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Sample records for agr mutant strains

  1. Staphylococcal superantigen-like genes, ssl5 and ssl8, are positively regulated by Sae and negatively by Agr in the Newman strain.

    PubMed

    Pantrangi, Madhulatha; Singh, Vineet K; Wolz, Christiane; Shukla, Sanjay K

    2010-07-01

    Some of the staphylococcal superantigen-like (SSL) proteins SSL5, SSL7, SSL9, and SSL11 act as immunomodulatory proteins in Staphylococcus aureus. However, little is known about their regulatory mechanisms. We determined the expression levels of ssl5 and ssl8 in seven clinically important S. aureus strains and their regulatory mechanisms in the Newman strain, which had the highest ssl5 and ssl8 expression. Independent comparisons of ssl5 or ssl8 coding and upstream sequences in these strains identified multiple haplotypes that did not correlate with the differential expression of ssl5 and ssl8, suggesting the role of additional regulatory elements. Using knockout mutant strains of known S. aureus global regulators such as Agr, Sae, and SigB in the Newman strain, we showed that both ssl5 and ssl8 were induced by Sae and repressed by Agr, suggesting that Sae and Agr are the positive and the negative regulators, respectively, of these two ssl genes. Moreover, we observed upregulation of sae in the agr mutant and upregulation of agr in the sae mutant compared with the isogenic Newman strain, suggesting that the Agr and Sae may be inhibiting each other. The SigB mutation did not affect ssl5 and ssl8 expression, but they were downregulated in the agr/sigB double mutant, indicating that SigB probably acts synergistically with Agr in their upregulation.

  2. Loss of hemolysin expression in Staphylococcus aureus agr mutants correlates with selective survival during mixed infections in murine abscesses and wounds.

    PubMed

    Schwan, William R; Langhorne, Michael H; Ritchie, Heather D; Stover, C Kendall

    2003-08-18

    During the screening of a Staphylococcus aureus signature-tagged mutagenesis library, it was noted that nonhemolytic bacteria became more abundant as time passed in murine abscess and wound models, but not within organ tissues associated with systemic infections. To examine this further, a mixed population of hyperhemolytic, hemolytic, and nonhemolytic S. aureus strain RN6390 cells were inoculated into mice using abscess, wound, and systemic models of infection. After 7 days in the abscess, the hyperhemolytic group markedly declined, whereas the nonhemolytic population increased significantly. A similar phenomenon occurred in murine wounds, but not during the systemic infection. Sequencing of several of the signature-tagged mutants indicated mutations in the agrC gene or within the agrA-agrC intergenic region. Both alpha-hemolysin and delta-hemolysin activity was curtailed in these mutants, but beta-hemolysin activity was unaffected. Single strain comparisons between wild-type strain 8325-4 and strain DU1090 (hla-) as well as between strain RN6911 (agr) and wild-type strain RN6390 were performed using the same three animal models of infection. The agr mutant strain and the hla mutant strain showed no difference in bacterial counts in murine wounds compared to their respective parent strains. The same held true in murine abscesses at day 4, but strain RN6911 counts then declined at day 7. Considerable clearing of the hla mutant strain and the agr mutant strain occurred in the systemic model of infection. Mixed infections with the DU1090 and 8325-4 strains in the abscess model showed a slight advantage given to the DU1090 population, but a distinct selection for the parental 8325-4 strain in the liver. These results suggest that agr mutations cause reductions in the expression of several secreted proteins, including alpha- and delta-hemolysin, which in turn contribute to a growth advantage of this agr mutant group within a mixed population of S. aureus cells residing

  3. Epsilon-Toxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718 Is Dependent upon the agr Operon but Not the VirS/VirR Two-Component Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens type B and D strains cause enterotoxemias and enteritis in livestock after proliferating in the intestines and producing epsilon-toxin (ETX), alpha-toxin (CPA), and, usually, perfringolysin O (PFO). Although ETX is one of the most potent bacterial toxins, the regulation of ETX production by type B or D strains remains poorly understood. The present work determined that the type D strain CN3718 upregulates production of ETX upon close contact with enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This host cell-induced upregulation of ETX expression was mediated at the transcriptional level. Using an isogenic agrB null mutant and complemented strain, the agr operon was shown to be required when CN3718 produces ETX in broth culture or, via a secreted signal consistent with a quorum-sensing (QS) effect, upregulates ETX production upon contact with host cells. These findings provide the first insights into the regulation of ETX production, as well as additional evidence that the Agr-like QS system functions as a global regulator of C. perfringens toxin production. Since it was proposed previously that the Agr-like QS system regulates C. perfringens gene expression via the VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system, an isogenic virR null mutant of CN3718 was constructed to evaluate the importance of VirS/VirR for CN3718 toxin production. This mutation affected production of CPA and PFO, but not ETX, by CN3718. These results provide the first indication that C. perfringens toxin expression regulation by the Agr-like quorum-sensing system may not always act via the VirS/VirR two-component system. PMID:22167225

  4. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  5. Regulation of neurotoxin production and sporulation by a Putative agrBD signaling system in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Cooksley, Clare M; Davis, Ian J; Winzer, Klaus; Chan, Weng C; Peck, Michael W; Minton, Nigel P

    2010-07-01

    A significant number of genome sequences of Clostridium botulinum and related species have now been determined. In silico analysis of these data revealed the presence of two distinct agr loci (agr-1 and agr-2) in all group I strains, each encoding putative proteins with similarity to AgrB and AgrD of the well-studied Staphylococcus aureus agr quorum sensing system. In S. aureus, a small diffusible autoinducing peptide is generated from AgrD in a membrane-located processing event that requires AgrB. Here the characterization of both agr loci in the group I strain C. botulinum ATCC 3502 and of their homologues in a close relative, Clostridium sporogenes NCIMB 10696, is reported. In C. sporogenes NCIMB 10696, agr-1 and agr-2 appear to form transcriptional units that consist of agrB, agrD, and flanking genes of unknown function. Several of these flanking genes are conserved in Clostridium perfringens. In agreement with their proposed role in quorum sensing, both loci were maximally expressed during late-exponential-phase growth. Modulation of agrB expression in C. sporogenes was achieved using antisense RNA, whereas in C. botulinum, insertional agrD mutants were generated using ClosTron technology. In comparison to the wild-type strains, these strains exhibited drastically reduced sporulation and, for C. botulinum, also reduced production of neurotoxin, suggesting that both phenotypes are controlled by quorum sensing. Interestingly, while agr-1 appeared to control sporulation, agr-2 appeared to regulate neurotoxin formation.

  6. Existence of two groups of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis based on biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular profile and agr-typing.

    PubMed

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Caplin, Jonathan; Detilleux, Johann; Graber, Hans; Moroni, Paolo; Taminiau, Bernard; Mainil, Jacques G

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is recognised worldwide as an important pathogen causing contagious acute and chronic bovine mastitis. Chronic mastitis account for a significant part of all bovine cases and represent an important economic problem for dairy producers. Several properties (biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular expression and group agr) are thought to be associated with this chronic status. In a previous study, we found the existence of two groups of strains based on the association of these features. The aim of the present work was to confirm on a large international and non-related collection of strains the existence of these clusters and to associate them with case history records. In addition, the genomes of eight strains were sequenced to study the genomic differences between strains of each cluster. The results confirmed the existence of both groups based on capsular typing, intracellular survival and agr-typing: strains cap8-positive, belonging to agr group II, showing a low invasion rate and strains cap5-positive, belonging to agr group I, showing a high invasion rate. None of the two clusters were associated with the chronic status of the cow. When comparing the genomes of strains belonging to both clusters, the genes specific to the group "cap5-agrI" would suggest that these strains are better adapted to live in hostile environment. The existence of these two groups is highly important as they may represent two clusters that are adapted differently to the host and/or the surrounding environment.

  7. The Agr communication system provides a benefit to the populations of Listeria monocytogenes in soil

    PubMed Central

    Vivant, Anne-Laure; Garmyn, Dominique; Gal, Laurent; Piveteau, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the Agr communication system of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes was involved in adaptation and competitiveness in soil. Alteration of the ability to communicate, either by deletion of the gene coding the response regulator AgrA (response-negative mutant) or the signal pro-peptide AgrD (signal-negative mutant), did not affect population dynamics in soil that had been sterilized but survival was altered in biotic soil suggesting that the Agr system of L. monocytogenes was involved to face the complex soil biotic environment. This was confirmed by a set of co-incubation experiments. The fitness of the response-negative mutant was lower either in the presence or absence of the parental strain but the fitness of the signal-negative mutant depended on the strain with which it was co-incubated. The survival of the signal-negative mutant was higher when co-cultured with the parental strain than when co-cultured with the response-negative mutant. These results showed that the ability to respond to Agr communication provided a benefit to listerial cells to compete. These results might also indicate that in soil, the Agr system controls private goods rather than public goods. PMID:25414837

  8. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  9. Identification of the agr Peptide of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zetzmann, Marion; Sánchez-Kopper, Andrés; Waidmann, Mark S.; Blombach, Bastian; Riedel, Christian U.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is an important food-borne human pathogen that is able to strive under a wide range of environmental conditions. Its accessory gene regulator (agr) system was shown to impact on biofilm formation and virulence and has been proposed as one of the regulatory mechanisms involved in adaptation to these changing environments. The Lm agr operon is homologous to the Staphylococcus aureus system, which includes an agrD-encoded autoinducing peptide that stimulates expression of the agr genes via the AgrCA two-component system and is required for regulation of target genes. The aim of the present study was to identify the native autoinducing peptide (AIP) of Lm using a luciferase reporter system in wildtype and agrD deficient strains, rational design of synthetic peptides and mass spectrometry. Upon deletion of agrD, luciferase reporter activity driven by the PII promoter of the agr operon was completely abolished and this defect was restored by co-cultivation of the agrD-negative reporter strain with a producer strain. Based on the sequence and structures of known AIPs of other organisms, a set of potential Lm AIPs was designed and tested for PII-activation. This led to the identification of a cyclic pentapeptide that was able to induce PII-driven luciferase reporter activity and restore defective invasion of the agrD deletion mutant into Caco-2 cells. Analysis of supernatants of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing AgrBD identified a peptide identical in mass and charge to the cyclic pentapeptide. The Lm agr system is specific for this pentapeptide since the AIP of Lactobacillus plantarum, which also is a pentapeptide yet with different amino acid sequence, did not induce PII activity. In summary, the presented results provide further evidence for the hypothesis that the agrD gene of Lm encodes a secreted AIP responsible for autoregulation of the agr system of Lm. Additionally, the structure of the native Lm AIP was identified. PMID

  10. A point mutation in AgrC determines cytotoxic or colonizing properties associated with phenotypic variants of ST22 MRSA strains

    PubMed Central

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Siemens, Nikolai; Monk, Ian R.; Mohan, Disha B.; Mukundan, Santhosh; Krishnan, Karthickeyan Chella; Prabhakara, Sushma; Snäll, Johanna; Kearns, Angela; Vandenesch, Francois; Svensson, Mattias; Kotb, Malak; Gopal, Balasubramanian; Arakere, Gayathri; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections. One of the highly successful and rapidly disseminating clones is MRSA ST22 commonly associated with skin tropism. Here we show that a naturally occurring single amino acid substitution (tyrosine to cysteine) at position 223 of AgrC determines starkly different ST22 S. aureus virulence phenotypes, e.g. cytotoxic or colonizing, as evident in both in vitro and in vivo skin infections. Y223C amino acid substitution destabilizes AgrC-AgrA interaction leading to a colonizing phenotype characterized by upregulation of bacterial surface proteins. The colonizing phenotype strains cause less severe skin tissue damage, show decreased susceptibility towards the antimicrobial LL-37 and induce autophagy. In contrast, cytotoxic strains with tyrosine at position 223 of AgrC cause infections characterized by inflammasome activation and severe skin tissue pathology. Taken together, the study demonstrates how a single amino acid substitution in the histidine kinase receptor AgrC of ST22 strains determines virulence properties and infection outcome. PMID:27511873

  11. Staphylococcus epidermidis agr quorum-sensing system: signal identification, cross talk, and importance in colonization.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael E; Todd, Daniel A; Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Paharik, Alexandra E; Van Dyke, Michael J; Büttner, Henning; Dunman, Paul M; Rohde, Holger; Cech, Nadja B; Fey, Paul D; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic pathogen that is one of the leading causes of medical device infections. Global regulators like the agr quorum-sensing system in this pathogen have received a limited amount of attention, leaving important questions unanswered. There are three agr types in S. epidermidis strains, but only one of the autoinducing peptide (AIP) signals has been identified (AIP-I), and cross talk between agr systems has not been tested. We structurally characterized all three AIP types using mass spectrometry and discovered that the AIP-II and AIP-III signals are 12 residues in length, making them the largest staphylococcal AIPs identified to date. S. epidermidis agr reporter strains were developed for each system, and we determined that cross-inhibitory interactions occur between the agr type I and II systems and between the agr type I and III systems. In contrast, no cross talk was observed between the type II and III systems. To further understand the outputs of the S. epidermidis agr system, an RNAIII mutant was constructed, and microarray studies revealed that exoenzymes (Ecp protease and Geh lipase) and low-molecular-weight toxins were downregulated in the mutant. Follow-up analysis of Ecp confirmed the RNAIII is required to induce protease activity and that agr cross talk modulates Ecp activity in a manner that mirrors the agr reporter results. Finally, we demonstrated that the agr system enhances skin colonization by S. epidermidis using a porcine model. This work expands our knowledge of S. epidermidis agr system function and will aid future studies on cell-cell communication in this important opportunistic pathogen.

  12. XerC Contributes to Diverse Forms of Staphylococcus aureus Infection via agr-Dependent and agr-Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Danielle N; Beenken, Karen E; Loughran, Allister J; Meeker, Daniel G; Lantz, Tamara L; Graham, Justin W; Spencer, Horace J; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that mutation of xerC, which reportedly encodes a homologue of an Escherichia coli recombinase, limits biofilm formation in the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain LAC and the methicillin-sensitive strain UAMS-1. This was not due to the decreased production of the polysaccharide intracellular adhesin (PIA) in either strain because the amount of PIA was increased in a UAMS-1xerC mutant and undetectable in both LAC and its isogenic xerC mutant. Mutation of xerC also resulted in the increased production of extracellular proteases and nucleases in both LAC and UAMS-1, and limiting the production of either class of enzymes increased biofilm formation in the isogenic xerC mutants. More importantly, the limited capacity to form a biofilm was correlated with increased antibiotic susceptibility in both strains in the context of an established biofilm in vivo. Mutation of xerC also attenuated virulence in a murine bacteremia model, as assessed on the basis of the bacterial loads in internal organs and overall lethality. It also resulted in the decreased accumulation of alpha toxin and the increased accumulation of protein A. These findings suggest that xerC may impact the functional status of agr. This was confirmed by demonstrating the reduced accumulation of RNAIII and AgrA in LAC and UAMS-1xerC mutants. However, this cannot account for the biofilm-deficient phenotype of xerC mutants because mutation of agr did not limit biofilm formation in either strain. These results demonstrate that xerC contributes to biofilm-associated infections and acute bacteremia and that this is likely due to agr-independent and -dependent pathways, respectively.

  13. XerC Contributes to Diverse Forms of Staphylococcus aureus Infection via agr-Dependent and agr-Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Karen E.; Loughran, Allister J.; Meeker, Daniel G.; Lantz, Tamara L.; Graham, Justin W.; Spencer, Horace J.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that mutation of xerC, which reportedly encodes a homologue of an Escherichia coli recombinase, limits biofilm formation in the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain LAC and the methicillin-sensitive strain UAMS-1. This was not due to the decreased production of the polysaccharide intracellular adhesin (PIA) in either strain because the amount of PIA was increased in a UAMS-1 xerC mutant and undetectable in both LAC and its isogenic xerC mutant. Mutation of xerC also resulted in the increased production of extracellular proteases and nucleases in both LAC and UAMS-1, and limiting the production of either class of enzymes increased biofilm formation in the isogenic xerC mutants. More importantly, the limited capacity to form a biofilm was correlated with increased antibiotic susceptibility in both strains in the context of an established biofilm in vivo. Mutation of xerC also attenuated virulence in a murine bacteremia model, as assessed on the basis of the bacterial loads in internal organs and overall lethality. It also resulted in the decreased accumulation of alpha toxin and the increased accumulation of protein A. These findings suggest that xerC may impact the functional status of agr. This was confirmed by demonstrating the reduced accumulation of RNAIII and AgrA in LAC and UAMS-1 xerC mutants. However, this cannot account for the biofilm-deficient phenotype of xerC mutants because mutation of agr did not limit biofilm formation in either strain. These results demonstrate that xerC contributes to biofilm-associated infections and acute bacteremia and that this is likely due to agr-independent and -dependent pathways, respectively. PMID:26857575

  14. Revealing Differences in Metabolic Flux Distributions between a Mutant Strain and Its Parent Strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhu, Hui-Xia; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Jia, Shi-Ru; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955) using DEC (diethyl sulfate) and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct) concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0%) compared with parent strain (17.0%). It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53–6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain. PMID:24901455

  15. Biofilm formation by exopolysaccharide mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355 produces the soluble exopolysaccharides alternan and dextran in planktonic cultures. A set of mutants of this strain are available that are deficient in the production of alternan, dextran, or both. Another mutant of NRRL B-1355, strain R1510, produces ...

  16. Isolation and characterization of mutant strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica lacking dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability.

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, H; Nakai, T; Horiguchi, Y; Kume, K

    1988-01-01

    Mutant strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica, named B-42, B-76, B-84, and B-119, were obtained after serial passages of a parent strain, L3, on Bordet-Gengou agar plates containing 20% horse blood and 200 micrograms of nalidixic acid per ml (BGN-20 agar plates) at 42 degrees C. Mutant strains completely lacked dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability, and lethal activity of the strains for mice was apparently reduced compared with that of strain L3. Mutant strains were able to grow at 42 degrees C, and the strains were nalidixic acid resistant. The mutant strains showed domed (Dom+) colony morphology with smooth texture (Scs+) and no production of zone of hemolysis (Hly-), but the agglutinability of these strains to antiserum prepared with Dom+ Scs+ Hly+ organisms of strain L3 was the same as that of strain L3. When strain B-42 was inoculated intramuscularly or intranasally into guinea pigs, all the animals survived without manifesting clinical signs and produced a high-level of serum agglutination antibodies against strain L3. These inoculated animals were protected against intranasal challenge with strain L3. These properties of mutant strains are hereditarily stable after 50 subcultures on BGN-20 agar plates or 20 passages in mice. These data suggest that the mutant strains lacking dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability can be used as a live attenuated vaccine against swine atrophic rhinitis. PMID:3182989

  17. Rhizobium japonicum mutant strains unable to grow chemoautotrophically with H2.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, R J

    1981-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum strain SR grows chemoautotrophically on a mineral salts medium when incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow or that grow very poorly chemoautotrophically with H2 have been isolated from strain SR. The mutant isolation procedure involved mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate, penicillin selection under chemoautotrophic growth conditions, and plating of the survivors onto medium containing carbon. The resulting colonies were replica plated onto medium that did not contain carbon, and the plates were incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow under these conditions were chosen. Over 100 mutant strains with defects in chemoautotrophic metabolism were obtained. The phenotypes of the mutants fall into various classes. These include strains unable to oxidize H2 and strains deficient in CO2 uptake. Some of the mutant strains were capable of oxidizing H2 only when artificial electron acceptors were provided. Two mutant strains specifically lack activity of the key CO2-fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. Other mutant strains lack both H2-oxidizing ability and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity. PMID:6780521

  18. Antibacterial Activity of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Argon Plasma against 78 Genetically Different (mecA, luk-P, agr or Capsular Polysaccharide Type) Staphylococcus aureus Strains.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Rutger; Lührman, Anne; Holtfreter, Silva; Kolata, Julia; Radke, Dörte; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on the antimicrobial activity of cold atmospheric pressure argon plasma showed varying effects against mecA+ or mecA-Staphylococcus aureus strains. This observation may have important clinical and epidemiological implications. Here, the antibacterial activity of argon plasma was investigated against 78 genetically different S. aureus strains, stratified by mecA, luk-P, agr1-4, or the cell wall capsule polysaccharide types 5 and 8. kINPen09® served as the plasma source for all experiments. On agar plates, mecA+luk-P-S. aureus strains showed a decreased susceptibility against plasma compared to other S. aureus strains. This study underlines the high complexity of microbial defence against antimicrobial treatment and confirms a previously reported strain-dependent susceptibility of S. aureus to plasma treatment.

  19. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in Soil Requires AgrA-Mediated Regulation.

    PubMed

    Vivant, Anne-Laure; Garmyn, Dominique; Gal, Laurent; Hartmann, Alain; Piveteau, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    In a recent paper, we demonstrated that inactivation of the Agr system affects the patterns of survival of Listeria monocytogenes (A.-L. Vivant, D. Garmyn, L. Gal, and P. Piveteau, Front Cell Infect Microbiol 4:160, http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2014.00160). In this study, we investigated whether the Agr-mediated response is triggered during adaptation in soil, and we compared survival patterns in a set of 10 soils. The fate of the parental strain L. monocytogenes L9 (a rifampin-resistant mutant of L. monocytogenes EGD-e) and that of a ΔagrA deletion mutant were compared in a collection of 10 soil microcosms. The ΔagrA mutant displayed significantly reduced survival in these biotic soil microcosms, and differential transcriptome analyses showed large alterations of the transcriptome when AgrA was not functional, while the variations in the transcriptomes between the wild type and the ΔagrA deletion mutant were modest under abiotic conditions. Indeed, in biotic soil environments, 578 protein-coding genes and an extensive repertoire of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) were differentially transcribed. The transcription of genes coding for proteins involved in cell envelope and cellular processes, including the phosphotransferase system and ABC transporters, and proteins involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptides was affected. Under sterilized soil conditions, the differences were limited to 86 genes and 29 ncRNAs. These results suggest that the response regulator AgrA of the Agr communication system plays important roles during the saprophytic life of L. monocytogenes in soil.

  20. Mutant Strains of Escherichia coli K-12 Unable to Form Ubiquinone

    PubMed Central

    Cox, G. B.; Gibson, F.; Pittard, James

    1968-01-01

    A strain of Escherichia coli was isolated which was unable to form ubiquinone. This mutant was obtained by selecting strains unable to grow on malate as sole source of carbon. Such strains were further screened by examination of the quinone content of cells grown on a glucose medium. A mutant unable to form vitamin K was also isolated by this procedure. A genetic analysis of the ubiquinoneless strain showed that it possessed two mutations affecting ubiquinone biosynthesis. Images PMID:4870277

  1. Gastrointestinal Colonization by Candida albicans Mutant Strains in Antibiotic-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Stephen M.; Jechorek, Robert P.; Garni, Robb M.; Bendel, Catherine M.; Wells, Carol L.

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotic-treated mice orally inoculated with one of three Candida albicans strains (including two mutant strains) or indigenous Candida pelliculosa showed levels of candidal gastrointestinal colonization that were strain specific. However, regardless of strain, the numbers of viable candida were intermediate to high in the stomach, were consistently lowest in the upper small intestine, and increased progressively down the intestinal tract. PMID:11139219

  2. AgrAbility Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... It’s About Hope AgrAbility on Twitter AgrAbility on Facebook AgrAbility on You Tube AgrAbility… It’s About Hope ... summary report available... AgrAbility Harvest Get a copy Facebook Posts National AgrAbility Project 12 hours ago Good ...

  3. Comparative metabolic flux analysis of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a high riboflavin-producing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bo-Young; Wittmann, Christoph; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the central metabolic pathway of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a riboflavin over-producing mutant strain developed in a previous study in order to characterize the riboflavin over-production pathway. (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was carried out in both strains, and the resulting data were fit to a steady-state flux isotopomer model using OpenFLUX. Flux to pentose-5-phosphate (P5P) via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) was 9% higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. The flux from purine synthesis to riboflavin in the mutant strain was 1.6%, while that of the wild type strain was only 0.1%, a 16-fold difference. In addition, the flux from the cytoplasmic pyruvate pool to the extracellular metabolites, pyruvate, lactate, and alanine, was 2-fold higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. This result demonstrates that increased guanosine triphosphate (GTP) flux through the PPP and purine synthesis pathway (PSP) increased riboflavin production in the mutant strain. The present study provides the first insight into metabolic flux through the central carbon pathway in A. gossypii and sets the foundation for development of a quantitative and functional model of the A. gossypii metabolic network.

  4. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct.

  5. The agr Locus Regulates Virulence and Colonization Genes in Clostridium difficile 027

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Melissa J.; Clare, Simon; Goulding, David; Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Barquist, Lars; Browne, Hilary P.; Pettit, Laura; Dougan, Gordon; Lawley, Trevor D.

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator AgrA, a member of the LytTR family of proteins, plays a key role in controlling gene expression in some Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. AgrA is encoded by the agrACDB global regulatory locus, and orthologues are found within the genome of most Clostridium difficile isolates, including the epidemic lineage 027/BI/NAP1. Comparative RNA sequencing of the wild type and otherwise isogenic agrA null mutant derivatives of C. difficile R20291 revealed a network of approximately 75 differentially regulated transcripts at late exponential growth phase, including many genes associated with flagellar assembly and function, such as the major structural subunit, FliC. Other differentially regulated genes include several involved in bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis and toxin A expression. C. difficile 027 R20291 agrA mutant derivatives were poorly flagellated and exhibited reduced levels of colonization and relapses in the murine infection model. Thus, the agr locus likely plays a contributory role in the fitness and virulence potential of C. difficile strains in the 027/BI/NAP1 lineage. PMID:23772065

  6. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  7. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  8. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  9. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  10. Electrical Phenotypes of Calcium Transport Mutant Strains of a Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Hamam, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the electrical phenotypes of mutants with mutations in genes encoding calcium transporters—a mechanosensitive channel homolog (MscS), a Ca2+/H+ exchange protein (cax), and Ca2+-ATPases (nca-1, nca-2, nca-3)—as well as those of double mutants (the nca-2 cax, nca-2 nca-3, and nca-3 cax mutants). The electrical characterization used dual impalements to obtain cable-corrected current-voltage measurements. Only two types of mutants (the MscS mutant; the nca-2 mutant and nca-2-containing double mutants) exhibited lower resting potentials. For the nca-2 mutant, on the basis of unchanged conductance and cyanide-induced depolarization of the potential, the cause is attenuated H+-ATPase activity. The growth of the nca-2 mutant-containing strains was inhibited by elevated extracellular Ca2+ levels, indicative of lesions in Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the net Ca2+ effluxes of the nca-2 mutant, measured noninvasively with a self-referencing Ca2+-selective microelectrode, were similar to those of the wild type. All of the mutants exhibited osmosensitivity similar to that of the wild type (the turgor of the nca-2 mutant was also similar to that of the wild type), suggesting that Ca2+ signaling does not play a role in osmoregulation. The hyphal tip morphology and tip-localized mitochondria of the nca-2 mutant were similar to those of the wild type, even when the external [Ca2+] was elevated. Thus, although Ca2+ homeostasis is perturbed in the nca-2 mutant (B. J. Bowman et al., Eukaryot. Cell 10:654–661, 2011), the phenotype does not extend to tip growth or to osmoregulation but is revealed by lower H+-ATPase activity. PMID:22408225

  11. Phosphoregulation of an Inner Dynein Arm Complex in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Is Altered in Phototactic Mutant Strains

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    1997-01-01

    To gain a further understanding of axonemal dynein regulation, mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that had defects in both phototactic behavior and flagellar motility were identified and characterized. ptm1, ptm2, and ptm3 mutant strains exhibited motility phenotypes that resembled those of known inner dynein arm region mutant strains, but did not have biochemical or genetic phenotypes characteristic of other inner dynein arm mutations. Three other mutant strains had defects in the f class of inner dynein arms. Dynein extracts from the pf9-4 strain were missing the entire f complex. Strains with mutations in pf9/ida1, ida2, or ida3 failed to assemble the f dynein complex and did not exhibit phototactic behavior. Fractionated dynein from mia1-1 and mia2-1 axonemes exhibited a novel f class inner dynein arm biochemical phenotype; the 138-kD f intermediate chain was present in altered phosphorylation forms. In vitro axonemal dynein activity was reduced by the mia1-1 and mia2-1 mutations. The addition of kinase inhibitor restored axonemal dynein activity concomitant with the dephosphorylation of the 138-kD f intermediate chain. Dynein extracts from uni1-1 axonemes, which specifically assemble only one of the two flagella, contained relatively high levels of the altered phosphorylation forms of the 138-kD intermediate chain. We suggest that the f dynein complex may be phosphoregulated asymmetrically between the two flagella to achieve phototactic turning. PMID:9008712

  12. Genetics of Peripheral Vestibular Dysfunction: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sherri M.; Jones, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of research has been published about genetic hearing impairment. Fifty to sixty percent of hearing loss is thought to have a genetic cause. Genes may also play a significant role in acquired hearing loss due to aging, noise exposure, or ototoxic medications. Between 1995 and 2012, over 100 causative genes have been identified for syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of hereditary hearing loss (see Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage http://hereditaryhearingloss.org). Mouse models have been extremely valuable in facilitating the discovery of hearing loss genes, and in understanding inner ear pathology due to genetic mutations or elucidating fundamental mechanisms of inner ear development. Purpose Whereas much is being learned about hereditary hearing loss and the genetics of cochlear disorders, relatively little is known about the role genes may play in peripheral vestibular impairment. Here we review the literature with regard to genetics of vestibular dysfunction and discuss what we have learned from studies using mutant mouse models and direct measures of peripheral vestibular neural function. Results Several genes are considered that when mutated lead to varying degrees of inner ear vestibular dysfunction due to deficits in otoconia, stereocilia, hair cells, or neurons. Behavior often does not reveal the inner ear deficit. Many of the examples presented are also known to cause human disorders. Conclusions Knowledge regarding the roles of particular genes in the operation of the vestibular sensory apparatus is growing and it is clear that gene products co-expressed in the cochlea and vestibule may play different roles in the respective end organs. The discovery of new genes mediating critical inner ear vestibular function carries the promise of new strategies in diagnosing, treating and managing patients as well as predicting the course and level of morbidity in human vestibular disease. PMID:25032973

  13. Antifolate Agents Against Wild and Mutant Strains of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, M. S.; Rana, J.; Gaikwad, D.; Leartsakulpanich, U.; Ambre, Premlata K.; Pissurlenkar, R. R. S.; Coutinho, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase is an important target for antimalarial chemotherapy. The emergence of resistance has significantly reduced the efficacy of the classic antifolate drugs cycloguanil and pyrimethamine. In this paper we report new dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors identified using molecular modelling principles with the goal of designing new antifolate agents active against both wild and tetramutant dihydrofolate reductase strains three series of trimethoprim analogues were designed, synthesised and tested for biological activity. Pyrimethamine and cycloguanil have been reported to loose efficacy because of steric repulsion in the active site pocket produced due to mutation in Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase. The synthesised molecules have sufficient flexibility to withstand this steric repulsion to counteract the resistance. The molecules have been synthesised by conventional techniques and fully characterised by spectroscopic methods. The potency of these molecules was evaluated by in vitro enzyme specific assays. Some of the molecules were active in micromolar concentrations and can easily be optimised to improve binding and activity. PMID:24843184

  14. Mechanical properties of elytra from Tribolium castaneum wild-type and body color mutant strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cuticle tanning in insects involves simultaneous cuticular hardening and pigmentation. The dynamic mechanical properties of the highly modified and cuticle-rich forewings (elytra) from Tribolium castaneum (red flour beetle) body color mutant strains were investigated to determine the relationship b...

  15. A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, lacking flagella, has unusual growth physiology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Derrick L; Notey, Jaspreet S; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Loder, Andrew J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638 exhibited an extended exponential phase and atypical cell aggregation behavior. Genomic DNA from the mutant culture was sequenced and compared to wild-type (WT) DSM3638, revealing 145 genes with one or more insertions, deletions, or substitutions (12 silent, 33 amino acid substitutions, and 100 frame shifts). Approximately, half of the mutated genes were transposases or hypothetical proteins. The WT transcriptome revealed numerous changes in amino acid and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathways coincidental with growth phase transitions, unlike the mutant whose transcriptome reflected the observed prolonged exponential phase. Targeted gene deletions, based on frame-shifted ORFs in the mutant genome, in a genetically tractable strain of P. furiosus (COM1) could not generate the extended exponential phase behavior observed for the mutant. For example, a putative radical SAM family protein (PF2064) was the most highly up-regulated ORF (>25-fold) in the WT between exponential and stationary phase, although this ORF was unresponsive in the mutant; deletion of this gene in P. furiosus COM1 resulted in no apparent phenotype. On the other hand, frame-shifting mutations in the mutant genome negatively impacted transcription of a flagellar biosynthesis operon (PF0329-PF0338).Consequently, cells in the mutant culture lacked flagella and, unlike the WT, showed minimal evidence of exopolysaccharide-based cell aggregation in post-exponential phase. Electron microscopy of PF0331-PF0337 deletions in P. furiosus COM1 showed that absence of flagella impacted normal cell aggregation behavior and, furthermore, indicated that flagella play a key role, beyond motility, in the growth physiology of P. furiosus.

  16. Selenite-stress selected mutant strains of probiotic bacteria for Se source production.

    PubMed

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Kovács, Szilvia; Pócsi, István; Prokisch, József

    2015-04-01

    Selenium deficiency is a major health problem worldwide for about 1 billion people. Bacterial cells usually possess low tolerance to selenite stress and also low ability to reduce high concentrations of toxic selenite. Here, high tolerance to selenite and selenium bioaccumulation capability were developed in mutated clones of probiotic and starter bacteria including Enterococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis by food-level strain development process and clone selection. All mutant clones possessed increased glutathione concentration and glutathione reductase activity. The selenite treatment increased further these values in L. casei mutant strain pointing at a different selenite reduction pathway and/or stress response in this organism. Considerable conversion of selenite to cell bound selenium forms with a concomitant high biomass production was detected in E. faecium and B. animalis ssp. lactis cultures. Possible application of these strains as food and feed supplements is under investigation.

  17. Spontaneous Gac Mutants of Pseudomonas Biological Control Strains: Cheaters or Mutualists? ▿

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, William W.; Pepper, John W.; Pierson, Leland S.; Pierson, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria rely on a range of extracellular metabolites to suppress competitors, gain access to resources, and exploit plant or animal hosts. The GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system positively controls the expression of many of these beneficial external products in pseudomonad bacteria. Natural populations often contain variants with defective Gac systems that do not produce most external products. These mutants benefit from a decreased metabolic load but do not appear to displace the wild type in nature. How could natural selection maintain the wild type in the presence of a mutant with enhanced growth? One hypothesis is that Gac mutants are “cheaters” that do not contribute to the public good, favored within groups but selected against between groups, as groups containing more mutants lose access to ecologically important external products. An alternative hypothesis is that Gac mutants have a mutualistic interaction with the wild type, so that each variant benefits by the presence of the other. In the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 30-84, Gac mutants do not produce phenazines, which suppress competitor growth and are critical for biofilm formation. Here, we test the predictions of these alternative hypotheses by quantifying interactions between the wild type and the phenazine- and biofilm-deficient Gac mutant within growing biofilms. We find evidence that the wild type and Gac mutants interact mutualistically in the biofilm context, whereas a phenazine-defective structural mutant does not. Our results suggest that the persistence of alternative Gac phenotypes may be due to the stabilizing role of local mutualistic interactions. PMID:21873476

  18. Keratinase production and keratin degradation by a mutant strain of Bacillus subtilis *

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Cheng-gang; Lou, Bing-gan; Zheng, Xiao-dong

    2008-01-01

    A new feather-degrading bacterium was isolated from a local feather waste site and identified as Bacillus subtilis based on morphological, physiochemical, and phylogenetic characteristics. Screening for mutants with elevated keratinolytic activity using N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis resulted in a mutant strain KD-N2 producing keratinolytic activity about 2.5 times that of the wild-type strain. The mutant strain produced inducible keratinase in different substrates of feathers, hair, wool and silk under submerged cultivation. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed the degradation of feathers, hair and silk by the keratinase. The optimal conditions for keratinase production include initial pH of 7.5, inoculum size of 2% (v/v), age of inoculum of 16 h, and cultivation at 23 °C. The maximum keratinolytic activity of KD-N2 was achieved after 30 h. Essential amino acids like threonine, valine, methionine as well as ammonia were produced when feathers were used as substrates. Strain KD-N2, therefore, shows great promise of finding potential applications in keratin hydrolysis and keratinase production. PMID:18196614

  19. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, Lee R; Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Zhu, Mingjun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  20. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  1. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  2. Isolation and characterization of the E. coli membrane protein production strain Mutant56(DE3)

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Schlegel, Susan; Wagner, Samuel; Löw, Mirjam; Eriksson, Jonas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus J.; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Nørholm, Morten H. H.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-01-01

    Membrane protein production is usually toxic to E. coli. However, using genetic screens strains can be isolated in which the toxicity of membrane protein production is reduced, thereby improving production yields. Best known examples are the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, which are both derived from the T7 RNA polymerase (P)-based BL21(DE3) protein production strain. In C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) mutations lowering t7rnap expression levels result in strongly reduced T7 RNAP accumulation levels. As a consequence membrane protein production stress is alleviated in the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, thereby increasing membrane protein yields. Here, we isolated Mutant56(DE3) from BL21(DE3) using a genetic screen designed to isolate BL21(DE3)-derived strains with mutations alleviating membrane protein production stress other than the ones in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). The defining mutation of Mutant56(DE3) changes one amino acid in its T7 RNAP, which weakens the binding of the T7 RNAP to the T7 promoter governing target gene expression rather than lowering T7 RNAP levels. For most membrane proteins tested yields in Mutant56(DE3) were considerably higher than in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). Thus, the isolation of Mutant56(DE3) shows that the evolution of BL21(DE3) can be promoted towards further enhanced membrane protein production. PMID:28338018

  3. Production of a thermal stress resistant mutant Euglena gracilis strain using Fe-ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koji; Kazama, Yusuke; Mitra, Sharbanee; Marukawa, Yuka; Arashida, Ryo; Abe, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Euglena gracilis is a common phytoplankton species, which also has motile flagellate characteristics. Recent research and development has enabled the industrial use of E. gracilis and selective breeding of this species is expected to further expand its application. However, the production of E. gracilis nuclear mutants is difficult because of the robustness of its genome. To establish an efficient mutation induction procedure for E. gracilis, we employed Fe-ion beam irradiation in the RIKEN RI beam factory. A decrease in the survival rate was observed with the increase in irradiation dose, and the upper limit used for E. gracilis selective breeding was around 50 Gy. For a practical trial of Fe-ion irradiation, we conducted a screening to isolate high-temperature-tolerant mutants. The screening yielded mutants that proliferated faster than the wild-type strain at 32 °C. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation on E. gracilis selective breeding.

  4. Immunological roles of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) using a PMT mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jung; Toan, Nguyen Tat; Jang, Eun Jin; Jung, Bock Gie; Lee, Jae Il; Lee, Bong Joo

    2007-08-01

    The immunological role of the Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) in mice was examined using a PMT mutant strain. After a nasal inoculation, the mutant strain failed to induce interstitial pneumonia. Moreover, PMT had no significant effect on the populations of CD4+, CD8+, CD3+, and CD19+ immunocytes in blood or on the populations of CD4+ and CD8+ splenocytes (P<0.01). However, there was a significant increase in the total number of cells in the BAL samples obtained from the wild-type P. multocida-inoculated mice. On the other hand, the level of IL-1 expression decreased when the macrophages from the bronchio-alveolar lavage were stimulated with PMT. Overall, PMT appears to play some role (stimulating and/or inhibiting) in the immunological responses but further studies will be required to confirm this.

  5. Regulation of nitrogen metabolism is altered in a glnB mutant strain of Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Amar, M; Patriarca, E J; Manco, G; Bernard, P; Riccio, A; Lamberti, A; Defez, R; Iaccarino, M

    1994-02-01

    We isolated a Rhizobium leguminosarum mutant strain altered in the glnB gene. This event, which has never been described in the Rhizobiaceae, is rare in comparison to mutants isolated in the contiguous gene, glnA. The glnB mutation removes the glnBA promoter but in vivo does not prevent glnA expression from its own promoter, which is not nitrogen regulated. The glnB mutant strain does not grow on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source and it is Nod+, Fix+. Two -24/-12 promoters, for the glnII and glnBA genes, are constitutively expressed in the glnB mutant, while two -35/-10-like promoters for glnA and ntrBC are unaffected. We propose that the glnB gene product, the PII protein, plays a negative role in the ability of NtrC to activate transcription from its target promoters and a positive role in the mechanism of nitrate utilization.

  6. Cytological characterization of an Aspergillus Nidulans mutant from a strain with chromosomic duplication

    PubMed Central

    Giancoli, Ágata Cristiane Huppert; de Azevedo, João Lúcio; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    A development mutant, named V103, was obtained spontaneously from the A strain of A. nidulans. The A strain contains a duplicated segment of chromosome I that has undergone translocation to chromosome II (I II). It is mitotically unstable and generates phenotypically deteriorated types, some with enhanced stability. The deteriorated variants of A. nidulans show abnormal development, exhibiting slower colony growth, variations in colony pigmentation and changes in conidiophore structure. The alterations observed in the conidiophore include fewer metulae and phialides, further elongation and ramification of these structures, delayed nuclear migration and the presence of secondary conidiophores. PMID:24031489

  7. A cysG mutant strain of Rhizobium etli pleiotropically defective in sulfate and nitrate assimilation.

    PubMed Central

    Tate, R; Riccio, A; Iaccarino, M; Patriarca, E J

    1997-01-01

    By its inability to grow on sulfate as the sole sulfur source, a mutant strain (CTNUX8) of Rhizobium etli carrying Tn5 was isolated and characterized. Sequence analysis showed that Tn5 is inserted into a cysG (siroheme synthetase)-homologous gene. By RNase protection assays, it was established that the cysG-like gene had a basal level of expression in thiosulfate- or cysteine-grown cells, which was induced when sulfate or methionine was used. Unlike its wild-type parent (strain CE3), the mutant strain, CTNUX8, was also unable to grow on nitrate as the sole nitrogen source and was unable to induce a high level of nitrite reductase. Despite its pleiotropic phenotype, strain CTNUX8 was able to induce pink, effective (N2-fixing) nodules on the roots of Phaseolus vulgaris plants. However, mixed inoculation experiments showed that strain CTNUX8 is significantly different from the wild type in its ability to nodulate. Our data support the notion that sulfate (or sulfite) is the sulfur source of R. etli in the rhizosphere, while cysteine, methionine, or glutathione is supplied by the root cells to bacteria growing inside the plant. PMID:9393698

  8. Coenzyme Q10 production in a 150-l reactor by a mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kien, Nguyen Ba; Kong, In-Soo; Lee, Min-Gyu; Kim, Joong Kyun

    2010-05-01

    For the commercial production of CoQ(10), batch-type fermentations were attempted in a 150-l fermenter using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides. Optimum temperature and initial aeration rate were found to be 30 degrees C and 2 vvm, respectively. Under optimum fermentation conditions, the maximum value of specific CoQ(10) content was achieved reproducibly as 6.34 mg/g DCW after 24 h, with 3.02 g/l of DCW. During the fermentation, aeration shift (from the adequate aeration at the early growth phase to the limited aeration in active cellular metabolism) was a key factor in CoQ(10) production for scale-up. A higher value of the specific CoQ(10) content (8.12 mg/g DCW) was achieved in fed-batch fermentation and comparable to those produced by the pilot-scale fed-batch fermentations of A. tumefaciens, which indicated that the mutant strain of R. sphaeroides used in this study was a potential high CoQ(10) producer. This is the first detailed study to demonstrate a pilot-scale production of CoQ(10) using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides.

  9. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  10. Structure-Function Analysis of Peptide Signaling in the Clostridium perfringens Agr-Like Quorum Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Menglin; Li, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accessory growth regulator (Agr)-like quorum sensing (QS) system of Clostridium perfringens controls the production of many toxins, including beta toxin (CPB). We previously showed (J. E. Vidal, M. Ma, J. Saputo, J. Garcia, F. A. Uzal, and B. A. McClane, Mol Microbiol 83:179–194, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07925.x) that an 8-amino-acid, AgrD-derived peptide named 8-R upregulates CPB production by this QS system. The current study synthesized a series of small signaling peptides corresponding to sequences within the C. perfringens AgrD polypeptide to investigate the C. perfringens autoinducing peptide (AIP) structure-function relationship. When both linear and cyclic ring forms of these peptides were added to agrB null mutants of type B strain CN1795 or type C strain CN3685, the 5-amino-acid peptides, whether in a linear or ring (thiolactone or lactone) form, induced better signaling (more CPB production) than peptide 8-R for both C. perfringens strains. The 5-mer thiolactone ring peptide induced faster signaling than the 5-mer linear peptide. Strain-related variations in sensing these peptides were detected, with CN3685 sensing the synthetic peptides more strongly than CN1795. Consistent with those synthetic peptide results, Transwell coculture experiments showed that CN3685 exquisitely senses native AIP signals from other isolates (types A, B, C, and D), while CN1795 barely senses even its own AIP. Finally, a C. perfringens AgrD sequence-based peptide with a 6-amino-acid thiolactone ring interfered with CPB production by several C. perfringens strains, suggesting potential therapeutic applications. These results indicate that AIP signaling sensitivity and responsiveness vary among C. perfringens strains and suggest C. perfringens prefers a 5-mer AIP to initiate Agr signaling. IMPORTANCE Clostridium perfringens possesses an Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system that regulates virulence, sporulation, and toxin production. The

  11. Interaction of mutant lpr gene with background strain influences renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kelley, V E; Roths, J B

    1985-11-01

    The mutant gene lpr on the MRL/Mp strain of mice is responsible for converting a late onset glomerulonephritis into an early, aggressive, and fatal renal disease. This gene induces the proliferation of a unique subset of lymphocytes, the production of a variety of autoantibodies and shortened survival in MRL/Mp as well as in the genetically distinct strains C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, and AKR/J. The present study examined in detail the role of the lpr gene in the formation of lupus nephritis. The results show that C3H-lpr and B6-lpr mice do not develop nephritis while the AKR-lpr strain has a mild form of renal disease. None of these newly constructed congenic mutant strains have the severity of proteinuria or the degree of renal pathology characteristic of MRL-lpr mice. Thus, the lpr gene alone is insufficient in producing severe renal injury. The interaction of the lpr gene with other factors is required for the induction of life-threatening lupus nephritis.

  12. Flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas: Studies of radial spoke-defective strains by dikaryon and revertant analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luck, David; Piperno, Gianni; Ramanis, Zenta; Huang, B.

    1977-01-01

    The motility mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pf14 lacks radial spoke structures in its flagellar axonemes, and 12 proteins present in wild type are missing from a two-dimensional map (isoelectrofocusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis) of its 35S-labeled flagellar proteins. Six of these same proteins are missing in pf1, which lacks spoke-heads. To determine whether any of the missing proteins represent the mutant gene product two experimental approaches have been applied. The first makes use of the fact that gametes of either mutant strain when fused with wild-type gametes to form quadriflagellate dikaryons undergo recovery of flagellar function. Recovery at the molecular level was monitored by prelabeling the mutant proteins with 35S and allowing recovery to occur in the absence of protein synthesis. It is to be expected that the mutant gene product would not be restored as a radioactive protein and that recovery would depend on the assembly of the wild-type counterpart that is not labeled. The second technique makes use of revertants induced by UV irradiation. Dikaryon rescue in the case of pf14 leads to restoration of 11 radioactive components; only protein 3 fails to appear as a radioactive spot. For pf1 only two radioactive proteins are restored; proteins 4, 6, 9, and 10 were not radioactive. Analysis of revertants of pf1 gave evidence (altered map positions) that protein 4 is the mutant gene product. In the case of pf14, analysis of 22 revertants has not provided similar positive evidence that protein 3 is the gene product. Images PMID:269405

  13. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection.

  14. Colonization of gnotobiotic piglets by a luxS mutant strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Dianna M; Sperandio, Vanessa; Kaper, James B; Dean-Nystrom, Evelyn A; Moon, Harley W

    2005-02-01

    Gnotobiotic piglets inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, its luxS mutant derivative, or nonpathogenic E. coli were evaluated for attaching and effacing lesions. Although no differences in clinical symptoms were seen between pigs inoculated with the parent and those inoculated with the luxS mutant, the luxS mutant-inoculated pigs had a lower frequency of attaching and effacing lesions in the spiral colon than parent strain-inoculated pigs.

  15. A Mutant Strain of a Surfactant-Producing Bacterium with Increased Emulsification Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingmei; Yao, Jianming; Pan, Renrui; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-06-01

    As reported in this paper, a strain of oil-degrading bacterium Sp-5-3 was determined to belong to Enterobacteriaceae, which would be useful for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The aim of our study was to generate a mutant using low energy N+ beam implantation. With 10 keV of energy and 5.2 × 1014 N+/cm2 of dose - the optimum condition, a mutant, S-34, was obtained, which had nearly a 5-fold higher surface and a 13-fold higher of emulsification activity than the wild type. The surface activity was measured by two methods, namely, a surface tension measuring instrument and a recording of the repulsive circle of the oil film; the emulsification activity was scaled through measuring the separating time of the oil-fermentation mixture. The metabolic acid was determined as methane by means of gas chromatography.

  16. Screening of mutant strain Streptomyces mediolani sp. AC37 for (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Jakeline Trejos; Sturdíková, Maria; Brezová, Vlasta; Svajdlenka, Emil; Novotová, Marta

    2012-12-01

    Streptomyces mediolani sp. AC37 was isolated from the root system of higher plant Taxus baccata and produced metabolite identified as (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin according to LC/MS/MS analysis. In our screening program for improvements of bioactive secondary metabolites from plant associate streptomycetes, mutation was used as a tool for the induction of genetic variations for selection of higher (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin producers of isolates. S. mediolani sp. AC37 was treated with UV irradiation and chemical mutagenic treatment (N-nitroso-N-methyl-urea). The radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin and extracts isolated from mutants were tested using EPR spin trapping technique and ABTS(·+) assay. Comparison of electron microscopic images of Streptomyces sp. AC37 and mutant strains of Streptomyces sp. AC37 revealed substantial differences in morphology and ultrastructure.

  17. Enhanced production of thrombinase by Streptomyces venezuelae: kinetic studies on growth and enzyme production of mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Naveena, Balakrishnan; Gopinath, Kannapan Panchamoorthy; Sakthiselvan, Punniavan; Partha, Nagarajan

    2012-05-01

    This investigation provides the enhanced production of thrombinase, a fibrinolytic enzyme using mutant Streptomyces venezuelae. Initially the mutagenesis of the marine isolate was done by UV and Ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and their mutational efficiencies were compared. The mutants were selected based on their high thrombinase activity and used for further studies. The mutant was found to be more halo and thermo tolerant comparing to wild. The effect of Dissolved oxygen level was also determined and the mutant offered the maximum specific growth rate as 0.2404 (h(-1)). The mutant showed high resistance to higher initial lactose concentration and the inhibition concentration was found to be 155.1mg/mL. The effect of S(0)/X(0) ratio on specific substrate consumption and production rate were also investigated. Both mutant and wild showed increase in specific substrate consumption and production rate at higher S(0)/X(0) ratio but the mutant showed better values than the wild strain.

  18. Differential abilities of capsulated and noncapsulated Staphylococcus aureus isolates from diverse agr groups to invade mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Buzzola, Fernanda R; Alvarez, Lucía P; Tuchscherr, Lorena P N; Barbagelata, María S; Lattar, Santiago M; Calvinho, Luis; Sordelli, Daniel O

    2007-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the bacterium most frequently isolated from milk of bovines with mastitis. Four allelic groups, which interfere with the regulatory activities among the different groups, have been identified in the accessory gene regulator (agr) system. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of the different agr groups in capsulated and noncapsulated S. aureus bacteria isolated from mastitic bovines in Argentina and whether a given agr group was associated with MAC-T cell invasion and in vivo persistence. Eighty-eight percent of the bovine S. aureus strains were classified in agr group I. The remainder belonged in agr groups II, III, and IV (2, 8, and 2%, respectively). By restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis after PCR amplification of the agr locus variable region, six agr restriction types were identified. All agr group I strains presented a unique allele (A/1), whereas strains from groups II, III, and IV exhibited more diversity. Bovine S. aureus strains defined as being in agr group I (capsulated or noncapsulated) showed significantly increased abilities to be internalized within MAC-T cells, compared with isolates from agr groups II, III, and IV. agr group II or IV S. aureus strains were cleared more efficiently than agr group I strains from the murine mammary gland. The results suggest that agr group I S. aureus strains are more efficiently internalized within epithelial cells and can persist in higher numbers in mammary gland tissue than S. aureus strains classified in agr group II, III, or IV.

  19. Production and downstream processing of (1→3)-β-D-glucan from mutant strain of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We isolated a mutant that produced higher levels of curdlan than the wild strain Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750 by chemical mutagenesis using N-methyl-N-nitro-nitrosoguanidine. The mutant strain produced 66 g/L of curdlan in 120 h with a yield of (0.88) while, the wild strain produced 41 g/L in 120 h with a yield of (0.62) in a stirred bioreactor. The mutant could not produce curdlan when the pH was shifted from 7.0 to 5.5 after nitrogen depletion as followed for wild strain. In contrast, pH optimum for cell growth and curdlan production for mutant was found to be 7.0. We optimized the downstream processing of curdlan by varying different volumes of NaOH and HCl for extraction and precipitation of curdlan. The molecular weight of the purified curdlan from the wild and mutant strain was 6.6 × 105 Da and 5.8 × 105 Da respectively. The monosaccharide analyses confirm that curdlan from both wild and mutant strain contains only glucose units. From the NMR and FTIR data, it has been confirmed that curdlan was exclusively composed of β (1 → 3)-D-glucan residues. PMID:22681895

  20. Characterisation of a cold adapted esterase and mutants from a psychotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gasmalla, Mohammed A A; Zhao, Wei; Sun, Jingtao; Liu, Wenyu; Wang, Mingming; Han, Liang; Yang, Ruijin

    2016-07-13

    A cold-adapted esterase-producing strain named T1-39 was isolated from Glacier No.1, Tianshan, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp. from 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The esterase (EstT1-39) secreted by this strain preferentially hydrolyzed esters of glycerol with short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Mutants of T1-39 were generated by the atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) method and screened for enhanced esterase activity. Among all the mutants, strain TB11 had 4.45-fold higher esterase productivity than T1-39, with high genetic stability over 10 generations of continuous cultivation. Maximum activity of EstT1-39 and EstTB11 was observed at 30°C, pH 9.0 and 25°C, pH 8.5, respectively. EstTB11 was thermally more stable (50°C for 1 hour) and active over a broader pH range than EstT1-39. EstTB11 also retained 38% of its maximal activity at 0°C and was found to be able to hydrolyze milk fats into short- and medium-chain fatty acids at 4°C. The characteristics of EstT1-39 made it a cold-adapted enzyme and the EstTB11 from the mutant, with its higher activity at lower temperatures, may be suitable for the production of aromas and flavors in the dairy industry. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Induction of various autoantibodies by mutant gene lpr in several strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Izui, S; Kelley, V E; Masuda, K; Yoshida, H; Roths, J B; Murphy, E D

    1984-07-01

    The effect of the autosomal mutant gene lpr (lymphoproliferation) on the development of various autoantibodies and immune complex (IC) glomerulonephritis was investigated in four genetically distinct strains of mice: MRL/ MpJ , C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, and AKR/J. The presence of the lpr gene not only enhanced the production of autoantibodies in the autoimmune MRL/ MpJ strain, but also induced the formation of various kinds of autoantibodies in the three other strains of mice without any apparent predisposition to autoimmune disease. Autoantibodies induced by the lpr gene included anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-single-stranded DNA, anti-IgG, anti-thymocyte, and anti-serum glycoprotein gp70. This indicates that the action of the lpr gene on the development of autoantibody response does not require the particular abnormalities of the MRL genome. The differences in amounts and types of autoantibodies among the lpr strains reflect the difference in the background genome of each strain, suggesting the participation of other genes or factors determining the quantity and/or specificity of autoantibodies. In addition to the development of autoantibodies, the three nonautoimmune strains of mice produced high levels of unidentified IC in the presence of the lpr gene, detectable by the C1q and the conglutinin binding tests. Their glomerular lesions, however, were relatively limited when compared with MRL/ MpJ -lpr/lpr mice, which developed severe glomerulonephritis early in their life. These results suggest that the lpr gene is able to induce the formation of various autoantibodies and IC at significant concentrations in nonautoimmune mice, but for the full manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus there may be a requirement for supplemental genetic abnormalities or factors.

  2. Influence of Sae-regulated and Agr-regulated factors on the escape of Staphylococcus aureus from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Münzenmayer, Lisa; Geiger, Tobias; Daiber, Ellen; Schulte, Berit; Autenrieth, Stella E; Fraunholz, Martin; Wolz, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is not a classical intracellular pathogen, it can survive within phagocytes and many other cell types. However, the pathogen is also able to escape from cells by mechanisms that are only partially understood. We analysed a series of isogenic S. aureus mutants of the USA300 derivative JE2 for their capacity to destroy human macrophages from within. Intracellular S. aureus JE2 caused severe cell damage in human macrophages and could efficiently escape from within the cells. To obtain this full escape phenotype including an intermittent residency in the cytoplasm, the combined action of the regulatory systems Sae and Agr is required. Mutants in Sae or mutants deficient in the Sae target genes lukAB and pvl remained in high numbers within the macrophages causing reduced cell damage. Mutants in the regulatory system Agr or in the Agr target gene psmα were largely similar to wild-type bacteria concerning cell damage and escape efficiency. However, these strains were rarely detectable in the cytoplasm, emphasizing the role of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) for phagosomal escape. Thus, Sae-regulated toxins largely determine damage and escape from within macrophages, whereas PSMs are mainly responsible for the escape from the phagosome into the cytoplasm. Damage of macrophages induced by intracellular bacteria was linked neither to activation of apoptosis-related caspase 3, 7 or 8 nor to NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation.

