins form trimeric complexes with the atypical G protein β subunit Gβ5 and a membrane anchor, R7BP. In this study, we examined GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity as well as Gα and GPCR selectivity of RGS7 and RGS9-2 complexes in live cells using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay that monitors dissociation of G protein subunits. We showed that RGS9-2/Gβ5 regulated both Gi and Go with a bias toward Go, but RGS7/Gβ5 could serve as a GAP only for Go. Interestingly, R7BP enhanced GAP activity of RGS7 and RGS9-2 toward Go and Gi and enabled RGS7 to regulate Gi signaling. Neither RGS7 nor RGS9-2 had any activity toward Gz, Gs, or Gq in the absence or presence of R7BP. We also observed no effect of GPCRs (MOR and D2R) on the G protein bias of R7 RGS proteins. However, the GAP activity of RGS9-2 showed a strong receptor preference for D2R over MOR. Finally, RGS7 displayed an four times greater GAP activity relative to RGS9-2. These findings illustrate the principles involved in establishing G protein and GPCR selectivity of striatal RGS proteins. PMID:23857581

  14. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jennifer R.; Wang, Jenny Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and G protein subunit Gαq in the maintenance of cancer stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia. This review will discuss how GPCRs and G proteins regulate stem cells with a focus on cancer stem cells, as well as their implications for the development of novel targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27187360

  15. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    PubMed

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1. PMID:27235398

  16. Extra-Large G Proteins Expand the Repertoire of Subunits in Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, David; Gookin, Timothy E.; Milner, Matthew J.; Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are a conserved signal transduction mechanism in eukaryotes. However, G protein subunit numbers in diploid plant genomes are greatly reduced as compared with animals and do not correlate with the diversity of functions and phenotypes in which heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated. In addition to GPA1, the sole canonical Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gα subunit, Arabidopsis has three related proteins: the extra-large GTP-binding proteins XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3. We demonstrate that the XLGs can bind Gβγ dimers (AGB1 plus a Gγ subunit: AGG1, AGG2, or AGG3) with differing specificity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid assays. Our in silico structural analysis shows that XLG3 aligns closely to the crystal structure of GPA1, and XLG3 also competes with GPA1 for Gβγ binding in yeast. We observed interaction of the XLGs with all three Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Bioinformatic and localization studies identified and confirmed nuclear localization signals in XLG2 and XLG3 and a nuclear export signal in XLG3, which may facilitate intracellular shuttling. We found that tunicamycin, salt, and glucose hypersensitivity and increased stomatal density are agb1-specific phenotypes that are not observed in gpa1 mutants but are recapitulated in xlg mutants. Thus, XLG-Gβγ heterotrimers provide additional signaling modalities for tuning plant G protein responses and increase the repertoire of G protein heterotrimer combinations from three to 12. The potential for signal partitioning and competition between the XLGs and GPA1 is a new paradigm for plant-specific cell signaling. PMID:26157115

  17. GABARAP proteins as scaffolds in localized TIAM1-RAC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Genau, Heide Marika; Behrends, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spatially restricted signaling is a hallmark of RAC1 signaling. Recent work has uncovered a novel role of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated proteins (GABARAPs), a subfamily of human ATG8 ubiquitin-like modifiers, in providing a scaffold for recruitment of an ubiquitin E3 ligase complex to its substrate, T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis-inducing protein 1 (TIAM1), to enable ubiquitylation and thereby local control of RAC1 activity. PMID:27308540

  18. Cell signaling, post-translational protein modifications and NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Liokatis, Stamatios; Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas; Yoon, Mi-Kyung; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Post-translationally modified proteins make up the majority of the proteome and establish, to a large part, the impressive level of functional diversity in higher, multi-cellular organisms. Most eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) denote reversible, covalent additions of small chemical entities such as phosphate-, acyl-, alkyl- and glycosyl-groups onto selected subsets of modifiable amino acids. In turn, these modifications induce highly specific changes in the chemical environments of individual protein residues, which are readily detected by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In the following, we provide a concise compendium of NMR characteristics of the main types of eukaryotic PTMs: serine, threonine, tyrosine and histidine phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, lysine and arginine methylation, and serine, threonine O-glycosylation. We further delineate the previously uncharacterized NMR properties of lysine propionylation, butyrylation, succinylation, malonylation and crotonylation, which, altogether, define an initial reference frame for comprehensive PTM studies by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23011410

  19. Intrinsic Disorder in Transmembrane Proteins: Roles in Signaling and Topology Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Bürgi, Jérôme; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are peculiar stretches of amino acids that lack stable conformations in solution. Intrinsic Disorder containing Proteins (IDP) are defined by the presence of at least one large IDR and have been linked to multiple cellular processes including cell signaling, DNA binding and cancer. Here we used computational analyses and publicly available databases to deepen insight into the prevalence and function of IDRs specifically in transmembrane proteins, which are somewhat neglected in most studies. We found that 50% of transmembrane proteins have at least one IDR of 30 amino acids or more. Interestingly, these domains preferentially localize to the cytoplasmic side especially of multi-pass transmembrane proteins, suggesting that disorder prediction could increase the confidence of topology prediction algorithms. This was supported by the successful prediction of the topology of the uncharacterized multi-pass transmembrane protein TMEM117, as confirmed experimentally. Pathway analysis indicated that IDPs are enriched in cell projection and axons and appear to play an important role in cell adhesion, signaling and ion binding. In addition, we found that IDP are enriched in phosphorylation sites, a crucial post translational modification in signal transduction, when compared to fully ordered proteins and to be implicated in more protein-protein interaction events. Accordingly, IDPs were highly enriched in short protein binding regions called Molecular Recognition Features (MoRFs). Altogether our analyses strongly support the notion that the transmembrane IDPs act as hubs in cellular signal events. PMID:27391701

  20. Identification of Key Proteins in Human Epithelial Cells Responding to Bystander Signals From Irradiated Trout Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard; Wang, Jiaxi; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel; Howe, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander signaling has been found to occur in live rainbow trout fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This article reports identification of key proteomic changes in a bystander reporter cell line (HaCaT) grown in low-dose irradiated tissue-conditioned media (ITCM) from rainbow trout fish. In vitro explant cultures were generated from the skin of fish previously exposed to low doses (0.1 and 0.5 Gy) of X-ray radiation in vivo. The ITCM was harvested from all donor explant cultures and placed on recipient HaCaT cells to observe any change in protein expression caused by the bystander signals. Proteomic methods using 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy were employed to screen for novel proteins expressed. The proteomic changes measured in HaCaT cells receiving the ITCM revealed that exposure to 0.5 Gy induced an upregulation of annexin A2 and cingulin and a downregulation of Rho-GDI2, F-actin-capping protein subunit beta, microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member, and 14-3-3 proteins. The 0.1 Gy dose also induced a downregulation of Rho-GDI2, hMMS19, F-actin-capping protein subunit beta, and microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member proteins. The proteins reported may influence apoptotic signaling, as the results were suggestive of an induction of cell communication, repair mechanisms, and dysregulation of growth signals. PMID:26673684

  1. Fas-Associated Protein with Death Domain Regulates Notch Signaling during Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Wang, Lu; He, Liangqiang; Yang, Bingya; Yao, Chun; Du, Pan; Xu, Qiang; Cheng, Wei; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Notch signaling plays critical roles during myogenesis by promoting the proliferation and inhibiting the differentiation of myogenic progenitors. However, the mechanism of the temporal regulation of Notch signaling during the myogenic lineage progression remains elusive. In the present study, we show that a constitutively phosphoryl-mimicking mutation of Fas-associated death domain (FADD-D) enhances Notch-1 signaling and compromises Wnt signaling in both cultured myoblasts and regenerating muscles, which results in inhibited myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration. Inhibition of Notch signaling recovers the regeneration ability in injured FADD-D muscles through rescuing Wnt signaling. Furthermore, we found that protein kinase Cα mediates FADD-D-induced Notch-1 signaling by stabilizing Notch-1. Collectively, these data identify a novel mechanism for the temporal regulation of Notch signaling during myogenic lineage progression and muscle regeneration. PMID:26303234

  2. Syntrophin proteins as Santa Claus: role(s) in cell signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hina F; Adams, Marvin E; Khanday, Firdous A

    2013-07-01

    Syntrophins are a family of cytoplasmic membrane-associated adaptor proteins, characterized by the presence of a unique domain organization comprised of a C-terminal syntrophin unique (SU) domain and an N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain that is split by insertion of a PDZ domain. Syntrophins have been recognized as an important component of many signaling events, and they seem to function more like the cell's own personal 'Santa Claus' that serves to 'gift' various signaling complexes with precise proteins that they 'wish for', and at the same time care enough for the spatial, temporal control of these signaling events, maintaining overall smooth functioning and general happiness of the cell. Syntrophins not only associate various ion channels and signaling proteins to the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), via a direct interaction with dystrophin protein but also serve as a link between the extracellular matrix and the intracellular downstream targets and cell cytoskeleton by interacting with F-actin. They play an important role in regulating the postsynaptic signal transduction, sarcolemmal localization of nNOS, EphA4 signaling at the neuromuscular junction, and G-protein mediated signaling. In our previous work, we reported a differential expression pattern of alpha-1-syntrophin (SNTA1) protein in esophageal and breast carcinomas. Implicated in several other pathologies, like cardiac dys-functioning, muscular dystrophies, diabetes, etc., these proteins provide a lot of scope for further studies. The present review focuses on the role of syntrophins in membrane targeting and regulation of cellular proteins, while highlighting their relevance in possible development and/or progression of pathologies including cancer which we have recently demonstrated. PMID:23263165

  3. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ni; Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin

    2013-02-05

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1-17 and 18-36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome.

  4. Regulator of G protein signaling 8 inhibits protease-activated receptor 1/Gi/o signaling by forming a distinct G protein-dependent complex in live cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Ghil, Sungho

    2016-05-01

    Activation of seven-transmembrane-domain-possessing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by extracellular stimuli elicits intracellular responses. One class of GPCRs-protease-activated receptors (PARs)-is activated by endogenous proteases, such as thrombin and trypsin. Members of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family stimulate GTP hydrolysis of G protein alpha (Gα) subunits, thereby inhibiting GPCR/Gα-mediated signaling. We previously reported that RGS2 and RGS4 inhibit PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling by interacting with PAR1 in a Gα-dependent manner. Here, employing the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technique, we identified RGS8 as a novel PAR1-interacting protein. Very little BRET activity was observed between PAR1-Venus (PAR1-Ven) and RGS8-Luciferase (RGS8-Luc) in the absence of Gα. However, in the presence of Gαo, BRET activity was specifically and significantly increased. This interaction was confirmed by biochemical and immunofluorescence assays. Notably, RGS8 inhibited PAR1/Gαi/o-mediated adenylyl cyclase and ERK activation, and prevented Gαo-induced neurite outgrowth and activation of Necdin protein, a downstream target of Gαo. Our findings suggest a novel function of RGS8 and reveal cellular mechanisms by which RGS8 mediates PAR1 inhibition. PMID:26829215

  5. Coupling Oxidative Signals to Protein Phosphorylation via Methionine Oxidation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms involved in sensing oxidative signaling molecules such as H2O2 in plant and animal cells are not completely understood. In the present study, we tested the postulate that oxidation of methionine (Met) to Met sulfoxide (MetSO) can couple oxidative signals to changes in protein phosphor...

  6. Leucine acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial rise in amino acids and insulin independently stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of piglets. Leucine is an important mediator of the response to amino acids. We have shown that the postprandial rise in leucine, but not isoleucine or valine, acutely stimulates muscle pro...

  7. Mapping membrane protein interactions in cell signaling systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Hadi, Masood Z.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2003-12-01

    We proposed to apply a chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry and modeling method called MS3D to the structure determination of the rhodopsin-transducin membrane protein complex (RTC). Herein we describe experimental progress made to adapt the MS3D approach for characterizing membrane protein systems, and computational progress in experimental design, data analysis and protein structure modeling. Over the past three years, we have developed tailored experimental methods for all steps in the MS3D method for rhodopsin, including protein purification, a functional assay, cross-linking, proteolysis and mass spectrometry. In support of the experimental effort. we have out a data analysis pipeline in place that automatically selects the monoisotopic peaks in a mass spectrometric spectrum, assigns them and stores the results in a database. Theoretical calculations using 24 experimentally-derived distance constraints have resulted in a backbone-level model of the activated form of rhodopsin, which is a critical first step towards building a model of the RTC. Cross-linked rhodopsin-transducin complexes have been isolated via gel electrophoresis and further mass spectrometric characterization of the cross-links is underway.

  8. Chloroplast unfolded protein response, a new plastid stress signaling pathway?

    PubMed

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    A unique feature of the ATP-dependent ClpP protease of eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms is that its catalytic subunit ClpP1 is encoded by the chloroplast genome. Attempts to inactivate this subunit through chloroplast transformation have failed because it is essential for cell survival. To study the function of ClpP we have developed a repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This system is based on the use of a chimeric nuclear gene in which the vitamin-repressible MetE promoter and Thi4 riboswitch have been fused to the coding sequence of Nac2. Upon entry into the chloroplast the Nac2 protein specifically interacts with the psbD 5'UTR and is required for the proper processing/translation of the psbD mRNA. This property can be conveyed to any chloroplast mRNA by replacing its 5'UTR with that of psbD. In this study we have chosen clpP1 as plastid target gene and examined the cellular events induced upon depletion of ClpP through transcriptomic, proteomic, biochemical and electron microscope analysis. Among the most striking features, a massive increase in protein abundance occurs for plastid chaperones, proteases and proteins involved in membrane assembly/disassembly strongly suggesting the existence of a chloroplast unfolded protein response. PMID:25482768

  9. A Mechanism Regulating G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling That Requires Cycles of Protein Palmitoylation and Depalmitoylation* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lixia; Chisari, Mariangela; Maktabi, Mohammad H.; Sobieski, Courtney; Zhou, Hao; Konopko, Aaron M.; Martin, Brent R.; Mennerick, Steven J.; Blumer, Kendall J.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible attachment and removal of palmitate or other long-chain fatty acids on proteins has been hypothesized, like phosphorylation, to control diverse biological processes. Indeed, palmitate turnover regulates Ras trafficking and signaling. Beyond this example, however, the functions of palmitate turnover on specific proteins remain poorly understood. Here, we show that a mechanism regulating G protein-coupled receptor signaling in neuronal cells requires palmitate turnover. We used hexadecyl fluorophosphonate or palmostatin B to inhibit enzymes in the serine hydrolase family that depalmitoylate proteins, and we studied R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-binding protein (R7BP), a palmitoylated allosteric modulator of R7 RGS proteins that accelerate deactivation of Gi/o class G proteins. Depalmitoylation inhibition caused R7BP to redistribute from the plasma membrane to endomembrane compartments, dissociated R7BP-bound R7 RGS complexes from Gi/o-gated G protein-regulated inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK) channels and delayed GIRK channel closure. In contrast, targeting R7BP to the plasma membrane with a polybasic domain and an irreversibly attached lipid instead of palmitate rendered GIRK channel closure insensitive to depalmitoylation inhibitors. Palmitate turnover therefore is required for localizing R7BP to the plasma membrane and facilitating Gi/o deactivation by R7 RGS proteins on GIRK channels. Our findings broaden the scope of biological processes regulated by palmitate turnover on specific target proteins. Inhibiting R7BP depalmitoylation may provide a means of enhancing GIRK activity in neurological disorders. PMID:24385443

  10. The Protein Architecture of Human Secretory Vesicles Reveals Differential Regulation of Signaling Molecule Secretion by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Ma, Qi; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the ‘human’ dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health. PMID:22916103

  11. PII signal transduction proteins are ATPases whose activity is regulated by 2-oxoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Radchenko, Martha V.; Thornton, Jeremy; Merrick, Mike

    2013-01-01

    PII proteins are one of the most widespread families of signal transduction proteins in nature, being ubiquitous throughout bacteria, archaea, and plants. In all these organisms, PII proteins coordinate many facets of nitrogen metabolism by interacting with and regulating the activities of enzymes, transcription factors, and membrane transport proteins. The primary mode of signal perception by PII proteins derives from their ability to bind the effector molecules 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) and ATP or ADP. The role of 2-OG as an indicator of cellular nitrogen status is well understood, but the function of ATP/ADP binding has remained unresolved. We have now shown that the Escherichia coli PII protein, GlnK, has an ATPase activity that is inhibited by 2-OG. Hence, when a drop in the cellular 2-OG pool signals nitrogen sufficiency, 2-OG depletion of GlnK causes bound ATP to be hydrolyzed to ADP, leading to a conformational change in the protein. We propose that the role of ATP/ADP binding in E. coli GlnK is to effect a 2-OG-dependent molecular switch that drives a conformational change in the T loops of the PII protein. We have further shown that two other PII proteins, Azospirillum brasilense GlnZ and Arabidopsis thaliana PII, have a similar ATPase activity, and we therefore suggest that this switch mechanism is likely to be a general property of most members of the PII protein family. PMID:23818625

  12. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  13. Xnr2 and Xnr5 unprocessed proteins inhibit Wnt signaling upstream of dishevelled.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Yasuko; Takahashi, Shuji; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Tanegashima, Kousuke; Yokota, Chika; Whitman, Malcolm; Asashima, Makoto

    2005-12-01

    Nodal and Nodal-related proteins activate the Activin-like signal pathway and play a key role in the formation of mesoderm and endoderm in vertebrate development. Recent studies have shown additional activities of Nodal-related proteins apart from the canonical Activin-like signal pathway. Here we report a novel function of Nodal-related proteins using cleavage mutants of Xenopus nodal-related genes (cmXnr2 and cmXnr5), which are known to be dominant-negative inhibitors of nodal family signaling. cmXnr2 and cmXnr5 inhibited both BMP signaling and Wnt signaling without activating the Activin-like signal in animal cap assays. Pro region construct of Xnr2 and Xnr5 did not inhibit Xwnt8, and pro/mature region chimera mutant cmActivin-Xnr2 and cmActivin-Xnr5 also did not inhibit Xwnt8 activity. These results indicate that the pro domains of Xnr2 and Xnr5 are necessary, but not sufficient, for Wnt inhibition, by Xnr family proteins. In addition, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that the unprocessed Xnr5 protein is stably produced and secreted as effectively as mature Xnr5 protein, and that the unprocessed Xnr5 protein diffused in the extracellular space. These results suggest that unprocessed Xnr2 and Xnr5 proteins may be involved in inhibiting both BMP and Wnt signaling and are able to be secreted to act on somewhat distant target cells, if these are highly produced. PMID:16193491

  14. A bacterial signal peptide is functional in plants and directs proteins to the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Lorena; Gan, Qinglei; Wang, Kan

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LT-B) has been used as a model antigen for the production of plant-derived high-valued proteins in maize. LT-B with its native signal peptide (BSP) has been shown to accumulate in starch granules of transgenic maize kernels. To elucidate the targeting properties of the bacterial LT-B protein and BSP in plant systems, the subcellular localization of visual marker green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to LT-B and various combinations of signal peptides was examined in Arabidopsis protoplasts and transgenic maize. Biochemical analysis indicates that the LT-B::GFP fusion proteins can assemble and fold properly retaining both the antigenicity of LT-B and the fluorescing properties of GFP. Maize kernel fractionation revealed that transgenic lines carrying BSP result in recombinant protein association with fibre and starch fractions. Confocal microscopy analysis indicates that the fusion proteins accumulate in the endomembrane system of plant cells in a signal peptide-dependent fashion. This is the first report providing evidence of the ability of a bacterial signal peptide to target proteins to the plant secretory pathway. The results provide important insights for further understanding the heterologous protein trafficking mechanisms and for developing effective strategies in molecular farming. PMID:19491306

  15. Differential regulation of Gli proteins by Sufu in the lung affects PDGF signaling and myofibroblast development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling relies on three Gli transcription factors to mediate Hh responses. This process is controlled in part by a major negative regulator, Sufu, through its effects on Gli protein level, distribution and activity. In this report, we showed that Sufu regulates Gli1 protein...

  16. Protein-protein, protein-RNA and protein-lipid interactions of signal-recognition particle components in the hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Acidianus ambivalens.

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Ralf G

    2003-01-01

    The signal-recognition particle (SRP) of one of the most acidophilic and hyperthermophilic archaeal cells, Acidianus ambivalens, and its putative receptor component, FtsY (prokaryotic SRP receptor), were investigated in detail. A. ambivalens Ffh (fifty-four-homologous protein) was shown to be a soluble protein with strong affinity to membranes. In its membrane-residing form, Ffh was extracted from plasma membranes with chaotropic agents like urea, but not with agents diminishing electrostatic interactions. Using unilamellar tetraether phospholipid vesicles, both Ffh and FtsY associate independently from each other in the absence of other factors, suggesting an equilibrium of soluble and membrane-bound protein forms under in vivo conditions. The Ffh protein precipitated from cytosolic cell supernatants with anti-Ffh antibodies, together with an 7 S-alike SRP-RNA, suggesting a stable core ribonucleoprotein composed of both components under native conditions. The SRP RNA of A. ambivalens depicted a size of about 309 nucleotides like the SRP RNA of the related organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. A stable heterodimeric complex composed of Ffh and FtsY was absent in cytosolic supernatants, indicating a transiently formed complex during archaeal SRP targeting. The FtsY protein precipitated in cytosolic supernatants with anti-FtsY antisera as a homomeric protein lacking accessory protein components. However, under in vitro conditions, recombinantly generated Ffh and FtsY associate in a nucleotide-independent manner, supporting a structural receptor model with two interacting apoproteins. PMID:12775213

  17. Nuclear Microinjection to Assess How Heterologously Expressed Proteins Impact Ca2+ Signals in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Xenopus oocyte is frequently used for heterologous expression and for studying the spatiotemporal patterning of Ca2+ signals. Here, we outline a protocol for nuclear microinjection of the Xenopus oocyte for the purpose of studying how subsequently expressed proteins impact intracellular Ca2+ signals evoked by inositol trisphosphate (InsP3). Injected oocytes can easily be identified by reporter technologies and the impact of heterologously expressed proteins on the generation and properties of InsP3-evoked Ca2+ signals can be resolved using caged InsP3 and fluorescent Ca2+ indicators. PMID:23457340

  18. Phase transitions in the assembly of multivalent signalling proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pilong; Banjade, Sudeep; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Kim, Soyeon; Chen, Baoyu; Guo, Liang; Llaguno, Marc; Hollingsworth, Javoris V.; King, David S.; Banani, Salman F.; Russo, Paul S.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Nixon, B. Tracy; Rosen, Michael K.

    2013-04-08

    Cells are organized on length scales ranging from angstrom to micrometers. However, the mechanisms by which angstrom-scale molecular properties are translated to micrometer-scale macroscopic properties are not well understood. Here we show that interactions between diverse synthetic, multivalent macromolecules (including multi-domain proteins and RNA) produce sharp liquid-liquid-demixing phase separations, generating micrometer-sized liquid droplets in aqueous solution. This macroscopic transition corresponds to a molecular transition between small complexes and large, dynamic supramolecular polymers. The concentrations needed for phase transition are directly related to the valency of the interacting species. In the case of the actin-regulatory protein called neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) interacting with its established biological partners NCK and phosphorylated nephrin1, the phase transition corresponds to a sharp increase in activity towards an actin nucleation factor, the Arp2/3 complex. The transition is governed by the degree of phosphorylation of nephrin, explaining how this property of the system can be controlled to regulatory effect by kinases. The widespread occurrence of multivalent systems suggests that phase transitions may be used to spatially organize and biochemically regulate information throughout biology.

  19. Phase transitions in the assembly of multivalent signalling proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Pilong; Banjade, Sudeep; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Kim, Soyeon; Chen, Baoyu; Guo, Liang; Llaguno, Marc; Hollingsworth, Javoris V; King, David S; Banani, Salman F; Russo, Paul S; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Nixon, B Tracy; Rosen, Michael K

    2012-03-15

    Cells are organized on length scales ranging from ångström to micrometres. However, the mechanisms by which ångström-scale molecular properties are translated to micrometre-scale macroscopic properties are not well understood. Here we show that interactions between diverse synthetic, multivalent macromolecules (including multi-domain proteins and RNA) produce sharp liquid-liquid-demixing phase separations, generating micrometre-sized liquid droplets in aqueous solution. This macroscopic transition corresponds to a molecular transition between small complexes and large, dynamic supramolecular polymers. The concentrations needed for phase transition are directly related to the valency of the interacting species. In the case of the actin-regulatory protein called neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) interacting with its established biological partners NCK and phosphorylated nephrin, the phase transition corresponds to a sharp increase in activity towards an actin nucleation factor, the Arp2/3 complex. The transition is governed by the degree of phosphorylation of nephrin, explaining how this property of the system can be controlled to regulatory effect by kinases. The widespread occurrence of multivalent systems suggests that phase transitions may be used to spatially organize and biochemically regulate information throughout biology. PMID:22398450

  20. SUMOylation regulates ciliary localization of olfactory signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Joiner, Ariell M.; Zhang, Lian; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge; Martens, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cilia are evolutionarily conserved organelles found on many mammalian cell types, including neuronal populations. Although neuronal cilia, including those on olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), are often delineated by localization of adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3, also known as ADCY3), the mechanisms responsible for targeting integral membrane proteins are largely unknown. Post-translational modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins plays an important role in protein localization processes such as nuclear–cytosolic transport. Here, we identified through bioinformatic analysis that adenylyl cyclases harbor conserved SUMOylation motifs, and show that AC3 is a substrate for SUMO modification. Functionally, overexpression of the SUMO protease SENP2 prevented ciliary localization of AC3, without affecting ciliation or cilia maintenance. Furthermore, AC3-SUMO mutants did not localize to cilia. To test whether SUMOylation is sufficient for cilia entry, we compared localization of ANO2, which possesses a SUMO motif, and ANO1, which lacks SUMOylation sites and does not localize to cilia. Introduction of SUMOylation sites into ANO1 was not sufficient for ciliary entry. These data suggest that SUMOylation is necessary but not sufficient for ciliary trafficking of select constituents, further establishing the link between ciliary and nuclear import. PMID:25908845

  1. Titin: central player of hypertrophic signaling and sarcomeric protein quality control.

    PubMed

    Kötter, Sebastian; Andresen, Christian; Krüger, Martina

    2014-11-01

    The giant sarcomeric protein titin has multiple important functions in striated muscle cells. Due to its gigantic size, its central position in the sarcomere and its elastic I-band domains, titin is a scaffold protein that is important for sarcomere assembly, and serves as a molecular spring that defines myofilament distensibility. This review focuses on the emerging role of titin in mechanosensing and hypertrophic signaling, and further highlights recent evidence that links titin to sarcomeric protein turnover. PMID:25205716

  2. The Stimulatory Gαs Protein Is Involved in Olfactory Signal Transduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ying; Zhang, Weiyi; Farhat, Katja; Oberland, Sonja; Gisselmann, Günter; Neuhaus, Eva M.

