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Sample records for agr type reactors

  1. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  2. Status of the NGNP fuel experiment AGR-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also undergo on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and sup

  3. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  4. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Ploger, Scott A.; Morris, Robert N.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Harp, Jason M.; Winston, Philip L.; Gerczak, Tyler J.; van Rooyen, Isabella J.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Silva, Chinthaka M.

    2015-10-23

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocarbon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1 × 10–4 to 5 × 10–4 for 154Eu and 8 × 10–7 to 3 × 10–5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs fractional release from compacts was <3 × 10–6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98 × 105 in the experiment experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs fractional release in two capsules to approximately 10–5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that

  5. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  6. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Ploger, Scott A.; ...

    2015-10-23

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that itmore » was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocarbon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1 × 10–4 to 5 × 10–4 for 154Eu and 8 × 10–7 to 3 × 10–5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs fractional release from compacts was <3 × 10–6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98 × 105 in the experiment experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs fractional release in two capsules to approximately 10–5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. In conclusion, palladium, silver, and

  7. Completion of the first NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiment, AGR-1, in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover; John Maki; David Petti

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and completed a very successful irradiation in early November 2009. The design of AGR-1 test train and support systems used to monitor and control the experiment during

  8. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  9. Performance of AGR-1 high-temperature reactor fuel during post-irradiation heating tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert N.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Reber, Edward L.

    2016-05-18

    The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor 1 (AGR-1) experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600–1800 °C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ~58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4% to 19.1% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products 110mAg, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 90Sr, and 85Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 °C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ~100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 × 10–6 after 300 h at 1600 °C or 100 h at 1800 °C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 °C, and 85Kr release was very low during the tests (particles with failed SiC, but intact outer pyrocarbon, retained most of their krypton). Krypton release from TRISO failures was only observed after ~210 h at 1800 °C in one compact. As a result, post-safety-test examination of fuel compacts and particles has focused on identifying specific particles from each compact with notable fission product release and detailed analysis of the coating

  10. Performance of AGR-1 high-temperature reactor fuel during post-irradiation heating tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert N.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Reber, Edward L.

    2016-05-18

    The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor 1 (AGR-1) experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600–1800 °C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ~58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4% to 19.1% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products 110mAg, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 90Sr, and 85Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 °C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ~100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 × 10–6 after 300 h at 1600 °C or 100 h at 1800 °C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 °C, and 85Kr release was very low during the tests (particles with failed SiC, but intact outer pyrocarbon, retained most of their krypton). Krypton release from TRISO failures was only observed after ~210 h at 1800 °C in one compact. As a result, post-safety-test examination of fuel compacts and particles has focused on identifying specific particles from each compact with notable fission product release and detailed analysis of the coating

  11. Performance of AGR-1 high-temperature reactor fuel during post-irradiation heating tests

    DOE PAGES

    Morris, Robert N.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; ...

    2016-05-18

    The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor 1 (AGR-1) experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600–1800 °C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ~58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4% to 19.1% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products 110mAg, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 90Sr, and 85Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium,more » and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 °C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ~100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 × 10–6 after 300 h at 1600 °C or 100 h at 1800 °C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 °C, and 85Kr release was very low during the tests (particles with failed SiC, but intact outer pyrocarbon, retained most of their krypton). Krypton release from TRISO failures was only observed after ~210 h at 1800 °C in one compact. As a result, post-safety-test examination of fuel compacts and particles has focused on identifying specific particles from each compact with notable fission product release and detailed analysis of the coating layers

  12. Improving the AGR Fuel Testing Power Density Profile Versus Irradiation-Time in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang; David A. Petti; John T. Maki; Misti A. Lillo

    2009-05-01

    The Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR), which is currently being developed, achieves simplification of safety through reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles. Each TRISO-coated fuel particle has its own containment which serves as the principal barrier against radionuclide release under normal operating and accident conditions. These fuel particles, in the form of graphite fuel compacts, are currently undergoing a series of irradiation tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel qualification program. A representive coated fuel particle with an 235U enrichment of 19.8 wt% was used in this analysis. The fuel burnup analysis tool used to perform the neutronics study reported herein, couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. The fuel burnup methodology known as Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) was used to evaluate the AGR experiment assembly and demonstrate compliance with ATR safety requirements. For the AGR graphite fuel compacts, the MCWO-calculated fission power density (FPD) due to neutron fission in 235U is an important design parameter. One of the more important AGR fuel testing requirements is to maintain the peak fuel compact temperature close to 1250°C throughout the proposed irradiation campaign of 550 effective full power days (EFPDs). Based on the MCWO-calculated FPD, a fixed gas gap size was designed to allow regulation of the fuel compact temperatures throughout the entire fuel irradiation campaign by filling the gap with a mixture of helium and neon gases. The chosen fixed gas gap can only regulate the peak fuel compact temperature in the desired range during the irradiation test if the ratio of the peak power density to the time-dependent low power density (P/T) at 550 EFPDs is less than 2.5. However, given the near constant neutron flux within the ATR driver core and the depletion of 235U in

  13. DESIGN OF AN ON-LINE, MULTI-SPECTROMETER FISSION PRODUCT MONITORING SYSTEM (FPMS) TO SUPPORT ADVANCED GAS REACTOR (AGR) FUEL TESTING AND QUALIFICATION IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Hartwell; D. M. Scates; M. W. Drigert

    2005-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is embarking on a series of tests of coated-particle reactor fuel for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR). As one part of this fuel development program a series of eight (8) fuel irradiation tests are planned for the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The first test in this series (AGR-1) will incorporate six separate “capsules” irradiated simultaneously, each containing about 51,000 TRISO-coated fuel particles supported in a graphite matrix and continuously swept with inert gas during irradiation. The effluent gas from each of the six capsules must be independently monitored in near real time and the activity of various fission gas nuclides determined and reported. A set of seven heavily-shielded high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based total radiation detectors have been designed, and are being configured and tested for use during the AGR-1 experiment. The AGR-1 test specification requires that the AGR-1 fission product measurement system (FPMS) have sufficient sensitivity to detect the failure of a single coated fuel particle and sufficient range to allow it to “count” multiple (up to 250) successive particle failures. This paper describes the design and expected performance of the AGR-1 FPMS.

  14. AGR-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    John T. Maki

    2009-10-01

    This document presents the current state of planning for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment will be irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The test will contain six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule will contain a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. The irradiation is planned for about 700 effective full power days (approximately 2.4 calendar years) with a time-averaged, volume-average temperature of approximately 1050 °C. Average fuel burnup, for the entire test, will be greater than 17.7 % FIMA, and the fuel will experience fast neutron fluences between 2.4 and 4.5 x 1025 n/m2 (E>0.18 MeV).

  15. Performance of AGR-1 High-Temperature Reactor Fuel During Post-Irradiation Heating Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A; Hunn, John D; Demkowicz, Paul; Reber, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO fuel compacts from the AGR-1 experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600 1800 C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ~58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4 to 19.1% FIMA have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products 110mAg, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 90Sr, and 85Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ~100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 10-6 after 300 h at 1600 C or 100 h at 1800 C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 C, and 85Kr release was very low during the tests (particles with breached SiC, but intact outer pyrocarbon, retained most of their krypton). Krypton release from TRISO failures was only observed after ~210 h at 1800 C in one compact. Post-safety-test examination of fuel compacts and particles has focused on identifying specific particles from each compact with notable fission product release and detailed analysis of the coating layers to understand particle behavior.

  16. The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

    2005-05-01

    The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

  17. Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

    2009-09-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and

  18. On reactor type comparisons for the next generation of reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Majumdar, K.C.

    1991-08-22

    In this paper, we present a broad comparison of studies for a selected set of parameters for different nuclear reactor types including the next generation. This serves as an overview of key parameters which provide a semi-quantitative decision basis for selecting nuclear strategies. Out of a number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR type, gas cooled type, and FBR type, currently on the drawing board, the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) seem to have some edge over other types of the next generation of reactors for the near-term application. This is based on a number of attributes related to the benefit of the vast operating experience with LWRs coupled with an estimated low risk profile, economics of scale, degree of utilization of passive systems, simplification in the plant design and layout, modular fabrication and manufacturing. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. AGR-1 Data Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Abbott

    2010-03-01

    ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the data streams associated with the first Advanced Gas Reactor experiment (AGR-1), the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. They include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing, to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documentation that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent quality assurance program. The NDMAS database processing and qualification status of the following five data streams is reported in this document: 1. Fuel fabrication data. All data have been processed into the NDMAS database and qualified (1,819 records). 2. Fuel irradiation data. Data from all 13 AGR-1 reactor cycles have been processed into the NDMAS database and tested. Of these, 85% have been qualified and 15% have failed NDMAS accuracy testing. 3. FPMS data. Reprocessed (January 2010) data from all 13 AGR-1 reactor cycles have been processed into the database and capture tested. Final qualification of these data will be recorded after QA approval of an Engineering Calculations and Analysis Report

  20. CALANDRIA TYPE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, R.M.; Mahlmeister, J.E.; Vaughn, N.E.; Sanders, W.J.; Williams, A.C.

    1964-02-11

    A sodium graphite power reactor in which the unclad graphite moderator and fuel elements are contained within a core tank is described. The core tank is submersed in sodium within the reactor vessel. Extending longitudinally through the core thnk are process tubes with fuel elements positioned therein. A bellows sealing means allows axial expansion and construction of the tubes. Within the core tank, a leakage plenum is located below the graphite, and above the graphite is a gas space. A vent line regulates the gas pressure in the space, and another line removes sodium from the plenum. The sodium coolant flows from the lower reactor vessel through the annular space between the fuel elements and process tubes and out into the reactor vessel space above the core tank. From there, the heated coolant is drawn off through an outlet line and sent to the heat exchange. (AEC)

  1. Analysis of Gln223Agr Polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in Type II Diabetic Mellitus Subjects among Malaysians

    PubMed Central

    Etemad, Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Pishva, Seyyed Reza; Heidari, Farzad; Aziz, Ahmad Fazli Abdul; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Mohamed; Pei, Chong Pei; Ismail, Patimah

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The Leptin Receptor (LEPR) gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05). PMID:24051404

  2. Pentose sugars inhibit metabolism and increase expression of an AgrD-type cyclic pentapeptide in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Tobin J; Giannone, Richard J; Klingeman, Dawn M; Engle, Nancy L; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Brown, Steven D; Hettich, Robert L; Elkins, James G

    2017-02-23

    Clostridium thermocellum could potentially be used as a microbial biocatalyst to produce renewable fuels directly from lignocellulosic biomass due to its ability to rapidly solubilize plant cell walls. While the organism readily ferments sugars derived from cellulose, pentose sugars from xylan are not metabolized. Here, we show that non-fermentable pentoses inhibit growth and end-product formation during fermentation of cellulose-derived sugars. Metabolomic experiments confirmed that xylose is transported intracellularly and reduced to the dead-end metabolite xylitol. Comparative RNA-seq analysis of xylose-inhibited cultures revealed several up-regulated genes potentially involved in pentose transport and metabolism, which were targeted for disruption. Deletion of the ATP-dependent transporter, CbpD partially alleviated xylose inhibition. A putative xylitol dehydrogenase, encoded by Clo1313_0076, was also deleted resulting in decreased total xylitol production and yield by 41% and 46%, respectively. Finally, xylose-induced inhibition corresponds with the up-regulation and biogenesis of a cyclical AgrD-type, pentapeptide. Medium supplementation with the mature cyclical pentapeptide also inhibits bacterial growth. Together, these findings provide new foundational insights needed for engineering improved pentose utilizing strains of C. thermocellum and reveal the first functional Agr-type cyclic peptide to be produced by a thermophilic member of the Firmicutes.

  3. Pentose sugars inhibit metabolism and increase expression of an AgrD-type cyclic pentapeptide in Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Tobin J.; Giannone, Richard J.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Engle, Nancy L.; Rydzak, Thomas; Guss, Adam M.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Brown, Steven D.; Hettich, Robert L.; Elkins, James G.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum could potentially be used as a microbial biocatalyst to produce renewable fuels directly from lignocellulosic biomass due to its ability to rapidly solubilize plant cell walls. While the organism readily ferments sugars derived from cellulose, pentose sugars from xylan are not metabolized. Here, we show that non-fermentable pentoses inhibit growth and end-product formation during fermentation of cellulose-derived sugars. Metabolomic experiments confirmed that xylose is transported intracellularly and reduced to the dead-end metabolite xylitol. Comparative RNA-seq analysis of xylose-inhibited cultures revealed several up-regulated genes potentially involved in pentose transport and metabolism, which were targeted for disruption. Deletion of the ATP-dependent transporter, CbpD partially alleviated xylose inhibition. A putative xylitol dehydrogenase, encoded by Clo1313_0076, was also deleted resulting in decreased total xylitol production and yield by 41% and 46%, respectively. Finally, xylose-induced inhibition corresponds with the up-regulation and biogenesis of a cyclical AgrD-type, pentapeptide. Medium supplementation with the mature cyclical pentapeptide also inhibits bacterial growth. Together, these findings provide new foundational insights needed for engineering improved pentose utilizing strains of C. thermocellum and reveal the first functional Agr-type cyclic peptide to be produced by a thermophilic member of the Firmicutes. PMID:28230109

  4. Sensitivity Evaluation of the Daily Thermal Predictions of the AGR-1 Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James Sterbentz; John Maki

    2011-05-01

    A temperature sensitivity evaluation has been performed for the AGR-1 fuel experiment on an individual capsule. A series of cases were compared to a base case by varying different input parameters into the ABAQUS finite element thermal model. These input parameters were varied by ±10% to show the temperature sensitivity to each parameter. The most sensitive parameters are the outer control gap distance, heat rate in the fuel compacts, and neon gas fraction. Thermal conductivity of the compacts and graphite holder were in the middle of the list for sensitivity. The smallest effects were for the emissivities of the stainless steel, graphite, and thru tubes. Sensitivity calculations were also performed varying with fluence. These calculations showed a general temperature rise with an increase in fluence. This is a result of the thermal conductivity of the fuel compacts and graphite holder decreasing with fluence.