  3. A phenotype survey of 36 mutant mouse strains with gene-targeted defects in glycosyltransferases or glycan-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sally L; Le, Dzung; Long, Jeffrey M; Sobieszczuk, Peter; Ma, Bo; Tian, Hua; Fang, Xiaoqun; Paulson, James C; Marth, Jamey D; Varki, Nissi

    2013-01-01

    The consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) was a large research initiative providing networking and resources for investigators studying the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins in health and disease. Starting in 2001, six scientific cores were established to generate data, materials and new technologies. By the end of funding in 2011, the mouse phenotype core (MPC) submitted data to a website from the phenotype screen of 36 mutant mouse strains deficient in a gene for either a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or glycosyltransferase (GT). Each mutant strain was allotted three months for analysis and screened by standard phenotype assays used in the fields of immunology, histology, hematology, coagulation, serum chemistry, metabolism and behavior. Twenty of the deficient mouse strains had been studied in other laboratories, and additional tests were performed on these strains to confirm previous observations and discover new data. The CFG constructed 16 new homozygous mutant mouse strains and completed the initial phenotype screen of the majority of these new mutant strains. In total, >300 phenotype changes were observed, but considering the over 100 assays performed on each strain, most of the phenotypes were unchanged. Phenotype differences include abnormal testis morphology in GlcNAcT9- and Siglec-H-deficient mice and lethality in Pomgnt1-deficient mice. The numerous altered phenotypes discovered, along with the consideration of the significant findings of normality, will provide a platform for future characterization to understand the important roles of glycans and GBPs in the mechanisms of health and disease. PMID:23118208

  4. A Quantitative Survey of Gravity Receptor Function in Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Yu, Heping; Erway, Lawrence C.; Alagramam, Kumar N.; Pollak, Natasha; Jones, Timothy A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify vestibular deficits in mice using linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEP thresholds, peak latencies, and peak amplitudes from 24 strains with known genetic mutations and 6 inbred background strains have been analyzed and descriptive statistics generated for each strain. Response parameters from mutant homozygotes were compared with heterozygote and/or background controls, and all strain averages were contrasted to normative ranges. Previous work established average values for normal screening VsEP parameters at +6 dB re: 1.0 g/ms: P1 = 1.3 ms, P2 = 2.2 ms, P3 = 2.8 ms; P1/N1 = 2 μV; P2/N2 = 1.6 μV. Normal thresholds averaged −8 dB re: 1.0 g/ms. Homozygotes of the following recessive mutations had absent VsEPs at the ages tested: Espnje, Atp2b2dfw-2J, Spnb4qv-lnd2J, Spnb4qv-3J, Myo7ash1, Tmiesr, Myo6sv, jc, Pcdh15av-J, Pcdh15av-2J, Pcdh15av-3J, Cdh23v-2J, Sansjs, hr, Kcne1pkr, and Pou3f4del. These results suggest profound gravity receptor deficits for these homozygotes, which is consistent with the structural deficits that have been documented for many of these strains. Homozygotes of Catna2cdf, Grid2ho4J, Wnt1sw, qk, and Mbpshi strains and heterozygotes of Grid2lc had measurable VsEPs, but one or more response parameters differed from the respective control group (heterozygote or background strain) or were outside normal ranges. For example, qk and Mbpshi homozygotes showed significantly prolonged latencies consistent with the abnormal myelin that has been described for these strains. Prolonged latencies may suggest deficits in neural conduction; elevated thresholds suggest reduced sensitivity, and reduced amplitudes may be suggestive for reduced neural synchrony. One mutation, Otx1jv, had all VsEP response parameters within normal limits, an expected finding because the abnormality in Otx1jv is presumably restricted to the lateral semicircular canal. Interestingly, some heterozygote groups also

  5. Gas exchange in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 and Its hydrogenase-deficient mutant strain NHM5.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Pia; Lindblad, Peter; Cournac, Laurent

    2004-04-01

    Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 is a nitrogen-fixing, heterocystous cyanobacterium of symbiotic origin. During nitrogen fixation, it produces molecular hydrogen (H(2)), which is recaptured by an uptake hydrogenase. Gas exchange in cultures of N. punctiforme ATCC 29133 and its hydrogenase-free mutant strain NHM5 was studied. Exchange of O(2), CO(2), N(2), and H(2) was followed simultaneously with a mass spectrometer in cultures grown under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Isotopic tracing was used to separate evolution and uptake of CO(2) and O(2). The amount of H(2) produced per molecule of N(2) fixed was found to vary with light conditions, high light giving a greater increase in H(2) production than N(2) fixation. The ratio under low light and high light was approximately 1.4 and 6.1 molecules of H(2) produced per molecule of N(2) fixed, respectively. Incubation under high light for a longer time, until the culture was depleted of CO(2), caused a decrease in the nitrogen fixation rate. At the same time, hydrogen production in the hydrogenase-deficient strain was increased from an initial rate of approximately 6 micro mol (mg of chlorophyll a)(-1) h(-1) to 9 micro mol (mg of chlorophyll a)(-1) h(-1) after about 50 min. A light-stimulated hydrogen-deuterium exchange activity stemming from the nitrogenase was observed in the two strains. The present findings are important for understanding this nitrogenase-based system, aiming at photobiological hydrogen production, as we have identified the conditions under which the energy flow through the nitrogenase can be directed towards hydrogen production rather than nitrogen fixation.

  6. Recovery of Nonpathogenic Mutant Bacteria from Tumors Caused by Several Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strains: a Frequent Event?▿

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Pablo; Murillo, Jesús; Lastra, Beatriz; López, María M.

    2009-01-01

    We have evaluated the interaction that bacterial genotypes and plant hosts have with the loss of pathogenicity in tumors, using seven Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains inoculated on 12 herbaceous and woody hosts. We performed a screening of the agrobacteria present inside the tumors, looking for nonpathogenic strains, and found a high variability of those strains in this niche. To verify the origin of the putative nonpathogenic mutant bacteria, we applied an efficient, reproducible, and specific randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis method. In contrast with previous studies, we recovered a very small percentage (0.01%) of nonpathogenic strains that can be considered true mutants. Of 5,419 agrobacterial isolates examined, 662 were nonpathogenic in tomato, although only 7 (from pepper and tomato tumors induced by two A. tumefaciens strains) could be considered to derive from the inoculated strain. Six mutants were affected in the transferred DNA (T-DNA) region; one of them contained IS426 inserted into the iaaM gene, whereas the whole T-DNA region was apparently deleted in three other mutants, and the virulence of the remaining two mutants was fully restored with the T-DNA genes as well. The plasmid profile was altered in six of the mutants, with changes in the size of the Ti plasmid or other plasmids and/or the acquisition of new plasmids. Our results also suggest that the frequent occurrence of nonpathogenic clones in the tumors is probably due to the preferential growth of nonpathogenic agrobacteria, of either endophytic or environmental origin, but different from the bacterial strain inducing the tumor. PMID:19700547

  7. Localization of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Egorova, O V; Nikolayeva, V M; Suzina, N E; Donova, M V

    2005-04-01

    The localization of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-OH SDH) was studied using cell fractionation and cytochemical investigation. Mycobacterium sp. Et1 mutant strain derived from Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D and characterized by increased 17beta-OH SDH activity was used as a model organism. Subcellular distribution study showed both soluble and membrane-bound forms of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The cytochemical method based on a copper ferrocyanide procedure followed by electron microscopic visualization was applied in order to investigate the intracellular localization of bacterial 17beta-OH SDH in more detail. The enzyme was found to be located in the peripheral cytoplasmic zone adjoining the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). 17beta-OH SDH was loosely membrane bound and easily released into the environment under the cell integrity failure.

  8. Purification and characterisation of α-amylase produced by mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae EMS-18.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Roheena; Ikram-ul-Haq

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase produced by a mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae EMS-18 has been purified to homogeneity as judged by sodium dodecyle sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was purified by using 70% ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex column and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. An enzyme purification factor of 9.5-fold was achieved with a final specific activity of 1987.7 U/mg protein and overall yield of 23.8%. The molecular weight of purified α-amylase was estimated to be 48 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The purified enzyme revealed an optimum assay temperature and pH 40°C and 5.0, respectively. Except Ca(++) all other metal ions such as Mg, Mn, Na, Zn, Ni, Fe, Cu, Co and Ba were found to be inhibitory to enzyme activity.

  9. Characterization of xanthan gum produced from glycerol by a mutant strain Xanthomonas campestris CCTCC M2015714.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zichao; Wu, Jianrong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiaobei

    2017-02-10

    Xanthan gum was produced by a mutant strain X. campestris CCTCC M2015714 with glycerol as the sole carbon source. The monosaccharide composition and molar ratio of xanthan gum produced from glycerol are glucose: mannose: glucuronic acid=2.0:1.65:1.0. Meanwhile, chemical structure of xanthan gum produced from glycerol is similar to that of the commercial xanthan through FT-IR and NMR. Remarkably, the molecular weight of xanthan gum produced using our method (3.0±0.14×10(6)Da) is about half that of the commercial one (5.8±0.25×10(6)Da), and the consistency index (K) of which is less than 1/10 that of the commercial xanthan. This work paves the way for xanthan production from glycerol and is useful for studying the structure/application of xanthan gum.

  10. Isolating tryptophan regulatory mutants in Escherichia coli by using a trp-lac fusion strain.

    PubMed

    Reznikoff, W S; Thornton, K P

    1972-02-01

    A trp-lac fusion strain of Escherichia coli in which the lac structural genes are part of the tryptophan operon has been used to isolate trp regulatory mutants. This was accomplished by isolating lac(+) colonies on either lactose-minimal agar or lactose-MacConkey indicator agar. Seventy-seven of 78 lac(+) isolates contained mutations which mapped near the ara locus and most of these isolates were found to be 5-methyltryptophan-resistant after introduction of an F-trp episome. The lac(+) phenotypes of these 77 isolates were therefore probably the result of trpR(-) mutations. The one remaining isolate carried a mutation which was not part of the trp regulatory system.

  11. Sensitivity of dark mutants of various strains of luminescent bacteria to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lyzeń, Robert; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies indicated that bioluminescence of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi may both stimulate DNA repair and contribute to detoxification of deleterious oxygen derivatives. Therefore, it was also proposed that these reactions can be considered biological roles of bacterial luminescence and might act as evolutionary drives in development of luminous systems. However, experimental evidence for the physiological role of luciferase in protection of cells against oxidative stress has been demonstrated only in one bacterial species, raising the question whether this is a specific or a more general phenomenon. Here we demonstrate that in the presence of various oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, cumene hydroperoxide, t-butyl hydroperoxide and ferrous ions) growth of dark mutants of different strains of Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi is impaired relative to wild-type bacteria, though to various extents. Deleterious effects of oxidants on the mutants could be reduced (with different efficiency) by addition of antioxidants, A-TEMPO or 4OH-TEMPO. These results support the hypotheses that (1) activities of bacterial luciferases may detoxify deleterious oxygen derivatives, and (2) significantly different efficiencies of this reaction are characteristic for various luciferases.

  12. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking catabolic NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. Growth characteristics of the mutant and regulation of enzyme synthesis in the wild-type strain.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, W J; van Eijk, J; van Renesse, R; Blijham, J M

    1978-01-01

    NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-B) was induced in a wild-type strain derived of alpha-sigma 1278b by alpha-amino acids, the nitrogen of which according to known degradative pathways is transferred to 2-oxoglutarate. A recessive mutant (gdhB) devoid of GDH-B activity grew more slowly than the wild type if one of these amino acids was the sole source of nitrogen. Addition of ammonium chloride, glutamine, asparagine or serine to growth media with inducing alpha-amino acids as the main nitrogen source increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant to the wild-type level and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the wild type. Arginine, urea and allantoin similarly increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the presence of glutamate, but not in the presence of aspartate, alanine or proline as the main nitrogen source. These observations are consistent with the view that GDH-B in vivo deaminates glutamate. Ammonium ions are required for the biosynthesis of glutamine, asparagine, arginine, histidine and purine and pyrimidine bases. Aspartate and alanine apparently are more potent inducers of GDH-B than glutamate. Anabolic NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-A) can not fulfil the function of GDH-B in the gdhB mutant. This is concluded from the equal growth rates in glutamate, aspartate and proline media as observed with a gdhB mutant and with a gdhA, gdhB double mutant in which both glutamate dehydrogenases area lacking. The double mutant showed an anomalous growth behaviour, growth rates on several nitrogen sources being unexpectedly low.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Anti-Cancerous Scopularide Production by a Marine Microascus brevicaulis Strain and Its UV Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Annemarie; Beck, Hans Christian; Kumar, Abhishek; Kristensen, Lars Peter; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Labes, Antje

    2015-01-01

    The marine fungus Microascus brevicaulis strain LF580 is a non-model secondary metabolite producer with high yields of the two secondary metabolites scopularides A and B, which exhibit distinct activities against tumour cell lines. A mutant strain was obtained using UV mutagenesis, showing faster growth and differences in pellet formation besides higher production levels. Here, we show the first proteome study of a marine fungus. Comparative proteomics were applied to gain deeper understanding of the regulation of production and of the physiology of the wild type strain and its mutant. For this purpose, an optimised protein extraction protocol was established. In total, 4759 proteins were identified. The central metabolic pathway of strain LF580 was mapped using the KEGG pathway analysis and GO annotation. Employing iTRAQ labelling, 318 proteins were shown to be significantly regulated in the mutant strain: 189 were down- and 129 upregulated. Proteomics are a powerful tool for the understanding of regulatory aspects: The differences on proteome level could be attributed to limited nutrient availability in the wild type strain due to a strong pellet formation. This information can be applied for optimisation on strain and process level. The linkage between nutrient limitation and pellet formation in the non-model fungus M. brevicaulis is in consensus with the knowledge on model organisms like Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. PMID:26460745

  14. Induced drought tolerance through wild and mutant bacterial strain Pseudomonas simiae in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sarita; Vaishnav, Anukool; Jain, Shekhar; Varma, Ajit; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on the overproducing mutant of a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae strain AU (MTCC-12057) for significant drought tolerance in mung bean plants. Five mutants namely AU-M1, AU-M2, AU-M3, AU-M4 and AU-M5 were made after treatment of wild type strain with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Mutant strain AU-M4 was recorded for enhanced ACC deaminase (ACC-D) activity, indole acetic acid (IAA) production and inorganic phosphate (Pi) solubilization compared to wild strain and other four mutant strains under drought condition. AU-M4 showed higher phosphate solubilization index (8.17) together with higher ACC-D activity (98 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (69.35 µg/ml) compared with the wild type P. simiae strain AU ACC-D activity (79 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (38.98 µg/ml) respectively. In this report, we investigated the effect of both wild and mutant type bacterial strain on mung bean plants under drought stress. Results showed that mutant AU-M4 and wild type strain AU inoculated plants exhibited superior tolerance against drought stress, as shown by their enhanced plant biomass (fresh weight), higher water content, higher proline accumulation and lower osmotic stress injury. Mutant AU-M4 and wild strain AU inoculated plants reduced the ethylene level by 59 and 45% respectively, compared to the control under stress condition. Furthermore, bacterial inoculated plants showed enhanced induced systemic drought tolerance by reducing stomata size and net photosynthesis resulting higher water content in mung bean plants that may help in survival of plants during drought condition. To mitigate the effects of drought stress, use of PGPR will be needed to ensure sufficient production of food from crop plants. Taking current leads available, concerted future research is needed in this area, particularly on field evaluation with application of potential microorganisms.

  15. Efficient method for generation of bacteriophage insensitive mutants of Streptococcus thermophilus yoghurt and mozzarella strains.

    PubMed

    Mills, S; Coffey, A; McAuliffe, O E; Meijer, W C; Hafkamp, B; Ross, R P

    2007-07-01

    Bacteriophage infection of Streptococcus thermophilus is becoming increasingly problematic in many industry fermentations such as yoghurt and mozzarella manufacture. This study describes the development of an efficient and rapid 3-step approach for the generation of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIMs) of these starter strains. The method initially involves infection of a culture in solid media at a multiplicity of infection (M.O.I.) of 10 which is then incubated in milk overnight. BIMs are then isolated following successive rounds (20-25) of growth in 10% reconstituted skimmed milk (RSM) in the presence of high phage titres. The method selects for BIMs which can grow efficiently in milk. Using this approach BIMs of two industrial strains were generated, whose starter performance was comparable to the parent starters in terms of performance in milk. Genomic fingerprinting used to validate the identity of each BIM, revealed a number of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in two of the resultant BIMs. This method provides a simple and reliable method for generation of BIMs of industrial starters which does not require any specialised equipment and should be widely applicable.

  16. Enhancing cellulase production by overexpression of xylanase regulator protein gene, xlnR, in Talaromyces cellulolyticus cellulase hyperproducing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Naoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    We obtained strains with the xylanase regulator gene, xlnR, overexpressed (HXlnR) and disrupted (DXlnR) derived from Talaromyces cellulolyticus strain C-1, which is a cellulase hyperproducing mutant. Filter paper degrading enzyme activity and cellobiohydrolase I gene expression was the highest in HXlnR, followed by C-1 and DXlnR. These results indicate that the enhancement of cellulase productivity was succeeded by xlnR overexpression.

  17. Functional analysis of an feoB mutant in Clostridium perfringens strain 13.

    PubMed

    Awad, Milena M; Cheung, Jackie K; Tan, Joanne E; McEwan, Alastair G; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial pathogens have adopted numerous mechanisms for acquiring iron from host proteins during an infection, including the direct acquisition of ferric iron from heme-associated proteins or from iron-scavenging siderophores. Ferric iron then is transported into the cytosol, where it can be utilized by the bacterial pathogen. Under anaerobic conditions bacteria can also transport ferrous iron using the transmembrane complex FeoAB, but little is known about iron transport systems in anaerobic bacteria such as the pathogenic clostridia. In this study we sought to characterize the iron acquisition process in Clostridium perfringens. Bioinformatic analysis of the Clostridium perfringens strain 13 genome sequence revealed that it has seven potential iron acquisition systems: three siderophore-mediated systems, one ferric citrate uptake system, two heme-associated acquisition systems and one ferrous iron uptake system (FeoAB). The relative level of expression of these systems was determined using quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays that were specific for one gene from each system. Each of these genes was expressed, with the feoAB genes generating the most abundant iron-uptake related transcripts. To further examine the role of this system in the growth of C. perfringens, insertional inactivation was used to isolate a chromosomal feoB mutant. Growth of this mutant in the presence and absence of iron revealed that it had altered growth properties and a markedly reduced total iron and manganese content compared to the wild type; effects that were reversed upon complementation with the wild-type feoB gene. These studies suggest that under anaerobic conditions FeoB is the major protein required for the uptake of iron into the cell and that it may play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infections.

  18. Lactococcus lactis SpOx Spontaneous Mutants: a Family of Oxidative-Stress-Resistant Dairy Strains§

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Tatiana; Gratadoux, Jean-Jacques; Corthier, Gérard; Coqueran, Bérard; Nader-Macias, Maria-Elena; Gruss, Alexandra; Langella, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Numerous industrial bacteria generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which may inhibit the growth of other bacteria in mixed ecosystems. We isolated spontaneous oxidative-stress-resistant (SpOx) Lactococcus lactis mutants by using a natural selection method with milk-adapted strains on dairy culture medium containing H2O2. Three SpOx mutants displayed greater H2O2 resistance. One of them, SpOx3, demonstrated better behavior in different oxidative-stress situations: (i) higher long-term survival upon aeration in LM17 and milk and (ii) the ability to grow with H2O2-producing Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii strains. Furthermore, the transit kinetics of the SpOx3 mutant in the digestive tract of a human flora-associated mouse model was not affected. PMID:15870374

  19. Simplifying multidimensional fermentation dataset analysis and visualization: One step closer to capturing high-quality mutant strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Xu, Dan; Jiang, Ting-Ting

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed mutants of Clostridium acetobutylicum, an organism used in a broad range of industrial processes related to biofuel production, to facilitate future studies of bioreactor and bioprocess design and scale-up, which are very important research projects for industrial microbiology applications. To accomplish this, we generated 329 mutant strains and applied principal component analysis (PCA) to fermentation data gathered from these strains to identify a core set of independent features for comparison. By doing so, we were able to explain the differences in the mutant strains’ fermentation expression states and simplify the analysis and visualization of the multidimensional datasets related to the strains. Our study has produced a high-efficiency PCA application based on a data analytics tool that is designed to visualize screening results and to support several hundred sets of data on fermentation interactions to assist researchers in more precisely screening and capturing high-quality mutant strains. More importantly, although this study focused on the use of PCA in microbial fermentation engineering, its results are broadly applicable. PMID:28045110

  20. Control of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in birds by using live vaccine candidate containing attenuated Salmonella Gallinarum mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; da Silva, Mariana Dias; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Berchieri, Angelo

    2010-04-01

    The ideal live vaccine to control Salmonella in commercial chicken flocks should engender protection against various strains. The purpose of the present study was to confirm the attenuation of a Salmonella Gallinarum (SG) mutant strain with deletion on genes cobS and cbiA, that are involved in the biosynthesis of cobalamin. Furthermore, evaluate its use as a live vaccine against Salmonella. For the evaluation of the vaccine efficacy, two experiments were conducted separately. Birds from a commercial brown line of chickens were used to perform challenge with SG wild type strain and birds from a commercial white line of chickens were used to perform challenge with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) wild type strain. In both experiments, the birds were separated in three groups (A, B and C). Birds were orally vaccinated with the SG mutant as the following programme: group A, one dose at 5 days of age; group B, one dose at 5 days of age and a second dose at 25 days of age; and group C, birds were kept unvaccinated as controls. At 45 days of age, birds from all groups, including the control, were challenged orally by SG wild type (brown line) or SE wild type (white line). Lastly, another experiment was performed to evaluate the use of the SG mutant strain to prevent caecal colonization by SE wild type on 1-day-old broiler chicks. Mortality and systemic infection by SG wild type strain were assessed in brown chickens; faecal shedding and systemic infection by SE wild type were assessed in white chickens and caecal colonization was assessed in broiler chicks. Either vaccination with one or two doses of SG mutant, were capable to protect brown chickens against SG wild type. In the experiment with white chickens, only vaccination with two doses of SG mutant protected the birds against challenge with SE wild type. Although, SG mutant could not prevent caecal colonization in 1-day-old broiler chicks by the challenge strain SE wild type. Overall, the results indicated that SG mutant

  1. The effect of gamma irradiation on astaxanthin synthetase encoding gene in two mutant strains of Phaffia rhodozyma

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Naeimeh; Hosseini, Ramin; Ahmadi, Ali-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Astaxanthin, an orange-red carotenoid pigment, acts as a protective agent against oxidative damage to cells in vivo. The astaxanthin synthetase gene (crtS) size consists of 3995 bp. This gene has been suggested to catalyse β-carotene to astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma. The aim of this research was to find any possible changes in this gene in two mutant strains, Gam1 and Gam2 (with high astaxanthin pigment production), previously created by gamma irradiation. Materials and Methods The astaxanthin synthetase gene sequence of Phaffia rhodozyma in the NCBI Gene bank was used to design primer. In Gam1, this gene was amplified using primers Asta F1, Asta R2, Asta F3, Asta R4. In Gam2, primers asta F1, asta R4 were used to amplify the gene. The amplified fragments were 8 sequenced using primers Asta F1, Asta R1, Asta F2, Asta R2, Asta F3, Asta R3 and Asta F4, Asta R4. Astaxanthin synthetase gene from two mutant strains, Gam1 and Gam2 were amplified using PCR. The amplified products were sequenced and aligned using the ClustalW software. Conclusion The comparison of this gene showed 98% and 99% similarities between the reference sequence and Gam1 and Gam2 mutant strains, respectively, whereas the comparison of this gene in Gam1 and Gam2 mutant strains showed 97% similarity. However, the deduced proteins showed 78% and 83% between the reference protein obtained from the wild type and Gam1 and Gam2, respectively. This similarity was 75% between the mutant strains. PMID:24475339

  2. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater.

  3. Cellulase production and saccharification of rice straw by the mutant strain Hypocrea koningii RSC1.

    PubMed

    Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2014-01-01

    The production of cellulase using solid-state fermentation of rice straw by the mutant strain Hypocrea koningii RSC1 was studied. Optimization of culture conditions, such as the nitrogen source, pH, and temperature, resulted in a maximum filter paper cellulase activity of 44.15 U g(-1) substrate, a carboxymethylcellulase activity of 324.6 U g(-1) substrate, and a β-glucosidase activity of 7.45 U g(-1) substrate. Saccharification of untreated, 1% H(2)SO(4)-treated, and 2.5% NaOH-treated rice straw using the RSC1 cellulase resulted in 19, 17, and 34 g L(-1) of reducing sugar, respectively. Further studies on the morphological and compositional changes of rice straw upon treatment with the cellulase by scanning electron microscopy analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the disruption of the arrangement of fibers and changes in the functional groups that occur in cellulose. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a reduction in crystallinity of the rice straw upon treatment with the cellulase. Our study shows that H. koningii RSC1 could be a good choice for the production of cellulase and reducing sugars from rice straw.

  4. Residual virulence and immunogenicity of CGV26 and CGV2631 B. melitensis Rev. 1 deletion mutant strains in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Laurence A; Laroucau, Karine; Olivier, Michel; Grillo, Maria Jesus; Marin, Clara M; Verger, Jean-Michel; Blasco, Jose-Maria

    2006-04-24

    The CGV26 and CGV2631 strains are novel engineered Brucella melitensis Rev.1 mutant strains deleted for the bp26 gene or for both bp26 and omp31 genes, respectively, coding for proteins of diagnostic significance. The residual virulence and immunogenicity of both mutants were compared to the parental Rev.1 strain in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination. The deletion of the bp26 gene or both bp26 and omp31 genes had no significant effect on the intracellular survival of the Rev.1 strain in ovine macrophage cultures. The kinetics of infection induced by both mutants in sheep was similar to the Rev.1 strain, and inoculation by the subcutaneous route produced wider and more generalized infections than the conjunctival route. All strains were cleared from lymph nodes and organs within 3 months after inoculation. The CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants induced both specific systemic antibody response and lymphoproliferation in sheep. The kinetics of the responses induced by the mutants was quite similar to that of the parental Rev.1 strain, except for the intensity of the lymphoproliferative response, which was attenuated for the CGV2631 mutant. In conclusion, the residual virulence of both CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants in sheep was similar to that of the parental Rev.1 vaccine strain. These mutants induced also significant specific antibody and cell-mediated immunity in sheep and are suitable to be evaluated as potential vaccine candidates against B. melitensis and B. ovis infections in sheep.

  5. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  6. Dynamics of Photosynthesis in a Glycogen-Deficient glgC Mutant of Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Simon A.; Eaton-Rye, Julian J.; Bryant, Donald A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacterial glycogen-deficient mutants display impaired degradation of light-harvesting phycobilisomes under nitrogen-limiting growth conditions and secrete a suite of organic acids as a putative reductant-spilling mechanism. This genetic background, therefore, represents an important platform to better understand the complex relationships between light harvesting, photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and carbon/nitrogen metabolisms. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of photosynthesis as a function of reductant sink manipulation in a glycogen-deficient glgC mutant of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. The glgC mutant showed increased susceptibility to photoinhibition during the initial phase of nitrogen deprivation. However, after extended periods of nitrogen deprivation, glgC mutant cells maintained higher levels of photosynthetic activity than the wild type, supporting continuous organic acid secretion in the absence of biomass accumulation. In contrast to the wild type, the glgC mutant maintained efficient energy transfer from phycobilisomes to photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers, had an elevated PSII/PSI ratio as a result of reduced PSII degradation, and retained a nitrogen-replete-type ultrastructure, including an extensive thylakoid membrane network, after prolonged nitrogen deprivation. Together, these results suggest that multiple global signals for nitrogen deprivation are not activated in the glgC mutant, allowing the maintenance of active photosynthetic complexes under conditions where photosynthesis would normally be abolished. PMID:26150450

  7. Mutant strains of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis to increase the efficiency of micro-ecological life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Igor

    The European Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an advanced idea for organizing a bioregenerative system for long term space flights and extraterrestrial settlements (Hendrickx, De Wever et al., 2005). Despite the hostility of both lunar and Martian environments to unprotected life, it seems possible to cultivate photosynthetic bacteria using closed bioreactors illuminated and heated by solar energy. Such reactors might be employed in critical processes, e.g. air revitalization, foodcaloric and protein source, as well as an immunomodulators production. The MELiSSA team suggested cyanobacterium Spirulina as most appropriate agent to revitalize air and produce a simple "fast" food. This is right suggestion because Spirulina was recently shown to be an oxygenic organism with the highest level of O2 production per unit mass (Ananyev et al., 2005). Chemical composition of Spirulina includes proteins (55Aiming to make Spirulina cultivation in life support systems like MELiSSA more efficient, we selected Spirulina mutant strains with increased fraction of methionine in the biomass of this cyanobacterium and compared the effect of parental wild strain of Spirulina and its mutants on the tendency of such experimental illnesses as radiationinduced lesions and hemolythic anemia. Results: It was found that mutant strains 198B and 27G contain higher quantities of total protein, essential amino acids, c-phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and chlorophyll a than parental wild strain of S. platensis. The strain 198B is also characterized with increased content of carotenoids. Revealed biochemical peculiarities of mutant strains suggest that these strains can serve as an additional source of essential amino acids as well as phycobiliproteins and carotenoids for the astronauts. Feeding animals suffering from radiation-induced lesions, c-phycocyanin, extracted from strain 27G, led to a correction in deficient dehydrogenase activity and energy-rich phosphate levels

  8. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  9. Binding of purified and radioiodinated capsular polysaccharides from Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A strains to capsule-free mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Small, J.M.; Mitchell, T.G.

    1986-12-01

    Strains 6, 15, 98, 110, and 145 of Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A vary in capsule size, animal virulence, and susceptibility to in vitro phagocytosis. The isolated capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) differ in monosaccharide composition ratios and molecular size, as determined by gel filtration. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the binding of CPSs to capsule-free mutants of C. neoformans and to examine CPSs from these strains for differences in their ability to bind, to determine whether such differences might explain the variation in the pathobiology of these strains. CPSs were partially periodate oxidized, tyraminated, iodinated with /sup 125/I, and used in binding studies with two capsule-free mutants of C. neoformans, strain 602 and Cap59. Binding was specific for yeast species and for polysaccharide and was saturable, which is consistent with a receptor-mediated mechanism of attachment. Binding occurred rapidly and was only slowly reversible. Binding was also independent of pH from pH 5.5 to 8, of cation concentrations, and of competition by sugars up to 1.0 M concentrations. Only a portion of CPS was capable of binding, and strains varied in the extent to which their CPS bound. CPS-15-IV (peak IV was the major polysaccharide peak on DEAE-cellulose chromatography of CPS from strain 15) had the highest proportion of binding (40%), followed by CPS from strains 98, 6, 145, 110, and 15-III (peak III was an earlier eluting fraction of CPS from strain 15). The CPSs differed similarly in their ability to competitively inhibit binding. Treatment of CPS, but not yeast cells, with proteinase XIV abolished binding without altering the CPS gross structure. Treatment of yeast cells with proteases, heat, or formaldehyde did not alter binding, and both strain 602 and Cap59 bound CPS similarly. Binding to encapsulated yeast cells was minimal.

  10. Behavior of two Tannerella forsythia strains and cell surface mutants in multispecies oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Susanne; Thurnheer, Thomas; Murakami, Yukitaka; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Schäffer, Christina

    2017-04-05

    As a member of subgingival multispecies biofilms, Tannerella forsythia is commonly associated with periodontitis. The bacterium has a characteristic cell surface (S-) layer modified with a unique O-glycan. Both the S-layer and the O-glycan were analyzed in this study for their role in biofilm formation by employing an in vitro multispecies biofilm model mimicking the situation in the oral cavity. Different T. forsythia strains and mutants with characterized defects in cell surface composition were incorporated into the model, together with nine species of select oral bacteria. The influence of the T. forsythia S-layer and attached glycan on the bacterial composition of the biofilms was analyzed quantitatively using colony forming unit counts and quantitative real-time PCR, as well as qualitatively by fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. This revealed that changes of the T. forsythia cell surface did not affect the quantitative composition of the multispecies consortium, with the exception of Campylobacter rectus cell numbers. The localization of T. forsythia within the bacterial agglomeration varied depending on changes in the S-layer glycan, and this also affected its aggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis. This suggests a selective role for the glycosylated T. forsythia S-layer in the positioning of this species within the biofilm, its co-localization with P. gingivalis, and the prevalence of C. rectus. These findings might translate into a potential role of T. forsythia cell surface structures in the virulence of this species when interacting with host tissues and immune system, from within or beyond the biofilm. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Absence of light-induced proton extrusion in a cotA-less mutant of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Katoh, A; Sonoda, M; Katoh, H; Ogawa, T

    1996-09-01

    cotA of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 was isolated as a gene that complemented a mutant defective in CO2 transport and is homologous to cemA that encodes a chloroplast envelope membrane protein (A. Katoh, K.S. Lee, H. Fukuzawa, K. Ohyama, and T. Ogawa, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:4006-4010, 1996). A mutant (M29) constructed by replacing cotA in the wild-type (WT) Synechocystis strain with the omega fragment was unable to grow in BG11 medium (approximately 17 mM Na+) at pH 6.4 or at any pH in a low-sodium medium (100 microM Na+) under aeration with 3% (vol/vol) CO2 in air. The WT cells grew well in the pH range between 6.4 and 8.5 in BG11 medium but only at alkaline pH in the low-sodium medium. Illumination of the WT cells resulted in an extrusion followed by an uptake of protons. In contrast, only proton uptake was observed for the M29 mutant in the light without proton extrusion. There was no difference in sodium uptake activity between the WT and mutant. The mutant still possessed 51% of the WT CO2 transport activity in the presence of 15 mM NaCl. On the basis of these results we concluded that cotA has a role in light-induced proton extrusion and that the inhibition of CO2 transport in the M29 mutant is a secondary effect of the inhibition of proton extrusion.

  12. Anthraquinone dyes decolorization capacity of anamorphic Bjerkandera adusta CCBAS 930 strain and its HRP-like negative mutants.

    PubMed

    Korniłłowicz-Kowalska, Teresa; Rybczyńska, Kamila

    2014-06-01

    Cultures of the anamorphic fungus Bjerkandera adusta CCBAS 930 decolorizing, in stationary cultures, 0.01 % solutions of carminic acid and Poly R-478, were characterised by a strong increase in the activity of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP-like) and manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) at a low activity of lignin peroxidase. Genotypically modified mutants of B. adusta CCBAS 930: 930-5 and 930-14, with total or partial loss of decolorization capabilities relative to anthraquinonic dyes, showed inhibition of the activity of HRP-like peroxidase and MnP. Whereas, compared to the parental strain, in the mutant cultures there was an increase in the activity of lignin peroxidase and laccase. The paper presents a discussion of the role of the studied enzymatic activities in the process of decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes by the strain B. adusta CCBAS 930.

  13. Multi-omics approach to study global changes in a triclosan-resistant mutant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Dinesh M; Chong, Patrick; Singh, Manu; Spicer, Victor; Unger, Mark; Loewen, Peter C; Westmacott, Garrett; Kumar, Ayush

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii AB042, a triclosan-resistant mutant strain, was examined for modulated gene expression using whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomics and proteomics in order to understand the mechanism of triclosan resistance as well as its impact on A. baumannii. Data revealed modulated expression of the fatty acid metabolism pathway, co-factors known to play a role in the synthesis of fatty acids, as well as several transcriptional regulators. The membrane composition of the mutant revealed a decrease in C18 with a corresponding increase in C16 fatty acids compared with the parent strain A. baumannii ATCC 17978. These data indicate that A. baumannii responds to triclosan by altering the expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, antibiotic resistance and amino acid metabolism.

  14. Characterization of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes in Euglena gracilis and its white mutant strain W(gm)ZOflL.

    PubMed

    Krnáčová, Katarína; Rýdlová, Ivana; Vinarčíková, Michaela; Krajčovič, Juraj; Vesteg, Matej; Horváth, Anton

    2015-03-12

    The enzymes involved in Euglena oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) were characterized in this study. We have demonstrated that Euglena gracilis strain Z and its stable bleached non-photosynthetic mutant strain WgmZOflL both possess fully functional OXPHOS apparatus as well as pathways requiring terminal alternative oxidase(s) and alternative mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase(s). Light (or dark) and plastid (non)functionality seem to have little effect on oxygen consumption, the activities of the enzymes involved in OXPHOS and the action of respiration inhibitors in Euglena. This study also demonstrates biochemical properties of complex III (cytochrome c reductase) in Euglena.

  15. Expression of the cloned Escherichia coli O9 rfb gene in various mutant strains of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, T; Kido, N; Komatsu, T; Ohta, M; Kato, N

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the effect of chromosomal mutation on the synthesis of rfe-dependent Escherichia coli O9 lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the cloned E. coli O9 rfb gene was introduced into Salmonella typhimurium strains defective in various genes involved in the synthesis of LPS. When E. coli O9 rfb was introduced into S. typhimurium strains possessing defects in rfb or rfc, they synthesized E. coli O9 LPS on their cell surfaces. The rfe-defective mutant of S. typhimurium synthesized only very small amounts of E. coli O9 LPS after the introduction of E. coli O9 rfb. These results confirmed the widely accepted idea that the biosynthesis of E. coli O9-specific polysaccharide does not require rfc but requires rfe. By using an rfbT mutant of the E. coli O9 rfb gene, the mechanism of transfer of the synthesized E. coli O9-specific polysaccharide from antigen carrier lipid to the R-core of S. typhimurium was investigated. The rfbT mutant of the E. coli O9 rfb gene failed to direct the synthesis of E. coli O9 LPS in the rfc mutant strain of S. typhimurium, in which rfaL and rfbT functions are intact, but directed the synthesis of the precursor. Because the intact E. coli O9 rfb gene directed the synthesis of E. coli O9 LPS in the same strain, it was suggested that the rfaL product of S. typhimurium and rfbT product of E. coli O9 cooperate to synthesize E. coli O9 LPS in S. typhimurium. Images PMID:1987133

  16. The Use of NF1 and NF2 Mutant Mouse Strains in the Investigation of Gene Function and Disease Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    percentage of which show features of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ). Importantly, human NFl patients also develop MPNSTs at high...significant subset (at least 50%) are malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ). This evaluation is based on the presence of S 100 staining...percentage of MPNSTs that develop in NF1 patients have mutations in p53. Thus, the Nfl/p53 mutant strain represents an animal model of the more malignant

  17. Free mycolic acid accumulation in the cell wall of the mce1 operon mutant strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Sally A; Leavell, Michael D; Marjanovic, Olivera; Iavarone, Anthony T; Leary, Julie A; Riley, Lee W

    2013-10-01

    The lipid-rich cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the agent of tuberculosis, serves as an effective barrier against many chemotherapeutic agents and toxic host cell effector molecules, and it may contribute to the mechanism of persistence. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains mutated in a 13-gene operon called mce1, which encodes a putative ABC lipid transporter, induce aberrant granulomatous response in mouse lungs. Because of the postulated role of the mce1 operon in lipid importation, we compared the cell wall lipid composition of wild type and mce1 operon mutant M. tuberculosis H37Rv strains. High resolution mass spectrometric analyses of the mce1 mutant lipid extracts showed unbound mycolic acids to accumulate in the cell wall. Quantitative analysis revealed a 10.7 fold greater amount of free mycolates in the mutant compared to that of the wild type strain. The free mycolates were comprised of alpha, methoxy and keto mycolates in the ratio 1:0.9:0.6, respectively. Since the mce1 operon is regulated in vivo, the free mycolates that accumulate during infection may serve as a barrier for M. tuberculosis against toxic products and contribute to the pathogen's persistence.

  18. Effects of Pyrogallol on Growth and Cytotoxicity of Wild-Type and katG Mutant Strains of Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ju Young; Kim, Choon-Mee; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Kim, Young Ran

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a causative agent of fatal septicemia and necrotic wound infection and the pathogen infection became an important public health problem in many counties. Vibrio vulnificus causes RtxA1 toxin-induced acute cell death. We tried to identify natural products that inhibit the acute cytotoxicity of V. vulnificus using a lactate hydrogenase assay. A polyphenol pyrogallol protected HeLa cells from V. vulnificus-induced cytotoxicity. Pyrogallol also decreased the growth of V. vulnificus; this inhibitory effect was more significant during log phase than stationary phase. To further elucidate the inhibitory mechanism, pyrogallol-induced toxicity was compared between a V. vulnificus catalase-peroxidase mutant (katG−) and the isogenic wild-type MO6-24/O strains. No growth was observed for the katG− mutant in the presence of pyrogallol (50 μg/mL) even after 24 h, whereas the wild-type strain demonstrated growth recovery following a prolonged lag phase. Pyrogallol-mediated growth inhibition of the katG− mutant strain was partially rescued by exogenous catalase treatment. These results indicate that the mechanism by which pyrogallol inhibits the growth and cytotoxicity of V. vulnificus likely involves polyphenol-induced prooxidant damage. Taken together, these results suggest that pyrogallol has potential for development as a new paradigm drug to treat infectious diseases. PMID:27936080

  19. Constitutive expression of the tzs gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens virG mutant strains is responsible for improved transgenic plant regeneration in cotton meristem transformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xudong; Chen, Yurong; Wan, Yuechun; Hong, Yun-Jeong; Ruebelt, Martin C; Gilbertson, Larry A

    2016-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : virG mutant strains of a nopaline type of Agrobacterium tumefaciens increase the transformation frequency in cotton meristem transformation. Constitutive cytokinin expression from the tzs gene in the virG mutant strains is responsible for the improvement. Strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were tested for their ability to improve cotton meristem transformation frequency. Two disarmed A. tumefaciens nopaline strains with either a virGN54D constitutively active mutation or virGI77V hypersensitive induction mutation significantly increased the transformation frequency in a cotton meristem transformation system. The virG mutant strains resulted in greener explants after three days of co-culture in the presence of light, which could be attributed to a cytokinin effect of the mutants. A tzs knockout strain of virGI77V mutant showed more elongated, less green explants and decreased cotton transformation frequency, as compared to a wild type parental strain, suggesting that expression of the tzs gene is required for transformation frequency improvement in cotton meristem transformation. In vitro cytokinin levels in culture media were tenfold higher in the virGN54D strain, and approximately 30-fold higher in the virGI77V strain, in the absence of acetosyringone induction, compared to the wild type strain. The cytokinin level in the virGN54D strain is further increased upon acetosyringone induction, while the cytokinin level in the virGI77V mutant is decreased by induction, suggesting that different tzs gene expression regulation mechanisms are present in the two virG mutant strains. Based on these data, we suggest that the increased cytokinin levels play a major role in increasing Agrobacterium attachment and stimulating localized division of the attached plant cells.

  20. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. P.; Beingesser, J.; Fisher, D. J.; Sayeed, S.; McClane, B. A.; Posthaus, H.; Uzal, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch’s postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24 h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24 h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. PMID:22296994

  1. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Beingesser, J; Fisher, D J; Sayeed, S; McClane, B A; Posthaus, H; Uzal, F A

    2012-06-15

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch's postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis.

  2. Flocculation characteristics of an isolated mutant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain and its application for fuel ethanol production from kitchen refuse.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kedong; Wakisaka, Minato; Sakai, Kenji; Shirai, Yoshihito

    2009-04-01

    A stable mutant flocculent yeast strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae KRM-1 was isolated during repeated-batch ethanol fermentation using kitchen refuse as the medium. The mechanism of flocculation and interaction with the medium was investigated. According to sugar inhibition assay, it was found that the mutant flocculent strain was a NewFlo phenotype. Flocculation was completely inhibited by protease, proteinase K and partially reduced by treatments with carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes. Flocculation ability showed no difference for pH 3.0-6.0. Furthermore, the mutant flocculent yeast provided repeated-batch cultivations employing cell recycles by flocculation over 10 rounds of cultivation for the production of ethanol from kitchen refuse medium, resulting in relatively high productivity averaging 8.25 g/L/h over 10 batches and with a maximal of 10.08 g/L/h in the final batch. Cell recycle by flocculation was fast and convenient, and could therefore be applicable for industrial-scale ethanol production.

  3. Tissue persistence and vaccine efficacy of tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism mutant strains of Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Neeti; Abdelhamed, Hossam; Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L

    2014-06-30

    Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia in fish. Recently, we reported construction of E. ictaluri mutants with single and double gene deletions in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and one-carbon (C-1) metabolism. Here, we report the tissue persistence, virulence, and vaccine efficacy of TCA cycle (EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, and EiΔmdh), C-1 metabolism (EiΔgcvP and EiΔglyA), and combination mutants (EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, EiΔgcvPΔsdhC, EiΔmdhΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔglyA) in channel catfish. The tissue persistence study showed that EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔsdhC were able to invade catfish and persist until 11 days post-infection. Vaccination of catfish fingerlings with all nine mutants provided significant (P<0.05) protection against subsequent challenge with the virulent parental strain. Vaccinated catfish fingerlings had 100% survival when subsequently challenged by immersion with wild-type E. ictaluri except for EiΔgcvPΔglyA and EiΔgcvP. Mutant EiΔgcvPΔsdhC was found to be very good at protecting catfish fry, as evidenced by 10-fold higher survival compared to non-vaccinated fish.

  4. A genome-scale Escherichia coli kinetic metabolic model k-ecoli457 satisfying flux data for multiple mutant strains

    PubMed Central

    Khodayari, Ali; Maranas, Costas D.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic models of metabolism at a genome scale that faithfully recapitulate the effect of multiple genetic interventions would be transformative in our ability to reliably design novel overproducing microbial strains. Here, we introduce k-ecoli457, a genome-scale kinetic model of Escherichia coli metabolism that satisfies fluxomic data for wild-type and 25 mutant strains under different substrates and growth conditions. The k-ecoli457 model contains 457 model reactions, 337 metabolites and 295 substrate-level regulatory interactions. Parameterization is carried out using a genetic algorithm by simultaneously imposing all available fluxomic data (about 30 measured fluxes per mutant). The Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental data and predicted product yields for 320 engineered strains spanning 24 product metabolites is 0.84. This is substantially higher than that using flux balance analysis, minimization of metabolic adjustment or maximization of product yield exhibiting systematic errors with correlation coefficients of, respectively, 0.18, 0.37 and 0.47 (k-ecoli457 is available for download at http://www.maranasgroup.com). PMID:27996047

  5. Competitive growth experiments with a high-lipid Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant strain and its wild-type to predict industrial and ecological risks.

    PubMed

    Russo, David A; Beckerman, Andrew P; Pandhal, Jagroop

    2017-12-01

    Key microalgal species are currently being exploited as biomanufacturing platforms using mass cultivation systems. The opportunities to enhance productivity levels or produce non-native compounds are increasing as genetic manipulation and metabolic engineering tools are rapidly advancing. Regardless of the end product, there are both environmental and industrial risks associated to open pond cultivation of mutant microalgal strains. A mutant escape could be detrimental to local biodiversity and increase the risk of algal blooms. Similarly, if the cultivation pond is invaded by a wild-type (WT) microalgae or the mutant reverts to WT phenotypes, productivity could be impacted. To investigate these potential risks, a response surface methodology was applied to determine the competitive outcome of two Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains, a WT (CC-124) and a high-lipid accumulating mutant (CC-4333), grown in mixotrophic conditions, with differing levels of nitrogen and initial WT to mutant ratios. Results of the growth experiments show that mutant cells have double the exponential growth rate of the WT in monoculture. However, due to a slower transition from lag phase to exponential phase, mutant cells are outcompeted by the WT in every co-culture treatment. This suggests that, under the conditions tested, outdoor cultivation of the C. reinhardtii cell wall-deficient mutant strains does not carry a significant environmental risk to its WT in an escape scenario. Furthermore, lipid results show the mutant strain accumulates over 200% more TAGs per cell, at 50 mg L(-1) NH4Cl, compared to the WT, therefore, the fragility of the mutant strain could impact on overall industrial productivity.

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of a Bordetella bronchiseptica Mutant Strain with a Deep Rough Lipopolysaccharide Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Federico; Fernández, Julieta; Rodríguez, María Eugenia; Lagares, Antonio; Guiso, Nicole; Hozbor, Daniela Flavia

    2002-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is closely related to Bordetella pertussis, which produces respiratory disease primarily in mammals other than humans. However, its importance as a human pathogen is being increasingly recognized. Although a large amount of research on Bordetella has been generated regarding protein virulence factors, the participation of the surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS) during B. bronchiseptica infection is less understood. To get a better insight into this matter, we constructed and characterized the behavior of an LPS mutant with the deepest possible rough phenotype. We generated the defective mutant B. bronchiseptica LP39 on the waaC gene, which codes for a heptosyl transferase involved in the biosynthesis of the core region of the LPS molecule. Although in B. bronchiseptica LP39 the production of the principal virulence determinants adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin persisted, the quantity of the two latter factors was diminished, with the levels of pertactin being the most greatly affected. Furthermore, the LPS of B. bronchiseptica LP39 did not react with sera obtained from mice that had been infected with the parental strain, indicating that this defective LPS is immunologically different from the wild-type LPS. In vivo experiments demonstrated that the ability to colonize the respiratory tract is reduced in the mutant, being effectively cleared from lungs within 5 days, whereas the parental strain survived at least for 30 days. In vitro experiments have demonstrated that, although B. bronchiseptica LP39 was impaired for adhesion to human epithelial cells, it is still able to survive within the host cells as efficiently as the parental strain. These results seem to indicate that the deep rough form of B. bronchiseptica LPS cannot represent a dominant phenotype at the first stage of colonization. Since isolates with deep rough LPS phenotype have already been obtained from human B. bronchiseptica chronic

  7. Emergence of potential superbug mycobacterium tuberculosis, lessons from new delhi mutant-1 bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Taha; Abraham, Suraj; Islam, Azharul

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that certain bacterial strains attain the New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) enzyme and become resistant to a broad range of antibiotics. Similarly, more dangerous "superbugs" of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensive drug resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are gradually emerging through rapid genetic mutation caused by prescription non-compliance or unsupervised indiscriminate use of anti-tubercular drugs or other antibiotics. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases have been reported in highly susceptible population groups including the aboriginal communities of US and Canada. In Canada alone, the total number of reported tuberculosis cases has decreased over the past decade. However, there is a steady increase in HIV cases in certain communities including the aboriginal communities. Reintroduction of MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis is possible in these susceptible communities, which in turn may pose serious public health situation. MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis are virtually untreatable using current anti-tubercular medication protocols. Thus, MDR/XDR tuberculosis presents a grave global public health threat. The unpredictable genetic mechanism involved in generating MDR/XDR resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may pose greater challenges in developing appropriate treatment strategies. In this article, we briefly review potential genetic mechanism of emerging NDM-1 bacterial strains and draw a rationale parallel to the underlying genetic mechanism of MDR/XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain development.

  8. Regulators of pseudohyphal differentiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified through multicopy suppressor analysis in ammonium permease mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, M C; Heitman, J

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen-starved diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae differentiate into a filamentous, pseudohyphal growth form. Recognition of nitrogen starvation is mediated, at least in part, by the ammonium permease Mep2p and the Galpha subunit Gpa2p. Genetic activation of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase cascade, which is also required for filamentous growth, only weakly suppresses the filamentation defect of Deltamep2/Deltamep2 and Deltagpa2/Deltagpa2 strain. Surprisingly, deletion of Mep1p, an ammonium permease not previously thought to regulate differentiation, significantly enhances the potency of MAP kinase activation, such that the STE11-4 allele induces filamentation to near wild-type levels in Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 and Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltagpa2/Deltagpa2 strains. To identify additional regulatory components, we isolated high-copy suppressors of the filamentation defect of the Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 mutant. Multicopy expression of TEC1, PHD1, PHD2 (MSS10/MSN1/FUP4), MSN5, CDC6, MSS11, MGA1, SKN7, DOT6, HMS1, HMS2, or MEP2 each restored filamentation in a Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 strain. Overexpression of SRK1 (SSD1), URE2, DAL80, MEP1, or MEP3 suppressed only the growth defect of the Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 mutant strain. Characterization of these genes through deletion analysis and epistasis underscores the complexity of this developmental pathway and suggests that stress conditions other than nitrogen deprivation may also promote filamentous growth. PMID:9832522

  9. Ribitol dehydrogenase of Klebsiella aerogenes. Sequence and properties of wild-type and mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dothie, J M; Giglio, J R; Moore, C B; Taylor, S S; Hartley, B S

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the sequence of 249 amino acids in ribitol dehydrogenase-A from Klebsiella aerogenes. Continuous culture on xylitol yields strains that superproduce 'wild-type' enzyme but mutations appear to have arisen in this process. Other strains selected by such continuous culture produce enzymes with increased specific activity for xylitol but without loss of ribitol activity. One such enzyme, ribitol dehydrogenase-D, has Pro-196 for Gly-196. Another, ribitol dehydrogenase-B, has a different mutation. PMID:3904726

  10. Pigmentation restored in mutant laboratory strain of the lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata through dietary supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory colony of Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer), ye, selected for a pigmentation deficiency, was restored to near wild type cuticle coloration by adding crushed heads and wings of the red colored parental strain to the diet. While the wings and other colored portions of the cuticle regained th...

  11. Isolation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain deficient in deoxycytidylate deaminase activity and partial characterization of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, E M; Haynes, R H

    1984-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been partially characterized. The yeast enzyme was found to exhibit properties similar to those of dCMP deaminases isolated from higher eucaryotes. A mutant strain completely deficient in dCMP deaminase activity was isolated by selection for resistance to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidylate followed by screening for cross sensitivity to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridylate, a potent inhibitor of the yeast thymidylate synthetase. We have designated this new allele dcd1 . A strain exhibiting an auxotrophic requirement for dUMP was isolated after mutagenesis of a dcd1 tup7 haploid. Genetic analysis revealed that this auxotrophic phenotype resulted from a combination of the dcd1 allele and a second, unlinked, nuclear mutation that we designated dmp1 . This allele, which by itself conveys no readily discernible phenotype, presumably impairs efficient synthesis of dUMP from UDP. The auxotrophic requirement of dcd1 dmp1 tup7 strains also can be satisfied by exogenous dTMP but not deoxyuridine. PMID:6373725

  12. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  13. FACS selection of valuable mutant mouse round spermatids and strain rescue via round spermatid injection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lian; Zhou, Wei; Kong, Peng-Cheng; Wang, Mei-Shan; Zhu, Yan; Feng, Li-Xin; Chen, Xue-Jin; Jiang, Man-Xi

    2015-06-01

    Round spermatid injection (ROSI) into mammalian oocytes can result in the development of viable embryos and offspring. One current limitation to this technique is the identification of suitable round spermatids. In the current paper, round spermatids were selected from testicular cells with phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and ROSI was performed in two strains of mice. The rates of fertilization, embryonic development and offspring achieved were the same in all strains. Significantly, round spermatids selected by PCM and FACS were effectively used to rescue the infertile Pten-null mouse. The current results indicate that FACS selection of round spermatids can not only provide high-purity and viable round spermatids for use in ROSI, but also has no harmful effects on the developmental capacity of subsequently fertilized embryos. It was concluded that round spermatids selected by FACS are useful for mouse strain rederivation and rescue of infertile males; ROSI should be considered as a powerful addition to the armamentarium of assisted reproduction techniques applicable in the mouse.

  14. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains expressing nitrate reductase under control of the cabII-1 promoter: isolation of chlorate resistant mutants and identification of new loci for nitrate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Navarro, María Teresa; Mariscal, Vicente; Macías, María Isabel; Fernández, Emilio; Galván, Aurora

    2005-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Tx11-8 is a transgenic alga that bears the nitrate reductase gene (Nia1) under control of the CabII-1 gene promoter (CabII-1-Nia1). Approximately nine copies of the chimeric CabII-1-Nia1 gene were found to be integrated in this strain and to confer a phenotype of chlorate sensitivity in the presence of ammonium. We have used this strain for the isolation of spontaneous chlorate resistant mutants in the presence of ammonium that were found to be defective at loci involved in MoCo metabolism and light-dependent growth in nitrate media. Of a total of 45 mutant strains analyzed first, 44 were affected in the MoCo activity (16 Nit(-), unable to grow in nitrate, and 28 Nit(+), able to grow in nitrate). All the Nit(-) strains lacked MoCo activity. Diploid complementation of Nit(-), MoCo(-) strains with C. reinhardtii MoCo mutants and genetic analysis indicated that some strains were defective at known loci for MoCo biosynthesis, while three strains were defective at two new loci, hereafter named Nit10 and Nit11. The other 28 Nit(+) strains showed almost undetectable MoCo activity or activity was below 20% of the parental strain. Second, only one strain (named 23c(+)) showed MoCo and NR activities comparable to those in the parental strain. Strain 23c(+) seems to be affected in a locus, Nit12, required for growth in nitrate under continuous light. It is proposed that this locus is required for nitrate/chlorate transport activity. In this work, mechanisms of chlorate toxicity are reviewed in the light of our results.

  15. AGR-1 Thermocouple Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Einerson

    2012-05-01

    This report documents an effort to analyze measured and simulated data obtained in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel irradiation test program conducted in the INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. The work follows up on a previous study (Pham and Einerson, 2010), in which statistical analysis methods were applied for AGR-1 thermocouple data qualification. The present work exercises the idea that, while recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to further improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the combined analysis of measured and simulation data can generate insights about simulation model uncertainty that can be useful for model improvement. This report also describes an experimental control procedure to maintain fuel target temperature in the future AGR tests using regression relationships that include simulation results. The report is organized into four chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, overview of AGR-1 measured data, and overview of physics and thermal simulation, including modeling assumptions and uncertainties. A brief summary of statistical analysis methods developed in (Pham and Einerson 2010) for AGR-1 measured data qualification within NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) is also included for completeness. Chapters 2-3 describe and discuss cases, in which the combined use of experimental and simulation data is realized. A set of issues associated with measurement and modeling uncertainties resulted from the combined analysis are identified. This includes demonstration that such a combined analysis led to important insights for reducing uncertainty in presentation of AGR-1 measured data (Chapter 2) and interpretation of

  16. Effects of tazobactam on the frequency of the emergence of resistant strains from Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, and Proteus vulgaris (beta-lactamase derepressed mutants).