    2011-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors typically mediate olfactory signal transduction by coupling to G-proteins. Although insect odorant receptors have seven transmembrane domains like G-protein coupled receptors, they have an inverted membrane topology, constituting a key difference between the olfactory systems of insects and other animals. While heteromeric insect ORs form ligand-activated non-selective cation channels in recombinant expression systems, the evidence for an involvement of cyclic nucleotides and G-proteins in odor reception is inconsistent. We addressed this question in vivo by analyzing the role of G-proteins in olfactory signaling using electrophysiological recordings. We found that Gαs plays a crucial role for odorant induced signal transduction in OR83b expressing olfactory sensory neurons, but not in neurons expressing CO2 responsive proteins GR21a/GR63a. Moreover, signaling of Drosophila ORs involved Gαs also in a heterologous expression system. In agreement with these observations was the finding that elevated levels of cAMP result in increased firing rates, demonstrating the existence of a cAMP dependent excitatory signaling pathway in the sensory neurons. Together, we provide evidence that Gαs plays a role in the OR mediated signaling cascade in Drosophila. PMID:21490930

  3. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator and repressor proteins use different nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Skiadopoulos, M H; McBride, A A

    1996-02-01

    The E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus type 1 encodes at least three nuclear phosphoproteins that regulate viral transcription and DNA replication. All three proteins have a common C-terminal domain that has DNA-binding and dimerization activities. A basic region in this domain forms an alpha helix which makes direct contact with the DNA target. In this study, it is shown that in addition to its role in DNA binding, this basic region functions as a nuclear localization signal both in the E2 DNA-binding domain and in a heterologous protein. Deletion of this signal sequence resulted in increased accumulation of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins in the cytoplasm, but nuclear localization was not eliminated. In the full-length transactivator protein, another signal, present in the N-terminal transactivation domain, is used for transport to the nucleus, and the C-terminal nuclear localization signal(s) are masked. The use of different nuclear localization signals could potentially allow differential regulation of the subcellular localization of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins at some stage in the viral life cycle. PMID:8551571

  4. Allosteric and Biased G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling Regulation: Potentials for New Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Etienne; Clément, Stéphanie; Laporte, Stéphane A.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that participate in many aspects of the endocrine function and are important targets for drug development. They transduce signals mainly, but not exclusively, via hetero-trimeric G proteins, leading to a diversity of intracellular signaling cascades. Ligands binding at the hormone orthosteric sites of receptors have been classified as agonists, antagonists, and/or inverse agonists based on their ability to mainly modulate G protein signaling. Accumulating evidence also indicates that such ligands, alone or in combination with other ones such as those acting outside the orthosteric hormone binding sites (e.g., allosteric modulators), have the ability to selectively engage subsets of signaling responses as compared to the natural endogenous ligands. Such modes of functioning have been variously referred to as “functional selectivity” or “ligand-biased signaling.” In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding GPCR-biased signaling and their functional regulation with a focus on the evolving concept that receptor domains can also be targeted to allosterically bias signaling, and discuss the usefulness of such modes of regulation for the design of more efficient therapeutics. PMID:24847311

  5. The evolutionarily conserved BMP-binding protein Twisted gastrulation promotes BMP signalling

    PubMed Central

    Oelgeschläger, Michael; Larraín, Juan; Geissert, Douglas; De Robertis, Eddy M.

    2008-01-01

    Dorsal-ventral patterning in vertebrate and Drosophila embryos requires a conserved system of extracellular proteins to generate a positional information gradient. The components involved include bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP/Dpp), a BMP antagonist (Chordin/Short gastrulation; Chd/Sog) and a secreted metalloproteinase (Xolloid/Tolloid) that cleaves Chd/Sog. Here we describe Xenopus Twisted gastrulation (xTsg), another member of this signalling pathway. xTsg is expressed ventrally as part of the BMP-4 synexpression group and encodes a secreted BMP-binding protein that is a BMP signalling agonist. The data suggest a molecular mechanism by which xTsg dislodges latent BMPs bound to Chordin BMP-binding fragments generated by Xolloid cleavage, providing a permissive signal that allows high BMP signalling in the embryo. Drosophila Tsg also binds BMPs and is expressed dorsally, supporting the proposal that the dorsal-ventral axis was inverted in the course of animal evolution. PMID:10866189

  6. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling Pathway as a Discovery Target in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Nan, Guangxian

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases are critical modulators of a variety of intracellular and extracellular signal transduction pathways, and abnormal phosphorylation events can contribute to disease progression in a variety of diseases. As a result, protein kinases have emerged as important new drug targets for small molecule therapeutics. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway transmits signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus in response to a variety of different stimuli. Because this pathway controls a broad spectrum of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and stress responses, it is accepted as a therapeutic target for cancer and peripheral inflammatory disorders. There is also increasing evidence that MAPK is an important regulator of ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral vascular disease, raising the possibility that it might be a drug discovery target for stroke. In this review, we discuss the MAPK signaling pathway in association with its activation in stroke-induced brain injury. PMID:26842916

  7. Characterization of Golgi scaffold proteins and their roles in compartmentalizing cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wenna; Lei, Qiang; Jiang, Zheng; Hu, Zhiping

    2014-08-01

    Subcellular compartmentalization has become an important theme in cell signaling. In particular, the Golgi apparatus (GA) plays a prominent role in compartmentalizing signaling cascades that originate at the plasma membrane or other organelles. To precisely regulate this process, cells have evolved a unique class of organizer proteins, termed "scaffold proteins". Sef, PAQR3, PAQR10 and PAQR11 are scaffold proteins that have recently been identified on the GA and are referred to as Golgi scaffolds. The major cell growth signaling pathways, such as Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, insulin and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), are tightly regulated spatially and temporally by these Golgi scaffolds to ensure a physiologically appropriate outcome. Here, we discuss the subcellular localization and characterization of the topology and functional domains of these Golgi scaffolds and summarize their roles in the compartmentalization of cell signaling. We also highlight the physiological and pathological roles of these Golgi scaffolds in tumorigenesis and developmental disorders. PMID:24337566

  8. A protein targeting signal that functions in polarized epithelial cells in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Ali, S; Hall, J; Hazlewood, G P; Hirst, B H; Gilbert, H J

    1996-01-01

    Eukaryotic membrane-associated polypeptides often contain a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that signals the attachment of GPI lipids to these proteins. The GPI anchor can function as a basolateral or apical targeting signal in mammalian cells cultured in vitro, although the function of the GPI anchor in vivo remains to be elucidated. In this study we have evaluated the effect of fusing a GPI anchor sequence to a prokaryotic reporter protein on the cellular location of the polypeptide in polarized epithelial cells of transgenic mice. The bacterial enzyme, when fused to a eukaryotic signal peptide, was secreted through the basolateral membrane of small-intestinal enterocytes; however, when the enzyme was lined to the GPI anchor sequence the polypeptide was redirected to the apical surface of the epithelial cells. These data provide the first direct evidence that the GPI anchor functions as an apical membrane protein sorting signal in polarized epithelial cells in vivo. PMID:8645168

  9. GTPase acceleration as the rate-limiting step in Arabidopsis G protein-coupled sugar signaling.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher A; Taylor, J Philip; Gao, Yajun; Kimple, Adam J; Grigston, Jeffrey C; Chen, Jin-Gui; Siderovski, David P; Jones, Alan M; Willard, Francis S

    2007-10-30

    Heterotrimeric G protein signaling is important for cell-proliferative and glucose-sensing signal transduction pathways in the model plant organism Arabidopsis thaliana. AtRGS1 is a seven-transmembrane, RGS domain-containing protein that is a putative membrane receptor for d-glucose. Here we show, by using FRET, that d-glucose alters the interaction between the AtGPA1 and AtRGS1 in vivo. AtGPA1 is a unique heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit that is constitutively GTP-bound given its high spontaneous nucleotide exchange coupled with slow GTP hydrolysis. Analysis of a point mutation in AtRGS1 that abrogates GTPase-accelerating activity demonstrates that the regulation of AtGPA1 GTP hydrolysis mediates sugar signal transduction during Arabidopsis development, in contrast to animals where nucleotide exchange is the limiting step in the heterotrimeric G protein nucleotide cycle. PMID:17951432

  10. The GoLoco motif: heralding a new tango between G protein signaling and cell division.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2002-04-01

    The Galpha and Gbetagamma components of heterotrimeric G proteins, typically associated with cell-surface receptor signaling, also partake in the macromolecular interactions that underlie cell polarity and cell division. Proteins with Galpha-binding GoLoco motifs, such as Drosophila melanogaster Pins (for Partner of Inscuteable) and its mammalian counterpart LGN, participate in multi-protein complexes that maintain cellular asymmetry and orderly segregation of chromosomal content and daughter cell bodies. The GoLoco motif was recently identified as a selective Galpha-binding partner: the GoLoco-Galpha interaction can displace Gbetagamma and inhibit guanine nucleotide release from the bound Galpha subunit. Recent x-ray crystallographic studies suggest ways in which GoLoco-motif peptides may modulate heterotrimeric G protein signaling. Such peptides could be exploited to help dissect the signals that underpin cell polarity and cell division processes. PMID:14993354

  11. The PHR proteins: intracellular signaling hubs in neuronal development and axon degeneration.

    PubMed

    Grill, Brock; Murphey, Rodney K; Borgen, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    During development, a coordinated and integrated series of events must be accomplished in order to generate functional neural circuits. Axons must navigate toward target cells, build synaptic connections, and terminate outgrowth. The PHR proteins (consisting of mammalian Phr1/MYCBP2, Drosophila Highwire and C. elegans RPM-1) function in each of these events in development. Here, we review PHR function across species, as well as the myriad of signaling pathways PHR proteins regulate. These findings collectively suggest that the PHR proteins are intracellular signaling hubs, a concept we explore in depth. Consistent with prominent developmental functions, genetic links have begun to emerge between PHR signaling networks and neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, schizophrenia and intellectual disability. Finally, we discuss the recent and important finding that PHR proteins regulate axon degeneration, which has further heightened interest in this fascinating group of molecules. PMID:27008623

  12. Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer Disease: Role of Amyloid Precursor Protein and Presenilin 1 Intracellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nizzari, Mario; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Pagano, Aldo; Porcile, Carola; Russo, Claudio; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder characterized by (1) progressive loss of synapses and neurons, (2) intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein, and (3) amyloid plaques. Genetically, AD is linked to mutations in few proteins amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 and 2 (PS1 and PS2). The molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in AD as well as the physiological function of APP are not yet known. A recent theory has proposed that APP and PS1 modulate intracellular signals to induce cell-cycle abnormalities responsible for neuronal death and possibly amyloid deposition. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of a complex network of proteins, clearly involved in the regulation of signal transduction mechanisms that interact with both APP and PS1. In this review we discuss the significance of novel finding related to cell-signaling events modulated by APP and PS1 in the development of neurodegeneration. PMID:22496686

  13. WRKY Proteins: Signaling and Regulation of Expression during Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are emerging players in plant signaling and have been thoroughly reported to play important roles in plants under biotic stress like pathogen attack. However, recent advances in this field do reveal the enormous significance of these proteins in eliciting responses induced by abiotic stresses. WRKY proteins act as major transcription factors, either as positive or negative regulators. Specific WRKY factors which help in the expression of a cluster of stress-responsive genes are being targeted and genetically modified to induce improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The knowledge regarding the signaling cascade leading to the activation of the WRKY proteins, their interaction with other proteins of the signaling pathway, and the downstream genes activated by them are altogether vital for justified targeting of the WRKY genes. WRKY proteins have also been considered to generate tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses with possible roles in mediating a cross talk between abiotic and biotic stress responses. In this review, we have reckoned the diverse signaling pattern and biological functions of WRKY proteins throughout the plant kingdom along with the growing prospects in this field of research. PMID:25879071

  14. A novel non-canonical Notch signaling regulates expression of synaptic vesicle proteins in excitatory neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yukari; Nishimune, Hiroshi; Hozumi, Katsuto; Saga, Yumiko; Harada, Akihiro; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Kopan, Raphael; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling plays crucial roles for cellular differentiation during development through γ-secretase-dependent intramembrane proteolysis followed by transcription of target genes. Although recent studies implicate that Notch regulates synaptic plasticity or cognitive performance, the molecular mechanism how Notch works in mature neurons remains uncertain. Here we demonstrate that a novel Notch signaling is involved in expression of synaptic proteins in postmitotic neurons. Levels of several synaptic vesicle proteins including synaptophysin 1 and VGLUT1 were increased when neurons were cocultured with Notch ligands-expressing NIH3T3 cells. Neuron-specific deletion of Notch genes decreased these proteins, suggesting that Notch signaling maintains the expression of synaptic vesicle proteins in a cell-autonomous manner. Unexpectedly, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor, but not γ-secretase inhibitor, abolished the elevation of synaptic vesicle proteins, suggesting that generation of Notch intracellular domain is dispensable for this function. These data uncover a ligand-dependent, but γ-secretase-independent, non-canonical Notch signaling involved in presynaptic protein expression in postmitotic neurons. PMID:27040987

  15. A novel non-canonical Notch signaling regulates expression of synaptic vesicle proteins in excitatory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yukari; Nishimune, Hiroshi; Hozumi, Katsuto; Saga, Yumiko; Harada, Akihiro; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Kopan, Raphael; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling plays crucial roles for cellular differentiation during development through γ-secretase-dependent intramembrane proteolysis followed by transcription of target genes. Although recent studies implicate that Notch regulates synaptic plasticity or cognitive performance, the molecular mechanism how Notch works in mature neurons remains uncertain. Here we demonstrate that a novel Notch signaling is involved in expression of synaptic proteins in postmitotic neurons. Levels of several synaptic vesicle proteins including synaptophysin 1 and VGLUT1 were increased when neurons were cocultured with Notch ligands-expressing NIH3T3 cells. Neuron-specific deletion of Notch genes decreased these proteins, suggesting that Notch signaling maintains the expression of synaptic vesicle proteins in a cell-autonomous manner. Unexpectedly, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor, but not γ-secretase inhibitor, abolished the elevation of synaptic vesicle proteins, suggesting that generation of Notch intracellular domain is dispensable for this function. These data uncover a ligand-dependent, but γ-secretase-independent, non-canonical Notch signaling involved in presynaptic protein expression in postmitotic neurons. PMID:27040987

  16. Signaling the Unfolded Protein Response in primary brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Le Reste, Pierre-Jean; Avril, Tony; Quillien, Véronique; Morandi, Xavier; Chevet, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) is an adaptive cellular program used by eukaryotic cells to cope with protein misfolding stress in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). During tumor development, cancer cells are facing intrinsic (oncogene activation) and extrinsic (limiting nutrient or oxygen supply; exposure to chemotherapies) challenges, with which they must cope to survive. Primary brain tumors are relatively rare but deadly and present a significant challenge in the determination of risk factors in the population. These tumors are inherently difficult to cure because of their protected location in the brain. As such surgery, radiation and chemotherapy options carry potentially lasting patient morbidity and incomplete tumor cure. Some of these tumors, such as glioblastoma, were reported to present features of ER stress and to depend on UPR activation to sustain growth, but to date there is no clear general representation of the ER stress status in primary brain tumors. In this review, we describe the key molecular mechanisms controlling the UPR and their implication in cancers. Then we extensively review the literature reporting the status of ER stress in various primary brain tumors and discuss the potential impact of such observation on patient stratification and on the possibility of developing appropriate targeted therapies using the UPR as therapeutic target. PMID:27016056

  17. Protein kinase Cι expression and oncogenic signaling mechanisms in cancer.

    PubMed

    Murray, Nicole R; Kalari, Krishna R; Fields, Alan P

    2011-04-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that PKCι is an oncogene and prognostic marker that is frequently targeted for genetic alteration in many major forms of human cancer. Functional data demonstrate that PKCι is required for the transformed phenotype of lung, pancreatic, ovarian, prostate, colon, and brain cancer cells. Future studies will be required to determine whether PKCι is also an oncogene in the many other cancer types that also overexpress PKCι. Studies of PKCι using genetically defined models of tumorigenesis have revealed a critical role for PKCι in multiple stages of tumorigenesis, including tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. Recent studies in a genetic model of lung adenocarcinoma suggest a role for PKCι in transformation of lung cancer stem cells. These studies have important implications for the therapeutic use of aurothiomalate (ATM), a highly selective PKCι signaling inhibitor currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Significant progress has been made in determining the molecular mechanisms by which PKCι drives the transformed phenotype, particularly the central role played by the oncogenic PKCι-Par6 complex in transformed growth and invasion, and of several PKCι-dependent survival pathways in chemo-resistance. Future studies will be required to determine the composition and dynamics of the PKCι-Par6 complex, and the mechanisms by which oncogenic signaling through this complex is regulated. Likewise, a better understanding of the critical downstream effectors of PKCι in various human tumor types holds promise for identifying novel prognostic and surrogate markers of oncogenic PKCι activity that may be clinically useful in ongoing clinical trials of ATM. PMID:20945390

  18. Chapter Three - Ubiquitination and Protein Turnover of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in GPCR Signaling and Cellular Regulation.

    PubMed

    Penela, P

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for regulating a wide variety of physiological processes, and distinct mechanisms for GPCR inactivation exist to guarantee correct receptor functionality. One of the widely used mechanisms is receptor phosphorylation by specific G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), leading to uncoupling from G proteins (desensitization) and receptor internalization. GRKs and β-arrestins also participate in the assembly of receptor-associated multimolecular complexes, thus initiating alternative G-protein-independent signaling events. In addition, the abundant GRK2 kinase has diverse "effector" functions in cellular migration, proliferation, and metabolism homeostasis by means of the phosphorylation or interaction with non-GPCR partners. Altered expression of GRKs (particularly of GRK2 and GRK5) occurs during pathological conditions characterized by impaired GPCR signaling including inflammatory syndromes, cardiovascular disease, and tumor contexts. It is increasingly appreciated that different pathways governing GRK protein stability play a role in the modulation of kinase levels in normal and pathological conditions. Thus, enhanced GRK2 degradation by the proteasome pathway occurs upon GPCR stimulation, what allows cellular adaptation to chronic stimulation in a physiological setting. β-arrestins participate in this process by facilitating GRK2 phosphorylation by different kinases and by recruiting diverse E3 ubiquitin ligase to the receptor complex. Different proteolytic systems (ubiquitin-proteasome, calpains), chaperone activities and signaling pathways influence the stability of GRKs in different ways, thus endowing specificity to GPCR regulation as protein turnover of GRKs can be differentially affected. Therefore, modulation of protein stability of GRKs emerges as a versatile mechanism for feedback regulation of GPCR signaling and basic cellular processes. PMID:27378756

  19. A simple feature construction method for predicting upstream/downstream signal flow in human protein-protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Suyu; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways play important roles in understanding the underlying mechanism of cell growth, cell apoptosis, organismal development and pathways-aberrant diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are commonly-used infrastructure to infer signaling pathways. However, PPI networks generally carry no information of upstream/downstream relationship between interacting proteins, which retards our inferring the signal flow of signaling pathways. In this work, we propose a simple feature construction method to train a SVM (support vector machine) classifier to predict PPI upstream/downstream relations. The domain based asymmetric feature representation naturally embodies domain-domain upstream/downstream relations, providing an unconventional avenue to predict the directionality between two objects. Moreover, we propose a semantically interpretable decision function and a macro bag-level performance metric to satisfy the need of two-instance depiction of an interacting protein pair. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves satisfactory cross validation performance and independent test performance. Lastly, we use the trained model to predict the PPIs in HPRD, Reactome and IntAct. Some predictions have been validated against recent literature. PMID:26648121

  20. Multistep current signal in protein translocation through graphene nanopores.

    PubMed

    Bonome, Emma Letizia; Lepore, Rosalba; Raimondo, Domenico; Cecconi, Fabio; Tramontano, Anna; Chinappi, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    In nanopore sensing experiments, the properties of molecules are probed by the variation of ionic currents flowing through the nanopore. In this context, the electronic properties and the single-layer thickness of graphene constitute a major advantage for molecule characterization. Here we analyze the translocation pathway of the thioredoxin protein across a graphene nanopore, and the related ionic currents, by integrating two nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods with a bioinformatic structural analysis. To obtain a qualitative picture of the translocation process and to identify salient features we performed unsupervised structural clustering on translocation conformations. This allowed us to identify some specific and robust translocation intermediates, characterized by significantly different ionic current flows. We found that the ion current strictly anticorrelates with the amount of pore occupancy by thioredoxin residues, providing a putative explanation of the multilevel current scenario observed in recently published translocation experiments. PMID:25866995

  1. Cholesterol Modification of Hedgehog Signaling Proteins in Animal Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeffrey A.; Young, Keith E.; Beachy, Philip A.

    1996-10-01

    To determine the function of the pS2 trefoil protein, which is normally expressed in the gastric mucosa, the mouse pS2 (mpS2) gene was inactivated. The antral and pyloric gastric mucosa of mpS2-null mice was dysfunctional and exhibited severe hyperplasia and dysplasia. All homozygous mutant mice developed antropyloric adenoma, and 30 percent developed multifocal intraepithelial or intramucosal carcinomas. The small intestine was characterized by enlarged villi and an abnormal infiltrate of lymphoid cells. These results indicate that mpS2 is essential for normal differentiation of the antral and pyloric gastric mucosa and may function as a gastric-specific tumor suppressor gene.

  2. Fgfr1 regulates development through the combinatorial use of signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, J. Richard; Molotkov, Andrei; Mazot, Pierre; Hoch, Renée V.; Soriano, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling governs multiple processes important in development and disease. Many lines of evidence have implicated Erk1/2 signaling induced through Frs2 as the predominant effector pathway downstream from Fgf receptors (Fgfrs), but these receptors can also signal through other mechanisms. To explore the functional significance of the full range of signaling downstream from Fgfrs in mice, we engineered an allelic series of knock-in point mutations designed to disrupt Fgfr1 signaling functions individually and in combination. Analysis of each mutant indicates that Frs2 binding to Fgfr1 has the most pleiotropic functions in development but also that the receptor uses multiple proteins additively in vivo. In addition to Frs2, Crk proteins and Plcγ also contribute to Erk1/2 activation, affecting axis elongation and craniofacial and limb development and providing a biochemical mechanism for additive signaling requirements. Disruption of all known signaling functions diminished Erk1/2 and Plcγ activation but did not recapitulate the peri-implantation Fgfr1-null phenotype. This suggests that Erk1/2-independent signaling pathways are functionally important for Fgf signaling in vivo. PMID:26341559

  3. Inhibition of protein prenylation down-regulates signalling by inflammatory mediators in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Alaei, P; MacNulty, E E; Ryder, N S

    1996-05-01

    Several inflammatory mediators have been shown to activate phospholipase C in human keratinocytes via GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors. Since GTP-binding proteins are prenylated proteins, we have examined the role of prenylation in signal transduction in HaCaT keratinocytes. Indirect inhibition of prenylation with the HMG CoA reductase inhibitors fluvastatin or compactin decreased bradykinin-stimulated inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate generation. This effect was abolished by mevalonic acid but not by serum, indicating a requirement for a non-sterol metabolite for signal generation. The BK response was also inhibited by zaragozic acids B and C, known inhibitors of prenyl protein transferases. These results suggest that protein prenylation may be a novel therapeutic target in dermatological conditions where an up-regulation of the inositol lipid pathway has been demonstrated. PMID:8630058

  4. A matricellular protein and EGF-like repeat signalling in the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-12-01

    Matricellular proteins interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and modulate cellular processes by binding to cell surface receptors and initiating intracellular signal transduction. Their association with the ECM and the ability of some members of this protein family to regulate cell motility have opened up new avenues of research to investigate their functions in normal and diseased cells. In this review, we summarize the research on CyrA, an ECM calmodulin-binding protein in Dictyostelium. CyrA is proteolytically cleaved into smaller EGF-like (EGFL) repeat containing cleavage products during development. The first EGFL repeat of CyrA binds to the cell surface and activates a novel signalling pathway that modulates cell motility in this model organism. The similarity of CyrA to the most well-characterized matricellular proteins in mammals allows it to be designated as the first matricellular protein identified in Dictyostelium. PMID:22782112

  5. Conformational transition in signal transduction: metastable states and transition pathways in the activation of a signaling protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rahul; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Signal transduction is of vital importance to the growth and adaptation of living organisms. The key to understand mechanisms of biological signal transduction is elucidation of the conformational dynamics of its signaling proteins, as the activation of a signaling protein is fundamentally a process of conformational transition from an inactive to an active state. A predominant form of signal transduction for bacterial sensing of environmental changes in the wild or inside their hosts is a variety of two-component systems, in which the conformational transition of a response regulator (RR) from an inactive to an active state initiates responses to the environmental changes. Here, RR activation has been investigated using RR468 as a model system by extensive unbiased all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent, starting from snapshots along a targeted MD trajectory that covers the conformational transition. Markov state modeling, transition path theory, and geometric analyses of the wealth of the MD data have provided a comprehensive description of the RR activation. It involves a network of metastable states, with one metastable state essentially the same as the inactive state and another very similar to the active state that are connected via a small set of intermediates. Five major pathways account for >75% of the fluxes of the conformational transition from the inactive to the active-like state. The thermodynamic stability of the states and the activation barriers between states are found, to identify rate-limiting steps. The conformal transition is initiated predominantly by movements of the β3α3 loop, followed by movements of the β4α4-loop and neighboring α4 helix region, and capped by additional movements of the β3α3 loop. A number of transient hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions are revealed, and they may be important for the conformational transition. PMID:25945797

  6. Classification of signaling proteins based on molecular star graph descriptors using Machine Learning models.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Cuiñas, Rubén F; Seoane, José A; Fernández-Blanco, Enrique; Dorado, Julian; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2015-11-01

    Signaling proteins are an important topic in drug development due to the increased importance of finding fast, accurate and cheap methods to evaluate new molecular targets involved in specific diseases. The complexity of the protein structure hinders the direct association of the signaling activity with the molecular structure. Therefore, the proposed solution involves the use of protein star graphs for the peptide sequence information encoding into specific topological indices calculated with S2SNet tool. The Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship classification model obtained with Machine Learning techniques is able to predict new signaling peptides. The best classification model is the first signaling prediction model, which is based on eleven descriptors and it was obtained using the Support Vector Machines-Recursive Feature Elimination (SVM-RFE) technique with the Laplacian kernel (RFE-LAP) and an AUROC of 0.961. Testing a set of 3114 proteins of unknown function from the PDB database assessed the prediction performance of the model. Important signaling pathways are presented for three UniprotIDs (34 PDBs) with a signaling prediction greater than 98.0%. PMID:26297890

  7. The adaptor protein CIN85 assembles intracellular signaling clusters for B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Julius; Wong, Leo E; Pirkuliyeva, Sona; Schulz, Kathrin; Schwiegk, Claudia; Fünfgeld, Kevser Gencalp; Keppler, Selina; Batista, Facundo D; Urlaub, Henning; Habeck, Michael; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Wienands, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor molecule Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kD (CIN85) regulates signaling from a number of cell surface receptors, such as growth factor receptors and antigen receptors on lymphocytes. Because of its multidomain structure, CIN85 is thought to act as a classical adaptor protein that connects functionally distinct components of a given signaling pathway through diverse protein domains. However, we found that in B lymphocytes, CIN85 functions to oligomerize SLP-65, which is the central effector protein of the B cell receptor (BCR). Therefore, CIN85 trimerizes through a carboxyl-terminal, coiled-coil domain. The multiple Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of trimeric CIN85 molecules associated with multiple SLP-65 molecules, which recruited further CIN85 trimers, thereby perpetuating the oligomerization process. Formation of this oligomeric signaling complex in resting B cells rendered the cells poised for the efficient initiation of intracellular signaling upon BCR stimulation. Our data suggest that the functionality of signaling cascades does not rely solely on the qualitative linkage of their various components but requires a critical number of effectors to become concentrated in signaling complexes. PMID:27353366

  8. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca; Kleinjung, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Allostery offers a highly specific way to modulate protein function. Therefore, understanding this mechanism is of increasing interest for protein science and drug discovery. However, allosteric signal transmission is difficult to detect experimentally and to model because it is often mediated by local structural changes propagating along multiple pathways. To address this, we developed a method to identify communication pathways by an information-theoretical analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. Signal propagation was described as information exchange through a network of correlated local motions, modeled as transitions between canonical states of protein fragments. The method was used to describe allostery in two-component regulatory systems. In particular, the transmission from the allosteric site to the signaling surface of the receiver domain NtrC was shown to be mediated by a layer of hub residues. The location of hubs preferentially connected to the allosteric site was found in close agreement with key residues experimentally identified as involved in the signal transmission. The comparison with the networks of the homologues CheY and FixJ highlighted similarities in their dynamics. In particular, we showed that a preorganized network of fragment connections between the allosteric and functional sites exists already in the inactive state of all three proteins.—Pandini, A., Fornili, A., Fraternali, F., Kleinjung, J. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics. PMID:22071506

  9. A complex of LIN-5 and GPR proteins regulates G protein signaling and spindle function in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G.; Fisk, Ridgely M.; Xu, Huihong; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2003-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans coiled-coil protein LIN-5 mediates several processes in cell division that depend on spindle forces, including alignment and segregation of chromosomes and positioning of the spindle. Here, we describe two closely related proteins, GPR-1 and GPR-2 (Gprotein regulator), which associate with LIN-5 in vivo and in vitro and depend on LIN-5 for localization to the spindle and cell cortex. GPR-1/GPR-2 contain a GoLoco/GPR motif that mediates interaction with GDP-bound Gαi/o. Inactivation of lin-5, gpr-1/gpr-2, or the Gαi/o genes goa-1 and gpa-16 all cause highly similar chromosome segregation and spindle positioning defects, indicating a positive role for the LIN-5 and GPR proteins in G protein signaling. The lin-5 and gpr-1/gpr-2 genes appear to act downstream of the par polarity genes in the one- and two-cell stages and downstream of the tyrosine kinase-related genes mes-1 and src-1 at the four-cell stage. Together, these results indicate that GPR-1/GPR-2 in association with LIN-5 activate G protein signaling to affect spindle force. Polarity determinants may regulate LIN-5/GPR/Gα locally to create the asymmetric forces that drive spindle movement. Results in C. elegans and other species are consistent with a novel model for receptor-independent activation of Gαi/o signaling. PMID:12730122

  10. Chronic leucine supplementation of a low protein diet increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTOR signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine acutely stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. We hypothesized that leucine supplementation of a low protein diet will enhance protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in the neonate for prolonged periods. Fasted 5-d-old pigs (n=6–8...