  5. AGR-1 Data Qualification Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Machael Abbott

    2009-08-01

    Projects for the very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR Program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the data streams associated with the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) experiment, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY09 qualification status of the AGR-1 data to date. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category, which is assigned by the data generator, and include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing, to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documentation that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent QA program. The interim qualification status of the following four data streams is reported in this document: (1) fuel fabrication data, (2) fuel irradiation data, (3) fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data, and (4) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) operating conditions data. A final report giving the NDMAS qualification status of all AGR-1 data (including cycle 145A) is planned for February 2010.

  6. Existence of two groups of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis based on biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular profile and agr-typing.

    PubMed

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Caplin, Jonathan; Detilleux, Johann; Graber, Hans; Moroni, Paolo; Taminiau, Bernard; Mainil, Jacques G

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is recognised worldwide as an important pathogen causing contagious acute and chronic bovine mastitis. Chronic mastitis account for a significant part of all bovine cases and represent an important economic problem for dairy producers. Several properties (biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular expression and group agr) are thought to be associated with this chronic status. In a previous study, we found the existence of two groups of strains based on the association of these features. The aim of the present work was to confirm on a large international and non-related collection of strains the existence of these clusters and to associate them with case history records. In addition, the genomes of eight strains were sequenced to study the genomic differences between strains of each cluster. The results confirmed the existence of both groups based on capsular typing, intracellular survival and agr-typing: strains cap8-positive, belonging to agr group II, showing a low invasion rate and strains cap5-positive, belonging to agr group I, showing a high invasion rate. None of the two clusters were associated with the chronic status of the cow. When comparing the genomes of strains belonging to both clusters, the genes specific to the group "cap5-agrI" would suggest that these strains are better adapted to live in hostile environment. The existence of these two groups is highly important as they may represent two clusters that are adapted differently to the host and/or the surrounding environment.

  7. Detection of biofilm related genes, classical enterotoxin genes and agr typing among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine with subclinical mastitis in southwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Khoramrooz, Seyed Sajjad; Mansouri, Fariba; Marashifard, Masoud; Malek Hosseini, Seyed Ali Asghar; Akbarian Chenarestane-Olia, Fereshteh; Ganavehei, Banafsheh; Gharibpour, Farzaneh; Shahbazi, Ardavan; Mirzaii, Mehdi; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus by producing biofilm and facilitating chronic infection is a common cause of mastitis in cows and thereby can cause food poisoning by production of enterotoxins in milk. The agr typing method is an important tool for epidemiological investigation about S. aureus. The aims of the present study were to detect biofilm related genes, 5 classical enterotoxin genes and the agr types among S. aureus isolates. The ability of S. aureus isolates to produce biofilm was evaluated by modified CRA plate. Six biofilm related adhesion genes (icaD, icaA, fnbA, bap, clfA and cna), five classical enterotoxin genes (sea, seb, sec, sed and see) and tst-1 gene were detected by PCR methods. Multiplex-PCR was used to determination of the agr groups. 55 out of 80(68.8%) S. aureus isolates were biofilm producer. The icaD gene was detected in 70 (87.5%) of isolates. The prevalence rates of fnbA, icaA, clfA, cna and bap were 72.5, 56.25, 50, 22.5, and 5% respectively. The agr group I and III were detected in 57.5% 25% of studied isolates. The sea, sed and tst-1 genes were found in 10%, 7.5% and 1.25% of isolates respectively. The majority of S. aureus were able to produce biofilm. Significant associations were observed between presence of the icaD, icaA, fnbA, clfA and the cna genes as well as biofilm formation. The present study revealed that isolates with the agr type III are more potent for biofilm production. Our data supported a possible link between the agr types and certain SE genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pentose sugars inhibit metabolism and increase expression of an AgrD-type cyclic pentapeptide in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Verbeke, Tobin J.; Giannone, Richard J.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Significant hurdles exist in efforts to domesticate and industrialize a microbial species for biotechnological application as specific metabolic functions found in natural communities disappear in axenic cultures. For the lignocellulose-deconstructing specialist Clostridium thermocellum, the catabolism of hemicellulose-derived pentoses, which the bacterium cannot ferment, is one such function. Here, we report that various xylo-oligomers significantly inhibit C. thermocellum metabolism and growth and that microbe-sugar interactions occur across multiple dimensions. First, stable isotope metabolomics confirmed C. thermocellum s ability to transport and metabolize pentose sugars. This transport occurs, at least in part, through the ATP-dependent transporter, CbpD. Secondly, xylose is an electronmore » sink for C. thermocellum metabolism leading to the production of xylitol. Deletion of Clo1313_0076, annotated as a xylitol dehydrogenase, reduced the total production and molar xylitol yields by 41% and 46%, respectively. However, it also altered the relative end-product distribution patterns confirming that external electron acceptors may influence the bacterium s redox metabolism to a greater extent than previously considered. Finally, xylose-induced inhibition corresponds with the up-regulation and biogenesis of an AgrD-type, lactone cyclized pentapeptide signaling molecule; which is the first report of an AgrD-type signaling peptide in any thermophile. Addition of synthetic versions of the cyclic peptide inhibited cultures grown in the absence of xylose, but had no effect on cultures already inhibited by the pentose sugar. Together, our findings identify that C. thermocellum has evolved previously unrecognized strategies to cope with C5-sugars, but the absence of a native catabolic sink negatively affects strain metabolism and growth.« less

  9. AGR-1 Thermocouple Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Einerson

    2012-05-01

    This report documents an effort to analyze measured and simulated data obtained in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel irradiation test program conducted in the INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. The work follows up on a previous study (Pham and Einerson, 2010), in which statistical analysis methods were applied for AGR-1 thermocouple data qualification. The present work exercises the idea that, while recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to further improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the combined analysis of measured and simulation data can generate insights about simulation model uncertainty that can be useful for model improvement. This report also describes an experimental control procedure to maintain fuel target temperature in the future AGR tests using regression relationships that include simulation results. The report is organized into four chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, overview of AGR-1 measured data, and overview of physics and thermal simulation, including modeling assumptions and uncertainties. A brief summary of statistical analysis methods developed in (Pham and Einerson 2010) for AGR-1 measured data qualification within NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) is also included for completeness. Chapters 2-3 describe and discuss cases, in which the combined use of experimental and simulation data is realized. A set of issues associated with measurement and modeling uncertainties resulted from the combined analysis are identified. This includes demonstration that such a combined analysis led to important insights for reducing uncertainty in presentation of AGR-1 measured data (Chapter 2) and interpretation of

  10. Structure-Function Analyses of a Staphylococcus epidermidis Autoinducing Peptide Reveals Motifs Critical for AgrC-type Receptor Modulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tian; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Paharik, Alexandra E; Horswill, Alexander R; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-07-15

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is frequently implicated in human infections associated with indwelling medical devices due to its ubiquity in the skin flora and formation of robust biofilms. The accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing (QS) system plays a prominent role in the establishment of biofilms and infection by this bacterium. Agr activation is mediated by the binding of a peptide signal (or autoinducing peptide, AIP) to its cognate AgrC receptor. Many questions remain about the role of QS in S. epidermidis infections, as well as in mixed-microbial populations on a host, and chemical modulators of its agr system could provide novel insights into this signaling network. The AIP ligand provides an initial scaffold for the development of such probes; however, the structure-activity relationships (SARs) for activation of S. epidermidis AgrC receptors by AIPs are largely unknown. Herein, we report the first SAR analyses of an S. epidermidis AIP by performing systematic alanine and d-amino acid scans of the S. epidermidis AIP-I. On the basis of these results, we designed and identified potent, pan-group inhibitors of the AgrC receptors in the three S. epidermidis agr groups, as well as a set of AIP-I analogs capable of selective AgrC inhibition in either specific S. epidermidis agr groups or in another common staphylococcal species, S. aureus. In addition, we uncovered a non-native peptide agonist of AgrC-I that can strongly inhibit S. epidermidis biofilm growth. Together, these synthetic analogs represent new and readily accessible probes for investigating the roles of QS in S. epidermidis colonization and infections.

  11. Influence of the AgrC-AgrA complex on the response time of Staphylococcus aureus quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sandeep K; Rajasree, Kalagiri; Fasim, Aneesa; Arakere, Gayathri; Gopal, Balasubramanian

    2014-08-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus agr quorum-sensing system plays a major role in the transition from the persistent to the virulent phenotype. S. aureus agr type I to IV strains are characterized by mutations in the sensor domain of the histidine kinase AgrC and differences in the sequences of the secreted autoinducing peptides (AIP). Here we demonstrate that interactions between the cytosolic domain of AgrC (AgrCCyto) and the response regulator domain of AgrA (AgrARR) dictate the spontaneity of the cellular response to AIP stimuli. The crystal structure of AgrCCyto provided a basis for a mechanistic model of AgrC-AgrA interactions. This model enabled an analysis of the biochemical and biophysical parameters of AgrC-AgrA interactions in the context of the conformational features of the AgrC-AgrA complex. This analysis revealed distinct sequence and conformational features that determine the affinity, specificity, and kinetics of the phosphotransfer reaction. This step, which governs the response time for transcriptional reengineering triggered by an AIP stimulus, is independent of the agr type and similar for agonist and antagonist stimuli. These experimental data could serve as a basis on which to validate simulations of the quorum-sensing response and for strategies that employ the agr quorum-sensing system to combat biofilm formation in S. aureus infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Difference in agr dysfunction and reduced vancomycin susceptibility between MRSA bacteremia involving SCCmec types IV/IVa and I-III.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hee-Chang; Kang, Seung-Ji; Choi, Su-Mi; Park, Kyung-Hwa; Shin, Jong-Hee; Choy, Hyon E; Jung, Sook-In; Kim, Hong Bin

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction of agr, with reduced susceptibility or hetero-resistance to vancomycin, is thought to be associated with a worse outcome of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (MRSAB). However, the difference in agr dysfunction according to the SCCmec type in MRSA infection is undetermined. We compared the prevalence of agr dysfunction, reduced vancomycin susceptibility and the outcomes of SCCmec IV/IVa and I-III MRSAB. The study included 307 cases of MRSAB. SCCmec types were determined by multiplex PCR. The clinical and microbiological features and outcomes of 58 SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB were compared with those of 249 SCCmec I-III MRSAB. Compared with SCCmec I-III MRSAB, SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB was associated with lower rates of agr dysfunction (3% vs. 43%), vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 2 µg/mL (3% vs. 15%), and hetero-resistance to vancomycin (0% vs. 8%) (all P<0.05). However, the 30-day and S. aureus-related mortality in patients with SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB were not different from those in patients with SCCmec I-III MRSAB in multivariate analyses (HR 1.168, 95% CI 0.705-1.938; HR 1.025, 95% CI 0.556-1.889). SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB was associated with lower rates of agr dysfunction and hetero-resistance to vancomycin and a lower vancomycin MIC, compared with SCCmec I-III MRSAB. However, the outcomes of SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB did not differ from those of SCCmec I-III MRSAB.

  13. Difference in agr Dysfunction and Reduced Vancomycin Susceptibility between MRSA Bacteremia Involving SCCmec Types IV/IVa and I–III

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Su-Mi; Park, Kyung-Hwa; Shin, Jong-Hee; Choy, Hyon E.; Jung, Sook-In; Kim, Hong Bin

    2012-01-01

    Background Dysfunction of agr, with reduced susceptibility or hetero-resistance to vancomycin, is thought to be associated with a worse outcome of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (MRSAB). However, the difference in agr dysfunction according to the SCCmec type in MRSA infection is undetermined. We compared the prevalence of agr dysfunction, reduced vancomycin susceptibility and the outcomes of SCCmec IV/IVa and I–III MRSAB. Methods The study included 307 cases of MRSAB. SCCmec types were determined by multiplex PCR. The clinical and microbiological features and outcomes of 58 SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB were compared with those of 249 SCCmec I–III MRSAB. Results Compared with SCCmec I–III MRSAB, SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB was associated with lower rates of agr dysfunction (3% vs. 43%), vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 2 µg/mL (3% vs. 15%), and hetero-resistance to vancomycin (0% vs. 8%) (all P<0.05). However, the 30-day and S. aureus-related mortality in patients with SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB were not different from those in patients with SCCmec I–III MRSAB in multivariate analyses (HR 1.168, 95% CI 0.705–1.938; HR 1.025, 95% CI 0.556–1.889). Conclusions SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB was associated with lower rates of agr dysfunction and hetero-resistance to vancomycin and a lower vancomycin MIC, compared with SCCmec I–III MRSAB. However, the outcomes of SCCmec IV/IVa MRSAB did not differ from those of SCCmec I–III MRSAB. PMID:23152862

  14. Characterization of structural elements in native autoinducing peptides and non-native analogues that permit the differential modulation of AgrC-type quorum sensing receptors in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tal-Gan, Yftah; Ivancic, Monika; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-01-07

    Staphylococcus aureus uses short macrocyclic peptides (i.e., autoinducing peptides, or AIPs) to assess its local population density in a cell-cell signaling mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). At high cell numbers, this pathogen can initiate many virulent behaviors that allow for the establishment of infection. Binding of the AIP signal to its cognate transmembrane AgrC-type receptor is a critical event in the QS signaling cascade; consequently, interference of AIP:receptor interactions may have the potential to prevent and eradicate certain S. aureus infections. To date, four pairs of AIP:AgrC receptors have been identified in S. aureus, each pair being utilized by a specific S. aureus group (I-IV). Other staphylococcal species also use closely related, but distinct, AIP:AgrC pairs to control QS. We seek to develop non-native ligands capable of intercepting AIP:AgrC binding in each S. aureus group and in related species. As these bacteria may use their respective AIP signal to attenuate the QS systems of other groups/species, such ligands would provide valuable chemical tools to probe possible interference mechanisms in a range of contexts. In the current study, we used solution-phase NMR techniques to characterize the 3-D structures of a set of known native and non-native peptides that have differential modulatory activity in certain AgrC receptors. Analysis of these structures revealed several distinct structural motifs that belay differential activity in selected S. aureus AgrC receptors (i.e., AgrC-I, AgrC-II, and AgrC-III). The results of this study can be leveraged for the design of new synthetic ligands with enhanced selectivities and potencies for these AgrC receptors.