    PubMed

    Higashitani, F; Nishida, K; Hyodo, A; Inoue, M

    1995-09-01

    When Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, and Proteus vulgaris were treated with piperacillin (PIPC) in combination with tazobactam (TAZ), the in vitro frequency of emergence of resistant strains (beta-lactamase producing mutants) was lower than with PIPC or ceftazidime (CAZ) treated bacteria. In a mouse intraperitoneal infection model caused by E. cloacae, beta-lactamase derepressed mutants were detected following therapy with PIPC or CAZ, although no derepressed mutants were detected after treatment with PIPC in combination with TAZ. This suppression of the selection of derepressed mutants, which produce large amounts of beta-lactamases, by the combination of TAZ and PIPC suggests that the combination delays the increase of resistant mutants compared with PIPC alone.

  17. Isolation of a novel mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by an ethyl methane sulfonate-induced mutagenesis approach as a high producer of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Mobini-Dehkordi, Mohsen; Nahvi, Iraj; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Ghaedi, Kamran; Tavassoli, Manoochehr; Akada, Rinji

    2008-04-01

    In order to obtain mutant strains showing higher bioethanol production than wild-type strains, a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae type was subjected to mutagenesis using ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS). After adding EMS to a shaken yeast suspension, the viability of yeast cells was assessed by diluted sample inoculation to solid yeast-extract peptone glucose (YEPG) medium at 15-min intervals. At 45 min, the viability of yeast cells was estimated to be about 40%. Mutagenized cells were recovered from YEPG broth after incubation at 30 degrees C for 18 h. After this period, EMS-treated yeast cells were grown on solid aerobic low-peptone (ALP) medium containing 2-12% (v/v) ethanol. All plates were incubated at 30 degrees C for 2-6 d in order to form colonies. The mutant strains that tolerated high concentrations of ethanol were selected for bioethanol production in microfuge tubes containing fermentation medium. Formation of bioethanol in small tubes was detected by the distillation-colorimetric method. In addition, trehalose content and invertase activity were determined in each mutant strain. Among many isolated mutant strains, there were six isolated colonies that grew on ALP medium supplemented with 10% (v/v) ethanol and one of them produced bioethanol 17.3% more than the wild type.

  18. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. Results In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell

  19. Decreased coenzyme A levels in ridA mutant strains of Salmonella enterica result from inactivated serine hydroxymethyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jeffrey M; Christopherson, Melissa R; Downs, Diana M

    2013-08-01

    The RidA/Yer057/UK114 family of proteins is well represented across the domains of life and recent work has defined both an in vitro activity and an in vivo role for RidA. RidA proteins have enamine deaminase activity, and in their absence the reactive 2-aminoacrylate (2-AA) accumulates and inactivates at least some pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-containing enzymes in Salmonella enterica. The conservation of RidA suggested that 2-AA was a ubiquitous cellular stressor that was generated in central metabolism. Phenotypically, strains of S. enterica that lack RidA accumulated significantly more pyruvate in the growth medium than wild-type strains. Here we dissected this ridA mutant phenotype and showed it was an indirect consequence of damage to serine hydroxymethyltransferase (GlyA; E.C. 2.1.2.1). The results here identified a fourth PLP enzyme as a target of enamine stress in Salmonella.

  20. Construction of "Toxin Complex" in a Mutant Serotype C Strain of Clostridium botulinum Harboring a Defective Neurotoxin Gene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Nagano, Thomas; Niwa, Koichi; Uchino, Masataka; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    A non-toxigenic mutant of the toxigenic serotype C Clostridium botulinum strain Stockholm (C-St), C-N71, does not produce the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). However, the original strain C-St produces botulinum toxin complex, in which BoNT is associated with non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNHA) and three hemagglutinin proteins (HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17). Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of bont gene knockout on the formation of the "toxin complex." Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that a premature stop codon was introduced in the bont gene, whereas other genes were not affected by this mutation. Moreover, we successfully purified the "toxin complex" produced by C-N71. The "toxin complex" was identified as a mixture of NTNHA/HA-70/HA-17/HA-33 complexes with intact NTNHA or C-terminally truncated NTNHA, without BoNT. These results indicated that knockout of the bont gene does not affect the formation of the "toxin complex." Since the botulinum toxin complex has been shown to play an important role in oral toxin transport in the human and animal body, a non-neurotoxic "toxin complex" of C-N71 may be valuable for the development of an oral drug delivery system.

  1. Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 cell surface structures and supernatant increase paracellular permeability through different pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Ranjita; Anderson, Rachel C; Altermann, Eric; McNabb, Warren C; Ganesh, Siva; Armstrong, Kelly M; Moughan, Paul J; Roy, Nicole C

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum is commonly found in food products, and some strains are known to have beneficial effects on human health. However, our previous research indicated that L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases in vitro intestinal barrier integrity. The hypothesis was that cell surface structures of AGR1487 are responsible for the observed in vitro effect. AGR1487 was compared to another human oral L. fermentum strain, AGR1485, which does not cause the same effect. The examination of phenotypic traits associated with the composition of cell surface structures showed that compared to AGR1485, AGR1487 had a smaller genome, utilized different sugars, and had greater tolerance to acid and bile. The effect of the two strains on intestinal barrier integrity was determined using two independent measures of paracellular permeability of the intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) assay specifically measures ion permeability, whereas the mannitol flux assay measures the passage of uncharged molecules. Both live and UV-inactivated AGR1487 decreased TEER across Caco-2 cells implicating the cell surfaces structures in the effect. However, only live AGR1487, and not UV-inactivated AGR1487, increased the rate of passage of mannitol, implying that a secreted component(s) is responsible for this effect. These differences in barrier integrity results are likely due to the TEER and mannitol flux assays measuring different characteristics of the epithelial barrier, and therefore imply that there are multiple mechanisms involved in the effect of AGR1487 on barrier integrity. PMID:25943073

  2. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Tiffany M.; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 104 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Conclusions/Significance Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis. PMID:26114445

  3. AgrAbility: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... AgrAbility Services Equipment and Vehicle Modifications Financing-Related Matters Other Modifications Other Disability and Agricultural-related questions Main Menu Home About AgrAbility State Projects Directory The Toolbox AT Database Resources Veterans & ...

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. PMID:27284151

  5. Genetic stability and mutant selection in Sabin 2 strain of oral poliovirus vaccine grown under different cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Taffs, R E; Chumakov, K M; Rezapkin, G V; Lu, Z; Douthitt, M; Dragunsky, E M; Levenbook, I S

    1995-06-01

    Mutations that consistently accumulated in the attenuated Sabin 2 strain of poliovirus during propagation in cell cultures were identified by sequence heterogeneity assay and quantified by mutant analysis by PCR and restriction enzyme cleavage (MAPREC). Eight additional sites previously identified in stool isolates were also examined by MAPREC in the virus passages. The pattern of selectable mutations and the rate of their accumulation depended on the type and confluence of the cell culture and the temperature of virus growth. Five unstable genomic sites were identified in Sabin 2 virus passaged 10 times at 34 degrees in African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells, with the mutations accumulating in the range 1 to 24%. Accumulation of these mutations did not appear to result in a loss of attenuated phenotype since the virus passaged under these conditions passed the monkey neurovirulence test (MNVT). The content of the 481-G revertant known to be related to neurovirulence in monkeys did not increase. Thus, our results suggest that upon growth of Sabin 2 virus in AGMK cells at 34 degrees, the key determinant(s) of attenuation remained stable, and the mutations that occurred did not affect monkey neurovirulence. In virus passaged 10 times at 37 degrees in AGMK cells, 4 unstable genomic sites were identified, in some of them accumulating up to 12% of the mutants. This virus sample severely failed the MNVT. Virus passaged in Vero cells at 34 and 37 degrees accumulated mutants at 7 and 14 genomic sites, respectively, including 481-G in both cases, with almost complete substitution of the original nucleotides at some of the sites. We tested 44 commercial monopools of Type 2 OPV and found out that all of them contained 481-G revertants in the range 0.4-1.1%. An increase in the 481-G revertants in passaged viruses to the level of 4% and above correlated with failure of these samples by the MNVT. Since the pattern of selectable mutations differed in viruses grown in the two

  6. Booster vaccination with safe, modified, live-attenuated mutants of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine confers protective immunity against virulent strains of B. abortus and Brucella canis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Kim, Kiju; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Brucella abortus attenuated strain RB51 vaccine (RB51) is widely used in prevention of bovine brucellosis. Although vaccination with this strain has been shown to be effective in conferring protection against bovine brucellosis, RB51 has several drawbacks, including residual virulence for animals and humans. Therefore, a safe and efficacious vaccine is needed to overcome these disadvantages. In this study, we constructed several gene deletion mutants (ΔcydC, ΔcydD and ΔpurD single mutants, and ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double mutants) of RB51 with the aim of increasing the safety of the possible use of these mutants as vaccine candidates. The RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔpurD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD and RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages in vitro or in BALB/c mice. A single intraperitoneal immunization with RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD or RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants was rapidly cleared from mice within 3 weeks, whereas the RB51ΔpurD mutant and RB51 were detectable in spleens until 4 and 7 weeks, respectively. Vaccination with a single dose of RB51 mutants induced lower protective immunity in mice than did parental RB51. However, a booster dose of these mutants provided significant levels of protection in mice against challenge with either the virulent homologous B. abortus strain 2308 or the heterologous Brucella canis strain 26. In addition, these mutants were found to induce a mixed but T-helper-1-biased humoral and cellular immune response in immunized mice. These data suggest that immunization with a booster dose of attenuated RB51 mutants provides an attractive strategy to protect against either bovine or canine brucellosis.

  7. Dynamics of the Emergence of a Human Cytomegalovirus UL97 Mutant Strain Conferring Ganciclovir Resistance in a Pediatric Stem-Cell Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Katharina; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Mikeler, Elfriede; Lang, Peter; Jahn, Gerhard; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hamprecht, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Stem-cell transplant recipients are at risk of developing ganciclovir-resistant human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection caused by mutations in the viral UL97 gene. Knowledge of the relative proportions of coexisting HCMV wild-type and mutant strains may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of in vivo mutant strain selection under ganciclovir. Currently, genotype resistance screening for UL97 is routinely performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism detection and sequencing. We present here the longitudinal course of a pediatric recipient of an allogeneic stem-cell transplant infected with a ganciclovir-resistant HCMV strain. EDTA-treated blood samples were analyzed longitudinally. The patient acquired a primary HCMV infection shortly before transplantation and reactivated the virus following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, thus receiving an intensive antiviral treatment schedule. Three different methods for UL97 mutation analysis, restriction fragment length polymorphism detection, sequencing, and a new, real-time PCR approach were performed. In conclusion, for our pediatric patient, during peak viral load, the UL97 wild-type strain predominates, while during clinical deterioration with low viral load, the predominant mutant strain persists. PMID:19477945

  8. Construction of a quadruple auxotrophic mutant of an industrial polyploid saccharomyces cerevisiae strain by using RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kong, In Iok; Kim, Heejin; Liu, Jing-Jing; Cate, Jamie H D; Jin, Yong-Su

    2014-12-01

    Industrial polyploid yeast strains harbor numerous beneficial traits but suffer from a lack of available auxotrophic markers for genetic manipulation. Here we demonstrated a quick and efficient strategy to generate auxotrophic markers in industrial polyploid yeast strains with the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease. We successfully constructed a quadruple auxotrophic mutant of a popular industrial polyploid yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 4124, with ura3, trp1, leu2, and his3 auxotrophies through RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease. Even though multiple alleles of auxotrophic marker genes had to be disrupted simultaneously, we observed knockouts in up to 60% of the positive colonies after targeted gene disruption. In addition, growth-based spotting assays and fermentation experiments showed that the auxotrophic mutants inherited the beneficial traits of the parental strain, such as tolerance of major fermentation inhibitors and high temperature. Moreover, the auxotrophic mutants could be transformed with plasmids containing selection marker genes. These results indicate that precise gene disruptions based on the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease now enable metabolic engineering of polyploid S. cerevisiae strains that have been widely used in the wine, beer, and fermentation industries.

  9. Dataset of differentially regulated proteins in HUVECs challenged with wild type and UGM1 mutant Aspergillus fumigatus strains.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gabriela Westerlund Peixoto; Curty, Nathália; Kubitschek-Barreira, Paula Helena; Fontaine, Thierry; Souza, Gustavo Henrique Martins Ferreira; Cunha, Marcel Lyra; Goldman, Gustavo H; Beauvais, Anne; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2016-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is the primary opportunistic invasive fungal infection described in neutropenic hematologic patients, caused by the angioinvasive pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. The molecular mechanisms associated with A. fumigatus infection in the vascular endothelium are poorly understood. In this context, we used a high-throughput proteomic approach to unveil the proteins modulated in HUVECs after interaction with a wild type strain and the UGM1 mutant (Δugm1) of A. fumigatus. The proteomic analysis was also performed in HUVECs challenged with a galactosaminogalactan (GAG) purified from A. fumigatus cell wall. The dataset presented here correspond to all proteins identified that fit a 2-fold change criteria (log 2 ratio ≥ 1 or ≤ -1), disregarding the statistical validation cut off, in order to supplement the research article entitled "Modifications to the composition of the hyphal outer layer of Aspergillus fumigatus modulates the HUVEC proteins associated with inflammatory and stress responses" (G.W.P. Neves, N.A. Curty, P.H. Kubitschek-Barreira, T. Fontaine, G.H.M.F. Souza, M. Lyra Cunha, G.H. Goldman, A. Beauvais, J.P. Latgé, L.M. Lopes-Bezerra, 2016) [1]. The mass spectrometry proteomic data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002823.

  10. Detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of cows based on a TaqMan real-time PCR discriminating wild type strains from an lppQ− mutant vaccine strain used for DIVA-strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vilei, Edy M.; Frey, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is the most serious cattle disease in Africa, caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small-colony type (SC). CBPP control strategies currently rely on vaccination with a vaccine based on live attenuated strains of the organism. Recently, an lppQ− mutant of the existing vaccine strain T1/44 has been developed (Janis et al., 2008). This T1lppQ− mutant strain is devoid of lipoprotein LppQ, a potential virulence attribute of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC. It is designated as a potential live DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine strain allowing both serological and etiological differentiation. The present paper reports on the validation of a control strategy for CBPP in cattle, whereby a TaqMan real-time PCR based on the lppQ gene has been developed for the direct detection of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC in ex vivo bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of cows and for the discrimination of wild type strains from the lppQ− mutant vaccine strain. PMID:20381545

  11. Staphylococcus intermedius Produces a Functional agr Autoinducing Peptide Containing a Cyclic Lactone

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guangyong; Pei, Wuhong; Zhang, Linsheng; Qiu, Rongde; Lin, Jianqun; Benito, Yvonne; Lina, Gerard; Novick, Richard P.

    2005-01-01

    The agr system is a global regulator of accessory functions in staphylococci, including genes encoding exoproteins involved in virulence. The agr locus contains a two-component signal transduction module that is activated by an autoinducing peptide (AIP) encoded within the agr locus and is conserved throughout the genus. The AIP has an unusual partially cyclic structure that is essential for function and that, in all but one case, involves an internal thiolactone bond between a conserved cysteine and the C-terminal carboxyl group. The exceptional case is a strain of Staphylococcus intermedius that has a serine in place of the conserved cysteine. We demonstrate here that the S. intermedius AIP is processed by the S. intermedius AgrB protein to generate a cyclic lactone, that it is an autoinducer as well as a cross-inhibitor, and that all of five other S. intermedius strains examined also produce serine-containing AIPs. PMID:15838041

  12. AGR-1, AGR-2 and AGR-3/4 Dimensional Change Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Herberger, Sarah E.

    2016-02-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been completed in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory in support of qualification and development of tristructural isotropic fuel. Each AGR test consists of multiple independently controlled and monitored capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in the graphite, enabling temperature control. The fuel compacts are composed of fuel particles surrounded by a graphitic A3 matrix material. Dimensional change in AGR fuel compacts is vital because the swelling or shrinkage affects the size of the gas gaps that are used to control temperatures. Analysis of dimensional change in the AGR fuel compacts is needed to establish the variables directly relating to compact shrinkage. The variables initially identified for consideration were matrix density, compact density, fuel packing fraction, uranium loading, fuel particle diameter, cumulative fast neutron fluence, and volume average time average fuel temperature. In addition to the data available from the AGR experiments, the analysis included specimens formed from the same A3 matrix material used in Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiments, which provide graphite creep data during irradiation for design and licensing purposes. The primary purpose of including the AGC specimens was to encompass dimensional behavior at zero packing fraction, zero uranium loading, and zero particle diameter. All possible combinations of first-order variable regressions were considered in the analysis. The study focused on identifying the best regression models for percent change in diameter, length, and volume. Bootstrap analysis was used to ensure the resulting regression models were robust and well-performing. The variables identified as very significant in predicting change in one or more dimensions (diameter, length, and volume) are volume average time average temperature, fast fluence

  13. Effects of static magnetic fields on growth and membrane lipid composition of Salmonella typhimurium wild-type and dam mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Mihoub, Mouadh; El May, Alya; Aloui, Amine; Chatti, Abdelwaheb; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2012-07-02

    This study was carried out to explore the adaptive mechanisms of S. typhimurium particularly, the implication of the Dam methyltransferase in the remodelling of membrane lipid composition to overcome magnetic field stress. With this aim, we focused our analyses on the increase in viable numbers and membrane lipid modifications of S. typhimurium wild-type and dam mutant cells exposed for 10h to static magnetic fields (SMF; 200 mT). For the wild-type strain, exposure to SMF induced a significant decrease (p<0.05) of CFU at 6h, followed by an increase between 8 and 10h. Growth of the dam mutant was significantly affected (p<0.05) after 6h and no recovery was observed until 10h, highlighting a different behavior of SMF stressed wild-type and dam mutant strains. SMF significantly affected the phospholipid proportions in the two strains. The most affected were those of the acidic phospholipids, cardiolipins (CL). In the dam strain the phospholipid response to SMF followed a globally similar trend as in the wild-type with however lower effects, leading mainly to an unusual accumulation of CL. This would in part explain the different behavior of the wild-type and the dam strain. Results showed a significant increase of membrane cyclic fatty acids Cyc17 and Cyc19 in the wild-type strain but only the Cyc17 in the dam strain and a meaningful increase of the total unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) to total saturated fatty acids (SFAs) ratios of the exposed cells compared to controls from 3 to 9h (p<0.05) for both strains. The net increase of the total UFAs to total SFAs ratios seemed to result mainly from the increase of (C18:1) proportion (p<0.05) and to a lower extent from that of (C16:1) (p<0.05). These modifications of cyclic and unsaturated fatty acid proportions constitute an adaptive response to SMF stress in S. typhimurium wild-type and dam mutants to maintain an optimum level of membrane fluidity under SMF.

  14. Isolation of an Escherichia coli K-12 mutant strain able to form biofilms on inert surfaces: involvement of a new ompR allele that increases curli expression.

    PubMed

    Vidal, O; Longin, R; Prigent-Combaret, C; Dorel, C; Hooreman, M; Lejeune, P

    1998-05-01

    Classical laboratory strains of Escherichia coli do not spontaneously colonize inert surfaces. However, when maintained in continuous culture for evolution studies or industrial processes, these strains usually generate adherent mutants which form a thick biofilm, visible with the naked eye, on the wall of the culture apparatus. Such a mutant was isolated to identify the genes and morphological structures involved in biofilm formation in the very well characterized E. coli K-12 context. This mutant acquired the ability to colonize hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (polystyrene) surfaces and to form aggregation clumps. A single point mutation, resulting in the replacement of a leucine by an arginine residue at position 43 in the regulatory protein OmpR, was responsible for this phenotype. Observations by electron microscopy revealed the presence at the surfaces of the mutant bacteria of fibrillar structures looking like the particular fimbriae described by the Olsén group and designated curli (A. Olsén, A. Jonsson, and S. Normark, Nature 338:652-655, 1989). The production of curli (visualized by Congo red binding) and the expression of the csgA gene encoding curlin synthesis (monitored by coupling a reporter gene to its promoter) were significantly increased in the presence of the ompR allele described in this work. Transduction of knockout mutations in either csgA or ompR caused the loss of the adherence properties of several biofilm-forming E. coli strains, including all those which were isolated in this work from the wall of a continuous culture apparatus and two clinical strains isolated from patients with catheter-related infections. These results indicate that curli are morphological structures of major importance for inert surface colonization and biofilm formation and demonstrate that their synthesis is under the control of the EnvZ-OmpR two-component regulatory system.

  15. High Production of 2,3-butanediol by a Mutant Strain of the Newly Isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae SRP2 with Increased Tolerance Towards Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Shafiqur; Xu, Chunbao (Charles); Ma, Kesen; Nanda, Malaya; Qin, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesel, a renewable fuel produced by transesterification of animal fats and vegetable oils, generates about 10% (v/v) of crude glycerol as a core byproduct. The high volume of this non bio-degradable glycerol is becoming of a great environmental and economical concern due to its worldwide ever-growing surplus. Herein we report a high production of 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) from pure and biodiesel derived crude glycerol using a mutant K. pneumoniae SRM2 obtained from a newly isolated strain Klebsiella pneumoniae SRP2. The mutant strain SRM2 with standing high glycerol concentration (220 g L-1 of medium) could rapidly convert glycerol aerobically to 2,3-BD, a versatile product extensively used in chemical, pharmaceutical and fuel industries Our study revealed that an increased GDH activity led to a substantially enhanced production of 2,3-BD. The mutant strain exhibited 1.3-fold higher activity of GDH than that of parent strain (500.08 vs. 638.6 µmol min -1 mg -1 protein), yielding of 32.3 g L-1 and 77.5 g L-1 2,3-BD with glycerol in batch and fed-batch process respectively. However, in batch culture with crude glycerol, cell growth and glycerol consumption were expressively boosted, and 2,3-BD production was 27.7 g L-1 from 75.0 g/L crude glycerol. In this report, the optimal conditions for high production of 2,3-BD were defined in a completely aerobic process, and 0.59 g g-1 product yield of 2,3-BD was attained by the mutated strain K. pneumoniae SRM2, which is the highest amount obtained from batch biotransformation process of glycerol metabolism till today. These results indicated that our newly developed mutant can tolerate high concentration of glycerol, have a high glycerol utilization rate, and high product yield of 2,3-BD. It is demonstrated that the mutant strain K. pneumoniae SRM2 has an ability to produce fewer co-products at trace concentrations at higher glycerol concentrations, and could be a potential candidate for 2,3-DB production in an industrial

  16. Nitrogen fixation ability of exopolysaccharide synthesis mutants of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 and Rhizobium trifolii is restored by the addition of homologous exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, S P; Chen, H; Batley, M; Redmond, J W; Rolfe, B G

    1987-01-01

    Several transposon Tn5-induced mutants of the broad-host-range Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 produce little or no detectable acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS) and are unable to induce nitrogen-fixing nodules on Leucaena leucocephala var. Peru or siratro plants. The ability of these Exo- mutants to induce functioning nodules on Leucaena plants was restored by coinoculation with a Sym plasmid-cured (Nod- Exo+) derivative of parent strain NGR234, purified EPS from the parent strain, or the oligosaccharide from the EPS. Coinoculation with EPS or related oligosaccharide also resulted in formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on siratro plants. In addition, an Exo- mutant (ANU437) of Rhizobium trifolii ANU794 was able to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on white clover in the presence of added EPS or related oligosaccharide from R. trifolii ANU843. These results demonstrate that the absence of Rhizobium EPSs can result in failure of effective symbiosis with both temperate and subtropical legumes. Images PMID:3025187

  17. Selective chemical inhibition of agr quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus promotes host defense with minimal impact on resistance.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O; Alexander, Susan M; Femling, Jon K; Gray, Brian M; DeLeo, Frank R; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Horswill, Alexander R; Hall, Pamela R; Gresham, Hattie D

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  18. Selective Chemical Inhibition of agr Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus Promotes Host Defense with Minimal Impact on Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O.; Alexander, Susan M.; Femling, Jon K.; Gray, Brian M.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Hall, Pamela R.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  19. Use of the quorum sensing inhibitor furanone C-30 to interfere with biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and its luxS mutant strain.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyan; Wang, Qian; Hu, Yuejian; Liang, Jingping; Jiang, Yuntao; Ma, Rui; Tang, Zisheng; Huang, Zhengwei

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is recognised as a major aetiological agent of dental caries. One of its important virulence factors is its ability to form biofilms on tooth surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the quorum sensing inhibitor furanone C-30 on biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain. The effects of furanone C-30 on biofilms of both strains formed on 96-well microtitre plates at 37 °C were determined by a colorimetric technique (MTT assay). Different concentrations of furanone C-30 (0.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μg/mL) and different time points of biofilm formation (4, 14 and 24 h) were investigated. The structures and thickness of the biofilms were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Quorum sensing-related gene expression (ftf, smu630, brpA, gbpB, gtfB, vicR, comDE and relA) was investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that synthetic furanone C-30 can inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain, although it does not affect the bacterial growth rate itself. The quantities of biofilm formed by both strains significantly decreased (P<0.05) and the biofilms became thinner and looser as revealed by CLSM with increasing concentrations of furanone C-30. Expression of the genes tested was downregulated in the biofilms by the addition of furanone C-30. These results revealed that synthetic furanone C-30 can effectively inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain.

  20. Immunological responses induced by asd and wzy/asd mutant strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Piao, Hong Hua; Tam, Vo Thi Minh; Na, Hee Sam; Kim, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Phil Youl; Kim, Soo Young; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Choy, Hyon E; Kim, Suhng Wook; Hong, Yeongjin

    2010-08-01

    Attenuated bacteria have long been developed as vaccine candidates but can have some disadvantages, such as the potential for damage to immune organs due to insufficient clearance. To minimize these disadvantages, we generated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants SHJ2104 (asd::cm) and HTSaYA (wzy::km, asd::cm). The wzy gene codes for the O-antigen polymerase, which is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, and asd codes for aspartate beta-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, which participates in cell wall formation. The strains synthesized LPS with a short-chain length, and showed lower cytotoxicity and reduced intracellular proliferation in animal cells compared to wild-type bacteria. After oral infection, the mutants were cleared in immune tissues, including the Peyer's patch, mesenteric lymph node, and spleen, within 5 days. The LD50 of the mutants in Balb/c mice was estimated to be 10(6) higher than wild-type bacteria when administered either via an oral or i.p. route, indicating that the two strains are highly attenuated. To compare the immune response to and protective effects of the mutants against wild-type bacterial infection, we inoculated the mutants into mice via an oral (1x10(10)CFU) or i.p. (1x10(7) CFU) route once or twice at a two week interval. All immune responses, such as serum IgG and secretory IgA levels, cytokine production, and delayed hypersensitivity, were highly induced by two rounds of immunization. HTSaYA and SHJ2104 induced similar immune responses, and mice immunized with HTSaYA or SHJ2104 via an i.p. route were protected against wild-type Salmonella infection even at 100-fold of the LD(50) (5x10(6) CFU). Taken together, these data indicate that HTSaYA and SHJ2104 could be developed as live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidates.

  1. Systematic strain construction and process development: Xylitol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Candida tenuis xylose reductase in wild-type or mutant form.

    PubMed

    Pratter, S M; Eixelsberger, T; Nidetzky, B

    2015-12-01

    A novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae whole-cell biocatalyst for xylitol production based on Candida tenuis xylose reductase (CtXR) is presented. Six recombinant strains expressing wild-type CtXR or an NADH-specific mutant were constructed and evaluated regarding effects of expression mode, promoter strength, biocatalyst concentration and medium composition. Intracellular XR activities ranged from 0.09 U mgProt(-1) to 1.05 U mgProt(-1) but did not correlate with the strains' xylitol productivities, indicating that other factors limited xylose conversion in the high-activity strains. The CtXR mutant decreased the biocatalyst's performance, suggesting use of the NADPH-preferring wild-type enzyme when (semi-)aerobic conditions are applied. In a bioreactor process, the best-performing strain converted 40 g L(-1) xylose with an initial productivity of 1.16 g L(-1)h(-1) and a xylitol yield of 100%. The obtained results underline the potential of CtXR wild-type for xylose reduction and point out parameters to improve "green" xylitol production.

  2. AGR-1 Data Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Abbott

    2010-03-01

    ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the data streams associated with the first Advanced Gas Reactor experiment (AGR-1), the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. They include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing, to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documentation that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent quality assurance program. The NDMAS database processing and qualification status of the following five data streams is reported in this document: 1. Fuel fabrication data. All data have been processed into the NDMAS database and qualified (1,819 records). 2. Fuel irradiation data. Data from all 13 AGR-1 reactor cycles have been processed into the NDMAS database and tested. Of these, 85% have been qualified and 15% have failed NDMAS accuracy testing. 3. FPMS data. Reprocessed (January 2010) data from all 13 AGR-1 reactor cycles have been processed into the database and capture tested. Final qualification of these data will be recorded after QA approval of an Engineering Calculations and Analysis Report

  3. Comparison of wild-type and UV-mutant beta-glucanase-producing strains of Talaromyces emersonii with potential in brewing applications.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Tracey C; Lalor, Eoin; Hanniffy, Orla; Savage, Angela V; Tuohy, Maria G

    2005-04-01

    A screen of 46 UV-mutant strains of the moderately thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii yielded two mutants (TC2, TC5) that displayed gross morphological differences to the parent strain and enhanced activity against mixed linkage cereal beta-glucans. Activity against beta-(1, 3)(1, 4)-D: -glucan from barley (BBGase) was measured during growth of the mutant and wild-type strains on a variety of carbon sources, ranging from solka floc to crude cereal fractions. In liquid culture, TC2 and TC5 secreted 1.2- to 8.6-fold more BBGase than the parent strain and markedly less beta-glucosidase (exo-activity); enzyme levels were dependent on the carbon source. Cellulose induced high BBGase. However, beet pulp, wheat bran, carob and tea-leaves were cheap and effective inducers. T. emersonii wild-type, TC2 and TC5 crude enzyme preparations achieved similar end-points during the hydrolysis of commercial barley beta-glucan (13.0-16.9%), but were more active against crude beta-glucan from barley (16.0-24.2% hydrolysis). The products of hydrolysis were quantified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Mash trials indicated that enzyme preparations from all three organisms effected a significant reduction in wort viscosity and residual mash beta-glucan. Finally, TC2 and TC5 produce more efficient beta-glucan-depolymerizing enzymes; and wheat bran and solka floc can be used to provide inexpensive and potent enzyme cocktails with potential in brewing applications.

  4. Evaluation of the G145R Mutant of the Hepatitis B Virus as a Minor Strain in Mother-to-Child Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Haruki; Inui, Ayano; Umetsu, Shuichiro; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Konishi, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    The role of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) mutant G145R, with a single change in amino acid 145 of the surface protein, as a minor population remains unknown in mother-to-child transmission. The minor strain as well as the major strain of the G145R mutant were evaluated in three cohorts using a locked nucleic acid probe-based real-time PCR. The breakthrough cohort consisted of children who were born to HBV carrier mothers and became HBV carriers despite immnoprophylaxis (n = 25). The control cohort consisted of HBV carriers who had no history of receiving the hepatitis B vaccine, hepatitis B immunoglobulin or antiviral treatment (n = 126). The pregnant cohort comprised pregnant women with chronic HBV infection (n = 31). In the breakthrough cohort, 6 showed positive PCR results (major, 2; minor, 4). In the control cohort, 13 showed positive PCR results (major, 0; minor, 13). HBeAg-positive patients were prone to have the G145R mutant as a minor population. Deep sequencing was performed in a total of 32 children (PCR positive, n = 13; negative, n = 19). In the breakthrough cohort, the frequency of the G145R mutant ranged from 0.54% to 6.58%. In the control cohort, the frequency of the G145R mutant ranged from 0.42% to 4.1%. Of the 31 pregnant women, 4 showed positive PCR results (major, n = 0; minor, n = 4). All of the pregnant women were positive for HBeAg and showed a high viral load. Three babies born to 3 pregnant women with the G145R mutant were evaluated. After the completion of immunoprophylaxis, 2 infants became negative for HBsAg. The remaining infant became negative for HBsAg after the first dose of HB vaccine. G145R was detected in one-fourth of the children with immunoprophylaxis failure. However, the pre-existence of the G145R mutant as a minor population in pregnant women does not always cause breakthrough infection in infants. PMID:27812178

  5. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) production from biodiesel by-product and propionic acid by mutant strains of Pandoraea sp.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Fabrício C; Contiero, Jonas; de Paula, Carolina B C; Gomez, José Gregório C; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2017-04-10

    Pandoraea sp. MA03 wild type strain was subjected to UV mutation in order to obtain mutants unable to grow on propionic acid (PA) but still able to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] from glycerol and PA at high 3HV yields. In shake flask experiments, mutant prp25 was selected from 52 mutants affected in the propionate metabolism exhibiting a conversion rate of PA into 3HV units of 0.78 gg(-1) . The utilization of crude glycerol (CG) plus PA or valeric acid resulted in a copolymer with 3HV contents varying from 21.9 to 30 mol% and 22.2 to 36.7 mol%, respectively. Fed-batch fermentations were performed using CG and PA and reached a 3HV yield of 1.16 gg(-1) , which is 86% of the maximum theoretical yield. Nitrogen limitation was a key parameter for polymer accumulation reaching up to 63.7% content and 18.1 mol% of 3HV. Henceforth, mutant prp25 is revealed as an additional alternative to minimize costs and support the P(3HB-co-3HV) production from biodiesel by-products. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlation between biofilm production, antibiotic susceptibility and exopolysaccharide composition in Burkholderia pseudomallei bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Mongkolrob, Rungrawee; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2015-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a fatal tropical infectious disease, which has been reported to have a high rate of recurrence, even when an intensive dose of antibiotics is used. Biofilm formation is believed to be one of the possible causes of relapse because of its ability to increase drug resistance. EPS in biofilms have been reported to be related to the limitation of antibiotic penetration in B. pseudomallei. However, the mechanisms by which biofilms restrict the diffusion of antibiotics remain unclear. The present study presents a correlation between exopolysaccharide production in biofilm matrix and antibiotic resistance in B. pseudomallei using bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains. CLSM revealed a reduction in exopolysaccharide production and disabled micro-colony formation in B. pseudomallei mutants, which paralleled the antibiotic resistance. Different ratios of carbohydrate contents in the exopolysaccharides of the mutants were detected, although they have the same components, including glucose, galactose, mannose, and rhamnose, with the exception being that no detectable rhamnose peak was observed in the bpsI mutant. These results indicate that the correlation between these phenomena in the B. pseudomallei biofilm at least results from the exopolysaccharide, which may be under the regulation of bpsI, ppk, or rpoS genes.

  7. A new osteopetrosis mutant mouse strain (ntl) with odontoma-like proliferations and lack of tooth roots.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xincheng; Rios, Hector F; Jiang, Baichun; Xing, Lianping; Kadlcek, Renata; Greenfield, Edward M; Luo, Guangbin; Feng, Jian Q

    2009-12-01

    A new spontaneous mouse mutant (ntl) with autosomal-recessive osteopetrosis was characterized. These mice formed tartrate-resistant acid phosphate (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts but their osteoclasts had no ruffled border and did not resorb bone. These mice displayed no tooth eruption or tooth root formation. Adult mutant mice developed odontoma-like proliferations near the proximal ends of the incisors. Intraperitoneal injection of progenitor cells from the liver of 16.5 days postcoitum wild-type embryos into newborn mutants rescued the osteopetrosis phenotype, indicating that the defects were intrinsic to the osteoclasts. Our findings not only provide further support for a critical role of osteoclasts in tooth eruption and tooth root development, but also suggest that the perturbation of the homeostasis of the odontogenic precursors of the incisors is primarily responsible for the development of the odontoma-like proliferations in this osteopetrosis mutant. Genetic mapping has narrowed down the location of the mutant allele to a genetic interval of 3.2 cM on mouse chromosome 17.

  8. Computational studies on the resistance of penicillin-binding protein 2B (PBP2B) of wild-type and mutant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae against β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Jothi; Vennila, Jannet; Subbiah, Parthasarathy

    2013-09-01

    Mutations within transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein 2B of the strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to resistance against β-lactam antibiotics. To uncover the important residues responsible for sensitivity and resistance, the recently determined three dimensional structures of penicillin-binding protein 2B of both wild-type R6 (sensitive) and mutant 5204 (resistant) strains along with the predicted structures of other mutant strains G54, Hungary19A-6 and SP195 were considered for the interaction study with β-lactam antibiotics using induced-fit docking of Schrödinger. Associated binding energies of the complexes and their intermolecular interactions in the binding site clearly show that the wild-type R6 as sensitive, mutant strains 5204 and G54 as highly resistant, and the mutant strains Hungary19A-6 and SP195 as intermediate resistant. The study also reveals that the mutant strains Hungary19A-6 and SP195 exhibit intermediate resistant because of the existence of mutations till the intermediate 538th and 516th positions, respectively, and not till the end of the C-terminus. Furthermore, our investigations show that if the mutations are extended till the end of the C terminus, then the antibiotic resistance of induced-mutated strains increases from intermediate to high as in the strains 5204 and G54. The binding patterns obtained in the study are useful in designing potential inhibitors against multidrug resistant S. pneumoniae.

  9. Sulphide Resistance in the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa: a Comparative Study of Morphology and Photosynthetic Performance Between the Sulphide-Resistant Mutant and the Wild-Type Strain.

    PubMed

    Bañares-España, Elena; del Mar Fernández-Arjona, María; García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Hernández-López, Miguel; Reul, Andreas; Mariné, Mariona Hernández; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is a mesophilic freshwater organism, which cannot tolerate sulphide. However, it was possible to isolate a sulphide-resistant (S(r)) mutant strain that was able to survive in a normally lethal medium sulphide. In order to evaluate the cost of the mutation conferring sulphide resistance in the S(r) strain of M. aeruginosa, the morphology and the photosynthetic performance were compared to that found in the wild-type, sulphide-sensitive (S(s)) strain. An increase in size and a disrupted morphology was observed in S(r) cells in comparison to the S(s) counterpart. Phycoerythrin and phycocyanin levels were higher in the S(r) than in the S(s) cells, whereas a higher carotenoid content, per unit volume, was found in the S(s) strain. The irradiance-saturated photosynthetic oxygen-production rate (GPR max) and the photosynthetic efficiency (measured both by oxygen production and fluorescence, α(GPR) and α(ETR)) were lower in the S(r) strain than in the wild-type. These results appear to be the result of package effect. On the other hand, the S(r) strain showed higher quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching, especially those regulated mechanisms (estimated throughout qN and Y(NPQ)) and a significantly lower slope in the maximum quantum yield of light-adapted samples (Fv'/Fm') compared to the S(s) strain. These findings point to a change in the regulation of the quenching of the transition states (qT) in the S(r) strain which may be generated by a change in the distribution of thylakoidal membranes, which somehow could protect metalloenzymes of the electron transport chain from the lethal effect of sulphide.

  10. NAD(P)+-Malic Enzyme Mutants of Sinorhizobium sp. Strain NGR234, but Not Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571, Maintain Symbiotic N2 Fixation Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Aono, Toshihiro; Poole, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    C4-dicarboxylic acids appear to be metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in N2-fixing bacteria (bacteroids) within legume nodules. In Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteroids from alfalfa, NAD+-malic enzyme (DME) is required for N2 fixation, and this activity is thought to be required for the anaplerotic synthesis of pyruvate. In contrast, in the pea symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum, pyruvate synthesis occurs via either DME or a pathway catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and pyruvate kinase (PYK). Here we report that dme mutants of the broad-host-range Sinorhizobium sp. strain NGR234 formed nodules whose level of N2 fixation varied from 27 to 83% (plant dry weight) of the wild-type level, depending on the host plant inoculated. NGR234 bacteroids had significant PCK activity, and while single pckA and single dme mutants fixed N2 at reduced rates, a pckA dme double mutant had no N2-fixing activity (Fix−). Thus, NGR234 bacteroids appear to synthesize pyruvate from TCA cycle intermediates via DME or PCK pathways. These NGR234 data, together with other reports, suggested that the completely Fix− phenotype of S. meliloti dme mutants may be specific to the alfalfa-S. meliloti symbiosis. We therefore examined the ME-like genes azc3656 and azc0119 from Azorhizobium caulinodans, as azc3656 mutants were previously shown to form Fix− nodules on the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata. We found that purified AZC3656 protein is an NAD(P)+-malic enzyme whose activity is inhibited by acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and stimulated by succinate and fumarate. Thus, whereas DME is required for symbiotic N2 fixation in A. caulinodans and S. meliloti, in other rhizobia this activity can be bypassed via another pathway(s). PMID:22307295

  11. 2-DE based proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild and K+ transport-affected mutant (trk1,2) strains at the growth exponential and stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Curto, Miguel; Valledor, Luis; Navarrete, Clara; Gutiérrez, Dolores; Sychrova, Hana; Ramos, José; Jorrin, Jesús

    2010-11-10

    By using a 2-DE based workflow, the proteome of wild and potassium transport mutant trk1,2 under optimal growth potassium concentration (50mM) has been analyzed. At the exponential and stationary phases, both strains showed similar growth, morphology potassium content, and Vmax of rubidium transport, the only difference found being the Km values for this potassium analogue transport, higher for the mutant (20mM) than for the wild (3-6mM) cells. Proteins were buffer-extracted, precipitated, solubilized, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the 5-8 pH range. More differences in protein content (37-64mgg(-1) cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (178-307) were found between growth phases than between strains. In all, 164 spots showed no differences between samples and a total of 105 were considered to be differential after ANOVA test. 171 proteins, corresponding to 71 unique gene products have been identified, this set being dominated by cytosolic species and glycolitic enzymes. The ranking of the more abundant spots revealed no differences between samples and indicated fermentative metabolism, and active cell wall biosynthesis, redox homeostasis, biosynthesis of amino acids, coenzymes, nucleotides, and RNA, and protein turnover, apart from cell division and growth. PCA analysis allowed the separation of growth phases (PC1 and 2) and strains at the stationary phase (PC3 and 4), but not at the exponential one. These results are also supported by clustering analysis. As a general tendency, a number of spots newly appeared at the stationary phase in wild type, and to a lesser extent, in the mutant. These up-accumulated spots corresponded to glycolitic enzymes, indicating a more active glucose catabolism, accompanied by an accumulation of methylglyoxal detoxification, and redox-homeostasis enzymes. Also, more extensive proteolysis was observed at the stationary phase with this resulting in an accumulation of low Mr protein species.

  12. The Use of NF1 and NF2 Mutant Mouse Strains in the Investigation of Gene Function and Disease Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    combined germline Nfl/p53 mutant model that develops MPNSTs . Genetic modifier screens using the Nfl/p53 model have proceeded to the point of identifying...34 model of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ) was recently published (10) and will not be described further here. The use of the Nfi...phosphorylation sites) will allow us to test this hypothesis in the context of our existing and future mouse models of neurofibroma and MPNST formation

  13. Comparative Study of Nonautolytic Mutant and Wild-Type Strains of Coprinopsis cinerea Supports an Important Role of Glucanases in Fruiting Body Autolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonghua; Niu, Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Wenming; Yang, Mingmei; Liu, Cuicui; Xiong, Yuanjing; Zhao, Yan; Pei, Siyu; Qin, Qin; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Yuan; Yuan, Sheng

    2015-11-04

    Autolysis of Coprinopsis cinerea fruiting bodies affects its commercial value. In this study, a mutant of C. cinerea that exhibits pileus expansion without pileus autolysis was obtained using ultraviolet mutagenesis. This suggests that pileus expansion and pileus autolysis involve different enzymes or proteins. Among the detected hydrolytic enzymes, only β-1,3-glucanase activity increased with expansion and autolysis of pilei in the wild-type strain, but the increase was abolished in the mutant. This suggests that β-1,3-glucanases plays a major role in the autolysis. Although there are 43 possible β-1,3-glucoside hydrolases genes, only 4 known genes, which have products that are thought to act synergistically to degrade the β-1,3-glucan backbone of cell walls during fruiting body autolysis, and an unreported gene were upregulated during pileus expansion and autolysis in the wild-type stain but were suppressed in the mutant. This suggests that expression of these β-1,3-glucanases is potentially controlled by a single regulatory mechanism.

  14. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of nitrile hydratase gene of mutant 4D strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA 34 in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Pratush, Amit; Seth, Amit; Bhalla, T C

    2012-10-01

    The NHase encoding gene of mutant 4D was isolated by PCR amplification. The NHase gene of mutant 4D was successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli by using Ek/LIC Duet cloning kits (Novagen). For the active expression of the NHase gene, the co-expression of small cobalt transporter gene (P-protein gene) has also been co-expressed with NHase gene E. coli. The nucleotide sequence of this NHase gene revealed high homology with the H-NHase of Rhodococcus rhodochrous J1. The recombinant E. coli cells showed higher NHase activity (5.9 U/mg dcw) as compared to the wild (4.1 U/mg dcw) whereas it is less than the mutant strain (8.4 U/mg dcw). Addition of cobalt ion in Luria-Bertani medium is needed up to a very small concentration (0.4 mM) for NHase activity. The recombinant E. coli exhibited maximum NHase activity at 6 h of incubation and was purified with a yield of 56 % with specific activity of 37.1 U/mg protein.

  15. Morphological and genetic characterization of group I Clostridium botulinum type B strain 111 and the transcriptional regulator spoIIID gene knockout mutant in sporulation.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Koji; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Kohda, Tomoko; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a heat-resistant spore-forming bacterium that causes the serious paralytic illness botulism. Heat-resistant spores may cause food sanitation hazards and sporulation plays a central role in the survival of C. botulinum. We observed morphological changes and investigated the role of the transcriptional regulator SpoIIID in the sporulation of C. botulinum type B strain 111 in order to elucidate the molecular mechanism in C. botulinum. C. botulinum type B formed heat-resistant spores through successive morphological changes corresponding to those of Bacillus subtilis, a spore-forming model organism. An analysis of the spoIIID gene knockout mutant revealed that the transcriptional regulator SpoIIID contributed to heat-resistant spore formation by C. botulinum type B and activated the transcription of the sigK gene later during sporulation. Transcription of the spoIIID gene, which differed from that in B. subtilis and Clostridium difficile, was observed in the sigE gene knockout mutant of C. botulinum type B. An analysis of the sigF gene knockout mutant showed that the sporulation-specific sigma factor SigF was essential for transcription of the spoIIID gene in C. botulinum type B. These results suggest that the regulation of sporulation in C. botulinum is not similar to that in B. subtilis and other clostridia.

  16. Sodium dodecyl sulphate, a strong inducer of thermostable glucanhydrolase secretion from a derepressed mutant strain of Bacillus alcalophilus GCBNA-4.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Nadia; Ali, Sikander; Ul-Haq, Ikram

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we report the optimisation of batch conditions for improved α-1,4-glucan-glucanohydrolase (GGH) secretion by a nitrous acid (NA)-treated Bacillus alcalophilus. The wild (isolate GCB-18) and NA-derivative (mutant GCBNA-4) were grown in a medium containing 10 g/L nutrient broth, 10 g/L starch, 5 g/L lactose, 2 g/L ammonium sulphate, 2 g/L CaCl2 and phosphate buffer (pH 7.6). Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was used as an enzyme inducer while batch fermentations were carried out at 40 °C. The mutant produced GGH in 40 h which was 15-fold higher than the wild in presence of SDS. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the mutant culture exhibited the capability for improved enzyme activity over a broad range of temperature (35-70 °C). The enzyme was purified by cation-exchange column chromatography with ~80 % recovery. The performance of fuzzy-logic system control was found to be highly promising for the improved substrate conversion rate. The correlation (1.045E + 0025) among variables demonstrated the model terms as highly significant indicating commercial utility of the culture used (P < 0.05).

  17. Open fermentative production of fuel ethanol from food waste by an acid-tolerant mutant strain of Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kedong; Ruan, Zhiyong; Shui, Zongxia; Wang, Yanwei; Hu, Guoquan; He, Mingxiong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of present study was to develop a process for open ethanol fermentation from food waste using an acid-tolerant mutant of Zymomonas mobilis (ZMA7-2). The mutant showed strong tolerance to acid condition of food waste hydrolysate and high ethanol production performance. By optimizing fermentation parameters, ethanol fermentation with initial glucose concentration of 200 g/L, pH value around 4.0, inoculum size of 10% and without nutrient addition was considered as best conditions. Moreover, the potential of bench scales fermentation and cell reusability was also examined. The fermentation in bench scales (44 h) was faster than flask scale (48 h), and the maximum ethanol concentration and ethanol yield (99.78 g/L, 0.50 g/g) higher than that of flask scale (98.31 g/L, 0.49 g/g). In addition, the stable cell growth and ethanol production profile in five cycles successive fermentation was observed, indicating the mutant was suitable for industrial ethanol production.

  18. Eye pigments in wild-type and eye-color mutant strains of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Beard, C B; Benedict, M Q; Primus, J P; Finnerty, V; Collins, F H

    1995-01-01

    Chromatographic analysis of pigments extracted from wild-type eyes of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae reveals the presence of the ommatin precursor 3-hydroxykynurenine, its transamination derivative xanthurenic acid, and a dark, red-brown pigment spot that probably is composed of two or more low mobility xanthommatins. No colored or fluorescent pteridines are evident. Mosquitoes homozygous for an autosomal recessive mutation at the red-eye (r) locus have a brick-red eye color in larvae, pupae, and young adults, in contrast to the almost black color of the wild eye. Mosquitoes homozygous for this mutant allele have levels of ommochrome precursors that are indistinguishable from the wild-type, but the low-mobility xanthommatin spot is ochre-brown in color rather than red-brown as in the wild-type. Mosquitoes with two different mutant alleles at the X-linked pink-eye locus (p, which confers a pink eye color, and pw, which confers a white eye phenotype in homozygotes or hemizygous males) have normal levels of ommochrome precursors but no detectable xanthommatins. Mosquitoes homozygous for both the r and p mutant alleles have apricot-colored eyes and show no detectable xanthommatins. Both the pink-eye and red-eye mutations appear to involve defects in the transport into or assembly of pigments in the membrane-bound pigment granules rather then defects in ommochrome synthesis.

  19. Evaluation of the virulence of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris mutant strains lacking functional genes in the OxyR regulon.

    PubMed

    Charoenlap, Nisanart; Buranajitpakorn, Sarinya; Duang-Nkern, Jintana; Namchaiw, Poommaree; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2011-08-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris causes black rot in cruciferous crops. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production and accumulation is an important initial response in plant defense against invading microbes. The role of genes involved in the bacterial H(2)O(2) protection system in pathogenicity was evaluated. Mutants of katA (encoding a monofunctional catalase) and, to a lesser extent, katG (encoding a catalase-peroxidase) and oxyR (encoding a H(2)O(2) sensor and a transcription regulator), are hypersensitive to H(2)O(2) treatments that mimic the plant H(2)O(2) burst. These data correlate with the results of pathogenicity testing that show katA, katG, and oxyR mutants are avirulent on a compatible plant. Moreover, exposure to H(2)O(2) (1, 2, and 4 mM) highly induces the expression of genes in the OxyR regulon, including katA, katG, and ahpC. The avirulent phenotype of the oxyR mutant is partly because of its inability to mount an adaptive response upon exposure to an H(2)O(2) burst. Our data provide insights into important roles of a transcription regulator and other genes involved in peroxide stress protection in the virulence of X. campestris pv. campestris.

  20. Production of acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) by a hyper-producing mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and recovery by pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, N.; Blaschek, H.P.

    1999-07-01

    A silicone membrane was used to study butanol separation from model butanol solutions and fermentation broth. Depending upon the butanol feed concentration in the model solution and pervaporation conditions, butanol selectivities of 20.88--68.32 and flux values of 158.7--215.4 g m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} were achieved. Higher flux values were obtained at higher butanol concentrations using air as sweep gas. In an integrated process of butanol fermentation--recovery, solvent productivities were improved to 200% of the control batch fermentation productivities. In a batch reactor the hyper-butanol-producing mutant strain C. beijerinckii BA101 utilized 57.3 g/L glucose and produced 24.2 g/L total solvents, while in the integrated process it produced 51.5 g/L (culture volume) total solvents. Concentrated glucose medium was also fermented. The C. beijerinckii BA101 mutant strain was not negatively affected by the pervaporative conditions. In the integrated experiment, acids were not produced. With the active fermentation broth, butanol selectivity was reduced by a factor of 2--3. However, the membrane flux was not affected by the active fermentation broth. The butanol permeate concentration ranged from 26.4 to 95.4 g/L, depending upon butanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Since the permeate of most membranes contains acetone, butanol, and ethanol, it is suggested that distillation be used for further purification.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Agroindustrial Byproducts for the Production of Alkaline Protease by Wild and Mutant Strains of Bacillus subtilis in Submerged and Solid State Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Ikramul

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the screening of different agroindustrial byproducts for enhanced production of alkaline protease by a wild and EMS induced mutant strain of Bacillus subtilis IH-72EMS8. During submerged fermentation, different agro-industrial byproducts were tested which include defatted seed meals of rape, guar, sunflower, gluten, cotton, soybean, and gram. In addition to these meals, rice bran, wheat bran, and wheat flour were also evaluated for protease production. Of all the byproducts tested, soybean meal at a concentration of 20 g/L gave maximum production of the enzyme, that is, 5.74  ±  0.26 U/mL from wild and 11.28  ±  0.45 U/mL from mutant strain, during submerged fermentation. Different mesh sizes (coarse, medium, and fine) of the soybean meal were also evaluated, and a finely ground soybean meal (fine mesh) was found to be the best. In addition to the defatted seed meals, their alkali extracts were also tested for the production of alkaline protease by Bacillus subtilis, but these were proved nonsignificant for enhanced production of the enzyme. The production of the enzyme was also studied in solid state fermentation, and different agro-industrial byproducts were also evaluated for enzyme production. Wheat bran partially replaced with guar meal was found as the best substrate for maximum enzyme production under solid state fermentation conditions. PMID:24294129

  2. Production of acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) by a hyper-producing mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and recovery by pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Blaschek, H P

    1999-01-01

    A silicone membrane was used to study butanol separation from model butanol solutions and fermentation broth. Depending upon the butanol feed concentration in the model solution and pervaporation conditions, butanol selectivities of 20.88-68.32 and flux values of 158.7-215.4 g m(-)(2) h(-)(1) were achieved. Higher flux values (400 g m(-)(2) h(-)(1)) were obtained at higher butanol concentrations using air as sweep gas. In an integrated process of butanol fermentation-recovery, solvent productivities were improved to 200% of the control batch fermentation productivities. In a batch reactor the hyper-butanol-producing mutant strain C. beijerinckii BA101 utilized 57.3 g/L glucose and produced 24.2 g/L total solvents, while in the integrated process it produced 51.5 g/L (culture volume) total solvents. Concentrated glucose medium was also fermented. The C. beijerinckii BA101 mutant strain was not negatively affected by the pervaporative conditions. In the integrated experiment, acids were not produced. With the active fermentation broth, butanol selectivity was reduced by a factor of 2-3. However, the membrane flux was not affected by the active fermentation broth. The butanol permeate concentration ranged from 26.4 to 95.4 g/L, depending upon butanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Since the permeate of most membranes contains acetone, butanol, and ethanol (and small concentrations of acids), it is suggested that distillation be used for further purification.

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of Klebsiella pneumonia (LCT-KP214) and a mutant strain (LCT-KP289) obtained after spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With the development of space science, it is important to analyze the relationship between the space environment and genome variations that might cause phenotypic changes in microbes. Klebsiella pneumoniae is commonly found on the human body and is resistant to multiple drugs. To study space-environment-induced genome variations and drug resistance changes, K. pneumoniae was carried into outer space by the Shenzhou VIII spacecraft. Results The K. pneumoniae strain LCT-KP289 was selected after spaceflight based on its phenotypic differences compared to the ground-control strain. Analysis of genomic structural variations revealed one inversion, 25 deletions, fifty-nine insertions, two translocations and six translocations with inversions. In addition, 155 and 400 unique genes were observed in LCT-KP214 and LCT-KP289, respectively, including the gene encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase, which generates the ATP and NADH required for microbial growth. Furthermore, a large number of mutant genes were related to transport and metabolism. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most genes in these two strains had a dN/dS value greater than 1, indicating that the strain diversity increased after spaceflight. Analysis of drug-resistance phenotypes revealed that the K. pneumoniae strain LCT-KP289 was resistant to sulfamethoxazole, whereas the control strain, LCT-KP214, was not; both strains were resistant to benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, lincomycin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol and streptomycin. The sulfamethoxazole resistance may be associated with sequences in Scaffold7 in LCT-KP289, which were not observed in LCT-K214; this scaffold contained the gene sul1. In the strain LCT-KP289, we also observed a drug-resistance integron containing emrE (confers multidrug resistance) and ant (confers resistance to spectinomycin, streptomycin, tobramycin, kanamycin, sisomicin, dibekacin, and gentamicin). The gene ampC (confers resistance to penicillin, cephalosporin-ii and

  4. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Canovas, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S.; Andersen, Paal S.; Grzeskowiak, Piotr K.; Stegger, Marc; Damborg, Peter; Olsen, Christian A.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly

  5. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System.

    PubMed

    Canovas, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S; Andersen, Paal S; Grzeskowiak, Piotr K; Stegger, Marc; Damborg, Peter; Olsen, Christian A; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly

  6. Development of a nuclear transformation system for Oleaginous Green Alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa and genetic complementation of a mutant strain, deficient in arachidonic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zorin, Boris; Grundman, Omer; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Leu, Stefan; Shapira, Michal; Kaye, Yuval; Tourasse, Nicolas; Vallon, Olivier; Boussiba, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are considered a promising source for various high value products, such as carotenoids, ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The unicellular green alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa is an outstanding candidate for the efficient phototrophic production of arachidonic acid (AA), an essential ω-6 PUFA for infant brain development and a widely used ingredient in the baby formula industry. Although phototrophic production of such algal products has not yet been established, estimated costs are considered to be 2-5 times higher than competing heterotrophic production costs. This alga accumulates unprecedented amounts of AA within triacylglycerols and the molecular pathway of AA biosynthesis in L. incisa has been previously elucidated. Thus, progress in transformation and metabolic engineering of this high value alga could be exploited for increasing the efficient production of AA at competitive prices. We describe here the first successful transformation of L. incisa using the ble gene as a selection marker, under the control of the endogenous RBCS promoter. Furthermore, we have succeeded in the functional complementation of the L. incisa mutant strain P127, containing a mutated, inactive version of the delta-5 (Δ5) fatty acid desaturase gene. A copy of the functional Δ5 desaturase gene, linked to the ble selection marker, was transformed into the P127 mutant. The resulting transformants selected for zeocine resistant, had AA biosynthesis partially restored, indicating the functional complementation of the mutant strain with the wild-type gene. The results of this study present a platform for the successful genetic engineering of L. incisa and its long-chain PUFA metabolism.