  11. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E; Pelicci, P G; Pouysségur, J; Van Obberghen-Schilling, E

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have recently been elucidated biochemically and genetically. The present study was undertaken to determine whether common signaling components are used by these two distinct classes of receptors. Here we report that the adaptor protein Shc, is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues following stimulation of the thrombin receptor in growth-responsive CCL39 fibroblasts. Shc phosphorylation by thrombin or the thrombin receptor agonist peptide is maximal by 15 min and persists for > or = 2 h. Following thrombin stimulation, phosphorylated Shc is recruited to Grb2 complexes. One or more pertussis toxin-insensitive proteins appear to mediate this effect, since (i) pertussis toxin pre-treatment of cells does not blunt the action of thrombin and (ii) Shc phosphorylation on tyrosine can be stimulated by the muscarinic m1 receptor. Shc phosphorylation does not appear to involve protein kinase C, since the addition of 4-beta-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate has no effect. Rather, thrombin-induced Shc phosphorylation is enhanced in cells depleted of phorbol ester-sensitive protein kinase C isoforms. Expression of mutant Shc proteins defective in Grb2 binding displays a dominant-negative effect on thrombin-stimulated p44 MAP kinase activation, gene induction and cell growth. From these data, we conclude that Shc represents a crucial point of convergence between signaling pathways activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. Images PMID:8605873

  12. Effect of Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein-2 (WISP-2/CCN5), a downstream protein of Wnt signaling, on adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Inadera, Hidekuni Shimomura, Akiko; Tachibana, Shinjiro

    2009-02-20

    Wnt signaling negatively regulates adipocyte differentiation, and ectopic expression of Wnt-1 in 3T3-L1 cells induces several downstream molecules of Wnt signaling, including Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein (WISP)-2. In this study, we examined the role of WISP-2 in the process of adipocyte differentiation using an in vitro cell culture system. In the differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, WISP-2 expression was observed in growing cells and declined thereafter. In the mitotic clonal expansion phase of adipocyte differentiation, WISP-2 expression was transiently down-regulated concurrently with up-regulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein {delta} expression. Treatment of 3T3-L1 cells in the differentiation medium with lithium, an activator of Wnt signaling, inhibited the differentiation process with concomitant induction of WISP-2. Treatment of differentiated cells with lithium induced de-differentiation as evidenced by profound reduction of peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor {gamma} expression and concomitant induction of WISP-2. However, de-differentiation of differentiated cells induced by tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} did not induce WISP-2 expression. To directly examine the effect of WISP-2 on adipocyte differentiation, 3T3-L1 cells were infected with a retrovirus carrying WISP-2. Although forced expression of WISP-2 inhibited preadipocyte proliferation, it had no effect on adipocyte differentiation. Thus, although WISP-2 is a downstream protein of Wnt signaling, the role of WISP-2 on adipocyte differentiation may be marginal, at least in this in vitro culture model.

  13. Biased signaling through G-protein-coupled PROKR2 receptors harboring missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Oualid; Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Various missense mutations in the gene coding for prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome. However, the functional consequences of these mutations on the different signaling pathways of this receptor have not been studied. We first showed that the wild-type PROKR2 can activate different G-protein subtypes (Gq, Gs, and Gi/o) and recruit β-arrestins in transfected HEK-293 cells. We then examined, for each of these signaling pathways, the effects of 9 mutations that did not significantly impair cell surface targeting or ligand binding of the receptor. Four mutant receptors showing defective Gq signaling (R85C, R85H, R164Q, and V331M) could still recruit β-arrestins on ligand activation, which may cause biased signaling in vivo. Conversely, the R80C receptor could activate the 3 types of G proteins but could not recruit β-arrestins. Finally, the R268C receptor could recruit β-arrestins and activate the Gq and Gs signaling pathways but could not activate the Gi/o signaling pathway. Our results validate the concept that mutations in the genes encoding membrane receptors can bias downstream signaling in various ways, possibly leading to pathogenic and, perhaps in some cases, protective (e.g., R268C) effects. PMID:24830383

  14. A protein tagging system for signal amplification in gene expression and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Qi, Lei S.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Signals in many biological processes can be amplified by recruiting multiple copies of regulatory proteins to a site of action. Harnessing this principle, we have developed a novel protein scaffold, a repeating peptide array termed SunTag, which can recruit multiple copies of an antibody-fusion protein. We show that the SunTag can recruit up to 24 copies of GFP, thereby enabling long-term imaging of single protein molecules in living cells. We also use the SunTag to create a potent synthetic transcription factor by recruiting multiple copies of a transcriptional activation domain to a nuclease-deficient CRISPR/Cas9 protein and demonstrate strong activation of endogenous gene expression and re-engineered cell behavior with this system. Thus, the SunTag provides a versatile platform for multimerizing proteins on a target protein scaffold and is likely to have many applications in imaging and in controlling biological outputs. PMID:25307933

  15. The Detection of Protein via ZnO Resonant Raman Scattering Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Guiye; Yang, Guoliang; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Yichun

    2008-03-01

    Detecting protein with high sensitivity and specificity is essential for disease diagnostics, drug screening and other application. Semiconductor nanoparticles show better properties than organic dye molecules when used as markers for optical measurements. We used ZnO nanoparticles as markers for detecting protein in resonant Raman scattering measurements. The highly sensitive detection of proteins was achieved by an antibody-based sandwich assay. A probe for the target protein was constructed by binding the ZnO/Au nanoparticles to a primary antibody by eletrostatic interaction between Au and the antibody. A secondary antibody, which could be specifically recognized by target protein, was attached to a solid surface. The ZnO/Au-antibody probe could specifically recognize and bind to the complex of the target protein and secondary antibody. Our measurements using the resonant Raman scattering signal of ZnO nanoparticles showed good selectivity and sensitivity for the target protein.

  16. Protein Kinase D1 Signaling in Angiogenic Gene Expression and VEGF-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase D 1 (PKD-1) is a signaling kinase important in fundamental cell functions including migration, proliferation, and differentiation. PKD-1 is also a key regulator of gene expression and angiogenesis that is essential for cardiovascular development and tumor progression. Further understanding molecular aspects of PKD-1 signaling in the regulation of angiogenesis may have translational implications in obesity, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. The author will summarize and provide the insights into molecular mechanisms by which PKD-1 regulates transcriptional expression of angiogenic genes, focusing on the transcriptional regulation of CD36 by PKD-1-FoxO1 signaling axis along with the potential implications of this axis in arterial differentiation and morphogenesis. He will also discuss a new concept of dynamic balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic signaling in determining angiogenic switch, and stress how PKD-1 signaling regulates VEGF signaling-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:27200349

  17. Protein Kinase D1 Signaling in Angiogenic Gene Expression and VEGF-Mediated Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase D 1 (PKD-1) is a signaling kinase important in fundamental cell functions including migration, proliferation, and differentiation. PKD-1 is also a key regulator of gene expression and angiogenesis that is essential for cardiovascular development and tumor progression. Further understanding molecular aspects of PKD-1 signaling in the regulation of angiogenesis may have translational implications in obesity, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. The author will summarize and provide the insights into molecular mechanisms by which PKD-1 regulates transcriptional expression of angiogenic genes, focusing on the transcriptional regulation of CD36 by PKD-1-FoxO1 signaling axis along with the potential implications of this axis in arterial differentiation and morphogenesis. He will also discuss a new concept of dynamic balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic signaling in determining angiogenic switch, and stress how PKD-1 signaling regulates VEGF signaling-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:27200349

  18. Cell-free translation and purification of Arabidopsis thaliana regulator of G signaling 1 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Makino, Shin-Ichi; Beebe, Emily T; Urano, Daisuke; Aceti, David J; Misenheimer, Tina M; Peters, Jonathan; Fox, Brian G; Jones, Alan M

    2016-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana Regulator of G protein Signalling 1 (AtRGS1) is a protein with a predicted N-terminal 7-transmembrane (7TM) domain and a C-terminal cytosolic RGS1 box domain. The RGS1 box domain exerts GTPase activation (GAP) activity on Gα (AtGPA1), a component of heterotrimeric G protein signaling in plants. AtRGS1 may perceive an exogenous agonist to regulate the steady-state levels of the active form of AtGPA1. It is uncertain if the full-length AtRGS1 protein exerts any atypical effects on Gα, nor has it been established exactly how AtRGS1 contributes to perception of an extracellular signal and transmits this response to a G-protein dependent signaling cascade. Further studies on full-length AtRGS1 have been inhibited due to the extreme low abundance of the endogenous AtRGS1 protein in plants and lack of a suitable heterologous system to express AtRGS1. Here, we describe methods to produce full-length AtRGS1 by cell-free synthesis into unilamellar liposomes and nanodiscs. The cell-free synthesized AtRGS1 exhibits GTPase activating activity on Gα and can be purified to a level suitable for biochemical analyses. PMID:27164033

  19. Systematic Analysis of Essential Genes Reveals New Regulators of G protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cappell, Steven D.; Baker, Rachael; Skowyra, Dorota; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The yeast pheromone pathway consists of a canonical heterotrimeric G protein and MAP kinase cascade. To identify new signaling components we systematically evaluated 870 essential genes using a library of repressible-promoter strains. Quantitative transcription-reporter and MAPK activity assays were used to identify strains that exhibit altered pheromone sensitivity. Of the 92 newly identified essential genes required for proper G protein signaling, those involved with protein degradation were most highly-represented. Included in this group are members of the SCF (Skp-Cullin-F-Box) ubiquitin ligase complex. Further genetic and biochemical analysis reveals that SCFCdc4 acts together with the Cdc34 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme at the level of the G protein, promotes degradation of the G protein α subunit, Gpa1, in vivo and catalyzes Gpa1 ubiquitination in vitro. These new insights to the G protein signaling network reveal the essential-genome as an untapped resource for identifying new components and regulators of signal transduction pathways. PMID:20542006

  20. Cell density signal protein suitable for treatment of connective tissue injuries and defects

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    2002-08-13

    Identification, isolation and partial sequencing of a cell density protein produced by fibroblastic cells. The cell density signal protein comprising a 14 amino acid peptide or a fragment, variant, mutant or analog thereof, the deduced cDNA sequence from the 14 amino acid peptide, a recombinant protein, protein and peptide-specific antibodies, and the use of the peptide and peptide-specific antibodies as therapeutic agents for regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. A method for treatment and repair of connective tissue and tendon injuries, collagen deficiency, and connective tissue defects.

  1. The signal sequence of exported protein-1 directs the green fluorescent protein to the parasitophorous vacuole of transfected malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Adisa, Akinola; Rug, Melanie; Klonis, Nectarios; Foley, Michael; Cowman, Alan F; Tilley, Leann

    2003-02-21

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, spends part of its life cycle inside the erythrocytes of its human host. In the mature stages of intraerythrocytic growth, the parasite undertakes extensive remodeling of its adopted cellular home by exporting proteins beyond the confines of its own plasma membrane. To examine the signals involved in export of parasite proteins, we have prepared transfected parasites expressing a chimeric protein comprising the N-terminal region of the Plasmodium falciparum exported protein-1 appended to green fluorescent protein. The majority of the population of the chimeric protein appears to be correctly processed and trafficked to the parasitophorous vacuole, indicating that this is the default destination for protein secretion. Some of the protein is redirected to the parasite food vacuole and further degraded. Photobleaching studies reveal that the parasitophorous vacuole contains subcompartments that are only partially interconnected. Dual labeling with the lipid probe, BODIPY-TR-ceramide, reveals the presence of membrane-bound extensions that can bleb from the parasitophorous vacuole to produce double membrane-bound compartments. We also observed regions and extensions of the parasitophorous vacuole, where there is segregation of the lumenal chimera from the lipid components. These regions may represent sites for the sorting of proteins destined for the trafficking to sites beyond the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. PMID:12456681

  2. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 signaling in innate immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Susanne; Ruland, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein (Card)9 is a nonredundant adapter protein that functions in the innate immune system in the assembly of multifunctional signaling complexes. Together with B cell lymphoma (Bcl)10 and the paracaspase, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein (Malt)1, Card9 links spleen-tyrosine kinase (Syk)-coupled C-type lectin receptors to inflammatory responses. Card9 signaling also responds to intracellular danger sensors, such as retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and nucleotide-oligomerization domain (Nod)2. Card9 complexes are engaged upon fungal, bacterial, or viral recognition, and they are essential for host protection. Moreover, Card9 polymorphisms are commonly associated with human inflammatory diseases. Here, we discuss the molecular regulation and the physiological functions of Card9 in host defense and immune homeostasis, and provide a framework for the therapeutic targeting of Card9 signaling in immune-mediated diseases. PMID:23523010

  3. The regulation and function of the striated muscle activator of rho signaling (STARS) protein

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Lamon, Séverine; Russell, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Healthy living throughout the lifespan requires continual growth and repair of cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle. To effectively maintain these processes muscle cells detect extracellular stress signals and efficiently transmit them to activate appropriate intracellular transcriptional programs. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) protein, also known as Myocyte Stress-1 (MS1) protein and Actin-binding Rho-activating protein (ABRA) is highly enriched in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle. STARS binds actin, co-localizes to the sarcomere and is able to stabilize the actin cytoskeleton. By regulating actin polymerization, STARS also controls an intracellular signaling cascade that stimulates the serum response factor (SRF) transcriptional pathway; a pathway controlling genes involved in muscle cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth. Understanding the activation, transcriptional control and biological roles of STARS in cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle, will improve our understanding of physiological and pathophysiological muscle development and function. PMID:23248604

  4. LDL Receptor-related Protein 1 Regulates the Abundance of Diverse Cell-signaling Proteins in the Plasma Membrane Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Gaultier, Alban; Simon, Gabriel; Niessen, Sherry; Dix, Melissa; Takimoto, Shinako; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Gonias, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is an endocytic receptor, reported to regulate the abundance of other receptors in the plasma membrane, including uPAR and tissue factor. The goal of this study was to identify novel plasma membrane proteins, involved in cell-signaling, which are regulated by LRP1. Membrane protein ectodomains were prepared from RAW 264.7 cells in which LRP1 was silenced and control cells using protease K. Peptides were identified by LC-MS/MS. By analysis of spectral counts, 31 transmembrane and secreted proteins were regulated in abundance at least 2-fold when LRP1 was silenced. Validation studies confirmed that semaphorin4D (Sema4D), plexin domain-containing protein-1 (Plxdc1), and neuropilin-1 were more abundant in the membranes of LRP1 gene-silenced cells. Regulation of Plxdc1 by LRP1 was confirmed in CHO cells, as a second model system. Plxdc1 co-immunoprecipitated with LRP1 from extracts of RAW 264.7 cells and mouse liver. Although Sema4D did not co-immunoprecipitate with LRP1, the cell-surface level of Sema4D was increased by RAP, which binds to LRP1 and inhibits binding of other ligands. These studies identify Plxdc1, Sema4D, and neuropilin-1 as novel LRP1-regulated cell-signaling proteins. Overall, LRP1 emerges as a generalized regulator of the plasma membrane proteome. PMID:20919742

  5. Ultrasensitive proteomic quantitation of cellular signaling by digitized nanoparticle-protein counting

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Thomas; Agarwal, Anupriya; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; O’Hare, Thomas; Gönen, Mehmet; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Druker, Brian J.; Vu, Tania Q.

    2016-01-01

    Many important signaling and regulatory proteins are expressed at low abundance and are difficult to measure in single cells. We report a molecular imaging approach to quantitate protein levels by digitized, discrete counting of nanoparticle-tagged proteins. Digitized protein counting provides ultrasensitive molecular detection of proteins in single cells that surpasses conventional methods of quantitating total diffuse fluorescence, and offers a substantial improvement in protein quantitation. We implement this digitized proteomic approach in an integrated imaging platform, the single cell-quantum dot platform (SC-QDP), to execute sensitive single cell phosphoquantitation in response to multiple drug treatment conditions and using limited primary patient material. The SC-QDP: 1) identified pAKT and pERK phospho-heterogeneity and insensitivity in individual leukemia cells treated with a multi-drug panel of FDA-approved kinase inhibitors, and 2) revealed subpopulations of drug-insensitive CD34+ stem cells with high pCRKL and pSTAT5 signaling in chronic myeloid leukemia patient blood samples. This ultrasensitive digitized protein detection approach is valuable for uncovering subtle but important differences in signaling, drug insensitivity, and other key cellular processes amongst single cells. PMID:27320899

  6. Leverage principle of retardation signal in titration of double protein via chip moving reaction boundary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liu-Xia; Cao, Yi-Ren; Xiao, Hua; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Shao-Rong; Meng, Qing-Hua; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2016-03-15

    In the present work we address a simple, rapid and quantitative analytical method for detection of different proteins present in biological samples. For this, we proposed the model of titration of double protein (TDP) and its relevant leverage theory relied on the retardation signal of chip moving reaction boundary electrophoresis (MRBE). The leverage principle showed that the product of the first protein content and its absolute retardation signal is equal to that of the second protein content and its absolute one. To manifest the model, we achieved theoretical self-evidence for the demonstration of the leverage principle at first. Then relevant experiments were conducted on the TDP-MRBE chip. The results revealed that (i) there was a leverage principle of retardation signal within the TDP of two pure proteins, and (ii) a lever also existed within these two complex protein samples, evidently demonstrating the validity of TDP model and leverage theory in MRBE chip. It was also showed that the proposed technique could provide a rapid and simple quantitative analysis of two protein samples in a mixture. Finally, we successfully applied the developed technique for the quantification of soymilk in adulterated infant formula. The TDP-MRBE opens up a new window for the detection of adulteration ratio of the poor food (milk) in blended high quality one. PMID:26414025

  7. Thiol-based Redox Proteins in Brassica napus Guard Cell Abscisic Acid and Methyl Jasmonate Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mengmeng; Zhu, Ning; Song, Wen-yuan; Harmon, Alice C.; Assmann, Sarah M.; Chen, Sixue

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Reversibly oxidized cysteine sulfhydryl groups serve as redox sensors or targets of redox sensing that are important in different physiological processes. Little is known, however, about redox sensitive proteins in guard cells and how they function in stomatal signaling. In this study, Brassica napus guard cell proteins altered by redox in response to abscisic acid (ABA) or methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were identified by complementary proteomics approaches, saturation differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT). In total, 65 and 118 potential redox responsive proteins were identified in ABA and MeJA treated guard cells, respectively. All the proteins contain at least one cysteine, and over half of them are predicted to form intra-molecular disulfide bonds. Most of the proteins fall into the functional groups of energy, stress and defense, and metabolism. Based on the peptide sequences identified by mass spectrometry, 30 proteins were common to ABA and MeJA treated samples. A total of 44 cysteines was mapped in all the identified proteins, and their levels of redox sensitivity were quantified. Two of the proteins, a SNRK2 kinase and an isopropylmalate dehydrogenase were confirmed to be redox regulated and involved in stomatal movement. This study creates an inventory of potential redox switches, and highlights a protein redox regulatory mechanism in guard cell ABA and MeJA signal transduction. PMID:24580573

  8. Immunological detection of potential signal-transduction proteins expressed during wheat somatic tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Nato, A; Mirshahi, A; Tichtinsky, G; Mirshahi, M; Faure, J P; Lavergne, D; De Buyser, J; Jean, C; Ducreux, G; Henry, Y

    1997-03-01

    An immunochemical approach was used to detect the expression of putative guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins), arrestin, and nucleoside diphosphate kinases during wheat (Triticum aestivum) tissue culture initiated from immature embryos. Both the soluble and membrane extracts from the immature embryos revealed bands of 58, 40, and 16 kD with antibodies to G-protein (alpha subunit), arrestin, and nucleoside diphosphate kinase, respectively. These proteins were overexpressed in vitro in both nonembryogenic callus and embryogenic cultures. An additional soluble protein (32 kD) was detected by anti-G alpha antibodies in cultured tissues but not in immature embryos, suggesting a possible function in cell multiplication. Moreover, somatic embryogenesis was associated with the appearance of a 29-kD protein reactive with anti-arrstin antibodies, both in soluble and membrane fractions. Tissue-cultured genetic stocks of Chinese Spring wheat, including the disomic, 36 ditelosomic, and 6 nullisomic-tetrasomic wheat lines, were used to ascertain the chromosomal location of the genes encoding the 29-kD arrestin-like protein. The lack of a signal with the nonembryogenic ditelosomic 3 D short chromosome arm line suggests that the 3 D long chromosome arm possesses at least one gene involved in the expression of the 29-kD protein. The putative role of the 29-kD protein in signal-transduction regulating embryogenesis is discussed. PMID:9085574

  9. Immunological detection of potential signal-transduction proteins expressed during wheat somatic tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Nato, A; Mirshahi, A; Tichtinsky, G; Mirshahi, M; Faure, J P; Lavergne, D; De Buyser, J; Jean, C; Ducreux, G; Henry, Y

    1997-01-01

    An immunochemical approach was used to detect the expression of putative guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins), arrestin, and nucleoside diphosphate kinases during wheat (Triticum aestivum) tissue culture initiated from immature embryos. Both the soluble and membrane extracts from the immature embryos revealed bands of 58, 40, and 16 kD with antibodies to G-protein (alpha subunit), arrestin, and nucleoside diphosphate kinase, respectively. These proteins were overexpressed in vitro in both nonembryogenic callus and embryogenic cultures. An additional soluble protein (32 kD) was detected by anti-G alpha antibodies in cultured tissues but not in immature embryos, suggesting a possible function in cell multiplication. Moreover, somatic embryogenesis was associated with the appearance of a 29-kD protein reactive with anti-arrstin antibodies, both in soluble and membrane fractions. Tissue-cultured genetic stocks of Chinese Spring wheat, including the disomic, 36 ditelosomic, and 6 nullisomic-tetrasomic wheat lines, were used to ascertain the chromosomal location of the genes encoding the 29-kD arrestin-like protein. The lack of a signal with the nonembryogenic ditelosomic 3 D short chromosome arm line suggests that the 3 D long chromosome arm possesses at least one gene involved in the expression of the 29-kD protein. The putative role of the 29-kD protein in signal-transduction regulating embryogenesis is discussed. PMID:9085574

  10. Improved Protein Arrays for Quantitative Systems Analysis of the Dynamics of Signaling Pathway Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    YANG, CHIN-RANG

    2013-12-11

    Astronauts and workers in nuclear plants who repeatedly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR, <10 cGy) are likely to incur specific changes in signal transduction and gene expression in various tissues of their body. Remarkable advances in high throughput genomics and proteomics technologies enable researchers to broaden their focus from examining single gene/protein kinetics to better understanding global gene/protein expression profiling and biological pathway analyses, namely Systems Biology. An ultimate goal of systems biology is to develop dynamic mathematical models of interacting biological systems capable of simulating living systems in a computer. This Glue Grant is to complement Dr. Boothman’s existing DOE grant (No. DE-FG02-06ER64186) entitled “The IGF1/IGF-1R-MAPK-Secretory Clusterin (sCLU) Pathway: Mediator of a Low Dose IR-Inducible Bystander Effect” to develop sensitive and quantitative proteomic technology that suitable for low dose radiobiology researches. An improved version of quantitative protein array platform utilizing linear Quantum dot signaling for systematically measuring protein levels and phosphorylation states for systems biology modeling is presented. The signals are amplified by a confocal laser Quantum dot scanner resulting in ~1000-fold more sensitivity than traditional Western blots and show the good linearity that is impossible for the signals of HRP-amplification. Therefore this improved protein array technology is suitable to detect weak responses of low dose radiation. Software is developed to facilitate the quantitative readout of signaling network activities. Kinetics of EGFRvIII mutant signaling was analyzed to quantify cross-talks between EGFR and other signaling pathways.

  11. Regulation of Arabidopsis Brassinosteroid Signaling by Atypical Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhu, Yongyou; Fujioka, Shozo; Asami, Tadao; Li, Jiayang; Li, Jianming

    2009-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are highly conserved transcription factors critical for cell proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies have implicated bHLH proteins in many plant signaling processes, including brassinosteroid (BR) signaling. Here, we report identification of two families of atypical bHLH proteins capable of modulating BR signaling. We found that activation-tagged bri1 suppressor 1-Dominant (atbs1-D), previously identified as a dominant suppressor of a weak BR receptor mutant bri1-301, was caused by overexpression of a 93–amino acid atypical bHLH protein lacking amino acids critical for DNA binding. Interestingly, atbs1-D only suppresses weak BR mutants, while overexpression of a truncated ATBS1 lacking the basic motif also rescues bri1-301, suggesting that ATBS1 likely stimulates BR signaling by sequestering negative BR signaling components. A yeast two-hybrid screen using ATBS1 as bait discovered four ATBS1-Interacting Factors (AIFs) that are members of another atypical bHLH protein subfamily. AIF1 exhibits an overlapping expression pattern with ATBS1 and its homologs and interacts with ATBS1 in vitro and in vivo. AIF1 overexpression nullifies the suppressive effect of atbs1-D on bri1-301 and results in dwarf transgenic plants resembling BR mutants. By contrast, silencing of AIF1 partially suppressed the bri1-301 phenotype. Our results suggested that plants use these atypical bHLH proteins to regulate BR signaling. PMID:20023194

  12. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 terminates G-protein-coupled receptor function in steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wen-Li; Wang, Di; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals across the cell membrane. GPCR kinases (GRKs) desensitize GPCR signals in the cell membrane. However, the role and mechanism of GRKs in the desensitization of steroid hormone signaling are unclear. In this study, we propose that GRK2 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) in response to induction by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), which determines its translocation to the cell membrane of the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. GRK2 protein expression is increased during the metamorphic stage because of induction by 20E. Knockdown of GRK2 in larvae causes accelerated pupation, an increase in 20E-response gene expression, and advanced apoptosis and metamorphosis. 20E induces translocation of GRK2 from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane via steroid hormone ecdysone-responsive GPCR (ErGPCR-2). GRK2 is phosphorylated by PKC on serine 680 after induction by 20E, which leads to the translocation of GRK2 to the cell membrane. GRK2 interacts with ErGPCR-2. These data indicate that GRK2 terminates the ErGPCR-2 function in 20E signaling in the cell membrane by a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:27412951

  13. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 terminates G-protein-coupled receptor function in steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Li; Wang, Di; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals across the cell membrane. GPCR kinases (GRKs) desensitize GPCR signals in the cell membrane. However, the role and mechanism of GRKs in the desensitization of steroid hormone signaling are unclear. In this study, we propose that GRK2 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) in response to induction by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), which determines its translocation to the cell membrane of the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. GRK2 protein expression is increased during the metamorphic stage because of induction by 20E. Knockdown of GRK2 in larvae causes accelerated pupation, an increase in 20E-response gene expression, and advanced apoptosis and metamorphosis. 20E induces translocation of GRK2 from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane via steroid hormone ecdysone-responsive GPCR (ErGPCR-2). GRK2 is phosphorylated by PKC on serine 680 after induction by 20E, which leads to the translocation of GRK2 to the cell membrane. GRK2 interacts with ErGPCR-2. These data indicate that GRK2 terminates the ErGPCR-2 function in 20E signaling in the cell membrane by a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:27412951

  14. A novel computer simulation method for simulating the multiscale transduction dynamics of signal proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Emanuel; Dick, Bernhard; Baeurle, Stephan A.