  15. AGR-1, AGR-2 and AGR-3/4 Dimensional Change Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Herberger, Sarah E.

    2016-02-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been completed in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory in support of qualification and development of tristructural isotropic fuel. Each AGR test consists of multiple independently controlled and monitored capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in the graphite, enabling temperature control. The fuel compacts are composed of fuel particles surrounded by a graphitic A3 matrix material. Dimensional change in AGR fuel compacts is vital because the swelling or shrinkage affects the size of the gas gaps that are used to control temperatures. Analysis of dimensional change in the AGR fuel compacts is needed to establish the variables directly relating to compact shrinkage. The variables initially identified for consideration were matrix density, compact density, fuel packing fraction, uranium loading, fuel particle diameter, cumulative fast neutron fluence, and volume average time average fuel temperature. In addition to the data available from the AGR experiments, the analysis included specimens formed from the same A3 matrix material used in Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiments, which provide graphite creep data during irradiation for design and licensing purposes. The primary purpose of including the AGC specimens was to encompass dimensional behavior at zero packing fraction, zero uranium loading, and zero particle diameter. All possible combinations of first-order variable regressions were considered in the analysis. The study focused on identifying the best regression models for percent change in diameter, length, and volume. Bootstrap analysis was used to ensure the resulting regression models were robust and well-performing. The variables identified as very significant in predicting change in one or more dimensions (diameter, length, and volume) are volume average time average temperature, fast fluence

  16. Analysis of virulence genes and accessory gene regulator (agr) types among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in Iran.

    PubMed

    Cheraghi, Sara; Pourgholi, Leyla; Shafaati, Maryam; Fesharaki, Shirinsadat Hashemi; Jalali, Arash; Nosrati, Rahim; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali

    2017-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are a major cause of hospital-acquired infections and are considered a serious public health concern. MRSA isolates have abundant virulence factors that are the basis for their pathogenicity. The accessory gene regulator (agr) locus co-ordinates the expression of these genes. The aim of this study was to determine the presence and frequency of various virulence genes encoding enterotoxins and adhesins as well as to identify agr specificity groups in MRSA isolates. This descriptive study included a total of 296 MRSA strains isolated from clinical samples collected in Tehran Heart Center (Tehran, Iran) between October 2004 and March 2013. Following DNA extraction, PCR-based assays were used to evaluate the presence of various virulence genes. IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows v.21.0 was used for statistical analysis. The results indicated that the most frequent toxin genes were see (120/296; 40.5%), followed by sea (79/296; 26.7%); the other genes were encoded less frequently. The presence of seb and seh was not found in any of the isolates. Furthermore, the most frequent adhesin genes were clfA, spa, cna, map/eap and bbp, found in 281 (94.9%), 275 (92.9%), 267 (90.2%), 265 (89.5%) and 264 (89.2%) isolates, respectively. The majority of isolates belonged to agr group I (53.0%), followed by agr group III (1.4%). None of the isolates belonged to agr group II. The relatively high frequency of various virulence genes suggests the emergence and pathogenic potential of MRSA isolates containing these genes in the study area. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Safety testing of AGR-2 UO2 compacts 3-3-2 and 3-4-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D.; Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.

    2015-09-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is in progress on tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated-particle fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program second irradiation experiment (AGR-2) [Collin 2014]. The AGR-2 PIE will build upon new information and understanding acquired throughout the recently-concluded six-year AGR-1 PIE campaign [Demkowicz et al. 2015] and establish a database for the different AGR-2 fuel designs.

  18. AGR-2 and AGR-3/4 Release-to-Birth Ratio Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh T.; Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Scates, Dawn M.; Maki, John T.; Petti, David A.

    2014-09-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation tests is being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in support of development and qualification of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) low enriched fuel used in the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). Each AGR test consists of multiple independently controlled and monitored capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel shell. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in the graphite enabling temperature control. AGR configuration and irradiation conditions are based on prismatic HTGR technology that is distinguished primarily through use of helium coolant, a low-power-density ceramic core capable of withstanding very high temperatures, and TRISO coated particle fuel. Thus, these tests provide valuable irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes.

  19. AGR-2 Data Qualification Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Abbott

    2010-09-01

    Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to manage and document VHTR data qualification, for storage of the data in a readily accessible electronic form, and to assist in the analysis and presentation of the data. This document gives the status of NDMAS processing and qualification of data associated with the initial reactor cycle (147A) of the second Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-2) experiment which began on June 21, 2010. Because it is early in the AGR-2 experiment, data from only two AGR-2 data streams are reported on: Fuel Fabrication and Fuel Irradiation data. As of August 1, 2010, approximately 311,000 irradiation data records have been stored in NDMAS, and qualification tests are in progress. Preliminary information indicates that TC 2 in Capsule 2 failed prior to start of the experiment, and NDMAS testing has thus far identified only two invalid data values from the METSO data collection system Data from the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) are not currently processed until after reactor cycle shutdown and have not yet been received. A description of the ATR operating conditions data associated with the AGR-2 experiment (e.g., power levels) are summarized in the AGR-1 data qualification report (INL/EXT-09-16460). Since ATR data are collected under ATR program data quality requirements (i.e., outside the VHTR program), the NGNP program and NDMAS do not take additional actions to qualify these data other than NDMAS capture testing. Data qualification of graphite characterization data collected under the Graphite Technology Development Project is reported in a separate status report (Hull 2010).

  20. Molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from patients with bacteremia based on MLST, SCCmec, spa, and agr locus types analysis.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Nasiri, Mohammad Javad; Goudarzi, Hossein; Sajadi Nia, Raheleh; Dabiri, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    The widespread emergence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as a common cause of nosocomial infections, is becoming a serious concern in global public health. The objective of the present study was to investigate antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, frequency of virulence genes and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from patients with bacteremia. A total of 128 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected during February 2015 to January 2016. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was assessed using the disk diffusion method. Conventional PCR was performed for the detection of adhesion (can, bbp, ebp, fnbB, fnbA, clfB, clfA) and toxin (etb, eta, pvl, tst) encoding genes, determining the agr type, SCCmec, MLST and spa typing of the isolates. All the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found to be sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and vancomycin. Resistance to the tested antibiotics varied from 97.7% for penicillin to 24.2% for mupirocin. The rate of multi drug resistance (MDR) in the present study was 97.7%. The most commonly detected toxin and adhesion genes were tst (58.6%), and clfB (100%), respectively. The majority of SCCmec III isolates were found in agr group I while SCCmec IV and II isolates were distributed among agr group III. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of the MRSA isolates showed five different sequence types: ST239 (43%), ST22 (39.8%), ST585 (10.9%), ST45 (3.9%) and ST240 (2.3%). All of the pvl positive strains belonged to ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 clone and were MDR. Among different 7 spa types, the most common were t790 (27.3%), t037 (21.9%), and t030 (14.1%). spa types t016, t924 and spa type t383 were reported for the first time from Asia and Iran, respectively. It was shown that spa types circulating in the studied hospitals varied which support the need to perform future surveillance studies in order to understand

  1. Pin-Type Gas Cooled Reactor for Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a point design for a pin-type Gas-Cooled Reactor concept that uses a fuel pin design similar to the SP100 fuel pin. The Gas-Cooled Reactor is designed to operate at 100 kWe for 7 years plus have a reduced power mode of 20% power for a duration of 5 years. The power system uses a gas-cooled, UN-fueled, pin-type reactor to heat He/Xe gas that flows directly into a recuperated Brayton system to produce electricity. Heat is rejected to space via a thermal radiator that unfolds in space. The reactor contains approximately 154 kg of 93.15 % enriched UN in 313 fuel pins. The fuel is clad with rhenium-lined Nb-1Zr. The pressures vessel and ducting are cooled by the 900 K He/Xe gas inlet flow or by thermal radiation. This permits all pressure boundaries to be made of superalloy metals rather than refractory metals, which greatly reduces the cost and development schedule required by the project. The reactor contains sufficient rhenium (a neutron poison) to make the reactor subcritical under water immersion accidents without the use of internal shutdown rods. The mass of the reactor and reflectors is about 750 kg.

  2. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise P. Collin

    2012-06-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one

  3. Nox2 Modification of LDL Is Essential for Optimal Apolipoprotein B-mediated Control of agr Type III Staphylococcus aureus Quorum-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Pamela R.; Elmore, Bradley O.; Spang, Cynthia H.; Alexander, Susan M.; Manifold-Wheeler, Brett C.; Castleman, Moriah J.; Daly, Seth M.; Peterson, M. Michal; Sully, Erin K.; Femling, Jon K.; Otto, Michael; Horswill, Alexander R.; Timmins, Graham S.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contains an autoinducing quorum-sensing system encoded within the agr operon that coordinates expression of virulence genes required for invasive infection. Allelic variation within agr has generated four agr specific groups, agr I–IV, each of which secretes a distinct autoinducing peptide pheromone (AIP1-4) that drives agr signaling. Because agr signaling mediates a phenotypic change in this pathogen from an adherent colonizing phenotype to one associated with considerable tissue injury and invasiveness, we postulated that a significant contribution to host defense against tissue damaging and invasive infections could be provided by innate immune mechanisms that antagonize agr signaling. We determined whether two host defense factors that inhibit AIP1-induced agrI signaling, Nox2 and apolipoprotein B (apoB), also contribute to innate control of AIP3-induced agrIII signaling. We hypothesized that apoB and Nox2 would function differently against AIP3, which differs from AIP1 in amino acid sequence and length. Here we show that unlike AIP1, AIP3 is resistant to direct oxidant inactivation by Nox2 characteristic ROS. Rather, the contribution of Nox2 to defense against agrIII signaling is through oxidation of LDL. ApoB in the context of oxLDL, and not LDL, provides optimal host defense against S. aureus agrIII infection by binding the secreted signaling peptide, AIP3, and preventing expression of the agr-driven virulence factors which mediate invasive infection. ApoB within the context of oxLDL also binds AIP 1-4 and oxLDL antagonizes agr signaling by all four agr alleles. Our results suggest that Nox2-mediated oxidation of LDL facilitates a conformational change in apoB to one sufficient for binding and sequestration of all four AIPs, demonstrating the interdependence of apoB and Nox2 in host defense against agr signaling. These data reveal a novel role for oxLDL in host defense against S. aureus quorum-sensing signaling. PMID:23459693

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Argon Plasma against 78 Genetically Different (mecA, luk-P, agr or Capsular Polysaccharide Type) Staphylococcus aureus Strains.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Rutger; Lührman, Anne; Holtfreter, Silva; Kolata, Julia; Radke, Dörte; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on the antimicrobial activity of cold atmospheric pressure argon plasma showed varying effects against mecA+ or mecA-Staphylococcus aureus strains. This observation may have important clinical and epidemiological implications. Here, the antibacterial activity of argon plasma was investigated against 78 genetically different S. aureus strains, stratified by mecA, luk-P, agr1-4, or the cell wall capsule polysaccharide types 5 and 8. kINPen09® served as the plasma source for all experiments. On agar plates, mecA+luk-P-S. aureus strains showed a decreased susceptibility against plasma compared to other S. aureus strains. This study underlines the high complexity of microbial defence against antimicrobial treatment and confirms a previously reported strain-dependent susceptibility of S. aureus to plasma treatment. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. AGR-1 Safety Test Predictions using the PARFUME code

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2012-05-01

    The PARFUME modeling code was used to predict failure probability of TRISO-coated fuel particles and diffusion of fission products through these particles during safety tests following the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program (AGR-1). These calculations support the AGR-1 Safety Testing Experiment, which is part of the PIE effort on AGR-1. Modeling of the AGR-1 Safety Test Predictions includes a 620-day irradiation followed by a 300-hour heat-up phase of selected AGR-1 compacts. Results include fuel failure probability, palladium penetration, and fractional release of fission products. Results show that no particle failure is predicted during irradiation or heat-up, and that fractional release of fission products is limited during irradiation but that it significantly increases during heat-up.

  6. AgrAbility Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... About AgrAbility State Projects Directory The Toolbox AT Database Resources Veterans & Beginning Farmers Communities of Interest News ... 800) 825-4264 Home About The Toolbox AT Database Resources Online Training Contact Us You are here: ...