  7. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11

    enhanced H2 production profiles using selected culture conditions and inhibitors of specific pathways in WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 3. Create Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutant strains with modified hydrogenases exhibiting increased O2 tolerance and greater H2 production; and 4. Integrate enhanced hydrogenase mutants and culture and metabolic factor studies to maximize 24-hour H2 production.

  8. AGR-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    John T. Maki

    2009-10-01

    This document presents the current state of planning for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment will be irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The test will contain six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule will contain a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. The irradiation is planned for about 700 effective full power days (approximately 2.4 calendar years) with a time-averaged, volume-average temperature of approximately 1050 °C. Average fuel burnup, for the entire test, will be greater than 17.7 % FIMA, and the fuel will experience fast neutron fluences between 2.4 and 4.5 x 1025 n/m2 (E>0.18 MeV).

  9. Live Attenuated Mutants of Francisella tularensis Protect Rabbits against Aerosol Challenge with a Virulent Type A Strain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Le'Kneitah P.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Santiago, Araceli E.; Mann, Barbara J.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia. No licensed vaccine is currently available for protection against tularemia, although an attenuated strain, dubbed the live vaccine strain (LVS), is given to at-risk laboratory personnel as an investigational new drug (IND). In an effort to develop a vaccine that offers better protection, recombinant attenuated derivatives of a virulent type A strain, SCHU S4, were evaluated in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Rabbits vaccinated via scarification with the three attenuated derivatives (SCHU S4 ΔguaBA, ΔaroD, and ΔfipB strains) or with LVS developed a mild fever, but no weight loss was detected. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all vaccinated rabbits were seropositive for IgG to F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4 at doses ranging from 50 to 500 50% lethal doses (LD50). All rabbits developed fevers and weight loss after challenge, but the severity was greater for mock-vaccinated rabbits. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives provided partial protection against death (27 to 36%) and a prolonged time to death compared to results for the mock-vaccinated group. In contrast, LVS and the ΔfipB strain both prolonged the time to death, but there were no survivors from the challenge. This is the first demonstration of vaccine efficacy against aerosol challenge with virulent type A F. tularensis in a species other than a rodent since the original work with LVS in the 1960s. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives warrant further evaluation and consideration as potential vaccines for tularemia and for identification of immunological correlates of protection. PMID:24614653

  10. Unusual ∆7,12,19 C35:3 Alkenone Produced by the Mutant Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP2758 in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Dillon, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Alkenones with chain length ranging from C37 to C40 are highly specific biomarkers for certain haptophyte algae in ocean and lake sediments and have been widely used for paleoclimate studies. Short chain alkenones (e.g., C35 and C36) have been found in environmental and culture samples but the origin and structures of these compounds are not fully understood. The benchmark marine alkenone producer, Emiliania huxleyi CCMP2758 strain (the mutant of strain CCMP1742, NEPCC55a) was reported to make 35:2 alkenone when cultured at 15 °C (Prahl et al., 2006). Here we show, when this strain is cultured at lower temperatures (e.g., 4°C), CCMP2758 produces large amount of 35:3 alkenone with unusual double bond positions of ∆7,12,19. We determined the double bond positions of the C35:3 methyl ketonee based on GC-MS analysis of cyclobutylimine derivatives and dimethyl disulfide derivatives respectively, and provide the first temperature calibrations based on the unsaturation ratios of C35 alkenones. Previous studies have found 35:2 alkenone with three methylene interruption in the Black Sea sediment, but it is the first time that an alkenone with a mixed three and five methylene interruption is found. The discovery of short chain alkenones with unusual double bond positions may shed new light to alkenone biosynthesis.

  11. Comparative transcriptome analysis between an evolved abscisic acid-overproducing mutant Botrytis cinerea TBC-A and its ancestral strain Botrytis cinerea TBC-6

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhongtao; Zhang, Zhi; Zhong, Juan; Luo, Di; Zhou, Jinyan; Yang, Jie; Xiao, Liang; Shu, Dan; Tan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical phytohormone which plays an important role in plant stress resistance. Moreover, ABA is also found to regulate the activation of innate immune cells and glucose homeostasis in mammals. Therefore, this ‘stress hormone’ is of great importance to theoretical research and agricultural and medical applications. Botrytis cinerea is a well-known phytopathogenic ascomycete that synthesizes ABA via a pathway substantially different from higher plants. Identification of the functional genes involved in ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea would be of special interest. We developed an ABA-overproducing mutant strain, B. cinerea TBC-A, previously and obtained a 41.5-Mb genome sequence of B. cinerea TBC-A. In this study, the transcriptomes of B. cinerea TBC-A and its ancestral strain TBC-6 were sequenced under identical fermentation conditions. A stringent comparative transcriptome analysis was performed to identify differentially expressed genes participating in the metabolic pathways related to ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea. This study provides the first global view of the transcriptional changes underlying the very different ABA productivity of the B. cinerea strains and will expand our knowledge of the molecular basis for ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea. PMID:27892476

  12. Gain/loss of poly(Glu50Tyr50)/poly(Glu60Ala30Tyr10) responsiveness in the bm12 mutant strain

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The development of inbred strains of mutant mice has proven useful in ascribing specific gene functions to particular genetic loci within the regions and subregions of the H-2 complex. The B6.C-H-2bm12 (bm12) strain is of particular interest in that, compared to parental C57Bl/6Kh (B6) mice, it bears a presumptive single gene mutation altering the Ab beta chain encoded by the I-A subregion. Our data show that bm12 mice have gained the ability to respond to poly(Glu50Tyr50)(GT) and have lost the ability to make plaque-forming cell or delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to the closely related copolymer, poly(Glu60Ala30Tyr10)(GAT), although retaining the ability to mount a GAT-specific T cell proliferative response. This is in sharp contrast to the parental B6 strain, which is a GT nonresponder and a GAT responder. Thus, this study is the first to report the establishment of responder status as a consequence of mutation. Possible mechanisms accounting for the gain/loss of GT/GAT responsiveness in the context of a two-step helper T cell model are discussed. PMID:7047670

  13. In vivo recruitment analysis and a mutant strain without any group 2 σ factor reveal roles of different σ factors in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Satu; Hakkila, Kaisa; Gunnelius, Liisa; Kurkela, Juha; Wada, Hajime; Tyystjärvi, Taina

    2016-01-01

    In eubacteria, replacement of one σ factor in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme by another one changes the transcription pattern. Cyanobacteria are eubacteria characterized by oxygenic photosynthesis, and they typically encode numerous group 2 σ factors that closely resemble the essential primary σ factor. A mutant strain of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 without functional group 2 σ factors (named as ΔsigBCDE) could not acclimate to heat, high salt or bright light stress, but in standard conditions ΔsigBCDE grew only 9% slower than the control strain. One-fifth of the genes in ΔsigBCDE was differently expressed compared with the control strain in standard growth conditions and several physiological changes in photosynthesis, and pigment and lipid compositions were detected. To directly analyze the σ factor content of RNAP holoenzyme in vivo, a His-tag was added to the γ subunit of RNAP in Synechocystis and RNAPs were collected. The results revealed that all group 2 σ factors were recruited by RNAP in standard conditions, but recruitment of SigB and SigC increased in heat stress, SigD in bright light, SigE in darkness and SigB, SigC and SigE in high salt, explaining the poor acclimation of ΔsigBCDE to these stress conditions.

  14. EXAFS of Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase MoFe protein from wild-type and nif V mutant strains

    SciTech Connect

    Eidsness, M.K.; Flank, A.M.; Smith, B.E.; Flood, A.C.; Garner, C.D.; Cramer. S.P.

    1986-05-14

    The enzyme nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N/sub 2/ to NH/sub 3/. In Klebsiella pneumoniae a cluster of 17 genes in seven transcriptional units has been associated with nitrogen fixation. The nitrogenase enzyme from the nif V mutants is relatively ineffective at dinitrogen reduction, is more efficient than the wild-type enzyme at HCN reduction, and has its hydrogen evolution activity inhibited up to 80% by CO. This altered substrate specificity has been shown to be associated with the iron-molybdenum cofactor, FeMo-co, of the enzyme. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been a valuable tool for probing the molybdenum environment of wild-type nitrogenase, and the authors report here similar studies on the Nif V/sup -/ enzyme.

  15. A competitive index assay identifies several Ralstonia solanacearum type III effector mutant strains with reduced fitness in host plants.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Guidot, Alice; Barberis, Patrick; Beuzón, Carmen R; Genin, Stéphane

    2010-09-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, is a soil bacterium which can naturally infect a wide range of host plants through the root system. Pathogenicity relies on a type III secretion system which delivers a large set of approximately 75 type III effectors (T3E) into plant cells. On several plants, pathogenicity assays based on quantification of wilting symptoms failed to detect a significant contribution of R. solanacearum T3E in this process, thus revealing the collective effect of T3E in pathogenesis. We developed a mixed infection-based method with R. solanacearum to monitor bacterial fitness in plant leaf tissues as a virulence assay. This accurate and sensitive assay provides evidence that growth defects can be detected for T3E mutants: we identified 12 genes contributing to bacterial fitness in eggplant leaves and 3 of them were also implicated in bacterial fitness on two other hosts, tomato and bean. Contribution to fitness of several T3E appears to be host specific, and we show that some known avirulence determinants such as popP2 or avrA do provide competitive advantages on some susceptible host plants. In addition, this assay revealed that the efe gene, which directs the production of ethylene by bacteria in plant tissues, and hdfB, involved in the biosynthesis of the secondary metabolite 3-hydroxy-oxindole, are also required for optimal growth in plant leaf tissues.

  16. Mapping of internal monophosphate 5′ ends of Bacillus subtilis messenger RNAs and ribosomal RNAs in wild-type and ribonuclease-mutant strains

    PubMed Central

    DiChiara, Jeanne M.; Liu, Bo; Figaro, Sabine; Condon, Ciarán; Bechhofer, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The recent findings that the narrow-specificity endoribonuclease RNase III and the 5′ exonuclease RNase J1 are not essential in the Gram-positive model organism, Bacillus subtilis, facilitated a global analysis of internal 5′ ends that are generated or acted upon by these enzymes. An RNA-Seq protocol known as PARE (Parallel Analysis of RNA Ends) was used to capture 5′ monophosphorylated RNA ends in ribonuclease wild-type and mutant strains. Comparison of PARE peaks in strains with RNase III present or absent showed that, in addition to its well-known role in ribosomal (rRNA) processing, many coding sequences and intergenic regions appeared to be direct targets of RNase III. These target sites were, in most cases, not associated with a known antisense RNA. The PARE analysis also revealed an accumulation of 3′-proximal peaks that correlated with the absence of RNase J1, confirming the importance of RNase J1 in degrading RNA fragments that contain the transcription terminator structure. A significant result from the PARE analysis was the discovery of an endonuclease cleavage just 2 nts downstream of the 16S rRNA 3′ end. This latter observation begins to answer, at least for B. subtilis, a long-standing question on the exonucleolytic versus endonucleolytic nature of 16S rRNA maturation. PMID:26883633

  17. Degradation of trichloroethylene by Pseudomonas cepacia G4 and the constitutive mutant strain G4 5223 PR1 in aquifer microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krumme, M.L.; Timmis, K.N.; Dwyer, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 degrades trichloroethylene (TCE) via a degradation pathway for aromatic compounds which is induced by substrates such as phenol and tryptophan. P. cepacia G4 5223 PR1 (PR1) is a Tn5 insertion mutant which constitutively expresses the toluene ortho-monooxygenase responsible for TCE degradation. In groundwater microcosms, phenol-induced strain G4 and noninduced strain PR1 degraded TCE (20 and 50 microM) to nondetectable levels (< 0.1 microM) within 24 h at densities of 10(8) cells per ml; at lower densities, degradation of TCE was not observed after 48 h. In aquifer sediment microcosms, TCE was reduced from 60 to < 0.1 microM within 24 h at 5 x 10(8) PR1 organisms per g (wet weight) of sediment and from 60 to 26 microM over a period of 10 weeks at 5 x 10(7) PR1 organisms per g. Viable G4 and PR1 cells decreased from approximately 10(7) to 10(4) per g over the 10-week period.

  18. Towards a vaccine for attaching/effacing Escherichia coli: a LEE encoded regulator (ler) mutant of rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli is attenuated, immunogenic, and protects rabbits from lethal challenge with the wild-type virulent strain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengru; Feng, Shuzhang; Thate, Timothy E; Kaper, James B; Boedeker, Edgar C

    2006-05-01

    The ler (LEE encoded regulator) gene product is a central regulator for the genes encoded on the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island of attaching/effacing (A/E) pathogens, including human enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) as well as animal isolates. Although an in vivo role for Ler in bacterial virulence has not been documented, we hypothesized that a Ler deletion mutant should be attenuated for virulence but might retain immunogenicity. The goals of this study were to genetically characterize ler of a rabbit EPEC (rEPEC) strain (O103:H2), to examine the effect of ler on in vivo virulence, and to determine if intragastric inoculation of an attenuated rEPEC ler mutant was immunogenic and could protect rabbits against subsequent challenge with the wild-type virulent parent strain. The predicted ler gene product of rEPEC strain O103:H2 shares high homology (over 95% amino acid identity) with the Lers of another rEPEC strain RDEC-1 (O15:H-) and human EPEC and EHEC. A defined internal ler deletion mutant of rEPEC O103:H2 showed reduced production of secreted proteins. Although orogastric inoculation of rabbits with the virulent parent O103:H2 strain induced severe diarrhea, significant weight loss and early mortality with adherent mucosal bacteria found at sacrifice, the isogeneic ler mutant strain was well tolerated. Animals gained weight and showed no clinical signs of disease. Examination of histological sections of intestinal segments revealed the absence of mucosal bacterial adherence. This result demonstrates an essential role for Ler in in vivo pathogenicity of A/E E. coli. Single dose orogastric immunization with the rEPEC ler mutant induced serum IgG antibody to whole bacteria (but not to intimin). Immunized animals were protected against enteric infection with the WT virulent parent strain exhibiting normal weight gain, absence of diarrhea and absence of mucosally adherent bacteria at sacrifice. Such

  19. Screening of High-Level 4-Hydroxy-2 (or 5)-Ethyl-5 (or 2)-Methyl-3(2H)-Furanone-Producing Strains from a Collection of Gene Deletion Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Jun; Akao, Takeshi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-2 (or 5)-ethyl-5 (or 2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF) is an important flavor compound that contributes to the sensory properties of many natural products, particularly soy sauce and soybean paste. The compound exhibits a caramel-like aroma and several important physiological activities, such as strong antioxidant activity. HEMF is produced by yeast species in soy sauce manufacturing; however, the enzymes involved in HEMF production remain unknown, hindering efforts to breed yeasts with high-level HEMF production. In this study, we identified high-level HEMF-producing mutants among a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion mutant collection. Fourteen deletion mutants were screened as high-level HEMF-producing mutants, and the ADH1 gene deletion mutant (adh1Δ) exhibited the maximum HEMF production capacity. Further investigations of the adh1Δ mutant implied that acetaldehyde accumulation contributes to HEMF production, agreeing with previous findings. Therefore, acetaldehyde might be a precursor for HEMF. The ADH1 gene deletion mutant of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, which is the dominant strain of yeast found during soy sauce fermentation, also produces HEMF effectively, suggesting that acetaldehyde accumulation might be a benchmark for breeding industrial yeasts with excellent HEMF production abilities. PMID:25362059

  20. AGR-2 Data Qualification Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Abbott

    2010-09-01

    Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to manage and document VHTR data qualification, for storage of the data in a readily accessible electronic form, and to assist in the analysis and presentation of the data. This document gives the status of NDMAS processing and qualification of data associated with the initial reactor cycle (147A) of the second Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-2) experiment which began on June 21, 2010. Because it is early in the AGR-2 experiment, data from only two AGR-2 data streams are reported on: Fuel Fabrication and Fuel Irradiation data. As of August 1, 2010, approximately 311,000 irradiation data records have been stored in NDMAS, and qualification tests are in progress. Preliminary information indicates that TC 2 in Capsule 2 failed prior to start of the experiment, and NDMAS testing has thus far identified only two invalid data values from the METSO data collection system Data from the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) are not currently processed until after reactor cycle shutdown and have not yet been received. A description of the ATR operating conditions data associated with the AGR-2 experiment (e.g., power levels) are summarized in the AGR-1 data qualification report (INL/EXT-09-16460). Since ATR data are collected under ATR program data quality requirements (i.e., outside the VHTR program), the NGNP program and NDMAS do not take additional actions to qualify these data other than NDMAS capture testing. Data qualification of graphite characterization data collected under the Graphite Technology Development Project is reported in a separate status report (Hull 2010).

  1. Hydrogen production by hup(-) mutant and wild-type strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus from dark fermentation effluent of sugar beet thick juice in batch and continuous photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Basar; Gürgan, Muazzez; Özgür, Ebru; Gündüz, Ufuk; Yücel, Meral; Eroglu, Inci

    2015-10-01

    Photofermentative production of hydrogen is a promising and sustainable process; however, it should be coupled to dark fermentation to become cost effective. In order to integrate dark fermentation and photofermentation, the suitability of dark fermenter effluents for the photofermentative hydrogen production must be demonstrated. In this study, thermophilic dark fermenter effluent (DFE) of sugar beet thick juice was used as a substrate in photofermentation process to compare wild-type and uptake hydrogenase-deficient (hup (-)) mutant strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus by means of hydrogen production and biomass growth. The tests were conducted in small-scale (50 mL) batch and large-scale (4 L) continuous photobioreactors in indoor conditions under continuous illumination. In small scale batch conditions, maximum cell concentrations were 0.92 gdcw/L c and 1.50 gdcw/L c, hydrogen yields were 34 % and 31 %, hydrogen productivities were 0.49 mmol/(L c·h) and 0.26 mmol/(Lc·h), for hup (-) and wild-type cells, respectively. In large-scale continuous conditions, maximum cell concentrations were 1.44 gdcw/L c and 1.87 gdcw/L c, hydrogen yields were 48 and 46 %, and hydrogen productivities were 1.01 mmol/(L c·h) and 1.05 mmol/(L c·h), for hup (-) and wild-type cells, respectively. Our results showed that Rhodobacter capsulatus hup (-) cells reached to a lower maximum cell concentration but their hydrogen yield and productivity were in the same range or superior compared to the wild-type cells in both batch and continuous operating modes. The maximum biomass concentration, yield and productivity of hydrogen were higher in continuous mode compared to the batch mode with both bacterial strains.

  2. Enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff and pyruvate decarboxylation pathways in Zymomonas mobilis wild-type CP4 and mutant strains grown in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Savvides, A L; Chalkou, K I; Typas, M A; Karagouni, A D

    2001-12-01

    The osmotolerant Zymomonas mobilis strain suc40, (containing plasmid pDS3154-inaZ), which is capable of producing simultaneously ethanol and ice nuclei protein, was cultivated in a chemically defined complete sucrose medium, as well as in a sugar beet molasses medium in continuous culture. The strain exhibited the normal Monod's relationship between biomass and dilution rate, and between growth substrate concentration and dilution rate. Specific activities of a number of enzymes that appear to control important steps in the metabolic flux of the Entner-Doudoroff and pyruvate decarboxylation pathways were investigated over a range of growth rates in steady state cultures. With the exception of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and gluconate kinase, all of the enzymes exhibited a very similar pattern for the wild type Z. mobilis CP4 and for the osmotolerant mutants, independent of the media used; the enzyme patterns remained relatively constant over the studied growth range. The specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was increased 2-fold by decreasing dilution rate in sugar beet molasses. The specific activity of gluconate kinase was 2-fold lower at medium growth rates compared with that at either low or high growth rates. Pyruvate kinase, pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities were significantly higher compared with those of the enzymes governing the early steps of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The present study, which was designed to determine the behaviour of important enzymes in sucrose metabolism of Z. mobilis suc40/pDS3154-inaZ grown in continuous culture showed that the microorganism required regulation of specific enzyme activities at the transcriptional level when sugar beet molasses were used as the growth medium.

  3. Computation of interactive effects and optimization of process parameters for alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Deepali; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Darmwal, Nandan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055 was optimized in shake flask batch fermentation using response surface methodology. An empirical model was developed through Box-Behnken experimental design to describe the relationship among tested variables (pH, temperature, castor oil, starch and triton-X-100). The second-order quadratic model determined the optimum conditions as castor oil, 1.77 mL.L−1; starch, 15.0 g.L−1; triton-X-100, 0.93 mL.L−1; incubation temperature, 34.12 °C and pH 8.1 resulting into maximum alkaline lipase production (3142.57 U.mL−1). The quadratic model was in satisfactory adjustment with the experimental data as evidenced by a high coefficient of determination (R2) value (0.9987). The RSM facilitated the analysis and interpretation of experimental data to ascertain the optimum conditions of the variables for the process and recognized the contribution of individual variables to assess the response under optimal conditions. Hence Box-Behnken approach could fruitfully be applied for process optimization. PMID:24159311

  4. Effect of multiple short highly energetic X-ray pulses on the synthesis of endoglucanase by a mutant strain of Trichoderma reesei-M7.

    PubMed

    Gemishev, Orlin; Zapryanov, Stanislav; Blagoev, Alexander; Markova, Maya; Savov, Valentin

    2014-09-03

    Bioconversion of cellulose-containing substrate to glucose represents an important area of modern biotechnology. Enzymes for the degradation of the polysaccharide part of biomass have been produced, mostly by fungi belonging to genus Trichoderma. Studies were carried out with the mutant strain Trichoderma reesei-M7, a cellulase producer. Spores of the enzyme producer were irradiated with different doses of characteristic X-ray radiation from metallic tungsten (mainly the W Kα1 and Kα2 lines) with a high dose rate. The latter is a specific property of the dense plasma focus (DPF) device, which has pulsed operation and thus gives short and highly energetic pulses of multiple types of rays and particles. In this case, we focused our study on the influence of hard X-rays. The doses of X-rays absorbed by the spores varied in the range of approximately 5-11,000 mSv measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The influence of the applied doses in combination with exceptionally high dose rates (in the order of tens of millisieverts per microsecond) on the activity of the produced endoglucanase, amount of biomass and extra-cellular protein, was studied in batch cultivation conditions. In the dose range of 200-1200 mSv, some enhancement of endoglucanase activity was obtained: around 18%-32%, despite the drop of the biomass amount, compared with the untreated material.

  5. High-yield production of aryl alcohol oxidase under limited growth conditions in small-scale systems using a mutant Aspergillus nidulans strain.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Prade, Rolf A; Wilkins, Mark R

    2017-02-01

    Aryl alcohol oxidase (MtGloA) is an enzyme that belongs to the ligninolytic consortium and can play an important role in the bioenergy industry. This study investigated production of an MtGloA client enzyme by a mutant strain of Aspergillus nidulans unable to synthesize its own pyridoxine. Pyridoxine limitation can be used to control cell growth, diverting substrate to protein production. In agitated culture, enzyme production was similar when using media with 1 mg/L and without pyridoxine (26.64 ± 6.14 U/mg mycelia and 26.14 ± 8.39 U/mg mycelia using media with and without pyridoxine, respectively). However, the treatment lacking pyridoxine had to be supplemented with pyridoxine after 156 h of fermentation to sustain continued enzyme production. Use of extremely diluted pyridoxine levels allowed reduced fungal growth while maintaining steady enzyme production. Concentrations of 9 and 13.5 µg/L pyridoxine allowed MtGloA production with a growth rate of only 5% of that observed when using the standard 1 mg/L pyridoxine media.

  6. O-Antigen-Deficient Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Mutants Are Ingested via an Aberrant Form of Looping Phagocytosis and Show Altered Kinetics of Intracellular Trafficking in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bai-Yu; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the uptake and intracellular trafficking of F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) and LVS with disruptions of wbtDEF and wbtI genes essential for synthesis of the O antigen of lipopolysaccharide. Unlike parental bacteria, O-antigen-deficient LVS is efficiently killed by serum with intact complement but not by serum lacking terminal complement components. Opsonization of O-antigen-deficient LVS in serum lacking terminal complement components allows efficient uptake of these live bacteria by macrophages. In the presence of complement, whereas parental F. tularensis LVS is internalized within spacious pseudopod loops, mutant LVS is internalized within tightly juxtaposed multiple onion-like layers of pseudopodia. Without complement, both parental and mutant LVSs are internalized within spacious pseudopod loops. Thus, molecules other than O antigen are important in triggering dramatic pseudopod extensions and uptake by spacious pseudopod loops. Following uptake, both parental and mutant LVSs enter compartments that show limited staining for the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein CD63 and little fusion with secondary lysosomes. Subsequently, both parental and mutant LVSs lose their CD63 staining. Whereas the majority of parental LVS escapes into the cytosol by 6 h after uptake, mutant LVS shows a marked lag but does escape by 1 day after uptake. Despite the altered kinetics of phagosome escape, both mutant and parental strains grow to high levels within human macrophages. Thus, the O antigen plays a role in the morphology of uptake in the presence of complement and the kinetics of intracellular growth but is not essential for escape, survival, altered membrane trafficking, or intramacrophage growth. PMID:22202123

  7. AGR-2 and AGR-3/4 Release-to-Birth Ratio Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh T.; Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Scates, Dawn M.; Maki, John T.; Petti, David A.

    2014-09-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation tests is being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in support of development and qualification of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) low enriched fuel used in the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). Each AGR test consists of multiple independently controlled and monitored capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel shell. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in the graphite enabling temperature control. AGR configuration and irradiation conditions are based on prismatic HTGR technology that is distinguished primarily through use of helium coolant, a low-power-density ceramic core capable of withstanding very high temperatures, and TRISO coated particle fuel. Thus, these tests provide valuable irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes.

  8. Effect of Trehalose and Trehalose Transport on the Tolerance of Clostridium perfringens to Environmental Stress in a Wild Type Strain and Its Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miseon; Mitchell, Wilfrid J.

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose has been shown to protect bacterial cells from environmental stress. Its uptake and osmoprotective effect in Clostridium perfringens were investigated by comparing wild type C. perfringens ATCC 13124 with a fluoroquinolone- (gatifloxacin-) resistant mutant. In a chemically defined medium, trehalose and sucrose supported the growth of the wild type but not that of the mutant. Microarray data and qRT-PCR showed that putative genes for the phosphorylation and transport of sucrose and trehalose (via phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems, PTS) and some regulatory genes were downregulated in the mutant. The wild type had greater tolerance than the mutant to salts and low pH; trehalose and sucrose further enhanced the osmotolerance of the wild type to NaCl. Expression of the trehalose-specific PTS was lower in the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant. Protection of C. perfringens from environmental stress could therefore be correlated with the ability to take up trehalose. PMID:28058047

  9. Polymorphic Variation in Susceptibility and Metabolism of Triclosan-Resistant Mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains Obtained after Exposure to Biocides and Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R.; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRIr) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRIhs) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRIr mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRIr mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRIr mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRIr mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRIr mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive traits. PMID

  10. AGR-1 Data Qualification Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Machael Abbott

    2009-08-01

    Projects for the very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR Program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the data streams associated with the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) experiment, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY09 qualification status of the AGR-1 data to date. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category, which is assigned by the data generator, and include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing, to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documentation that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent QA program. The interim qualification status of the following four data streams is reported in this document: (1) fuel fabrication data, (2) fuel irradiation data, (3) fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data, and (4) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) operating conditions data. A final report giving the NDMAS qualification status of all AGR-1 data (including cycle 145A) is planned for February 2010.

  11. AGR-1 Post Irradiation Examination Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew

    2015-08-01

    The post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-1 experiment was a multi-year, collaborative effort between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the performance of UCO (uranium carbide, uranium oxide) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel fabricated in the U.S. and irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor at INL to a peak burnup of 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom. This work involved a broad array of experiments and analyses to evaluate the level of fission product retention by the fuel particles and compacts (both during irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to simulate reactor accident conditions), investigate the kernel and coating layer morphology evolution and the causes of coating failure, and explore the migration of fission products through the coating layers. The results have generally confirmed the excellent performance of the AGR-1 fuel, first indicated during the irradiation by the observation of zero TRISO coated particle failures out of 298,000 particles in the experiment. Overall release of fission products was determined by PIE to have been relatively low during the irradiation. A significant finding was the extremely low levels of cesium released through intact coatings. This was true both during the irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to temperatures as high as 1800°C. Post-irradiation safety test fuel performance was generally excellent. Silver release from the particles and compacts during irradiation was often very high. Extensive microanalysis of fuel particles was performed after irradiation and after high-temperature safety testing. The results of particle microanalysis indicate that the UCO fuel is effective at controlling the oxygen partial pressure within the particle and limiting kernel migration. Post-irradiation examination has provided the final body of data that speaks to the quality of the AGR-1 fuel, building

  12. Polymorphic variation in susceptibility and metabolism of triclosan-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains obtained after exposure to biocides and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRI(r)) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRI(hs)) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRI(r) mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRI(r) mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRI(r) mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRI(r) mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRI(r) mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive

  13. AGR-1 Safety Test Predictions using the PARFUME code

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2012-05-01

    The PARFUME modeling code was used to predict failure probability of TRISO-coated fuel particles and diffusion of fission products through these particles during safety tests following the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program (AGR-1). These calculations support the AGR-1 Safety Testing Experiment, which is part of the PIE effort on AGR-1. Modeling of the AGR-1 Safety Test Predictions includes a 620-day irradiation followed by a 300-hour heat-up phase of selected AGR-1 compacts. Results include fuel failure probability, palladium penetration, and fractional release of fission products. Results show that no particle failure is predicted during irradiation or heat-up, and that fractional release of fission products is limited during irradiation but that it significantly increases during heat-up.

  14. A Salmonella Enteritidis hilAssrAfliG deletion mutant is a safe live vaccine strain that confers protection against colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Geeraerts, S; Balan, V; Elroy, M; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2013-10-17

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans. Therefore, there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonization-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the safety and efficacy of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonization-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated. After administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old chickens, this strain could not be isolated from the gut, internal organs or faeces after 21 days of age. In addition, administration of this strain to one-day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and caecal and internal organ colonization of a Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an attenuated Salmonella strain for which both the safety and efficacy has been shown in long-term experiments (until slaughter age) in broiler strain can potentially be used as a live colonization-inhibition strain for controlling Salmonella Enteritidis infections in broilers.

  15. Quenching of the antibacterial activity of chlorhexidine and benzalkonium by Letheen broth and Letheen agar in relation to wild-type and envelope mutant strains of gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    el-Falaha, B M; Furr, J R; Russell, A D

    1987-01-01

    Letheen broth and Letheen agar have been investigated for their ability to act as neutralising and recovery media for wild-type and envelope mutants exposed to chlorhexidine diacetate and benzalkonium chloride. At high dilutions, untreated cells of the envelope mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 799/61 were unable to produce colonies on Letheen agar. As a result of various procedures, it was concluded that dilution in Letheen broth and plating in Isosensitest agar was a suitable method for quenching cationic bactericides without harming the test strains, and that the increasing use of Gram-negative bacteria with outer membrane defects means that considerable care may be necessary in selecting media for evaluating bactericidal activity.

  16. Identification of concomitant infection with Chlamydia trachomatis IncA-negative mutant and wild-type strains by genomic, transcriptional, and biological characterizations.

    PubMed

    Suchland, Robert J; Jeffrey, Brendan M; Xia, Minsheng; Bhatia, Ajay; Chu, Hencelyn G; Rockey, Daniel D; Stamm, Walter E

    2008-12-01

    Clinical isolates of Chlamydia trachomatis that lack IncA on their inclusion membrane form nonfusogenic inclusions and have been associated with milder, subclinical infections in patients. The molecular events associated with the generation of IncA-negative strains and their roles in chlamydial sexually transmitted infections are not clear. We explored the biology of the IncA-negative strains by analyzing their genomic structure, transcription, and growth characteristics in vitro and in vivo in comparison with IncA-positive C. trachomatis strains. Three clinical samples were identified that contained a mixture of IncA-positive and -negative same-serovar C. trachomatis populations, and two more such pairs were found in serial isolates from persistently infected individuals. Genomic sequence analysis of individual strains from each of two serovar-matched pairs showed that these pairs were very similar genetically. In contrast, the genome sequence of an unmatched IncA-negative strain contained over 5,000 nucleotide polymorphisms relative to the genome sequence of a serovar-matched but otherwise unlinked strain. Transcriptional analysis, in vitro culture kinetics, and animal modeling demonstrated that IncA-negative strains isolated in the presence of a serovar-matched wild-type strain are phenotypically more similar to the wild-type strain than are IncA-negative strains isolated in the absence of a serovar-matched wild-type strain. These studies support a model suggesting that a change from an IncA-positive strain to the previously described IncA-negative phenotype may involve multiple steps, the first of which involves a translational inactivation of incA, associated with subsequent unidentified steps that lead to the observed decrease in transcript level, differences in growth rate, and differences in mouse infectivity.

  17. A dnaN Plasmid Shuffle Strain for Rapid In Vivo Analysis of Mutant Escherichia coli β Clamps Provides Insight Into the Role of Clamp in umuDC-Mediated Cold Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The E. coli umuDC gene products participate in two temporally distinct roles: UmuD2C acts in a DNA damage checkpoint control, while UmuD'2C, also known as DNA polymerase V (Pol V), catalyzes replication past DNA lesions via a process termed translesion DNA synthesis. These different roles of the umuDC gene products are managed in part by the dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein. Co-overexpression of the β clamp and Pol V severely blocked E. coli growth at 30°C. We previously used a genetic assay that was independent of the ability of β clamp to support E. coli viability to isolate 8 mutant clamp proteins (βQ61K, βS107L, βD150N, βG157S, βV170M, βE202K, βM204K and βP363S) that failed to block growth at 30°C when co-overexpressed with Pol V. It was unknown whether these mutant clamps were capable of supporting E. coli viability and normal umuDC functions in vivo. The goals of this study were to answer these questions. To this end, we developed a novel dnaN plasmid shuffle assay. Using this assay, βD150N and βP363S were unable to support E. coli viability. The remaining 6 mutant clamps, each of which supported viability, were indistinguishable from β+ with respect to umuDC functions in vivo. In light of these findings, we analyzed phenotypes of strains overexpressing either β clamp or Pol V alone. The strain overexpressing β+, but not those expressing mutant β clamps, displayed slowed growth irrespective of the incubation temperature. Moreover, growth of the Pol V-expressing strain was modestly slowed at 30°, but not 42°C. Taken together, these results suggest the mutant clamps were identified due to their inability to slow growth rather than an inability to interact with Pol V. They further suggest that cold sensitivity is due, at least in part, to the combination of their individual effects on growth at 30°C. PMID:24896652

  18. A dnaN plasmid shuffle strain for rapid in vivo analysis of mutant Escherichia coli β clamps provides insight into the role of clamp in umuDC-mediated cold sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Babu, Vignesh M P; Sutton, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    The E. coli umuDC gene products participate in two temporally distinct roles: UmuD2C acts in a DNA damage checkpoint control, while UmuD'2C, also known as DNA polymerase V (Pol V), catalyzes replication past DNA lesions via a process termed translesion DNA synthesis. These different roles of the umuDC gene products are managed in part by the dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein. Co-overexpression of the β clamp and Pol V severely blocked E. coli growth at 30°C. We previously used a genetic assay that was independent of the ability of β clamp to support E. coli viability to isolate 8 mutant clamp proteins (βQ61K, βS107L, βD150N, βG157S, βV170M, βE202K, βM204K and βP363S) that failed to block growth at 30°C when co-overexpressed with Pol V. It was unknown whether these mutant clamps were capable of supporting E. coli viability and normal umuDC functions in vivo. The goals of this study were to answer these questions. To this end, we developed a novel dnaN plasmid shuffle assay. Using this assay, βD150N and βP363S were unable to support E. coli viability. The remaining 6 mutant clamps, each of which supported viability, were indistinguishable from β+ with respect to umuDC functions in vivo. In light of these findings, we analyzed phenotypes of strains overexpressing either β clamp or Pol V alone. The strain overexpressing β+, but not those expressing mutant β clamps, displayed slowed growth irrespective of the incubation temperature. Moreover, growth of the Pol V-expressing strain was modestly slowed at 30°, but not 42°C. Taken together, these results suggest the mutant clamps were identified due to their inability to slow growth rather than an inability to interact with Pol V. They further suggest that cold sensitivity is due, at least in part, to the combination of their individual effects on growth at 30°C.

  19. The Outer Membrane of Brucella ovis Shows Increased Permeability to Hydrophobic Probes and Is More Susceptible to Cationic Peptides than Are the Outer Membranes of Mutant Rough Brucella abortus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Freer, Enrique; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Weintraub, Andrej; Bengoechea, José-Antonio; Moriyón, Ignacio; Hultenby, Kjell; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the outer membrane (OM) to hydrophobic probes and its susceptibility to bactericidal cationic peptides were investigated for natural rough Brucella ovis and for mutant rough Brucella abortus strains. The OM of B. ovis displayed an abrupt and faster kinetic profile than rough B. abortus during the uptake of the hydrophobic probe N-phenyl-naphthylamine. B. ovis was more sensitive than rough B. abortus to the action of cationic peptides. Bactenecins 5 and 7 induced morphological alterations on the OMs of both rough Brucella strains. B. ovis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) captured considerably more polymyxin B than LPSs from both rough and smooth B. abortus strains. Polymyxin B, poly-l-lysine, and poly-l-ornithine produced a thick coating on the surfaces of both strains, which was more evident in B. ovis than in rough B. abortus. The distinct functional properties of the OMs of these two rough strains correlate with some structural differences of their OMs and with their different biological behaviors in animals and culture cells. PMID:10531286

  20. Genetic analysis of membrane differentiation in Paramecium. Freeze- fracture study of the trichocyst cycle in wild-type and mutant strains

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Using a series of mutants of Paramecium tetraurelia, we demonstrate, for the first time, changes in the internal structure of the cell membrane, as revealed by freeze-fracture, that correspond to specific single gene mutations. On the plasma membrane of Paramecium circular arrays of particles mark the sites of attachment of the tips of the intracellular secretory organelles-trichocysts. In wild-type paramecia, where attached trichocysts can be expelled by exocytosis under various stimuli, the plasma membrane array is composed of a double outer ring of particles (300 nm in diameter) and inside the ring a central rosette (fusion rosette) of particles (76 nm in diameter). Mutant nd9, characterized by a thermosensitive ability to discharge trichocysts, shows the same organization in cells grown at the permissive temperature (18 degrees C), while in cells grown at the nonpermissive temperature (27 degrees C) the rosette is missing. In mutant tam 8, characterized by normal but unattached trichocysts, and in mutant tl, completely devoid of trichocysts, no rosette is formed and the outer rings always show a modified configuration called "parentheses", also found in wild-type and in nd9 (18 degrees C) cells. From this comparison between wild type and mutants, we conclude: (a) that the formation of parentheses is a primary differentiation of the plasma membrane, independent of the presence of trichocysts, while the secondary transformation of parentheses into circular arrays and the formation of the rosette are triggered by interaction between trichocysts and plasma membranes; and (b) that the formation of the rosette is a prerequisite for trichocyst exocytosis. PMID:1254639

  1. The effects of modeled microgravity on growth kinetics, antibiotic susceptibility, cold growth, and the virulence potential of a Yersinia pestis ymoA-deficient mutant and its isogenic parental strain.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Abidat; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Erova, Tatiana E; Kozlova, Elena V; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K; Rosenzweig, Jason A

    2013-09-01

    Previously, we reported that there was no enhancement in the virulence potential (as measured by cell culture infections) of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis (YP) following modeled microgravity/clinorotation growth. We have now further characterized the effects of clinorotation (CR) on YP growth kinetics, antibiotic sensitivity, cold growth, and YP's virulence potential in a murine model of infection. Surprisingly, none of the aforementioned phenotypes were altered. To better understand why CR did not enhance YP's virulence potential as it did for other bacterial pathogens, a YP ΔymoA isogenic mutant in the KIM/D27 background strain that is unable to produce the histone-like YmoA protein and influences DNA topography was used in both cell culture and murine models of infection. YmoA represses type three secretion system (T3SS) virulence gene expression in the yersiniae. Similar to our CR-grown parental YP strain data, the CR-grown ΔymoA mutant induced reduced HeLa cell cytotoxicity with concomitantly decreased Yersinia outer protein E (YopE) and low calcium response V (LcrV) antigen production and secretion. Important, however, were our findings that, although no significant differences were observed in survival of mice infected intraperitoneally with either normal gravity (NG)- or CR-grown parental YP, the ΔymoA mutant induced significantly more mortality in infected mice than did the parental strain following CR growth. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CR did enhance the virulence potential of the YP ΔymoA mutant in a murine infection model (relative to the CR-grown parental strain), despite inducing less HeLa cell rounding in our cell culture infection assay due to reduced T3SS activity. Therefore, CR, which induces a unique type of bacterial stress, might be enhancing YP's virulence potential in vivo through a T3SS-independent mechanism when the histone-like YmoA protein is absent.

  2. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson; Grant L. Hawkes

    2012-04-01

    This report documents an effort to quantify the uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) fuel irradiation experiment conducted in the INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, the results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the temperature simulation data for AGR tests can be used for validation of the fuel transport and fuel performance simulation models. The crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. The report is organized into three chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program and provides overviews of AGR-1 measured data, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, and thermal simulation. Chapters 2 describes the uncertainty quantification procedure for temperature simulation data of the AGR-1 experiment, namely, (i) identify and quantify uncertainty sources; (ii) perform sensitivity analysis for several thermal test conditions; (iii) use uncertainty propagation to quantify overall response temperature uncertainty. A set of issues associated with modeling uncertainties resulting from the expert assessments are identified. This also includes the experimental design to estimate the main effects and interactions of the important thermal model parameters. Chapter 3 presents the overall uncertainty results for the six AGR-1 capsules. This includes uncertainties for the daily volume-average and peak fuel temperatures, daily average temperatures at TC locations, and time-average volume-average and time-average peak fuel temperatures.

  3. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson; Grant L. Hawkes

    2013-03-01

    This report documents an effort to quantify the uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) fuel irradiation experiment conducted in the INL’s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, the results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the temperature simulation data for AGR tests can be used for validation of the fuel transport and fuel performance simulation models. The crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. The report is organized into three chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program and provides overviews of AGR-1 measured data, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, and thermal simulation. Chapters 2 describes the uncertainty quantification procedure for temperature simulation data of the AGR-1 experiment, namely, (i) identify and quantify uncertainty sources; (ii) perform sensitivity analysis for several thermal test conditions; (iii) use uncertainty propagation to quantify overall response temperature uncertainty. A set of issues associated with modeling uncertainties resulting from the expert assessments are identified. This also includes the experimental design to estimate the main effects and interactions of the important thermal model parameters. Chapter 3 presents the overall uncertainty results for the six AGR-1 capsules. This includes uncertainties for the daily volume-average and peak fuel temperatures, daily average temperatures at TC locations, and time-average volume-average and time-average peak fuel temperatures.

  4. Control of protein synthesis in herpesvirus-infected cells: analysis of the polypeptides induced by wild type and sixteen temperature-sensitive mutants of HSV strain 17.

    PubMed

    Marsden, H S; Crombie, I K; Subak-Sharpe, J H

    1976-06-01

    The polypeptides induced in cells infected with a Glasgow isolate of HSV-I (17 syn+) have been characterized by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Study of the kinetics of synthesis in three cell lines has detected a total of 52 polypeptides, 33 of which can be identified in polypeptide profiles of purified virions. These include six low mol. wt. polypeptides that have not been previously reported. Several polypeptides were labelled with glucosamine in infected BHK cells. The different polypeptide patterns obtained at permissive (31 degrees C) and nonpermissive (38 degrees C) temperature in cells infected with 16 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants are reported. The effect of multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) on the polypeptide profile has been examined for two of the DNA -ve mutants: below ten, the profile varied with the m.o.i. whereas above ten it was constant. All mutants were therefore examined at an m.o.i. of approx. 20. Mutants from the same complementation group showed very similar profiles. A number of general conclusions concerning control of protein synthesis in HSV infected cells can be made: (I) As most of the 16 ts mutants affected the synthesis of several or many polypeptides it follows that a large proportion of genome specifies controlling functions. (2) The high frequency with which some polypeptides were affected suggests they are at or near the terminus of biosynthetic pathways which are under multiple control. (3) Conversely, some polypeptides were affected with a low frequency suggesting that their synthesis is not dependent on the expression of many virus functions. (4) Several individual ts mutations lead to the synthesis of increased amounts of different large polypeptides. (5) Analysis of every band detectably affected by at least one ts mutation has disclosed nine classes of dependence relationship between polypeptide synthesis and the DNA phenotype of the mutants, illustrating that this relationship is complex and different for

  5. Cloning of an agr homologue of Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Sakinc, Türkan; Kulczak, Pawel; Henne, Karsten; Gatermann, Sören G

    2004-08-01

    An agr homologue of Staphylococcus saprophyticus was identified, cloned and sequenced. The gene locus shows homologies to other staphylococcal agr systems, especially to those of S. epidermidis and S. lugdunensis. A putative RNAIII was identified and found to be differentially expressed during the growth phases. In contrast to the RNAIII molecules of S. epidermidis and S. aureus it does not contain an open reading frame that codes for a protein with homologies to the delta-toxin. Using PCR, the agr was found to be present in clinical isolates of S. saprophyticus.

  6. An organic acid-tolerant HAA1-overexpression mutant of an industrial bioethanol strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its application to the production of bioethanol from sugarcane molasses.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Takuya; Watanabe, Daisuke; Yoshiyama, Yoko; Tanaka, Koichi; Ogawa, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Shima, Jun

    2013-12-30

    Bacterial contamination is known as a major cause of the reduction in ethanol yield during bioethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Acetate is an effective agent for the prevention of bacterial contamination, but it negatively affects the fermentation ability of S. cerevisiae. We have proposed that the combined use of organic acids including acetate and lactate and yeast strains tolerant to organic acids may be effective for the elimination of principally lactic acid bacterial (LAB) contamination. In a previous study employing laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, we showed that overexpression of the HAA1 gene, which encodes a transcriptional activator, could be a useful molecular breeding method for acetate-tolerant yeast strains. In the present study, we constructed a HAA1-overexpressing diploid strain (MATa/α, named ER HAA1-OP) derived from the industrial bioethanol strain Ethanol Red (ER). ER HAA1-OP showed tolerance not only to acetate but also to lactate, and this tolerance was dependent on the increased expression of HAA1 gene. The ethanol production ability of ER HAA1-OP was almost equivalent to that of the parent strain during the bioethanol production process from sugarcane molasses in the absence of acetate. The addition of acetate at 0.5% (w/v, pH 4.5) inhibited the fermentation ability of the parent strain, but such an inhibition was not observed in the ethanol production process using ER HAA1-OP.

  7. An organic acid-tolerant HAA1-overexpression mutant of an industrial bioethanol strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its application to the production of bioethanol from sugarcane molasses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial contamination is known as a major cause of the reduction in ethanol yield during bioethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Acetate is an effective agent for the prevention of bacterial contamination, but it negatively affects the fermentation ability of S. cerevisiae. We have proposed that the combined use of organic acids including acetate and lactate and yeast strains tolerant to organic acids may be effective for the elimination of principally lactic acid bacterial (LAB) contamination. In a previous study employing laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, we showed that overexpression of the HAA1 gene, which encodes a transcriptional activator, could be a useful molecular breeding method for acetate-tolerant yeast strains. In the present study, we constructed a HAA1-overexpressing diploid strain (MATa/α, named ER HAA1-OP) derived from the industrial bioethanol strain Ethanol Red (ER). ER HAA1-OP showed tolerance not only to acetate but also to lactate, and this tolerance was dependent on the increased expression of HAA1 gene. The ethanol production ability of ER HAA1-OP was almost equivalent to that of the parent strain during the bioethanol production process from sugarcane molasses in the absence of acetate. The addition of acetate at 0.5% (w/v, pH 4.5) inhibited the fermentation ability of the parent strain, but such an inhibition was not observed in the ethanol production process using ER HAA1-OP. PMID:24373204

  8. Expression and Immunogenicity of a Mutant Diphtheria Toxin Molecule, CRM197, and Its Fragments in Salmonella typhi Vaccine Strain CVD 908-htrA

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nadav; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    1999-01-01

    Mutant diphtheria toxin molecule CRM197 and fragments thereof were expressed in attenuated Salmonella typhi CVD 908-htrA, and the constructs were tested for their ability to induce serum antitoxin. Initially, expressed proteins were insoluble, and the constructs failed to induce neutralizing antitoxin. Soluble CRM197 was expressed at low levels by utilizing the hemolysin A secretion system from Escherichia coli. PMID:10417208

  9. Biological Control of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Colonization, and pAgK84 Transfer with Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 and the Tra- Mutant Strain K1026

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Begonya; Peñalver, Ramón; Asins, María José; López, María M.

    1993-01-01

    The efficacies of Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 and K1026 in root colonization, crown gall control, and plasmid transfer were compared. Levels of root colonization by K84 and K1026 of Montclar and Nemaguard peach seedlings were similar during the 21 days of the experiment. Four strains of A. tumefaciens bv. 1 were used for soil inoculations in biological control experiments on GF677 and Adafuel peach × almond rootstocks; two were sensitive and two were resistant to agrocin 84. Both strains K84 and K1026 were very efficient in controlling the sensitive strains, but some tumors appeared with both treatments. In the biocontrol of resistant strains, no galls were observed in K1026-treated plants, but some K84-treated plants had galls. Recovery of agrobacteria from galls in experiments with sensitive and resistant strains showed that all of the isolates from the controls or K1026-treated plants and most of the isolates from K84-treated plants had the same characteristics as the inoculated strains. Nine isolates from the K84-treated plants growing in soil inoculated with one resistant strain were virulent and produced agrocin 84. These isolates had a plasmid that hybridized with a probe prepared with the BamHI C fragment from pAgK84. These results show the efficiency of K1026 in biocontrol of agrocin 84-sensitive and -resistant strains of A. tumefaciens and suggest the use of K1026 as a safer organism than K84 for biological control of crown gall. Images PMID:16348854

  10. Locating a modifier gene of Ovum mutant through crosses between DDK and C57BL/6J inbred strains in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jing; Song, Gen Di; Song, Jia Sheng; Ren, Shi Hao; Li, Chun Li; Zheng, Zhen Yu; Zhao, Wei Dong

    2016-06-01

    A striking infertile phenotype has been discovered in the DDK strain of mouse. The DDK females are usually infertile when crossed with males of other inbred strains, whereas DDK males exhibit normal fertility in reciprocal crosses. This phenomenon is caused by mutation in the ovum (Om) locus on chromosome 11 and known as the DDK syndrome. Previously, some research groups reported that the embryonic mortality deviated from the semilethal rate in backcrosses between heterozygous (Om/+) females and males of other strains. This embryonic mortality exhibited an aggravated trend with increasing background genes of other strains. These results indicated that some modifier genes of Om were present in other strains. In the present study, a population of N₂2 (Om/+) females from the backcrosses between C57BL/6J (B6) and F₁ (B6♀ × DDK♂) was used to map potential modifier genes of Om. Quantitative trait locus showed that a major locus, namely Amom1 (aggravate modifier gene of Om 1), was located at the middle part of chromosome 9 in mice. The Amom1 could increase the expressivity of Om gene, thereby aggravating embryonic lethality when heterozygous (Om/+) females mated with males of B6 strain. Further, the 1.5 LOD-drop analysis indicated that the confidence interval was between 37.54 and 44.46 cM, ~6.92 cM. Amom1 is the first modifier gene of Om in the B6 background.

  11. Comparison of Gen-probe transcription-mediated amplification, Abbott PCR, and Roche PCR assays for detection of wild-type and mutant plasmid strains of Chlamydia trachomatis in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Pedersen, Lisbeth Nørum; Persson, Kenneth

    2008-12-01

    The clinical performance of two nucleic acid amplification assays targeting the cryptic plasmid and two assays targeting rRNA molecules in Chlamydia trachomatis was examined. First-catch urine samples from Malmoe, Sweden, were tested for C. trachomatis with the Abbott real-time PCR assay m2000 and an in-house PCR for the new variant strain of C. trachomatis with a deletion in the cryptic plasmid. Aliquots of the urine samples were sent to Aarhus, Denmark, and further examined with the Roche COBAS Amplicor CT (RCA) PCR, the Gen-Probe Aptima Combo 2 assay (AC2) targeting the C. trachomatis 23S rRNA, and the Aptima C. trachomatis assay (ACT) targeting the 16S rRNA molecule. A positive prevalence of 9% (163/1,808 urine samples examined) was detected according to the combined reference standard. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of the four assays were as follows: for ACT, 100% (163/163) and 99.9% (1,643/1,645), respectively; for AC2, 100% (163/163) and 99.6% (1,640/1,645); for m2000, 68.7% (112/163) and 99.9% (1,644/1,645); for RCA, 63.8% (104/163) and 99.9% (1,643/1,645). The two Gen-Probe assays detected all mutant strains characterized by the in-house PCR as having the deletion in the cryptic plasmid, whereas the Roche and the Abbott PCRs targeting the plasmid were both unable to detect the plasmid mutant. The difference in clinical sensitivity between the plasmid PCR assays m2000 and RCA, on the one hand, and the rRNA assays AC2 and ACT, on the other, could be attributed almost exclusively to the presence of the plasmid mutant in about one-quarter of the Chlamydia-positive samples examined.

  12. 15 CFR 740.18 - Agricultural commodities (AGR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of the EAR). (2) No export or reexport to or for use in biological, chemical, nuclear warfare or missile proliferation activities may be made under License Exception AGR (see part 744 of the EAR). (3)...

  13. Mobile genetic element SCCmec-encoded psm-mec RNA suppresses translation of agrA and attenuates MRSA virulence.

    PubMed

    Kaito, Chikara; Saito, Yuki; Ikuo, Mariko; Omae, Yosuke; Mao, Han; Nagano, Gentaro; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Numata, Shunsuke; Han, Xiao; Obata, Kazuaki; Hasegawa, Setsuo; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Inokuchi, Koiti; Ito, Teruyo; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Community acquired-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a socially problematic pathogen that infects healthy individuals, causing severe disease. CA-MRSA is more virulent than hospital associated-MRSA (HA-MRSA). The underlying mechanism for the high virulence of CA-MRSA is not known. The transcription product of the psm-mec gene, located in the mobile genetic element SCCmec of HA-MRSA, but not CA-MRSA, suppresses the expression of phenol-soluble modulin α (PSMα), a cytolytic toxin of S. aureus. Here we report that psm-mec RNA inhibits translation of the agrA gene encoding a positive transcription factor for the PSMα gene via specific binding to agrA mRNA. Furthermore, 25% of 325 clinical MRSA isolates had a mutation in the psm-mec promoter that attenuated transcription, and 9% of the strains had no psm-mec. In most of these psm-mec-mutated or psm-mec-deleted HA-MRSAs, PSMα expression was increased compared with strains carrying intact psm-mec, and some mutated strains produced high amounts of PSMα comparable with that of CA-MRSA. Deletion of psm-mec from HA-MRSA strains carrying intact psm-mec increased the expression of AgrA protein and PSMα, and virulence in mice. Thus, psm-mec RNA suppresses MRSA virulence via inhibition of agrA translation and the absence of psm-mec function in CA-MRSA causes its high virulence property.

  14. A mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit allows survival of Escherichia coli strains defective in 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Urós, Eva María; Ibáñez, Ester; Boronat, Albert; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2006-02-06

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway has been proposed as a promising target to develop new antimicrobial agents. However, spontaneous mutations in Escherichia coli were observed to rescue the otherwise lethal loss of the first two enzymes of the pathway, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) synthase (DXS) and DXP reductoisomerase (DXR), with a relatively high frequency. A mutation in the gene encoding the E1 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was shown to be sufficient to rescue the lack of DXS but not DXR in vivo, suggesting that the mutant enzyme likely allows the synthesis of DXP or an alternative substrate for DXR.

  15. Transcript and proteomic analyses of wild-type and gpa2 mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains suggest a role for glycolytic carbon source sensing in pseudohyphal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Medintz, Igor L; Vora, Gary J; Rahbar, Amir M; Thach, Dzung C

    2007-09-01

    In response to limited nitrogen and abundant carbon sources, diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains undergo a filamentous transition in cell growth as part of pseudohyphal differentiation. Use of the disaccharide maltose as the principal carbon source, in contrast to the preferred nutrient monosaccharide glucose, has been shown to induce a hyper-filamentous growth phenotype in a strain deficient for GPA2 which codes for a Galpha protein component that interacts with the glucose-sensing receptor Gpr1p to regulate filamentous growth. In this report, we compare the global transcript and proteomic profiles of wild-type and Gpa2p deficient diploid yeast strains grown on both rich and nitrogen starved maltose media. We find that deletion of GPA2 results in significantly different transcript and protein profiles when switching from rich to nitrogen starvation media. The results are discussed with a focus on the genes associated with carbon utilization, or regulation thereof, and a model for the contribution of carbon sensing/metabolism-based signal transduction to pseudohyphal differentiation is proposed.