    2012-03-01

    Signal proteins are able to adapt their response to a change in the environment, governing in this way a broad variety of important cellular processes in living systems. While conventional molecular-dynamics (MD) techniques can be used to explore the early signaling pathway of these protein systems at atomistic resolution, the high computational costs limit their usefulness for the elucidation of the multiscale transduction dynamics of most signaling processes, occurring on experimental timescales. To cope with the problem, we present in this paper a novel multiscale-modeling method, based on a combination of the kinetic Monte-Carlo- and MD-technique, and demonstrate its suitability for investigating the signaling behavior of the photoswitch light-oxygen-voltage-2-Jα domain from Avena Sativa (AsLOV2-Jα) and an AsLOV2-Jα-regulated photoactivable Rac1-GTPase (PA-Rac1), recently employed to control the motility of cancer cells through light stimulus. More specifically, we show that their signaling pathways begin with a residual re-arrangement and subsequent H-bond formation of amino acids near to the flavin-mononucleotide chromophore, causing a coupling between β-strands and subsequent detachment of a peripheral α-helix from the AsLOV2-domain. In the case of the PA-Rac1 system we find that this latter process induces the release of the AsLOV2-inhibitor from the switchII-activation site of the GTPase, enabling signal activation through effector-protein binding. These applications demonstrate that our approach reliably reproduces the signaling pathways of complex signal proteins, ranging from nanoseconds up to seconds at affordable computational costs.

  15. A novel computer simulation method for simulating the multiscale transduction dynamics of signal proteins.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel; Dick, Bernhard; Baeurle, Stephan A

    2012-03-28

    Signal proteins are able to adapt their response to a change in the environment, governing in this way a broad variety of important cellular processes in living systems. While conventional molecular-dynamics (MD) techniques can be used to explore the early signaling pathway of these protein systems at atomistic resolution, the high computational costs limit their usefulness for the elucidation of the multiscale transduction dynamics of most signaling processes, occurring on experimental timescales. To cope with the problem, we present in this paper a novel multiscale-modeling method, based on a combination of the kinetic Monte-Carlo- and MD-technique, and demonstrate its suitability for investigating the signaling behavior of the photoswitch light-oxygen-voltage-2-Jα domain from Avena Sativa (AsLOV2-Jα) and an AsLOV2-Jα-regulated photoactivable Rac1-GTPase (PA-Rac1), recently employed to control the motility of cancer cells through light stimulus. More specifically, we show that their signaling pathways begin with a residual re-arrangement and subsequent H-bond formation of amino acids near to the flavin-mononucleotide chromophore, causing a coupling between β-strands and subsequent detachment of a peripheral α-helix from the AsLOV2-domain. In the case of the PA-Rac1 system we find that this latter process induces the release of the AsLOV2-inhibitor from the switchII-activation site of the GTPase, enabling signal activation through effector-protein binding. These applications demonstrate that our approach reliably reproduces the signaling pathways of complex signal proteins, ranging from nanoseconds up to seconds at affordable computational costs. PMID:22462840

  16. Structural insights into biased G protein-coupled receptor signaling revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rahmeh, Rita; Damian, Marjorie; Cottet, Martin; Orcel, Hélène; Mendre, Christiane; Durroux, Thierry; Sharma, K. Shivaji; Durand, Grégory; Pucci, Bernard; Trinquet, Eric; Zwier, Jurriaan M.; Deupi, Xavier; Bron, Patrick; Banères, Jean-Louis; Mouillac, Bernard; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, representing the largest group of therapeutic targets. Recent studies show that some GPCRs signal through both G protein and arrestin pathways in a ligand-specific manner. Ligands that direct signaling through a specific pathway are known as biased ligands. The arginine-vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R), a prototypical peptide-activated GPCR, is an ideal model system to investigate the structural basis of biased signaling. Although the native hormone arginine-vasopressin leads to activation of both the stimulatory G protein (Gs) for the adenylyl cyclase and arrestin pathways, synthetic ligands exhibit highly biased signaling through either Gs alone or arrestin alone. We used purified V2R stabilized in neutral amphipols and developed fluorescence-based assays to investigate the structural basis of biased signaling for the V2R. Our studies demonstrate that the Gs-biased agonist stabilizes a conformation that is distinct from that stabilized by the arrestin-biased agonists. This study provides unique insights into the structural mechanisms of GPCR activation by biased ligands that may be relevant to the design of pathway-biased drugs. PMID:22493271

  17. Use of a Novel Report Protein to Study the Secretion Signal of Flagellin in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangqiang; Xia, Yongjun; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Hui; Ai, Lianzhong

    2016-08-01

    Flagellin (also called Hag) is the main component of bacterial flagellum and is transported across the cytoplasmic membrane by flagellar secretion apparatus. Because flagella play an essential role in the pathogenesis of numerous pathogens, the flagellins of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Campylobacter jejuni, and Vibrio cholerae have been intensively studied; however, very few studies have focused on the flagellin of Bacillus subtilis, which is considered to be a model organism with which to study the secretion of bacteria and is used on an industrial scale for the secretion of proteins. The signal of B. subtilis flagellin is still debated. This study was performed to seek the export signals of flagellin from B. subtilis. The naturally nonsecretory, intrinsically disordered domain of nucleoskeletal-like protein (Nsp) was used as the reporter protein. Our results demonstrate that the export signal is contained within the first 50 amino acids of B. subtilis flagellin. Nsp is easily degraded inside the cell and can be exported into culture medium with the aid of the signal of flagellin. This method provides a new potential strategy for the expression of proteins with high proteolytic susceptibility via fusion to export signals. PMID:27154466

  18. Structural and functional protein network analyses predict novel signaling functions for rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Christina; Vogt, Andreas; Campagna, Anne; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Swiatek-de Lange, Magdalena; Beer, Monika; Bolz, Sylvia; Mack, Andreas F; Kinkl, Norbert; Cesareni, Gianni; Serrano, Luis; Ueffing, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Orchestration of signaling, photoreceptor structural integrity, and maintenance needed for mammalian vision remain enigmatic. By integrating three proteomic data sets, literature mining, computational analyses, and structural information, we have generated a multiscale signal transduction network linked to the visual G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin, the major protein component of rod outer segments. This network was complemented by domain decomposition of protein–protein interactions and then qualified for mutually exclusive or mutually compatible interactions and ternary complex formation using structural data. The resulting information not only offers a comprehensive view of signal transduction induced by this GPCR but also suggests novel signaling routes to cytoskeleton dynamics and vesicular trafficking, predicting an important level of regulation through small GTPases. Further, it demonstrates a specific disease susceptibility of the core visual pathway due to the uniqueness of its components present mainly in the eye. As a comprehensive multiscale network, it can serve as a basis to elucidate the physiological principles of photoreceptor function, identify potential disease-associated genes and proteins, and guide the development of therapies that target specific branches of the signaling pathway. PMID:22108793

  19. Microscopic characterization of teeth of pacas bred in captivity (Agouti paca, Linnaeus, 1766).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F S; Canola, J C; Oliveira, P T; Pécora, J D; Capelli, A

    2007-10-01

    The microscopic description of the teeth of pacas (Agouti paca) bred in captivity was developed for providing biological data on one of the largest American wild rodents, as not many references exist in the literature about this species. Two newborn males, two adult males (9 and 72 months old), one newborn female and two adult females (30 and 54 months old) were used after death due to fights, neonatal cannibalism or unknown causes. Animals were radiographed, and their teeth were extracted and put on an acrylic resin block, cut on a diamond-like disc microtome and diaphanized. It was noted that enamel surrounds the coronary dentine and projects to the root region, besides being present as internal laminae, arranged in a parallel way and in the vestibulolingual direction. The dentine is located between the enamel laminae and surrounds the pulp horns. The cementum is located internal to the enamel laminae. From scanning electronic microscopy, we find that the enamel is the outer element on the vestibular surface, and it is in direct contact with the dentine. On the lingual surface, the cementum and dentine are the outer elements. PMID:17845228

  20. Agouti-related peptide neural circuits mediate adaptive behaviors in the starved state.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Stephanie L; Qiu, Jian; Soden, Marta E; Sanz, Elisenda; Nestor, Casey C; Barker, Forrest D; Quintana, Albert; Zweifel, Larry S; Rønnekleiv, Oline K; Kelly, Martin J; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-05-01

    In the face of starvation, animals will engage in high-risk behaviors that would normally be considered maladaptive. Starving rodents, for example, will forage in areas that are more susceptible to predators and will also modulate aggressive behavior within a territory of limited or depleted nutrients. The neural basis of these adaptive behaviors likely involves circuits that link innate feeding, aggression and fear. Hypothalamic agouti-related peptide (AgRP)-expressing neurons are critically important for driving feeding and project axons to brain regions implicated in aggression and fear. Using circuit-mapping techniques in mice, we define a disynaptic network originating from a subset of AgRP neurons that project to the medial nucleus of the amygdala and then to the principal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, which suppresses territorial aggression and reduces contextual fear. We propose that AgRP neurons serve as a master switch capable of coordinating behavioral decisions relative to internal state and environmental cues. PMID:27019015

  1. Jatropha curcas Protein Concentrate Stimulates Insulin Signaling, Lipogenesis, Protein Synthesis and the PKCα Pathway in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    León-López, Liliana; Márquez-Mota, Claudia C; Velázquez-Villegas, Laura A; Gálvez-Mariscal, Amanda; Arrieta-Báez, Daniel; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Tovar, Armando R; Torres, Nimbe

    2015-09-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oil seed plant that belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family. Nontoxic genotypes have been reported in Mexico. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the effect of a Mexican variety of J. curcas protein concentrate (JCP) on weight gain, biochemical parameters, and the expression of genes and proteins involved in insulin signaling, lipogenesis, cholesterol and protein synthesis in rats. The results demonstrated that short-term consumption of JCP increased serum glucose, insulin, triglycerides and cholesterol levels as well as the expression of transcription factors involved in lipogenesis and cholesterol synthesis (SREBP-1 and LXRα). Moreover, there was an increase in insulin signaling mediated by Akt phosphorylation and mTOR. JCP also increased PKCα protein abundance and the activation of downstream signaling pathway targets such as the AP1 and NF-κB transcription factors typically activated by phorbol esters. These results suggested that phorbol esters are present in JCP, and that they could be involved in the activation of PKC which may be responsible for the high insulin secretion and consequently the activation of insulin-dependent pathways. Our data suggest that this Mexican Jatropha variety contains toxic compounds that produce negative metabolic effects which require caution when using in the applications of Jatropha-based products in medicine and nutrition. PMID:26243665

  2. Exploring signal transduction in heteromultimeric protein based on energy dissipation model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng-Wei; Xiu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic intersubunit interactions are key elements in the regulation of many biological systems. A better understanding of how subunits interact with each other and how their interactions are related to dynamic protein structure is a fundamental task in biology. In this paper, a heteromultimeric allosteric protein, Corynebacterium glutamicum aspartokinase, is used as a model system to explore the signal transduction involved in intersubunit interactions and allosteric communication with an emphasis on the intersubunit signaling process. For this purpose, energy dissipation simulation and network construction are conducted for each subunit and the whole protein. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the mutation sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. Additionally, analysis revealed that the function of the effector threonine is to facilitate the binding of the two subunits without contributing to the allosteric communication. During the allosteric regulation upon the binding of the effector lysine, signals can be transferred from the β-subunit to the catalytic site of the α-subunit through both a direct way of intersubunit signal transduction, and an indirect way: first, to the regulatory region of the α-subunit by intersubunit signal transduction and then to the catalytic region by intramolecular signal transduction. Therefore, the new approach is able to illustrate the diversity of the underlying mechanisms when the strength of feedback inhibition by the effector(s) is modulated, providing useful information that has potential applications in engineering heteromultimeric allosteric regulation. PMID:24279729

  3. 14-3-3 Proteins Buffer Intracellular Calcium Sensing Receptors to Constrain Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Michael P.; Cavanaugh, Alice; Breitwieser, Gerda E.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium sensing receptors (CaSR) interact with 14-3-3 binding proteins at a carboxyl terminal arginine-rich motif. Mutations identified in patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, pancreatitis or idiopathic epilepsy support the functional importance of this motif. We combined total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches to determine the mechanism of 14-3-3 protein regulation of CaSR signaling. Loss of 14-3-3 binding caused increased basal CaSR signaling and plasma membrane levels, and a significantly larger signaling-evoked increase in plasma membrane receptors. Block of core glycosylation with tunicamycin demonstrated that changes in plasma membrane CaSR levels were due to differences in exocytic rate. Western blotting to quantify time-dependent changes in maturation of expressed wt CaSR and a 14-3-3 protein binding-defective mutant demonstrated that signaling increases synthesis to maintain constant levels of the immaturely and maturely glycosylated forms. CaSR thus operates by a feed-forward mechanism, whereby signaling not only induces anterograde trafficking of nascent receptors but also increases biosynthesis to maintain steady state levels of net cellular CaSR. Overall, these studies suggest that 14-3-3 binding at the carboxyl terminus provides an important buffering mechanism to increase the intracellular pool of CaSR available for signaling-evoked trafficking, but attenuates trafficking to control the dynamic range of responses to extracellular calcium. PMID:26317416

  4. Annotation of human cancers with EGFR signaling-associated protein complexes using proximity ligation assays

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew A.; Hall, Richard; Fisher, Kate; Haake, Scott M.; Khalil, Farah; Schabath, Matthew B.; Vuaroqueaux, Vincent; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert; Altiok, Soner; Chen, Y. Ann; Haura, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Strategies to measure functional signaling-associated protein complexes have the potential to augment current molecular biomarker assays, such as genotyping and expression profiling, used to annotate diseases. Aberrant activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling contributes to diverse cancers. Here, we used a proximity ligation assay (PLA) to detect EGFR in a complex with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2), the major signaling adaptor for EGFR. We used multiple lung cancer cell lines to develop and characterize EGFR:GRB2 PLA and correlated this assay with established biochemical measures of EGFR signaling. In a panel of patient-derived xenografts in mice, the intensity of EGFR:GRB2 PLA correlated with the reduction in tumor size in response to the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab. In tumor biopsies from three cohorts of lung cancer patients, positive EGFR:GRB2 PLA was observed in patients with and without EGFR mutations and the intensity of EGFR:GRB2 PLA was predictive of overall survival in an EGFR inhibitor-treated cohort. Thus, we established the feasibility of using PLA to measure EGFR signaling-associated protein complexes in patient-based materials, suggesting the potential for similar assays for a broader array of receptor tyrosine kinases and other key signaling molecules. PMID:25587191

  5. G protein signaling modulator-3: a leukocyte regulator of inflammation in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Matthew J; Gall, Bryan J; Richards, Kristy L; Siderovski, David P; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2014-01-01

    G protein signaling modulator-3 (GPSM3), also known as G18 or AGS4, is a member of a family of proteins containing one or more copies of a small regulatory motif known as the GoLoco (or GPR) motif. GPSM3 interacts directly with Gα and Gβ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream intracellular signals initiated by G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated via binding to their cognate ligands. GPSM3 has a selective tissue distribution and is highly expressed in immune system cells; genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have recently revealed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GPSM3 are associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. This review highlights the current knowledge of GPSM3 function in normal and pathologic immune-mediated conditions. PMID:25143870

  6. Emerging roles of protein kinase CK2 in abscisic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Belmiro; Pagès, Montserrat; Riera, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many aspects of plant growth and development as well as responses to multiple stresses. Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation or ubiquitination have pivotal roles in the regulation of ABA signaling. In addition to the positive regulator sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2), the relevance of the role of other protein kinases, such as CK2, has been recently highlighted. We have recently established that CK2 phosphorylates the maize ortholog of open stomata 1 OST1, ZmOST1, suggesting a role of CK2 phosphorylation in the control of ZmOST1 protein degradation (Vilela et al., 2015). CK2 is a pleiotropic enzyme involved in multiple developmental and stress-responsive pathways. This review summarizes recent advances that taken together suggest a prominent role of protein kinase CK2 in ABA signaling and related processes. PMID:26579189

  7. The inhibition of IGF-1 signaling promotes proteostasis by enhancing protein aggregation and deposition.

    PubMed

    Moll, Lorna; Ben-Gedalya, Tziona; Reuveni, Hadas; Cohen, Ehud

    2016-04-01

    The discovery that the alteration of aging by reducing the activity of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) cascade protects nematodes and mice from neurodegeneration-linked, toxic protein aggregation (proteotoxicity) raises the prospect that IIS inhibitors bear therapeutic potential to counter neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we reported that NT219, a highly efficient IGF-1 signaling inhibitor, protects model worms from the aggregation of amyloid β peptide and polyglutamine peptides that are linked to the manifestation of Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases, respectively. Here, we employed cultured cell systems to investigate whether NT219 promotes protein homeostasis (proteostasis) in mammalian cells and to explore its underlying mechanisms. We found that NT219 enhances the aggregation of misfolded prion protein and promotes its deposition in quality control compartments known as "aggresomes." NT219 also elevates the levels of certain molecular chaperones but, surprisingly, reduces proteasome activity and impairs autophagy. Our findings show that IGF-1 signaling inhibitors in general and NT219 in particular can promote proteostasis in mammalian cells by hyperaggregating hazardous proteins, thereby bearing the potential to postpone the onset and slow the progression of neurodegenerative illnesses in the elderly.-Moll, L., Ben-Gedalya, T., Reuveni, H., Cohen, E. The inhibition of IGF-1 signaling promotes proteostasis by enhancing protein aggregation and deposition. PMID:26722006

  8. An HMG1-like protein facilitates Wnt signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lily I.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    1999-01-01

    We show that during Caenorhabditis elegans male spicule development, the specification of a glial versus neuronal cell fate in a canonical neurogenic sublineage is dependent on Wnt signaling. Inactivation of a Wnt signaling pathway mediated by the Wnt receptor LIN-17 transforms the SPD sheath cell into its sister, the SPD neuron. We discovered a new mutant, son-1, that displays this same cell fate transformation. The son-1 mutation enhances the phenotypes of reduction-of-function lin-17 mutants in several developmental processes, including vulva development, somatic gonad development, and male tail patterning. son-1 encodes an HMG1/2-like DNA-binding protein and is localized in all cell nuclei through development as revealed by a GFP reporter construct. Disruption of son-1 function by RNA-mediated interference results in the same spicule defect as caused by overexpression of POP-1, a TCF/LEF class HMG protein known to act downstream of the Wnt signaling pathway. Our results provide in vivo evidence for the functional involvement of an HMG1/2-like protein, SON-1, in Wnt signaling. The sequence nonspecific HMG protein SON-1 and the sequence specific HMG protein POP-1 might both act in the Wnt responding cells to regulate gene transcription in opposite directions. PMID:10197987

  9. Modulation of apoptosis and immune signaling pathways by the Hantaan virus nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ontiveros, Steven J.; Li Qianjun; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2010-06-05

    Herein, we show a direct relationship between the Hantaan virus (HTNV) nucleocapsid (N) protein and the modulation of apoptosis. We observed an increase in caspase-7 and -8, but not -9 in cells expressing HTNV N protein mutants lacking amino acids 270-330. Similar results were observed for the New World hantavirus, Andes virus. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) was sequestered in the cytoplasm after tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) stimulation in cells expressing HTNV N protein. Further, TNFR stimulated cells expressing HTNV N protein inhibited caspase activation. In contrast, cells expressing N protein truncations lacking the region from amino acids 270-330 were unable to inhibit nuclear import of NF-kappaB and the mutants also triggered caspase activity. These results suggest that the HTNV circumvents host antiviral signaling and apoptotic response mediated by the TNFR pathway through host interactions with the N protein.

  10. Bead Assembly Magnetorotation as a Signal Transduction Method for Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Ariel; Commiskey, Patrick; Shah, Nicholas; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a proof-of-principle for a new signal transduction method for protein detection called Bead Assembly Magnetorotation (BAM). In this paper, we chose to focus on the protein thrombin, a popular choice for proof-of-principle work in this field. BAM is based on using the protein target to mediate the formation of aptamer-coated 1 μm magnetic beads into a bead assembly, formed at the bottom of a 1 μL hanging droplet. The size, shape and fractal dimension of this bead assembly all depend on the protein concentration. The protein concentration can be measured in two ways: by magnetorotation, in which the rotational period of the assembly correlates with the protein concentration, or by fractal analysis. Additionally, a microscope-free magnetorotation detection method is introduced, based on a simple laser apparatus built from standard laboratory components. PMID:23639345

  11. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP26 protein, ceramide kinase-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-05-12

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. A mutation in a new ceramide kinase (CERK) homologous gene, named CERK-like protein (CERKL), was found to cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP26). Here, we show a point mutation of one of two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences inhibited the nuclear localization of the protein. Furthermore, the tetra-GFP-tagged NLS, which cannot passively enter the nucleus, was observed not only in the nucleus but also in the nucleolus. Our results provide First evidence of the active nuclear import of CERKL and suggest that the identified NLS might be responsible for nucleolar retention of the protein. As recent studies have shown other RP-related proteins are localized in the nucleus or the nucleolus, our identification of NLS in CERKL suggests that CERKL likely plays important roles for retinal functions in the nucleus and the nucleolus.

  12. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  13. The Role of Inhibitory G Proteins and Regulators of G Protein Signaling in the in vivo Control of Heart Rate and Predisposition to Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Richard; Opel, Aaisha; Tinker, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins and the control of heart rate. The activation of cell signaling pathways involving inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins acts to slow the heart rate via modulation of ion channels. A large number of Regulators of G protein signalings (RGSs) can act as GTPase accelerating proteins to inhibitory G proteins and thus it is important to understand the network of RGS\\G-protein interaction. We will review our recent findings on in vivo heart rate control in mice with global genetic deletion of various inhibitory G protein alpha subunits. We will discuss potential central and peripheral contributions to the phenotype and the controversies in the literature. PMID:22783193

  14. The Role of Inhibitory G Proteins and Regulators of G Protein Signaling in the in vivo Control of Heart Rate and Predisposition to Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Ang, Richard; Opel, Aaisha; Tinker, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins and the control of heart rate. The activation of cell signaling pathways involving inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins acts to slow the heart rate via modulation of ion channels. A large number of Regulators of G protein signalings (RGSs) can act as GTPase accelerating proteins to inhibitory G proteins and thus it is important to understand the network of RGS\\G-protein interaction. We will review our recent findings on in vivo heart rate control in mice with global genetic deletion of various inhibitory G protein alpha subunits. We will discuss potential central and peripheral contributions to the phenotype and the controversies in the literature. PMID:22783193

  15. Wnt Signaling Translocates Lys48-Linked Polyubiquitinated Proteins to the Lysosomal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjoon; Vick, Philipp; Hedtke, Joshua; Ploper, Diego; De Robertis, Edward M

    2015-05-26

    Cellular proteins are degraded in either proteasomes or lysosomes depending on the types of ubiquitin chains that covalently modify them. It is not known whether the choice between these two pathways is physiologically regulated. The Lys48-polyubiquitin chain is the major signal directing proteins for degradation in proteasomes. Here, we report the unexpected finding that canonical Wnt signaling translocates some K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins to the endolysosomal pathway. Proteasomal target proteins, such as b-catenin, Smad1, and Smad4, were targeted into endolysosomes in a process dependent on GSK3 activity. Relocalization was also dependent on Axin1 and the multivesicular body (MVB) proteins HRS/Vps27 and Vps4. The Wnt-induced accumulation of K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins in endolysosomal organelles was accompanied by a transient decrease in cellular levels of free mono-ubiquitin, which may contribute to Wnt-regulated stabilization of proteins (Wnt/ STOP). We conclude that Wnt redirects Lys48-polyubiquitinated proteins that are normally degraded in proteasomes to endolysosomes. PMID:26004177

  16. The similarity between N-terminal targeting signals for protein import into different organelles and its evolutionary relevance

    PubMed Central

    Kunze, Markus; Berger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The proper distribution of proteins between the cytosol and various membrane-bound compartments is crucial for the functionality of eukaryotic cells. This requires the cooperation between protein transport machineries that translocate diverse proteins from the cytosol into these compartments and targeting signal(s) encoded within the primary sequence of these proteins that define their cellular destination. The mechanisms exerting protein translocation differ remarkably between the compartments, but the predominant targeting signals for mitochondria, chloroplasts and the ER share the N-terminal position, an α-helical structural element and the removal from the core protein by intraorganellar cleavage. Interestingly, similar properties have been described for the peroxisomal targeting signal type 2 mediating the import of a fraction of soluble peroxisomal proteins, whereas other peroxisomal matrix proteins encode the type 1 targeting signal residing at the extreme C-terminus. The structural similarity of N-terminal targeting signals poses a challenge to the specificity of protein transport, but allows the generation of ambiguous targeting signals that mediate dual targeting of proteins into different compartments. Dual targeting might represent an advantage for adaptation processes that involve a redistribution of proteins, because it circumvents the hierarchy of targeting signals. Thus, the co-existence of two equally functional import pathways into peroxisomes might reflect a balance between evolutionary constant and flexible transport routes. PMID:26441678

  17. Intersecting roles of protein tyrosine kinase and calcium signaling during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, William H

    2013-01-01

    The oocyte is a highly specialized cell that must respond to fertilization with a preprogrammed series of signal transduction events that establish a block to polyspermy, trigger resumption of the cell cycle and execution of a developmental program. The fertilization-induced calcium transient is a key signal that initiates the process of oocyte activation and studies over the last several years have examined the signaling pathways that act upstream and downstream of this calcium transient. Protein tyrosine kinase signaling was found to be an important component of the upstream pathways that stimulated calcium release at fertilization in oocytes from animals that fertilize externally, but a similar pathway has not been found in mammals which fertilize internally. The following review will examine the diversity of signaling in oocytes from marine invertebrates, amphibians, fish and mammals in an attempt to understand the basis for the observed differences. In addition to the pathways upstream of the fertilization-induced calcium transient, recent studies are beginning to unravel the role of protein tyrosine kinase signaling downstream of the calcium transient. The PYK2 kinase was found to respond to fertilization in the zebrafish system and seems to represent a novel component of the response of the oocyte to fertilization. The potential impact of impaired PTK signaling in oocyte quality will also be discussed. PMID:23201334

  18. NSP-Cas protein structures reveal a promiscuous interaction module in cell signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, P.D.; Robinson, H.; Wallez, Y.; Dobaczewska, M. K.; Lee, J. J.; Pasquale, E. B.; Riedl, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Members of the novel SH2-containing protein (NSP) and Crk-associated substrate (Cas) protein families form multidomain signaling platforms that mediate cell migration and invasion through a collection of distinct signaling motifs. Members of each family interact via their respective C-terminal domains, but the mechanism of this association has remained enigmatic. Here we present the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain from the NSP protein BCAR3 and the complex of NSP3 with p130Cas. BCAR3 adopts the Cdc25-homology fold of Ras GTPase exchange factors, but it has a 'closed' conformation incapable of enzymatic activity. The structure of the NSP3-p130Cas complex reveals that this closed conformation is instrumental for interaction of NSP proteins with a focal adhesion-targeting domain present in Cas proteins. This enzyme-to-adaptor conversion enables high-affinity, yet promiscuous, interactions between NSP and Cas proteins and represents an unprecedented mechanistic paradigm linking cellular signaling networks.