  7. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  8. Epsilon-Toxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718 Is Dependent upon the agr Operon but Not the VirS/VirR Two-Component Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens type B and D strains cause enterotoxemias and enteritis in livestock after proliferating in the intestines and producing epsilon-toxin (ETX), alpha-toxin (CPA), and, usually, perfringolysin O (PFO). Although ETX is one of the most potent bacterial toxins, the regulation of ETX production by type B or D strains remains poorly understood. The present work determined that the type D strain CN3718 upregulates production of ETX upon close contact with enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This host cell-induced upregulation of ETX expression was mediated at the transcriptional level. Using an isogenic agrB null mutant and complemented strain, the agr operon was shown to be required when CN3718 produces ETX in broth culture or, via a secreted signal consistent with a quorum-sensing (QS) effect, upregulates ETX production upon contact with host cells. These findings provide the first insights into the regulation of ETX production, as well as additional evidence that the Agr-like QS system functions as a global regulator of C. perfringens toxin production. Since it was proposed previously that the Agr-like QS system regulates C. perfringens gene expression via the VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system, an isogenic virR null mutant of CN3718 was constructed to evaluate the importance of VirS/VirR for CN3718 toxin production. This mutation affected production of CPA and PFO, but not ETX, by CN3718. These results provide the first indication that C. perfringens toxin expression regulation by the Agr-like quorum-sensing system may not always act via the VirS/VirR two-component system. PMID:22167225

  9. Optimized Battery-Type Reactor Primary System Design Utilizing Lead

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Lee, Il S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    A number of small and medium size reactors are being developed worldwide as well as large electricity generation reactors for co-generation, district heating or desalination. The Seoul National University has started to develop 23 MWth BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System) as a multi-purpose reactor. BORIS is an integral-type optimized fast reactor with an ultra long life core. BORIS is being designed to meet the Generation IV nuclear energy system goals of sustainability, safety, reliability and economics. Major features of BORIS include 20 consecutive years of operation without refueling; elimination of an intermediate heat transport loop and main coolant pump; open core without individual subassemblies; inherent negative reactivity feedback; and inherent load following capability. Its one mission is to provide incremental electricity generation to match the needs of developing nations and especially remote communities without major electrical grid connections. BORIS consists of a reactor module, heat exchanger, coolant module, guard vessel, reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS), secondary system, containment and the seismic isolation. BORIS is designed to generate 10 MWe with the resulting thermal efficiency of 45 %. BORIS uses lead as the primary system coolant because of the inherent safety of the material. BORIS is coupled with a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle as the secondary system to gain a high cycle efficiency in the range of 45 %. The reference core consists of 757 fuel rods without assembly with an active core height of 0.8 m. The BORIS core consists of single enrichment zone composed of a Pu-MA (minor actinides)-U-N fuel and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel clad. This study is intended to set up appropriate reactor vessel geometry by performing thermal hydraulic analysis on RVACS using computational fluid dynamics codes; to examine the liquid metal coolant behavior along the subchannels; to find out whether the

  10. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson; Grant L. Hawkes

    2012-04-01

    This report documents an effort to quantify the uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) fuel irradiation experiment conducted in the INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, the results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the temperature simulation data for AGR tests can be used for validation of the fuel transport and fuel performance simulation models. The crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. The report is organized into three chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program and provides overviews of AGR-1 measured data, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, and thermal simulation. Chapters 2 describes the uncertainty quantification procedure for temperature simulation data of the AGR-1 experiment, namely, (i) identify and quantify uncertainty sources; (ii) perform sensitivity analysis for several thermal test conditions; (iii) use uncertainty propagation to quantify overall response temperature uncertainty. A set of issues associated with modeling uncertainties resulting from the expert assessments are identified. This also includes the experimental design to estimate the main effects and interactions of the important thermal model parameters. Chapter 3 presents the overall uncertainty results for the six AGR-1 capsules. This includes uncertainties for the daily volume-average and peak fuel temperatures, daily average temperatures at TC locations, and time-average volume-average and time-average peak fuel temperatures.

  11. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson; Grant L. Hawkes

    2013-03-01

    This report documents an effort to quantify the uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) fuel irradiation experiment conducted in the INL’s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) R&D program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR-1 test, the results of the numerical simulations can be used in combination with the statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. Additionally, the temperature simulation data for AGR tests can be used for validation of the fuel transport and fuel performance simulation models. The crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. The report is organized into three chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification program and provides overviews of AGR-1 measured data, AGR-1 test configuration and test procedure, and thermal simulation. Chapters 2 describes the uncertainty quantification procedure for temperature simulation data of the AGR-1 experiment, namely, (i) identify and quantify uncertainty sources; (ii) perform sensitivity analysis for several thermal test conditions; (iii) use uncertainty propagation to quantify overall response temperature uncertainty. A set of issues associated with modeling uncertainties resulting from the expert assessments are identified. This also includes the experimental design to estimate the main effects and interactions of the important thermal model parameters. Chapter 3 presents the overall uncertainty results for the six AGR-1 capsules. This includes uncertainties for the daily volume-average and peak fuel temperatures, daily average temperatures at TC locations, and time-average volume-average and time-average peak fuel temperatures.

  12. Determining Reactor Fuel Type from Continuous Antineutrino Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffke, Patrick; Huber, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the ability of an antineutrino detector to determine the fuel type of a reactor. A hypothetical 5-ton antineutrino detector is placed 25 m from the core and measures the spectral shape and rate of antineutrinos emitted by fission fragments in the core for a number of 90-d periods. Our results indicate that four major fuel types can be differentiated from the variation of fission fractions over the irradiation time with a true positive probability of detection at approximately 95%. In addition, we demonstrate that antineutrinos can identify the burnup at which weapons-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel would be reduced to reactor-grade MOX, on average, providing assurance that plutonium-disposition goals are met. We also investigate removal scenarios where plutonium is purposefully diverted from a mixture of MOX and low-enriched uranium fuel. Finally, we discuss how our analysis is impacted by a spectral distortion around 6 MeV observed in the antineutrino spectrum measured from commercial power reactors.

  13. An agr Quorum Sensing System That Regulates Granulose Formation and Sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Elisabeth; Scott, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum has considerable biotechnological potential due to its ability to produce solvents as fermentation products, in particular the biofuel butanol. Its genome contains a putative agr locus, agrBDCA, known in staphylococci to constitute a cyclic peptide-based quorum sensing system. In staphylococci, agrBD is required for the generation of a peptide signal that, upon extracellular accumulation, is sensed by an agrCA-encoded two-component system. Using ClosTron technology, agrB, agrC, and agrA mutants of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 were generated and phenotypically characterized. Mutants and wild type displayed similar growth kinetics and no apparent differences in solvent formation under the conditions tested. However, the number of heat-resistant endospores formed by the mutants in liquid culture was reduced by about one order of magnitude. On agar-solidified medium, spore formation was more strongly affected, particularly in agrA and agrC mutants. Similarly, accumulation of the starch-like storage compound granulose was almost undetectable in colonies of agrB, agrA, and agrC mutants. Importantly, these defects could be genetically complemented, demonstrating that they were directly linked to agr inactivation. A diffusible factor produced by agrBD-expressing strains was found to restore granulose and spore formation in the agrB mutant. Furthermore, a synthetic cyclic peptide, designed on the basis of the C. acetobutylicum AgrD sequence, was also capable of complementing the defects of the agrB mutant when added exogenously to the culture. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that agr-dependent quorum sensing is involved in the regulation of sporulation and granulose formation in C. acetobutylicum. PMID:22179241

  14. An agr quorum sensing system that regulates granulose formation and sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Elisabeth; Scott, Jamie; Minton, Nigel P; Winzer, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    The Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum has considerable biotechnological potential due to its ability to produce solvents as fermentation products, in particular the biofuel butanol. Its genome contains a putative agr locus, agrBDCA, known in staphylococci to constitute a cyclic peptide-based quorum sensing system. In staphylococci, agrBD is required for the generation of a peptide signal that, upon extracellular accumulation, is sensed by an agrCA-encoded two-component system. Using ClosTron technology, agrB, agrC, and agrA mutants of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 were generated and phenotypically characterized. Mutants and wild type displayed similar growth kinetics and no apparent differences in solvent formation under the conditions tested. However, the number of heat-resistant endospores formed by the mutants in liquid culture was reduced by about one order of magnitude. On agar-solidified medium, spore formation was more strongly affected, particularly in agrA and agrC mutants. Similarly, accumulation of the starch-like storage compound granulose was almost undetectable in colonies of agrB, agrA, and agrC mutants. Importantly, these defects could be genetically complemented, demonstrating that they were directly linked to agr inactivation. A diffusible factor produced by agrBD-expressing strains was found to restore granulose and spore formation in the agrB mutant. Furthermore, a synthetic cyclic peptide, designed on the basis of the C. acetobutylicum AgrD sequence, was also capable of complementing the defects of the agrB mutant when added exogenously to the culture. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that agr-dependent quorum sensing is involved in the regulation of sporulation and granulose formation in C. acetobutylicum.

  15. Scale Effects on Magnet Systems of Heliotron-Type Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Imagawa; A, Sagara

    2005-02-01

    For power plants heliotron-type reactors have attractive advantages, such as no current-disruptions, no current-drive, and wide space between helical coils for the maintenance of in-vessel components. However, one disadvantage is that a major radius has to be large enough to obtain large Q-value or to produce sufficient space for blankets. Although the larger radius is considered to increase the construction cost, the influence has not been understood clearly, yet. Scale effects on superconducting magnet systems have been estimated under the conditions of a constant energy confinement time and similar geometrical parameters. Since the necessary magnetic field with a larger radius becomes lower, the increase rate of the weight of the coil support to the major radius is less than the square root. The necessary major radius will be determined mainly by the blanket space. The appropriate major radius will be around 13 m for a reactor similar to the Large Helical Device (LHD).

  16. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycle 154B

    SciTech Connect

    Binh Pham; Jeff Einerson

    2014-01-01

    This report provides the data qualification status of Advanced Gas Reactor-2 (AGR-2) fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 154B as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). This is the last cycle of AGR-2 irradiation, as the test train was pulled from the ATR core during the outage portion of ATR Cycle 155A. The AGR-2 data streams addressed in this report include thermocouple (TC) temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rates including new Fission Product Monitoring (FPM) downstream flows from Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) detectors, pressure, and moisture content), and FPMS data (release rates and release-to-birth rate ratios [R/Bs]) for each of the six capsules in the AGR-2 experiment. The final data qualification status for these data streams is determined by a Data Review Committee (DRC) comprised of AGR technical leads, Sitewide Quality Assurance (QA), and NDMAS analysts. The Data Review Committee reviewed the data acquisition process, considered whether the data met the requirements for data collection as specified in QA-approved Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) data collection plans, examined the results of NDMAS data testing and statistical analyses, and confirmed the qualification status of the data as given in this report.

  17. FABRICATION OF TUBE TYPE FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Loeb, E.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1959-02-01

    A method of fabricating a nuclear reactor fuel element is given. It consists essentially of fixing two tubes in concentric relationship with respect to one another to provide an annulus therebetween, filling the annulus with a fissionablematerial-containing powder, compacting the powder material within the annulus and closing the ends thereof. The powder material is further compacted by swaging the inner surface of the inner tube to increase its diameter while maintaining the original size of the outer tube. This process results in reduced fabrication costs of powdered fissionable material type fuel elements and a substantial reduction in the peak core temperatures while materially enhancing the heat removal characteristics.

  18. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, Melissa E.; Quek, Sue -Ing; True, Lawrence D.; ...

    2016-02-15

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. Normal organs express AGR2 and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact on the utility of AGR2 as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is, however, secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. The blood proteomes also contain no significantmore » peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting that little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression is lost in urothelial carcinoma, but 25% primary tumors retained AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer urine, which matched the frequency of AGR2-positive urothelial carcinoma. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. In addition to secretion, AGR2 is also localized to the cell surface. Thus, secretion/cell surface localization of AGR2 is pecific to cancer while expression itself is not. Lastly, since AGR2 is found in many solid tumor types, this tumor-associated antigen constitutes a highly promising therapeutic target.« less

  19. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Melissa E.; Quek, Sue -Ing; True, Lawrence D.; Seiler, Roland; Fleischmann, Achim; Bagryanova, Lora; Kim, Sara R.; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Rosser, Charles J.; Gao, Yuqian; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-02-15

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. Normal organs express AGR2 and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact on the utility of AGR2 as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is, however, secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. The blood proteomes also contain no significant peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting that little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression is lost in urothelial carcinoma, but 25% primary tumors retained AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer urine, which matched the frequency of AGR2-positive urothelial carcinoma. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. In addition to secretion, AGR2 is also localized to the cell surface. Thus, secretion/cell surface localization of AGR2 is pecific to cancer while expression itself is not. Lastly, since AGR2 is found in many solid tumor types, this tumor-associated antigen constitutes a highly promising therapeutic target.

  20. Overall plant concept for a tank-type fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Hideo; Davies, S.M.; Goodman, L.

    1984-01-01

    Japanese nuclear industries are expressing interest in the merits of the tank-type FBR as a large plant (demonstration) after JOYO (experimental, in operation) and MONJU (prototype, under construction). In response to this growing interest in a tank-type FBR demonstration plant, Hitachi has initiated a conceptual study of a 1000 MWe tank plant concept in collaboration with GE and Bechtel. Key objectives of this study have been: to select reliable and competitive tank plant concepts, with emphases on a seismic-resistant and compact tank reactor system;to select reliable shutdown heat removal system;and to identify R and D items needed for early 1990s construction. Design goals were defined as follows: capital costs must be less than twice, and as close as practical to 1.5 those of equivalent LWR plants;earthquake resistant structures to meet stringent Japanese seismic conditions must be as simple and reliable as practical;safety must be maintained at LWR-equivalent risks;and R and D needs must be limited to minimum cost for the limited time allowed. This paper summarizes the overall plant concepts with some selected topics, whereas detailed descriptions of the reactor assembly and the layout design are found in separate papers.