  16. Growth of wildtype and mutant E. coli strains in minimal media for optimal production of nucleic acids for preparing labeled nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Chandar S; Brown, Margaret E; Sama, Jacob N; Jackson, Melantha E; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2010-10-01

    Since RNAs lie at the center of most cellular processes, there is a need for synthesizing large amounts of RNAs made from stable isotope-labeled nucleotides to advance the study of their structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A particularly effective means of obtaining labeled nucleotides is to harvest these nucleotides from bacteria grown in defined minimal media supplemented with 15NH4Cl and various carbon sources. Given the high cost of carbon precursors required for labeling nucleic acids for NMR studies, it becomes important to evaluate the optimal growth for commonly used strains under standard minimal media conditions. Such information is lacking. In this study, we characterize the growth for Escherichia coli strains K12, K10zwf, and DL323 in three minimal media with isotopic-labeled carbon sources of acetate, glycerol, and glycerol combined with formate. Of the three media, the LeMaster-Richards and the Studier media outperform the commonly used M9 media and both support optimal growth of E. coli for the production of nucleotides. However, the growth of all three E. coli strains in acetate is reduced almost twofold compared to growth in glycerol. Analysis of the metabolic pathway and previous gene array studies help to explain this differential growth in glycerol and acetate. These studies should benefit efforts to make selective 13C-15N isotopic-labeled nucleotides for synthesizing biologically important RNAs.

  17. Induction of Unconventional T Cells by a Mutant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Strain Formulated in Cationic Liposomes Correlates with Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections of Immunocompromised Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, Idalia; Morris, Sheldon; Cowley, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies aimed at defining protective immunity induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG immunization have largely focused on the induction of antituberculosis CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Here we describe a vaccine consisting of a BCGΔmmaA4 deletion mutant formulated in dimethyl dioctadecyl-ammonium bromide (DDA) with d-(+)-trehalose 6,6′-dibehenate (TDB) (DDA/TDB) adjuvant (A4/Adj) that protected TCRδ−/− mice depleted of CD4+, CD8+, and NK1.1+ T cells against an aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis. These mice were significantly protected relative to mice immunized with a nonadjuvanted BCGΔmmaA4 (BCG-A4) mutant and nonvaccinated controls at 2 months and 9 months postvaccination. In the absence of all T cells following treatment with anti-Thy1.2 antibody, the immunized mice lost the ability to control the infection. These results indicate that an unconventional T cell population was mediating protection in the absence of CD4+, CD8+, NK1.1+, and TCRγδ T cells and could exhibit memory. Focusing on CD4− CD8− double-negative (DN) T cells, we found that these cells accumulated in the lungs postchallenge significantly more in A4/Adj-immunized mice and induced significantly greater frequencies of pulmonary gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells than were seen in the nonvaccinated or nonadjuvanted BCG control groups. Moreover, pulmonary DN T cells from the A4/Adj group exhibited significantly higher IFN-γ integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) values than were seen in the control groups. We also showed that enriched DN T cells from mice immunized with A4/Adj could control mycobacterial growth in vitro significantly better than naive whole-spleen cells. These results suggest that formulating BCG in DDA/TDB adjuvant confers superior protection in immunocompromised mice and likely involves the induction of long-lived memory DN T cells. PMID:27226281

  18. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycle 154B

    SciTech Connect

    Binh Pham; Jeff Einerson

    2014-01-01

    This report provides the data qualification status of Advanced Gas Reactor-2 (AGR-2) fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 154B as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). This is the last cycle of AGR-2 irradiation, as the test train was pulled from the ATR core during the outage portion of ATR Cycle 155A. The AGR-2 data streams addressed in this report include thermocouple (TC) temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rates including new Fission Product Monitoring (FPM) downstream flows from Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) detectors, pressure, and moisture content), and FPMS data (release rates and release-to-birth rate ratios [R/Bs]) for each of the six capsules in the AGR-2 experiment. The final data qualification status for these data streams is determined by a Data Review Committee (DRC) comprised of AGR technical leads, Sitewide Quality Assurance (QA), and NDMAS analysts. The Data Review Committee reviewed the data acquisition process, considered whether the data met the requirements for data collection as specified in QA-approved Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) data collection plans, examined the results of NDMAS data testing and statistical analyses, and confirmed the qualification status of the data as given in this report.

  19. Secretion of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 confers tumorigenic properties

    PubMed Central

    Fessart, Delphine; Domblides, Charlotte; Avril, Tony; Eriksson, Leif A; Begueret, Hugues; Pineau, Raphael; Malrieux, Camille; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Lucchesi, Carlo; Chevet, Eric; Delom, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an instrumental role in determining the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and the formation of lumens in glandular tissues during morphogenesis. Here, we show that the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-resident protein anterior gradient-2 (AGR2), a soluble protein-disulfide isomerase involved in ER protein folding and quality control, is secreted and interacts with the ECM. Extracellular AGR2 (eAGR2) is a microenvironmental regulator of epithelial tissue architecture, which plays a role in the preneoplastic phenotype and contributes to epithelial tumorigenicity. Indeed, eAGR2, is secreted as a functionally active protein independently of its thioredoxin-like domain (CXXS) and of its ER-retention domain (KTEL), and is sufficient, by itself, to promote the acquisition of invasive and metastatic features. Therefore, we conclude that eAGR2 plays an extracellular role independent of its ER function and we elucidate this gain-of-function as a novel and unexpected critical ECM microenvironmental pro-oncogenic regulator of epithelial morphogenesis and tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13887.001 PMID:27240165

  20. Secretion of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 confers tumorigenic properties.

    PubMed

    Fessart, Delphine; Domblides, Charlotte; Avril, Tony; Eriksson, Leif A; Begueret, Hugues; Pineau, Raphael; Malrieux, Camille; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Lucchesi, Carlo; Chevet, Eric; Delom, Frederic

    2016-05-30

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an instrumental role in determining the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and the formation of lumens in glandular tissues during morphogenesis. Here, we show that the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-resident protein anterior gradient-2 (AGR2), a soluble protein-disulfide isomerase involved in ER protein folding and quality control, is secreted and interacts with the ECM. Extracellular AGR2 (eAGR2) is a microenvironmental regulator of epithelial tissue architecture, which plays a role in the preneoplastic phenotype and contributes to epithelial tumorigenicity. Indeed, eAGR2, is secreted as a functionally active protein independently of its thioredoxin-like domain (CXXS) and of its ER-retention domain (KTEL), and is sufficient, by itself, to promote the acquisition of invasive and metastatic features. Therefore, we conclude that eAGR2 plays an extracellular role independent of its ER function and we elucidate this gain-of-function as a novel and unexpected critical ECM microenvironmental pro-oncogenic regulator of epithelial morphogenesis and tumorigenesis.

  1. Growth of wildtype and mutant E. coli strains in minimal media for optimal production of nucleic acids for preparing labeled nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Chandar S.; Brown, Margaret E.; Sama, Jacob N.; Jackson, Melantha E.

    2010-01-01

    Since RNAs lie at the center of most cellular processes, there is a need for synthesizing large amounts of RNAs made from stable isotope-labeled nucleotides to advance the study of their structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A particularly effective means of obtaining labeled nucleotides is to harvest these nucleotides from bacteria grown in defined minimal media supplemented with 15NH4Cl and various carbon sources. Given the high cost of carbon precursors required for labeling nucleic acids for NMR studies, it becomes important to evaluate the optimal growth for commonly used strains under standard minimal media conditions. Such information is lacking. In this study, we characterize the growth for Escherichia coli strains K12, K10zwf, and DL323 in three minimal media with isotopic-labeled carbon sources of acetate, glycerol, and glycerol combined with formate. Of the three media, the LeMaster-Richards and the Studier media outperform the commonly used M9 media and both support optimal growth of E. coli for the production of nucleotides. However, the growth of all three E. coli strains in acetate is reduced almost twofold compared to growth in glycerol. Analysis of the metabolic pathway and previous gene array studies help to explain this differential growth in glycerol and acetate. These studies should benefit efforts to make selective 13C-15N isotopic-labeled nucleotides for synthesizing biologically important RNAs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00253-010-2813-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20730533

  2. Breeding L-arginine-producing strains by a novel mutagenesis method: Atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Xu, Jianzhong; Xia, Xiuhua; Guo, Yanfeng; Xu, Kai; Su, Cunsheng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2016-07-03

    A plasma jet, driven by an active helium atom supplied with an atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) biological breeding system, was used as a novel method to breed L-arginine high-yielding strains. A mutant with resistance to L-homoarginine and 8-azaguaine, ARG 3-15 (L-HA(r), 8-AG(r), L-His(-)), was screened after several rounds of screening. The L-arginine production of these mutants was more than that of the original strain, increased by 43.79% for ARG 3-15. Moreover, N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase activity of these mutants was also increased. After a series of passages, the hereditary properties of these mutants were found to be stable. Interestingly, beet molasses was utilized in a co-feeding fermentation and benefited to increase the productivity by 5.88%. Moreover, the fermentation with 1.0 g/L betaine could produce 9.33% more L-arginine than without betaine. In fed-batch fermentation, C. glutamicum ARG 3-15 began to produce L-arginine at the initial of logarithmic phase, and continuously increased over 24 hr to a final titer of 45.36 ± 0.42 g/L. The L-arginine productivity was 0.571 g/L/hr and the conversion of glucose (α) was 32.4% after 96 hr. These results indicated that C. glutamicum ARG 3-15 is a promising industrial producer.

  3. D-Fucose as a gratuitous inducer of the L-arabinose operon in strains of Escherichia coli B-r mutant in gene araC.

    PubMed

    Beverin, S; Sheppard, D E; Park, S S

    1971-07-01

    d-Fucose, a nonmetabolizable analogue of l-arabinose, prevents growth of Escherichia coli B/r on a mineral salts medium plus l-arabinose by inhibiting induction of the l-arabinose operon. Mutations giving rise to d-fucose resistance map in gene araC and result in constitutive expression of the l-arabinose operon. Most of these mutations also permit d-fucose to serve as a gratuitous inducer. It is concluded that d-fucose-resistant mutants produce an araC gene product with an altered inducer specificity. Addition of l-arabinose to cells induced with the gratuitous inducer, d-fucose, resulted in severe transient repression of operon expression followed by permanent catabolite repression. Transient repression but no permanent catabolite repression was obtained when cells unable to metabolize l-arabinose were employed. It is concluded that transport of l-arabinose alone is sufficient to achieve transient repression of its own operon, but that metabolism of l-arabinose must occur to achieve permanent catabolite repression of the l-arabinose operon. This general effect has been termed "self-catabolite repression."

  4. Comparison of the Exposure Time Dependence of the Activities of Synthetic Ozonide Antimalarials and Dihydroartemisinin against K13 Wild-Type and Mutant Plasmodium falciparum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tuo; Xie, Stanley C.; Cao, Pengxing; Giannangelo, Carlo; McCaw, James; Creek, Darren J.; Charman, Susan A.; Klonis, Nectarios

    2016-01-01

    Fully synthetic endoperoxide antimalarials, namely, OZ277 (RBx11160; also known as arterolane) and OZ439 (artefenomel), have been approved for marketing or are currently in clinical development. We undertook an analysis of the kinetics of the in vitro responses of Plasmodium falciparum to the new ozonide antimalarials. For these studies we used a K13 mutant (artemisinin resistant) isolate from a region in Cambodia and a genetically matched (artemisinin sensitive) K13 revertant. We used a pulsed-exposure assay format to interrogate the time dependence of the response. Because the ozonides have physicochemical properties different from those of the artemisinins, assay optimization was required to ensure that the drugs were completely removed following the pulsed exposure. Like that of artemisinins, ozonide activity requires active hemoglobin degradation. Short pulses of the ozonides were less effective than short pulses of dihydroartemisinin; however, when early-ring-stage parasites were exposed to drugs for periods relevant to their in vivo exposure, the ozonide antimalarials were markedly more effective. PMID:27161632

  5. Assessment of Metabolic Changes in Mycobacterium smegmatis Wild-Type and alr Mutant Strains: Evidence of a New Pathway of d-Alanine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Darrell D; Halouska, Steven; Zinniel, Denise K; Fenton, Robert J; Kenealy, Katie; Chahal, Harpreet K; Rathnaiah, Govardhan; Barletta, Raúl G; Powers, Robert

    2017-03-03

    In mycobacteria, d-alanine is an essential precursor for peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The only confirmed enzymatic pathway to form d-alanine is through the racemization of l-alanine by alanine racemase (Alr, EC 5.1.1.1). Nevertheless, the essentiality of Alr in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis for cell survivability in the absence of d-alanine has been a point of controversy with contradictory results reported in the literature. To address this issue, we examined the effects of alr inactivation on the cellular metabolism of M. smegmatis. The M. smegmatis alr insertion mutant TAM23 exhibited essentially identical growth to wild-type mc(2)155 in the absence of d-alanine. NMR metabolomics revealed drastically distinct phenotypes between mc(2)155 and TAM23. A metabolic switch was observed for TAM23 as a function of supplemented d-alanine. In the absence of d-alanine, the metabolic response directed carbon through an unidentified transaminase to provide the essential d-alanine required for survival. The process is reversed when d-alanine is available, in which the d-alanine is directed to peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Our results provide further support for the hypothesis that Alr is not an essential function of M. smegmatis and that specific Alr inhibitors will have no bactericidal action.

  6. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Melissa E.; Quek, Sue -Ing; True, Lawrence D.; Seiler, Roland; Fleischmann, Achim; Bagryanova, Lora; Kim, Sara R.; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Rosser, Charles J.; Gao, Yuqian; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-02-15

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. Normal organs express AGR2 and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact on the utility of AGR2 as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is, however, secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. The blood proteomes also contain no significant peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting that little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression is lost in urothelial carcinoma, but 25% primary tumors retained AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer urine, which matched the frequency of AGR2-positive urothelial carcinoma. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. In addition to secretion, AGR2 is also localized to the cell surface. Thus, secretion/cell surface localization of AGR2 is pecific to cancer while expression itself is not. Lastly, since AGR2 is found in many solid tumor types, this tumor-associated antigen constitutes a highly promising therapeutic target.

  7. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, Melissa E.; Quek, Sue -Ing; True, Lawrence D.; ...

    2016-02-15

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. Normal organs express AGR2 and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact on the utility of AGR2 as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is, however, secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. The blood proteomes also contain no significantmore » peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting that little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression is lost in urothelial carcinoma, but 25% primary tumors retained AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer urine, which matched the frequency of AGR2-positive urothelial carcinoma. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. In addition to secretion, AGR2 is also localized to the cell surface. Thus, secretion/cell surface localization of AGR2 is pecific to cancer while expression itself is not. Lastly, since AGR2 is found in many solid tumor types, this tumor-associated antigen constitutes a highly promising therapeutic target.« less

  8. Altered Antibiotic Transport in OmpC Mutants Isolated from a Series of Clinical Strains of Multi-Drug Resistant E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Matteo; Mach, Tivadar; Beis, Konstantinos; Low, Alison S.; Bamford, Victoria A.; Booth, Ian R.; Bayley, Hagan; Naismith, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, particularly Gram negative species, present significant health care challenges. The permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane is largely effected by the porin superfamily, changes in which contribute to antibiotic resistance. A series of antibiotic resistant E. coli isolates were obtained from a patient during serial treatment with various antibiotics. The sequence of OmpC changed at three positions during treatment giving rise to a total of four OmpC variants (denoted OmpC20, OmpC26, OmpC28 and OmpC33, in which OmpC20 was derived from the first clinical isolate). We demonstrate that expression of the OmpC K12 porin in the clinical isolates lowers the MIC, consistent with modified porin function contributing to drug resistance. By a range of assays we have established that the three mutations that occur between OmpC20 and OmpC33 modify transport of both small molecules and antibiotics across the outer membrane. This results in the modulation of resistance to antibiotics, particularly cefotaxime. Small ion unitary conductance measurements of the isolated porins do not show significant differences between isolates. Thus, resistance does not appear to arise from major changes in pore size. Crystal structures of all four OmpC clinical mutants and molecular dynamics simulations also show that the pore size is essentially unchanged. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that perturbation of the transverse electrostatic field at the constriction zone reduces cefotaxime passage through the pore, consistent with laboratory and clinical data. This subtle modification of the transverse electric field is a very different source of resistance than occlusion of the pore or wholesale destruction of the transverse field and points to a new mechanism by which porins may modulate antibiotic passage through the outer membrane. PMID:22053181

  9. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of Staphylococcus aureus surface LPXTG-proteins: correlation with agr genotypes and adherence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ythier, Mathilde; Resch, Grégory; Waridel, Patrice; Panchaud, Alexandre; Gfeller, Aurélie; Majcherczyk, Paul; Quadroni, Manfredo; Moreillon, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections involve numerous adhesins and toxins, which expression depends on complex regulatory networks. Adhesins include a family of surface proteins covalently attached to the peptidoglycan via a conserved LPXTG motif. Here we determined the protein and mRNA expression of LPXTG-proteins of S. aureus Newman in time-course experiments, and their relation to fibrinogen adherence in vitro. Experiments were performed with mutants in the global accessory-gene regulator (agr), surface protein A (Spa), and fibrinogen-binding protein A (ClfA), as well as during growth in iron-rich or iron-poor media. Surface proteins were recovered by trypsin-shaving of live bacteria. Released peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass-spectrometry. To unambiguously identify peptides unique to LPXTG-proteins, the analytical conditions were refined using a reference library of S. aureus LPXTG-proteins heterogeneously expressed in surrogate Lactococcus lactis. Transcriptomes were determined by microarrays. Sixteen of the 18 LPXTG-proteins present in S. aureus Newman were detected by proteomics. Nine LPXTG-proteins showed a bell-shape agr-like expression that was abrogated in agr-negative mutants including Spa, fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA), ClfA, iron-binding IsdA, and IsdB, immunomodulator SasH, functionally uncharacterized SasD, biofilm-related SasG and methicillin resistance-related FmtB. However, only Spa and SasH modified their proteomic and mRNA profiles in parallel in the parent and its agr- mutant, whereas all other LPXTG-proteins modified their proteomic profiles independently of their mRNA. Moreover, ClfA became highly transcribed and active in fibrinogen-adherence tests during late growth (24 h), whereas it remained poorly detected by proteomics. On the other hand, iron-regulated IsdA-B-C increased their protein expression by >10-times in iron-poor conditions. Thus, proteomic, transcriptomic, and adherence

  10. The Unilateral Urogenital Anomalies (UUA) Rat: A New Mutant Strain Associated with Unilateral Renal Agenesis, Cryptorchidism, and Malformations of Reproductive Organs Restricted to the Left Side

    PubMed Central

    Amakasu, Kohei; Suzuki, Katsushi; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2009-01-01

    We established an inbred rat strain with unilateral urogenital anomalies from an incidentally identified male rat with unilateral renal agenesis and an undescended left testis. These rats were characterized by unilateral renal agenesis in both sexes, undescended testes with agenesis and hypoplasia of the accessory sex organs in male rats, and complete and partial agenesis of the uterine horn in female rats. All of these urogenital anomalies were unilateral and restricted to the left side; we named this phenotype unilateral urogenital anomalies (UUA). Breeding tests showed that these abnormalities were inherited as polygenic traits. The weight of right kidneys of affected rats was 1.7-fold higher than that of normal rats; histologically, glomerulosclerosis, tubular dilations, and tubular casts were detected at 30 wk of age. These alterations may have resulted from compensatory renal adaptation to the lack of 1 kidney. The cryptorchid left testes of affected male rats showed atrophy of seminiferous tubules and degeneration of spermatocytes and spermatids. These results indicate that the UUA rat may be a good model to study the etiology of unilateral renal agenesis accompanied by agenesis of the reproductive tract and to study compensatory alterations resulting from the congenital loss of 1 kidney. PMID:19619415

  11. Comparative Analysis of kdp and ktr Mutants Reveals Distinct Roles of the Potassium Transporters in the Model Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Nanatani, Kei; Shijuku, Toshiaki; Takano, Yousuke; Zulkifli, Lalu; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Tominaga, Akira; Souma, Satoshi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Morishita, Megumi; Ishiura, Masahiro; Hagemann, Martin; Suzuki, Iwane; Maruyama, Hisataka; Arai, Fumihito

    2014-01-01

    Photoautotrophic bacteria have developed mechanisms to maintain K+ homeostasis under conditions of changing ionic concentrations in the environment. Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 contains genes encoding a well-characterized Ktr-type K+ uptake transporter (Ktr) and a putative ATP-dependent transporter specific for K+ (Kdp). The contributions of each of these K+ transport systems to cellular K+ homeostasis have not yet been defined conclusively. To verify the functionality of Kdp, kdp genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, where Kdp conferred K+ uptake, albeit with lower rates than were conferred by Ktr. An on-chip microfluidic device enabled monitoring of the biphasic initial volume recovery of single Synechocystis cells after hyperosmotic shock. Here, Ktr functioned as the primary K+ uptake system during the first recovery phase, whereas Kdp did not contribute significantly. The expression of the kdp operon in Synechocystis was induced by extracellular K+ depletion. Correspondingly, Kdp-mediated K+ uptake supported Synechocystis cell growth with trace amounts of external potassium. This induction of kdp expression depended on two adjacent genes, hik20 and rre19, encoding a putative two-component system. The circadian expression of kdp and ktr peaked at subjective dawn, which may support the acquisition of K+ required for the regular diurnal photosynthetic metabolism. These results indicate that Kdp contributes to the maintenance of a basal intracellular K+ concentration under conditions of limited K+ in natural environments, whereas Ktr mediates fast potassium movements in the presence of greater K+ availability. Through their distinct activities, both Ktr and Kdp coordinate the responses of Synechocystis to changes in K+ levels under fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:25313394

  12. 15 CFR 740.18 - Agricultural commodities (AGR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... required). In the case of multiple partial shipments, all such shipments must be made within the 12 months... procedures set forth in paragraph (c) of this section. If you intend to engage in multiple shipments during... reexport (or prior to the first of multiple shipments) under License Exception AGR. (2) Procedures....

  13. 15 CFR 740.18 - Agricultural commodities (AGR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... required). In the case of multiple partial shipments, all such shipments must be made within the 12 months... procedures set forth in paragraph (c) of this section. If you intend to engage in multiple shipments during... reexport (or prior to the first of multiple shipments) under License Exception AGR. (2) Procedures....

  14. 15 CFR 740.18 - Agricultural commodities (AGR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... procedures set forth in paragraph (c) of this section. If you intend to engage in multiple shipments during the one-year period after the signing of the contract, you need only notify BIS prior to the first... reexport (or prior to the first of multiple shipments) under License Exception AGR. (2) Procedures....

  15. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel.

  16. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: 1. Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. 2. Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. 3. Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tristructural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S.-produced fuel.

  17. AGR-2 safety test predictions using the PARFUME code

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-09-01

    This report documents calculations performed to predict failure probability of TRISO-coated fuel particles and diffusion of fission products through these particles during safety tests following the second irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program (AGR-2). The calculations include the modeling of the AGR-2 irradiation that occurred from June 2010 to October 2013 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the modeling of a safety testing phase to support safety tests planned at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a selection of AGR-2 compacts. The heat-up of AGR-2 compacts is a critical component of the AGR-2 fuel performance evaluation, and its objectives are to identify the effect of accident test temperature, burnup, and irradiation temperature on the performance of the fuel at elevated temperature. Safety testing of compacts will be followed by detailed examinations of the fuel particles to further evaluate fission product retention and behavior of the kernel and coatings. The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact). PARFUME calculates the

  18. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise P. Collin

    2012-06-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one

  19. Safety testing of AGR-2 UO2 compacts 3-3-2 and 3-4-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D.; Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.

    2015-09-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is in progress on tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated-particle fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program second irradiation experiment (AGR-2) [Collin 2014]. The AGR-2 PIE will build upon new information and understanding acquired throughout the recently-concluded six-year AGR-1 PIE campaign [Demkowicz et al. 2015] and establish a database for the different AGR-2 fuel designs.

  20. Xanthine Dehydrogenase (XDH) cross-reacting material in mutants of Drosophila melanogaster deficient in XDH activity.

    PubMed

    Browder, L W; Tucker, L; Wilkes, J

    1982-02-01

    Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate xanthine dehydrogenase cross-reacting material (XDH-CRM) in strains containing the cin and cin mutant genes, which are deficient in XDH enzymatic activity. CRM levels were determined as percentages of CRM in the Oregon-R wild-type strain. The mutant strains contain 72 and 76% of Oregon-R CRM, respectively. CRM levels in strains containing the XDH-deficient mutant genes lxd and mal are 93 and 105%, respectively. The high levels of CRM in these four mutant strains indicate that the primary effects of the mutant genes are on the function of XDH protein rather than its accumulation.

  1. Isolation and Preliminary Characterization of Developmental Mutants from Microsporum gypseum

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, T. J.; Stock, J. J.

    1970-01-01

    Developmental mutants affected in either sporulation or spore germination have been isolated from Microsporum gypseum with the aid of nitrosoguanidine or as spontaneously occurring mutants. The time course levels of several proteins temporally associated with conidial development have been assayed in the wild-type and mutant strains. The spore germination characteristics of two of the mutants are described. The relationship of alkaline protease accumulation to tyrosinase accumulation and spore germination is discussed. PMID:4992372

  2. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  3. AGR2 is induced in asthma and promotes allergen-induced mucin overproduction.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Bradley W; Verhaeghe, Catherine; Park, Sung-Woo; Nguyenvu, Louis T; Huang, Xiaozhu; Zhen, Guohua; Erle, David J

    2012-08-01

    Mucins are gel-forming proteins that are responsible for the characteristic viscoelastic properties of mucus. Mucin overproduction is a hallmark of asthma, but the cellular requirements for airway mucin production are poorly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein anterior gradient homolog 2 (AGR2) is required for production of the intestinal mucin MUC2, but its role in the production of the airway mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B is not established. Microarray data were analyzed to examine the relationship between AGR2 and MUC5AC expression in asthma. Immunofluorescence was used to localize AGR2 in airway cells. Coimmunoprecipitation was used to identify AGR2-immature MUC5AC complexes. Agr2(-/-) mice were used to determine the role of AGR2 in allergic airway disease. AGR2 localized to the ER of MUC5AC- and MUC5B-producing airway cells and formed a complex with immature MUC5AC. AGR2 expression increased together with MUC5AC expression in airway epithelium from "Th2-high" asthmatics. Allergen-challenged Agr2(-/-) mice had greater than 50% reductions in MUC5AC and MUC5B proteins compared with allergen-challenged wild-type mice. Impaired mucin production in Agr2(-/-) mice was accompanied by an increase in the proportion of mucins contained within the ER and by evidence of ER stress in airway epithelium. This study shows that AGR2 increases with mucin overproduction in individuals with asthma and in mouse models of allergic airway disease. AGR2 interacts with immature mucin in the ER and loss of AGR2 impairs allergen-induced MUC5AC and MUC5B overproduction.

  4. Targeting agr- and agr-Like Quorum Sensing Systems for Development of Common Therapeutics to Treat Multiple Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Brian; Hall, Pamela; Gresham, Hattie

    2013-01-01

    Invasive infection by the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is controlled by a four gene operon, agr that encodes a quorum sensing system for the regulation of virulence. While agr has been well studied in S. aureus, the contribution of agr homologues and analogues in other Gram-positive pathogens is just beginning to be understood. Intriguingly, other significant human pathogens, including Clostridium perfringens, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis contain agr or analogues linked to virulence. Moreover, other significant human Gram-positive pathogens use peptide based quorum sensing systems to establish or maintain infection. The potential for commonality in aspects of these signaling systems across different species raises the prospect of identifying therapeutics that could target multiple pathogens. Here, we review the status of research into these agr homologues, analogues, and other peptide based quorum sensing systems in Gram-positive pathogens as well as the potential for identifying common pathways and signaling mechanisms for therapeutic discovery. PMID:23598501

  5. AGR 3/4 Irradiation Test Final As Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-06-01

    Several fuel and material irradiation experiments have been planned for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program (referred to as the INL ART TDO/AGR fuel program hereafter), which supports the development and qualification of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The goals of these experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination and safety testing (INL 05/2015). AGR-3/4 combined the third and fourth in this series of planned experiments to test TRISO coated low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide fuel. This combined experiment was intended to support the refinement of fission product transport models and to assess the effects of sweep gas impurities on fuel performance and fission product transport by irradiating designed-to-fail fuel particles and by measuring subsequent fission metal transport in fuel-compact matrix material and fuel-element graphite. The AGR 3/4 fuel test was successful in irradiating the fuel compacts to the burnup and fast fluence target ranges, considering the experiment was terminated short of its initial 400 EFPD target (Collin 2015). Out of the 48 AGR-3/4 compacts, 42 achieved the specified burnup of at least 6% fissions per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). Three capsules had a maximum fuel compact average burnup < 10% FIMA, one more than originally specified, and the maximum fuel compact average burnup was <19% FIMA for the remaining capsules, as specified. Fast neutron fluence fell in the expected range of 1.0 to 5.5×1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for all compacts. In addition, the AGR-3/4 experiment was globally successful in keeping the

  6. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Peter Agre, Chemistry 2003

    PubMed Central

    Agre, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Peter Agre, born in 1949 in Northfield Minnesota, shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Roderick MacKinnon for his discovery of aquaporins, the channel proteins that allow water to cross the cell membrane. Agre's interest medicine was inspired by the humanitarian efforts of the Medical Missionary program run by the Norwegians of his home community in Minnesota. Hoping to provide new treatments for diseases affecting the poor, he joined a cholera laboratory during medical school at Johns Hopkins. He found that he enjoyed biomedical research, and continued his laboratory studies for an additional year after medical school. Agre completed his clinical training at Case Western Hospitals of Cleveland and the University of North Carolina, and returned to Johns Hopkins in 1981. There, his serendipitous discovery of aquaporins was made while pursuing the identity of the Rhesus (Rh) antigen. For a century, physiologists and biophysicists had been trying to understand the mechanism by which fluid passed across the cell's plasma membrane. Biophysical evidence indicated a limit to passive diffusion of water, suggesting the existence of another mechanism for water transport across the membrane. The putative "water channel," however, could not be identified. In 1988, while attempting to purify the 30kDa Rh protein, Agre and colleagues began investigating a 28 kDa contaminant that they believed to be a proteolytic fragment of the Rh protein. Subsequent studies over the next 3-4 years revealed that the contaminant was a membrane-spanning oligomeric protein, unrelated to the Rh antigen, and that it was highly abundant in renal tubules and red blood cells. Still, they could not assign a function to it. The breakthrough came following a visit with his friend and former mentor John Parker. After Agre described the properties of the mysterious 28 kDa protein, Parker suggested that it might be the long-sought-after water channel. Agre and colleagues tested this idea by

  7. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Scott A. Ploger; Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Jay S. Kehn

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak compact-average burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3 x 105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Six compacts have been examined, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose from 36 to 79 individual particles near midplane on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer–IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, 981 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel protrusion into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer–IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only four classified particles, all in conjunction with IPyC–SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures and IPyC–SiC debonds.

  8. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Scott Ploger; John Hunn

    2012-05-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Five irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These five compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The five compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. Approximately 40 to 80 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to mid-plane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 830 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  9. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Scott Ploger; John Hunn; Jay S. Kehn

    2012-09-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Six irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These six compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The six compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. From 36 to 79 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to midplane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 931 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  10. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Ploger; Paul Demkowicz; John Hunn; Robert Morris

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3×105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Five compacts have been examined so far, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose between approximately 40-80 individual particles on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer-IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, over 800 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in approximately 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel swelling into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer-IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only three particles, all in conjunction with IPyC-SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures, IPyC-SiC debonds, and SiC fractures.

  11. Sulphate metabolism of selenate-resistant Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants.

    PubMed

    Bánszky, Luca; Simonics, Tibor; Maráz, Anna

    2003-10-01

    Selenate-resistant mutants were obtained from several strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The obtained mutants all belonged to the same genetic complementation group. They were low in sulphate uptake activity and in ATP sulphurylase activity. They grew on medium containing sulphite, thiosulphate, cysteine or glutathione but not methionine as the sole source of sulphur. From these results, the mutants were concluded to carry mutations in the ATP sulphurylase gene. Inability of the mutants to utilize methionine as a sulphur source is rationalized by the absence of the reverse transsulphurylation pathway in this organism; wild type strains must utilize methionine as a sulphur source after it is degraded to give rise to sulphate.

  12. Agravitropic mutants of the moss Ceratodon purpureus do not complement mutants having a reversed gravitropic response.

    PubMed

    Cove, David J; Quatrano, Ralph S

    2006-07-01

    New mutants of the moss Ceratodon purpureus have been isolated, which showed abnormal gravitropic responses. The apical cells of protonemal filaments of wild-type strains respond to gravity by growing upwards and are well aligned to the gravity vector. This response only occurs in darkness. Mutants show a range of phenotypes. Some are insensitive to gravity, showing symmetrical growth, while others align to the gravity vector but orient growth downwards. A further class grows in darkness as though it were in light, showing insensitivity to gravity and continued chlorophyll synthesis. Somatic hybrids between mutants and wild-type strains and between pairs of mutants have been selected using transgenic antibiotic resistance as selective markers. Hybrids between wild-type strains and all of the mutants have a wild-type phenotype, and so all mutants therefore have recessive phenotypes. Mutants comprise three complementation groups. One group has a single member, while another has three members. The third has at least 16 members and shows a complex pattern of complementation consistent with a single gene product functioning in both orientation and alignment to gravity, as well as contributing more than one subunit to the mature product.

  13. Cancer-secreted AGR2 induces programmed cell death in normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Vitello, Elizabeth A.; Quek, Sue-Ing; Kincaid, Heather; Fuchs, Thomas; Crichton, Daniel J.; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) is a protein expressed in many solid tumor types including prostate, pancreatic, breast and lung. AGR2 functions as a protein disulfide isomerase in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, AGR2 is secreted by cancer cells that overexpress this molecule. Secretion of AGR2 was also found in salamander limb regeneration. Due to its ubiquity, tumor secretion of AGR2 must serve an important role in cancer, yet its molecular function is largely unknown. This study examined the effect of cancer-secreted AGR2 on normal cells. Prostate stromal cells were cultured, and tissue digestion media containing AGR2 prepared from prostate primary cancer 10-076 CP and adenocarcinoma LuCaP 70CR xenograft were added. The control were tissue digestion media containing no AGR2 prepared from benign prostate 10-076 NP and small cell carcinoma LuCaP 145.1 xenograft. In the presence of tumor-secreted AGR2, the stromal cells were found to undergo programmed cell death (PCD) characterized by formation of cellular blebs, cell shrinkage, and DNA fragmentation as seen when the stromal cells were UV irradiated or treated by a pro-apoptotic drug. PCD could be prevented with the addition of the monoclonal AGR2-neutralizing antibody P3A5. DNA microarray analysis of LuCaP 70CR media-treated vs. LuCaP 145.1 media-treated cells showed downregulation of the gene SAT1 as a major change in cells exposed to AGR2. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the array result. SAT1 encodes spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, which maintains intracellular polyamine levels. Abnormal polyamine metabolism as a result of altered SAT1 activity has an adverse effect on cells through the induction of PCD. PMID:27283903

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Triple Mutant Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E.; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E.; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven effective for characterizing cellular functions but can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed Triple Mutant Analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, that is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principle actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete, and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1536 single mutants. PMID:25010907

  15. Isolation of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, M; Sharma, B; Petras, S F; Reese, C P; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M

    1995-01-01

    Two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 that do not produce leukotoxin were isolated. Following mutagenesis, colonies were screened with antiserum by a filter assay for absence of the secreted leukotoxin. The two mutants both appeared to produce normal amounts of other antigens, as judged by reactivity with polyclonal serum from an animal with pasteurellosis, and were not altered in beta-hemolytic activity as seen on blood agar plates. There was no evidence of either cell-associated or secreted leukotoxin protein when Western blots (immunoblots) were carried out with the polyclonal serum or with a monoclonal antibody directed against the leukotoxin. Southern blots revealed that both mutants show the wild-type restriction pattern at the leukotoxin locus, although the strain with the lktA2 mutation showed differences in other regions of the chromosome on analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The strain with the lktA2 mutation grew more slowly than did the wild-type strain, while the strain with the lktA1 mutation was indistinguishable from the wild-type strain in its growth properties. The strain with the lktA1 mutation should be valuable in determining the role of the leukotoxin in virulence as well as in identifying other virulence factors of P. haemolytica. PMID:7868223

  16. AGR2 is associated with gastric cancer progression and poor survival

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUN; JIN, YONGMING; XU, SHAONAN; ZHENG, JIAYIN; ZHANG, QI; WANG, YUANYU; CHEN, JINPING; HUANG, YAZENG; HE, XUJUN; ZHAO, ZHONGSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Anterior gradient protein 2 (AGR2) has been reported as a novel biomarker with a potential oncogenic role. However, its association with the prognosis and survival rate of gastric cancer (GC) has not yet been determined. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the expression and prognostic significance of AGR2 in patients with GC. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze AGR2 and cathepsin D (CTSD) protein expression in 436 clinicopathologically characterized GC cases and 92 noncancerous tissue samples. AGR2 and CTSD expression were both elevated in GC lesions compared with noncancerous tissues. In 204/436 (46.8%) GC patients, high expression of AGR2 was positively correlated with the expression of CTSD (r=0.577, P<0.01). Furthermore, several clinicopathological parameters were significantly associated with AGR2 expression level, including tumor size, depth of invasion and TNM stage (P<0.05). Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, it was determined that the mean survival time of patients with low levels of AGR2 expression was significantly longer than those with high ARG2 expression (in stages I, II and III; P<0.05). For stage IV disease, no significant difference in survival time was identified. Multivariate survival analysis demonstrated that AGR2 was an independent prognostic factor and was associated in the progression of GC. The findings of the present study indicate that AGR2 expression is significantly associated with location and size of GC, depth of invasion, TNM stage, lymphatic metastasis, vessel invasion, distant metastasis, Lauren's classification, high CTSD expression and poor prognosis. Thus, AGR2 may be a novel GC marker and may present a potential therapeutic target for GC. PMID:26998125

  17. Pentose sugars inhibit metabolism and increase expression of an AgrD-type cyclic pentapeptide in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Tobin J; Giannone, Richard J; Klingeman, Dawn M; Engle, Nancy L; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Brown, Steven D; Hettich, Robert L; Elkins, James G

    2017-02-23

    Clostridium thermocellum could potentially be used as a microbial biocatalyst to produce renewable fuels directly from lignocellulosic biomass due to its ability to rapidly solubilize plant cell walls. While the organism readily ferments sugars derived from cellulose, pentose sugars from xylan are not metabolized. Here, we show that non-fermentable pentoses inhibit growth and end-product formation during fermentation of cellulose-derived sugars. Metabolomic experiments confirmed that xylose is transported intracellularly and reduced to the dead-end metabolite xylitol. Comparative RNA-seq analysis of xylose-inhibited cultures revealed several up-regulated genes potentially involved in pentose transport and metabolism, which were targeted for disruption. Deletion of the ATP-dependent transporter, CbpD partially alleviated xylose inhibition. A putative xylitol dehydrogenase, encoded by Clo1313_0076, was also deleted resulting in decreased total xylitol production and yield by 41% and 46%, respectively. Finally, xylose-induced inhibition corresponds with the up-regulation and biogenesis of a cyclical AgrD-type, pentapeptide. Medium supplementation with the mature cyclical pentapeptide also inhibits bacterial growth. Together, these findings provide new foundational insights needed for engineering improved pentose utilizing strains of C. thermocellum and reveal the first functional Agr-type cyclic peptide to be produced by a thermophilic member of the Firmicutes.

  18. Pentose sugars inhibit metabolism and increase expression of an AgrD-type cyclic pentapeptide in Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Tobin J.; Giannone, Richard J.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Engle, Nancy L.; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Brown, Steven D.; Hettich, Robert L.; Elkins, James G.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum could potentially be used as a microbial biocatalyst to produce renewable fuels directly from lignocellulosic biomass due to its ability to rapidly solubilize plant cell walls. While the organism readily ferments sugars derived from cellulose, pentose sugars from xylan are not metabolized. Here, we show that non-fermentable pentoses inhibit growth and end-product formation during fermentation of cellulose-derived sugars. Metabolomic experiments confirmed that xylose is transported intracellularly and reduced to the dead-end metabolite xylitol. Comparative RNA-seq analysis of xylose-inhibited cultures revealed several up-regulated genes potentially involved in pentose transport and metabolism, which were targeted for disruption. Deletion of the ATP-dependent transporter, CbpD partially alleviated xylose inhibition. A putative xylitol dehydrogenase, encoded by Clo1313_0076, was also deleted resulting in decreased total xylitol production and yield by 41% and 46%, respectively. Finally, xylose-induced inhibition corresponds with the up-regulation and biogenesis of a cyclical AgrD-type, pentapeptide. Medium supplementation with the mature cyclical pentapeptide also inhibits bacterial growth. Together, these findings provide new foundational insights needed for engineering improved pentose utilizing strains of C. thermocellum and reveal the first functional Agr-type cyclic peptide to be produced by a thermophilic member of the Firmicutes. PMID:28230109

  19. Characteristics of Agrobacterium tumefaciens auxotrophic mutant infectivity.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, B B; Lippincott, J A

    1966-10-01

    Lippincott, Barbara B. (Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill.), and James A. Lippincott. Characteristics of Agrobacterium tumefaciens auxotrophic mutant infectivity. J. Bacteriol. 92:937-945. 166.-Mutants of Agrobacterium tumefaciens auxotrophic for adenine, methionine, or asparagine are less infectious than the wild-type strain B6 from which they were derived and show increased infectivity on pinto bean leaves when the specific compounds required for growth of the mutants are added to the infected leaf. Reversion to a prototrophic form of nutrition is accompanied by increased infectivity. Tumors initiated by these auxotrophic mutants are shown to arise only at large wound sites where nutritional conditions may be less restricting. The data indicate that, after inoculation, the bacteria pass through a phase in which host-supplied nutrients are utilized for the production of one or more factors necessary for successful tumor initiation.

  20. Quantity of 135I released from the AGR-1, AGR-2, and AGR-3/4 experiments and discovery of 131I at the FPMS traps during the AGR-3/4 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Scates, Dawn M.

    2014-09-01

    A series of three Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). From 2006 through 2014, these experiments supported the development and qualification of the new U.S. tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Each AGR experiment consisted of multiple fueled capsules, each plumbed for independent temperature control using a mix of helium and neon gases. The gas leaving a capsule was routed to individual Fission Product Monitor (FPM) detectors. For intact fuel particles, the TRISO particle coatings provide a substantial barrier to fission product release. However, particles with failed coatings, whether because of a minute percentage of initially defective particles, those which fail during irradiation, or those designed to fail (DTF) particles, can release fission products to the flowing gas stream. Because reactive fission product elements like iodine and cesium quickly deposit on cooler capsule components and piping structures as the effluent gas leaves the reactor core, only the noble fission gas isotopes of Kr and Xe tend to reach FPM detectors. The FPM system utilizes High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors coupled with a thallium activated sodium iodide NaI(Tl) scintillator. The HPGe detector provides individual isotopic information, while the NaI(Tl) scintillator is used as a gross count rate meter. During irradiation, the 135mXe concentration reaching the FPM detectors is from both direct fission and by decay of the accumulated 135I. About 2.5 hours after irradiation (ten 15.3 minute 135mXe half lives) the directly produced 135mXe has decayed and only the longer lived 135I remains as a source. Decay systematics dictate that 135mXe will be in secular equilibrium with its 135I parent, such that its production rate very nearly equals the decay rate of the

  1. Isolation and characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae unencapsulated mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Benedi, V.J.; Ciurana, B.; Tomas, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants were obtained after UV irradiation and negative selection with anticapsular serum. Unencapsulation, rather than expression of a structurally altered capsule, was found in the mutants. The mutant strains showed no alterations in their outer membrane proteins and lipopolysaccharide, and a great similarity with the wild type in the properties tested (serum resistance, antimicrobial sensitivity, and lipopolysaccharide-specific bacteriophage sensitivity), with the exception of a higher cell surface hydrophobicity and resistance to bacteriophage FC3-9.

  2. Mutant Proteins--Enzymes to Hydrolyze Toxic Organophosphates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-15

    strains of infectious bacteria and the serine protease’ lytic protease. We also employ novel chemical modifications of ; mutant proteins to achieve...mutant RTEM -1 8-lactamase. We have previously generated and characterized mutants of RTEM -1 .- lactamase with all possible amino acid substitutions (site...denaturation than wild-type -lactamase. Uniquely among class A B- lactamases, the RTEM -1 (and RTEM -2) enzymes contain a single disulfide bond between Cys

  3. AGR-5/6/7 LEUCO Kernel Fabrication Readiness Review

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Douglas W.; Bailey, Kirk W.

    2015-02-01

    In preparation for forming low-enriched uranium carbide/oxide (LEUCO) fuel kernels for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel development and qualification program, Idaho National Laboratory conducted an operational readiness review of the Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group – Lynchburg (B&W NOG-L) procedures, processes, and equipment from January 14 – January 16, 2015. The readiness review focused on requirements taken from the American Society Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Nuclear Quality Assurance Standard (NQA-1-2008, 1a-2009), a recent occurrence at the B&W NOG-L facility related to preparation of acid-deficient uranyl nitrate solution (ADUN), and a relook at concerns noted in a previous review. Topic areas open for the review were communicated to B&W NOG-L in advance of the on-site visit to facilitate the collection of objective evidences attesting to the state of readiness.

  4. Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides produced by mutant bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  5. Repair effects of laser on mutants of filamentous fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yansheng; Xiao, Canpeng; Qian, Hailun; Su, Baoliang; Hu, Yujun; Deng, Jianhui

    1999-09-01

    The paper reports that penicillin-producing strains and lovastatin-producing strains were irradiated by UV and subsequently by laser (632.8 nm), and the reparation rate reached 297% and 264%. High-yield mutant was selected with improved potency of 24.5% and 30%, respectively; Gibberellin producing strains were treated with chemical agent LiCl, and then irradiated with 632.8 nm laser. One mutant with 189.6% increased potency was obtained. The experimental results indicated that using laser irradiation after UV or chemical agent mutation was a new useful method in breeding high-yield strains.

  6. Increasing AIP Macrocycle Size Reveals Key Features of agr Activation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey G; Wang, Boyuan; Debelouchina, Galia T; Novick, Richard P; Muir, Tom W

    2015-05-04

    The agr locus in the commensal human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, is a two-promoter regulon with allelic variability that produces a quorum-sensing circuit involved in regulating virulence within the bacterium. Secretion of unique autoinducing peptides (AIPs) and detection of their concentrations by AgrC, a transmembrane receptor histidine kinase, coordinates local bacterial population density with global changes in gene expression. The finding that staphylococcal virulence can be inhibited through antagonism of this quorum-sensing pathway has fueled tremendous interest in understanding the structure-activity relationships underlying the AIP-AgrC interaction. The defining structural feature of the AIP is a 16-membered, thiolactone-containing macrocycle. Surprisingly, the importance of ring size on agr activation or inhibition has not been explored. In this study, we address this deficiency through the synthesis and functional analysis of AIP analogues featuring enlarged and reduced macrocycles. Notably, this study is the first to interrogate AIP function by using both established cell-based reporter gene assays and newly developed in vitro AgrC-I binding and autophosphorylation activity assays. Based on our data, we present a model for robust agr activation involving a cooperative, three-points-of-contact interaction between the AIP macrocycle and AgrC.

  7. Effect of light and oxygen and adaptation to changing light conditions in a photosynthetic mutant in which the LHII complex of Rhv. sulfidophilum was heterologously expressed in a strain of Rb. capsulatus whose puc operon was deleted.

    PubMed

    Barbieri Md, María del Rosario; Kerber, Norma L; Pucheu, Norma L; Tadros, Monier H; García, Augusto F

    2002-09-01

    In this paper we show the effect of oxygen and light on the expression of the photosynthetic apparatus of a mutant heterologously expressing the puc operon. This mutant was obtained by introducing in trans an expression plasmid, bearing the puc A, B, and C genes of Rhv. sulfidophilum, as well as its own promoter, in an LHII(-) mutant of Rb. capsulatus. The results showed that oxygen and light repressed LHII expression. Even low-light intensities lowered the LHII content to undetectable levels by spectrophotometry or by SDS-PAGE. In high-light grown cells, where the relative ratios of LHI and LHII complexes were significantly diminished, we were able to detect LHII complexes. Under the latter condition, the absorption spectrum showed that some pigment accumulated in the membrane even in the absence of cell division. These pigments were used in a later step to assemble LHII complexes, when the high-light grown cells were transferred to semiaerobiosis in the dark. Transition of high-light grown cells to low-light conditions allowed us to study the adaptability of these heterologous mutant cells. We observed that adaptation never occurred, in part probably owing to energy limitation.

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldolase. The aldolase activity in various mutant alleles measured as fructose 1,6-bisphosphate cleavage is between 1 to 2% and as condensation of triose phosphates to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is 2 to 5% that of the wild-type. The mutants accumulate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate from glucose during glycolysis and dihydroxyacetone phosphate during gluconeogenesis. This suggests that the aldolase activity is absent in vivo. PMID:6384192

  9. Elevated curdlan production by a mutant of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2009-12-01

    A mutant strain of the curdlan-producing bacterium Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749, isolated by ethylmethane sulfonate mutagenesis and resistance to ampicillin, was capable of elevated curdlan synthesis. Using 2.5% corn syrup, glucose or maltose as a carbon source, the mutant strain was shown to produce a 1.5-fold, 1.5-fold or 1.5-fold higher level of curdlan, respectively, than its parent strain after 120 h of growth. The mutant strain produced higher curdlan levels after 96 or 120 h of growth on glucose or maltose as a carbon source than it did on corn syrup. Biomass production by the mutant strain grown on the carbon sources studied was slightly elevated compared to its parent strain. It was concluded that the elevated curdlan production observed for the mutant strain grown on corn syrup or glucose was not due to an increase in biomass production.

  10. Antigenic and virulence properties of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Petras, S F; Chidambaram, M; Illyes, E F; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M; Reese, C P

    1995-01-01

    Antigenic properties of two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica, strains 59B0071 and 59B0072, that do not produce detectable leukotoxin were investigated. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with a number of polyclonal sera from animals recovering from pasteurellosis revealed that both mutants secreted a variety of antigens that were also present in cultures of several wild-type strains. These antigens ranged from about 100 to 15 kDa. Mutant strain 59B0071 was found to be totally deficient in leukotoxin, as judged not only by Western blotting but also by cytotoxicity assays with bovine lymphoma (BL-3) cells or bovine polymorphonuclear cells as targets. The mutant strain 59B0071 had normal levels of a secreted sialylglycoprotease, however. When strains were tested for virulence in goat and cattle challenge experiments, a reduction in mortality and lung lesions was observed with the mutant 59B0071 in comparison with results obtained with wild-type strains. These results are consistent with an important role for leukotoxin in P. haemolytica virulence and suggest that leukotoxin-negative mutants may be useful tools in the investigation of other virulence properties involved in P. haemolytica infections. PMID:7868224

  11. Fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants of Burkholderia cepacia.

    PubMed

    Pope, C F; Gillespie, S H; Pratten, J R; McHugh, T D

    2008-03-01

    Fluoroquinolone-resistant Burkholderia cepacia mutants were selected on ciprofloxacin. The rate of mutation in gyrA was estimated to be 9.6 x 10(-11) mutations per division. Mutations in gyrA conferred 12- to 64-fold increases in MIC, and an additional parC mutation conferred a large increase in MIC (>256-fold). Growth rate, biofilm formation, and survival in water and during drying were not impaired in strains containing single gyrA mutations. Double mutants were impaired only in growth rate (0.85, relative to the susceptible parent).

  12. A molecular mechanism of azoxystrobin resistance in Penicillium digitatum UV mutants and a PCR-based assay for detection of azoxystrobin-resistant strains in packing- or store-house isolates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifang; Zhu, Zengrong; Ma, Zhonghua; Li, Hongye

    2009-05-31

    Sixty-five isolates of Pencillium digitatum (Pers.:Fr) Sacc., a causative agent of green mold of postharvest citrus, were collected from various locations in Zhejiang province in 2000, 2005 and 2006, and assayed for their sensitivity to the quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicide azoxystrobin. The results showed that azoxystrobin is highly effective against P. digitatum, in vitro, and that the effective concentrations resulting in reduction of conidial germination and mycelial growth by 50% (EC(50)) averaged 0.0426 microg/ml and 0.0250 microg/ml, respectively. Twenty-eight azoxystrobin-resistant mutants were obtained by UV mutagenesis and subsequent selection on medium amended with azoxystrobin (12 microg/ml) and salicylhydroxamic acid. All obtained mutants were highly resistant to azoxystrobin and their resistance was genetically stable. Analysis of the cytochrome b gene structure of P. digitatum (Pdcyt b) showed the absence of type I intron in the first hot spot region of mutation. These results indicate that P. digitatum is likely to evolve high levels of resistance to azoxystrobin after its application. Analysis of partial sequences of Pdcyt b from both the azoxystrobin-sensitive parental isolate and the 28 azoxystrobin-resistant mutants revealed that a point mutation, which leads to the substitution at code 143 of alanine for glycine (G143A), is responsible for the observed azoxystrobin resistance in the laboratory mutants. Based on this point mutation, two allele-specific PCR primers were designed and optimized for allele-specific PCR detection of azoxystrobin-resistant isolates of P. digitatum.

  13. AGR-2 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    SciTech Connect

    Ploger, Scott; Demkowciz, Paul; Harp, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The AGR 2 irradiation experiment began in June 2010 and was completed in October 2013. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in July 2014 for post-irradiation examination (PIE). The first PIE activities included nondestructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and their graphite fuel holders. Dimensional metrology was then performed on the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsule shells. AGR 2 disassembly and metrology were performed with the same equipment used successfully on AGR 1 test train components. Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Disassembly of the AGR 2 test train and its capsules was conducted rapidly and efficiently by employing techniques refined during the AGR 1 disassembly campaign. Only one major difficulty was encountered while separating the test train into capsules when thermocouples (of larger diameter than used in AGR 1) and gas lines jammed inside the through tubes of the upper capsules, which required new tooling for extraction. Disassembly of individual capsules was straightforward with only a few minor complications. On the whole, AGR 2 capsule structural components appeared less embrittled than their AGR 1 counterparts. Compacts from AGR 2 Capsules 2, 3, 5, and 6 were in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor damage or markings were visible using high resolution photographic inspection. Compact dimensional measurements indicated radial shrinkage between 0.8 to 1.7%, with the greatest shrinkage observed on Capsule 2 compacts that were irradiated at higher temperature. Length shrinkage ranged from 0.1 to 0.9%, with by far the lowest axial shrinkage on Capsule 3 compacts

  14. Overproduction of threonine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to hydroxynorvaline.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, C; Calderon, I L

    1992-01-01

    In this work, we isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce threonine from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutants were selected for resistance to the threonine analog alpha-amino-beta-hydroxynorvalerate (hydroxynorvaline), and, of these, the ones able to excrete threonine to the medium were chosen. The mutant strains produce between 15 and 30 times more threonine than the wild type does, and, to a lesser degree, they also accumulate isoleucine. Genetic and biochemical studies have revealed that the threonine overproduction is, in all cases studied, associated with the presence in the strain of a HOM3 allele coding for a mutant aspartate kinase that is totally or partially insensitive to feedback inhibition by threonine. This enzyme seems, therefore, to be crucial in the regulation of threonine biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The results obtained suggest that this strategy could be efficiently applied to the isolation of threonine-overproducing strains of yeasts other than S. cerevisiae, even those used industrially. PMID:1622238

  15. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Variant 3 Compact Lot LEU01-49T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Montgomery, Fred C; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 vriant 3 fuel compact lot LEU01-49T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-49T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 variant 3 coated particle composite LEU01-49t CAN BE FOUND IN ornl/tm-2006/022.

  16. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Resident Protein AGR3. Required for Regulation of Ciliary Beat Frequency in the Airway.

    PubMed

    Bonser, Luke R; Schroeder, Bradley W; Ostrin, Lisa A; Baumlin, Nathalie; Olson, Jean L; Salathe, Matthias; Erle, David J

    2015-10-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family members regulate protein folding and calcium homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The PDI family member anterior gradient (AGR) 3 is expressed in the airway, but the localization, regulation, and function of AGR3 are poorly understood. Here we report that AGR3, unlike its closest homolog AGR2, is restricted to ciliated cells in the airway epithelium and is not induced by ER stress. Mice lacking AGR3 are viable and develop ciliated cells with normal-appearing cilia. However, ciliary beat frequency was lower in airways from AGR3-deficient mice compared with control mice (20% lower in the absence of stimulation and 35% lower after ATP stimulation). AGR3 deficiency had no detectable effects on ciliary beat frequency (CBF) when airways were perfused with a calcium-free solution, suggesting that AGR3 is required for calcium-mediated regulation of ciliary function. Decreased CBF was associated with impaired mucociliary clearance in AGR3-deficient airways. We conclude that AGR3 is a specialized member of the PDI family that plays an unexpected role in the regulation of CBF and mucociliary clearance in the airway.

  17. Co-elimination of mec and spa genes in Staphylococcus aureus and the effect of agr and protein A production on bacterial adherence to cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Poston, S M; Glancey, G R; Wyatt, J E; Hogan, T; Foster, T J

    1993-12-01

    Phenotypic loss of protein A production was tested in six methicillin-resistant (McR) Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates and their isogenic methicillin-sensitive (McS) variants by a radiolabelled IgG-binding assay with washed cells and by Western blotting of supernates prepared from lysed washed cells. Genomic DNA was probed for homology with the protein A gene (spa) in EcoRI digests and for homology to the methicillin resistance gene (mec) in HindIII digests. The McS variants had lost homology with mec. An isogenic pair of McR and McS strains, and derivatives of S. aureus 8325-4 with site-specific mutations of the accessory gene regulator locus (agr) and spa, were tested for adherence to human peritoneal mesothelial cells in monolayer culture. The isogenic pair were also tested for adherence to HEp-2 and Vero cell monolayers in assays with 3H thymidine-labelled bacteria. McR isolates produced protein A which was absent from three strains that had become McS. This correlated with deletion of the spa locus. Spa homology, but reduced production of protein A, was retained in one McS strain which also showed reduced adherence to HEp-2, Vero and mesothelial cells (p < 0.05) compared with the parent McR strain. A spa mutation in strain 8325-4 did not significantly affect adherence to mesothelial cells but mutation in agr increased adherence significantly in both Spa+ and Spa- strains.