  19. Natural Genetic Variation Influences Protein Abundances in C. elegans Developmental Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kapil Dev; Roschitzki, Bernd; Snoek, L. Basten; Grossmann, Jonas; Zheng, Xue; Elvin, Mark; Kamkina, Polina; Schrimpf, Sabine P.; Poulin, Gino B.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2016-01-01

    Complex traits, including common disease-related traits, are affected by many different genes that function in multiple pathways and networks. The apoptosis, MAPK, Notch, and Wnt signalling pathways play important roles in development and disease progression. At the moment we have a poor understanding of how allelic variation affects gene expression in these pathways at the level of translation. Here we report the effect of natural genetic variation on transcript and protein abundance involved in developmental signalling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans. We used selected reaction monitoring to analyse proteins from the abovementioned four pathways in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) generated from the wild-type strains N2 (Bristol) and CB4856 (Hawaii) to enable quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. About half of the cases from the 44 genes tested showed a statistically significant change in protein abundance between various strains, most of these were however very weak (below 1.3-fold change). We detected a distant QTL on the left arm of chromosome II that affected protein abundance of the phosphatidylserine receptor protein PSR-1, and two separate QTLs that influenced embryonic and ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis on chromosome IV. Our results demonstrate that natural variation in C. elegans is sufficient to cause significant changes in signalling pathways both at the gene expression (transcript and protein abundance) and phenotypic levels. PMID:26985669

  20. Phosphoproteomics reveals malaria parasite Protein Kinase G as a signalling hub regulating egress and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mahmood M.; Solyakov, Lev; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Flueck, Christian; Siddiqui, Faiza A.; Singh, Shailja; Mistry, Sharad; Viskaduraki, Maria; Lee, Kate; Hopp, Christine S.; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Doerig, Christian; Moon, Robert W.; Green, Judith L.; Holder, Anthony A.; Baker, David A.; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the key phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways in the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, remains rudimentary. Here we address this issue for the essential cGMP-dependent protein kinase, PfPKG. By employing chemical and genetic tools in combination with quantitative global phosphoproteomics, we identify the phosphorylation sites on 69 proteins that are direct or indirect cellular targets for PfPKG. These PfPKG targets include proteins involved in cell signalling, proteolysis, gene regulation, protein export and ion and protein transport, indicating that cGMP/PfPKG acts as a signalling hub that plays a central role in a number of core parasite processes. We also show that PfPKG activity is required for parasite invasion. This correlates with the finding that the calcium-dependent protein kinase, PfCDPK1, is phosphorylated by PfPKG, as are components of the actomyosin complex, providing mechanistic insight into the essential role of PfPKG in parasite egress and invasion. PMID:26149123

  1. Phosphoproteomics reveals malaria parasite Protein Kinase G as a signalling hub regulating egress and invasion.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mahmood M; Solyakov, Lev; Bottrill, Andrew R; Flueck, Christian; Siddiqui, Faiza A; Singh, Shailja; Mistry, Sharad; Viskaduraki, Maria; Lee, Kate; Hopp, Christine S; Chitnis, Chetan E; Doerig, Christian; Moon, Robert W; Green, Judith L; Holder, Anthony A; Baker, David A; Tobin, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the key phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways in the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, remains rudimentary. Here we address this issue for the essential cGMP-dependent protein kinase, PfPKG. By employing chemical and genetic tools in combination with quantitative global phosphoproteomics, we identify the phosphorylation sites on 69 proteins that are direct or indirect cellular targets for PfPKG. These PfPKG targets include proteins involved in cell signalling, proteolysis, gene regulation, protein export and ion and protein transport, indicating that cGMP/PfPKG acts as a signalling hub that plays a central role in a number of core parasite processes. We also show that PfPKG activity is required for parasite invasion. This correlates with the finding that the calcium-dependent protein kinase, PfCDPK1, is phosphorylated by PfPKG, as are components of the actomyosin complex, providing mechanistic insight into the essential role of PfPKG in parasite egress and invasion. PMID:26149123

  2. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  3. Protein Kinase PKN1 Represses Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Human Melanoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    James, Richard G.; Bosch, Katherine A.; Kulikauskas, Rima M.; Yang, Peitzu T.; Robin, Nick C.; Toroni, Rachel A.; Biechele, Travis L.; Berndt, Jason D.; von Haller, Priska D.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Chien, Andy J.; Moon, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in phosphoproteomics have made it possible to monitor changes in protein phosphorylation that occur at different steps in signal transduction and have aided the identification of new pathway components. In the present study, we applied this technology to advance our understanding of the responses of melanoma cells to signaling initiated by the secreted ligand WNT3A. We started by comparing the phosphopeptide patterns of cells treated with WNT3A for different periods of time. Next, we integrated these data sets with the results from a siRNA screen that targeted protein kinases. This integration of siRNA screening and proteomics enabled us to identify four kinases that exhibit altered phosphorylation in response to WNT3A and that regulate a luciferase reporter of β-catenin-responsive transcription (β-catenin-activated reporter). We focused on one of these kinases, an atypical PKC kinase, protein kinase N1 (PKN1). Reducing the levels of PKN1 with siRNAs significantly enhances activation of β-catenin-activated reporter and increases apoptosis in melanoma cell lines. Using affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry, we then found that PKN1 is present in a protein complex with a WNT3A receptor, Frizzled 7, as well as with proteins that co-purify with Frizzled 7. These data establish that the protein kinase PKN1 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and sensitizes melanoma cells to cell death stimulated by WNT3A. PMID:24114839

  4. Identification of peptides that inhibit regulator of G protein signaling 4 function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuren; Lee, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Young, Kathleen H

    2008-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) are a family of GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) that interact with heterotrimeric G proteins in the negative regulation of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. RGS4, the first identified mammalian member of the RGS family, has been implicated in many GPCR signaling pathways involved in disease states. We report herein the identification of a 16-amino-acid peptide (P17) as an inhibitor of RGS4. The peptide was found by screening a random peptide library using RGS4 as 'bait' in a yeast two-hybrid system. This peptide inhibited RGS4 GAP activity on Galpha(i1)in a GTPase assay, and blocked the interaction between RGS4 and Galpha(i1)in a pull-down assay. The peptide displayed dose-dependent inhibition of RGS4 and Galpha-interacting protein (GAIP) GAP activities, yet showed no substantial effect on RGS7. Electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated that P17 attenuates RGS4 modulation of M(2) muscarinic receptor stimulation of GIRK (G-protein-mediated inwardly rectifying potassium) channels. Deletion of an arginine at the N terminus of P17 abolished its ability to inhibit RGS4 GAP activity, as did deletions of C-terminal residues. The P17 peptide showed no similarity to any known peptide sequence. Further investigation and optimization of the peptide may provide unique information for the development of RGS4 inhibitors for future therapeutic application. PMID:18547979

  5. Vigilant keratinocytes trigger pathogen-associated molecular pattern signaling in response to streptococcal M1 protein.

    PubMed

    Persson, Sandra T; Wilk, Laura; Mörgelin, Matthias; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-12-01

    The human skin exerts many functions in order to maintain its barrier integrity and protect the host from invading microorganisms. One such pathogen is Streptococcus pyogenes, which can cause a variety of superficial skin wounds that may eventually progress into invasive deep soft tissue infections. Here we show that keratinocytes recognize soluble M1 protein, a streptococcal virulence factor, as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern to release alarming inflammatory responses. We found that this interaction initiates an inflammatory intracellular signaling cascade involving the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and Jun N-terminal protein kinase and the subsequent induction and mobilization of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1. We also determined the imprint of the inflammatory mediators released, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), growth-related oncogene alpha, migration inhibitory factor, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, IL-1α, IL-1 receptor a, and ST2, in response to streptococcal M1 protein. The expression of IL-8 is dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 activity and subsequent activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and p38. Notably, this signaling seems to be distinct for IL-8 release, and it is not shared with the other inflammatory mediators. We conclude that keratinocytes participate in a proinflammatory manner in streptococcal pattern recognition and that expression of the chemoattractant IL-8 by keratinocytes constitutes an important protective mechanism against streptococcal M1 protein. PMID:26416902

  6. Functional characterization of the evolutionarily preserved mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus.

    PubMed

    Kasthuri, Saranya Revathy; Wan, Qiang; Whang, Ilson; Lim, Bong-Soo; Yeo, Sang-Yeob; Choi, Cheol Young; Lee, Jehee

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial immune defense is evolutionarily preserved in all organisms. Mammals have developed robust, protein-based antiviral defenses, which are under constant investigation. Studies have provided evidences for the various fish immune factors sharing similarity with those of mammals. In this study, we have identified an ortholog of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus. RbMAVS cDNA possesses an open reading frame (ORF) of 1758 bp coding for a protein of 586 amino acids with molecular mass of approximately 62 kDa and isoelectric point of 4.6. In silico analysis of RbMAVS protein revealed a caspase recruitment domain (CARD), a proline rich domain and a transmembrane domain. RbMAVS protein also contains a putative TRAF2 binding motif, (319)PVQDT(323). Primary sequence comparison of RbMAVS with other orthologues revealed heterogeneity towards the C-terminus after the CARD region. RbMAVS transcripts were evident in all the examined tissues. RbMAVS expression was induced in vivo after poly I:C challenge in peripheral blood cells, liver, head kidney and spleen tissues. Over-expression of RbMAVS potently inhibited marine birnavirus (MABV) infection in rock bream heart cells and induced various cytokines and signaling molecules in vitro. Thus, RbMAVS is an antiviral protein and potentially involved in the recognition and signaling of antiviral defense mechanism in rock bream. PMID:25107693

  7. Vigilant Keratinocytes Trigger Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Response to Streptococcal M1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Laura; Mörgelin, Matthias; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The human skin exerts many functions in order to maintain its barrier integrity and protect the host from invading microorganisms. One such pathogen is Streptococcus pyogenes, which can cause a variety of superficial skin wounds that may eventually progress into invasive deep soft tissue infections. Here we show that keratinocytes recognize soluble M1 protein, a streptococcal virulence factor, as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern to release alarming inflammatory responses. We found that this interaction initiates an inflammatory intracellular signaling cascade involving the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and Jun N-terminal protein kinase and the subsequent induction and mobilization of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1. We also determined the imprint of the inflammatory mediators released, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), growth-related oncogene alpha, migration inhibitory factor, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, IL-1α, IL-1 receptor a, and ST2, in response to streptococcal M1 protein. The expression of IL-8 is dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 activity and subsequent activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and p38. Notably, this signaling seems to be distinct for IL-8 release, and it is not shared with the other inflammatory mediators. We conclude that keratinocytes participate in a proinflammatory manner in streptococcal pattern recognition and that expression of the chemoattractant IL-8 by keratinocytes constitutes an important protective mechanism against streptococcal M1 protein. PMID:26416902

  8. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Revati; Nagata, Asako; Murray, Brion W.

    2014-01-01

    The perception of reactive oxygen species has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g., cancer). New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically distinct alterations to the protein (e.g., sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disulfides). These post-translational modifications (PTM) are shown to affect the protein structure and function. Because redox-sensitive proteins can traffic between subcellular compartments that have different redox environments, cysteine oxidation enables a spatio-temporal control to signaling. Understanding ramifications of these oxidative modifications to the functions of signaling proteins is crucial for understanding cellular regulation as well as for informed-drug discovery process. The effects of EGFR oxidation of Cys797 on inhibitor pharmacology are presented to illustrate the principle. Taken together, cysteine redox PTM can impact both cell biology and drug pharmacology. PMID:25339904

  9. Phosducin-like protein 1 is essential for G protein assembly and signaling in retinal rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chun Wan J.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Blake, Devon R.; Jiang, Li; Stewart, Jubal S.; Chen, Ching-Kang; Barrow, Jeffery R.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Willardson, Barry M.

    2013-01-01

    G protein β subunits perform essential neuronal functions as part of G protein βγ and Gβ5-RGS (Regulators of G protein Signaling) complexes. Both Gβγ and Gβ5-RGS are obligate dimers that are thought to require the assistance of the cytosolic chaperonin CCT and a co-chaperone, phosducin-like protein 1 (PhLP1) for dimer formation. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we deleted the Phlp1 gene in mouse (Mus musculus) retinal rod photoreceptor cells and measured the effects on G protein biogenesis and visual signal transduction. In the PhLP1-depleted rods, Gβγ dimer formation was decreased 50-fold, resulting in a more than 10-fold decrease in light sensitivity. Moreover, a 20-fold reduction in Gβ5 and RGS9-1 expression was also observed, causing a 15-fold delay in the shutoff of light responses. These findings conclusively demonstrate in vivo that PhLP1 is required for the folding and assembly of both Gβγ and Gβ5-RGS9. PMID:23637185

  10. Sequence-specific targeting of nuclear signal transduction pathways by homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Grueneberg, D A; Simon, K J; Brennan, K; Gilman, M

    1995-01-01

    Cells translate extracellular signals into specific programs of gene expression that reflect their developmental history or identity. We present evidence that one way this interpretation may be performed is by cooperative interactions between serum response factor (SRF) and certain homeodomain proteins. We show that human and Drosophila homeodomain proteins of the paired class have the ability to recruit SRF to DNA sequences not efficiently recognized by SRF on its own, thereby imparting to a linked reporter gene the potential to respond to polypeptide growth factors. This activity requires both the DNA-binding activity of the homeodomain and putative protein-protein contact residues on the exposed surfaces of homeodomain helices 1 and 2. The ability of the homeodomain to impart signal responsiveness is DNA sequence specific, and this specificity differs from the simple DNA-binding specificity of the homeodomain in vitro. The homeodomain imparts response to a spectrum of signals characteristic of the natural SRF-binding site in the c-fos gene. Response to some of these signals is dependent on the secondary recruitment of SRF-dependent ternary complex factors, and we show directly that a homeodomain can promote the recruitment of one such factor, Elk1. We infer that SRF and homeodomains interact cooperatively on DNA and that formation of SRF-homeodomain complexes permits the recruitment of signal-responsive SRF accessory proteins. The ability to route extracellular signals to specific target genes is a novel activity of the homeodomain, which may contribute to the identity function displayed by many homeodomain genes. PMID:7760827

  11. The CRMP Family of Proteins and Their Role in Sema3A Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric F.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    The CRMP proteins were originally identified as mediators of Sema3A signaling and neuronal differentiation. Much has been learned about the mechanism by which CRMPs regulate cellular responses to Sema3A. In this review, the evidence for CRMP as a component of the Sema3A signaling cascade and the modulation of CRMP by plexin and phosphorylation are considered. In addition, current knowledge of the function of CRMP in a variety of cellular processes, including regulation of the cytoskeleton and endocytosis, is discussed in relationship to the mechanisms of axonal growth cone Sema3A response. The secreted protein Sema3A (collapsin-1) was the first identified vertebrate semaphorin. Sema3A acts primarily as a repulsive axon guidance cue, and can cause a dramatic collapse of the growth cone lamellipodium. This process results from the redistribution of the F-actin cytoskeleton1,2 and endocytosis of the growth cone cell membrane.2–4 Neuropilin-1 (NP1) and members of the class A plexins (PlexA) form a Sema3A receptor complex, with NP1 serving as a high-affinity ligand binding partner, and PlexA transducing the signal into the cell via its large intracellular domain. Although the effect of Sema3A on growth cones was first described nearly 15 years ago, the intracellular signaling pathways that lead to the cellular effects have only recently begun to be understood. Monomeric G-proteins, various kinases, the redox protein, MICAL, and protein turnover have all been implicated in PlexA transduction. In addition, the collapsin-response-mediator protein (CRMP) family of cytosolic phosphoproteins plays a crucial role in Sema3A/NP1/PlexA signal transduction. Current knowledge regarding CRMP functions are reviewed here. PMID:17607942

  12. A Single Peroxisomal Targeting Signal Mediates Matrix Protein Import in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nicola H.; Felsner, Gregor; Schramm, Frederic D.; Klingl, Andreas; Maier, Uwe-G.; Bolte, Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisomes are single membrane bound compartments. They are thought to be present in almost all eukaryotic cells, although the bulk of our knowledge about peroxisomes has been generated from only a handful of model organisms. Peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized cytosolically and posttranslationally imported into the peroxisomal matrix. The import is generally thought to be mediated by two different targeting signals. These are respectively recognized by the two import receptor proteins Pex5 and Pex7, which facilitate transport across the peroxisomal membrane. Here, we show the first in vivo localization studies of peroxisomes in a representative organism of the ecologically relevant group of diatoms using fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. By expression of various homologous and heterologous fusion proteins we demonstrate that targeting of Phaeodactylum tricornutum peroxisomal matrix proteins is mediated only by PTS1 targeting signals, also for proteins that are in other systems imported via a PTS2 mode of action. Additional in silico analyses suggest this surprising finding may also apply to further diatoms. Our data suggest that loss of the PTS2 peroxisomal import signal is not reserved to Caenorhabditis elegans as a single exception, but has also occurred in evolutionary divergent organisms. Obviously, targeting switching from PTS2 to PTS1 across different major eukaryotic groups might have occurred for different reasons. Thus, our findings question the widespread assumption that import of peroxisomal matrix proteins is generally mediated by two different targeting signals. Our results implicate that there apparently must have been an event causing the loss of one targeting signal even in the group of diatoms. Different possibilities are discussed that indicate multiple reasons for the detected targeting switching from PTS2 to PTS1. PMID:21966495

  13. Structural Insights into mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhubing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yanyan; Li, Chuanchuan; Wang, Xin; He, Feng; Sun, Lina; Jiao, Shi; Shi, Weiyang; Zhou, Zhaocai

    2015-10-30

    In response to viral infection, cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors sense viral RNA and promote oligomerization of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), which then recruits tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family proteins, including TRAF6, to activate an antiviral response. Currently, the interaction between MAVS and TRAF6 is only partially understood, and atomic details are lacking. Here, we demonstrated that MAVS directly interacts with TRAF6 through its potential TRAF6-binding motif 2 (T6BM2; amino acids 455-460). Further, we solved the crystal structure of MAVS T6BM2 in complex with the TRAF6 TRAF_C domain at 2.95 Å resolution. T6BM2 of MAVS binds to the canonical adaptor-binding groove of the TRAF_C domain. Structure-directed mutational analyses in vitro and in cells revealed that MAVS binding to TRAF6 via T6BM2 instead of T6BM1 is essential but not sufficient for an optimal antiviral response. Particularly, a MAVS mutant Y460E retained its TRAF6-binding ability as predicted but showed significantly impaired signaling activity, highlighting the functional importance of this tyrosine. Moreover, these observations were further confirmed in MAVS(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Collectively, our work provides a structural basis for understanding the MAVS-TRAF6 antiviral response. PMID:26385923

  14. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Family Proteins and c-jun Signaling in Injury-induced Schwann Cell Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Jeong; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Park, Hwan Tae

    2014-06-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) in the peripheral nerves myelinate axons during postnatal development to allow saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Well-organized structures of myelin sheathes are maintained throughout life unless nerves are insulted. After peripheral nerve injury, unidentified signals from injured nerves drive SC dedifferentiation into an immature state. Dedifferentiated SCs participate in axonal regeneration by producing neurotrophic factors and removing degenerating nerve debris. In this review, we focus on the role of mitogen activated protein kinase family proteins (MAP kinases) in SC dedifferentiation. In addition, we will highlight neuregulin 1 and the transcription factor c-jun as upstream and downstream signals for MAP kinases in SC responses to nerve injury. PMID:24963277

  15. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E; Trimble, William S; Foster, Leonard J; Finlay, B Brett

    2015-07-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 couples cellular prion protein to intracellular signalling in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Laura T; Salazar, Santiago V; Kostylev, Mikhail A; Um, Ji Won; Kaufman, Adam C; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease-related phenotypes in mice can be rescued by blockade of either cellular prion protein or metabotropic glutamate receptor 5. We sought genetic and biochemical evidence that these proteins function cooperatively as an obligate complex in the brain. We show that cellular prion protein associates via transmembrane metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 with the intracellular protein mediators Homer1b/c, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and the Alzheimer's disease risk gene product protein tyrosine kinase 2 beta. Coupling of cellular prion protein to these intracellular proteins is modified by soluble amyloid-β oligomers, by mouse brain Alzheimer's disease transgenes or by human Alzheimer's disease pathology. Amyloid-β oligomer-triggered phosphorylation of intracellular protein mediators and impairment of synaptic plasticity in vitro requires Prnp-Grm5 genetic interaction, being absent in transheterozygous loss-of-function, but present in either single heterozygote. Importantly, genetic coupling between Prnp and Grm5 is also responsible for signalling, for survival and for synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease transgenic model mice. Thus, the interaction between metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and cellular prion protein has a central role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, and the complex is a potential target for disease-modifying intervention. PMID:26667279

  17. Spring Viremia of Carp Virus N Protein Suppresses Fish IFNφ1 Production by Targeting the Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling Protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Long-Feng; Li, Shun; Lu, Xiao-Bing; LaPatra, Scott E; Zhang, Nu; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Chen, Dan-Dan; Nie, Pin; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-05-01

    For a virus to replicate efficiently, it must try and inhibit host IFN expression because IFN is an important host defense at early stages after viral infection. For aquatic viruses, the mechanisms used to escape the hosts IFN system are still unclear. In this study, we show that the N protein of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) inhibits zebrafish IFNφ1 production by degrading the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS). First, the upregulation of IFNφ1 promoter activity stimulated by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) or MAVS was suppressed by the SVCV infection. However, the upregulation by the downstream factor of the RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, TANK-binding kinase 1, was not affected. Notably, at the protein level, MAVS decreased remarkably when cells were infected with SVCV. Second, consistent with the result of the SVCV infection, overexpression of the N protein of SVCV blocked the IFNφ1 transcription activated by MAVS and downregulated MAVS expression at the protein level but not at the mRNA level. Further analysis demonstrated that the N protein targeted MAVS for K48-linked ubiquitination, which promoted the degradation of MAVS. These data indicated that fish MAVS could be degraded by the N protein of SVCV through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first article of a fish RIG-I-like receptor pathway interfered by an aquatic virus in an ubiquitin-proteasome manner, suggesting that immune evasion of a virus also exists in lower vertebrates. PMID:26994222

  18. Activators of G-protein Signaling 3: A drug addiction molecular gateway

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, M. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Drug addiction is marked by continued drug-seeking behavior despite deleterious consequences and a heightened propensity to relapse notwithstanding long, drug-free periods. The enduring nature of addiction has been hypothesized to arise from perturbations in intracellular signaling, gene expression, and brain circuitry induced by substance abuse. Ameliorating some of these aberrations should abate behavioral and neurochemical markers associated with an “addiction phenotype”. This review summarizes data showing that protein expression and signaling through the non-receptor Activator of heterotrimeric G-protein Signaling 3 (AGS3) is altered by commonly abused substances in rat and in vitro addiction models. AGS3 structure and function are unrelated to the more broadly studied Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) family. Thus, the unique role of AGS3 is the focus of this review. Intriguingly, AGS3 protein changes persist into drug abstinence. Accordingly, studies probing the role of AGS3 in the neurochemistry of drug-seeking behavior and relapse are reviewed in detail. To illuminate this work, AGS3 structure, cellular localization, and function are covered so that an idealized AGS3-targeted pharmacotherapy can be proposed. PMID:20700046

  19. RARRES3 regulates signal transduction through post-translational protein modifications

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tzu-Hui; Chang, Tsu-Chung

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that retinoic acid receptor responder 3 (RARRES3)-mediated protein deacylation resulted in significant inhibition of the transformed properties of breast cancer cells. This finding suggests a key role of RARRES3 in the regulation of growth signaling and metastasis in cancer cells and as a potential therapeutic target for cancer therapy. PMID:27308522

  20. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca; Kleinjung, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Allostery offers a highly specific way to modulate protein function. Therefore, understanding this mechanism is of increasing interest for protein science and drug discovery. However, allosteric signal transmission is difficult to detect experimentally and to model because it is often mediated by local structural changes propagating along multiple pathways. To address this, we developed a method to identify communication pathways by an information-theoretical analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. Signal propagation was described as information exchange through a network of correlated local motions, modeled as transitions between canonical states of protein fragments. The method was used to describe allostery in two-component regulatory systems. In particular, the transmission from the allosteric site to the signaling surface of the receiver domain NtrC was shown to be mediated by a layer of hub residues. The location of hubs preferentially connected to the allosteric site was found in close agreement with key residues experimentally identified as involved in the signal transmission. The comparison with the networks of the homologues CheY and FixJ highlighted similarities in their dynamics. In particular, we showed that a preorganized network of fragment connections between the allosteric and functional sites exists already in the inactive state of all three proteins. PMID:22071506

  1. RARRES3 regulates signal transduction through post-translational protein modifications.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Hui; Chang, Tsu-Chung

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that retinoic acid receptor responder 3 (RARRES3)-mediated protein deacylation resulted in significant inhibition of the transformed properties of breast cancer cells. This finding suggests a key role of RARRES3 in the regulation of growth signaling and metastasis in cancer cells and as a potential therapeutic target for cancer therapy. PMID:27308522

  2. Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangfan P.; Tsai, I-Chun; Morleo, Manuela; Oh, Edwin C.; Leitch, Carmen C.; Massa, Filomena; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Parker, David S.; Finley, Daniel; Zaghloul, Norann A.; Franco, Brunella; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are critical mediators of paracrine signaling; however, it is unknown whether proteins that contribute to ciliopathies converge on multiple paracrine pathways through a common mechanism. Here, we show that loss of cilopathy-associated proteins Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 (BBS4) or oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) results in the accumulation of signaling mediators normally targeted for proteasomal degradation. In WT cells, several BBS proteins and OFD1 interacted with proteasomal subunits, and loss of either BBS4 or OFD1 led to depletion of multiple subunits from the centrosomal proteasome. Furthermore, overexpression of proteasomal regulatory components or treatment with proteasomal activators sulforaphane (SFN) and mevalonolactone (MVA) ameliorated signaling defects in cells lacking BBS1, BBS4, and OFD1, in morphant zebrafish embryos, and in induced neurons from Ofd1-deficient mice. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that other proteasome-dependent pathways not known to be associated with ciliopathies are defective in the absence of ciliopathy proteins. We found that loss of BBS1, BBS4, or OFD1 led to decreased NF-κB activity and concomitant IκBβ accumulation and that these defects were ameliorated with SFN treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that basal body proteasomal regulation governs paracrine signaling pathways and suggest that augmenting proteasomal function might benefit ciliopathy patients. PMID:24691443

  3. Rhizobium nod factor signaling. Evidence for a g protein-mediated transduction mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pingret, JL; Journet, EP; Barker, DG

    1998-01-01

    Rhizobium nodulation (Nod) factors are lipochitooligosaccharide signals that elicit key symbiotic developmental responses in the host legume root. In this study, we have investigated Nod factor signal transduction in the Medicago root epidermis by using a pharmacological approach in conjunction with transgenic plants expressing the Nod factor-responsive reporter construct pMtENOD12-GUS. Evidence for the participation of heterotrimeric G proteins in Nod factor signaling has come from three complementary observations: (1) the amphiphilic peptides mastoparan and Mas7, known G protein agonists, are able to mimic Nod factor-induced epidermal MtENOD12 expression; (2) growth of plants in nodulation-inhibiting conditions (10 mM NH4NO3) leads to a dramatic reduction in both Nod factor- and mastoparan-elicited gene expression; and (3) bacterial pertussis toxin, a well-characterized G protein antagonist, blocks the activities of both the Nod factor and mastoparan. In addition, we have found that antagonists that interfere with phospholipase C activity (neomycin and U73122) and Ca2+ influx/release (EGTA, La3+, and ruthenium red) block Nod factor/mastoparan activity. Taken together, these results are consistent with a Nod factor signal transduction mechanism involving G protein mediation coupled to the activation of both phosphoinositide and Ca2+ second messenger pathways. PMID:9596628

  4. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  5. Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2) deficiency accelerates the progression of kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Noh, Mira; Rhee, Man Hee; Park, Kwon Moo

    2014-09-01

    The regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2) is a potent negative regulator of Gq protein signals including the angiotensin II (AngII)/AngII receptor signal, which plays a critical role in the progression of fibrosis. However, the role of RGS2 on the progression of kidney fibrosis has not been assessed. Here, we investigated the role of RGS2 in kidney fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in mice. UUO resulted in increased expression of RGS2 mRNA and protein in the kidney along with increases of AngII and its type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling and fibrosis. Furthermore, UUO increased the levels of F4/80, Ly6G, myeloperoxidase, and CXCR4 in the kidneys. RGS2 deficiency significantly enhanced these changes in the kidney. RGS2 deletion in the bone marrow-derived cells by transplanting the bone marrow of RGS2 knock-out mice into wild type mice enhanced UUO-induced kidney fibrosis. Overexpression of RGS2 in HEK293 cells, a human embryonic kidney cell line, and RAW264.7 cells, a monocyte/macrophage line, inhibited the AngII-induced activation of ERK and increase of CXCR4 expression. These findings provide the first evidence that RGS2 negatively regulates the progression of kidney fibrosis following UUO, likely by suppressing fibrogenic and inflammatory responses through the inhibition of AngII/AT1R signaling. PMID:24973550

  6. Intercellular signaling through secreted proteins induces free-energy gradient-directed cell movement.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Shin, Young Shik; Sutherland, Alex; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2016-05-17

    Controlling cell migration is important in tissue engineering and medicine. Cell motility depends on factors such as nutrient concentration gradients and soluble factor signaling. In particular, cell-cell signaling can depend on cell-cell separation distance and can influence cellular arrangements in bulk cultures. Here, we seek a physical-based approach, which identifies a potential governed by cell-cell signaling that induces a directed cell-cell motion. A single-cell barcode chip (SCBC) was used to experimentally interrogate secreted proteins in hundreds of isolated glioblastoma brain cancer cell pairs and to monitor their relative motions over time. We used these trajectories to identify a range of cell-cell separation distances where the signaling was most stable. We then used a thermodynamics-motivated analysis of secreted protein levels to characterize free-energy changes for different cell-cell distances. We show that glioblastoma cell-cell movement can be described as Brownian motion biased by cell-cell potential. To demonstrate that the free-energy potential as determined by the signaling is the driver of motion, we inhibited two proteins most involved in maintaining the free-energy gradient. Following inhibition, cell pairs showed an essentially random Brownian motion, similar to the case for untreated, isolated single cells. PMID:27140641

  7. Characterization of Differential Protein Tethering at the Plasma Membrane in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan D.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Physical tethering of membrane proteins to the cortical actin cytoskeleton provides functional organization to the plasma membrane and contributes to diverse cellular processes including cell signaling, vesicular trafficking, endocytosis, and migration. For these processes to occur, membrane protein tethering must be dynamically regulated in response to environmental cues. In this study, we describe a novel biochemical scheme for isolating the complement of plasma membrane proteins that are physically tethered to the actin cytoskeleton. We utilized this method in combination with tandem liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) to demonstrate that cytoskeletal tethering of membrane proteins is acutely regulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in normal human kidney (HK2) cells. Our results indicate that several proteins known to be involved in EGF signaling, as well as other proteins not traditionally associated with this pathway, are tethered to the cytoskeleton in dynamic fashion. Further analysis of one hit from our proteomic survey, the receptor phosphotyrosine phosphatase PTPRS, revealed a correlation between cytoskeletal tethering and endosomal trafficking in response to EGF. This finding parallels previous indications that PTPRS is involved in the desensitization of EGFR and provides a potential mechanism to coordinate localization of these two membrane proteins in the same compartment upon EGFR activation. PMID:22559174

  8. Protein serine/threonine phosphatase PPM1A dephosphorylates Smad1 in the bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xueyan; Liang, Yao-Yun; Feng, Xin-Hua; Lin, Xia

    2006-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are secreted polypeptides belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily that activates a broad range of biological responses in the metazoan organism. The BMP-initiated signaling pathway is under tight control by processes including regulation of the ligands, the receptors, and the key downstream intracellular effector Smads. A critical point of control in BMP signaling is the phosphorylation of Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 in their C-terminal SXS motif. Although such phosphorylation, which is mediated by the type I BMP receptor kinases in response to BMP stimulation, is well characterized, biochemical mechanisms underlying Smad dephosphorylation remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have found that PPM1A, a metal ion-dependent protein serine/threonine phosphatase, physically interacts with and dephosphorylates Smad1 both in vitro and in vivo. Functionally, overexpression of PPM1A abolishes BMP-induced transcriptional responses, whereas RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PPM1A enhances BMP signaling. Collectively, our study suggests that PPM1A plays an important role in controlling BMP signaling through catalyzing Smad dephosphorylation. PMID:16931515

  9. Structural determinants of G-protein alpha subunit selectivity by regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2).