  1. Development of toroid-type HTS DC reactor series for HVDC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangmin; Go, Byeong-Soo; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Sung-kyu; Kim, Seokho; Lee, Sangjin; Oh, Yunsang; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes design specifications and performance of a toroid-type high-temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The first phase operation targets of the HTS DC reactor were 400 mH and 400 A. The authors have developed a real HTS DC reactor system during the last three years. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. The total system has been successfully developed and tested in connection with LCC type HVDC system. Now, the authors are studying a 400 mH, kA class toroid-type HTS DC reactor for the next phase research. The 1500 A class DC reactor system was designed using layered 13 mm GdBCO 2G HTS wire. The expected operating temperature is under 30 K. These fundamental data obtained through both works will usefully be applied to design a real toroid-type HTS DC reactor for grid application.

  2. AGR-1 Post Irradiation Examination Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew

    2015-08-01

    The post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-1 experiment was a multi-year, collaborative effort between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the performance of UCO (uranium carbide, uranium oxide) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel fabricated in the U.S. and irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor at INL to a peak burnup of 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom. This work involved a broad array of experiments and analyses to evaluate the level of fission product retention by the fuel particles and compacts (both during irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to simulate reactor accident conditions), investigate the kernel and coating layer morphology evolution and the causes of coating failure, and explore the migration of fission products through the coating layers. The results have generally confirmed the excellent performance of the AGR-1 fuel, first indicated during the irradiation by the observation of zero TRISO coated particle failures out of 298,000 particles in the experiment. Overall release of fission products was determined by PIE to have been relatively low during the irradiation. A significant finding was the extremely low levels of cesium released through intact coatings. This was true both during the irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to temperatures as high as 1800°C. Post-irradiation safety test fuel performance was generally excellent. Silver release from the particles and compacts during irradiation was often very high. Extensive microanalysis of fuel particles was performed after irradiation and after high-temperature safety testing. The results of particle microanalysis indicate that the UCO fuel is effective at controlling the oxygen partial pressure within the particle and limiting kernel migration. Post-irradiation examination has provided the final body of data that speaks to the quality of the AGR-1 fuel, building

  3. Differential abilities of capsulated and noncapsulated Staphylococcus aureus isolates from diverse agr groups to invade mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Buzzola, Fernanda R; Alvarez, Lucía P; Tuchscherr, Lorena P N; Barbagelata, María S; Lattar, Santiago M; Calvinho, Luis; Sordelli, Daniel O

    2007-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the bacterium most frequently isolated from milk of bovines with mastitis. Four allelic groups, which interfere with the regulatory activities among the different groups, have been identified in the accessory gene regulator (agr) system. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of the different agr groups in capsulated and noncapsulated S. aureus bacteria isolated from mastitic bovines in Argentina and whether a given agr group was associated with MAC-T cell invasion and in vivo persistence. Eighty-eight percent of the bovine S. aureus strains were classified in agr group I. The remainder belonged in agr groups II, III, and IV (2, 8, and 2%, respectively). By restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis after PCR amplification of the agr locus variable region, six agr restriction types were identified. All agr group I strains presented a unique allele (A/1), whereas strains from groups II, III, and IV exhibited more diversity. Bovine S. aureus strains defined as being in agr group I (capsulated or noncapsulated) showed significantly increased abilities to be internalized within MAC-T cells, compared with isolates from agr groups II, III, and IV. agr group II or IV S. aureus strains were cleared more efficiently than agr group I strains from the murine mammary gland. The results suggest that agr group I S. aureus strains are more efficiently internalized within epithelial cells and can persist in higher numbers in mammary gland tissue than S. aureus strains classified in agr group II, III, or IV.

  4. Seismic responses of a pool-type fast reactor with different core support designs

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W. )

    1989-01-01

    In designing the core support system for a pool-type fast reactor, there are many issues which must be considered in order to achieve an optimum and balanced design. These issues include safety, reliability, as well as costs. Several design options are possible to support the reactor core. Different core support options yield different frequency ranges and responses. Seismic responses of a large pool-type fast reactor incorporated with different core support designs have been investigated. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  5. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: 1. Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. 2. Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. 3. Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tristructural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S.-produced fuel.

  6. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel.

  7. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  8. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  9. Thorium Fuel Utilization Analysis on Small Long Life Reactor for Different Coolant Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    A small power reactor and long operation which can be deployed for less population and remote area has been proposed by the IAEA as a small and medium reactor (SMR) program. Beside uranium utilization, it can be used also thorium fuel resources for SMR as a part of optimalization of nuclear fuel as a “partner” fuel with uranium fuel. A small long-life reactor based on thorium fuel cycle for several reactor coolant types and several power output has been evaluated in the present study for 10 years period of reactor operation. Several key parameters are used to evaluate its effect to the reactor performances such as reactor criticality, excess reactivity, reactor burnup achievement and power density profile. Water-cooled types give higher criticality than liquid metal coolants. Liquid metal coolant for fast reactor system gives less criticality especially at beginning of cycle (BOC), which shows liquid metal coolant system obtains almost stable criticality condition. Liquid metal coolants are relatively less excess reactivity to maintain longer reactor operation than water coolants. In addition, liquid metal coolant gives higher achievable burnup than water coolant types as well as higher power density for liquid metal coolants.

  10. Supercritical CO2 direct cycle Gas Fast Reactor (SC-GFR) concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven Alan; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Al Rashdan, Ahmad; Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich; Vernon, Milton E.; Fleming, Darryn D.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) direct cycle gas fast reactor (SC-GFR) concept. The SC-GFR reactor concept was developed to determine the feasibility of a right size reactor (RSR) type concept using S-CO{sub 2} as the working fluid in a direct cycle fast reactor. Scoping analyses were performed for a 200 to 400 MWth reactor and an S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Although a significant amount of work is still required, this type of reactor concept maintains some potentially significant advantages over ideal gas-cooled systems and liquid metal-cooled systems. The analyses presented in this report show that a relatively small long-life reactor core could be developed that maintains decay heat removal by natural circulation. The concept is based largely on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) commercial power plants operated in the United Kingdom and other GFR concepts.

  11. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 x 1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below

  12. [Effects of outer type and built-in type straw bio-reactors on tomato growth and photosynthetic performance].

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Yu; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Zou, Zhi-Rong; Zhang, Jing; Yan, Fei

    2013-03-01

    Taking the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar "Kuiguan108" as test object, a comparative study was made on the effects of outer type and built-in type straw bio-reactors on the CO2 concentration, air relative humidity , air vapor pressure deficit in the solar greenhouse during the tomato growth over autumn-delayed cultivation as well as the effects of the bio-reactors on the tomato growth and photosynthetic performance. As compared with that in CK, the average CO2 concentration in the greenhouse with outer type straw bio-reactor at 9:30-11:30 and 14:30-15:00 on sunny days was increased significantly by 207. 3 and 103 micromol . mol-1 , respectively, and the ave-rage CO2 concentration in the greenhouse with built-in straw bio-reactor at 9:30-11:30 on sunny days was raised by 19.0 micromol . mol-1. Both the outer type and the built-in type straw bio-reactors promoted the tomato plant height growth and early flowering, enhanced the plant net photosynthetic rate and the yield per plant and per unit area significantly, and decreased the plant transpiration rate at the stages of vegetative growth and fruit- bearing significantly. Nevertheless, as compared with built-in type straw bio-reactor, outer type straw bio-reactor was more suitable for the autumn- delayed cultivation of tomato in solar greenhouse.

  13. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  14. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  15. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  16. Regulation of neurotoxin production and sporulation by a Putative agrBD signaling system in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Cooksley, Clare M; Davis, Ian J; Winzer, Klaus; Chan, Weng C; Peck, Michael W; Minton, Nigel P

    2010-07-01

    A significant number of genome sequences of Clostridium botulinum and related species have now been determined. In silico analysis of these data revealed the presence of two distinct agr loci (agr-1 and agr-2) in all group I strains, each encoding putative proteins with similarity to AgrB and AgrD of the well-studied Staphylococcus aureus agr quorum sensing system. In S. aureus, a small diffusible autoinducing peptide is generated from AgrD in a membrane-located processing event that requires AgrB. Here the characterization of both agr loci in the group I strain C. botulinum ATCC 3502 and of their homologues in a close relative, Clostridium sporogenes NCIMB 10696, is reported. In C. sporogenes NCIMB 10696, agr-1 and agr-2 appear to form transcriptional units that consist of agrB, agrD, and flanking genes of unknown function. Several of these flanking genes are conserved in Clostridium perfringens. In agreement with their proposed role in quorum sensing, both loci were maximally expressed during late-exponential-phase growth. Modulation of agrB expression in C. sporogenes was achieved using antisense RNA, whereas in C. botulinum, insertional agrD mutants were generated using ClosTron technology. In comparison to the wild-type strains, these strains exhibited drastically reduced sporulation and, for C. botulinum, also reduced production of neurotoxin, suggesting that both phenotypes are controlled by quorum sensing. Interestingly, while agr-1 appeared to control sporulation, agr-2 appeared to regulate neurotoxin formation.

  17. Developing the European Center of Competence on VVER-Type Nuclear Power Reactors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geraskin, Nikolay; Pironkov, Lyubomir; Kulikov, Evgeny; Glebov, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the European educational projects CORONA and CORONA-II which are dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of VVER-type nuclear power reactors technologies (Water-Water Energetic Reactor, WWER or VVER). The development of the European Center of Competence for…

  18. Fission product release during a LOCA in VVER-440/213-type reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sdouz, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In 1988, Austria initiated a research program to investigate the source term behavior of VVER-type reactors. Mainly, there are three design categories for VVER-type reactors. The first standardized 440-MW(electric) nuclear power plant was designated as VVER-440/MW(electric) nuclear power plant was designated as VVER-440/230. A somewhat more advanced model was designated as model V213. These reactors have six loops, isolation valves on each loop, horizontal steam generators, and hexagonal fuel assemblies. To prevent the release of fission products, the concept of local area compartmentalization is applied. The main difference between the two models is the existence of an emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and a bubbler-condenser tower in the newer model. In the 1970s, a 1000-MW(electric) reactor was designed and designated as VVER-1000. This unit has four loops housed in a containment-type structure with spray-type steam suppression. The Austrian program started with source term calculations for the VVEr-1000-type reactor. A TMLB{prime} and a S{sub 1}B accident sequence were calculated using the Source Term Code Package (STCP). In 1990, the source term analyses were extended to both models of the VVER-440-type reactors. In this paper, the results of the thermohydraulic part of the calculation for the VVER-440/213 reactor are presented.

  19. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  20. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sipaun, Susan; Usman, Shoaib

    2016-01-22

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system’s performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm{sup −3}. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR’s nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s{sup −1} from the 4” pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  1. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipaun, Susan; Usman, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U3Si2Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system's performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm-3. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR's nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s-1 from the 4" pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  2. REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    Thermonuclear reactors, methods, and apparatus are described for controlling and confining high temperature plasma. Main axial confining coils in combination with helical windings provide a rotational transform that avoids the necessity of a figure-eight shaped reactor tube. The helical windings provide a multipolar helical magnetic field transverse to the axis of the main axial confining coils so as to improve the effectiveness of the confining field by counteracting the tendency of the more central lines of force in the stellarator tube to exchange positions with the magnetic lines of force nearer the walls of the tube. (AEC)

  3. AGR2 is induced in asthma and promotes allergen-induced mucin overproduction.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Bradley W; Verhaeghe, Catherine; Park, Sung-Woo; Nguyenvu, Louis T; Huang, Xiaozhu; Zhen, Guohua; Erle, David J

    2012-08-01

    Mucins are gel-forming proteins that are responsible for the characteristic viscoelastic properties of mucus. Mucin overproduction is a hallmark of asthma, but the cellular requirements for airway mucin production are poorly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein anterior gradient homolog 2 (AGR2) is required for production of the intestinal mucin MUC2, but its role in the production of the airway mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B is not established. Microarray data were analyzed to examine the relationship between AGR2 and MUC5AC expression in asthma. Immunofluorescence was used to localize AGR2 in airway cells. Coimmunoprecipitation was used to identify AGR2-immature MUC5AC complexes. Agr2(-/-) mice were used to determine the role of AGR2 in allergic airway disease. AGR2 localized to the ER of MUC5AC- and MUC5B-producing airway cells and formed a complex with immature MUC5AC. AGR2 expression increased together with MUC5AC expression in airway epithelium from "Th2-high" asthmatics. Allergen-challenged Agr2(-/-) mice had greater than 50% reductions in MUC5AC and MUC5B proteins compared with allergen-challenged wild-type mice. Impaired mucin production in Agr2(-/-) mice was accompanied by an increase in the proportion of mucins contained within the ER and by evidence of ER stress in airway epithelium. This study shows that AGR2 increases with mucin overproduction in individuals with asthma and in mouse models of allergic airway disease. AGR2 interacts with immature mucin in the ER and loss of AGR2 impairs allergen-induced MUC5AC and MUC5B overproduction.

  4. In-reactor performance of LWR-type tritium targe rods

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D.; Paxton, M.M.; Crumbaugh, L.

    1992-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted several one-year irradiation tests of light-water reactor (LWR)-type tritium target rods. This report discusses these tests which have been sponsored by DOE`s Office of New Production Reactors. The first test, designated water capsule-I (WC-1), was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at DOE`s Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from November 1989 to December 1990. The test vehicle contained a single four-foot target rod within a pressurized water capsule. The capsule maintained the rod at PWR-type water temperature and pressure conditions.