  18. Superior triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless mutants of Scenedesmus obliquus: (I) mutant generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae are a promising platform for producing neutral lipids, to be used in the application for biofuels or commodities in the feed and food industry. A very promising candidate is the oleaginous green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus, because it accumulates up to 45% w/w triacylglycerol (TAG) under nitrogen starvation. Under these conditions, starch is accumulated as well. Starch can amount up to 38% w/w under nitrogen starvation, which is a substantial part of the total carbon captured. When aiming for optimized TAG production, blocking the formation of starch could potentially increase carbon allocation towards TAG. In an attempt to increase TAG content, productivity and yield, starchless mutants of this high potential strain were generated using UV mutagenesis. Previous studies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that blocking the starch synthesis yields higher TAG contents, although these TAG contents do not surpass those of oleaginous microalgae yet. So far no starchless mutants in oleaginous green microalgae have been isolated that result in higher TAG productivities. Results Five starchless mutants have been isolated successfully from over 3,500 mutants. The effect of the mutation on biomass and total fatty acid (TFA) and TAG productivity under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions was studied. All five starchless mutants showed a decreased or completely absent starch content. In parallel, an increased TAG accumulation rate was observed for the starchless mutants and no substantial decrease in biomass productivity was perceived. The most promising mutant showed an increase in TFA productivity of 41% at 4 days after nitrogen depletion, reached a TAG content of 49.4% (% of dry weight) and had no substantial change in biomass productivity compared to the wild type. Conclusions The improved S. obliquus TAG production strains are the first starchless mutants in an oleaginous green microalga that show enhanced TAG content under

  19. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii altered in cercosporin synthesis and pathogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Upchurch, R.G.; Walker, D.C.; Rollins, J.A.; Ehrenshaft, M.; Daub, M.E. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  20. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii Altered in Cercosporin Synthesis and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, R G; Walker, D C; Rollins, J A; Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1991-10-01

    We have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  1. Construction and physiological analysis of a Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae recA mutant.

    PubMed

    Mongkolsuk, S; Rabibhadana, S; Sukchavalit, R; Vaughn, G

    1998-12-15

    A Xoo recA insertion inactivation mutant was constructed. The mutant, lacking RecA, showed increased sensitivity towards mutagen killing. This phenotype could be complemented by a cloned, functional recA. Unlike other bacteria, both the recA mutant and the parental strain had similar level of resistance to H2O2 killing and peroxide-induced mutagenesis.

  2. PDGFRA-mutant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Carbone, Arnaldo; Lanza, Paola; Biondi, Alberto; Rindi, Guido; Cassano, Alessandra; Larghi, Alberto; Persiani, Roberto; Larocca, Luigi M

    2015-07-01

    Germline PDGFRA mutations cause multiple heterogeneous gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. In its familial form this disease, which was formerly termed intestinal neurofibromatosis/neurofibromatosis 3b (INF/NF3b), has been included among familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) because of its genotype, described when GIST was the only known PDGFRA-mutant gastrointestinal tumor. Shortly afterwards, however, inflammatory fibroid polyps also revealed PDGFRA mutations. Subsequently, gastrointestinal CD34+ 'fibrous tumors' of uncertain classification were described in a germline PDGFRA-mutant context. Our aim was to characterize the syndrome produced by germline PDGFRA mutations and establish diagnostic criteria and management strategies for this hitherto puzzling disease. We studied a kindred displaying multiple gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors, comparing it with published families/individuals with possible analogous conditions. We identified a novel inherited PDGFRA mutation (P653L), constituting the third reported example of familial PDGFRA mutation. In adult mutants we detected inflammatory fibroid polyps, gastric GISTs and gastrointestinal fibrous tumors of uncertain nosology. We demonstrate that the syndrome formerly defined as INF/NF3b (exemplified by the family reported herein) is simplistically considered a form of familial GIST, because inflammatory fibroid polyps often prevail. Fibrous tumors appear variants of inflammatory fibroid polyps. 'INF/NF3b' and 'familial GIST' are misleading terms which we propose changing to 'PDGFRA-mutant syndrome'. In this condition, unlike KIT-dependent familial GIST syndromes, if present, GISTs are stomach-restricted and diffuse Cajal cell hyperplasia is not observed. This restriction of GISTs to the stomach in PDGFRA-mutant syndrome: (i) focuses oncological concern on gastric masses, as inflammatory fibroid polyps are benign; (ii) supports a selective role of gastric environment for PDGFRA mutations to elicit GISTs

  3. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michael A.; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V.; Manoil, Colin

    2003-01-01

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering. PMID:14617778

  4. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael A; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V; Manoil, Colin

    2003-11-25

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering.

  5. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Baseline Compact Lot LEU01-46T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Montgomery, Fred C; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 baseline compact lot LEU01-46T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-46T, which was a composite of four batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 baseline coated particle composite LEU01-46T can be found in ORNL/TM-2006/019. The AGR-1 Fuel product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance of the fuel manufactured for the AGR-1 irradiation test. Section 6.2 of EDF-4380 provides the property requirements for the heat treated compacts. The Statistical Sampling Plan for AGR Fuel materials (INL EDF-4542) provides additional guidance regarding statistical methods for product acceptance and recommended sample sizes. The procedures for characterizing and qualifying the compacts are outlined in ORNL product inspection plan AGR-CHAR-PIP-05. the inspection report forms generated by this product inspection plan document the product acceptance for the property requirements listed in section 6.2 of EDF-4380.

  6. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Variant 2 Compact Lot LEU01-48T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Montgomery, Fred C; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 variant 2 compact lot LEU01-48T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-48T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 variant 2 coated particle composite LEU01-48T can be found in ORNL/TM-2006/021. The AGR-1 Fuel Product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance of the fuel manufactured for the AGR-1 irradiation test. Section 6.2 of EDF-4380 provides the property requirements for the heat treated compacts. The Statistical Sampling Plan for AGR Fuel materials (INL EDF-4542) provides additional guidance regarding statistical methods for product acceptance and recommended sample sizes. The procedures for characterizing and qualifying the compacts are outlined in ORNL product inspection plan AGR-CHAR-PIP-05. The inspection report forms generated by this product inspection plan document the product acceptance for the property requirements listed in section 6.2 of EDF-4380.

  7. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Variant 1 Compact Lot LEU01-47T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Montgomery, Fred C; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 variant 1 compact lot LEU01-47T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the ADvanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-47T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrcoarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified at LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 variant 1 coated particle composite LEU01-47T can be found in ORNL/TM-2006/020. The AGR-1 Fuel Product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance of the fuel manufactured for the AGR-1 irradiation test. Section 6.2 of EDF-4380 provides the property requirements for the heat treated compacts. The Statistical Sampling Plan for AGR Fuel Materials (INL EDF-4542) provides additional guidance regarding statistical methods for product acceptance and recommended sample sizes. The procedures for characterizing and qualifying the compacts are outlined in ORNL product inspection plan AGR-CHAR-PIP-05. The inspection report forms generated by this product inspection plan document the product acceptance for the property requirements listed in section 6.2 of EDF-4380.

  8. Rhizobium japonicum mutants that are hypersensitive to repression of H2 uptake by oxygen.

    PubMed

    Maier, R J; Merberg, D M

    1982-04-01

    The synthesis of an H2 oxidation system in free-living Rhizobium japonicum wild-type strain SR is repressed by oxygen. Maximal H2 uptake rates were obtained in strain SR after derepression in 11 microM or less dissolved oxygen. Oxygen levels above 45 microM completely repressed H2 uptake in strain SR. Five R. japonicum mutant strains that are hypersensitive to repression or H2 oxidation by oxygen were derived from strain SR. The mutants were obtained by screening H2 uptake-negative mutants that retained the ability to oxidize H2 as bacteroids from soybean nodules. As bacteroids, the five mutant strains were capable of H2 oxidation rates comparable to that of the wild type. The mutants did not take up H2 when derepressed in 22 microM dissolved oxygen, whereas strain SR had substantial activity at this oxygen concentration. The O2 repression of H2 uptake in both the wild-type and two mutant strains, SR174 and SR200, was rapid and was similar to the effect of inhibiting synthesis of H2 uptake system components with rifampin. None of the mutant strains was able to oxidize H2 when the artificial electron acceptors methylene blue or phenazine methosulfate were provided. The mutant strains were not sensitive to killing by oxygen, they took up O2 at rates similar to strain SR, and they did not produce an H2 uptake system that was oxygen labile. Cyclic AMP levels were comparable in strain SR and the five mutant strains after subjection of the cultures to the derepression conditions.

  9. Rhizobium japonicum mutants that are hypersensitive to repression of H2 uptake by oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, R J; Merberg, D M

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of an H2 oxidation system in free-living Rhizobium japonicum wild-type strain SR is repressed by oxygen. Maximal H2 uptake rates were obtained in strain SR after derepression in 11 microM or less dissolved oxygen. Oxygen levels above 45 microM completely repressed H2 uptake in strain SR. Five R. japonicum mutant strains that are hypersensitive to repression or H2 oxidation by oxygen were derived from strain SR. The mutants were obtained by screening H2 uptake-negative mutants that retained the ability to oxidize H2 as bacteroids from soybean nodules. As bacteroids, the five mutant strains were capable of H2 oxidation rates comparable to that of the wild type. The mutants did not take up H2 when derepressed in 22 microM dissolved oxygen, whereas strain SR had substantial activity at this oxygen concentration. The O2 repression of H2 uptake in both the wild-type and two mutant strains, SR174 and SR200, was rapid and was similar to the effect of inhibiting synthesis of H2 uptake system components with rifampin. None of the mutant strains was able to oxidize H2 when the artificial electron acceptors methylene blue or phenazine methosulfate were provided. The mutant strains were not sensitive to killing by oxygen, they took up O2 at rates similar to strain SR, and they did not produce an H2 uptake system that was oxygen labile. Cyclic AMP levels were comparable in strain SR and the five mutant strains after subjection of the cultures to the derepression conditions. PMID:6277861

  10. Production of extracellular enzymes in mutants isolated from trichoderma viride unable to hydrolyze cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Nevalainen, K M; Palva, E T

    1978-01-01

    Mutant strains not producing cellulases were induced and isolated from the cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma viride. Enrichment of mutants was carried out with the aid of nystatin selection. Mutants were shown to lack the ability to hydrolyze both soluble and crystalline cellulose. Mannanase and xylanase activities were also absent, indicating a common regulation for all these enzymes in T. viride. In some strains aryl-beta-glucosidase activity was also missing. Mutants grew normally, but the amount of proteins secreted into the medium was very low, and in most cases these proteins were qualitatively different from the proteins of the parent strain. Images PMID:564161

  11. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  12. SiC layer microstructure in AGR-1 and AGR-2 TRISO fuel particles and the influence of its variation on the effective diffusion of key fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Hunn, John D.; Lowden, Richard A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2016-08-15

    Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel is a promising fuel form for advanced reactor concepts such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) and is being developed domestically under the US Department of Energy’s Nuclear Reactor Technologies Initiative in support of Advanced Reactor Technologies. The fuel development and qualification plan includes a series of fuel irradiations to demonstrate fuel performance from the laboratory to commercial scale. The first irradiation campaign, AGR-1, included four separate TRISO fuel variants composed of multiple, laboratory-scale coater batches. The second irradiation campaign, AGR-2, included TRISO fuel particles fabricated by BWX Technologies with a larger coater representative of an industrial-scale system. The SiC layers of as-fabricated particles from the AGR-1 and AGR-2 irradiation campaigns have been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide key information about the microstructural features relevant to fuel performance. The results of a comprehensive study of multiple particles from all constituent batches are reported. The observations indicate that there were microstructural differences between variants and among constituent batches in a single variant. Finally, insights on the influence of microstructure on the effective diffusivity of key fission products in the SiC layer are also discussed.

  13. SiC layer microstructure in AGR-1 and AGR-2 TRISO fuel particles and the influence of its variation on the effective diffusion of key fission products

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Hunn, John D.; Lowden, Richard A.; ...

    2016-08-15

    Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel is a promising fuel form for advanced reactor concepts such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) and is being developed domestically under the US Department of Energy’s Nuclear Reactor Technologies Initiative in support of Advanced Reactor Technologies. The fuel development and qualification plan includes a series of fuel irradiations to demonstrate fuel performance from the laboratory to commercial scale. The first irradiation campaign, AGR-1, included four separate TRISO fuel variants composed of multiple, laboratory-scale coater batches. The second irradiation campaign, AGR-2, included TRISO fuel particles fabricated by BWX Technologies with a larger coater representativemore » of an industrial-scale system. The SiC layers of as-fabricated particles from the AGR-1 and AGR-2 irradiation campaigns have been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide key information about the microstructural features relevant to fuel performance. The results of a comprehensive study of multiple particles from all constituent batches are reported. The observations indicate that there were microstructural differences between variants and among constituent batches in a single variant. Finally, insights on the influence of microstructure on the effective diffusivity of key fission products in the SiC layer are also discussed.« less

  14. SiC layer microstructure in AGR-1 and AGR-2 TRISO fuel particles and the influence of its variation on the effective diffusion of key fission products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Hunn, John D.; Lowden, Richard A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2016-11-01

    Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel is a promising fuel form for advanced reactor concepts such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) and is being developed domestically under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Reactor Technologies Initiative in support of Advanced Reactor Technologies. The fuel development and qualification plan includes a series of fuel irradiations to demonstrate fuel performance from the laboratory to commercial scale. The first irradiation campaign, AGR-1, included four separate TRISO fuel variants composed of multiple, laboratory-scale coater batches. The second irradiation campaign, AGR-2, included TRISO fuel particles fabricated by BWX Technologies with a larger coater representative of an industrial-scale system. The SiC layers of as-fabricated particles from the AGR-1 and AGR-2 irradiation campaigns have been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide key information about the microstructural features relevant to fuel performance. The results of a comprehensive study of multiple particles from all constituent batches are reported. The observations indicate that there were microstructural differences between variants and among constituent batches in a single variant. Insights on the influence of microstructure on the effective diffusivity of key fission products in the SiC layer are also discussed.

  15. Occurrence of toxicity among protease, amylase, and color mutants of a nontoxic soy sauce koji mold

    SciTech Connect

    Kalayanamitr, A.; Bhumiratana, A.; Flegel, T.W.; Glinsukon, T.; Shinmyo, A.

    1987-08-01

    A soy sauce koji mold, Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris Raper and Fennel (ATCC 44310), was treated with UV irradiation to obtain mutant strains possessing high protease activities, high amylase activities, and light-colored conidia. Selected mutant strains were tested for toxicity, and some were found acutely toxic to weanling rats, although all were negative for aflatoxin production.

  16. Occurrence of toxicity among protease, amylase, and color mutants of a nontoxic soy sauce koji mold.

    PubMed Central

    Kalayanamitr, A; Bhumiratana, A; Flegel, T W; Glinsukon, T; Shinmyo, A

    1987-01-01

    A soy sauce koji mold, Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris Raper and Fennel (ATCC 44310), was treated with UV irradiation to obtain mutant strains possessing high protease activities, high amylase activities, and light-colored conidia. Selected mutant strains were tested for toxicity, and some were found acutely toxic to weanling rats, although all were negative for aflatoxin production. PMID:2444160

  17. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  18. Preoperative Albumin to Globulin Ratio (AGR) as Prognostic Factor in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobo; Guo, Shengjie; Chen, Dong; Yang, Guangwei; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yijun; He, Qiuming; Qin, Zike; Liu, Zhuowei; Xue, Yunfei; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ruiwu; Zhou, Fangjian; Han, Hui; Yao, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition and systemic inflammatory response are frequently associated with prognosis in patients with several types of cancer, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The study is aimed to investigate the ability of preoperative serum albumin to globulin ratio (AGR) to predict the long-term mortality of RCC patients. Methods: The study is a retrospective study of an unselected cohort of 895 RCC patients who underwent a curative radical or partial nephrectomy at the Department of Urology in the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center between January 2000 and December 2012 and had documented preoperative serum total protein and albumin (ALB) levels. The preoperative AGR was calculated as the ratio of ALB to (total protein-ALB) and its association with other clinical indices was assessed using survival analysis. Results: Low preoperative AGR was associated with older population, lower hemoglobin, higher total protein, lower ALB, lower body mass index and advanced stage. The univariate and multivariate Cox analyses demonstrated that preoperative AGR was an independent prognostic indicator of overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio (HR): 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.43 to 0.93, P=0.022). In addition, patients with low preoperative AGR at pT1-2, pT3-4, pN0, pN1, pM0 and pM1 stages had significantly shorter OS than patients with high preoperative AGR. Conclusion: Preoperative AGR is a proven objective, reproducible, inexpensive survival predictor of RCC patients following surgical resection and should be considered for routine clinical use. PMID:28243330

  19. Safety Testing of AGR-2 UCO Compacts 5-2-2, 2-2-2, and 5-4-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D.; Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.

    2016-08-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is being performed on tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated-particle fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program second irradiation experiment (AGR-2). This effort builds upon the understanding acquired throughout the AGR-1 PIE campaign, and is establishing a database for the different AGR-2 fuel designs. The AGR-2 irradiation experiment included TRISO fuel particles coated at BWX Technologies (BWXT) with a 150-mm-diameter engineering-scale coater. Two coating batches were tested in the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. Batch 93085 had 508-μm-diameter uranium dioxide (UO2) kernels. Batch 93073 had 427-μm-diameter UCO kernels, which is a kernel design where some of the uranium oxide is converted to uranium carbide during fabrication to provide a getter for oxygen liberated during fission and limit CO production. Fabrication and property data for the AGR-2 coating batches have been compiled and compared to those for AGR-1. The AGR-2 TRISO coatings were most like the AGR-1 Variant 3 TRISO deposited in the 50-mm-diameter ORNL lab-scale coater. In both cases argon-dilution of the hydrogen and methyltrichlorosilane coating gas mixture employed to deposit the SiC was used to produce a finer-grain, more equiaxed SiC microstructure. In addition to the fact that AGR-1 fuel had smaller, 350-μm-diameter UCO kernels, notable differences in the TRISO particle properties included the pyrocarbon anisotropy, which was slightly higher in the particles coated in the engineering-scale coater, and the exposed kernel defect fraction, which was higher for AGR-2 fuel due to the detected presence of particles with impact damage introduced during TRISO particle handling.

  20. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  1. Analysis of Sporulation Mutants II. Mutants Blocked in the Citric Acid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fortnagel, Peter; Freese, Ernst

    1968-01-01

    Sporulation mutants that were unable to incorporate uracil during the developmental period recovered this capacity with the addition of ribose and in most cases with the addition of glutamate. Of the mutants that responded to both ribose and glumate, all but three also responded to citrate, and all but five responded to acetate. One of the exceptional strains was deficient in aconitase and another one in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase; both required glutamate for growth. For the mutants which did not respond to glutamate, the products made from 14C-glutamate were determined by thin-layer chromatography. Significant differences were found which enabled the identification of mutant blocks. The deficiency of the corresponding enzyme activity was verified. Several mutants were deficient in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and one lacked succinic dehydrogenase. These mutants could still grow on glucose as sole carbon source, but not on glutamate. The intact Krebs cycle is therefore not required for vegetative growth of aerobic Bacillis subtilis, but it is indispensable for sporulation. Images PMID:4967197

  2. Elucidation of the Photorhabdus temperata Genome and Generation of a Transposon Mutant Library To Identify Motility Mutants Altered in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Sheldon; Rowedder, Holli; Michaels, Brandye; Bullock, Hannah; Jackobeck, Ryan; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Durakovic, Umjia; Gately, Jon; Janicki, Erik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora forms a specific mutualistic association with its bacterial partner Photorhabdus temperata. The microbial symbiont is required for nematode growth and development, and symbiont recognition is strain specific. The aim of this study was to sequence the genome of P. temperata and identify genes that plays a role in the pathogenesis of the Photorhabdus-Heterorhabditis symbiosis. A draft genome sequence of P. temperata strain NC19 was generated. The 5.2-Mb genome was organized into 17 scaffolds and contained 4,808 coding sequences (CDS). A genetic approach was also pursued to identify mutants with altered motility. A bank of 10,000 P. temperata transposon mutants was generated and screened for altered motility patterns. Five classes of motility mutants were identified: (i) nonmotile mutants, (ii) mutants with defective or aberrant swimming motility, (iii) mutant swimmers that do not require NaCl or KCl, (iv) hyperswimmer mutants that swim at an accelerated rate, and (v) hyperswarmer mutants that are able to swarm on the surface of 1.25% agar. The transposon insertion sites for these mutants were identified and used to investigate other physiological properties, including insect pathogenesis. The motility-defective mutant P13-7 had an insertion in the RNase II gene and showed reduced virulence and production of extracellular factors. Genetic complementation of this mutant restored wild-type activity. These results demonstrate a role for RNA turnover in insect pathogenesis and other physiological functions. IMPORTANCE The relationship between Photorhabdus and entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis represents a well-known mutualistic system that has potential as a biological control agent. The elucidation of the genome of the bacterial partner and role that RNase II plays in its life cycle has provided a greater understanding of Photorhabdus as both an insect pathogen and a nematode symbiont. PMID

  3. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori urease mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, E D; Shon, J; Tompkins, L S

    1992-01-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, and peptic ulcer is well established, and the association of infection with gastric cancer has been noted in several developing countries. However, the pathogenic mechanism(s) leading to disease states has not been elucidated. The H. pylori urease is thought to be a determinant of pathogenicity, since the enzyme is produced by all H. pylori clinical isolates. Evidence indicates that some H. pylori strains are more cytotoxic than others, with a correlation between the activity of the urease and the presence of a vacuolating cytotoxin having been made. However, the number of cytotoxins remains unknown at this time. The relationship between the urease and cytotoxicity has previously been examined with chemical inhibitors. To examine the role of the urease and its relationship to cytotoxicity, urease-deficient mutants were produced following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of H. pylori 87A300. Two mutants (the ure1 and ure5 mutants) which were entirely deficient in urease activity (Ure-) were selected. Characterization of the isolates at the protein level showed that the urease subunits lacked the ability to complex and form the active urease enzyme. The ure1 mutant was shown to be sensitive to the effects of low pH in vitro and exhibited no cytotoxicity to eucaryotic cells, whereas the parental strain (Ure+) produced a cytotoxic effect in the presence of urea. Interaction between the H. pylori Ure+ and Ure- strains and Caco-2 cells appeared to be similar in that both bacterial types elicited pedestal formation and actin condensation. These results indicate that the H. pylori urease may have many functions, among them (i) protecting H. pylori against the acidic environment of the stomach, (ii) acting as a cytotoxin, with human gastric cells especially susceptible to its activity, and (iii) disrupting cell tight junctions in such a manner that the cells remain viable but an ionic flow between the cells occurs

  4. Analysis of Fission Products on the AGR-1 Capsule Components

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Jason M. Harp; Philip L. Winston; Scott A. Ploger

    2013-03-01

    The components of the AGR-1 irradiation capsules were analyzed to determine the retained inventory of fission products in order to determine the extent of in-pile fission product release from the fuel compacts. This includes analysis of (i) the metal capsule components, (ii) the graphite fuel holders, (iii) the graphite spacers, and (iv) the gas exit lines. The fission products most prevalent in the components were Ag-110m, Cs 134, Cs 137, Eu-154, and Sr 90, and the most common location was the metal capsule components and the graphite fuel holders. Gamma scanning of the graphite fuel holders was also performed to determine spatial distribution of Ag-110m and radiocesium. Silver was released from the fuel components in significant fractions. The total Ag-110m inventory found in the capsules ranged from 1.2×10 2 (Capsule 3) to 3.8×10 1 (Capsule 6). Ag-110m was not distributed evenly in the graphite fuel holders, but tended to concentrate at the axial ends of the graphite holders in Capsules 1 and 6 (located at the top and bottom of the test train) and near the axial center in Capsules 2, 3, and 5 (in the center of the test train). The Ag-110m further tended to be concentrated around fuel stacks 1 and 3, the two stacks facing the ATR reactor core and location of higher burnup, neutron fluence, and temperatures compared with Stack 2. Detailed correlation of silver release with fuel type and irradiation temperatures is problematic at the capsule level due to the large range of temperatures experienced by individual fuel compacts in each capsule. A comprehensive Ag 110m mass balance for the capsules was performed using measured inventories of individual compacts and the inventory on the capsule components. For most capsules, the mass balance was within 11% of the predicted inventory. The Ag-110m release from individual compacts often exhibited a very large range within a particular capsule.

  5. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Ploger, Scott A.; ...

    2015-10-23

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that itmore » was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocarbon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1 × 10–4 to 5 × 10–4 for 154Eu and 8 × 10–7 to 3 × 10–5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs fractional release from compacts was <3 × 10–6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98 × 105 in the experiment experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs fractional release in two capsules to approximately 10–5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. In conclusion, palladium, silver, and

  6. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Ploger, Scott A.; Morris, Robert N.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Harp, Jason M.; Winston, Philip L.; Gerczak, Tyler J.; van Rooyen, Isabella J.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Silva, Chinthaka M.

    2015-10-23

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocarbon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1 × 10–4 to 5 × 10–4 for 154Eu and 8 × 10–7 to 3 × 10–5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs fractional release from compacts was <3 × 10–6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98 × 105 in the experiment experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs fractional release in two capsules to approximately 10–5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that

  7. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  8. Rhizobium phaseoli symbiotic mutants with transposon Tn5 insertions.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Sanchez, A; Fernandez, L; Leemans, J; Cevallos, M A

    1984-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli CFN42 DNA was mutated by random insertion of Tn5 from suicide plasmid pJB4JI to obtain independently arising strains that were defective in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris but grew normally outside the plant. When these mutants were incubated with the plant, one did not initiate visible nodule tissue (Nod-), seven led to slow nodule development (Ndv), and two led to superficially normal early nodule development but lacked symbiotic nitrogenase activity (Sna-). The Nod- mutant lacked the large transmissible indigenous plasmid pCFN42d that has homology to Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase (nif) genes. The other mutants had normal plasmid content. In the two Sna- mutants and one Ndv mutant, Tn5 had inserted into plasmid pCFN42d outside the region of nif homology. The insertions of the other Ndv mutants were apparently in the chromosome. They were not in plasmids detected on agarose gels, and, in contrast to insertions on indigenous plasmids, they were transmitted in crosses to wild-type strain CFN42 at the same frequency as auxotrophic markers and with the same enhancement of transmission by conjugation plasmid R68.45. In these Ndv mutants the Tn5 insertions were the same as or very closely linked to mutations causing the Ndv phenotype. However, in two mutants with Tn5 insertions on plasmid pCFN42d, an additional mutation on the same plasmid, rather than Tn5, was responsible for the Sna- or Ndv phenotype. When plasmid pJB4JI was transferred to two other R. phaseoli strains, analysis of symbiotic mutants was complicated by Tn5-containing deleted forms of pJB4JI that were stably maintained. Images PMID:6325385

  9. DETERMINATION OF THE AGR-1 CAPSULE TO FPMS SPECTROMETER TRANSPORT VOLUMES FROM LEADOUT FLOW TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Hartwell; J. B. Walter; D. M. Scates; M. W. Drigert

    2007-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. A flow experiment conducted during the AGR-1 irradiation provided data that included the effect of flow rate changes on the decay of a short-lived radionuclide (23Ne). This data has been analyzed to determine the capsule-specific downstream transport volume through which the capsule effluents must pass before arrival at the fission product monitoring system spectrometers. These resultant transport volumes when coupled with capsule outlet flow rates determine the transport times from capsule-to-detector. In this work an analysis protocol is developed and applied in order to determine capsule-specific transport volumes to precisions of better than +/- 7%.

  10. Widely Used Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 Deletion Mutant Strain dl1403 and Its Derivative Viruses Do Not Express Glycoprotein C Due to a Secondary Mutation in the gC Gene.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cristina W; Taylor, Kathryne E; Pritchard, Suzanne M; Delboy, Mark G; Komala Sari, Tri; Aguilar, Hector C; Mossman, Karen L; Nicola, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0 is a multi-functional phosphoprotein expressed with immediate early kinetics. An ICP0 deletion mutant, HSV-1 dl1403, has been widely used to study the roles of ICP0 in the HSV-1 replication cycle including gene expression, latency, entry and assembly. We show that HSV-1 dl1403 virions lack detectable levels of envelope protein gC, and that gC is not synthesized in infected cells. Sequencing of the gC gene from HSV-1 dl1403 revealed a single amino acid deletion that results in a frameshift mutation. The HSV-1 dl1403 gC gene is predicted to encode a polypeptide consisting of the original 62 N-terminal amino acids of the gC protein followed by 112 irrelevant, non-gC residues. The mutation was also present in a rescuant virus and in two dl1403-derived viruses, D8 and FXE, but absent from the parental 17+, suggesting that the mutation was introduced during the construction of the dl1403 virus, and not as a result of passage in culture.

  11. AgrAbility mental/behavioral health for farm/ranch families with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Roberta A; Deboy, Gail R; Jones, Paul J; Field, William E

    2011-04-01

    Farmers and their families are at high risk for work-related stressors and incidents that may result in physically disabling conditions. Coping with the acute and chronic results of disability has been documented to contribute to mental and behavioral health issues. Improvements in the ability to cope with the impact of stressors and adjustment to living with a severe disability can enhance quality of life and well-being and decrease long-term emotional complications. Due to the unique characteristics of many rural or agricultural communities (including isolation, low population density, and lack of transportation services), residents with disabilities are at significant risk for mental/behavioral health issues complicated by the lack of mental/behavioral health services and resources. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) AgrAbility Program was authorized by Congress as part of the 1990 Farm Bill to assist farmers, ranchers, their workers, and families who are impacted by disability. Initially AgrAbility services targeted physical disabilities; but as the need has become more apparent, efforts are being made to expand mental/behavioral health-related services, including referrals to appropriate sources of treatment. A survey was conducted in 2009 by the National AgrAbility Project (NAP) to identify the types of mental/behavioral health services and resources that the 21 USDA-funded State and Regional AgrAbility Projects (SRAPs) provide for their clients. Resources were also identified from three other experts in the rural mental/behavioral health field who are associated with the AgrAbility Program. The purpose of this article is to report a summary of those services and resources that are currently available through the AgrAbility network. Recommendations for the NAP concerning mental/behavioral health initiatives and implementation strategies for the SRAPs are also presented.

  12. [Eremothecium ashbyii mutants resistant to 2,6-diaminopurine].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, A I; Beburov, M Iu; Zhdanov, V G

    1975-01-01

    3 groups of Eremothecium ashbyii mutants resistant to 5-10(-3) M 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) ahve been obtained. The mutants of the 1st group (Dap-r) are selected from the initial susceptible strain by the ability to grow in the presence of 5-10(-3) M DAP. The mutants of the 2nd group (Azg-Dap-r) are selected in the selective background of two analogues of 5-10(-3) M DAP and 10(-4) M 8-azaguanine (AG). The mutants of the 3rd group (Azg-r - DAP-r) are isolated from the mutant Azg-r 34 resistant to 10(-4) M AG. The results of studying cross-resistance of mutants to DAP, AG and 8-azaadenine (AA) show that Dap-r and Azg-Dap-r mutants in contrast to Azg-r - Dap-r, have common phenotypic properties and can grow only on the analogues of adenine. DAP, but not AA, eliminates the inhibitory effect of AG on the growth of these mutants. This effect is probably due to deaminating DAP to guanine. Mutants Azg-r - Dap-r retain the initial resistance to 10(-4) M AG, but are susceptible to higher concentrations of AG and in this case DAP does not eliminate the inhibitory effect of AG. In all mutants obtained the effectiveness of the incorporation of 14C-adenine (but not 14C-guanine) is sharply reduced, thus indicating the absence of adenosine-monophosphate pyrophosphorylase activity. The mutants do not excrete purine-like compounds into the medium. In the course of the continuous growth of mutants in the presence of DAP but not of guanine the red intracellular pigment is formed which seems to be a complex of riboflavin with DAP. A disturbance in the synthesis of adenosine monophosphate pyrophosphorylase does not influence practically the level of the synthesis of riboflavin in E. ashbyii.

  13. Selection of hypercellulolytic mutants of Trichoderma reesei based on resistance to nystatin

    SciTech Connect

    Schimenti, J.; Garrett, T.; Montenecourt, B.S.; Eveleigh, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Nystatin-resistant mutants of Trichoderma reesei were isolated, and several derived from the wild strain showed increased production of cellulase. Thus, the concept of gaining greater enzyme release through interference with membrane function was confirmed. Certain nystatin-resistant mutants derived from the hypercellulolytic strain RUT-C30 also showed increased cellulase yields, but these strains proved unstable and reverted to giving basal enzyme yields.

  14. Isolation and preliminary characterization of auxotrophic and morphological mutants of the yeastlike form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    San Blas, F; Centeno, S

    1977-01-01

    N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, which is known to be a very effective mutagen in many systems, was used to induce mutants in the yeastlike form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain IVIC Pb9, an imperfect fungus. Forty-three auxotrophic and 27 prototrophic morphological mutants were isolated after treatment with 50 mug of nitrosoguanidine per ml in 0.1 M citrate buffer, pH 5.0. Auxotrophic mutants required primarily either amino acids, purines, or pyrimidines. Some auxotrophs were also morphological mutants. The main morphological difference from the parental strain was the texture or the color of the yeast-like colonies. Only one prototrophic morphological mutant differed in the size and form of the yeastlike cells when compared with the parental strain. Suxotrophic mutants were used in pairwise combination to attempt heterokaryon formation without success. Images PMID:830638

  15. Mutants of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica defective in lysine catabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Gaillardin, C; Fournier, P; Sylvestre, G; Heslot, H

    1976-01-01

    Wild-type strains of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica are able to use lysine as a carbon or a nitrogen source, but not as a unique source for both. Mutants were selected that could not use lysine either as a nitrogen or as a carbon source. Some of them, however, utilized N-6-acetyllysine or 5-aminovaleric acid. Many of the mutants appeared to be blocked in both utilizations, suggesting a unique pathway for lysine degradation (either as a carbon or as a nitrogen source). Genetic characterization of these mutants was achieved by complementation and recombination tests. PMID:1245461

  16. A dinoflagellate mutant with higher frequency of multiple fission.

    PubMed

    Lam, C M; Chong, C; Wong, J T

    2001-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii Biecheler propagates by both binary and multiple fission. By a newly developed mutagenesis protocol based on using ethyl methanesulfonate and a cell size screening method, a cell cycle mutant, mf2, was isolated with giant cells which predominantly divide by multiple fission. The average cell size of the mutant mf2 is larger than the control C. cohnii. Cell cycle synchronization experiments suggest that mutant mf2, when compared with the control strain, has a prolonged G1 phase with a corresponding delay of the G2 + M phase.

  17. Isolation of Mutants of Euglena gracilis With Impaired Photosynthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Russell, George K.; Lyman, Harvard

    1968-01-01

    Four mutant strains of Euglena gracilis have been isolated after treatment of wild type cells with ultraviolet light or the chemical mutagen nitrosoguanidine. None of the mutants is capable of autotrophic growth or photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation. The mutant strains contain normal amounts of the enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and are qualitatively similar to the wild type in pigment composition, but are unable to carry out the Hill reaction (light induced reduction of 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol). Isolated mutant plastids cannot photoreduce NADP with water as the electron donor but can carry out this reaction when the electron donating system is ascorbate and 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol. Whole cells of the mutants show the light induced oxidation of cytochrome f by light reaction I but are unable to bring about cytochrome f reduction by light reaction II. The mutants appear to be blocked at or near light reaction II in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The mutants may represent alterations of the chloroplast genome since the mutation isolation was carried out under conditions where chloroplast viability was severely impaired, but cell viability was unaffected. PMID:5700022

  18. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the AGR 3/4 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh Thi-Cam

    2015-09-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation experiments are being conducted within the Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The main objectives of the fuel experimental campaign are to provide the necessary data on fuel performance to support fuel process development, qualify a fuel design and fabrication process for normal operation and accident conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes (PLN 3636, “Technical Program Plan for INL Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program”). The AGR 3/4 test was inserted in the Northeast Flux Trap position in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in December 2011 and successfully completed irradiation in mid-April 2014, resulting in irradiation of the tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel for 369.1 effective full-power days (EFPDs) during approximately 2.4 calendar years. The AGR 3/4 data, including the irradiation data and calculated results, were qualified and stored in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). To support the U.S. TRISO fuel performance assessment and to provide data for validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, the daily as run thermal analysis has been performed separately on each of twelve AGR 3/4 capsules for the entire irradiation as discussed in ECAR-2807, “AGR 3/4 Daily As Run Thermal Analyses”. The ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal model predicts the daily average volume average (VA) fuel temperature (FT), peak FT, and graphite matrix, sleeve, and sink temperature in each capsule. The JMOCUP simulation codes were also created to perform depletion calculations for the AGR 3/4 experiment (ECAR-2753, “JMOCUP As-Run Daily Physics Depletion Calculation for the AGR 3/4 TRISO Particle Experiment in ATR

  19. Estándar para la Protección del Trabajador Agrícola Revisado

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estas revisiones al Estándar de Protección a los Trabajadores Agrícolas, promulgado en 1992, proporcionarán protecciones de salud a los trabajadores agrícolas similares a las que ya disponen trabajadores en otras industrias.

  20. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  1. Cambios al Estándar de Protección a los Trabajadores Agrícolas de la EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estos cambios proporcionarán protecciones de salud a los trabajadores agrícolas similares a las que ya disponen trabajadores en otras industrias, teniendo en cuenta el entorno laboral único de muchos trabajos agrícolas.

  2. Elevated 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde production from glycerol using a Citrobacter freundii mutant.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P; Peterson, Jessica L

    2014-01-01

    A mutant strain of Citrobacter freundii capable of elevated 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde production from glycerol was isolated using chemical mutagenesis and a screening protocol. The protocol involved screening mutagenized bacterial cells on solid minimal medium containing 5 % (v/v) glycerol. Colonies were picked onto duplicate solid minimal medium plates and one plate was stained with 1 % (w/v) phloroglucinol. Those colonies staining red were further screened and a mutant, HPAO-1, was identified. The mutant strain produced a several-fold higher 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde concentration than did the parent strain when grown on 5 % (v/v) glycerol. The ratio of culture volume to flask volume influenced 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde production by the mutant cells compared to the parent cells. Aldehyde production was highest when the mutant strain was grown on 5 % (v/v) glycerol at a ratio of culture volume to flask volume of 1:3 or 1:12.5.

  3. Simplified AIP-II Peptidomimetics Are Potent Inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus AgrC Quorum Sensing Receptors.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Joseph K; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Tyler, Kimberly A; Blackwell, Helen E

    2017-02-16

    The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus controls many aspects of virulence by using the accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing (QS) system. The agr system is activated by a macrocyclic peptide signal known as an autoinducing peptide (AIP). We sought to develop structurally simplified mimetics of AIPs for use as chemical tools to study QS in S. aureus. Herein, we report new peptidomimetic AgrC receptor inhibitors based on a tail-truncated AIP-II peptide that have almost analogous inhibitory activities to the parent peptide. Structural comparison of one of these peptidomimetics to the parent peptide and a highly potent, all-peptide-derived, S. aureus agr inhibitor (AIP-III D4A) revealed a conserved hydrophobic motif and overall amphipathic nature. Our results suggest that the AIP scaffold is amenable to structural mimicry and minimization for the development of synthetic agr inhibitors.

  4. Structure-Function Analyses of a Staphylococcus epidermidis Autoinducing Peptide Reveals Motifs Critical for AgrC-type Receptor Modulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tian; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Paharik, Alexandra E; Horswill, Alexander R; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-07-15

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is frequently implicated in human infections associated with indwelling medical devices due to its ubiquity in the skin flora and formation of robust biofilms. The accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing (QS) system plays a prominent role in the establishment of biofilms and infection by this bacterium. Agr activation is mediated by the binding of a peptide signal (or autoinducing peptide, AIP) to its cognate AgrC receptor. Many questions remain about the role of QS in S. epidermidis infections, as well as in mixed-microbial populations on a host, and chemical modulators of its agr system could provide novel insights into this signaling network. The AIP ligand provides an initial scaffold for the development of such probes; however, the structure-activity relationships (SARs) for activation of S. epidermidis AgrC receptors by AIPs are largely unknown. Herein, we report the first SAR analyses of an S. epidermidis AIP by performing systematic alanine and d-amino acid scans of the S. epidermidis AIP-I. On the basis of these results, we designed and identified potent, pan-group inhibitors of the AgrC receptors in the three S. epidermidis agr groups, as well as a set of AIP-I analogs capable of selective AgrC inhibition in either specific S. epidermidis agr groups or in another common staphylococcal species, S. aureus. In addition, we uncovered a non-native peptide agonist of AgrC-I that can strongly inhibit S. epidermidis biofilm growth. Together, these synthetic analogs represent new and readily accessible probes for investigating the roles of QS in S. epidermidis colonization and infections.

  5. Acriflavine-Resistant Mutant of Streptococcus cremoris†

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Selection for resistance to acriflavine in Streptococcus cremoris resulted in cross-resistance to the drugs neomycin, streptomycin, ethidium bromide, mitomycin C, and proflavine. Furthermore, the mutants showed resistance to lytic bacteriophages to which the parental strain was sensitive, and, unlike the parent, the mutants grew well at higher temperatures (40°C). Revertants selected independently either for temperature sensitivity or for acriflavine sensitivity lost resistance to all the drugs and dyes but retained the bacteriophage resistance phenotype. The acriflavine-resistant mutation resulted in an increase in resistance by the bacterial cells to sodium dodecyl sulfate, a potent solvent of lipopolysaccharide and lipoprotein. It is suggested that the acriflavine resistance mutation determines the synthesis of a membrane substance resistant to higher temperatures. PMID:907329

  6. Surface coatings that promote rapid release of peptide-based AgrC inhibitors for attenuation of quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Adam H; Stacy, Danielle M; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Kratochvil, Michael J; Blackwell, Helen E; Lynn, David M

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for a variety of life-threatening infections. The pathogenicity of this organism is attributed to its ability to produce a range of virulence factors and toxins, including the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). While many S. aureus infections can be treated using conventional antibiotics, strains resistant to these bactericidal agents have emerged. Approaches that suppress pathogenicity through mechanisms that are nonbactericidal (i.e., antivirulence approaches) could provide new options for treating infections, including those caused by resistant strains. Here, we report a nonbactericidal approach to suppressing pathogenicity based on the release of macrocyclic peptides (1 and 2) that inhibit the agr quorum sensing (QS) circuit in group-III S. aureus. It is demonstrated that these peptides can be immobilized on planar and complex objects (on glass slides, nonwoven meshes, or within absorbent tampons) using the rapidly dissolving polymer carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Peptide-loaded CMC films released peptide rapidly (<5 min) and promoted strong (>95%) inhibition of the agr QS circuit without inducing cell death when incubated in the presence of a group-III S. aureus gfp-reporter strain. Peptide 1 is among the most potent inhibitors of QS in S. aureus reported to date, and the group-III QS circuit regulates production of TSST-1, the primary cause of toxic shock syndrome (TSS). These results thus suggest approaches to treat the outer covers of tampons, wound dressings, or other objects to suppress toxin production and reduce the severity of TSS in clinical and personal care contexts. Because peptide 1 also inhibits QS in S. aureus groups-I, -II, and -IV, this approach could also provide a pathway for attenuation of QS and associated virulence phenotypes in a broader range of contexts.

  7. Gravitropism in roots of intermediate-starch mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Wright, J. B.; Caspar, T.

    1996-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in roots of wild type (WT) Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (strain Wassilewskija) and three starch-deficient mutants that were generated by T-DNA insertional mutagenesis. One of these mutants was starchless while the other two were intermediate mutants, which had 51% and 60%, respectively, of the WT amount of starch as determined by light and electron microscopy. The four parameters used to assay gravitropism were: orientation during vertical growth, time course of curvature, induction, and intermittent stimulation experiments. WT roots were much more responsive to gravity than were roots of the starchless mutant, and the intermediate starch mutants exhibited an intermediate graviresponse. Our data suggest that lowered starch content in the mutants primarily affects gravitropism rather than differential growth because both phototropic curvature and growth rates were approximately equal among all four genotypes. Since responses of intermediate-starch mutants were closer to the WT response than to the starchless mutant, it appears that 51-60% of the WT level of starch is near the threshold amount needed for full gravitropic sensitivity. While other interpretations are possible, the data are consistent with the starch statolith hypothesis for gravity perception in that the degree of graviresponsiveness is proportional to the total mass of plastids per cell.

  8. Highly-substrate active isoenzyme acetylcholinesterase-II, in rosy eye mutant of Aedes aegypti mosquito.

    PubMed

    Mourya, D T; Gokhale, M D; Barde, P V; Deobagkar, D N

    2001-08-01

    Insecticide bioassays were carried out on larvae and adults of rosy eye mutant and wildtype strains of A. aegypti. Both the strains were equally susceptible to DDT, malathion and deltamethrin. Biochemical assays showed an increase in acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) activity in all the stages of mutant strain with both the substrates i.e. acetylthiocholine iodide and S-butyrylthiocholine iodide. However, there was no difference in the percent inhibition of enzyme activity with propoxur in these two strains. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis performed in native conditions on the homogenates of adults of rosy eye mosquitoes showed that AChE-II allele was highly active with the substrate acetylthiocholine iodide as compared to wildtype strain. Frequency of the highly active AChE-II allele in the mutant strain was about 68%, whereas it was about 5% in the wildtype strain.

  9. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes.

  10. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Pre-Production Test: NUCO350-75T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Lowden, Richard Andrew; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-03-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for compact lot NUCO350-75T-Z. This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite NUCO350-75T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 m natural uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (NUCO). The compacts and coated particles were produced as part of a development effort at ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The kernels were obtained from BWXT and were identified as composite G73B-NU-69300. The BWXT kernel lot G73B-NU-69300 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating. The ORNL identification for these kernel sublots was NUCO350-## (where ## were a series of integers beginning with 01). NUCO350-75T-Z was produced as part of the ORNL AGR development effort and is not fully representative of a final product. This compact lot was the first run through of the entire ORNL AGR-1 irradiation test fuel production process involving coating, characterization, and compacting of TRISO-coated 350 m NUCO. The results of this exercise were used to fine tune the irradiation test fuel production process and as a basis for the decision to proceed with the production of the baseline fuel for the AGR-1 irradiation test.

  11. AgrAbility Project: Promoting Success in Agriculture for People with Disabilities and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The AgrAbility Project offers education and assistance to farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural workers with physical and mental disabilities. The project also eliminates barriers and creates a favorable climate among rural service providers for people with disabilities. Disabilities and conditions covered are listed. Examples of the project's…

  12. PIE on Safety-Tested AGR-1 Compact 5-1-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D.; Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Gerczak, Tyler J.

    2015-08-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is being performed in support of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel development and qualification for High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). AGR-1 was the first in a series of TRISO fuel irradiation experiments initiated in 2006 under the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program; this work continues to be funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) initiative. AGR-1 fuel compacts were fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2006 and irradiated for three years in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to demonstrate and evaluate fuel performance under HTGR irradiation conditions. PIE is being performed at INL and ORNL to study how the fuel behaved during irradiation, and to examine fuel performance during exposure to elevated temperatures at or above temperatures that could occur during a depressurized conduction cooldown event. This report summarizes safety testing of irradiated AGR-1 Compact 5-1-1 in the ORNL Core Conduction Cooldown Test Facility (CCCTF) and post-safety testing PIE.

  13. Colorado's AgrAbility Project's Effects on KASA and Practice Changes with Agricultural Producers and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Jackman, Danielle M.

    2015-01-01

    Disability rates resulting from work-related injuries remain steadily high among farmers and ranchers. To address the gap in services within this population, USDA implemented AgrAbility nationally. Using part of Bennett's hierarchical model, the current study evaluated the KASA and practice change levels of 401 farmers and ranchers and compared…

  14. Stress Tolerance in Doughs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Trehalase Mutants Derived from Commercial Baker’s Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Shima, Jun; Hino, Akihiro; Yamada-Iyo, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Mori, Katsumi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is widely believed to be a critical determinant in improving the stress tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used in commercial bread dough. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cells, we constructed, for the first time, diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Δnth1), acid trehalase mutants (Δath1), and double mutants (Δnth1 ath1) by using commercial baker’s yeast strains as the parent strains and the gene disruption method. During fermentation in a liquid fermentation medium, degradation of intracellular trehalose was inhibited with all of the trehalase mutants. The gassing power of frozen doughs made with these mutants was greater than the gassing power of doughs made with the parent strains. The Δnth1 and Δath1 strains also exhibited higher levels of tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strains exhibited; however, the Δnth1 ath1 strain exhibited lower tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strain exhibited. The improved freeze tolerance exhibited by all of the trehalase mutants may make these strains useful in frozen dough. PMID:10388673

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to catabolite repression: use in cheese whey hydrolysate fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.B.; Benitez, T.; Woodward, A.

    1982-09-01

    Mutants of an industrial-type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which rapidly and completely fermented equimolar mixtures of glucose and galactose to ethanol were isolated. These mutants fell into two general phenotypic classes based upon their fermentation kinetics and enzyme induction patterns. One class apparently specifically effects the utilization of galactose and allows sequential utilization of first glucose and then galactose in an anaerobic fermentation. The second class of mutants was resistant to general catabolite repression and produced maltase, invertase, and galactokinase in the presence of repressive levels of glucose. These mutants were completely dominant and appear to represent an as yet undescribed class of mutant. (Refs. 23).

  16. Insoluble Glucans from Planktonic and Biofilm Cultures of Mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1355

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355 produces the soluble exopolysaccharides alternan and dextran in planktonic cultures. Mutants of this strain are available that are deficient in the production of alternan, dextran, or both. Our recent work demonstrated that biofilms from all strains con...

  17. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  18. RNA Sequencing Analysis of the Broad-Host-Range Strain Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234 Identifies a Large Set of Genes Linked to Quorum Sensing-Dependent Regulation in the Background of a traI and ngrI Deletion Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Krysciak, Dagmar; Grote, Jessica; Rodriguez Orbegoso, Mariita; Utpatel, Christian; Förstner, Konrad U.; Li, Lei; Schmeisser, Christel; Krishnan, Hari B.

    2014-01-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234 has an exceptionally wide host range, as it forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with more legumes than any other known microsymbiont. Within its 6.9-Mbp genome, it encodes two N-acyl-homoserine-lactone synthase genes (i.e., traI and ngrI) involved in the biosynthesis of two distinct autoinducer I-type molecules. Here, we report on the construction of an NGR234-ΔtraI and an NGR234-ΔngrI mutant and their genome-wide transcriptome analysis. A high-resolution RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of early-stationary-phase cultures in the NGR234-ΔtraI background suggested that up to 316 genes were differentially expressed in the NGR234-ΔtraI mutant versus the parent strain. Similarly, in the background of NGR234-ΔngrI 466 differentially regulated genes were identified. Accordingly, a common set of 186 genes was regulated by the TraI/R and NgrI/R regulon. Coregulated genes included 42 flagellar biosynthesis genes and 22 genes linked to exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis. Among the genes and open reading frames (ORFs) that were differentially regulated in NGR234-ΔtraI were those linked to replication of the pNGR234a symbiotic plasmid and cytochrome c oxidases. Biotin and pyrroloquinoline quinone biosynthesis genes were differentially expressed in the NGR234-ΔngrI mutant as well as the entire cluster of 21 genes linked to assembly of the NGR234 type III secretion system (T3SS-II). Further, we also discovered that genes responsible for rhizopine catabolism in NGR234 were strongly repressed in the presence of high levels of N-acyl-homoserine-lactones. Together with nodulation assays, the RNA-seq-based findings suggested that quorum sensing (QS)-dependent gene regulation appears to be of higher relevance during nonsymbiotic growth rather than for life within root nodules. PMID:25002423

  19. Nitrate reduction mutants of Fusarium moniliforme (Gibberella fujikuroi)

    SciTech Connect

    Klittich, C.J.R.; Leslie, J.F.

    1988-03-01

    Twelve strains of Fusarium moniliforme were examined for their ability to sector spontaneously on toxic chlorate medium. All strains sectored frequently; 91% of over 1200 colonies examined formed chlorate-resistant, mutant sectors. Most of these mutants had lesions in the nitrate reduction pathway and were unable to utilize nitrate (nit mutants). nit mutations occurred in seven loci: a structural gene for nitrate reductase (nit1), a regulatory gene specific for the nitrate reduction pathway (nit3), and five genes controlling the production of a molybdenum-containing cofactors that is necessary for nitrate reductase activity (nit2, nit4, nit5, nit6, nit7). No mutations affecting nitrite reductase or a major nitrogen regulatory locus were found among over 1000 nit mutants. Mutations of nit1 were recovered most frequently (39-66%, depending on the strain) followed by nit3 mutations (23-42%). The frequency of isolation of each mutant type could be altered, however, by changing the source of nitrogen in the chlorate medium. The authors concluded that genetic control of nitrate reduction in F. moniliforme is similar to that in Aspergillus and Neurospora, but that the overall regulation of nitrogen metabolism may be different.

  20. RECOMBINATIONS OF MUTANT PHAGES OF BACILLUS MEGATHERIUM 899A

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James S.

    1953-01-01

    A group of mutant phages stemming from the virus of B. megatherium 899a (lysogenic), growing on a sensitive B. megatherium strain (KM), have been studied with respect to their recombination reactions. All these mutants and many of their recombinations can be recognized by a characteristic plaque morphology. A similar group of phages have been isolated directly from a culture of B. megatherium 899a in this laboratory. Previous work has shown that when two different plaque mutant phages both infect essentially all the bacteria in a culture, a characteristic per cent of recombinants is produced. This percentage depends on the two recombinants used, each pair having its own value. Hershey and coworkers (2–5) have demonstrated with coli-phage T2, that the percentages of recombination found can be handled mathematically and that they demonstrate the existence of a relationship between the mutations entirely comparable to crossover percentages as used in gene locus maps in genetics. This has been found to hold true for the phages studied in the present work. Only one "linkage group" has been detected and all the mutants studied showed low percentages of recombination (0.8 to 7.6). B. megatherium 899a phage and some of its mutants have been examined with an electron microscope and no differences have been detected between the different mutant strains. PMID:13109115

  1. Quantitative analysis of triple-mutant genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E; Krogan, Nevan J

    2014-08-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven to be effective for characterizing cellular functions, but it can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed triple-mutant analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, which is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principal actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double-mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1,536 single mutants.

  2. AGR2 promotes the proliferation, migration and regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Si-Rui; Mao, Liang; Deng, Wei-Wei; Li, Yi-Cun; Bu, Lin-Lin; Yu, Guang-Tao; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) is a common head and neck cancer with the propensity for local spread and distant metastasis. In our previous study, elevated expression of Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) was detected in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stemness. However, to date, the expression and function of AGR2 in AdCC has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, human AdCC tissue microarrays including 18 cases of normal salivary gland (NSG), 12 cases of pleomorphic adenoma (PMA) and 72 cases of AdCC were employed for immunohistochemical staining analysis. Results indicated that AGR2, which was remarkably correlated with Ki-67, transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) and CD147, was significantly elevated in human salivary AdCC tissues. Knockdown of AGR2 significantly repressed the proliferation and migration of human SACC-83 and SACC-LM cell lines. Additionally, AGR2 silencing obviously reversed the EMT phenomena induced by TGF-β1. Taken together, our present study revealed the potential pro-metastasis role of AGR2 in AdCC, indicating that AGR2 might be a novel therapeutic target of AdCC with distant metastasis. PMID:28337279

  3. AGR3 in breast cancer: prognostic impact and suitable serum-based biomarker for early cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Garczyk, Stefan; von Stillfried, Saskia; Antonopoulos, Wiebke; Hartmann, Arndt; Schrauder, Michael G; Fasching, Peter A; Anzeneder, Tobias; Tannapfel, Andrea; Ergönenc, Yavuz; Knüchel, Ruth; Rose, Michael; Dahl, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Blood-based early detection of breast cancer has recently gained novel momentum, as liquid biopsy diagnostics is a fast emerging field. In this study, we aimed to identify secreted proteins which are up-regulated both in tumour tissue and serum samples of breast cancer patients compared to normal tissue and sera. Based on two independent tissue cohorts (n = 75 and n = 229) and one serum cohort (n = 80) of human breast cancer and healthy serum samples, we characterised AGR3 as a novel potential biomarker both for breast cancer prognosis and early breast cancer detection from blood. AGR3 expression in breast tumours is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor α (P<0.001) and lower tumour grade (P<0.01). Interestingly, AGR3 protein expression correlates with unfavourable outcome in low (G1) and intermediate (G2) grade breast tumours (multivariate hazard ratio: 2.186, 95% CI: 1.008-4.740, P<0.05) indicating an independent prognostic impact. In sera analysed by ELISA technique, AGR3 protein concentration was significantly (P<0.001) elevated in samples from breast cancer patients (n = 40, mainly low stage tumours) compared to healthy controls (n = 40). To develop a suitable biomarker panel for early breast cancer detection, we measured AGR2 protein in human serum samples in parallel. The combined AGR3/AGR2 biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 64.5% and a specificity of 89.5% as shown by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve statistics. Thus our data clearly show the potential usability of AGR3 and AGR2 as biomarkers for blood-based early detection of human breast cancer.

  4. Isolation and characterization of yeast monomorphic mutants of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Elorza, M V; Sentandreu, R; Ruiz-Herrera, J

    1994-01-01

    A method was devised for the isolation of yeast monomorphic (LEV) mutants of Candida albicans. By this procedure, about 20 stable yeast-like mutants were isolated after mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate. The growth rate of the mutants in different carbon sources, both fermentable and not, was indistinguishable from that of the parental strain, but they were unable to grow as mycelial forms after application of any of the common effective inducers, i.e., heat shock, pH alterations, proline addition, or use of GlcNAc as the carbon source. Studies performed with one selected strain demonstrated that it had severe alterations in the chemical composition of the cell wall, mainly in the levels of chitin and glucans, and in specific mannoproteins, some of them recognizable by specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. It is suggested that these structural alterations hinder the construction of a normal hyphal wall. Images PMID:8157600

  5. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  6. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga.