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Soundararajan, Meera; Hutsell, Stephanie Q; Roos, Annette K; Urban, Daniel J; Setola, Vincent; Temple, Brenda R S; Roth, Bryan L; Knapp, Stefan; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2009-07-17

    "Regulator of G-protein signaling" (RGS) proteins facilitate the termination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling via their ability to increase the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate of Galpha subunits (known as GTPase-accelerating protein or "GAP" activity). RGS2 is unique in its in vitro potency and selectivity as a GAP for Galpha(q) subunits. As many vasoconstrictive hormones signal via G(q) heterotrimer-coupled receptors, it is perhaps not surprising that RGS2-deficient mice exhibit constitutive hypertension. However, to date the particular structural features within RGS2 determining its selectivity for Galpha(q) over Galpha(i/o) substrates have not been completely characterized. Here, we examine a trio of point mutations to RGS2 that elicits Galpha(i)-directed binding and GAP activities without perturbing its association with Galpha(q). Using x-ray crystallography, we determined a model of the triple mutant RGS2 in complex with a transition state mimetic form of Galpha(i) at 2.8-A resolution. Structural comparison with unliganded, wild type RGS2 and of other RGS domain/Galpha complexes highlighted the roles of these residues in wild type RGS2 that weaken Galpha(i) subunit association. Moreover, these three amino acids are seen to be evolutionarily conserved among organisms with modern cardiovascular systems, suggesting that RGS2 arose from the R4-subfamily of RGS proteins to have specialized activity as a potent and selective Galpha(q) GAP that modulates cardiovascular function. PMID:19478087

  10. Differential expression of the regulator of G protein signaling RGS9 protein in nociceptive pathways of different age rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jun; Moriyama, Kumi; Han, Kyung Ream; Sharma, Manohar; Han, Xiaokang; Xie, Guo-xi; Palmer, Pamela Pierce

    2005-11-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-activating proteins which act as modulators of G-protein-coupled receptors. RGS9 has two alternative splicing variants. RGS9-1 is expressed in the retina. RGS9-2 is expressed in the brain, especially abundant in the striatum. It is believed to be an essential regulatory component of dopamine and opioid signaling. In this study, we compared the expression of RGS9 proteins in the nervous system of different age groups of rats employing immunocytochemistry. In both 3-week- and 1-year-old rats, RGS9 is expressed abundantly in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, and olfactory tubercle. It is also expressed abundantly in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. Quantitative analysis showed that the intensities of RGS9 expression in 1-year-old rats are higher than those in the 3-week-old rats in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, periaqueductal gray, and gray matter of the spinal cord. In contrast, in thalamic nuclei and locus coeruleus, the intensities of RGS9 immunostaining in 3-week-old rats are higher than in 1-year-old rats. In DRG cells, there is no significant difference between the two age groups. These data suggest that RGS9 is differentially expressed with age. Such differential expression may play an important role in neuronal differentiation and development as well as in neuronal function, such as dopamine and opioid signaling. PMID:16153714

  11. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: From Housekeeping Enzymes to Master-Regulators of Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions surrounding the roles of protein phosphatases in the regulation of signal transduction, perhaps the most damaging of which is the erroneous view that these enzymes exert their effects merely as constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. On the contrary, the phosphatases are critical, specific regulators of signaling in their own right and serve an essential function, in a coordinated manner with the kinases, to determine the response to a physiological stimulus. This review is a personal perspective on the development of our understanding of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of enzymes. I have discussed various aspects of the structure, regulation and function of the PTP family, which I hope will illustrate the fundamental importance of these enzymes to the control of signal transduction. PMID:23176256

  12. Practical aspects of NMR signal assignment in larger and challenging proteins

    PubMed Central

    Frueh, Dominique P.

    2014-01-01

    NMR has matured into a technique routinely employed for studying proteins in near physiological conditions. However, applications to larger proteins are impeded by the complexity of the various correlation maps necessary to assign NMR signals. This article reviews the data analysis techniques traditionally employed for resonance assignment and describes alternative protocols necessary for overcoming challenges in large protein spectra. In particular, simultaneous analysis of multiple spectra may help overcome ambiguities or may reveal correlations in an indirect manner. Similarly, visualization of orthogonal planes in a multidimensional spectrum can provide alternative assignment procedures. We describe examples of such strategies for assignment of backbone, methyl, and nOe resonances. We describe experimental aspects of data acquisition for the related experiments and provide guidelines for preliminary studies. Focus is placed on large folded monomeric proteins and examples are provided for 37, 48, 53, and 81 kDa proteins. PMID:24534088

  13. Characterization of the nuclear localization signals of duck circovirus replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wu, Z; Xiang, Q; Li, Z; Zhang, R; Chen, J; Xia, L; Lin, S; Yu, W; Ma, Z; Xie, Z; Jiang, S

    2015-12-01

    Duck circovirus (DuCV) possess a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for its replication. Based on the viral genotype, there are two categories of Rep proteins: Rep1 and Rep2. To characterize the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) conferring the nuclear localization of the Rep proteins, defined coding regions of the rep gene of two genotypes of DuCV were cloned and co-expressed with the red fluorescent protein DsRed2. The results showed that deleting the putative N-terminal NLS located at amino acid residues 10-37 of Rep1 and Rep2 abrogated nuclear translocation, while deleting the putative C-terminal NLS located at residues 244-274 of Rep1 did not significantly alter its subcellular localization, confirming that only the NLS located at residues 10-37 in the N-termini of the Rep proteins had nuclear targeting activity. PMID:26666192

  14. Temporal regulation of EGF signaling networks by the scaffold protein Shc1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yong; Zhang, Cunjie; Croucher, David R.; Soliman, Mohamed A.; St-Denis, Nicole; Pasculescu, Adrian; Taylor, Lorne; Tate, Stephen A.; Hardy, Rod W.; Colwill, Karen; Dai, Anna Yue; Bagshaw, Rick; Dennis, James W.; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Daly, Roger J.; Pawson, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Cell-surface receptors frequently employ scaffold proteins to recruit cytoplasmic targets, but the rationale for this is uncertain. Activated receptor tyrosine kinases, for example, engage scaffolds such as Shc1 that contain phosphotyrosine (pTyr) binding (PTB) domains. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we find that Shc1 responds to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation through multiple waves of distinct phosphorylation events and protein interactions. Following stimulation, Shc1 rapidly binds a group of proteins that activate pro-mitogenic/survival pathways dependent on recruitment of the Grb2 adaptor to Shc1 pTyr sites. Akt-mediated feedback phosphorylation of Shc1 Ser29 then recruits the Ptpn12 tyrosine phosphatase. This is followed by a sub-network of proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, trafficking and signal termination that binds Shc1 with delayed kinetics, largely through the SgK269 pseudokinase/adaptor protein. Ptpn12 acts as a switch to convert Shc1 from pTyr/Grb2-based signaling to SgK269-mediated pathways that regulate cell invasion and morphogenesis. The Shc1 scaffold therefore directs the temporal flow of signaling information following EGF stimulation. PMID:23846654

  15. Cascade signal amplification strategy for subattomolar protein detection by rolling circle amplification and quantum dots tagging.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Yan, Feng; Ding, Lin; Ju, Huangxian; Yin, Yibing

    2010-04-15

    A cascade signal amplification strategy was proposed for detection of protein target at ultralow concentration by combining the rolling circle amplification (RCA) technique with oligonucleotide functionalized quantum dots (QDs), multiplex binding of the biotin-strepavidin system, and anodic stripping voltammetric detection. The RCA product containing tandem-repeat sequences could serve as excellent template for periodic assembly of QDs, which presented per protein recognition event to numerous quantum dot tags for electrochemical readout. Both the RCA and the multiplex binding system showed remarkable amplification efficiency, very little nonspecific adsorption, and low background signal. Using human vascular endothelial growth factor as a model protein, the designed strategy could quantitatively detect protein down to 16 molecules in a 100 microL sample with a linear calibration range from 1 aM to 1 pM and was amenable to quantification of protein target in complex biological matrixes. The proposed cascade signal amplification strategy would become a powerful tool for proteomics research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:20345087

  16. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ni; Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin

    2013-02-01

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1-17 and 18-36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome. PMID:23174505

  17. Deciphering and modulating G protein signalling in C. elegans using the DREADD technology

    PubMed Central

    Prömel, Simone; Fiedler, Franziska; Binder, Claudia; Winkler, Jana; Schöneberg, Torsten; Thor, Doreen

    2016-01-01

    G-protein signalling is an evolutionary conserved concept highlighting its fundamental impact on developmental and functional processes. Studies on the effects of G protein signals on tissues as well as an entire organism are often conducted in Caenorhabditis elegans. To understand and control dynamics and kinetics of the processes involved, pharmacological modulation of specific G protein pathways would be advantageous, but is difficult due to a lack in accessibility and regulation. To provide this option, we designed G protein-coupled receptor-based designer receptors (DREADDs) for C. elegans. Initially described in mammalian systems, these modified muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are activated by the inert drug clozapine-N-oxide, but not by their endogenous agonists. We report a novel C. elegans-specific DREADD, functionally expressed and specifically activating Gq-protein signalling in vitro and in vivo which we used for modulating mating behaviour. Therefore, this novel designer receptor demonstrates the possibility to pharmacologically control physiological functions in C. elegans. PMID:27461895

  18. Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing and Signaling by Protein Kinases in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Oka, Shin-ichi; Ale-Agha, Niloofar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidants were once principally considered perpetrators of injury and disease. However, this has become an antiquated view, with cumulative evidence showing that the oxidant hydrogen peroxide serves as a signaling molecule. Hydrogen peroxide carries vital information about the redox state of the cell and is crucial for homeostatic regulation during health and adaptation to stress. Recent Advances: In this review, we examine the contemporary concepts for how hydrogen peroxide is sensed and transduced into a biological response by introducing post-translational oxidative modifications on select proteins. Oxidant sensing and signaling by kinases are of particular importance as they integrate oxidant signals into phospho-regulated pathways. We focus on CAMKII, PKA, and PKG, kinases whose redox regulation has notable impact on cardiovascular function. Critical Issues: In addition, we examine the mechanism for regulating intracellular hydrogen peroxide, considering the net concentrations that may accumulate. The effects of endogenously generated oxidants are often modeled by applying exogenous hydrogen peroxide to cells or tissues. Here we consider whether model systems exposed to exogenous hydrogen peroxide have relevance to systems where the oxidant is generated endogenously, and if so, what concentration can be justified in terms of relevance to health and disease. Future Directions: Improving our understanding of hydrogen peroxide signaling and the sensor proteins that it can modify will help us develop new strategies to regulate intracellular signaling to prevent disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1042–1052. PMID:22867279

  19. Regulators and effectors of bone morphogenetic protein signalling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiang-Yun; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Li; Huang, Yu

    2015-07-15

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play key roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in various tissues and organs, including the cardiovascular system. BMPs signal through both Smad-dependent and -independent cascades to exert a wide spectrum of biological activities. Cardiovascular disorders such as abnormal angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy have been linked to aberrant BMP signalling. To correct the dysregulated BMP signalling in cardiovascular pathogenesis, it is essential to get a better understanding of how the regulators and effectors of BMP signalling control cardiovascular function and how the dysregulated BMP signalling contributes to cardiovascular dysfunction. We hence highlight several key regulators of BMP signalling such as extracellular regulators of ligands, mechanical forces, microRNAs and small molecule drugs as well as typical BMP effectors like direct downstream target genes, mitogen-activated protein kinases, reactive oxygen species and microRNAs. The insights into these molecular processes will help target both the regulators and important effectors to reverse BMP-associated cardiovascular pathogenesis. PMID:25952563

  20. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowers gastric adenocarcinoma TMK1 cell proliferation via bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Yu Le; Cho, C.H.

    2008-06-27

    Proteasome inhibitor is a novel class of cancer therapeutics, of which the mechanism of action is not fully understood. It is reported that proteasome inhibitor enhances bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in osteoblasts to stimulate bone formation. BMP signaling is also an important tumor-suppressing pathway in gastric carcinogenesis. We therefore sought to determine the anti-mitogenic effect of proteasome inhibition in relation to BMP signaling in gastric cancer cells. Results showed that proteasome inhibitor MG-132 significantly suppressed the proliferation and the colony-forming ability of gastric cancer TMK1 cells. In this connection, MG-132 activated BMP signaling, manifested as an increase in Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and up-regulation of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of BMP receptor II by RNA interference abolished Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} induction, and the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by MG-132. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 up-regulated the expression of BMP1 and BMP4 and suppressed the expression of Smad6. Knockdown of Smad6 also mimicked the effect of MG-132 on BMP signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of proteasome suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation via activation of BMP signaling. This discovery may open up a novel therapeutic avenue to proteasome inhibitors for the management of gastric cancer.

  1. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Banerji, Christopher R S; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology. PMID:25919796

  2. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology. PMID:25919796

  3. The Bro1-Domain Protein, EGO-2, Promotes Notch Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Maine, Eleanor M.

    2007-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, as in other animals, Notch-type signaling mediates numerous inductive events during development. The mechanism of Notch-type signaling involves proteolytic cleavage of the receptor and subsequent transport of the receptor intracellular domain to the nucleus, where it acts as a transcriptional regulator. Notch-type signaling activity is modulated by post-translational modifications and endocytosis of ligand and receptor. We previously identified the ego-2 (enhancer of glp-1) gene as a positive regulator of germline proliferation that interacts genetically with the GLP-1/Notch signaling pathway in the germline. Here, we show that ego-2 positively regulates signaling in various tissues via both GLP-1 and the second C. elegans Notch-type receptor, LIN-12. ego-2 activity also promotes aspects of development not known to require GLP-1 or LIN-12. The EGO-2 protein contains a Bro1 domain, which is known in other systems to localize to certain endosomal compartments. EGO-2 activity in the soma promotes GLP-1 signaling in the germline, consistent with a role for EGO-2 in production of active ligand. Another C. elegans Bro1-domain protein, ALX-1, is known to interact physically with LIN-12/Notch. We document a complex phenotypic interaction between ego-2 and alx-1, consistent with their relationship being antagonistic with respect to some developmental processes and agonistic with respect to others. PMID:17603118

  4. L-Alanylglutamine inhibits signaling proteins that activate protein degradation, but does not affect proteins that activate protein synthesis after an acute resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanyi; Choi, Ran Hee; Solares, Geoffrey J; Tseng, Hung-Min; Ding, Zhenping; Kim, Kyoungrae; Ivy, John L

    2015-07-01

    Sustamine™ (SUS) is a dipeptide composed of alanine and glutamine (AlaGln). Glutamine has been suggested to increase muscle protein accretion; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms of glutamine on muscle protein metabolism following resistance exercise have not been fully addressed. In the present study, 2-month-old rats climbed a ladder 10 times with a weight equal to 75 % of their body mass attached at the tail. Rats were then orally administered one of four solutions: placebo (PLA-glycine = 0.52 g/kg), whey protein (WP = 0.4 g/kg), low dose of SUS (LSUS = 0.1 g/kg), or high dose of SUS (HSUS = 0.5 g/kg). An additional group of sedentary (SED) rats was intubated with glycine (0.52 g/kg) at the same time as the ladder-climbing rats. Blood samples were collected immediately after exercise and at either 20 or 40 min after recovery. The flexor hallucis longus (FHL), a muscle used for climbing, was excised at 20 or 40 min post exercise and analyzed for proteins regulating protein synthesis and degradation. All supplements elevated the phosphorylation of FOXO3A above SED at 20 min post exercise, but only the SUS supplements significantly reduced the phosphorylation of AMPK and NF-kB p65. SUS supplements had no effect on mTOR signaling, but WP supplementation yielded a greater phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6k, and rpS6 compared with PLA at 20 min post exercise. However, by 40 min post exercise, phosphorylation of mTOR and rpS6 in PLA had risen to levels not different than WP. These results suggest that SUS blocks the activation of intracellular signals for MPB, whereas WP accelerates mRNA translation. PMID:25837301

  5. Keeping the Balance Right: Regulator of G Protein Signaling 5 in Vascular Physiology and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ganss, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular system including the heart and intricate network of arteries, veins, and capillaries is essential for normal organ homeostasis and tightly controlled by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling cascades. Imbalances of these signaling systems can manifest in cardiovascular disease. There has been a recent surge in studies on modulators of GPCR activity, so-called regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) molecules, due to their potential as pharmacological targets. Among RGS proteins, RGS5 is prominently expressed in arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) suggesting an important role in vascular function. Although apparently dispensable for embryonic development, RGS5 has now emerged as a crucial regulator of adaptive cardiovascular processes, including remodeling of the vascular wall under stress. RGS5 has been shown to regulate signaling pathways which shape vSMC differentiation, migration, contraction, as well as tissue inflammation and fibrosis. Indeed, studies in RGS5 mutant mice have confirmed a crucial and nonredundant role as regulator of cardiac function, blood pressure homeostasis, and adult neovascularization such as angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In response to environmental cues, RGS5 is dynamically controlled at both mRNA and protein levels. This enables direct, precise, and rapid modulation of Gαq- and Gαi-coupled GPCR signaling which also integrates receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and Gαs/Gα12/13-mediated GPCR signal transduction. Although RGS5's endogenous role in a spatiotemporal context is still largely unknown, its prominence in vascular tissue makes it an important molecule to study and a prime candidate for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26123304

  6. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies proteins modulating aberrant FLT3-ITD signaling

    PubMed Central

    Caldarelli, A; Müller, J P; Paskowski-Rogacz, M; Herrmann, K; Bauer, R; Koch, S; Heninger, A K; Krastev, D; Ding, L; Kasper, S; Fischer, T; Brodhun, M; Böhmer, F-D; Buchholz, F

    2013-01-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 is a commonly mutated gene in acute myeloid leukemia, with about one-third of patients carrying an internal-tandem duplication of the juxtamembrane domain in the receptor (FLT3-ITD). FLT3-ITD exhibits altered signaling quality, including aberrant activation of STAT5. To identify genes affecting FLT3-ITD-mediated STAT5 signaling, we performed an esiRNA-based RNAi screen utilizing a STAT5-driven reporter assay. Knockdowns that caused reduced FLT3-ITD-mediated STAT5 signaling were enriched for genes encoding proteins involved in protein secretion and intracellular protein transport, indicating that modulation of protein transport processes could potentially be used to reduce constitutive STAT5 signaling in FLT3-ITD-positive cells. The relevance of KDELR1, a component involved in the Golgi-ER retrograde transport, was further analyzed. In FLT3-ITD-expressing leukemic MV4-11 cells, downregulation of KDELR1 resulted in reduced STAT5 activation, proliferation and colony-forming capacity. Stable shRNA-mediated depletion of KDELR1 in FLT3-ITD-expressing 32D cells likewise resulted in reduced STAT5 signaling and cell proliferation. Importantly, these cells also showed a reduced capacity to generate a leukemia-like disease in syngeneic C3H/HeJ mice. Together our data suggest intracellular protein transport as a potential target for FLT3-ITD driven leukemias, with KDELR1 emerging as a positive modulator of oncogenic FLT3-ITD activity. PMID:23508117

  7. Serotonin1A-receptor-dependent signaling proteins in mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Whittle, Nigel; Klug, Stefanie; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Singewald, Nicolas; Toth, Miklos; Lubec, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin1A receptor (5-HT1A R) knock-out mouse (KO) is a widely used animal model for anxiety and cognitive function and regulation of signaling cascades by this receptor has been reported. We aimed to determine individual representatives of signaling cascades in order to screen 5-HT1A R-dependent signaling proteins (SPs). Hippocampal proteins from wild type and 5-HT1A R KO mice were extracted, run on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, proteins were identified by MALDI and nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS and SPs were quantified by specific software. Nucleoside diphosphate kinase A (NDK A, synonym: nm23), Dual specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MAPKK1, synonym: MEK), Serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1-gamma catalytic subunit (PP-1G), Septin-5, were reduced in the KO mice. Novel phosphorylation sites at T386 on MAPKK1 and at S225 and Y265 on Septin-5 were observed. MAPKK1 and PP-1G are known 5-HT1A R-dependent signaling compounds and are in agreement with receptor knock-out and septin-5 is involved in serotonin transport, although regulation by 5-HT1A R has not been reported. 5-HT1A R – dependent levels for NDK A have not been demonstrated so far and we herewith propose a role for NDK A in 5-HT1A R signaling. Reduced SP levels along with findings of two novel phosphorylation sites may be relevant for interpretation of previous and the design of future studies on this receptor system. PMID:19607848

  8. An Ancestral Role for CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 Proteins in Both Ethylene and Abscisic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, Yuki; Pierik, Ronald; Kelly, Steven; Sakuta, Masaaki; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2015-09-01

    Land plants have evolved adaptive regulatory mechanisms enabling the survival of environmental stresses associated with terrestrial life. Here, we focus on the evolution of the regulatory CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 (CTR1) component of the ethylene signaling pathway that modulates stress-related changes in plant growth and development. First, we compare CTR1-like proteins from a bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens (representative of early divergent land plants), with those of more recently diverged lycophyte and angiosperm species (including Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]) and identify a monophyletic CTR1 family. The fully sequenced P. patens genome encodes only a single member of this family (PpCTR1L). Next, we compare the functions of PpCTR1L with that of related angiosperm proteins. We show that, like angiosperm CTR1 proteins (e.g. AtCTR1 of Arabidopsis), PpCTR1L modulates downstream ethylene signaling via direct interaction with ethylene receptors. These functions, therefore, likely predate the divergence of the bryophytes from the land-plant lineage. However, we also show that PpCTR1L unexpectedly has dual functions and additionally modulates abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. In contrast, while AtCTR1 lacks detectable ABA signaling functions, Arabidopsis has during evolution acquired another homolog that is functionally distinct from AtCTR1. In conclusion, the roles of CTR1-related proteins appear to have functionally diversified during land-plant evolution, and angiosperm CTR1-related proteins appear to have lost an ancestral ABA signaling function. Our study provides new insights into how molecular events such as gene duplication and functional differentiation may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of regulatory mechanisms in plants. PMID:26243614

  9. D-AKAP1a is a signal-anchored protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Heeju; Lee, You-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Jin-A; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1a (D-AKAP1a, AKAP1) regulates cAMP signaling in mitochondria. However, it is not clear how D-AKAP1a is associated with mitochondria. In this study, we show that D-AKAP1a is a transmembrane protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). We revealed that the N-terminus of D-AKAP1a is exposed to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and that its C-terminus is located on the cytoplasmic side of the MOM. Moderate hydrophobicity and the positively charged flanking residues of the transmembrane domain of D-AKAP1a were important for targeting. Taken together, D-AKAP1a can be classified as a signal-anchored protein in the MOM. Our topological study provides valuable information about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mitochondrial targeting of AKAP1. PMID:26950402

  10. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lisse, Thomas S.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as “vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins”, behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vitamin D and estrogen resistances. This set of interactors belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family of previously known pre-mRNA-interacting proteins. This review provides new insights into the mechanism by which these novel regulators of signaling and metabolism can act to regulate responses to vitamin D and estrogen. In addition the review also describes other molecules that are known to influence nuclear receptor signaling through interaction with hormone response elements. PMID:21236284

  11. Science Signaling Podcast for 2 August 2016: Patient-specific protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Schrum, Adam G; Neier, Steven C; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Adam Schrum and Steven Neier, authors of a Research Article that appears in the 2 August 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about a method for identifying protein-protein interactions in patient tissue samples. The authors used this method to compare signaling complexes downstream of the T cell receptor in T cells from healthy skin with those in T cells from the skin of patients with the autoimmune disease alopecia areata. The study revealed differences in the relative abundance of some protein complexes between T cells from the control and patient groups. This technique could be adapted for use as a diagnostic tool to stratify patients by molecular phenotype and predict the therapeutic strategy that is likely to work best for each patient.Listen to Podcast. PMID:27485014

  12. Transcellular delivery of vesicular SOCS proteins from macrophages to epithelial cells blunts inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bourdonnay, Emilie; Zasłona, Zbigniew; Penke, Loka Raghu Kumar; Speth, Jennifer M.; Schneider, Daniel J.; Przybranowski, Sally; Swanson, Joel A.; Mancuso, Peter; Freeman, Christine M.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    JAK-STAT signaling mediates the actions of numerous cytokines and growth factors, and its endogenous brake is the family of SOCS proteins. Consistent with their intracellular roles, SOCS proteins have never been identified in the extracellular space. Here we report that alveolar macrophages can secrete SOCS1 and -3 in exosomes and microparticles, respectively, for uptake by alveolar epithelial cells and subsequent inhibition of STAT activation. Secretion is tunable and occurs both in vitro and in vivo. SOCS secretion into lung lining fluid was diminished by cigarette smoking in humans and mice. Secretion and transcellular delivery of vesicular SOCS proteins thus represent a new model for the control of inflammatory signaling, which is subject to dysregulation during states of inflammation. PMID:25847945