  5. Probabilistic risk analysis of HCDA scenarios in a pool-type breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.J.; Mueller, C.J.; Rothman, A.B.; Chasanov, M.; Sevy, R.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Froehle, P.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Farhadieh, R.

    1985-01-01

    One potential design for the future generation of nuclear reactors is that of the breeder reactor. As with present-day reactors there is the necessity for demonstrating that such a reactor will be operable with very small risk to the public. As a result, a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) will be a valuable tool in the design of future nuclear plants. This paper presents a risk analysis performed to evaluate hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDAs) in a large, pool-type LMFBR, and how it was used to evaluate the reduction in risk brought about by the addition of various safety-related design options. It was shown that the base design met the NRC risk guidelines with some margin, and that a design option featuring emergency cooling of the reactor vessel greatly reduced the risk.

  6. Staphylococcus epidermidis agr quorum-sensing system: signal identification, cross talk, and importance in colonization.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael E; Todd, Daniel A; Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Paharik, Alexandra E; Van Dyke, Michael J; Büttner, Henning; Dunman, Paul M; Rohde, Holger; Cech, Nadja B; Fey, Paul D; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic pathogen that is one of the leading causes of medical device infections. Global regulators like the agr quorum-sensing system in this pathogen have received a limited amount of attention, leaving important questions unanswered. There are three agr types in S. epidermidis strains, but only one of the autoinducing peptide (AIP) signals has been identified (AIP-I), and cross talk between agr systems has not been tested. We structurally characterized all three AIP types using mass spectrometry and discovered that the AIP-II and AIP-III signals are 12 residues in length, making them the largest staphylococcal AIPs identified to date. S. epidermidis agr reporter strains were developed for each system, and we determined that cross-inhibitory interactions occur between the agr type I and II systems and between the agr type I and III systems. In contrast, no cross talk was observed between the type II and III systems. To further understand the outputs of the S. epidermidis agr system, an RNAIII mutant was constructed, and microarray studies revealed that exoenzymes (Ecp protease and Geh lipase) and low-molecular-weight toxins were downregulated in the mutant. Follow-up analysis of Ecp confirmed the RNAIII is required to induce protease activity and that agr cross talk modulates Ecp activity in a manner that mirrors the agr reporter results. Finally, we demonstrated that the agr system enhances skin colonization by S. epidermidis using a porcine model. This work expands our knowledge of S. epidermidis agr system function and will aid future studies on cell-cell communication in this important opportunistic pathogen. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Development of a neutronics calculation method for designing commercial type Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Shimazu, Y.; Hibi, K.; Fujimura, K.

    2012-07-01

    Under the R and D project to improve the modeling accuracy for the design of fast breeder reactors the authors are developing a neutronics calculation method for designing a large commercial type sodium- cooled fast reactor. The calculation method is established by taking into account the special features of the reactor such as the use of annular fuel pellet, inner duct tube in large fuel assemblies, large core. The Verification and Validation, and Uncertainty Qualification (V and V and UQ) of the calculation method is being performed by using measured data from the prototype FBR Monju. The results of this project will be used in the design and analysis of the commercial type demonstration FBR, known as the Japanese Sodium fast Reactor (JSFR). (authors)

  8. In-reactor performance of LWR-type tritium target rods

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D. ); Paxton, M.M. ); Crumbaugh, L. )

    1992-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has conducted several 1-yr irradiation tests of light water reactor-type tritium target rods. These tests have been sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of New Production Reactors. The first test, designated water capsule-1 (WC-1), was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from November 1989 to December 1990. The test vehicle contained a single 4-ft target rod within a pressurized water capsule. The capsule maintained the rod at pressurized water reactor (PWR)-type water temperature and pressure conditions. Posttest nondestructive examinations of the WC-1 rod involved visual examinations, dimensional checks, gamma scanning, and neutron radiography. The results indicate that the rod maintained the integrity of its pressure seal and was otherwise unaltered both mechanically and dimensionally by its irradiation and posttest handling.

  9. Dismantling of Loop-Type Channel Equipment of MR Reactor in NRC 'Kurchatov Institute' - 13040

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Victor; Danilovich, Alexey; Zverkov, Yuri; Ivanov, Oleg; Kolyadin, Vyacheslav; Lemus, Alexey; Pavlenko, Vitaly; Semenov, Sergey; Fadin, Sergey; Shisha, Anatoly; Chesnokov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    In 2009 the project of decommissioning of MR and RTF reactors was developed and approved by the Expert Authority of the Russian Federation (Gosexpertiza). The main objective of the decommissioning works identified in this project: - complete dismantling of reactor equipment and systems; - decontamination of reactor premises and site in accordance with the established sanitary and hygienic standards. At the preparatory stage (2008-2010) of the project the following works were executed: loop-type channels' dismantling in the storage pool; experimental fuel assemblies' removal from spent fuel repositories in the central hall; spent fuel assembly removal from the liquid-metal-cooled loop-type channel of the reactor core and its placement into the SNF repository; and reconstruction of engineering support systems to the extent necessary for reactor decommissioning. The project assumes three main phases of dismantling and decontamination: - dismantling of equipment/pipelines of cooling circuits and loop-type channels, and auxiliary reactor equipment (2011-2012); - dismantling of equipment in underground reactor premises and of both MR and RTF in-vessel devices (2013-2014); - decontamination of reactor premises; rehabilitation of the reactor site; final radiation survey of reactor premises, loop-type channels and site; and issuance of the regulatory authorities' de-registration statement (2015). In 2011 the decommissioning license for the two reactors was received and direct MR decommissioning activities started. MR primary pipelines and loop-type facilities situated in the underground reactor hall were dismantled. Works were also launched to dismantle the loop-type channels' equipment in underground reactor premises; reactor buildings were reconstructed to allow removal of dismantled equipment; and the MR/RTF decommissioning sequence was identified. In autumn 2011 - spring 2012 results of dismantling activities performed are: - equipment from underground rooms (No. 66, 66

  10. Influence of containment spray systems on the source term behavior of VVER-1000-type reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sdouz, G. )

    1993-01-01

    In Austria a research program to investigate the source term behavior of VVER-type reactors is still going on. The first two generations of VVER-type reactors were designed for 440-MW(electric) power. The next generation with 1000-MW(electric) power is known as the VVER-1000. These reactors have four loops without isolation valves, horizontal steam generators, and hexagonal fuel assemblies. In addition to the first two generations, this type has a containment structure with spray-type steam suppression. The three spray systems work autonomously with a special power supply for each system. The purpose of the containment spray system is to control the pressure within the containment by cooling and condensing steam from the atmosphere and to remove airborne aerosols. To investigate the source term behavior of VVER-type reactors, Austria acquired the Source Term Code Package (STCP) and started the program investigating a TMLB and an S[sub 1]B accident sequence. In the next step, a calculation of the TMLB sequence with working spray systems and emergency core coolant (ECC) recirculation was performed. This paper describes the results of the calculation, the comparison with the calculation without spray, and the implications for the accident management of VVER-1000-type reactors.

  11. SiC layer microstructure in AGR-1 and AGR-2 TRISO fuel particles and the influence of its variation on the effective diffusion of key fission products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Hunn, John D.; Lowden, Richard A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2016-11-01

    Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel is a promising fuel form for advanced reactor concepts such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) and is being developed domestically under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Reactor Technologies Initiative in support of Advanced Reactor Technologies. The fuel development and qualification plan includes a series of fuel irradiations to demonstrate fuel performance from the laboratory to commercial scale. The first irradiation campaign, AGR-1, included four separate TRISO fuel variants composed of multiple, laboratory-scale coater batches. The second irradiation campaign, AGR-2, included TRISO fuel particles fabricated by BWX Technologies with a larger coater representative of an industrial-scale system. The SiC layers of as-fabricated particles from the AGR-1 and AGR-2 irradiation campaigns have been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide key information about the microstructural features relevant to fuel performance. The results of a comprehensive study of multiple particles from all constituent batches are reported. The observations indicate that there were microstructural differences between variants and among constituent batches in a single variant. Insights on the influence of microstructure on the effective diffusivity of key fission products in the SiC layer are also discussed.

  12. SiC layer microstructure in AGR-1 and AGR-2 TRISO fuel particles and the influence of its variation on the effective diffusion of key fission products

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Hunn, John D.; Lowden, Richard A.; ...

    2016-08-15

    Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel is a promising fuel form for advanced reactor concepts such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) and is being developed domestically under the US Department of Energy’s Nuclear Reactor Technologies Initiative in support of Advanced Reactor Technologies. The fuel development and qualification plan includes a series of fuel irradiations to demonstrate fuel performance from the laboratory to commercial scale. The first irradiation campaign, AGR-1, included four separate TRISO fuel variants composed of multiple, laboratory-scale coater batches. The second irradiation campaign, AGR-2, included TRISO fuel particles fabricated by BWX Technologies with a larger coater representativemore » of an industrial-scale system. The SiC layers of as-fabricated particles from the AGR-1 and AGR-2 irradiation campaigns have been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide key information about the microstructural features relevant to fuel performance. The results of a comprehensive study of multiple particles from all constituent batches are reported. The observations indicate that there were microstructural differences between variants and among constituent batches in a single variant. Finally, insights on the influence of microstructure on the effective diffusivity of key fission products in the SiC layer are also discussed.« less

  13. SiC layer microstructure in AGR-1 and AGR-2 TRISO fuel particles and the influence of its variation on the effective diffusion of key fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Hunn, John D.; Lowden, Richard A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2016-08-15

    Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel is a promising fuel form for advanced reactor concepts such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) and is being developed domestically under the US Department of Energy’s Nuclear Reactor Technologies Initiative in support of Advanced Reactor Technologies. The fuel development and qualification plan includes a series of fuel irradiations to demonstrate fuel performance from the laboratory to commercial scale. The first irradiation campaign, AGR-1, included four separate TRISO fuel variants composed of multiple, laboratory-scale coater batches. The second irradiation campaign, AGR-2, included TRISO fuel particles fabricated by BWX Technologies with a larger coater representative of an industrial-scale system. The SiC layers of as-fabricated particles from the AGR-1 and AGR-2 irradiation campaigns have been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide key information about the microstructural features relevant to fuel performance. The results of a comprehensive study of multiple particles from all constituent batches are reported. The observations indicate that there were microstructural differences between variants and among constituent batches in a single variant. Finally, insights on the influence of microstructure on the effective diffusivity of key fission products in the SiC layer are also discussed.

  14. SiC layer microstructure in AGR-1 and AGR-2 TRISO fuel particles and the influence of its variation on the effective diffusion of key fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Hunn, John D.; Lowden, Richard A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2016-08-15

    Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel is a promising fuel form for advanced reactor concepts such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) and is being developed domestically under the US Department of Energy’s Nuclear Reactor Technologies Initiative in support of Advanced Reactor Technologies. The fuel development and qualification plan includes a series of fuel irradiations to demonstrate fuel performance from the laboratory to commercial scale. The first irradiation campaign, AGR-1, included four separate TRISO fuel variants composed of multiple, laboratory-scale coater batches. The second irradiation campaign, AGR-2, included TRISO fuel particles fabricated by BWX Technologies with a larger coater representative of an industrial-scale system. The SiC layers of as-fabricated particles from the AGR-1 and AGR-2 irradiation campaigns have been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide key information about the microstructural features relevant to fuel performance. The results of a comprehensive study of multiple particles from all constituent batches are reported. The observations indicate that there were microstructural differences between variants and among constituent batches in a single variant. Finally, insights on the influence of microstructure on the effective diffusivity of key fission products in the SiC layer are also discussed.

  15. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  16. AGR-2 safety test predictions using the PARFUME code

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-09-01

    This report documents calculations performed to predict failure probability of TRISO-coated fuel particles and diffusion of fission products through these particles during safety tests following the second irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program (AGR-2). The calculations include the modeling of the AGR-2 irradiation that occurred from June 2010 to October 2013 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the modeling of a safety testing phase to support safety tests planned at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a selection of AGR-2 compacts. The heat-up of AGR-2 compacts is a critical component of the AGR-2 fuel performance evaluation, and its objectives are to identify the effect of accident test temperature, burnup, and irradiation temperature on the performance of the fuel at elevated temperature. Safety testing of compacts will be followed by detailed examinations of the fuel particles to further evaluate fission product retention and behavior of the kernel and coatings. The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact). PARFUME calculates the

  17. Safety Testing of AGR-2 UCO Compacts 5-2-2, 2-2-2, and 5-4-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D.; Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.

    2016-08-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is being performed on tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated-particle fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program second irradiation experiment (AGR-2). This effort builds upon the understanding acquired throughout the AGR-1 PIE campaign, and is establishing a database for the different AGR-2 fuel designs. The AGR-2 irradiation experiment included TRISO fuel particles coated at BWX Technologies (BWXT) with a 150-mm-diameter engineering-scale coater. Two coating batches were tested in the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. Batch 93085 had 508-μm-diameter uranium dioxide (UO2) kernels. Batch 93073 had 427-μm-diameter UCO kernels, which is a kernel design where some of the uranium oxide is converted to uranium carbide during fabrication to provide a getter for oxygen liberated during fission and limit CO production. Fabrication and property data for the AGR-2 coating batches have been compiled and compared to those for AGR-1. The AGR-2 TRISO coatings were most like the AGR-1 Variant 3 TRISO deposited in the 50-mm-diameter ORNL lab-scale coater. In both cases argon-dilution of the hydrogen and methyltrichlorosilane coating gas mixture employed to deposit the SiC was used to produce a finer-grain, more equiaxed SiC microstructure. In addition to the fact that AGR-1 fuel had smaller, 350-μm-diameter UCO kernels, notable differences in the TRISO particle properties included the pyrocarbon anisotropy, which was slightly higher in the particles coated in the engineering-scale coater, and the exposed kernel defect fraction, which was higher for AGR-2 fuel due to the detected presence of particles with impact damage introduced during TRISO particle handling.