  7. C. elegans and mutants with chronic nicotine exposure as a novel model of cancer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kanteti, Rajani; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; El-Hashani, Essam; Riehm, Jacob J; Stricker, Thomas; Nagy, Stanislav; Zaborin, Alexander; Zaborina, Olga; Biron, David; Alverdy, John C; Im, Hae Kyung; Siddiqui, Shahid; Padilla, Pamela A; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We previously investigated MET and its oncogenic mutants relevant to lung cancer in C. elegans. The inactive orthlogues of the receptor tyrosine kinase Eph and MET, namely vab-1 and RB2088 respectively, the temperature sensitive constitutively active form of KRAS, SD551 (let-60; GA89) and the inactive c-CBL equivalent mutants in sli-1 (PS2728, PS1258, and MT13032) when subjected to chronic exposure of nicotine resulted in a significant loss in egg-laying capacity and fertility. While the vab-1 mutant revealed increased circular motion in response to nicotine, the other mutant strains failed to show any effect. Overall locomotion speed increased with increasing nicotine concentration in all tested mutant strains except in the vab-1 mutants. Moreover, chronic nicotine exposure, in general, upregulated kinases and phosphatases. Taken together, these studies provide evidence in support of C. elegans as initial in vivo model to study nicotine and its effects on oncogenic mutations identified in humans.

  8. Brain dopamine and amino acid concentrations in Lurcher mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Reader, T A; Strazielle, C; Botez, M I; Lalonde, R

    1998-03-15

    Lurcher mutant mice are characterized by massive degeneration of the cerebellum, including Purkinje cells and granule cells, as well as for the loss of neurons from the inferior olive. Concentrations of dopamine and two of its metabolites and of several amino acid neurotransmitters were determined in the cerebellum and in other brain regions of these mutants. By comparison to wild-type mice of the same background strain, glutamate and taurine concentrations were reduced in the Lurcher cerebellum. No decrease was found for aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, as well as dopamine and its metabolites. Moreover, no neurochemical alterations occurred in the brain stem, thalamus, or neostriatum of Lurcher mutants. A selective reduction of glutamate concentration was found in the hippocampus, while all amino acids measured were decreased in the entorhinal-piriform areas. These results indicate region-selective reductions of neurotransmitter concentrations in a mouse mutant with a defined cerebellar cortical pathology.

  9. A novel mutant mouse, joggle, with inherited ataxia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyan; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oda, Sen-ichi

    2006-07-01

    While establishing a new mouse strain, we discovered a novel mutant mouse that exhibited ataxia. Mating experiments showed that the mutant phenotype was due to a single autosomal recessive gene, which we have termed joggle (gene symbol: jog). The ataxia becomes apparent around postnatal day 12, when the mice first attempt to walk, and worsens thereafter. The life span of the mutant mouse is comparable to that of the wild-type mouse. After 21 days of age, the cerebellum weights of the jog/jog mice are significantly lower than those of the wild-type mice. These observations indicate that jog/jog mutant mice could be useful models for biomedical research.

  10. Endospore degradation in an oligosporogenic, crystalliferous mutant of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Martínez, Pável; Ibarra, Jorge E; de la Torre, Mayra; Olmedo, Gabriela

    2004-02-01

    We isolated a new oligosporogenic mutant from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD73 that retains the ability to produce insecticidal crystal inclusions. Sporulation in this mutant initiates in a manner similar to the wild-type strain, and under the electron microscope endospores are seen, but these do not reach maturity (except for 0.2% of them). At a late stage, the coat surrounding the forespore seems to lack shape and to be empty. Most mutant cells exhibit a well-formed bipyramidal crystal but are completely devoid of the forespore. The mutant has a functional SigK holoenzyme, which is required for the expression of genes involved in the formation of spore coat and cortex and for cry1A transcription from the BtII promoter. Defective maturation of spores could be due to an inadequate forespore coat or cortex structure resulting in the arrest of sporulation at late stage III or early stage IV.

  11. Rhizobium japonicum mutants defective in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Stacey, G; Tandon, S R; Silver, L E; Brill, W J

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum strains 3I1b110 and 61A76 were mutagenized to obtain 25 independently derived mutants that produced soybean nodules defective in nitrogen fixation, as assayed by acetylene reduction. The proteins of both the bacterial and the plant portions of the nodules were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All of the mutants had lower-than-normal levels of the nitrogenase components, and all but four contained a prominent bacteroid protein not observed in wild-type bacteroids. Experiments with bacteria grown ex planta suggested that this protein was derepressed by the absence of ammonia. Nitrogenase component II of one mutant was altered in isoelectric point. The soluble plant fraction of the nodules of seven mutants had very low levels of heme, yet the nodules of five of these seven mutants contained the polypeptide of leghemoglobin. Thus, the synthesis of the globin may not be coupled to the content of available heme in soybean nodules. The nodules of the other two of these seven mutants lacked not only leghemoglobin but most of the other normal plant and bacteroid proteins. Ultrastructural examination of nodules formed by these two mutants indicated normal ramification of infection threads but suggested a problem in subsequent survival of the bacteria and their release from the infection threads. Images PMID:6956566

  12. Mutant Analysis and Enzyme Subunit Complementation in Bacterial Bioluminescence in Photobacterium fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Nealson, Kenneth H.; Markovitz, Alvin

    1970-01-01

    Chemical mutagens were used to obtain mutants deficient in bioluminescence in the marine bacterium Photobacterium fischeri strain MAV. Acridine dyes were effective in the production of dark mutants but not in the production of auxotrophs. These dark mutants were all of one type and appeared to contain lesions blocking the synthesis of luciferase. ICR-191 was especially effective in the production of aldehyde mutants, i.e., dark strains that luminesce when a long-chain aldehyde such as n-decanal is added to them. However, other mutant types were isolated after treatment with ICR-191. N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induced many bioluminescence-deficient types with respect to both the site of the lesion and the quantitative effect on the luminescent system. We characterized the dark and dim mutants with respect to their response to exogenous decanal, levels of in vivo and in vitro luminescence, and their rates of reversion to wild type. In addition, the luciferases of the mutant strains were examined by subunit complementation. On the basis of these analyses, we identified mutants which synthesize altered luciferase, strains which are deficient in synthesis of luciferase, and aldehyde mutants. The results of analysis of luciferase from the aldehyde mutants and the complementation studies indicate that the lesions in these strains are in the luciferase itself. Results obtained with wild-type cells grown in minimal medium, and aldehyde mutant cells grown either in complete or minimal medium, indicate that a “natural aldehyde factor” is involved in in vivo light emission. These same studies showed that the long-chain aldehyde(s) could only partially substitute for the natural “aldehyde factor.” The possibility that the in vivo aldehyde factor is not a long-chain aldehyde is discussed. PMID:5479452

  13. Genetic mapping and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants that hyperproduce exoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Björklind, A; Wretlind, B; Möllegård, I; Schad, P A; Iglewski, B H; Cox, C D

    1985-01-01

    We isolated two mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO with defective iron uptake. In contrast to the wild-type strain, the mutants produced extracellular protease activity in media containing high concentrations of salts or iron and hyperproduced elastase, staphylolytic enzyme, and exotoxin A in ordinary media (Xch mutants). The mutations were located in the 55' region of the chromosome, between the markers met-9011 and pyrD. PMID:3922951

  14. Emulsifier formation with Acinetobacter: search for an excretion-reduced mutant of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V.

    PubMed

    Müller, R H; Babel, W

    1986-01-01

    After growth on acetate three groups of Acinetobacter strains could be identified with respect to the excretion of a bioemulsifier. Mutants of A. calcoaceticus 69-V were selected which produced reduced amounts of emulsifier.

  15. Phenotypic spectrum of Parachlorella kessleri (Chlorophyta) mutants produced by heavy-ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shuhei; Matsuda, Takahiro; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Kazama, Yusuke; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2013-12-01

    Heavy-ion mutagenesis is a technology used for effective production of genetic mutants. This study demonstrates that algal breeding using a unicellular alga, Parachlorella kessleri, by heavy-ion mutagenesis can improve lipid yield in laboratory experiments. The primary screening yielded 23 mutants among which a secondary screening yielded 7 strains, which were subjected to phenotypic assays. P. kessleri strains produced by heavy-ion radiation spanned a broad spectrum of phenotypes that differed in lipid content and fatty acid profiles. Starch grain morphology was distinctively altered in one of the mutants. The growth of strain PK4 was comparable to that of the wild type under stress-free culture conditions, and the mutant also produced large quantities of lipids, a combination of traits that may be of commercial interest. Thus, heavy-ion irradiation is an effective mutagenic agent for microalgae and may have potential in the production of strains with gain-of-function phenotypes.

  16. UV-induced Lactobacillus gasseri mutants resisting sodium chloride and sodium nitrite for meat fermentation.

    PubMed

    Arihara, K; Itoh, M

    2000-06-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri, one of the predominant lactobacilli in human intestinal tracts, is utilized for probiotics and dairy starter cultures. However, since L. gasseri is relatively sensitive to sodium chloride and sodium nitrite (essential compounds for meat products), it is difficult to utilize this species for conventional fermented meat products. In this study, efforts were directed to generate mutants of L. gasseri resisting sodium chloride and sodium nitrite. UV irradiation of the strain of L. gasseri JCM1131(T) generated several mutants resisting these compounds. A mutant strain 1131-M8 demonstrated satisfactory growth in meat containing 3.3% sodium chloride and 200 ppm sodium nitrite. Although proteins extracted from the cell surface of 1131-M8 were slightly different from those of the original strain, other biochemical characteristics of both strains were indistinguishable. These results suggest that the L. gasseri mutant obtained in this study could be utilized as a starter culture to develop probiotic meat products.

  17. Some repair-deficient mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum display enhanced susceptibilities to bleomycin.

    PubMed Central

    Deering, R A; Guyer, R B; Stevens, L; Watson-Thais, T E

    1996-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a soil eukaryote, is highly resistant to DNA-damaging agents; repair mutants are more susceptible. Susceptibility to bleomycin, produced by Streptomyces verticillus, is greater for mutants which are susceptible to other agents than for resistant strains. The high potential for DNA repair may result from the need to cope with chemicals produced by other soil microorganisms. PMID:8834899

  18. Direct selection of Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentation mutants by a proton suicide method

    SciTech Connect

    Cueto, P.H.; Mendez, B.S. )

    1990-02-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 10132 mutants altered in acetic acid synthesis or in the shift to solventogenesis were directly selected by a proton suicide method after mutagenic treatment, by using bromide and bromate as selective agents. The mutants were characterized according to their solvent and acid production. On the selection plates they differed in colony phenotype from the parent strain.

  19. A Laboratory Exercise for Isolation and Characterizing Microbial Mutants with Metabolic Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doe, Frank J.; Leslie, John F.

    1993-01-01

    Describes science experiments for undergraduate biology instruction on the concepts of mutation and characterization of the resulting mutant strains. The filamentous fungi "Fusarium moniliforme" is used to illustrate the induction of mutants (mutagenesis), identification of the mutated gene, construction of a biochemical pathway, and…

  20. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 x 1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below

  1. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a

  2. Post-irradiation Examination and Fission Product Inventory Analysis of AGR-1 Irradiation Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    J M Harp; P D Demkowicz; S A Ploger

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment was the first in a series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments designed to test TRISO fuel under High Temperature Gas Reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post-irradiation examination (PIE) at INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). The inventory and distribution of fission products, especially Ag-110m, was assessed and analyzed for all the components of the AGR-1 capsules. This data should help inform the study of fission product migration in coated particle fuel. Gamma spectrometry was used to measure the activity of various different fission products in the different components of the AGR-1 test train. Each capsule contained: 12 fuel compacts, a graphite holder that kept the fuel compacts in place, graphite spacers that were above and below the graphite holders and fuel compacts, gas lines through which a helium neon gas mixture flowed in and out of each capsule, and the stainless steel shell that contained the experiment. Gamma spectrometry results and the experimental techniques used to capture these results will be presented for all the capsule components. The components were assayed to determine the total activity of different fission products present in or on them. These totals are compared to the total expected activity of a particular fission product in the capsule based on predictions from physics simulation. Based on this metric, a significant fraction of the Ag-110m was detected outside the fuel compacts, but the amount varied highly between the 6 capsules. Very small fractions of Cs-137 (<2E-5), Cs-134 (<1e-5), and Eu-154 (<4e-4) were detected outside of the fuel compacts. Additionally, the distribution of select fission products in some of the components including the fuel compacts and the graphite holders were measured and will be discussed.

  3. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  4. Vancomycin modifies the expression of the agr system in multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Ochoa, Sara A.; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodea, Gerardo E.; Escalona, Gerardo; Olivares, Alma L.; Olivares-Trejo, José de Jesús; Velázquez-Guadarrama, Norma; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes human hosts and causes a wide variety of diseases. Two interacting regulatory systems called agr (accessory gene regulator) and sar (staphylococcal accessory regulator) are involved in the regulation of virulence factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vancomycin on hld and spa gene expression during the exponential and post-exponential growth phases in multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. aureus. Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by the standard microdilution method. The phylogenetic profile was obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Polymorphisms of agr and SCCmec (staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec) were analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The expression levels of hld and spa were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect protein A, and biofilm formation was analyzed via crystal violet staining. Results: In total, 60.60% (20/33) of S. aureus clinical isolates were MDR. Half (10/20) of the MDR S. aureus isolates were distributed in subcluster 10, with >90% similarity among them. In the isolates of this subcluster, a high prevalence (100%) for the agrII and the cassette SCCmec II polymorphisms was found. Our data showed significant increases in hld expression during the post-exponential phase in the presence and absence of vancomycin. Significant increases in spa expression, protein A production and biofilm formation were observed during the post-exponential phase when the MDR S. aureus isolates were challenged with vancomycin. Conclusion: The polymorphism agrII, which is associated with nosocomial isolates, was the most prevalent polymorphism in MDR S. aureus. Additionally, under our study conditions, vancomycin modified hld and spa expression in these clinical isolates. Therefore, vancomycin may regulate alternative systems that jointly participate in the regulation of

  5. Status of the NGNP fuel experiment AGR-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also undergo on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and sup

  6. Construction and characterization of avian Escherichia coli cya crp mutants.

    PubMed

    Peighambari, S M; Gyles, C L

    1998-01-01

    We constructed delta cya delta crp mutants of two avian septicemic Escherichia coli strains and evaluated their attenuation in virulence. The P1 phage was used to transfer cya::Tn10 from an E. coli K-12 strain into virulent avian O78 and O2 E. coli isolates. Tetracycline-resistant transductants were plated on Bochner-Maloy Medium, and tetracycline-sensitive colonies were selected, then tested by polymerase chain reaction to confirm that they had deletions of the cya gene. Deletions of crp were created by the same technique in isolates with deletions in cya. The delta cya and delta cya delta crp derivatives had slower growth rates, smaller colonies, and impaired fermentation of carbohydrates compared with their wild parents, and they did not revert. Attenuation of the mutant strains was evaluated by subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculation of day-old chicks and by intratracheal (i.t.) inoculation of 9-day-old chicks previously inoculated intranasally with infectious bronchitis virus. For the wild O78 strain and its delta cya and delta cya delta crp derivatives, the percentages of chicks that died within 6 days of s.c. injection of approximately 5 x 10(7) organisms were 100, 60, and 0, respectively. The corresponding percentages for wild-type O2 and its delta cya and delta cya delta crp mutants were 100, 70, and 20 at a dose of approximately 2 x 10(5) organisms. Following i.t. inoculation, group scores based on pathologic and bacteriologic findings were 51%, 15%, and 9% for wild, delta cya, and delta crp O78 strains (inoculum approximately 2 x 10(7) organisms) and 98%, 31%, and 11%, respectively, for the corresponding O2 strains (inoculum approximately 4 x 10(6) organisms). This study demonstrated reduced virulence and stability of the double mutant, which may useful as a live attenuated vaccine against poultry colibacillosis.

  7. Autolysis and autoaggregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa colony morphology mutants.

    PubMed

    D'Argenio, David A; Calfee, M Worth; Rainey, Paul B; Pesci, Everett C

    2002-12-01

    Two distinctive colony morphologies were noted in a collection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposon insertion mutants. One set of mutants formed wrinkled colonies of autoaggregating cells. Suppressor analysis of a subset of these mutants showed that this was due to the action of the regulator WspR and linked this regulator (and the chemosensory pathway to which it belongs) to genes that encode a putative fimbrial adhesin required for biofilm formation. WspR homologs, related in part by a shared GGDEF domain, regulate cell surface factors, including aggregative fimbriae and exopolysaccharides, in diverse bacteria. The second set of distinctive insertion mutants formed colonies that lysed at their center. Strains with the most pronounced lysis overproduced the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), an extracellular signal that interacts with quorum sensing. Autolysis was suppressed by mutation of genes required for PQS biosynthesis, and in one suppressed mutant, autolysis was restored by addition of synthetic PQS. The mechanism of autolysis may involve activation of the endogenous prophage and phage-related pyocins in the genome of strain PAO1. The fact that PQS levels correlated with autolysis suggests a fine balance in natural populations of P. aeruginosa between survival of the many and persistence of the few.

  8. A yeast sir2 mutant temperature sensitive for silencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Lin; Landry, Joseph; Sternglanz, Rolf

    2008-12-01

    A screen for Saccharomyces cerevisiae temperature-sensitive silencing mutants identified a strain with a point mutation in the SIR2 gene. The mutation changed Ser276 to Cys. This amino acid is in the highly conserved NAD(+) binding pocket of the Sir2 family of proteins. Haploid strains of either mating type carrying the mutation were severely defective at mating at 37 degrees but normal at 25 degrees . Measurements of RNA from the HMR locus demonstrated that silencing was lost rapidly upon shifting the mutant from the low to the high temperature, but it took >8 hours to reestablish silencing after a shift back to 25 degrees . Silencing at the rDNA locus was also temperature sensitive. On the other hand, telomeric silencing was totally defective at both temperatures. Enzymatic activity of the recombinant wild-type and mutant Sir2 protein was compared by three different assays. The mutant exhibited less deacetylase activity than the wild-type protein at both 37 degrees and 25 degrees . Interestingly, the mutant had much more NAD(+)-nicotinamide exchange activity than wild type, as did a mutation in the same region of the protein in the Sir2 homolog, Hst2. Thus, mutations in this region of the NAD(+) binding pocket of the protein are able to carry out cleavage of NAD(+) to nicotinamide but are defective at the subsequent deacetylation step of the reaction.

  9. Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) Induced Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Signaling Is Essential for Murine Pancreatitis-Associated Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wodziak, Dariusz; Dong, Aiwen; Basin, Michael F.; Lowe, Anson W.

    2016-01-01

    A recently published study identified Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) as a regulator of EGFR signaling by promoting receptor presentation from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. AGR2 also promotes tissue regeneration in amphibians and fish. Whether AGR2-induced EGFR signaling is essential for tissue regeneration in higher vertebrates was evaluated using a well-characterized murine model for pancreatitis. The impact of AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling on tissue regeneration was evaluated using the caerulein-induced pancreatitis mouse model. EGFR signaling and cell proliferation were examined in the context of the AGR2-/- null mouse or with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG1478. In addition, the Hippo signaling coactivator YAP1 was evaluated in the context of AGR2 expression during pancreatitis. Pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression enabled EGFR translocation to the plasma membrane, the initiation of cell signaling, and cell proliferation. EGFR signaling and tissue regeneration were partially inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, but absent in the AGR2-/- null mouse. AG1478-treated and AGR2-/- null mice with pancreatitis died whereas all wild-type controls recovered. YAP1 activation was also dependent on pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression. AGR2-induced EGFR signaling was essential for tissue regeneration and recovery from pancreatitis. The results establish tissue regeneration as a major function of AGR2-induced EGFR signaling in adult higher vertebrates. Enhanced AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling are also universally present in human pancreatic cancer, which support a linkage between tissue injury, regeneration, and cancer pathogenesis. PMID:27764193

  10. Survival of Brucella abortus aqpX mutant in fresh and ripened cheeses.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodríguez, María Del Rosario; Díaz-Aparicio, Efrén; Arellano-Reynoso, Beatriz; García-Lobo, Juan M; Gimeno, Miquel; Palomares-Reséndiz, Erika G; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the survival of a Brucella abortus aqpX mutant during the elaboration and conservation of fresh and ripened cheeses at 4 °C and 24 °C. The pH values and water activity were monitored for each type of cheese. The fresh cheese was elaborated with raw milk inoculated with 6×10⁸ colony-forming units (CFU)/mL each of parental and mutant strain. Ripening cheeses were elaborated with both raw and pasteurized milk and inoculated with 12×10⁸ CFU/mL each of parental and mutant strains. In fresh cheese, survival was observed during elaboration and conservation for 7 days at 4 °C in mutant and parental strains. The number of survivors of the mutant strain was 10 times lower compared with the parental strain at pH 5 and a(w) of 0.930. In the cheese elaborated with raw milk and ripened at 24 °C, both strains survived until day 17 at pH 4.0 and a(w) of 0.89. However, when the cheese was elaborated with pasteurized milk, the parental strain survived until day 31 of ripening, and the mutant strain survived 24 days at pH 4 and a(w) of 0.886. The survival of the mutant strain showed a diminution of one logarithm during elaboration and ripening of cheese as compared with the parental strain. When the cheese was elaborated with raw milk and ripened at 4 °C, survival of the parental strain was 24 days, whereas the mutant strain survived only 17 days (pH 5 and a(w) 0.90). Regarding the cheese elaborated with pasteurized milk and maturated at 4 °C, both strains survived 31 days (pH 5 and a(w) 0.90), with the same survival diminution during elaboration and ripening. Our results show that in both types of cheese, the mutated aqpX strain survived 10 times less than the parental strain, which shows that the aqpX gene can be related to the survival of Brucella abortus in this type of cheese.

  11. alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutant of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, M J; Fraenkel, D G

    1979-01-01

    A mutant of Rhizobium meliloti selected as unable to grow on L-arabinose also failed to grow on acetate or pyruvate. It grew, but slower than the parental strain, on many other carbon sources. Assay showed it to lack alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (kgd) activity, and revertants of normal growth phenotype contained the activity again. Other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of the glyoxylate cycle were present in both mutant and parent strains. Enzymes of pyruvate metabolism were also assayed. L-Arabinose degradation in R. meliloti was found to differ from the known pathway in R. japonicum, since the former strain lacked 2-keto-o-deoxy-L-arabonate aldolase but contained alpha-ketoglutarate semialdehyde dehydrogenase; thus, it is likely that R. meliloti has the L-arabinose pathway leading to alpha-ketoglutarate rather than the one to glycolaldehyde and pyruvate. This finding accounts for the L-arabinose negativity of the mutant. Resting cells of the mutant were able to metabolize the three substrates which did not allow growth. PMID:762018

  12. Characterization of a mutant of Alteromonas aurantia A18 and its application in mariculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Chi, Zhenming; Li, Hongfang; Wang, Xianghong

    2008-02-01

    Mutant J61321 with enhanced siderophore production of Alteromonas aurantia A18 was obtained after a series of chemical-physical mutageneses. It was found that the antibacterial activity against Vibrio anguillarum W-1 and siderophore production of the mutant were higher than those by the original strain A18 which had been used in mariculture. The results of the specific assay(Csáky and Arnow methods) of siderophore showed that the sidrophore with hydroxamate group was produced by mutant J61321 and the original strain A18, respectively, while the siderophore with catechol group was yielded by strain W-1 ( Aibrio anguillarum). Meanwhile, the siderophore yield, antibacterial activity and anti-chelator activity of strain J61321 were higher than those of its parent strain A18.

  13. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the U.S. Capsules in the AGR-2 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lybeck, Nancy; Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Pham, Binh T.; Hawkes, Grant L.

    2015-03-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation experiments are being conducted within the Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The main objectives of the fuel experimental campaign are to provide the necessary data on fuel performance to support fuel process development, qualify a fuel design and fabrication process for normal operation and accident conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes (PLN-3636). The AGR-2 test was inserted in the B-12 position in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in June 2010 and successfully completed irradiation in October 2013, resulting in irradiation of the TRISO fuel for 559.2 effective full power days (EFPDs) during approximately 3.3 calendar years. The AGR-2 data, including the irradiation data and calculated results, were qualified and stored in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) (Pham and Einerson 2014). To support the U.S. TRISO fuel performance assessment and to provide data for validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, the daily as-run thermal analysis has been performed separately on each of four AGR-2 U.S. capsules for the entire irradiation as discussed in (Hawkes 2014). The ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal model predicts the daily average volume-average fuel temperature and peak fuel temperature in each capsule. This thermal model involves complex physical mechanisms (e.g., graphite holder and fuel compact shrinkage) and properties (e.g., conductivity and density). Therefore, the thermal model predictions are affected by uncertainty in input parameters and by incomplete knowledge of the underlying physics leading to modeling assumptions. Therefore, alongside with the deterministic predictions from a set of input thermal conditions, information about prediction uncertainty is instrumental for the ART

  14. Isolation and characterization of an Escherichia coli mutant lacking cytochrome d terminal oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Green, G N; Gennis, R B

    1983-01-01

    A screening procedure was devised which permitted the isolation of a cytochrome d-deficient mutant by its failure to oxidize the artificial electron donor N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine. Cytochrome a1 and probably cytochrome b558 were also missing in the mutant. Growth and oxygen uptake rates were similar for both parent and mutant strains. However, the strain lacking cytochrome d had an increased sensitivity to cyanide, indicating that cytochrome d confers some resistance to this respiratory inhibitor. The gene responsible for these phenotypes has been named cyd and maps between tolA and sucB. PMID:6304009

  15. Nuclear inheritance of erythromycin resistance in human cells: New class of mitochondrial protein synthesis mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Doersen, C.J.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1982-06-01

    The characterization of two new erythromycin-resistant mutants of HeLa cells is described. The strains ERY2305 and ERY2309 both exhibited resistance to erythromycin in growth assays and cell-free mitochondrial protein synthesis assays. The erythromycin resistance phenotype could not be transferred by cybridization. The mutation appeared to be encoded in the nucleus and inherited as a recessive trait. These two mutants, therefore, represent a new class of erythromycin-resistant mutants in human cells that is distinct from the cytoplasmically inherited mutation in strain ERY2301 described previously.

  16. [Isolation and primary identification of methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha mutants for peroxisome biogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, E M; Dutova, T A; Serkova, N N; Rabinovich, Ia M; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2004-05-01

    After exposure of cells of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha HF246 leu1-1 to N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, a collection of 227 mutants unable to grow on methanol at elevated temperature (45 degrees C) was obtained. Ninety four ts mutants (35% of the total number of mutants), which were unable to grow on methanol only at 45 degrees C but could grow at optimal temperature (37 degrees C), were isolated. Complementation analysis of mutants using 12 deletion mutants for genes of peroxisome biogenesis (PEX) (available in this yeast species by the beginning of our work) allowed to assign 51 mutants (including 16 ts) to the separate group of mutants unable to complement deletion mutants with defects in eight PEX genes. These mutants were classified into three groups: group 1 contained 10 pex10 mutants (4 ts mutants among them); group 2 included 19 mutants that failed to complement other pex testers: 1 pex1; 2 pex4 (1 ts); 6 pex5 (5 ts); 3 pex8; 6 (3ts)- pex19; group 3 contained 22 "multiple" mutants. In mutants of group 3, hybrids with several testers do not grow on methanol. All mutants (51) carried recessive mutations, except for mutant 108, in which the mutation was dominant only at 30 degrees C, which suggests that it is ts-dominant. Recombination analysis of mutants belonging to group 2 revealed that only five mutants (two pex5 and three pex8) carried mutations for the corresponding PEX genes. The remaining 14 mutants yielded methanol-utilizing segregants in an arbitrarily chosen sample of hybrids with the pex tester, which indicates mutation location in other genes. In 19 mutants, random analysis of ascospores from hybrids obtained upon crossing mutants of group 3 with a strain lacking peroxisomal disorders (ade11) revealed a single mutation causing the appearance of a multiple phenotype. A more detailed study of two mutants from this group allowed the localization of this mutation in the only PEX gene (PEX or PEX2). The revealed disorder of complementation

  17. Mutants of Myxococcus xanthus dsp defective in fibril binding.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, B Y; Dworkin, M

    1996-01-01

    The dsp mutant of Myxococcus xanthus lacks extracellular fibrils and as a result is unable to undergo cohesion, group motility, or development (J. W. Arnold and L. J. Shimkets, J. Bacteriol. 170:5765-5770, 1983; J. W. Arnold and L. J. Shimkets, J. Bacteriol. 170:5771-5777, 1983; R. M. Behmlander and M. Dworkin, J. Bacteriol. 173:7810-7821, 1991; L. J. Shimkets, J. Bacteriol. 166:837-841, 1986; L. J. Shimkets, J. Bacteriol. 166:842-848, 1986). However, cohesion and development can be phenotypically restored by the addition of isolated fibrils (R. M. Behmlander, Ph.D. thesis, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1994; B.-Y. Chang and M. Dworkin, J. Bacteriol. 176:7190-7196, 1994). As part of our attempts to examine the interaction of fibrils and cells of M. xanthus, we have isolated a series of secondary mutants of M. xanthus dsp in which cohesion, unlike that of the parent strain, could not be rescued by the addition of isolated fibrils. Cells of M. xanthus dsp were mutagenized either by ethyl methanesulfonate or by Tn5 insertions. Mutagenized cultures were enriched by selection of those cells that could not be rescued, i.e., that failed to cohere in the presence of isolated fibrils. Seven mutants of M. xanthus dsp, designated fbd mutants, were isolated from 6,983 colonies; these represent putative fibril receptor-minus mutants. The fbd mutants, like the parent dsp mutant, still lacked fibrils, but displayed a number of unexpected properties. They regained group motility and the ability to aggregate but not the ability to form mature fruiting bodies. In addition, they partially regained the ability to form myxospores. The fbd mutant was backcrossed into the dsp mutant by Mx4 transduction. Three independently isolated transconjugants showed essentially the same properties as the fbd mutants--loss of fibril rescue of cohesion, partial restoration of myxospore morphogenesis, and restoration of group motility. These results suggest that the physical presence of fibrils

  18. Expression of gamma-hemolysin regulated by sae in Staphylococcus aureus strain Smith 5R.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuko; Kato, Fuminori; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Kaneko, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strain Smith 5R produces a two-component pore-forming toxin and forms a rough-surfaced colony with hemolytic haloes on human red blood cell plates (R[+]). Serial subcultures of the strain in broth caused the appearance of gamma-hemolysin negative variants with a smooth colony shape (S[-]), and the S[-] valiant became predominant in culture. The R[+] strain, in which agrA is naturally disrupted by an insertion of IS1181, produced high levels of gamma-hemolysin. In the S[-] variant, expression of both hlg and lukS-F mRNAs was strongly reduced. Nucleotide sequencing of the sae locus revealed that all isolated S[-] variants had spontaneous mutations in the sae locus. Recovery of gamma-hemolysin productivity in S[-] by transformation of the wild-type sae allele strongly suggested that the expression of gamma-hemolysin is positively regulated by sae in an agr-independent manner.

  19. Plasmidless, photosynthetically incompetent mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, S A; Wimer, L T; Yoch, D C

    1984-01-01

    Ethyl methanesulfonate rendered a high percentage of Rhodospirillum rubrum cells plasmidless and photosynthetically incompetent (Kuhl et al., J. Bacteriol. 156:737-742, 1983). By probing restriction endonuclease-digested chromosomal DNA from these plasmidless strains with 32P-labeled R. rubrum plasmid DNA, we showed that no homology exists between the plasmid and the chromosomal DNA of the mutant. Loss of the plasmid in all the nonphotosynthetic isolates was accompanied by the synthesis of spirilloxanthin under aerobic growth conditions, resistance to cycloserine and HgCl2, and loss of ability to grow fermentatively on fructose. Changes in both the protein and lipid composition of the membranes and the impaired uptake of 203HgCl2 in the plasmidless strains (compared with the wild type) suggest either that membrane modification occurs as a result of plasmid loss, accounting for several of the acquired phenotype characteristics of the cured strains, or that both membrane modification and plasmid loss are part of the same pleiotropic mutation. Images PMID:6434514

  20. The isolation of Staphylococcus aureus tea tree oil-reduced susceptibility mutants.

    PubMed

    Cuaron, Jesus A; Dulal, Santosh; Cooke, Peter H; Torres, Nathanial J; Gustafson, John E

    2014-08-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO)-reduced susceptibility (TTORS) mutants of two Staphylococcus aureus laboratory strains were isolated utilizing TTO gradient plates. Attempts to isolate TTORS mutants employing agar plates containing single TTO concentrations failed. All TTORS mutants demonstrated a small colony variant (SCV) phenotype and produced cells with a smaller diameter, as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The addition of SCV auxotrophic supplements to media did not lead to an increase in TTORS mutant colony size. Revertants were also isolated from the TTORS mutants following growth in drug-free media, and all revertant strains demonstrated phenotypes similar to their respective parent strains. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that an SH1000 TTORS mutant demonstrated a thinner cell wall and novel septal invaginations compared with parent strain SH1000. In addition, comparative genomic sequencing did not reveal any mutations in an SH1000 TTORS mutant previously linked to well-characterized SCV genotypes. This study demonstrates that TTO can select for a unique SCV phenotype.

  1. Ferritin Mutants of Escherichia coli Are Iron Deficient and Growth Impaired, and fur Mutants are Iron Deficient

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Tehrani, Hossein; Hudson, Aaron J.; Chang, Yung-Sheng; Timms, Andrew R.; Hawkins, Chris; Williams, John M.; Harrison, Pauline M.; Guest, John R.; Andrews, Simon C.

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains at least two iron storage proteins, a ferritin (FtnA) and a bacterioferritin (Bfr). To investigate their specific functions, the corresponding genes (ftnA and bfr) were inactivated by replacing the chromosomal ftnA and bfr genes with disrupted derivatives containing antibiotic resistance cassettes in place of internal segments of the corresponding coding regions. Single mutants (ftnA::spc and bfr::kan) and a double mutant (ftnA::spc bfr::kan) were generated and confirmed by Western and Southern blot analyses. The iron contents of the parental strain (W3110) and the bfr mutant increased by 1.5- to 2-fold during the transition from logarithmic to stationary phase in iron-rich media, whereas the iron contents of the ftnA and ftnA bfr mutants remained unchanged. The ftnA and ftnA bfr mutants were growth impaired in iron-deficient media, but this was apparent only after the mutant and parental strains had been precultured in iron-rich media. Surprisingly, ferric iron uptake regulation (fur) mutants also had very low iron contents (2.5-fold less iron than Fur+ strains) despite constitutive expression of the iron acquisition systems. The iron deficiencies of the ftnA and fur mutants were confirmed by Mössbauer spectroscopy, which further showed that the low iron contents of ftnA mutants are due to a lack of magnetically ordered ferric iron clusters likely to correspond to FtnA iron cores. In combination with the fur mutation, ftnA and bfr mutations produced an enhanced sensitivity to hydroperoxides, presumably due to an increase in production of “reactive ferrous iron.” It is concluded that FtnA acts as an iron store accommodating up to 50% of the cellular iron during postexponential growth in iron-rich media and providing a source of iron that partially compensates for iron deficiency during iron-restricted growth. In addition to repressing the iron acquisition systems, Fur appears to regulate the demand for iron, probably by controlling

  2. Early-blocked asporogenous mutants of Bacillus subtilis are lysogenized at reduced frequency by temperate bacteriophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeuchi, T; Kurahashi, K

    1978-01-01

    The establishment of lysogeny in early-blocked asporogenous (Spo-) mutants of Bacillus subtilis 168, which were also defective in the production of antibiotics (Abs-), by temperate phage phi105 or SPO2 was studied. It was found that the frequency of lysogenization of Spo-Abs-mutants was 10 to 20% that of the wild-type bacteria. There was no difference in the efficiency of plating and the burst size of phi105 between wild-type and mutant strains. Phi105 lysogens of mutant strains were as stable as those of the wild type. Several rifampin-resistant mutants defective in the production of antibiotics were isolated. They were also defective in spore formation and lysogenized by phi105 at reduced frequency. PMID:96089

  3. Characterization of epitopes on the rabies virus glycoprotein by selection and analysis of escape mutants.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Firouzeh; Wandeler, Alexander I; Nadin-Davis, Susan A

    2016-07-15

    The glycoprotein (G) is the only surface protein of the lyssavirus particle and the only viral product known to be capable of eliciting the production of neutralizing antibodies. In this study, the isolation of escape mutants resistant to monoclonal antibody (Mab) neutralization was attempted by a selection strategy employing four distinct rabies virus strains: the extensively passaged Evelyn Rokitnicki Abelseth (ERA) strain and three field isolates representing two bat-associated variants and the Western Canada skunk variant (WSKV). No escape mutants were generated from either of the bat-associated viral variants but two neutralization mutants were derived from the WSKV isolate. Seven independent ERA mutants were recovered using Mabs directed against antigenic sites I (four mutants) and IIIa (three mutants) of the glycoprotein. The cross-neutralization patterns of these viral mutants were used to determine the precise location and nature of the G protein epitopes recognized by these Mabs. Nucleotide sequencing of the G gene indicated that those mutants derived using Mabs directed to antigenic site (AS) III all contained amino acid substitutions in this site. However, of the four mutants selected with AS I Mabs, two bore mutations within AS I as expected while the remaining two carried mutations in AS II. WSKV mutants exhibited mutations at the sites appropriate for the Mabs used in their selection. All ERA mutant preparations were more cytopathogenic than the parental virus when propagated in cell culture; when in vivo pathogenicity in mice was examined, three of these mutants exhibited reduced pathogenicity while the remaining four mutants exhibited comparable pathogenic properties to those of the parent virus.

  4. Isolation and characterization of xylitol-assimilating mutants of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tani, Tatsunori; Taguchi, Hisataka; Fujimori, Kazuhiro E; Sahara, Takehiko; Ohgiya, Satoru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Akamatsu, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of xylitol utilization, three xylitol-assimilating mutants were isolated from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains showing highly efficient xylose-utilization. The nucleotide sequences of the mutant genomes were analyzed and compared with those of the wild-type strains and the mutation sites were identified. gal80 mutations were common to all the mutants, and recessive to the wild-type allele. Hence we constructed a gal80Δ mutant and confirmed that the gal80Δ mutant showed a xylitol-assimilation phenotype. When the constructed gal80Δ mutant was crossed with the three isolated mutants, all diploid hybrids showed xylitol assimilation, indicating that the mutations were all located in the GAL80. We analyzed the role of the galactose permease Gal2, controlled by the regulatory protein Gal80, in assimilating xylitol. A gal2Δ gal80Δ double mutant did not show xylitol assimilation, whereas expression of GAL2 under the control of the TDH3 promoter in the GAL80 strain did result in assimilation. These data indicate that Gal2 was needed for xylitol assimilation in the wild-type strain. When the gal80 mutant with an initial cell concentration of A660 = 20 was used for batch fermentation in a complex medium containing 20 g/L xylose or 20 g/L xylitol at pH 5.0 and 30°C under oxygen limitation, the gal80 mutant consumed 100% of the xylose within 12 h, but <30% of the xylitol within 100 h, indicating that xylose reductase is required for xylitol consumption in oxygen-limited conditions.

  5. Metabolite profiling of Phycomyces blakesleeanus carotene mutants reveals global changes across intermediary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Eugenio; Fraser, Paul David

    2016-11-01

    The filamentous fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus provides a renewable biosource of industrial high-value compounds such as carotenes, other isoprenoids (ubiquinone and sterols), organic acids and fatty acids. Several Phycomyces mutants involved in the formation of β-carotene are available. For example, the carA mutants have a leaky mutation in the phytoene synthase and produce significantly lower amounts of carotenes, while the carB and carR mutants produce phytoene and lycopene, respectively, due to a null mutation in the genes encoding the phytoene dehydrogenase and lycopene cyclase, respectively. The carS mutants are mutated in the gene encoding the oxygenase responsible for the conversion of β-carotene into apocarotenoids and, as a result, β-carotene accumulates. In order to ascertain further the biochemical changes arising in these potential industrial strains, a metabolite profiling workflow was implemented for Phycomyces. GC-MS and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array platforms enabled the identification of over 100 metabolites in 11 carA, carB, carR and carS mutant strains and their wild-type comparator. All mutant strains possessed decreased TCA cycle intermediates, galactose, alanine and ribitol, while dodecanol and valine showed a general increase. As predicted, other terpenoid levels were affected in the carB, carR and carS mutants but not in the carA mutants. The global changes across intermediary metabolism of the mutants suggest that complex metabolic networks exist between intermediary and secondary metabolism or that other mutations beyond the carotene pathway may exist in these mutants. These data show the utility of the methodology in metabolically phenotyping Phycomyces strains with potential industrial exploitation.

  6. Accessory Gene Regulator-1 Locus Is Essential for Virulence and Pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Odo, Chioma; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is responsible for most of the definable cases of antibiotic- and hospital-associated diarrhea worldwide and is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. C. difficile, a multidrug-resistant anaerobic pathogen, causes disease by producing toxins A and B, which are controlled by an accessory gene regulator (Agr) quorum signaling system. Some C. difficile strains encode two Agr loci in their genomes, designated agr1 and agr2. The agr1 locus is present in all of the C. difficile strains sequenced to date, whereas the agr2 locus is present in a few strains. The functional roles of agr1 and agr2 in C. difficile toxin regulation and pathogenesis were unknown until now. Using allelic exchange, we deleted components of both agr loci and examined the mutants for toxin production and virulence. The results showed that the agr1 mutant cannot produce toxins A and B; toxin production can be restored by complementation with wild-type agr1. Furthermore, the agr1 mutant is able to colonize but unable to cause disease in a murine CDI model. These findings have profound implications for CDI treatment because we have uncovered a promising therapeutic target for the development of nonantibiotic drugs to treat this life-threatening emerging pathogen by targeting the toxins directly responsible for disease. PMID:27531912

  7. Hrp- Mutants of Pseudomonas solanacearum as Potential Biocontrol Agents of Tomato Bacterial Wilt

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Pascal; Prior, Philippe; Marie, Corinne; Kotoujansky, Alain; Trigalet-Demery, Daniele; Trigalet, Andre

    1994-01-01

    There have been many attempts to control bacterial wilt with antagonistic bacteria or spontaneous nonpathogenic mutants of Pseudomonas solanacearum that lack the ability to colonize the host, but they have met with limited success. Since a large gene cluster (hrp) is involved in the pathogenicity of P. solanacearum, we developed a biological control strategy using genetically engineered Hrp- mutants of P. solanacearum. Three pathogenic strains collected in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) were rendered nonpathogenic by insertion of an ω-Km interposon within the hrp gene cluster of each strain. The resulting Hrp- mutants were tested for their ability to control bacterial wilt in challenge inoculation experiments conducted either under growth chamber conditions or under greenhouse conditions in Guadeloupe. Compared with the colonization by a pathogenic strain which spread throughout the tomato plant, colonization by the mutants was restricted to the roots and the lower part of the stems. The mutants did not reach the fruit. Moreover, the presence of the mutants did not affect fruit production. When the plants were challenge inoculated with a pathogenic strain, the presence of Hrp- mutants within the plants was correlated with a reduction in disease severity, although pathogenic bacteria colonized the stem tissue at a higher density than the nonpathogenic bacteria. Challenge inoculation experiments conducted under growth chamber conditions led, in some cases, to exclusion of the pathogenic strain from the aerial part of the plant, resulting in high protection rates. Furthermore, there was evidence that one of the pathogenic strains used for the challenge inoculations produced a bacteriocin that inhibited the in vitro growth of the nonpathogenic mutants. Images PMID:16349373

  8. Effects of Excess Succinate and Retrograde Control of Metabolite Accumulation in Yeast Tricarboxylic Cycle Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, An-Ping; Anderson, Sondra L.; Minard, Karyl I.; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Cellular and mitochondrial metabolite levels were measured in yeast TCA cycle mutants (sdh2Δ or fum1Δ) lacking succinate dehydrogenase or fumarase activities. Cellular levels of succinate relative to parental strain levels were found to be elevated ∼8-fold in the sdh2Δ mutant and ∼4-fold in the fum1Δ mutant, and there was a preferential increase in mitochondrial levels in these mutant strains. The sdh2Δ and fum1Δ strains also exhibited 3–4-fold increases in expression of Cit2, the cytosolic form of citrate synthase that functions in the glyoxylate pathway. Co-disruption of the SFC1 gene encoding the mitochondrial succinate/fumarate transporter resulted in higher relative mitochondrial levels of succinate and in substantial reductions of Cit2 expression in sdh2Δsfc1Δ and fum1Δsfc1Δ strains as compared with sdh2Δ and fum1Δ strains, suggesting that aberrant transport of succinate out of mitochondria mediated by Sfc1 is related to the increased expression of Cit2 in sdh2Δ and fum1Δ strains. A defect (rtg1Δ) in the yeast retrograde response pathway, which controls expression of several mitochondrial proteins and Cit2, eliminated expression of Cit2 and reduced expression of NAD-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (Idh) and aconitase (Aco1) in parental, sdh2Δ, and fum1Δ strains. Concomitantly, co-disruption of the RTG1 gene reduced the cellular levels of succinate in the sdh2Δ and fum1Δ strains, of fumarate in the fum1Δ strain, and citrate in an idhΔ strain. Thus, the retrograde response is necessary for maintenance of normal flux through the TCA and glyoxylate cycles in the parental strain and for metabolite accumulation in TCA cycle mutants. PMID:21841001

  9. Production of astaxanthin from cellulosic biomass sugars by mutants of the yeast Phaffia rhodozyma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Astaxanthin is a carotenoid of high value to the aquaculture, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. Three mutant strains of the astaxanthin-producing yeast Phaffia rhodozyma, which were derived from the parent strain ATCC 24202 (UCD 67-210) and designated JTM166, JTM185, and SSM19, were test...

  10. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  11. HBV genotypes prevalence, precore and basal core mutants in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Baha, Warda; Ennaji, My Mustapha; Lazar, Fatiha; Melloul, Marouane; El Fahime, Elmostafa; El Malki, Abdelouahad; Bennani, Abdelouaheb

    2012-08-01

    The study of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genomic heterogeneity has become a major issue in investigations aimed at understanding the relationship between HBV mutants and the wide spectrum of clinical and pathological conditions associated with HBV infection. The objective of the current study was to find out the pattern of HBV genotypes circulating in Morocco and to investigate the precore (PC) and basal core promoter (BCP) mutants' status in Moroccan chronic hepatitis B patients. Viral genotypes were determined in 221 chronic carriers using INNO-LiPA HBV assay and hemi-nested PCR. Phylogenetic analysis was performed in 70 samples, and multiplex PCR method was used to confirm some genotyping results. PC and CP mutants were determined using Inno-Lipa. All isolates were successfully genotyped. The genotype distribution was D in 90.45% of cases, A (5.9%), E (1 case), and mixed genotypes (5 A/D and 2 D/F) in 3.17% patients. HBV carried in the HBV/D samples could be assigned to D7 (63.3%), D1 (32.7%) and 2% of strains to each D4 and D5, all HBV/A belonged to A2 subgenotype and HBV/E strain could not be sub-genotyped. In 70 studied strains, HBV mutants were detected in 88.6% of cases; PC mutants were detected in (40%) of patients and 21.5% present a mixture of wild type and G1896A mutation. BCP mutants were observed in 65.7% of cases, 22.9% were found to have the T1762/1764A double mutation, 18.6% had A1762/1764T mutation and 22.9% of patients showed the A1762T/G1764A double mutation with either A1762T/G1764T mutation. Co-infection by PC and BCP mutants was detected in 52.9% of cases. Movement from place to place most likely shapes the observed genotype distribution and consequent prevalence of genotypes other than A2 or D7 in this population. High circulation of PC and BCP mutants is common in chronic hepatitis B infection in Morocco.

  12. AGR-3/4 Final Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 151A through 155B-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh T.

    2015-03-01

    This report provides the qualification status of experimental data for the entire Advanced Gas Reactor 3/4 (AGR 3/4) fuel irradiation. AGR-3/4 is the third in a series of planned irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program, which supports development of the advanced reactor technology under the INL ART Technology Development Office (TDO). The main objective of AGR-3/4 irradiation is to provide a known source of fission products for subsequent transport through compact matrix and structural graphite materials due to the presence of designed-to-fail fuel particles. Full power irradiation of the AGR 3/4 test began on December 14, 2011 (ATR Cycle 151A), and was completed on April 12, 2014 (end of ATR Cycle 155B) after 369.1 effective full power days of irradiation. The AGR-3/4 test was in the reactor core for eight of the ten ATR cycles between 151A and 155B. During the unplanned outage cycle, 153A, the experiment was removed from the ATR northeast flux trap (NEFT) location and stored in the ATR canal. This was to prevent overheating of fuel compacts due to higher than normal ATR power during the subsequent Powered Axial Locator Mechanism cycle, 153B. The AGR 3/4 test was inserted back into the ATR NEFT location during the outage of ATR Cycle 154A on April 26, 2013. Therefore, the AGR-3/4 irradiation data received during these 2 cycles (153A and 153B) are irrelevant and their qualification status isnot included in this report. Additionally, during ATR Cycle 152A the ATR core ran at low power for a short enough duration that the irradiation data are not used for physics and thermal calculations. However, the qualification status of irradiation data for this cycle is still covered in this report. As a result, this report includes data from 8 ATR Cycles: 151A, 151B, 152A, 152B, 154A, 154B, 155A, and 155B, as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and

  13. Augmented lipid accumulation in ethyl methyl sulphonate mutants of oleaginous microalga for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Mehtani, Juhi; Arora, Neha; Patel, Alok; Jain, Priyanka; Pruthi, Parul A; Poluri, Kirshna Mohan; Pruthi, Vikas

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this work was to generate high lipid accumulating mutants of Chlorella minutissima (CM) using ethyl methyl sulphonate (EMS) as a random chemical mutagen. Amid the 5% surviving cells after exposure to EMS (2M), three fast growing mutants (CM2, CM5, CM7) were selected and compared with wild type for lipid productivity and biochemical composition. Among these mutants, CM7 showed the maximum biomass (2.4g/L) and lipid content (42%) as compared to wild type (1.5g/L; 27%). Further, the mutant showed high photosynthetic pigments with low starch content signifying the re-allocation of carbon flux to lipid. The obtained mutant showed no visible morphological changes in comparison to its WT. The fatty acid profile showed increase in monounsaturated fatty acids while decreased saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids signifying good quality biodiesel. The mutant strain thus obtained can be optimized further and applied for enhanced biodiesel production.

  14. Spontaneous Mutation at the Mtr Locus of Neurospora: The Spectrum of Mutant Types

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, D.; Macleod, H.; Dillon, D.

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated 135 strains of Neurospora which have mutations at the mtr locus resulting from independent spontaneous events. mtr is the structural gene for the neutral amino acid permease. The mutants have been characterized by their reversion behavior (both spontaneous and induced) and by hybridization studies of restriction digests of their DNA. About half of the mutants (54%) appear to result from single base-pair substitutions. Thirty-four percent have deletions, including some which extend into neighboring genes. Most of the remaining mutants have insertions. Several of the insertions are tandem duplications of 400-1000 bp and these mutants are unstable, reverting to mtr(+) with a high frequency. When tandem-duplication mutants go through a cross, they are modified: the mutant progeny are fully stable. This modification is probably due to RIP (repeat-induced point mutation). This process has an important bearing on the comparison of germinal to somatic mutation. PMID:1718818

  15. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 147A, 148A, 148B, and 149A

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Abbott; Keith A. Daum

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the data qualification status of fuel irradiation data from the first four reactor cycles (147A, 148A, 148B, and 149A) of the on-going second Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-2) experiment as recorded in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). This includes data received by NDMAS from the period June 22, 2010 through May 21, 2011. AGR-2 is the second in a series of eight planned irradiation experiments for the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program, which supports development of the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Irradiation of the AGR-2 test train is being performed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is planned for 600 effective full power days (approximately 2.75 calendar years) (PLN-3798). The experiment is intended to demonstrate the performance of UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Data qualification status of the AGR-1 experiment was reported in INL/EXT-10-17943 (Abbott et al. 2010).

  16. Cuticle surface proteins of wild type and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Blaxter, M L

    1993-03-25

    The molecular components of the surface of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have been identified by surface-specific radioiodination. Four compartments were defined by fractionation of labeled wild type (N2 strain) adult hermaphrodites. Organic solvents extracted cuticular lipids. Homogenization in detergents released a single, non-collagenous, hydrophobic protein. This is not glycosylated and is a heterodimer of 6.5- and 12-kDa subunits. The third compartment, proteins solubilized by reducing agents, included both the cuticular collagens and the heterodimer. Residual material corresponds to the cuticlin fraction. Larval stages showed a similar pattern, except that the dauer larva had an additional 37-kDa detergent-soluble protein. Other species of rhabditid nematodes displayed similar profiles, and comparison with parasitic species suggests that this simple pattern may be primitive in the Nematoda. A C. elegans strain mutant in cuticular collagen (rol-6) had a pattern identical to that of wild type, but another morphological mutant (dpy-3) [corrected] and several mutants that differ in surface reactivity to antibody and lectins (srf mutants) also had striking differences in surface labeling patterns.

  17. Readiness Review of BWXT for Fabrication of AGR-5/6/7 TRISO Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Douglas William; Sharp, Michelle Tracy

    2016-02-01

    INL readiness review assessment of BWXT readiness to commence fabrication of low-enriched TRISO coated fuel particles for the AGR-5/6/7 irradiation experiments. BWXT self-identified equipment issues preventing operation. INL identified two findings. The first was that disposition codes had not been assigned and documented on BWXT forms to ensure that off-specification materials could not be used in the fabrication of TRISO particles. The second was that chemical purity specifications were not reliably passed on to chemical suppliers, which resulted in the receipt of one acetylene cylinder with suspect impurity levels.

  18. Quality Assurance Program Plan for AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect

    W. Ken Sowder

    2004-02-01

    Quality Assurance Plan (QPP) is to document the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor’s quality assurance program for AGR Fuel Development and Qualification activities, which is under the control of the INEEL. The QPP is an integral part of the Gen IV Program Execution Plan (PEP) and establishes the set of management controls for those systems, structures and components (SSCs) and related quality affecting activities, necessary to provide adequate confidence that items will perform satisfactorily in service.

  19. Enhancement of yellow pigment production by intraspecific protoplast fusion of Monascus spp. yellow mutant (ade(-)) and white mutant (prototroph).

    PubMed

    Klinsupa, Worawan; Phansiri, Salak; Thongpradis, Panida; Yongsmith, Busaba; Pothiratana, Chetsada

    2016-01-10

    To breed industrially useful strains of a slow-growing, yellow pigment producing strain of Monascus sp., protoplasts of Monascus purpureus yellow mutant (ade(-)) and rapid-growing M. purpureus white mutant (prototroph) were fused and fusants were selected on minimal medium (MM). Preliminary conventional protoplast fusion of the two strains was performed and the result showed that only white colonies were detected on MM. It was not able to differentiate the fusants from the white parental prototroph. To solve this problem, the white parental prototroph was thus pretreated with 20mM iodoacetamide (IOA) for cytoplasm inactivation and subsequently taken into protoplast fusion with slow-growing Monascus yellow mutant. Under this development technique, only the fusants, with viable cytoplasm from Monascus yellow mutant (ade(-)), could thus grow on MM, whereas neither IOA pretreated white parental prototroph nor yellow auxotroph (ade(-)) could survive. Fifty-three fusants isolated from yellow colonies obtained through this developed technique were subsequently inoculated on complete medium (MY agar). Fifteen distinguished yellow colonies from their parental yellow mutant were then selected for biochemical, morphological and fermentative properties in cassava starch and soybean flour (SS) broth. Finally, three most stable fusants (F7, F10 and F43) were then selected and compared in rice solid culture. Enhancement of yellow pigment production over the parental yellow auxotroph was found in F7 and F10, while enhanced glucoamylase activity was found in F43. The formation of fusants was further confirmed by monacolin K content, which was intermediate between the two parents (monacolin K-producing yellow auxotroph and non-monacolin K producing white prototroph).

  20. Bioconversion of glycerol to ethanol by a mutant Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Res; Shahbazi, A; Wang, L; Ibrahim, S; Worku, M; Schimmel, K

    2012-03-29

    The main objective of this research is to develop, by adaptive evolution, mutant strains of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 that are capable of withstanding high glycerol concentration as well as resisting ethanol-inhibition. The mutant will be used for high ethanol fermentation from glycerol feedstock. Ethanol production from pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol using the stock was evaluated. A six-tube-subculture-generations method was used for developing the mutant. This involved subculturing the organism six consecutive times in tubes containing the same glycerol and ethanol concentrations at the same culture conditions. Then, the glycerol and/or ethanol concentration was increased and the six subculture generations were repeated. A strain capable of growing in 200 g/L glycerol and 30 g/L ethanol was obtained. The ability of this mutant, vis-à-vis the original strain, in utilizing glycerol in a high glycerol containing medium, with the concomitant ethanol yield, was assessed. Tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) was used as the fermentation medium. Fermentation products were analyzed using HPLC.In a 20 g/L glycerol TSB, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048 converted 18.5 g/L P-glycerol and 17.8 g/L R-glycerol into 12 and 12.8 g/L ethanol, respectively. In a 50 g/L P-glycerol TSB, it utilized only 15.6 g/L glycerol; but the new strain used up 39 g/L, yielding 20 g/L ethanol after 120 h, an equivalence of 1.02 mol ethanol/mol-glycerol. This is the highest ethanol yield reported from glycerol bioconversion. The result of this P-glycerol fermentation can be duplicated using the R-glycerol from biodiesel production.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Neurospora crassa Strain FGSC 73

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Simmons, Blake A.; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-03-05

    We report the elucidation of the complete genome of the Neurospora crassa (Shear and Dodge) strain FGSC 73, a mat-a, trp-3 mutant strain. The genome sequence around the idiotypic mating type locus represents the only publicly available sequence for a mat-a strain. 40.42 Megabases are assembled into 358 scaffolds carrying 11,978 gene models.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Neurospora crassa Strain FGSC 73

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Simmons, Blake A.; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-04-02

    We report the elucidation of the complete genome of the Neurospora crassa (Shear and Dodge) strain FGSC 73, a mat-a, trp-3 mutant strain. The genome sequence around the idiotypic mating type locus represents the only publicly available sequence for a mat-a strain. 40.42 Megabases are assembled into 358 scaffolds carrying 11,978 gene models.