  13. Vaults and the major vault protein: novel roles in signal pathway regulation and immunity.

    PubMed

    Berger, W; Steiner, E; Grusch, M; Elbling, L; Micksche, M

    2009-01-01

    The unique and evolutionary highly conserved major vault protein (MVP) is the main component of ubiquitous, large cellular ribonucleoparticles termed vaults. The 100 kDa MVP represents more than 70% of the vault mass which contains two additional proteins, the vault poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (vPARP) and the telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1), as well as several short untranslated RNAs (vRNA). Vaults are almost ubiquitously expressed and, besides chemotherapy resistance, have been implicated in the regulation of several cellular processes including transport mechanisms, signal transmissions and immune responses. Despite a growing amount of data from diverse species and systems, the definition of precise vault functions is still highly complex and challenging. Here we review the current knowledge on MVP and vaults with focus on regulatory functions in intracellular signal transduction and immune defence. PMID:18759128

  14. Transcellular delivery of vesicular SOCS proteins from macrophages to epithelial cells blunts inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Bourdonnay, Emilie; Zasłona, Zbigniew; Penke, Loka Raghu Kumar; Speth, Jennifer M; Schneider, Daniel J; Przybranowski, Sally; Swanson, Joel A; Mancuso, Peter; Freeman, Christine M; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2015-05-01

    JAK-STAT signaling mediates the actions of numerous cytokines and growth factors, and its endogenous brake is the family of SOCS proteins. Consistent with their intracellular roles, SOCS proteins have never been identified in the extracellular space. Here we report that alveolar macrophages can secrete SOCS1 and -3 in exosomes and microparticles, respectively, for uptake by alveolar epithelial cells and subsequent inhibition of STAT activation. Secretion is tunable and occurs both in vitro and in vivo. SOCS secretion into lung lining fluid was diminished by cigarette smoking in humans and mice. Secretion and transcellular delivery of vesicular SOCS proteins thus represent a new model for the control of inflammatory signaling, which is subject to dysregulation during states of inflammation. PMID:25847945

  15. Estrogen regulation of protein expression and signaling pathways in the heart

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sex differences in cardiovascular disease and cardiac physiology have been reported in humans as well as in animal models. Premenopausal women have reduced cardiovascular disease compared to men, but the incidence of cardiovascular disease in women increases following menopause. Sex differences in cardiomyocytes likely contribute to the differences in male–female physiology and response to disease. Sex differences in the heart have been noted in electrophysiology, contractility, signaling, metabolism, and cardioprotection. These differences appear to be due, at least in part, to differences in gene and protein expression as well as in posttranslational protein modifications. This review will focus primarily on estrogen-mediated male–female differences in protein expression and signaling pathways in the heart and cardiac cells. It should be emphasized that these basic differences are not intrinsically beneficial or detrimental per se; the difference can be good or bad depending on the context and circumstances. PMID:24612699

  16. Membrane localization of scaffold proteins promotes graded signaling in the yeast MAP kinase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade pathways can show various input-output behaviors, including either switch-like or graded responses to increasing levels of stimulus. Prior studies suggest that switch-like behavior is promoted by positive feedback loops and nonprocessive phosphorylation reactions, but it is unclear whether graded signaling is a default behavior or if it must be enforced by separate mechanisms. Scaffold proteins have been hypothesized to promote graded behavior. Results Here, we experimentally probe the determinants of graded signaling in the yeast mating MAPK pathway. We find that graded behavior is robust, as it resists perturbation by loss of several negative feedback regulators. However, the pathway becomes switch-like when activated by a crosstalk stimulus that bypasses multiple upstream components. To dissect the contributing factors, we developed a method for gradually varying the signal input at different pathway steps in vivo. Input at the beginning of the kinase cascade produced a sharp, threshold-like response. Surprisingly, the scaffold protein Ste5 increased this threshold behavior when limited to the cytosol. However, signaling remained graded whenever Ste5 was allowed to function at the plasma membrane. Conclusions The results suggest that the MAPK cascade module is inherently ultrasensitive, but is converted to a graded system by the pathway-specific activation mechanism. Scaffold-mediated assembly of signaling complexes at the plasma membrane allows faithful propagation of weak signals, which consequently reduces pathway ultrasensitivity. These properties help shape the input-output properties of the system to fit the physiological context. PMID:18722124

  17. Signal peptide optimization tool for the secretion of recombinant protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mori, Akihiro; Hara, Shoichi; Sugahara, Tomohiro; Kojima, Takaaki; Iwasaki, Yugo; Kawarasaki, Yasuaki; Sahara, Takehiko; Ohgiya, Satoru; Nakano, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    The secretion efficiency of foreign proteins in recombinant microbes is strongly dependent on the combination of the signal peptides (SPs) used and the target proteins; therefore, identifying the optimal SP sequence for each target protein is a crucial step in maximizing the efficiency of protein secretion in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this study, we developed a novel method, named the SP optimization tool (SPOT), for the generation and rapid screening of a library of SP-target gene fusion constructs to identify the optimal SP for maximizing target protein secretion. In contrast to libraries generated in previous studies, SPOT fusion constructs are generated without adding the intervening sequences associated with restriction enzyme digestion sites. Therefore, no extra amino acids are inserted at the N-terminus of the target protein that might affect its function or conformational stability. As a model system, β-galactosidase (LacA) from Aspergillus oryzae was used as a target protein for secretion from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In total, 60 SPs were selected from S. cerevisiae secretory proteins and utilized to generate the SP library. While many of the SP-LacA fusions were not secreted, several of the SPs, AGA2, CRH1, PLB1, and MF(alpha)1, were found to enhance LacA secretion compared to the WT sequence. Our results indicate that SPOT is a valuable method for optimizing the bioproduction of any target protein, and could be adapted to many host strains. PMID:25912446

  18. Repression of protein translation and mTOR signaling by proteasome inhibitor in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Volta, Viviana; Cho, Chi Hin; Wu, Ya Chun; Li, Hai Tao; Yu, Le; Li, Zhi Jie; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2009-09-04

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major catabolic pathway for protein degradation. In this respect, proteasome inhibition has been used therapeutically for the treatment of cancer. Whether inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor can repress protein translation via a negative feedback mechanism, however, is unknown. In this study, proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowered the proliferation of colon cancer cells HT-29 and SW1116. In this connection, MG-132 reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Ser2448 and Ser2481 and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets 4E-BP1 and p70/p85 S6 kinases. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 inhibited protein translation as evidenced by the reductions of {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation and polysomes/80S ratio. Knockdown of raptor, a structural component of mTOR complex 1, mimicked the anti-proliferative effect of MG-132. To conclude, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor represses mTOR signaling and protein translation in colon cancer cells.

  19. Spatiotemporal Control of Cell Signalling Using A Light-Switchable Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Levskaya, Anselm; Weiner, Orion D.; Lim, Wendell A.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Genetically-encodable optical reporters, such as Green Fluorescent Protein, have revolutionized the observation and measurement of cellular states. However, the inverse challenge of using light to precisely control cellular behavior has only recently begun to be addressed; semi-synthetic chromophore-tethered receptors1 and naturally-occurring channel rhodopsins have been used to directly perturb neuronal networks2,3. The difficulty of engineering light sensitive proteins remains a significant impediment to the optical control to most cell-biological processes. Here we demonstrate the use of a new genetically-encoded light-control system based on an optimized reversible protein-protein interaction from the phytochrome signaling network of Arabidopsis thaliana. Because protein-protein interactions are one of the most general currencies of cellular information, this system can in principal be generically used to control diverse functions. Here we show that this system can be used to precisely and reversibly translocate target proteins to the membrane with micrometer spatial resolution and second time resolution. We show that light-gated translocation of the upstream activators of rho-family GTPases, which control the actin cytoskeleton, can be used to precisely reshape and direct the cell morphology of mammalian cells. The light-gated protein-protein interaction that has been optimized in this work should be useful for the design of diverse light-programmable reagents, potentially enabling a new generation of perturbative, quantitative experiments in cell biology. PMID:19749742

  20. Spatiotemporal control of cell signalling using a light-switchable protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Levskaya, Anselm; Weiner, Orion D; Lim, Wendell A; Voigt, Christopher A

    2009-10-15

    Genetically encodable optical reporters, such as green fluorescent protein, have revolutionized the observation and measurement of cellular states. However, the inverse challenge of using light to control precisely cellular behaviour has only recently begun to be addressed; semi-synthetic chromophore-tethered receptors and naturally occurring channel rhodopsins have been used to perturb directly neuronal networks. The difficulty of engineering light-sensitive proteins remains a significant impediment to the optical control of most cell-biological processes. Here we demonstrate the use of a new genetically encoded light-control system based on an optimized, reversible protein-protein interaction from the phytochrome signalling network of Arabidopsis thaliana. Because protein-protein interactions are one of the most general currencies of cellular information, this system can, in principle, be generically used to control diverse functions. Here we show that this system can be used to translocate target proteins precisely and reversibly to the membrane with micrometre spatial resolution and at the second timescale. We show that light-gated translocation of the upstream activators of Rho-family GTPases, which control the actin cytoskeleton, can be used to precisely reshape and direct the cell morphology of mammalian cells. The light-gated protein-protein interaction that has been optimized here should be useful for the design of diverse light-programmable reagents, potentially enabling a new generation of perturbative, quantitative experiments in cell biology. PMID:19749742

  1. The cost and capacity of signaling in the Escherichia coli protein reaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsen, Jacob Bock; Krishna, Sandeep; Sneppen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    In systems biology new ways are required to analyze the large amount of existing data on regulation of cellular processes. Recent work can be roughly classified into either dynamical models of well-described subsystems, or coarse-grained descriptions of the topology of the molecular networks at the scale of the whole organism. In order to bridge these two disparate approaches one needs to develop simplified descriptions of dynamics and topological measures which address the propagation of signals in molecular networks. Transmission of a signal across a reaction node depends on the presence of other reactants. It will typically be more demanding to transmit a signal across a reaction node with more input links. Sending signals along a path with several subsequent reaction nodes also increases the constraints on the presence of other proteins in the overall network. Therefore counting in and out links along reactions of a potential pathway can give insight into the signaling properties of a particular molecular network. Here, we consider the directed network of protein regulation in E. coli, characterizing its modularity in terms of its potential to transmit signals. We demonstrate that the simplest measure based on identifying subnetworks of strong components, within which each node could send a signal to every other node, does indeed partition the network into functional modules. We suggest that the total number of reactants needed to send a signal between two nodes in the network can be considered as the cost associated with transmitting this signal. Similarly we define spread as the number of reaction products that could be influenced by transmission of a successful signal. Our considerations open for a new class of network measures that implicitly utilize the constrained repertoire of chemical modifications of any biological molecule. The counting of cost and spread connects the topology of networks to the specificity of signaling across the network. Thereby, we

  2. Structure and Function of Vps15 in the Endosomal G Protein Signaling Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Heenan, Erin J.; Vanhooke, Janeen L.; Temple, Brenda R.; Betts, Laurie; Sondek, John E.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2009-09-11

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate cellular responses to a wide variety of stimuli, including taste, light, and neurotransmitters. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, activation of the pheromone pathway triggers events leading to mating. The view had long been held that the G protein-mediated signal occurs principally at the plasma membrane. Recently, it has been shown that the G protein {alpha} subunit Gpa1 can promote signaling at endosomes and requires two components of the sole phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase in yeast, Vps15 and Vps34. Vps15 contains multiple WD repeats and also binds to Gpa1 preferentially in the GDP-bound state; these observations led us to hypothesize that Vps15 may function as a G protein {beta} subunit at the endosome. Here we show an X-ray crystal structure of the Vps15 WD domain that reveals a seven-bladed propeller resembling that of typical G{beta} subunits. We show further that the WD domain is sufficient to bind Gpa1 as well as to Atg14, a potential G{gamma} protein that exists in a complex with Vps15. The Vps15 kinase domain together with the intermediate domain (linking the kinase and WD domains) also contributes to Gpa1 binding and is necessary for Vps15 to sustain G protein signaling. These findings reveal that the Vps15 G{beta}-like domain serves as a scaffold to assemble Gpa1 and Atg14, whereas the kinase and intermediate domains are required for proper signaling at the endosome.

  3. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalling in Cancer and Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lipovka, Yulia; Konhilas, John P

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-protein kinase (AMPK) pathway is very versatile as it regulates cellular energetic homeostasis in many different tissue types. An appreciation for the importance of AMPK signalling and regulation in cardiovascular and tumor biology is increasing. Recently, a link has been established between anti-cancer therapy and susceptibility to cardiac disease. It has been shown that some anti-cancer drugs lead to an increased risk of cardiac disease, underlined by de-regulation of AMPK signalling. This review explores the AMPK signalling axis in both cardiac and tumor metabolism. We then examine off-target AMPK inhibition by cancer drugs and how this may translate into increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Finally, we discuss the implication of deregulated AMPK signalling during different stages of cardiac hypertrophy. Better understanding of the molecular pathways behind pathological processes will lead to the development of more effective therapeutics for cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26798768

  4. The novel plant homeodomain protein rhinoceros antagonizes Ras signaling in the Drosophila eye.

    PubMed Central

    Voas, Matthew G; Rebay, Ilaria

    2003-01-01

    The sequential specification of cell fates in the Drosophila eye requires repeated activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/Ras/MAP kinase (MAPK) pathway. Equally important are the multiple layers of inhibitory regulation that prevent excessive or inappropriate signaling. Here we describe the molecular and genetic analysis of a previously uncharacterized gene, rhinoceros (rno), that we propose functions to restrict EGFR signaling in the eye. Loss of rno results in the overproduction of photoreceptors, cone cells, and pigment cells and a corresponding reduction in programmed cell death, all phenotypes characteristic of hyperactivated EGFR signaling. Genetic interactions between rno and multiple EGFR pathway components support this hypothesis. rno encodes a novel but evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein with a PHD zinc-finger domain, a motif commonly found in chromatin-remodeling factors. Future analyses of rno will help to elucidate the regulatory strategies that modulate EGFR signaling in the fly eye. PMID:14704181

  5. Zebrafish Rab5 proteins and a role for Rab5ab in nodal signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Emma J.; Campos, Isabel; Bull, James C.; Williams, P. Huw; Stemple, Derek L.; Clark, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    The RAB5 gene family is the best characterised of all human RAB families and is essential for in vitro homotypic fusion of early endosomes. In recent years, the disruption or activation of Rab5 family proteins has been used as a tool to understand growth factor signal transduction in whole animal systems such as Drosophila melanogaster and zebrafish. In this study we have examined the functions for four rab5 genes in zebrafish. Disruption of rab5ab expression by antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) knockdown abolishes nodal signalling in early zebrafish embryos, whereas overexpression of rab5ab mRNA leads to ectopic expression of markers that are normally downstream of nodal signalling. By contrast MO disruption of other zebrafish rab5 genes shows little or no effect on expression of markers of dorsal organiser development. We conclude that rab5ab is essential for nodal signalling and organizer specification in the developing zebrafish embryo. PMID:25478908

  6. Knr4: a disordered hub protein at the heart of fungal cell wall signalling.

    PubMed

    Martin-Yken, Hélène; François, Jean Marie; Zerbib, Didier

    2016-09-01

    The most highly connected proteins in protein-protein interactions networks are called hubs; they generally connect signalling pathways. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Knr4 constitutes a connecting node between the two main signal transmission pathways involved in cell wall maintenance upon stress: the cell wall integrity and the calcium-calcineurin pathway. Knr4 is required to enable the cells to resist many cell wall-affecting stresses, and KNR4 gene deletion is synthetic lethal with the simultaneous deletion of numerous other genes involved in morphogenesis and cell wall biogenesis. Knr4 has been shown to engage in multiple physical interactions, an ability conferred by the intrinsic structural adaptability of major disordered regions present in the N-terminal and C-terminal parts of the protein. Taking all together, Knr4 is an intrinsically disordered hub protein. Available data from other fungi indicate the conservation of Knr4 homologs cellular function and localization at sites of polarized growth among fungal species, including pathogenic species. Because of their particular role in morphogenesis control and of their fungal specificity, these proteins could constitute interesting new pharmaceutical drug targets for antifungal combination therapy. PMID:27199081

  7. TUNABLE TENSOR VOTING FOR REGULARIZING PUNCTATE PATTERNS OFMEMBRANE-BOUND PROTEIN SIGNALS

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, Leandro; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-29

    Membrane-bound protein, expressed in the basal-lateral region, is heterogeneous and an important endpoint for understanding biological processes. At the optical resolution, membrane-bound protein can be visualized as being diffused (e.g., E-cadherin), punctate (e.g., connexin), or simultaneously diffused and punctate as a result of sample preparation or conditioning. Furthermore, there is a significant amount of heterogeneity as a result of technical and biological variations. This paper aims at enhancing membrane-bound proteins that are expressed between epithelial cells so that quantitative analysis can be enabled on a cell-by-cell basis. We propose a method to detect and enhance membrane-bound protein signal from noisy images. More precisely, we build upon the tensor voting framework in order to produce an efficient method to detect and refine perceptually interesting linear structures in images. The novelty of the proposed method is in its iterative tuning of the tensor voting fields, which allows the concentration of the votes only over areas of interest. The method is shown to produce high quality enhancements of membrane-bound protein signals with combined punctate and diffused characteristics. Experimental results demonstrate the benefits of using tunable tensor voting for enhancing and differentiating cell-cell adhesion mediated by integral cell membrane protein.

  8. Characterization of the targeting signal in mitochondrial β-barrel proteins.

    PubMed

    Jores, Tobias; Klinger, Anna; Groß, Lucia E; Kawano, Shin; Flinner, Nadine; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Wöhnert, Jens; Kalbacher, Hubert; Endo, Toshiya; Schleiff, Enrico; Rapaport, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial β-barrel proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and must be specifically targeted to the organelle before their integration into the mitochondrial outer membrane. The signal that assures such precise targeting and its recognition by the organelle remained obscure. In the present study we show that a specialized β-hairpin motif is this long searched for signal. We demonstrate that a synthetic β-hairpin peptide competes with the import of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins and that proteins harbouring a β-hairpin peptide fused to passenger domains are targeted to mitochondria. Furthermore, a β-hairpin motif from mitochondrial proteins targets chloroplast β-barrel proteins to mitochondria. The mitochondrial targeting depends on the hydrophobicity of the β-hairpin motif. Finally, this motif interacts with the mitochondrial import receptor Tom20. Collectively, we reveal that β-barrel proteins are targeted to mitochondria by a dedicated β-hairpin element, and this motif is recognized at the organelle surface by the outer membrane translocase. PMID:27345737

  9. Characterization of the targeting signal in mitochondrial β-barrel proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jores, Tobias; Klinger, Anna; Groß, Lucia E.; Kawano, Shin; Flinner, Nadine; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Wöhnert, Jens; Kalbacher, Hubert; Endo, Toshiya; Schleiff, Enrico; Rapaport, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial β-barrel proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and must be specifically targeted to the organelle before their integration into the mitochondrial outer membrane. The signal that assures such precise targeting and its recognition by the organelle remained obscure. In the present study we show that a specialized β-hairpin motif is this long searched for signal. We demonstrate that a synthetic β-hairpin peptide competes with the import of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins and that proteins harbouring a β-hairpin peptide fused to passenger domains are targeted to mitochondria. Furthermore, a β-hairpin motif from mitochondrial proteins targets chloroplast β-barrel proteins to mitochondria. The mitochondrial targeting depends on the hydrophobicity of the β-hairpin motif. Finally, this motif interacts with the mitochondrial import receptor Tom20. Collectively, we reveal that β-barrel proteins are targeted to mitochondria by a dedicated β-hairpin element, and this motif is recognized at the organelle surface by the outer membrane translocase. PMID:27345737

  10. CARDIOTHORACIC RATIO AND VERTEBRAL HEART SCALE IN CLINICALLY NORMAL BLACK-RUMPED AGOUTIS (DASYPROCTA PRYMNOLOPHA, WAGLER 1831).

    PubMed

    de Moura, Charlys Rhands Coelho; das Neves Diniz, Anaemilia; da Silva Moura, Laecio; das Chagas Araújo Sousa, Francisco; Baltazar, Pollyana Irene; Freire, Larisse Danielle; Guerra, Porfírio Candanedo; de Sousa, João Macedo; Giglio, Robson Fortes; Pessoa, Gerson Tavares; de Sá, Renan Paraguassu; Alves, Flávio Ribeiro

    2015-06-01

    Wild rodents, such as the lowland paca (Cuniculus paca), capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), rock cavy (Kerodon rupestris), guinea pig (Cavia aperea), and black-rumped agouti (Dasyprocta prymnolopha) are intensely hunted throughout Amazonia and at the semiarid regions of northeastern Brazil. To contribute to the preservation of these species, more information about their anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology is needed. The aim of this study was to standardize the vertebral heart scale (VHS) and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) in clinically normal black-rumped agouti, as well as to compare the results of these two methods, which are commonly used to evaluate the cardiac silhouette in domestic animals. Twelve healthy black-rumped agoutis, divided into two groups (six males and six females), obtained from the Nucleus for Wild Animal Studies and Conservation at the Federal University of Piauí, were radiographed in right and left lateral and dorsoventral projections. The values of the VHS were 8.00±0.31v (the number of thoracic vertebral length spanned by each dimension, starting at T4) for males and 8.11±0.41v for females, and there was no statistical difference between the decubitus (right and left) or between males and females (P>0.05). The CTR mean values obtained were 0.51±0.03 for males, and 0.52±0.02 for females, and there was no statistical difference between the genders (P>0.05). However, there was positive correlation between VHS and CTR (r=0.77 right decubitus and r=0.82 left decubitus). The thoracic and heart diameter had mean values of 6.72±0.61 and 3.48±0.30 cm (males), and for the females, it was 6.61±0.51 and 3.5±0.30 cm, respectively, and there was statistical difference between the genders. The results demonstrated high correlation between the VHS and CTR producing similar results, indicating similar clinical precision for assessing the size of the cardiac silhouette in the black-rumped agoutis. PMID:26056885

  11. Molecular characterization of a region of DNA associated with mutations at the agouti locus in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Bultman, S J; Russell, L B; Gutierrez-Espeleta, G A; Woychik, R P

    1991-01-01

    Molecular characterization of a radiation-induced agouti (a)-locus mutation has resulted in the isolation of a segment of DNA that maps at or near the a locus on chromosome 2 in the mouse. This region of DNA is deleted in several radiation- or chemical-induced homozygous-lethal a-locus mutations and is associated with specific DNA structural alterations in two viable a-locus mutations. We propose that DNA probes from this region of chromosome 2 will be useful for ultimately characterizing the individual gene or genes associated with a-locus function. Images PMID:1896452

  12. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, Melanie M. A.; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M.; Groth, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27477591

  13. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Melanie M A; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M; Groth, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27477591

  14. Identification of a Functional, CRM-1-Dependent Nuclear Export Signal in Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Maillard, Patrick; Minisini, Rosalba; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roohvand, Farzin; Pecheur, Eve-Isabelle; Pirisi, Mario; Budkowska, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV core protein is involved in nucleocapsid formation, but it also interacts with multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear molecules and plays a crucial role in the development of liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. The core protein is found mostly in the cytoplasm during HCV infection, but also in the nucleus in patients with hepatocarcinoma and in core-transgenic mice. HCV core contains nuclear localization signals (NLS), but no nuclear export signal (NES) has yet been identified. We show here that the aa(109–133) region directs the translocation of core from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutagenesis of the three hydrophobic residues (L119, I123 and L126) in the identified NES or in the sequence encoding the mature core aa(1–173) significantly enhanced the nuclear localisation of the corresponding proteins in transfected Huh7 cells. Both the NES and the adjacent hydrophobic sequence in domain II of core were required to maintain the core protein or its fragments in the cytoplasmic compartment. Electron microscopy studies of the JFH1 replication model demonstrated that core was translocated into the nucleus a few minutes after the virus entered the cell. The blockade of nucleocytoplasmic export by leptomycin B treatment early in infection led to the detection of core protein in the nucleus by confocal microscopy and coincided with a decrease in virus replication. Our data suggest that the functional NLS and NES direct HCV core protein shuttling between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, with at least some core protein transported to the nucleus. These new properties of HCV core may be essential for virus multiplication and interaction with nuclear molecules, influence cell signaling and the pathogenesis of HCV infection. PMID:22039426

  15. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Li; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  16. Signal Peptide-Binding Drug as a Selective Inhibitor of Co-Translational Protein Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Kurt; Bell, Thomas W.; Van Puyenbroeck, Victor; Giraut, Anne; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Schols, Dominique; Hartmann, Enno

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, surface expression of most type I transmembrane proteins requires translation and simultaneous insertion of the precursor protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for subsequent routing to the cell surface. This co-translational translocation pathway is initiated when a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide (SP) on the nascent protein emerges from the ribosome, binds the cytosolic signal recognition particle (SRP), and targets the ribosome-nascent chain complex to the Sec61 translocon, a universally conserved protein-conducting channel in the ER-membrane. Despite their common function in Sec61 targeting and ER translocation, SPs have diverse but unique primary sequences. Thus, drugs that recognise SPs could be exploited to inhibit translocation of specific proteins into the ER. Here, through flow cytometric analysis the small-molecule macrocycle cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA) is identified as a highly selective human CD4 (hCD4) down-modulator. We show that CADA inhibits CD4 biogenesis and that this is due to its ability to inhibit co-translational translocation of CD4 into the lumen of the ER, both in cells as in a cell-free in vitro translation/translocation system. The activity of CADA maps to the cleavable N-terminal SP of hCD4. Moreover, through surface plasmon resonance analysis we were able to show direct binding of CADA to the SP of hCD4 and identify this SP as the target of our drug. Furthermore, CADA locks the SP in the translocon during a post-targeting step, possibly in a folded state, and prevents the translocation of the associated protein into the ER lumen. Instead, the precursor protein is routed to the cytosol for degradation. These findings demonstrate that a synthetic, cell-permeable small-molecule can be developed as a SP-binding drug to selectively inhibit protein translocation and to reversibly regulate the expression of specific target proteins. PMID:25460167

  17. Translocation of signalling proteins to the plasma membrane revealed by a new bioluminescent procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Activation by extracellular ligands of G protein-coupled (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs), results in the generation of second messengers that in turn control specific cell functions. Further, modulation/amplification or inhibition of the initial signalling events, depend on the recruitment onto the plasma membrane of soluble protein effectors. High throughput methodologies to monitor quantitatively second messenger production, have been developed over the last years and are largely used to screen chemical libraries for drug development. On the contrary, no such high throughput methods are yet available for the other aspect of GPCRs regulation, i.e. protein translocation to the plasma membrane, despite the enormous interest of this phenomenon for the modulation of receptor downstream functions. Indeed, to date, the experimental procedures available are either inadequate or complex and expensive. Results Here we describe the development of a novel conceptual approach to the study of cytosolic proteins translocation to the inner surface of the plasma membrane. The basis of the technique consists in: i) generating chimeras between the protein of interests and the calcium (Ca2+)-sensitive, luminescent photo-protein, aequorin and ii) taking advantage of the large Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+] difference between bulk cytosolic and the sub-plasma membrane rim. Conclusion This approach, that keeps unaffected the translocation properties of the signalling protein, can in principle be applied to any protein that, upon activation, moves from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Thus, not only the modulation of GPCRs and RTKs can be investigated in this way, but that of all other proteins that can be recruited to the plasma membrane also independently of receptor activation. Moreover, its automated version, which can provide information about the kinetics and concentration-dependence of the process, is also applicable to high throughput screening of drugs

  18. Potential role of glutathione in evolution of thiol-based redox signaling sites in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mohanasundaram, Kaavya A.; Haworth, Naomi L.; Grover, Mani P.; Crowley, Tamsyn M.; Goscinski, Andrzej; Wouters, Merridee A.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is susceptible to a variety of modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen oxide species, including glutathionylation; and when two cysteines are involved, disulfide formation. Glutathione-cysteine adducts may be removed from proteins by glutaredoxin, whereas disulfides may be reduced by thioredoxin. Glutaredoxin is homologous to the disulfide-reducing thioredoxin and shares similar binding modes of the protein substrate. The evolution of these systems is not well characterized. When a single Cys is present in a protein, conjugation of the redox buffer glutathione may induce conformational changes, resulting in a simple redox switch that effects a signaling cascade. If a second cysteine is introduced into the sequence, the potential for disulfide formation exists. In favorable protein contexts, a bistable redox switch may be formed. Because of glutaredoxin's similarities to thioredoxin, the mutated protein may be immediately exapted into the thioredoxin-dependent redox cycle upon addition of the second cysteine. Here we searched for examples of protein substrates where the number of redox-active cysteine residues has changed throughout evolution. We focused on cross-strand disulfides (CSDs), the most common type of forbidden disulfide. We searched for proteins where the CSD is present, absent and also found as a single cysteine in protein orthologs. Three different proteins were selected for detailed study—CD4, ERO1, and AKT. We created phylogenetic trees, examining when the CSD residues were mutated during protein evolution. We posit that the primordial cysteine is likely to be the cysteine of the CSD which undergoes nucleophilic attack by thioredoxin. Thus, a redox-active disulfide may be introduced into a protein structure by stepwise mutation of two residues in the native sequence to Cys. By extension, evolutionary acquisition of structural disulfides in proteins can potentially occur via transition through a redox-active disulfide state. PMID

  19. Potential role of glutathione in evolution of thiol-based redox signaling sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Mohanasundaram, Kaavya A; Haworth, Naomi L; Grover, Mani P; Crowley, Tamsyn M; Goscinski, Andrzej; Wouters, Merridee A

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is susceptible to a variety of modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen oxide species, including glutathionylation; and when two cysteines are involved, disulfide formation. Glutathione-cysteine adducts may be removed from proteins by glutaredoxin, whereas disulfides may be reduced by thioredoxin. Glutaredoxin is homologous to the disulfide-reducing thioredoxin and shares similar binding modes of the protein substrate. The evolution of these systems is not well characterized. When a single Cys is present in a protein, conjugation of the redox buffer glutathione may induce conformational changes, resulting in a simple redox switch that effects a signaling cascade. If a second cysteine is introduced into the sequence, the potential for disulfide formation exists. In favorable protein contexts, a bistable redox switch may be formed. Because of glutaredoxin's similarities to thioredoxin, the mutated protein may be immediately exapted into the thioredoxin-dependent redox cycle upon addition of the second cysteine. Here we searched for examples of protein substrates where the number of redox-active cysteine residues has changed throughout evolution. We focused on cross-strand disulfides (CSDs), the most common type of forbidden disulfide. We searched for proteins where the CSD is present, absent and also found as a single cysteine in protein orthologs. Three different proteins were selected for detailed study-CD4, ERO1, and AKT. We created phylogenetic trees, examining when the CSD residues were mutated during protein evolution. We posit that the primordial cysteine is likely to be the cysteine of the CSD which undergoes nucleophilic attack by thioredoxin. Thus, a redox-active disulfide may be introduced into a protein structure by stepwise mutation of two residues in the native sequence to Cys. By extension, evolutionary acquisition of structural disulfides in proteins can potentially occur via transition through a redox-active disulfide state. PMID

  20. Identification of a tripartite import signal in the Ewing Sarcoma protein (EWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Debra J.; Morse, Robert; Todd, Adrian G.; Eggleton, Paul; Lorson, Christian L.; Young, Philip J.