  3. Analysis on the DNA Fingerprinting of Aspergillus Oryzae Mutant Induced by High Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Fan; Wang, Kai; Shen, Si-Le; Liu, Bing-Bing; Zou, Bo; Zou, Guang-Tian

    2011-01-01

    The mutant strains of aspergillus oryzae (HP300a) are screened under 300 MPa for 20 min. Compared with the control strains, the screened mutant strains have unique properties such as genetic stability, rapid growth, lots of spores, and high protease activity. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) are used to analyze the DNA fingerprinting of HP300a and the control strains. There are 67.9% and 51.3% polymorphic bands obtained by these two markers, respectively, indicating significant genetic variations between HP300a and the control strains. In addition, comparison of HP300a and the control strains, the genetic distances of random sequence and simple sequence repeat of DNA are 0.51 and 0.34, respectively.

  4. Characterization of lipopolysaccharide-deficient mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa derived from serotypes O3, O5, and O6.

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, T; de Kievit, T R; Masoud, H; Altman, E; Richards, J C; Sadovskaya, I; Speert, D P; Lam, J S

    1994-01-01

    Well-characterized rough mutants are important for the understanding of structures, functions, and biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in gram-negative organisms. In this study, three series of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS-deficient mutants, namely PAC strains derived from serotype O3, AK strains derived from strain PAO1 (serotype O5), and serotype O6-derived mutants were subjected to biochemical analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining as well as immunochemical characterization using LPS-specific monoclonal antibodies. The O-side-chain deficiency among the O6-derived mutants was also examined, and three mutants, A28, R5, and H4, were subsequently chosen for the elucidation of component sugars of the core structure of serotype O6 LPS. LPS of strain A28 has L-rhamnose and proportionally higher amounts of D-glucose, a feature shared by the O5-derived mutant, strain AK1401 (previously demonstrated as a mutant with a core-plus-one O repeat). In contrast strains R5 and H4 were shown to be devoid of L-rhamnose and have low and undetectable amounts of D-glucose, respectively, which indicated their core deficiency. The LPS-deficient or -sufficient characteristics of the P. aeruginosa strains examined correlated will with serum sensitivity data. This report represents a comprehensive analysis of rough mutants derived from O3 and O5 strains that have been used by others in many studies and a first look at the core oligosaccharide region of serotype O6 LPS obtained with the O6-derived mutants generated in this study. Images PMID:8112851

  5. Nox2 Modification of LDL Is Essential for Optimal Apolipoprotein B-mediated Control of agr Type III Staphylococcus aureus Quorum-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Pamela R.; Elmore, Bradley O.; Spang, Cynthia H.; Alexander, Susan M.; Manifold-Wheeler, Brett C.; Castleman, Moriah J.; Daly, Seth M.; Peterson, M. Michal; Sully, Erin K.; Femling, Jon K.; Otto, Michael; Horswill, Alexander R.; Timmins, Graham S.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contains an autoinducing quorum-sensing system encoded within the agr operon that coordinates expression of virulence genes required for invasive infection. Allelic variation within agr has generated four agr specific groups, agr I–IV, each of which secretes a distinct autoinducing peptide pheromone (AIP1-4) that drives agr signaling. Because agr signaling mediates a phenotypic change in this pathogen from an adherent colonizing phenotype to one associated with considerable tissue injury and invasiveness, we postulated that a significant contribution to host defense against tissue damaging and invasive infections could be provided by innate immune mechanisms that antagonize agr signaling. We determined whether two host defense factors that inhibit AIP1-induced agrI signaling, Nox2 and apolipoprotein B (apoB), also contribute to innate control of AIP3-induced agrIII signaling. We hypothesized that apoB and Nox2 would function differently against AIP3, which differs from AIP1 in amino acid sequence and length. Here we show that unlike AIP1, AIP3 is resistant to direct oxidant inactivation by Nox2 characteristic ROS. Rather, the contribution of Nox2 to defense against agrIII signaling is through oxidation of LDL. ApoB in the context of oxLDL, and not LDL, provides optimal host defense against S. aureus agrIII infection by binding the secreted signaling peptide, AIP3, and preventing expression of the agr-driven virulence factors which mediate invasive infection. ApoB within the context of oxLDL also binds AIP 1-4 and oxLDL antagonizes agr signaling by all four agr alleles. Our results suggest that Nox2-mediated oxidation of LDL facilitates a conformational change in apoB to one sufficient for binding and sequestration of all four AIPs, demonstrating the interdependence of apoB and Nox2 in host defense against agr signaling. These data reveal a novel role for oxLDL in host defense against S. aureus quorum-sensing signaling. PMID:23459693

  6. Development and characterisation of highly antibiotic resistant Bartonella bacilliformis mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J.; del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to develop and characterise in vitro Bartonella bacilliformis antibiotic resistant mutants. Three B. bacilliformis strains were plated 35 or 40 times with azithromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin or rifampicin discs. Resistance-stability was assessed performing 5 serial passages without antibiotic pressure. MICs were determined with/without Phe-Arg-β-Napthylamide and artesunate. Target alterations were screened in the 23S rRNA, rplD, rplV, gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE and rpoB genes. Chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin resistance were the most difficult and easiest (>37.3 and 10.6 passages) to be selected, respectively. All mutants but one selected with chloramphenicol achieved high resistance levels. All rifampicin, one azithromycin and one ciprofloxacin mutants did not totally revert when cultured without antibiotic pressure. Azithromycin resistance was related to L4 substitutions Gln-66 → Lys or Gly-70 → Arg; L4 deletion Δ62–65 (Lys-Met-Tyr-Lys) or L22 insertion 83::Val-Ser-Glu-Ala-His-Val-Gly-Lys-Ser; in two chloramphenicol-resistant mutants the 23S rRNA mutation G2372A was detected. GyrA Ala-91 → Val and Asp-95 → Gly and GyrB Glu474 → Lys were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. RpoB substitutions Gln-527 → Arg, His-540 → Tyr and Ser-545 → Phe plus Ser-588 → Tyr were detected in rifampicin-resistant mutants. In 5 mutants the effect of efflux pumps on resistance was observed. Antibiotic resistance was mainly related to target mutations and overexpression of efflux pumps, which might underlie microbiological failures during treatments. PMID:27667026

  7. Development and characterisation of highly antibiotic resistant Bartonella bacilliformis mutants.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-09-26

    The objective was to develop and characterise in vitro Bartonella bacilliformis antibiotic resistant mutants. Three B. bacilliformis strains were plated 35 or 40 times with azithromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin or rifampicin discs. Resistance-stability was assessed performing 5 serial passages without antibiotic pressure. MICs were determined with/without Phe-Arg-β-Napthylamide and artesunate. Target alterations were screened in the 23S rRNA, rplD, rplV, gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE and rpoB genes. Chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin resistance were the most difficult and easiest (>37.3 and 10.6 passages) to be selected, respectively. All mutants but one selected with chloramphenicol achieved high resistance levels. All rifampicin, one azithromycin and one ciprofloxacin mutants did not totally revert when cultured without antibiotic pressure. Azithromycin resistance was related to L4 substitutions Gln-66 → Lys or Gly-70 → Arg; L4 deletion Δ62-65 (Lys-Met-Tyr-Lys) or L22 insertion 83::Val-Ser-Glu-Ala-His-Val-Gly-Lys-Ser; in two chloramphenicol-resistant mutants the 23S rRNA mutation G2372A was detected. GyrA Ala-91 → Val and Asp-95 → Gly and GyrB Glu474 → Lys were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. RpoB substitutions Gln-527 → Arg, His-540 → Tyr and Ser-545 → Phe plus Ser-588 → Tyr were detected in rifampicin-resistant mutants. In 5 mutants the effect of efflux pumps on resistance was observed. Antibiotic resistance was mainly related to target mutations and overexpression of efflux pumps, which might underlie microbiological failures during treatments.

  8. Isolation and characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to Calcofluor white.

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, C; Valdivieso, M H; Ribas, J C; Durán, A

    1988-01-01

    Calcofluor is a fluorochrome that exhibits antifungal activity and a high affinity for yeast cell wall chitin. We isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to Calcofluor. The resistance segregated in a Mendelian fashion and behaved as a recessive character in all the mutants analyzed. Five loci were defined by complementation analysis. The abnormally thick septa between mother and daughter cells caused by Calcofluor in wild-type cells were absent in the mutants. The Calcofluor-binding capacity, observed by fluorescence microscopy, in a S. cerevisiae wild-type cells during alpha-factor treatment was also absent in some mutants and reduced in others. Staining of cell walls with wheat germ agglutinin-fluorescein complex indicated that the chitin uniformly distributed over the whole cell wall in vegetative or in alpha-factor-treated cells was almost absent in three of the mutants and reduced in the two others. Cell wall analysis evidenced a five- to ninefold reduction in the amount of chitin in mutants compared with that in the wild-type strain. The total amounts of cell wall mannan and beta-glucan in wild-type and mutant strains were similar; however, the percentage of beta-glucan that remained insoluble after alkali extraction was considerably reduced in mutant cells. The susceptibilities of the mutants and the wild-type strains to a cell wall enzymic lytic complex were rather similar. The in vitro levels of chitin synthase 2 detected in all mutants were similar to that in the wild type. The significance of these results is discussed in connection with the mechanism of chitin synthesis and cell wall morphogenesis in S. cerevisiae. Images PMID:3280554

  9. Survival, growth, and localization of epiphytic fitness mutants of pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, G.A.; Lindow, S.E. )

    1994-10-01

    Among 82 epiphytic fitness mutants of a Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain that were characterized in a previous study, 4 mutants were particularly intolerant of the stresses associated with dry leaf surfaces. These four mutants each exhibited distinctive behaviors when inoculated into and into plant leaves. For example, while non showed measurable growth on dry potato leaf surfaces, they grew to different population sizes in the intercellular space of bean leaves and on dry bean leaf surfaces, and one mutant appeared incapable of growth in both environments although it grew well on moist bean leaves. The presence of the parental strain did not influence the survival of the mutants immediately following exposure of leaves to dry, high-light incubation conditions, suggesting that the reduced survival of the mutants did not result from an inability to produce extracellular factors in planta. On moist bean leaves that were colonized by either a mutant or the wild type, the proportion of the total epiphytic population that was located in sizes protected from a surface sterilant was smaller for the mutants than for the wild type, indicating that the mutants were reduced in their ability to locate, multiply in, and/or survive in such protected sites. This reduced ability was only one of possible several factors contributing to the reduced epiphytic fitness of each mutant. Their reduced fitness was not specific to the host plant bean, since they also exhibited reduced fitness on the nonhost plant potato; the functions altered in these strains are thus of interest for their contribution to the general fitness of bacterial epiphytes. 52 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Phenotypic and Transcriptomic Characterization of Bacillus subtilis Mutants with Grossly Altered Membrane Composition▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, Letal I.; Helmann, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis membrane contains diacylglycerol-based lipids with at least five distinct headgroups that together help to define the physical and chemical properties of the lipid bilayer. Here, we describe the phenotypic characterization of mutant strains lacking one or more of the following lipids: glycolipids (ugtP mutants), phosphatidylethanolamine (pssA and psd mutants), lysylphosphatidylglycerol (mprF), and cardiolipin (ywnE and ywjE). Alterations of membrane lipid headgroup composition are generally well-tolerated by the cell, and even severe alterations lead to only modest effects on growth proficiency. Mutants with decreased levels of positively charged lipids display an increased sensitivity to cationic antimicrobial compounds, and cells lacking glycolipids are more sensitive to the peptide antibiotic sublancin and are defective in swarming motility. A quadruple mutant strain (ugtP pssA mprF ywnE), with a membrane comprised predominantly of phosphatidylglycerol, is viable and grows at near-wild-type rates, although it forms long, coiled filaments. Transcriptome comparisons identified numerous regulons with altered expression in cells of the ugtP mutant, the pssA mprF ywnE triple mutant, and the ugtP pssA mprF ywnE quadruple mutant. These effects included a general decrease in expression of the SigD and FapR regulons and increased expression of cell envelope stress responses mediated by σM and the YvrGHb two-component system. PMID:18820022

  11. Validation of the Physics Analysis used to Characterize the AGR-1 TRISO Fuel Irradiation Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James W.; Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Chang, Gray S.

    2015-05-01

    The results of a detailed physics depletion calculation used to characterize the AGR-1 TRISO-coated particle fuel test irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory are compared to measured data for the purpose of validation. The particle fuel was irradiated for 13 ATR power cycles over three calendar years. The physics analysis predicts compact burnups ranging from 11.30-19.56% FIMA and cumulative neutron fast fluence from 2.21?4.39E+25 n/m2 under simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor conditions in the ATR. The physics depletion calculation can provide a full characterization of all 72 irradiated TRISO-coated particle compacts during and post-irradiation, so validation of this physics calculation was a top priority. The validation of the physics analysis was done through comparisons with available measured experimental data which included: 1) high-resolution gamma scans for compact activity and burnup, 2) mass spectrometry for compact burnup, 3) flux wires for cumulative fast fluence, and 4) mass spectrometry for individual actinide and fission product concentrations. The measured data are generally in very good agreement with the calculated results, and therefore provide an adequate validation of the physics analysis and the results used to characterize the irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel.

  12. Isolation of an R- M+ mutant of Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:8 and its application in construction of rough mutants utilizing mini-Tn5 derivatives and lipopolysaccharide-specific phage.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Skurnik, M

    1994-01-01

    A generally applicable procedure was used to isolate a spontaneous restriction-deficient mutant of Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:8. Transposition frequency in the mutant strain 8081-res was approximately 6.7 x 10(-6) per recipient, while it was practically zero in the wild-type strain 8081-c. Mobilization frequency into 8081-res was 10(5) times higher than that into the wild-type strain. The mutant had lost the ability to express the YenI restriction endonuclease activity present in serotype O:8 strains. This allowed the construction of a transposon library in 8081-res. Insertion mutants with transposons in the genes of the rfa region were selected from this library. Images PMID:8132471

  13. Physiology and pathogenicity of cpdB deleted mutant of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huifang; Chen, Liping; Si, Wei; Wang, Chunlai; Zhu, Fangna; Li, Guangxing; Liu, Siguo

    2017-04-01

    Avian colibacillosis is one of the most common infectious diseases caused partially or entirely by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) in birds. In addition to spontaneous infection, APEC can also cause secondary infections that result in greater severity of illness and greater losses to the poultry industry. In order to assess the role of 2', 3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase (cpdB) in APEC on disease physiology and pathogenicity, an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli-34 (APEC-34) cpdB mutant was obtained using the Red system. The cpdB mutant grew at a slower rate than the natural strain APEC-34. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the bacteria of the cpdB mutant were significantly longer than the bacteria observed in the natural strain (P<0.01), and that the width of the cpdB mutant was significantly smaller than its natural counterpart (P<0.01). In order to evaluate the role of cpdB in APEC in the colonization of internal organs (lung, liver and spleen) in poultry, seven-day-old SPF chicks were infected with 10(9)CFU/chick of the cpdB mutant or the natural strain. No colonizations of cpdB mutants were observed in the internal organs 10days following the infection, though numerous natural strains were observed at 20days following infection. Additionally, the relative expression of division protein ftsZ, outer membrane protein A ompA, ferric uptake regulator fur and tryptophanase tnaA genes in the mutant strain were all significantly lower than in the natural strain (P<0.05 or P<0.01). These results suggested that cpdB is involved in the long-term colonization of APEC in the internal organs of the test subjects. The deletion of the cpdB gene also significantly affected the APEC growth and morphology.

  14. Survival of rifampin-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida in soil systems.

    PubMed Central

    Compeau, G; Al-Achi, B J; Platsouka, E; Levy, S B

    1988-01-01

    The fate of spontaneous chromosomal rifampin-resistant (Rifr) mutants of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens in sterile and live organic soil from which they were isolated was studied. In sterile native-soil assays, a Rifr mutant of P. putida showed no decrease in competitive fitness when compared with the wild-type parent. However, mutants of P. fluorescens were of two general categories. Group 1 showed no difference from the wild type in terms of growth rate, competitive fitness, and membrane protein composition. Group 2 showed a slower growth rate in both minimal and enriched media and an altered membrane protein profile. These mutants also demonstrated decreased competitive fitness compared with the wild-type strain. In live soil, the Rifr P. putida strain persisted throughout the 38-day test period with a decay rate of 0.7 log10 CFU/g of soil per 10 days. A group 1 Rifr P. fluorescens mutant maintained its inoculated titer for 7 to 10 days and then decayed at a rate of 0.2 to 0.4 log10 CFU/g of soil per 10 days. A group 2 Rifr P. fluorescens mutant remained at its titer for 1 to 5 days before decaying at a two- to threefold-faster rate. These findings indicate that rifampin resistance may not be an innocuous mutation in some pseudomonads and that marked strains should be compared with wild-type parents before being used as monitors of parental strain survival. Colonization of sterile soil with either the wild-type or mutant strain precluded normal colonization of the second added strain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3144244

  15. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based overexpression screening and characterization of AgrC, a Receptor protein of quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lina; Quan, Chunshan; Liu, Baoquan; Xu, Yongbin; Zhao, Pengchao; Xiong, Wen; Fan, Shengdi

    2013-09-06

    Staphylococcus aureus AgrC is an important component of the agr quorum-sensing system. AgrC is a membrane-embedded histidine kinase that is thought to act as a sensor for the recognition of environmental signals and the transduction of signals into the cytoplasm. However, the difficulty of expressing and purifying functional membrane proteins has drastically hindered in-depth understanding of the molecular structures and physiological functions of these proteins. Here, we describe the high-yield expression and purification of AgrC, and analyze its kinase activity. A C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion to AgrC served as a reporter for monitoring protein expression levels in real time. Protein expression levels were analyzed by the microscopic assessment of the whole-cell fluorescence. The expressed AgrC-GFP protein with a C-terminal His-tagged was purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) at yields of ≥ 10 mg/L, following optimization. We also assessed the effects of different detergents on membrane solubilization and AgrC kinase activity, and polyoxyethylene-(23)-lauryl-ether (Brij-35) was identified as the most suitable detergent. Furthermore, the secondary structural stability of purified AgrC was analyzed using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. This study may serve as a general guide for improving the yields of other membrane protein preparations and selecting the appropriate detergent to stabilize membrane proteins for biophysical and biochemical analyses.

  16. Gravitropism of inflorescence stems in starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weise, S. E.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have assayed the gravitropic response of roots and hypocotyls of wild type Arabidopsis thaliana, two reduced-starch strains, and a starchless strain. Because there have been few reports on inflorescence gravitropism, in this article, we use microscopic analyses and time-course studies of these mutants and their wild type to study gravitropism in these stems. Sedimentation of plastids was observed in endodermal cells of the wild type and reduced-starch mutants but not in the starchless mutant. In all of these strains, the short inflorescence stems (1.0-2.9 cm) were less responsive to the gravistimulus compared with the long stems (3.0-6.0 cm). In both long and short inflorescence stems, the wild type initially had the greatest response; the starchless mutant had the least response; and the reduced starch mutants exhibited an intermediate response. Furthermore, growth rates among all four strains were approximately equal. At about 6 h after reorientation, inflorescences of all strains returned to a position parallel to the gravity vector. Thus, in inflorescence stems, sedimentation of plastids may act as an accelerator but is not required to elicit a gravitropic response. Furthermore, the site of perception appears to be diffuse throughout the inflorescence stem. These results are consistent with both a plastid-based statolith model and the protoplast pressure hypothesis, and it is possible that multiple systems for gravity perception occur in plant cells.

  17. Pseudomonas corrugata (NRRL B-30409) Mutants Increased Phosphate Solubilization, Organic Acid Production, and Plant Growth at Lower Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Sa, Tongmin

    2008-02-01

    A study for screening and selection of mutants of Pseudomonas corrugata (NRRL B-30409) based on their phosphate solubilization ability, production of organic acids, and subsequent effect on plant growth at lower temperatures under in vitro and in situ conditions was conducted. Of a total 115 mutants tested, two (PCM-56 and PCM-82) were selected based on their greater phosphate solubilization ability at 21 degrees C in Pikovskaya's broth. The two mutants were found more efficient than wild-type strain for phosphate solubilization activity across a range of temperature from psychotropic (4 degrees C) to mesophilic (28 degrees C) in aerated GPS medium containing insoluble rock phosphate. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that phosphate solubilization potential of wild-type and mutant strains were mediated by production of organic acids in the culture medium. The two efficient mutants and the wild strain oxidized glucose to gluconic acid and sequentially to 2-ketogluconic acid. Under in vitro conditions at 10 degrees C, the mutants exhibited increased plant growth as compared to wild type, indicating their functionality at lower temperatures. In greenhouse trials using sterilized soil amended with either soluble or rock phosphate, inoculation with mutants showed greater positive effect on all of the growth parameters and soil enzymatic activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the development of phosphate solubilizing mutants of psychotropic wild strain of P. corrugata, native to the Indian Himalayan region.

  18. High-Throughput Parallel Sequencing to Measure Fitness of Leptospira interrogans Transposon Insertion Mutants during Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic species of Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that causes mortality and morbidity worldwide. The understanding of the virulence mechanisms of Leptospira spp is still at an early stage due to the limited number of genetic tools available for this microorganism. The development of random transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic strains a decade ago has contributed to the identification of several virulence factors. In this study, we used the transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) technique, which combines transposon mutagenesis with massive parallel sequencing, to study the in vivo fitness of a pool of Leptospira interrogans mutants. We infected hamsters with a pool of 42 mutants (input pool), which included control mutants with insertions in four genes previously analyzed by virulence testing (loa22, ligB, flaA1, and lic20111) and 23 mutants with disrupted signal transduction genes. We quantified the mutants in different tissues (blood, kidney and liver) at 4 days post-challenge by high-throughput sequencing and compared the frequencies of mutants recovered from tissues to their frequencies in the input pool. Control mutants that were less fit in the Tn-Seq experiment were attenuated for virulence when tested separately in the hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. Control mutants with unaltered fitness were as virulent as the wild-type strain. We identified two mutants with the transposon inserted in the same putative adenylate/guanylate cyclase gene (lic12327) that had reduced in vivo fitness in blood, kidney and liver. Both lic12327 mutants were attenuated for virulence when tested individually in hamsters. Growth of the control mutants and lic12327 mutants in culture medium were similar to that of the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of screening large pools of L. interrogans transposon mutants for those with altered fitness, and potentially attenuated virulence, by transposon sequencing. PMID

  19. High-Throughput Parallel Sequencing to Measure Fitness of Leptospira interrogans Transposon Insertion Mutants during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Lourdault, Kristel; Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A

    2016-11-01

    Pathogenic species of Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that causes mortality and morbidity worldwide. The understanding of the virulence mechanisms of Leptospira spp is still at an early stage due to the limited number of genetic tools available for this microorganism. The development of random transposon mutagenesis in pathogenic strains a decade ago has contributed to the identification of several virulence factors. In this study, we used the transposon sequencing (Tn-Seq) technique, which combines transposon mutagenesis with massive parallel sequencing, to study the in vivo fitness of a pool of Leptospira interrogans mutants. We infected hamsters with a pool of 42 mutants (input pool), which included control mutants with insertions in four genes previously analyzed by virulence testing (loa22, ligB, flaA1, and lic20111) and 23 mutants with disrupted signal transduction genes. We quantified the mutants in different tissues (blood, kidney and liver) at 4 days post-challenge by high-throughput sequencing and compared the frequencies of mutants recovered from tissues to their frequencies in the input pool. Control mutants that were less fit in the Tn-Seq experiment were attenuated for virulence when tested separately in the hamster model of lethal leptospirosis. Control mutants with unaltered fitness were as virulent as the wild-type strain. We identified two mutants with the transposon inserted in the same putative adenylate/guanylate cyclase gene (lic12327) that had reduced in vivo fitness in blood, kidney and liver. Both lic12327 mutants were attenuated for virulence when tested individually in hamsters. Growth of the control mutants and lic12327 mutants in culture medium were similar to that of the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of screening large pools of L. interrogans transposon mutants for those with altered fitness, and potentially attenuated virulence, by transposon sequencing.

  20. Characterization of Escherichia coli d-Cycloserine Transport and Resistant Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Baisa, Gary; Stabo, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    d-Cycloserine (DCS) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that inhibits d-alanine ligase and alanine racemase activity. When Escherichia coli K-12 or CFT073 is grown in minimal glucose or glycerol medium, CycA transports DCS into the cell. E. coli K-12 cycA and CFT073 cycA mutant strains display increased DCS resistance when grown in minimal medium. However, the cycA mutants exhibit no change in DCS sensitivity compared to their parental strains when grown in LB (CFT073 and K-12) or human urine (CFT073 only). These data suggest that cycA does not participate in DCS sensitivity when strains are grown in a non-minimal medium. The small RNA GvcB acts as a negative regulator of E. coli K-12 cycA expression when grown in LB. Three E. coli K-12 gcvB mutant strains failed to demonstrate a change in DCS sensitivity when grown in LB. This further suggests a limited role for cycA in DCS sensitivity. To aid in the identification of E. coli genes involved in DCS sensitivity when grown on complex media, the Keio K-12 mutant collection was screened for DCS-resistant strains. dadA, pnp, ubiE, ubiF, ubiG, ubiH, and ubiX mutant strains showed elevated DCS resistance. The phenotypes associated with these mutants were used to further define three previously characterized E. coli DCS-resistant strains (χ316, χ444, and χ453) isolated by Curtiss and colleagues (R. Curtiss, III, L. J. Charamella, C. M. Berg, and P. E. Harris, J. Bacteriol. 90:1238–1250, 1965). A dadA mutation was identified in both χ444 and χ453. In addition, results are presented that indicate for the first time that DCS can antagonize d-amino acid dehydrogenase (DadA) activity. PMID:23316042

  1. Zymomonas mobilis mutants with an increased rate of alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Y.A.; Ingram, L.O.

    1987-07-01

    Two new derivatives of Zymomonas mobilis CP4 were isolated from enrichment cultures after 18 months of serial transfer. These new strains were selected for the ability to grow and produce ethanol rapidly on transfer into fresh broth containing ethanol and allyl alcohol. Ethanol production by these strains was examined in batch fermentations under three sets of conditions. Both new derivatives were found to be superior to the parent strain CP4 with respect to the speed and completeness of glucose conversion to ethanol. The best of these, strain YO2, produced 9.5% ethanol (by weight; 11.9% by volume) after 17.4 h compared with 31.8 h for the parent strain CP4. The addition of 1 mM magnesium sulfate improved ethanol production in all three strains. Two factors contributed to the decrease in fermentation time required by the mutants: more rapid growth with minimal lag on subculturing and the retention of higher rates of ethanol production as fermentation proceeded. Alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes were altered in both new strains and no longer catalyzed the oxidation of allyl alcohol into the toxic product acrolein. This loss of allyl alcohol-oxidizing capacity is proposed as a primary factor contributing to increased allyl alcohol resistance, although it is likely that other mutations affecting glycolysis also contribute to the improvement in ethanol production.

  2. Selection and phenotypic characterization of nonhemagglutinating mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Chandad, F; Mayrand, D; Grenier, D; Hinode, D; Mouton, C

    1996-01-01

    To further investigate the relationship between fimbriae and the hemagglutinating adhesin HA-Ag2 of Porphyromonas gingivalis, three spontaneous mutants of the type strain ATCC 33277 were selected by a hemadsorption procedure. They were characterized for hemagglutination, trypsin-like and lectin-binding activities, and hydrophobicity and for the presence of fimbriae. The presence of the 42-kDa (the fimbrilin subunit) and the 43- and 49-kDa (the HA-Ag2 components) polypeptides was investigated by immunoblotting using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed to fimbriae and to the hemagglutinating adhesin HA-Ag2. Cells from two of the three mutants (M1 and M2) exhibited no or little hemagglutination activity and very low trypsin-like activity and did not show the 43- and 49-kDa polypeptides. Abnormal fimbriation in M1 was deduced from the following observations of cells grown for 18 h: absence of the 42-kDa polypeptide and of a 14-kDa polypeptide and no fimbriae visible on electron micrographs. While the cells of mutant M2, irrespective of the age of the culture, were found to lack the 43- and 49-kDa polypeptides and hemagglutination activity, the supernatants of cultures grown for 72 h had high hemagglutination and trypsin-like activities and revealed the presence of the 42-, 43-, and 49-kDa polypeptides. This suggests that M2 may be missing some molecules which anchor the components to the cell surface. Mutant M3 showed levels of activities similar to those of the parental strain but lacked the 43-kDa polypeptide. Other pleiotropic effects observed for the mutants included loss of dark pigmentation and lower hydrophobicity. The data from this study fuel an emerging consensus whereby fimbriation, hemagglutination, and proteolytic activities, as well as other functions in P. gingivalis, are intricate. PMID:8641806

  3. Isolation and characterization of ultraviolet light-sensitive mutants of the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asato, Y.

    1972-01-01

    Three independently isolated ultraviolet light sensitive (uvs) mutants of Anacystis nidulans were characterized. Strain uvs-1 showed the highest sensitivity to UV by its greatly reduced photoreactivation capacity following irradiation. Pretreatment with caffeine suppressed the dark-survival curve of strain uvs-1, thus indicating the presence of excision enzymes involved in dark repair. Under 'black' and 'white' illumination, strain uvs-1 shows photorecovery properties comparable with wild-type cultures. Results indicate that strains uvs-1, uvs-35, and uvs-88 are probably genetically distinct UV-sensitive mutants.

  4. Evaluation of the Adenocarcinoma-Associated Gene AGR2 and the Intestinal Stem Cell Marker LGR5 as Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel; Blanco-Calvo, Moisés; Reboredo, Margarita; Lorenzo-Patiño, María J.; Iglesias-Díaz, Pilar; Haz, Mar; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Medina, Vanessa; Santamarina, Isabel; Pértega, Sonia; Figueroa, Angélica; Antón-Aparicio, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    We aim to estimate the diagnostic performances of anterior gradient homolog-2 (AGR2) and Leucine-rich repeat-containing-G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5) in peripheral blood (PB) as mRNA biomarkers in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to explore their prognostic significance. Real-time PCR was used to analyze AGR2 and LGR5 in 54 stages I-IV CRC patients and 19 controls. Both mRNAs were significantly increased in PB from CRC patients compared to controls. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves were 0.722 (p = 0.006), 0.376 (p = 0.123) and 0.767 (p = 0.001) for AGR2, LGR5 and combined AGR2/LGR5, respectively. The AGR2/LGR5 assay resulted in 67.4% sensitivity and 94.7% specificity. AGR2 correlated with pT3–pT4 and high-grade tumors. LGR5 correlated with metastasis, R2 resections and high-grade. The progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with high AGR2 was reduced (p = 0.037; HR, 2.32), also in the stage I-III subgroup (p = 0.046). LGR5 indicated a poor prognosis regarding both PFS (p = 0.007; HR, 1.013) and overall survival (p = 0.045; HR, 1.01). High AGR2/LGR5 was associated with poor PFS (p = 0.014; HR, 2.8) by multivariate analysis. Our findings indicate that the assessment of AGR2 and LGR5 in PB might reflect the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) and stem cell like CTC in CRC. Increased AGR2 and LGR5 are associated with poor outcomes. PMID:22605983

  5. Isolation of mutants deficient in acetyl-CoA synthetase and a possible regulator of acetate induction in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Sealy-Lewis, H M; Fairhurst, V

    1998-07-01

    Acetate-non-utilizing mutants in Aspergillus niger were selected by resistance to 1.2% propionate in the presence of 0.1% glucose. Mutants showing normal morphology fell into two complementation groups. One class of mutant lacked acetyl-CoA synthetase but had high levels of isocitrate lyase, while the second class showed reduced levels of both acetyl-CoA synthetase and isocitrate lyase compared to the wild-type strain. By analogy with mutants selected by resistance to 1.2% propionate in Aspergillus nidulans, the properties of the mutants in A. niger suggest that the mutations are either in the structural gene for acetyl-CoA synthetase (acuA) or in a possible regulatory gene of acetate induction (acuB). A third class of mutant in a different complementation group was obtained which had abnormal morphology (yellow mycelium and few conidia); the specific lesion in these mutants has not been determined.

  6. Efficient construction of Haemophilus parasuis mutants based on natural transformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxing; Yuan, Xiufang; Xu, Lihua; Kang, Lei; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Yicheng

    2016-10-01

    Studies on virulence factors and pathogenecity of Haemophilus parasuis have long been hindered by a lack of a consistent system for genetic manipulation. In this study, competence was induced by transferring H. parasuis from rich medium to starvation medium media-IV (M-IV) and iscR gene deficient mutants of H. parasuis were generated efficiently. Transformation frequency varied from 4.1 × 10(-5) to 1.1 × 10(-8) when using circular plasmid, and increased to about 2- to 31-fold when transformed using linearized plasmid. Allele replacement occurred efficiently in 6 strains, which are transformable using both circular and linearized pTRU, but not in another 2 strains which could only be transformed using linearized plasmid. The iscR mutants were stable for at least 20 passages in vitro. Haemophilus parasuis strains vary extensively in natural transformation efficiency and the method established here allows for transformation of a larger spectrum of strains with an easily accessed plasmid. This provides important tools for genetic manipulation of H. parasuis.

  7. Purification and in vitro complementation of mutant histidinol dehydrogenases. [Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Grubmeyer, C.T.

    1987-09-01

    The biochemistry of interallelic complementation within the Salmonella typhimurium hisD gene was investigated by in vitro protein complementation of mutant histidinol dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.23). Double-mutant strains were constructed containing the his01242 (constitutive overproducer) attenuator mutations and selected hisDa or hisDb mutations. Extracts from such hisDa986 and hisDb1799 mutant cells failed to show histidinol dehydrogenase activity but complemented to produce active enzyme. Inactive mutant histidinol dehydrogenases were purified from each of the two mutants by ion-exchange chromatography. Complementation by the purified mutant proteins required the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol and MnCl/sub 2/, and protein-protein titrations indicated that heterodimers were strongly preferred in mixtures of the complementary mutant enzymes. Both purified mutant proteins failed to catalyze NAD-NADH exchange reactions reflective of the first catalytic step of the two-step reaction. The inactive enzymes bound /sup 54/Mn/sup 2 +/ weakly or not at all in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, in contrast to wild-type enzyme which bound /sup 54/Mn/sup 2 +/ to 0.6 sites per monomer under the same conditions. The mutant proteins, like wild-type histidinol dehydrogenase, behaved as dimers on analytical gel filtration chromatography, but dissociated to form monomers in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. This effect of 20-mercaptoethanol was prevented by low levels of MnCl/sub 2/.

  8. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology.

  9. Increased Resistance of Complex I Mutants to Phytosphingosine-induced Programmed Cell Death*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ana; Lemos, Catarina; Falcão, Artur; Glass, N. Louise; Videira, Arnaldo

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effects of phytosphingosine (PHS) on cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Highly reduced viability, impairment of asexual spore germination, DNA condensation and fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species were observed in conidia treated with the drug, suggesting that PHS induces an apoptosis-like death in this fungus. Interestingly, we found that complex I mutants are more resistant to PHS treatment than the wild type strain. This effect appears to be specific because it was not observed in mutants defective in other components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, pointing to a particular involvement of complex I in cell death. The response of the mutant strains to PHS correlated with their response to hydrogen peroxide. The fact that complex I mutants generate fewer reactive oxygen species than the wild type strain when exposed to PHS likely explains the PHS-resistant phenotype. As compared with the wild type strain, we also found that a strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding an AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor)-like protein is more resistant to PHS and H2O2. In contrast, a strain containing a deletion in a gene encoding an AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death)-like polypeptide is more sensitive to both drugs. These results indicate that N. crassa has the potential to be a model organism to investigate the molecular basis of programmed cell death in eukaryotic species. PMID:18474589

  10. Increased resistance of complex I mutants to phytosphingosine-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ana; Lemos, Catarina; Falcão, Artur; Glass, N Louise; Videira, Arnaldo

    2008-07-11

    We have studied the effects of phytosphingosine (PHS) on cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Highly reduced viability, impairment of asexual spore germination, DNA condensation and fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species were observed in conidia treated with the drug, suggesting that PHS induces an apoptosis-like death in this fungus. Interestingly, we found that complex I mutants are more resistant to PHS treatment than the wild type strain. This effect appears to be specific because it was not observed in mutants defective in other components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, pointing to a particular involvement of complex I in cell death. The response of the mutant strains to PHS correlated with their response to hydrogen peroxide. The fact that complex I mutants generate fewer reactive oxygen species than the wild type strain when exposed to PHS likely explains the PHS-resistant phenotype. As compared with the wild type strain, we also found that a strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding an AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor)-like protein is more resistant to PHS and H2O2. In contrast, a strain containing a deletion in a gene encoding an AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death)-like polypeptide is more sensitive to both drugs. These results indicate that N. crassa has the potential to be a model organism to investigate the molecular basis of programmed cell death in eukaryotic species.

  11. Production of actinomycin-D by the mutant of a new isolate of Streptomyces sindenensis

    PubMed Central

    Praveen, Vandana; Tripathi, C.K.M.; Bihari, Vinod; Srivastava, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    An actinomycin-D producing strain was isolated from soil and characterized as Streptomyces sindenensis. The culture was subjected to UV irradiation and a mutant with 400% higher actinomycin-D production was isolated (400 mg/l-1 as compared to 80 mg/l-1 produced by the parent). Production medium was optimized and antibiotic yield with the mutant was enhanced to 850 mg/l-1 which is 963% higher as compared with the parent. PMID:24031290

  12. Isolation and characterization of Pichia heedii mutants defective in xylose uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Does, A.L.; Bisson, L.F. )

    1990-11-01

    To investigate the role of xylose uptake in xylose metabolism in yeasts, we isolated a series of mutated strains of the yeast Pichia heedii which are defective in xylose utilization. Four of these demonstrated defects in xylose uptake. Overlaps between the functional or regulatory mechanisms for glucose and xylose uptake may exist in this yeast since some of the mutants defective in xylose uptake were also defective in glucose transport. None of the mutants were defective in xylose reductase or xylitol dehydrogenase activities.

  13. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2016-04-07

    Safety tests were conducted on fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800 °C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during 15 of these safety tests. Comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination results of the safety tests were conducted on two types of AGR-1 compacts: compacts containing only intact particles and compacts containing one or more particles whose SiC layers failed during safety testing. In both cases, PARFUME globally over-predicted the experimental release fractions by several orders of magnitude: more than three (intact) and two (failed SiC) orders of magnitude for silver, more than three and up to two orders of magnitude for strontium, and up to two and more than one orders of magnitude for krypton. The release of cesium from intact particles was also largely over-predicted (by up to five orders of magnitude) but its release from particles with failed SiC was only over-predicted by a factor of about 3. These over-predictions can be largely attributed to an over-estimation of the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles. The integral release nature of the data makes it difficult to estimate the individual over-estimations in the kernel or each coating layer. Nevertheless, a tentative assessment of correction factors to these diffusivities was performed to enable a better match between the modeling predictions and the safety testing results. The method could only be successfully applied to silver and cesium. In the case of strontium, correction factors could not be assessed because

  14. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    DOE PAGES

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; ...

    2016-04-07

    Safety tests were conducted on fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800 °C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during 15 of these safety tests. Comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination results of the safety tests were conducted on two types of AGR-1 compacts: compactsmore » containing only intact particles and compacts containing one or more particles whose SiC layers failed during safety testing. In both cases, PARFUME globally over-predicted the experimental release fractions by several orders of magnitude: more than three (intact) and two (failed SiC) orders of magnitude for silver, more than three and up to two orders of magnitude for strontium, and up to two and more than one orders of magnitude for krypton. The release of cesium from intact particles was also largely over-predicted (by up to five orders of magnitude) but its release from particles with failed SiC was only over-predicted by a factor of about 3. These over-predictions can be largely attributed to an over-estimation of the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles. The integral release nature of the data makes it difficult to estimate the individual over-estimations in the kernel or each coating layer. Nevertheless, a tentative assessment of correction factors to these diffusivities was performed to enable a better match between the modeling predictions and the safety testing results. The method could only be successfully applied to silver and cesium. In the case of strontium, correction factors could not be assessed

  15. Determination of the Quantity of I-135 Released from the AGR Experiment Series

    SciTech Connect

    Scates, Dawn Marie; Walter, John Bradley; Reber, Edward Lawrence; Sterbentz, James William; Petti, David Andrew

    2014-10-01

    A series of three Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). From 2006 through 2014, these experiments supported the development and qualification of the new U.S. tri structural isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Each AGR experiment consisted of multiple fueled capsules, each plumbed for independent temperature control using a mix of helium and neon gases. The gas leaving a capsule was routed to individual Fission Product Monitor (FPM) detectors. For intact fuel particles, the TRISO particle coatings provide a substantial barrier to fission product release. However, particles with failed coatings, whether because of a minute percentage of initially defective particles, those which fail during irradiation, or those designed to fail (DTF) particles, can release fission products to the flowing gas stream. Because reactive fission product elements like iodine and cesium quickly deposit on cooler capsule components and piping structures as the effluent gas leaves the reactor core, only the noble fission gas isotopes of Kr and Xe tend to reach FPM detectors. The FPM system utilizes High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors coupled with a thallium activated sodium iodide NaI(Tl) scintillator. The germanium detector provides individual isotopic information, while the NaI(Tl) scintillator is used as a gross count rate meter. During irradiation, the 135mXe concentration reaching the FPM detectors is from both direct fission and by decay of the accumulated 135I. About ~2.5 hours after irradiation (ten 15.3 minute 135mXe half lives) the directly produced 135mXe has decayed and only the longer lived 135I remains as a source. Decay systematics dictate that 135mXe will be in secular equilibrium with its 135I parent, such that it’s production rate very nearly equals the decay rate of the parent, and its concentration in the flowing gas stream will appear to

  16. Prevention of GABA reduction during dough fermentation using a baker's yeast dal81 mutant.

    PubMed

    Ando, Akira; Nakamura, Toshihide

    2016-10-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is consumed by yeasts during fermentation. To prevent GABA reduction in bread dough, a baker's yeast mutant AY77 deficient in GABA assimilation was characterized and utilized for wheat dough fermentation. An amber mutation in the DAL81 gene, which codes for a positive regulator of multiple nitrogen degradation pathways, was found in the AY77 strain. The qPCR analyses of genes involved in nitrogen utilization showed that transcriptional levels of the UGA1 and DUR3 genes encoding GABA transaminase and urea transporter, respectively, are severely decreased in the AY77 cells. The AY77 strain cultivated by fed-batch culture using cane molasses exhibited inferior gas production during dough fermentation compared to that of wild-type strain AY13. However, when fed with molasses containing 0.5% ammonium sulfate, the mutant strain exhibited gas production comparable to that of the AY13 strain. In contrast to the AY13 strain, which completely consumed GABA in dough within 5 h, the AY77 strain consumed no GABA under either culture condition. Dough fermentation with the dal81 mutant strain should be useful for suppression of GABA reduction in breads.

  17. Clavulanic acid production by the MMS 150 mutant obtained from wild type Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Vasconcelos, Eliton; de Lima, Vanderlei Aparecido; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Cruz-Hernández, Isara Lourdes; Hokka, Carlos Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a powerful inhibitor of the beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistants to penicillin and cefalosporin. This molecule is produced industrially by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus in complex media which carbon and nitrogen resources are supplied by inexpensive compounds still providing high productivity. The genetic production improvement using physical and chemical mutagenic agents is an important strategy in programs of industrial production development of bioactive metabolites. However, parental strains are susceptible to loss of their original productivity due genetic instability phenomenona. In this work, some S. clavuligerus mutant strains obtained by treatment with UV light and with MMS are compared with the wild type (Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064). The results indicated that the random mutations originated some strains with different phenotypes, most divergent demonstrated by the mutants strains named AC116, MMS 150 and MMS 54, that exhibited lack of pigmentation in their mature spores. Also, the strain MMS 150 presented a larger production of CA when cultivated in semi-synthetics media. Using other media, the wild type strain obtained a larger CA production. Besides, using the modifed complex media the MMS 150 strain showed changes in its lipolitic activity and a larger production of CA. The studies also allowed finding the best conditions for a lipase activity exhibited by wild type S. clavuligerus and the MMS150 mutant. PMID:24688492

  18. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, isolated on three different geography locations

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Maja; Hukić, Mirsada

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increased frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires rapid and reliable characterization of isolates and control of MRSA spread in hospitals. Typing of isolates helps to understand the route of a hospital pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA samples on three different geography locations. In addition, our aim was to evaluate three different methods of MRSA typing: spa-typing, agr-typing and GenoType MRSA. We included 104 samples of MRSA, isolated in 3 different geographical locations in clinical hospitals in Zagreb, Mostar, and Heidelberg, during the period of six months. Genotyping and phenotyping were done by spa-typing, agr-typing and dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. We failed to type all our samples by spa-typing. The most common spa-type in clinical hospital Zagreb was t041, in Mostar t001, and in Heidelberg t003. We analyzed 102/104 of our samples by agr-typing method. We did not find any agr-type IV in our locations. We analyzed all our samples by the dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. All isolates in our study were MRSA strains. In Zagreb there were no positive strains to PVL gene. In Mostar we have found 5/25 positive strains to PVL gene, in Heidelberg there was 1/49. PVL positive isolates were associated with spa-type t008 and agr-type I, thus, genetically, they were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Dipstick assay GenoType MRSA has demonstrated sufficient specificity, sensibility, simple performance and low cost, so we could introduce it to work in smaller laboratories. Using this method may expedite MRSA screening, thus preventing its spread in hospitals. PMID:26295294

  19. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, isolated on three different geography locations.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Maja; Hukić, Mirsada

    2015-08-04

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increased frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires rapid and reliable characterization of isolates and control of MRSA spread in hospitals. Typing of isolates helps to understand the route of a hospital pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA samples on three different geography locations. In addition, our aim was to evaluate three different methods of MRSA typing: spa-typing, agr-typing and GenoType MRSA.  We included 104 samples of MRSA, isolated in 3 different geographical locations in clinical hospitals in Zagreb, Mostar, and Heidelberg, during the period of six months. Genotyping and phenotyping were done by spa-typing, agr-typing and dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. We failed to type all our samples by spa-typing.  The most common spa-type in clinical hospital Zagreb was t041, in Mostar t001, and in Heidelberg t003.We analyzed 102/104 of our samples by agr-typing method. We did not find any agr-type IV in our locations. We analyzed all our samples by the dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. All isolates in our study were MRSA strains. In Zagreb there were no positive strains to PVL gene. In Mostar we have found 5/25 positive strains to PVL gene, in Heidelberg there was 1/49. PVL positive isolates were associated with spa-type t008 and agr-type I, thus, genetically, they were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Dipstick assay GenoType MRSA has demonstrated sufficient specificity, sensibility, simple performance and low cost, so we could introduce it to work in smaller laboratories. Using this method may expedite MRSA screening, thus preventing its spread in hospitals.

  20. An update to the list of mouse mutants with neural tube closure defects and advances toward a complete genetic perspective of neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Harris, Muriel J; Juriloff, Diana M

    2010-08-01

    The number of mouse mutants and strains with neural tube defects (NTDs) now exceeds 240, including 205 representing specific genes, 30 for unidentified genes, and 9 multifactorial strains. These mutants identify genes needed for embryonic neural tube closure. Reports of 50 new NTD mutants since our 2007 review (Harris and Juriloff, 2007) were considered in relation to the previously reviewed mutants to obtain new insights into mechanisms of NTD etiology. In addition to null mutations, some are hypomorphs or conditional mutants. Some mutations do not cause NTDs on their own, but do so in digenic, trigenic, and oligogenic combinations, an etiology that likely parallels the nature of genetic etiology of human NTDs. Mutants that have only exencephaly are fourfold more frequent than those that have spina bifida aperta with or without exencephaly. Many diverse cellular functions and biochemical pathways are involved; the NTD mutants draw new attention to chromatin modification (epigenetics), the protease-activated receptor cascade, and the ciliopathies. Few mutants directly involve folate metabolism. Prevention of NTDs by maternal folate supplementation has been tested in 13 mutants and reduces NTD frequency in six diverse mutants. Inositol reduces spina bifida aperta frequency in the curly tail mutant, and three new mutants involve inositol metabolism. The many NTD mutants are the foundation for a future complete genetic understanding of the processes of neural fold elevation and fusion along mechanistically distinct cranial-caudal segments of the neural tube, and they point to several candidate processes for study in human NTD etiology.

  1. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th) subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae.

  2. Rapid Mutation of Spirulina platensis by a New Mutagenesis System of Atmospheric and Room Temperature Plasmas (ARTP) and Generation of a Mutant Library with Diverse Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae. PMID:24319517

  3. Metabolic flexibility of a butyrate pathway mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Minyeong; Croux, Christian; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe

    2017-01-31

    Clostridium acetobutylicum possesses two homologous buk genes, buk (or buk1) and buk2, which encode butyrate kinases involved in the last step of butyrate formation. To investigate the contribution of buk in detail, an in-frame deletion mutant was constructed. However, in all the Δbuk mutants obtained, partial deletions of the upstream ptb gene were observed, and low phosphotransbutyrylase and butyrate kinase activities were measured. This demonstrates that i) buk (CA_C3075) is the key butyrate kinase-encoding gene and that buk2 (CA_C1660) that is poorly transcribed only plays a minor role; and ii) strongly suggests that a Δbuk mutant is not viable if the ptb gene is not also inactivated, probably due to the accumulation of butyryl-phosphate, which might be toxic for the cell. One of the ΔbukΔptb mutants was subjected to quantitative transcriptomic (mRNA molecules/cell) and fluxomic analyses in acidogenic, solventogenic and alcohologenic chemostat cultures. In addition to the low butyrate production, drastic changes in metabolic fluxes were also observed for the mutant: i) under acidogenic conditions, the primary metabolite was butanol and a new metabolite, 2-hydroxy-valerate, was produced ii) under solventogenesis, 58% increased butanol production was obtained compared to the control strain under the same conditions, and a very high yield of butanol formation (0.3gg(-1)) was reached; and iii) under alcohologenesis, the major product was lactate. Furthermore, at the transcriptional level, adhE2, which encodes an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase and is known to be a gene specifically expressed in alcohologenesis, was surprisingly highly expressed in all metabolic states in the mutant. The results presented here not only support the key roles of buk and ptb in butyrate formation but also highlight the metabolic flexibility of C. acetobutylicum in response to genetic alteration of its primary metabolism.

  4. Isolation of a Defective Prion Mutant from Natural Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Sergio; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Pirisinu, Laura; Riccardi, Geraldina; Nonno, Romolo

    2016-01-01

    It is widely known that prion strains can mutate in response to modification of the replication environment and we have recently reported that prion mutations can occur in vitro during amplification of vole-adapted prions by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification on bank vole substrate (bvPMCA). Here we exploited the high efficiency of prion replication by bvPMCA to study the in vitro propagation of natural scrapie isolates. Although in vitro vole-adapted PrPSc conformers were usually similar to the sheep counterpart, we repeatedly isolated a PrPSc mutant exclusively when starting from extremely diluted seeds of a single sheep isolate. The mutant and faithful PrPSc conformers showed to be efficiently autocatalytic in vitro and were characterized by different PrP protease resistant cores, spanning aa ∼155–231 and ∼80–231 respectively, and by different conformational stabilities. The two conformers could thus be seen as different bona fide PrPSc types, putatively accounting for prion populations with different biological properties. Indeed, once inoculated in bank vole the faithful conformer was competent for in vivo replication while the mutant was unable to infect voles, de facto behaving like a defective prion mutant. Overall, our findings confirm that prions can adapt and evolve in the new replication environments and that the starting population size can affect their evolutionary landscape, at least in vitro. Furthermore, we report the first example of “authentic” defective prion mutant, composed of brain-derived PrPC and originating from a natural scrapie isolate. Our results clearly indicate that the defective mutant lacks of some structural characteristics, that presumably involve the central region ∼90–155, critical for infectivity but not for in vitro replication. Finally, we propose a molecular mechanism able to account for the discordant in vitro and in vivo behavior, suggesting possible new paths for investigating the molecular bases of

  5. The effect of birthrate granularity on the release-to-birth ratio for the AGR-1 in-core experiment

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Scates; J. B. Walter; J. T. Maki; J. W. Sterbentz; J. R. Parry

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) tristructural-isotropic-particle fuel experiment underwent 13 irradiation intervals from December 2006 until November 2009 within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant program. During this multi-year experiment, release-to-birth rate ratios were computed at the end of each operating interval to provide information about fuel performance. Fission products released during irradiation were tracked daily by the Fission Product Monitoring System using 8-h measurements. Birth rate calculated by MCNP with ORIGEN for as-run conditions were computed at the end of each irradiation interval. Each time step in MCNP provided neutron flux, reaction rates and AGR-1 compact composition, which were used to determine birth rate using ORIGEN. The initial birth-rate data, consisting of four values for each irradiation interval at the beginning, end, and two intermediate times, were interpolated to obtain values for each 8-h activity. The problem with this method is that any daily changes in heat rates or perturbations, such as shim control movement or core/lobe power fluctuations, would not be reflected in the interpolated data and a true picture of the system would not be presented. At the conclusion of the AGR-1 experiment, great efforts were put forth to compute daily birthrates, which were reprocessed with the 8-h release activity. The results of this study are presented in this paper.

  6. The Effect of Birthrate Granularity on the Release- to- Birth Ratio for the AGR-1 In-core Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn Scates; John Walter

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) tristructural-isotropic-particle fuel experiment underwent 13 irradiation intervals from December 2006 until November 2009 within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant program. During this multi-year experiment, release-to-birth rate ratios were computed at the end of each operating interval to provide information about fuel performance. Fission products released during irradiation were tracked daily by the Fission Product Monitoring System using 8-hour measurements. Birth rates calculated by MCNP with ORIGEN for as-run conditions were computed at the end of each irradiation interval. Each time step in MCNP provided neutron flux, reaction rates and AGR-1 compact composition, which were used to determine birth rates using ORIGEN. The initial birth-rate data, consisting of four values for each irradiation interval at the beginning, end, and two intermediate times, were interpolated to obtain values for each 8-hour activity. The problem with this method is that any daily changes in heat rates or perturbations, such as shim control movement or core/lobe power fluctuations, would not be reflected in the interpolated data and a true picture of the system would not be presented. At the conclusion of the AGR-1 experiment, great efforts were put forth to compute daily birthrates, which were reprocessed with the 8-hour release activity. The results of this study are presented in this paper.

  7. Spontaneous white sectored-mutants in Streptomyces hygroscopicus 111-81: characterization and antibiotic productivity.

    PubMed

    Gesheva, Victoria

    2008-08-01

    Spontaneous white mutants from sectors of Streptomyces hygroscopicus 111-81 were isolated. The comparison of morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties of the mutants and ancestor showed the differences in colors of aerial, substrate mycelia, and sporulation. Changes in resistance to antibiotics and sensitivity to lysozyme indicated alterations in cell walls and cell membranes of the mutants. They showed antifungal activity close to that of the parent strain on fermentation medium FM2, with unchanged component composition of the AK-111-81 antibiotic complex. The cells of spontaneous white mutants are characterized with electron-transparent structures, vacuoles, aggregation of ribosomes, intrahyphal growth, and lack of multiple cell septa, which was established by transmission electron microscopy. The appearance of white sectored-mutants in S. hygroscopicus 111-81 is connected with exhausting of nutrients causing the substrate limitation and is a stress response to starvation.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with impaired glutamate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Folch, J L; Antaramián, A; Rodríguez, L; Bravo, A; Brunner, A; González, A

    1989-12-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lacks glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activity has been isolated. This mutant was obtained after chemical mutagenesis of a NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase-less mutant strain. The gdh gus mutant is a glutamate auxotroph. The genetic analysis of the gus mutant showed that the GOGAT-less phenotype is due to the presence of two loosely linked mutations. Evidence is presented which suggests the possibility that S. cerevisiae has two GOGAT activities, designated GOGAT A and GOGAT B. These activities can be distinguished by their pH optima and by their regulation by glutamate. Furthermore, one of the mutations responsible for the GOGAT-less phenotype affected GOGAT A activity, while the other mutation affected GOGAT B activity.

  9. Isolation and characterization of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with impaired glutamate synthase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Folch, J L; Antaramián, A; Rodríguez, L; Bravo, A; Brunner, A; González, A

    1989-01-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lacks glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activity has been isolated. This mutant was obtained after chemical mutagenesis of a NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase-less mutant strain. The gdh gus mutant is a glutamate auxotroph. The genetic analysis of the gus mutant showed that the GOGAT-less phenotype is due to the presence of two loosely linked mutations. Evidence is presented which suggests the possibility that S. cerevisiae has two GOGAT activities, designated GOGAT A and GOGAT B. These activities can be distinguished by their pH optima and by their regulation by glutamate. Furthermore, one of the mutations responsible for the GOGAT-less phenotype affected GOGAT A activity, while the other mutation affected GOGAT B activity. PMID:2687252

  10. Enhanced conversion of sucrose to isomaltulose by a mutant of Erwinia rhapontici.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seung-Joon; Yoo, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyeon-Cheol; Kim, Sang-Yong; Noh, Bong-Soo; Kim, Jung-Hoe; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2003-07-01

    Mutagenesis of Erwinia rhapontici was performed to enhance the production of isomaltulose from sucrose. A mutant strain, BN 68089, was obtained through a screening process involving automated and miniaturized cultivation in Bioscreen C. This high-throughput, miniaturized screening system was optimized to identify the mutant strain, which had a conversion yield (90%) and productivity (194 g l(-1) h(-1)). The BN 68089 mutant cells were immobilized in sodium alginate and when operated in a packed bed reactor gave a yield of 89% and a productivity of 144 g l(-1) h(-1) of at 30 degrees C, the optimal temperature. Immobilized BN 68089 cells exhibited 8% and 15% higher yield and productivity, respectively, than those of the wild-type strain.

  11. Virulence and immunity of Staphylococcus aureus BB and certain deficient mutants.