    2009-12-25

    The Ewing Sarcoma (EWS) protein is a ubiquitously expressed RNA processing factor that localises predominantly to the nucleus. However, the mechanism through which EWS enters the nucleus remains unclear, with differing reports identifying three separate import signals within the EWS protein. Here we have utilized a panel of truncated EWS proteins to clarify the reported nuclear localisation signals. We describe three C-terminal domains that are important for efficient EWS nuclear localization: (1) the third RGG-motif; (2) the last 10 amino acids (known as the PY-import motif); and (3) the zinc-finger motif. Although these three domains are involved in nuclear import, they are not independently capable of driving the efficient import of a GFP-moiety. However, collectively they form a complex tripartite signal that efficiently drives GFP-import into the nucleus. This study helps clarify the EWS import signal, and the identification of the involvement of both the RGG- and zinc-finger motifs has wide reaching implications.

  1. Sonic hedgehog protein signals not as a hydrolytic enzyme but as an apparent ligand for Patched

    PubMed Central

    Fuse, Naoyuki; Maiti, Tapan; Wang, Baolin; Porter, Jeffery A.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka; Leahy, Daniel J.; Beachy, Philip A.

    1999-01-01

    The amino-terminal signaling domain of the Sonic hedgehog secreted protein (Shh-N), which derives from the Shh precursor through an autoprocessing reaction mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain, executes multiple functions in embryonic tissue patterning, including induction of ventral and suppression of dorsal cell types in the developing neural tube. An apparent catalytic site within Shh-N is suggested by structural homology to a bacterial carboxypeptidase. We demonstrate here that alteration of residues presumed to be critical for a hydrolytic activity does not cause a loss of inductive activity, thus ruling out catalysis by Shh-N as a requirement for signaling. We favor the alternative, that Shh-N functions primarily as a ligand for the putative receptor Patched (Ptc). This possibility is supported by new evidence for direct binding of Shh-N to Ptc and by a strong correlation between the affinity of Ptc-binding and the signaling potency of Shh-N protein variants carrying alterations of conserved residues in a particular region of the protein surface. These results together suggest that direct Shh-N binding to Ptc is a critical event in transduction of the Shh-N signal. PMID:10500113

  2. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Paula M.; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity toward H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underlie the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses. PMID:25325054

  3. Interbacterial signaling via Burkholderia contact-dependent growth inhibition system proteins.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Erin C; Perault, Andrew I; Marlatt, Sara A; Cotter, Peggy A

    2016-07-19

    In prokaryotes and eukaryotes, cell-cell communication and recognition of self are critical to coordinate multicellular functions. Although kin and kind discrimination are increasingly appreciated to shape naturally occurring microbe populations, the underlying mechanisms that govern these interbacterial interactions are insufficiently understood. Here, we identify a mechanism of interbacterial signal transduction that is mediated by contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) system proteins. CDI systems have been characterized by their ability to deliver a polymorphic protein toxin into the cytoplasm of a neighboring bacterium, resulting in growth inhibition or death unless the recipient bacterium produces a corresponding immunity protein. Using the model organism Burkholderia thailandensis, we show that delivery of a catalytically active CDI system toxin to immune (self) bacteria results in gene expression and phenotypic changes within the recipient cells. Termed contact-dependent signaling (CDS), this response promotes biofilm formation and other community-associated behaviors. Engineered strains that are isogenic with B. thailandensis, except the DNA region encoding the toxin and immunity proteins, did not display CDS, whereas a strain of Burkholderia dolosa producing a nearly identical toxin-immunity pair induced signaling in B. thailandensis Our data indicate that bcpAIOB loci confer dual benefits; they direct antagonism toward non-self bacteria and promote cooperation between self bacteria, with self being defined by the bcpAIOB allele and not by genealogic relatedness. PMID:27335458

  4. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Philip, Finly; Sahu, Shriya; Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ) is activated by G protein subunits in response to environmental stimuli to increase intracellular calcium. In cells, a significant portion of PLCβ is cytosolic, where it binds a protein complex required for efficient RNA-induced silencing called C3PO (component 3 promoter of RISC). Binding between C3PO and PLCβ raises the possibility that RNA silencing activity can affect the ability of PLCβ to mediate calcium signals. By use of human and rat neuronal cell lines (SK-N-SH and PC12), we show that overexpression of one of the main components of C3PO diminishes Ca(2+) release in response to Gαq/PLCβ stimulation by 30 to 40%. In untransfected SK-N-SH or PC12 cells, the introduction of siRNA(GAPDH) [small interfering RNA(glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase)] reduces PLCβ-mediated calcium signals by ∼30%, but addition of siRNA(Hsp90) (heat shock protein 90) had little effect. Fluorescence imaging studies suggest an increase in PLCβ-C3PO association in cells treated with siRNA(GAPDH) but not siRNA(Hsp90). Taken together, our studies raise the possibility that Ca(2+) responses to extracellular stimuli can be modulated by components of the RNA silencing machinery.-Philip, F., Sahu, S., Golebiewska, U., Scarlata, S. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals. PMID:26862135

  5. Ciliopathy proteins establish a bipartite signaling compartment in a C. elegans thermosensory neuron

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong Anh T.; Liou, Willisa; Hall, David H.; Leroux, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT How signaling domains form is an important, yet largely unexplored question. Here, we show that ciliary proteins help establish two contiguous, yet distinct cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling compartments in Caenorhabditis elegans thermosensory AFD neurons. One compartment, a bona fide cilium, is delineated by proteins associated with Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS), Meckel syndrome and nephronophthisis at its base, and requires NPHP-2 (known as inversin in mammals) to anchor a cGMP-gated ion channel within the proximal ciliary region. The other, a subcompartment with profuse microvilli and a different lipid environment, is separated from the dendrite by a cellular junction and requires BBS-8 and DAF-25 (known as Ankmy2 in mammals) for correct localization of guanylyl cyclases needed for thermosensation. Consistent with a requirement for a membrane diffusion barrier at the subcompartment base, we reveal the unexpected presence of ciliary transition zone proteins where no canonical transition zone ultrastructure exists. We propose that differential compartmentalization of signal transduction components by ciliary proteins is important for the functions of ciliated sensory neurons. PMID:25335890

  6. Signals for Bidirectional Nucleocytoplasmic Transport in the Duck Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mabit, Helene; Breiner, Klaus M.; Knaust, Andreas; Zachmann-Brand, Beate; Schaller, Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Hepadnavirus genome replication involves cytoplasmic and nuclear stages, requiring balanced targeting of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids to the nuclear compartment. In this study, we analyze the signals determining capsid compartmentalization in the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) animal model, as this system also allows us to study hepadnavirus infection of cultured primary hepatocytes. Using fusions to the green fluorescent protein as a functional assay, we have identified a nuclear localization signal (NLS) that mediates nuclear pore association of the DHBV nucleocapsid and nuclear import of DHBV core protein (DHBc)-derived polypeptides. The DHBc NLS mapped is unique. It bears homology to repetitive NLS elements previously identified near the carboxy terminus of the capsid protein of hepatitis B virus, the human prototype of the hepadnavirus family, but it maps to a more internal position. In further contrast to the hepatitis B virus core protein NLS, the DHBc NLS is not positioned near phosphorylation target sites that are generally assumed to modulate nucleocytoplasmic transport. In functional assays with a knockout mutant, the DHBc NLS was found to be essential for nuclear pore association of the nucleocapsid. The NLS was found to be also essential for virus production from the full-length DHBV genome in transfected cells and from hepatocytes infected with transcomplemented mutant virus. Finally, the DHBc additionally displayed activity indicative of a nuclear export signal, presumably counterbalancing NLS function in the productive state of the infected cell and thereby preventing nucleoplasmic accumulation of nucleocapsids. PMID:11160696

  7. Crosstalk between signaling pathways provided by single and multiple protein phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hafumi; Demir, Emek; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular fate depends on the spatio-temporal separation and integration of signaling processes which can be provided by phosphorylation events. In this study we identify the crucial points in signaling crosstalk which can be triggered by discrete phosphorylation events on a single target protein. We integrated the data on individual human phosphosites with the evidence on their corresponding kinases, the functional consequences on phosphorylation on activity of the target protein and corresponding pathways. Our results show that there is a substantial fraction of phosphosites that can play critical roles in crosstalk between alternative or redundant pathways and regulatory outcome of phosphorylation can be linked to a type of phosphorylated residue. These regulatory phosphosites can serve as hubs in the signal flow and their functional roles are directly connected to their specific properties. Namely, phosphosites with similar regulatory functions are phosphorylated by the same kinases and participate in regulation of similar biochemical pathways. Such sites are more likely to cluster in sequence and space unlike sites with antagonistic outcomes of their phosphorylation on a target protein. In addition we found that in silico phosphorylation of sites with similar functional consequences have comparable outcomes on a target protein stability. An important role of phosphorylation sites in biological crosstalk is evident from the analysis of their evolutionary conservation. PMID:25451034

  8. Nephrin Suppresses Hippo Signaling through the Adaptor Proteins Nck and WTIP.

    PubMed

    Keyvani Chahi, Ava; Martin, Claire E; Jones, Nina

    2016-06-10

    Podocytes are key components of the kidney blood filtration barrier, and their ability to withstand hemodynamic strain is proposed to be closely tied to their unique and flexible cytoarchitecture. However, the mechanisms that control such mechanotransduction are poorly understood. We have previously established that tyrosine phosphorylation of the transmembrane protein nephrin promotes recruitment of the Nck1/2 cytoskeletal adaptor proteins and downstream actin remodeling. We now reveal that Nck integrates nephrin with the Hippo kinase cascade through association with the adaptor protein WTIP. Using mutational analysis, we show that Nck sequesters WTIP and its binding partner Lats1 to phosphorylated nephrin, resulting in decreased phospho-activation of Lats1. We further demonstrate that, coincident with nephrin dephosphorylation in a transient model of podocyte injury in mice, Lats1 is rapidly activated, and this precedes significant down-regulation of the transcription regulator Yap. Moreover, we show reduced levels of Yap protein in mice with chronic disruption of nephrin phospho-signaling. Together, these findings support the existence of a dynamic molecular link between nephrin signaling and the canonical Hippo pathway in podocytes, which may facilitate the conversion of mechanical cues to biochemical signals promoting podocyte viability. PMID:27033705

  9. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 Signaling Negatively Modulates Lymphatic Development in Vertebrate Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Dunworth, William P.; Cardona-Costa, Jose; Bozkulak, Esra Cagavi; Kim, Jun-Dae; Meadows, Stryder; Fischer, Johanna C.; Wang, Yeqi; Cleaver, Ondine; Qyang, Yibing; Ober, Elke A.; Jin, Suk-Won

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The emergence of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) seems to be highly regulated during development. Although several factors that promote the differentiation of LECs in embryonic development have been identified, those that negatively regulate this process are largely unknown. Objective Our aim was to delineate the role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 signaling in lymphatic development. Methods and Results BMP2 signaling negatively regulates the formation of LECs. Developing LECs lack any detectable BMP signaling activity in both zebrafish and mouse embryos, and excess BMP2 signaling in zebrafish embryos and mouse embryonic stem cell–derived embryoid bodies substantially decrease the emergence of LECs. Mechanistically, BMP2 signaling induces expression of miR-31 and miR-181a in a SMAD-dependent mechanism, which in turn results in attenuated expression of prospero homeobox protein 1 during development. Conclusions Our data identify BMP2 as a key negative regulator for the emergence of the lymphatic lineage during vertebrate development. PMID:24122719

  10. Ring Finger Protein 11 Inhibits Melanocortin 3 and 4 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anne; Niederstadt, Lars; Jonas, Wenke; Yi, Chun-Xia; Meyer, Franziska; Wiedmer, Petra; Fischer, Jana; Grötzinger, Carsten; Schürmann, Annette; Tschöp, Matthias; Kleinau, Gunnar; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko; Biebermann, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Intact melanocortin signaling via the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R), and melanocortin receptor 3 (MC3R) is crucial for body weight maintenance. So far, no connection between melanocortin signaling and hypothalamic inflammation has been reported. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation library screen, we identified a new interaction partner for these receptors, ring finger protein 11 (RNF11). RNF11 participates in the constitution of the A20 complex that is involved in reduction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced NFκB signaling, an important pathway in hypothalamic inflammation. Mice treated with high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 days demonstrated a trend toward an increase in hypothalamic Rnf11 expression, as shown for other inflammatory markers under HFD. Furthermore, Gs-mediated signaling of MC3/4R was demonstrated to be strongly reduced to 20–40% by co-expression of RNF11 despite unchanged total receptor expression. Cell surface expression was not affected for MC3R but resulted in a significant reduction of MC4R to 61% by co-expression with RNF11. Mechanisms linking HFD, inflammation, and metabolism remain partially understood. In this study, a new axis between signaling of specific body weight regulating GPCRs and factors involved in hypothalamic inflammation is suggested. PMID:27551276

  11. Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Enhances Interferon Signaling in Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Stanley, William J; Litwak, Sara A; Quah, Hong Sheng; Tan, Sih Min; Kay, Thomas W H; Tiganis, Tony; de Haan, Judy B; Thomas, Helen E; Gurzov, Esteban N

    2015-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the result of an autoimmune assault against the insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells, where chronic local inflammation (insulitis) leads to β-cell destruction. T cells and macrophages infiltrate into islets early in T1D pathogenesis. These immune cells secrete cytokines that lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and T-cell invasion and activation. Cytokine-signaling pathways are very tightly regulated by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) to prevent excessive activation. Here, we demonstrate that pancreata from NOD mice with islet infiltration have enhanced oxidation/inactivation of PTPs and STAT1 signaling compared with NOD mice that do not have insulitis. Inactivation of PTPs with sodium orthovanadate in human and rodent islets and β-cells leads to increased activation of interferon signaling and chemokine production mediated by STAT1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, this exacerbated STAT1 activation-induced cell death in islets was prevented by overexpression of the suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 or inactivation of the BH3-only protein Bim. Together our data provide a mechanism by which PTP inactivation induces signaling in pancreatic islets that results in increased expression of inflammatory genes and exacerbated insulitis. PMID:25732191

  12. Protein kinase G signaling in cardiac pathophysiology: Impact of proteomics on clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jonathan A; Holewinski, Ronald J; Crowgey, Erin L; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    The protective role of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-stimulated protein kinase G (PKG) in the heart makes it an attractive target for therapeutic drug development to treat a variety of cardiac diseases. Phosphodiesterases degrade cGMP, thus phosphodiesterase inhibitors that can increase PKG are of translational interest and the subject of ongoing human trials. PKG signaling is complex, however, and understanding its downstream phosphorylation targets and upstream regulation are necessary steps toward safe and efficacious drug development. Proteomic technologies have paved the way for assays that allow us to peer broadly into signaling minutia, including protein quantity changes and phosphorylation events. However, there are persistent challenges to the proteomic study of PKG, such as the impact of the expression of different PKG isoforms, changes in its localization within the cell, and alterations caused by oxidative stress. PKG signaling is also dependent upon sex and potentially the genetic and epigenetic background of the individual. Thus, the rigorous application of proteomics to the field will be necessary to address how these effectors can alter PKG signaling and interfere with pharmacological interventions. This review will summarize PKG signaling, how it is being targeted clinically, and the proteomic challenges and techniques that are being used to study it. PMID:26670943

  13. miR-219 regulates neural progenitors by dampening apical Par protein-dependent Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Hudish, Laura I; Galati, Domenico F; Ravanelli, Andrew M; Pearson, Chad G; Huang, Peng; Appel, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    The transition of dividing neuroepithelial progenitors to differentiated neurons and glia is essential for the formation of a functional nervous system. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a mitogen for spinal cord progenitors, but how cells become insensitive to the proliferative effects of Shh is not well understood. Because Shh reception occurs at primary cilia, which are positioned within the apical membrane of neuroepithelial progenitors, we hypothesized that loss of apical characteristics reduces the Shh signaling response, causing cell cycle exit and differentiation. We tested this hypothesis using genetic and pharmacological manipulation, gene expression analysis and time-lapse imaging of zebrafish embryos. Blocking the function of miR-219, a microRNA that downregulates apical Par polarity proteins and promotes progenitor differentiation, elevated Shh signaling. Inhibition of Shh signaling reversed the effects of miR-219 depletion and forced expression of Shh phenocopied miR-219 deficiency. Time-lapse imaging revealed that knockdown of miR-219 function accelerates the growth of primary cilia, revealing a possible mechanistic link between miR-219-mediated regulation of apical Par proteins and Shh signaling. Thus, miR-219 appears to decrease progenitor cell sensitivity to Shh signaling, thereby driving these cells towards differentiation. PMID:27226318

  14. Engineered G protein coupled receptors reveal independent regulation of internalization, desensitization and acute signaling

    PubMed Central

    Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Lieberman, Michael D; Elliott, Heather H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    Background The physiological regulation of G protein-coupled receptors, through desensitization and internalization, modulates the length of the receptor signal and may influence the development of tolerance and dependence in response to chronic drug treatment. To explore the importance of receptor regulation, we engineered a series of Gi-coupled receptors that differ in signal length, degree of agonist-induced internalization, and ability to induce adenylyl cyclase superactivation. All of these receptors, based on the kappa opioid receptor, were modified to be receptors activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSLs). This modification allows us to compare receptors that have the same ligands and effectors, but differ only in desensitization and internalization. Results Removal of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of the RASSL resulted in a mutant that was resistant to internalization and less prone to desensitization. Replacement of the C-terminus of the RASSL with the corresponding portion of the mu opioid receptor eliminated the induction of AC superactivation, without disrupting agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. Surprisingly, removal of phosphorylation sites from this chimera resulted in a receptor that is constitutively internalized, even in the absence of agonist. However, the receptor still signals and desensitizes in response to agonist, indicating normal G-protein coupling and partial membrane expression. Conclusions These studies reveal that internalization, desensitization and adenylyl cyclase superactivation, all processes that decrease chronic Gi-receptor signals, are independently regulated. Furthermore, specific mutations can radically alter superactivation or internalization without affecting the efficacy of acute Gi signaling. These mutant RASSLs will be useful for further elucidating the temporal dynamics of the signaling of G protein-coupled receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15707483

  15. Crosstalk and Signaling Switches in Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Dirk; Croucher, David R.; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades control cell fate decisions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis by integrating and processing intra- and extracellular cues. However, similar MAPK kinetic profiles can be associated with opposing cellular decisions depending on cell type, signal strength, and dynamics. This implies that signaling by each individual MAPK cascade has to be considered in the context of the entire MAPK network. Here, we develop a dynamic model of feedback and crosstalk for the three major MAPK cascades; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and also include input from protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Focusing on the bistable activation characteristics of the JNK pathway, this model explains how pathway crosstalk harmonizes different MAPK responses resulting in pivotal cell fate decisions. We show that JNK can switch from a transient to sustained activity due to multiple positive feedback loops. Once activated, positive feedback locks JNK in a highly active state and promotes cell death. The switch is modulated by the ERK, p38, and AKT pathways. ERK activation enhances the dual specificity phosphatase (DUSP) mediated dephosphorylation of JNK and shifts the threshold of the apoptotic switch to higher inputs. Activation of p38 restores the threshold by inhibiting ERK activity via the PP1 or PP2A phosphatases. Finally, AKT activation inhibits the JNK positive feedback, thus abrogating the apoptotic switch and allowing only proliferative signaling. Our model facilitates understanding of how cancerous deregulations disturb MAPK signal processing and provides explanations for certain drug resistances. We highlight a critical role of DUSP1 and DUSP2 expression patterns in facilitating the switching of JNK activity and show how oncogene induced ERK hyperactivity prevents the normal apoptotic switch explaining the failure of certain drugs to

  16. Protein kinase A modulates transforming growth factor-β signaling through a direct interaction with Smad4 protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huibin; Li, Gangyong; Wu, Jing-Jiang; Wang, Lidong; Uhler, Michael; Simeone, Diane M

    2013-03-22

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling normally functions to regulate embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. It is increasingly recognized that TGFβ signaling is regulated by cross-talk with other signaling pathways. We previously reported that TGFβ activates protein kinase A (PKA) independent of cAMP through an interaction of an activated Smad3-Smad4 complex and the regulatory subunit of the PKA holoenzyme (PKA-R). Here we define the interaction domains of Smad4 and PKA-R and the functional consequences of this interaction. Using a series of Smad4 and PKA-R truncation mutants, we identified amino acids 290-300 of the Smad4 linker region as critical for the specific interaction of Smad4 and PKA-R. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the B cAMP binding domain of PKA-R was sufficient for interaction with Smad4. Targeting of B domain regions conserved among all PKA-R isoforms and exposed on the molecular surface demonstrated that amino acids 281-285 and 320-329 were required for complex formation with Smad4. Interactions of these specific regions of Smad4 and PKA-R were necessary for TGFβ-mediated increases in PKA activity, CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) phosphorylation, induction of p21, and growth inhibition. Moreover, this Smad4-PKA interaction was required for TGFβ-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition, invasion of pancreatic tumor cells, and regulation of tumor growth in vivo. PMID:23362281

  17. Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) Signaling Up-regulates Neutral Sphingomyelinase 2 to Suppress Chondrocyte Maturation via the Akt Protein Signaling Pathway as a Negative Feedback Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Kakoi, Hironori; Maeda, Shingo; Shinohara, Naohiro; Matsuyama, Kanehiro; Imamura, Katsuyuki; Kawamura, Ichiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Takao; Yokouchi, Masahiro; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Komiya, Setsuro

    2014-01-01

    Although bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling promotes chondrogenesis, it is not clear whether BMP-induced chondrocyte maturation is cell-autonomously terminated. Loss of function of Smpd3 in mice results in an increase in mature hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we report that in chondrocytes the Runx2-dependent expression of Smpd3 was increased by BMP-2 stimulation. Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2), encoded by the Smpd3 gene, was detected both in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes of mouse embryo bone cartilage. An siRNA for Smpd3, as well as the nSMase inhibitor GW4869, significantly enhanced BMP-2-induced differentiation and maturation of chondrocytes. Conversely, overexpression of Smpd3 or C2-ceramide, which mimics the function of nSMase2, inhibited chondrogenesis. Upon induction of Smpd3 siRNA or GW4869, phosphorylation of both Akt and S6 proteins was increased. The accelerated chondrogenesis induced by Smpd3 silencing was negated by application of the Akt inhibitor MK2206 or the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor rapamycin. Importantly, in mouse bone culture, GW4869 treatment significantly promoted BMP-2-induced hypertrophic maturation and calcification of chondrocytes, which subsequently was eliminated by C2-ceramide. Smpd3 knockdown decreased the apoptosis of terminally matured ATDC5 chondrocytes, probably as a result of decreased ceramide production. In addition, we found that expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2) was elevated by a loss of Smpd3, which was restored by MK2206. Indeed, expression of Has2 protein decreased in nSMase2-positive hypertrophic chondrocytes in the bones of mouse embryos. Our data suggest that the Smpd3/nSMase2-ceramide-Akt signaling axis negatively regulates BMP-induced chondrocyte maturation and Has2 expression to control the rate of endochondral ossification as a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:24505141

  18. Ubiquitously expressed transcript is a novel interacting protein of protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 2

    PubMed Central

    KONG, XIANG; MA, SHIKUN; GUO, JIAQIAN; MA, YAN; HU, YANQIU; WANG, JIANJUN; ZHENG, YING

    2015-01-01

    Protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (PIAS2) is a member of the PIAS protein family. This protein family modulates the activity of several transcription factors and acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the sumoylation pathway. To improve understanding of the physiological roles of PIAS2, the current study used a yeast two-hybrid system to screen mouse stem cell cDNA libraries for proteins that interact with PIAS2. The screening identified an interaction between PIAS2 and ubiquitously expressed transcript (UXT). UXT, also termed androgen receptor trapped clone-27, is an α-class prefoldin-type chaperone that acts as a coregulator for various transcription factors, including nuclear factor-κB and androgen receptor (AR). A direct interaction between PIAS2 and UXT was confirmed by direct yeast two-hybrid analysis. In vitro evidence of the association of UXT with PIAS2 was obtained by co-immunoprecipitation. Colocalization between PIAS2 and UXT was identified in the nucleus and cytoplasm of HEK 293T and human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. The results of the current study suggested that UXT is a binding protein of PIAS2, and interaction between PIAS2 and UXT may be important for the transcriptional activation of AR. PMID:25434787

  19. Identification of a functional nuclear export signal in the green fluorescent protein asFP499

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Huseyin . E-mail: huseyinm@hotmail.com; Strasser, Bernd; Rauth, Sabine; Irving, Robert A.; Wark, Kim L.

    2006-04-21

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) asFP499 from Anemonia sulcata is a distant homologue of the GFP from Aequorea victoria. We cloned the asFP499 gene into a mammalian expression vector and showed that this protein was expressed in the human lymphoblast cell line Ramos RA1 and in the embryonic kidney 293T cell line (HEK 293T). In HEK 293T cells, asFP499 was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, suggesting that the protein was excluded from the nucleus. We identified {sub 194}LRMEKLNI{sub 201} as a candidate nuclear export signal in asFP499 and mutated the isoleucine at position 201 to an alanine. Unlike the wildtype form, the mutant protein was distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. This is First report of a GFP that contains a functional NES.

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling in vertebrate mo