  18. Development of a Monolithic Research Reactor Fuel Type at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.R.; Briggs, R.J.

    2004-10-06

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been tasked with the conversion of research reactors from highly enriched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). To convert several high power reactors, monolithic fuel, a new fuel type, is being developed. This fuel type replaces the standard fuel dispersion with a fuel alloy foil, which allows for fuel densities far in excess of that found in dispersion fuel. The single-piece fuel foil also contains a significantly lower interface area between the fuel and the aluminum in the plate than the standard fuel type, limiting the amount of detrimental fuel-aluminum interaction that can occur. Implementation of monolithic fuel is dependant on the development of a suitable fabrication method as traditional roll-bonding techniques are inadequate.

  19. Continuous adsorption and recovery of Cr(VI) in different types of reactors.

    PubMed

    Bai, Sudha R; Abraham, T Emilia

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the results of experiments on continuous adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI) ions by a chemically modified and polysulfone-immobilized biomass of the fungus Rhizopus nigricans. A fixed quantity of polymer-entrapped biomass beads corresponding to 2 g of dry biomass powder was employed in packed bed, fluidized bed, and stirred tank reactor for monitoring the continuous removal and recovery of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solution and synthetic chrome plating effluent. Parameters such as flow rate (5, 10 and 15 mL/min), inlet concentration of Cr(VI) ions (50, 100, 150 and 250 mg/L) and the depth of biosorbent packing (22.8, 11.2 and 4.9 cm) were evaluated for the packed bed reactor. The breakthrough time and the adsorption rates in the packed bed column were found to decrease with increasing flow rate and higher Cr inlet concentrations and to increase with higher depths of sorbent packing. To have a comparative analysis of Cr adsorption efficiency in different types of reactors, the fluidized bed reactor and stirred tank reactor were operated using the same quantities of biosorbent material. For the fluidized bed reactor, Cr(VI) solution of 100 mg/L was pumped at 5 mL/min and fluidized by compressed air at a flow rate of 0.5 kg/cm.(2) The stirred tank reactor had a working volume of 200 mL capacity and the inlet/outlet flow rate was 5 mL/min. The maximum removal efficiency (mg Cr/g biomass) was obtained for the stirred tank reactor (159.26), followed by the fluidized reactor (153.04) and packed bed reactor (123.33). In comparison to the adsorption rate from pure chromate solution, approximately 16% reduction was monitored for synthetic chrome plating effluent in the packed bed. Continuous desorption of bound Cr ions from the reactors was effective with 0.01 N Na(2)CO(3) and nearly 80-94% recoveries have been obtained for all the reactors.

  20. Cancer-secreted AGR2 induces programmed cell death in normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Vitello, Elizabeth A.; Quek, Sue-Ing; Kincaid, Heather; Fuchs, Thomas; Crichton, Daniel J.; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) is a protein expressed in many solid tumor types including prostate, pancreatic, breast and lung. AGR2 functions as a protein disulfide isomerase in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, AGR2 is secreted by cancer cells that overexpress this molecule. Secretion of AGR2 was also found in salamander limb regeneration. Due to its ubiquity, tumor secretion of AGR2 must serve an important role in cancer, yet its molecular function is largely unknown. This study examined the effect of cancer-secreted AGR2 on normal cells. Prostate stromal cells were cultured, and tissue digestion media containing AGR2 prepared from prostate primary cancer 10-076 CP and adenocarcinoma LuCaP 70CR xenograft were added. The control were tissue digestion media containing no AGR2 prepared from benign prostate 10-076 NP and small cell carcinoma LuCaP 145.1 xenograft. In the presence of tumor-secreted AGR2, the stromal cells were found to undergo programmed cell death (PCD) characterized by formation of cellular blebs, cell shrinkage, and DNA fragmentation as seen when the stromal cells were UV irradiated or treated by a pro-apoptotic drug. PCD could be prevented with the addition of the monoclonal AGR2-neutralizing antibody P3A5. DNA microarray analysis of LuCaP 70CR media-treated vs. LuCaP 145.1 media-treated cells showed downregulation of the gene SAT1 as a major change in cells exposed to AGR2. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the array result. SAT1 encodes spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, which maintains intracellular polyamine levels. Abnormal polyamine metabolism as a result of altered SAT1 activity has an adverse effect on cells through the induction of PCD. PMID:27283903

  1. Research reactors - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. DETERMINATION OF THE AGR-1 CAPSULE TO FPMS SPECTROMETER TRANSPORT VOLUMES FROM LEADOUT FLOW TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Hartwell; J. B. Walter; D. M. Scates; M. W. Drigert

    2007-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. A flow experiment conducted during the AGR-1 irradiation provided data that included the effect of flow rate changes on the decay of a short-lived radionuclide (23Ne). This data has been analyzed to determine the capsule-specific downstream transport volume through which the capsule effluents must pass before arrival at the fission product monitoring system spectrometers. These resultant transport volumes when coupled with capsule outlet flow rates determine the transport times from capsule-to-detector. In this work an analysis protocol is developed and applied in order to determine capsule-specific transport volumes to precisions of better than +/- 7%.

  3. Advanced Electron Microscopy and Micro analytical technique development and application for Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles from the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna; Lillo, Thomas Martin; Wen, Haiming; Wright, Karen Elizabeth; Madden, James Wayne; Aguiar, Jeffery Andrew

    2017-01-01

    A series of up to seven irradiation experiments are planned for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Quantification Program, with irradiation completed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the first experiment (i.e., AGR-1) in November 2009 for an effective 620 full power days. The objective of the AGR-1 experiment was primarily to provide lessons learned on the multi-capsule test train design and to provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development and post-irradiation safety testing data at high temperatures. This report describes the advanced microscopy and micro-analysis results on selected AGR-1 coated particles.

  4. Calorimetric Analysis to Infer Primary Circuit Flow in Integral and Pool-Type Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, Jamie; Tarver, Ryan; Hines, J. Wesley

    2017-02-01

    Primary system flow rate is a key parameter for monitoring and controlling thermal power in a nuclear power plant. The existing fleet of large light water reactors uses direct measurements of primary flow rate with the application of venturi meters, orifice plates, and magnetic flowmeters in primary loop piping. Integral light water reactors and pool-type advanced reactor designs, however, have largely eliminated primary loop piping to improve the inherent safety characteristics of these reactors. Furthermore, longer operating cycles between maintenance opportunities (typically 4 to 40 years) limit the applicability of these direct measurement methods over the operating period. Methods to infer the primary flow rate based on other, easily measured parameters are needed to ensure the operability of integral and pool-type reactors. Calorimetric analysis across the intermediate heat exchanger was investigated for real-time inference of primary flow rate. Heat balance equations were applied to an experimental forced flow loop to evaluate the efficacy of this approach. When appropriate time delays and heat losses are accounted for, the primary flow rate was inferred with accuracy and 95% prediction variance of 1.57 and 4.80 % mean value, respectively.

  5. PIE on Safety-Tested AGR-1 Compact 5-1-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D.; Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Gerczak, Tyler J.

    2015-08-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is being performed in support of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel development and qualification for High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). AGR-1 was the first in a series of TRISO fuel irradiation experiments initiated in 2006 under the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program; this work continues to be funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) initiative. AGR-1 fuel compacts were fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2006 and irradiated for three years in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to demonstrate and evaluate fuel performance under HTGR irradiation conditions. PIE is being performed at INL and ORNL to study how the fuel behaved during irradiation, and to examine fuel performance during exposure to elevated temperatures at or above temperatures that could occur during a depressurized conduction cooldown event. This report summarizes safety testing of irradiated AGR-1 Compact 5-1-1 in the ORNL Core Conduction Cooldown Test Facility (CCCTF) and post-safety testing PIE.

  6. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the AGR 3/4 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh Thi-Cam

    2015-09-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation experiments are being conducted within the Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The main objectives of the fuel experimental campaign are to provide the necessary data on fuel performance to support fuel process development, qualify a fuel design and fabrication process for normal operation and accident conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes (PLN 3636, “Technical Program Plan for INL Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program”). The AGR 3/4 test was inserted in the Northeast Flux Trap position in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in December 2011 and successfully completed irradiation in mid-April 2014, resulting in irradiation of the tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel for 369.1 effective full-power days (EFPDs) during approximately 2.4 calendar years. The AGR 3/4 data, including the irradiation data and calculated results, were qualified and stored in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). To support the U.S. TRISO fuel performance assessment and to provide data for validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, the daily as run thermal analysis has been performed separately on each of twelve AGR 3/4 capsules for the entire irradiation as discussed in ECAR-2807, “AGR 3/4 Daily As Run Thermal Analyses”. The ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal model predicts the daily average volume average (VA) fuel temperature (FT), peak FT, and graphite matrix, sleeve, and sink temperature in each capsule. The JMOCUP simulation codes were also created to perform depletion calculations for the AGR 3/4 experiment (ECAR-2753, “JMOCUP As-Run Daily Physics Depletion Calculation for the AGR 3/4 TRISO Particle Experiment in ATR

  7. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Variant 3 Compact Lot LEU01-49T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Montgomery, Fred C; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 vriant 3 fuel compact lot LEU01-49T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-49T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 variant 3 coated particle composite LEU01-49t CAN BE FOUND IN ornl/tm-2006/022.

  8. SVBR-100 module-type fast reactor of the IV generation for regional power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrodnikov, A. V.; Toshinsky, G. I.; Komlev, O. G.; Stepanov, V. S.; Klimov, N. N.

    2011-08-01

    In the report the following is presented: basic conceptual provisions of the innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on modular fast reactors (FR) SVBR-100, summarized results of calculations of the reactor, analysis of the opportunities of multi-purpose application of such reactor facilities (RF) including export potentials with due account of nonproliferation requirements. The most important features of the proposed NPT analyzed in the report are as follows: (1) integral (monoblock) arrangement of the primary circuit equipment with entire elimination of the primary circuit pipelines and valves that considerably reduces the construction and assembly works period and coupling with high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) deterministically eliminates accidents of the LOCA type, (2) option for 100 MWe power and dimensions of the reactor provide: on the one hand, an opportunity to transport the reactor monoblock in factory-readiness by railway as well as other kinds of transport, on the other hand, core breeding ratio (CBR) exceeds 1 while MOX-fuel is used. The preferable area of application of RF SVBR-100 is regional and small power requiring power-units of electric power in a range of (100-600) MW, which could be used for cogeneration-based district heating while locating them nearby cities as well as for generation of electric power in a mode of load tracking in the regions with low network systems.

  9. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    DOE PAGES

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; ...

    2016-04-07

    Safety tests were conducted on fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800 °C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during 15 of these safety tests. Comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination results of the safety tests were conducted on two types of AGR-1 compacts: compactsmore » containing only intact particles and compacts containing one or more particles whose SiC layers failed during safety testing. In both cases, PARFUME globally over-predicted the experimental release fractions by several orders of magnitude: more than three (intact) and two (failed SiC) orders of magnitude for silver, more than three and up to two orders of magnitude for strontium, and up to two and more than one orders of magnitude for krypton. The release of cesium from intact particles was also largely over-predicted (by up to five orders of magnitude) but its release from particles with failed SiC was only over-predicted by a factor of about 3. These over-predictions can be largely attributed to an over-estimation of the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles. The integral release nature of the data makes it difficult to estimate the individual over-estimations in the kernel or each coating layer. Nevertheless, a tentative assessment of correction factors to these diffusivities was performed to enable a better match between the modeling predictions and the safety testing results. The method could only be successfully applied to silver and cesium. In the case of strontium, correction factors could not be assessed

  10. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2016-04-07

    Safety tests were conducted on fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800 °C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during 15 of these safety tests. Comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination results of the safety tests were conducted on two types of AGR-1 compacts: compacts containing only intact particles and compacts containing one or more particles whose SiC layers failed during safety testing. In both cases, PARFUME globally over-predicted the experimental release fractions by several orders of magnitude: more than three (intact) and two (failed SiC) orders of magnitude for silver, more than three and up to two orders of magnitude for strontium, and up to two and more than one orders of magnitude for krypton. The release of cesium from intact particles was also largely over-predicted (by up to five orders of magnitude) but its release from particles with failed SiC was only over-predicted by a factor of about 3. These over-predictions can be largely attributed to an over-estimation of the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles. The integral release nature of the data makes it difficult to estimate the individual over-estimations in the kernel or each coating layer. Nevertheless, a tentative assessment of correction factors to these diffusivities was performed to enable a better match between the modeling predictions and the safety testing results. The method could only be successfully applied to silver and cesium. In the case of strontium, correction factors could not be assessed because

  11. AGR 3/4 Irradiation Test Final As Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-06-01

    Several fuel and material irradiation experiments have been planned for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program (referred to as the INL ART TDO/AGR fuel program hereafter), which supports the development and qualification of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The goals of these experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination and safety testing (INL 05/2015). AGR-3/4 combined the third and fourth in this series of planned experiments to test TRISO coated low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide fuel. This combined experiment was intended to support the refinement of fission product transport models and to assess the effects of sweep gas impurities on fuel performance and fission product transport by irradiating designed-to-fail fuel particles and by measuring subsequent fission metal transport in fuel-compact matrix material and fuel-element graphite. The AGR 3/4 fuel test was successful in irradiating the fuel compacts to the burnup and fast fluence target ranges, considering the experiment was terminated short of its initial 400 EFPD target (Collin 2015). Out of the 48 AGR-3/4 compacts, 42 achieved the specified burnup of at least 6% fissions per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). Three capsules had a maximum fuel compact average burnup < 10% FIMA, one more than originally specified, and the maximum fuel compact average burnup was <19% FIMA for the remaining capsules, as specified. Fast neutron fluence fell in the expected range of 1.0 to 5.5×1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for all compacts. In addition, the AGR-3/4 experiment was globally successful in keeping the

  12. The use of experimental data in an MTR-type nuclear reactor safety analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Simon E.

    Reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) are a category of events required for research reactor safety analysis. A subset of this is unprotected RIAs in which mechanical systems or human intervention are not credited in the response of the system. Light-water cooled and moderated MTR-type ( i.e., aluminum-clad uranium plate fuel) reactors are self-limiting up to some reactivity insertion limit beyond which fuel damage occurs. This characteristic was studied in the Borax and Spert reactor tests of the 1950s and 1960s in the USA. This thesis considers the use of this experimental data in generic MTR-type reactor safety analysis. The approach presented herein is based on fundamental phenomenological understanding and uses correlations in the reactor test data with suitable account taken for differences in important system parameters. Specifically, a semi-empirical approach is used to quantify the relationship between the power, energy and temperature rise response of the system as well as parametric dependencies on void coefficient and the degree of subcooling. Secondary effects including the dependence on coolant flow are also examined. A rigorous curve fitting approach and error assessment is used to quantify the trends in the experimental data. In addition to the initial power burst stage of an unprotected transient, the longer term stability of the system is considered with a stylized treatment of characteristic power/temperature oscillations (chugging). A bridge from the HEU-based experimental data to the LEU fuel cycle is assessed and outlined based on existing simulation results presented in the literature. A cell-model based parametric study is included. The results are used to construct a practical safety analysis methodology for determining reactivity insertion safety limits for a light-water moderated and cooled MTR-type core.

  13. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 147A, 148A, 148B, and 149A

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Abbott; Keith A. Daum

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the data qualification status of fuel irradiation data from the first four reactor cycles (147A, 148A, 148B, and 149A) of the on-going second Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-2) experiment as recorded in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). This includes data received by NDMAS from the period June 22, 2010 through May 21, 2011. AGR-2 is the second in a series of eight planned irradiation experiments for the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program, which supports development of the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Irradiation of the AGR-2 test train is being performed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is planned for 600 effective full power days (approximately 2.75 calendar years) (PLN-3798). The experiment is intended to demonstrate the performance of UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Data qualification status of the AGR-1 experiment was reported in INL/EXT-10-17943 (Abbott et al. 2010).

  14. Quantity of 135I released from the AGR-1, AGR-2, and AGR-3/4 experiments and discovery of 131I at the FPMS traps during the AGR-3/4 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Scates, Dawn M.

    2014-09-01

    A series of three Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). From 2006 through 2014, these experiments supported the development and qualification of the new U.S. tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Each AGR experiment consisted of multiple fueled capsules, each plumbed for independent temperature control using a mix of helium and neon gases. The gas leaving a capsule was routed to individual Fission Product Monitor (FPM) detectors. For intact fuel particles, the TRISO particle coatings provide a substantial barrier to fission product release. However, particles with failed coatings, whether because of a minute percentage of initially defective particles, those which fail during irradiation, or those designed to fail (DTF) particles, can release fission products to the flowing gas stream. Because reactive fission product elements like iodine and cesium quickly deposit on cooler capsule components and piping structures as the effluent gas leaves the reactor core, only the noble fission gas isotopes of Kr and Xe tend to reach FPM detectors. The FPM system utilizes High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors coupled with a thallium activated sodium iodide NaI(Tl) scintillator. The HPGe detector provides individual isotopic information, while the NaI(Tl) scintillator is used as a gross count rate meter. During irradiation, the 135mXe concentration reaching the FPM detectors is from both direct fission and by decay of the accumulated 135I. About 2.5 hours after irradiation (ten 15.3 minute 135mXe half lives) the directly produced 135mXe has decayed and only the longer lived 135I remains as a source. Decay systematics dictate that 135mXe will be in secular equilibrium with its 135I parent, such that its production rate very nearly equals the decay rate of the

  15. Safety and Environment aspects of Tokamak- type Fusion Power Reactor- An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshi, Bharat; Reddy, D. Chenna

    2017-04-01

    Power Reactor). This paper describes an overview of safety and environmental merits of fusion power reactor, issues and design considerations and need for R&D on safety and environmental aspects of Tokamak type fusion reactor.

  16. PACTEL, an experimental facility for modelling VVER-440 type nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Faussi, P.; Ritonummi, T.; Kervinen, T.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments conducted with thermal-hydraulic testing facilities are of fundamental importance in nuclear power plant safety research. In this field Technical Research Centre of Finland has co-operated with Lappeenranta University of Technology for 15 years. The latest tests facility is called PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop). PACTEL is a large and multifaceted test facility for simulating the behaviour of VVER-type reactors under abnormal conditions. VVER-reactors are Soviet designed Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) with some major differences compared with western PWRs (e.g. horizontal steam generators). Finland has two VVER-440 reactors at the Loviisa power plant. The PACTEL facility aids in the search for the best methods of returning nuclear powe rplants to a safe status following various operational malfunctions and process breakdowns. The information received will be utilized in developing and evaluating nuclear power plant safety systems, in improving safety directives and in developing and assessing the computer codes, specially for VVER analyses. The facility can also be used for training nuclear power plant personnel.

  17. Synthesis of layered double hydroxide nanosheets by coprecipitation using a T-type microchannel reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiujiang; Sun, Meiyu; Ma, Xiuming; Hou, Wanguo

    2014-02-15

    The synthesis of Mg{sub 2}Al–NO{sub 3} layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets by coprecipitation using a T-type microchannel reactor is reported. Aqueous LDH nanosheet dispersions were obtained. The LDH nanosheets were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and particle size analysis, and the transmittance and viscosity of LDH nanosheet dispersions were examined. The two-dimensional LDH nanosheets consisted of 1–2 brucite-like layers and were stable for ca. 16 h at room temperature. In addition, the co-assembly between LDH nanosheets and dodecyl sulfate (DS) anions was carried out, and a DS intercalated LDH nanohybrid was obtained. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of LDH nanosheets being directly prepared in bulk aqueous solution. This simple, cheap method can provide naked LDH nanosheets in high quantities, which can be used as building blocks for functional materials. - Graphical abstract: Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets were synthesized by coprecipitation using a T-type microchannel reactor, and could be used as basic building blocks for LDH-based functional materials. Display Omitted - Highlights: • LDH nanosheets were synthesized by coprecipitation using a T-type microchannel reactor. • Naked LDH nanosheets were dispersed in aqueous media. • LDH nanosheets can be used as building blocks for functional materials.

  18. Assessing optimal fermentation type for bio-hydrogen production in continuous-flow acidogenic reactors.

    PubMed

    Ren, N Q; Chua, H; Chan, S Y; Tsang, Y F; Wang, Y J; Sin, N

    2007-07-01

    In this study, the optimal fermentation type and the operating conditions of anaerobic process in continuous-flow acidogenic reactors was investigated for the maximization of bio-hydrogen production using mixed cultures. Butyric acid type fermentation occurred at pH>6, propionic acid type fermentation occurred at pH about 5.5 with E(h) (redox potential) >-278mV, and ethanol-type fermentation occurred at pH<4.5. The representative strains of these fermentations were Clostridium sp., Propionibacterium sp. and Bacteriodes sp., respectively. Ethanol fermentation was optimal type by comparing the operating stabilities and hydrogen production capacities between the fermentation types, which remained stable when the organic loading rate (OLR) reached the highest OLR at 86.1kgCOD/m(3)d. The maximum hydrogen production reached up to 14.99L/d.

  19. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Baseline Compact Lot LEU01-46T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Montgomery, Fred C; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 baseline compact lot LEU01-46T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-46T, which was a composite of four batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 baseline coated particle composite LEU01-46T can be found in ORNL/TM-2006/019. The AGR-1 Fuel product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance of the fuel manufactured for the AGR-1 irradiation test. Section 6.2 of EDF-4380 provides the property requirements for the heat treated compacts. The Statistical Sampling Plan for AGR Fuel materials (INL EDF-4542) provides additional guidance regarding statistical methods for product acceptance and recommended sample sizes. The procedures for characterizing and qualifying the compacts are outlined in ORNL product inspection plan AGR-CHAR-PIP-05. the inspection report forms generated by this product inspection plan document the product acceptance for the property requirements listed in section 6.2 of EDF-4380.

  20. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Variant 2 Compact Lot LEU01-48T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Montgomery, Fred C; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 variant 2 compact lot LEU01-48T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-48T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 variant 2 coated particle composite LEU01-48T can be found in ORNL/TM-2006/021. The AGR-1 Fuel Product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance of the fuel manufactured for the AGR-1 irradiation test. Section 6.2 of EDF-4380 provides the property requirements for the heat treated compacts. The Statistical Sampling Plan for AGR Fuel materials (INL EDF-4542) provides additional guidance regarding statistical methods for product acceptance and recommended sample sizes. The procedures for characterizing and qualifying the compacts are outlined in ORNL product inspection plan AGR-CHAR-PIP-05. The inspection report forms generated by this product inspection plan document the product acceptance for the property requirements listed in section 6.2 of EDF-4380.

  1. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Variant 1 Compact Lot LEU01-47T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Montgomery, Fred C; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 variant 1 compact lot LEU01-47T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the ADvanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-47T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrcoarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified at LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 variant 1 coated particle composite LEU01-47T can be found in ORNL/TM-2006/020. The AGR-1 Fuel Product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance of the fuel manufactured for the AGR-1 irradiation test. Section 6.2 of EDF-4380 provides the property requirements for the heat treated compacts. The Statistical Sampling Plan for AGR Fuel Materials (INL EDF-4542) provides additional guidance regarding statistical methods for product acceptance and recommended sample sizes. The procedures for characterizing and qualifying the compacts are outlined in ORNL product inspection plan AGR-CHAR-PIP-05. The inspection report forms generated by this product inspection plan document the product acceptance for the property requirements listed in section 6.2 of EDF-4380.

  2. Consistent neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculations of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, Georgy; Saldikov, Ivan; Ternovykh, Mikhail; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    For modeling the isotopic composition of fuel, and maximum temperatures at different moments of time, one can use different algorithms and codes. In connection with the development of new types of fuel assemblies and progress in computer technology, the task makes important to increase accuracy in modeling of the above characteristics of fuel assemblies during the operation. Calculations of neutronphysical characteristics of fuel rods are mainly based on models using averaged temperature, thermal conductivity factors, and heat power density. In this paper, complex approach is presented, based on modern algorithms, methods and codes to solve separate tasks of thermal conductivity, neutron transport, and nuclide transformation kinetics. It allows to perform neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculation of the reactor with detailed temperature distribution, with account of temperature-depending thermal conductivity and other characteristics. It was applied to studies of fuel cell of the VVER-1000 reactor. When developing new algorithms and programs, which should improve the accuracy of modeling the isotopic composition and maximum temperature in the fuel rod, it is necessary to have a set of test tasks for verification. The proposed approach can be used for development of such verification base for testing calculation of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

  3. Magnetic hysteresis properties of neutron-irradiated VVER440-type nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Gillemot, F.; Horváth, Á.; Székely, R.; Horváth, M.

    2012-11-01

    The development of non-destructive evaluation methods for irradiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels has a key role for safe and long-term operation of nuclear power plants. In this study, we have investigated the effect of neutron irradiation on base and weld metals of Russian VVER440-type reactor pressure vessel steels by measurements of magnetic minor hysteresis loops. A minor-loop coefficient, which is obtained from a scaling power-law relation of minor-loop parameters and is a sensitive indicator of internal stress, is found to change with neutron fluence for both metals. While the coefficient for base metal exhibits a local maximum at low fluence and a subsequent slow decrease, that for weld metal monotonically decreases with fluence. The observed results are explained by competing mechanisms of nanoscale defect formation and recovery, among which the latter process plays a dominant role for magnetic property changes in weld metal due to its ferritic microstructure.

  4. Ceramography of Irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) Fuel from the AGR-2 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Francine Joyce; Stempien, John Dennis

    2016-09-01

    Ceramography was performed on cross sections from four tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel compacts taken from the AGR-2 experiment, which was irradiated between June 2010 and October 2013 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The fuel compacts examined in this study contained TRISO-coated particles with either uranium oxide (UO2) kernels or uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) kernels that were irradiated to final burnup values between 9.0 and 11.1% FIMA. These examinations are intended to explore kernel and coating morphology evolution during irradiation. This includes kernel porosity, swelling, and migration, and irradiation-induced coating fracture and separation. Variations in behavior within a specific cross section, which could be related to temperature or burnup gradients within the fuel compact, are also explored. The criteria for categorizing post-irradiation particle morphologies developed for AGR-1 ceramographic exams, was applied to the particles in the AGR-2 compacts particles examined. Results are compared with similar investigations performed as part of the earlier AGR-1 irradiation experiment. This paper presents the results of the AGR-2 examinations and discusses the key implications for fuel irradiation performance.

  5. Design and manufacture of a D-shape coil-based toroid-type HTS DC reactor using 2nd generation HTS wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangmin; Go, Byeong-Soo; Sung, Hae-Jin; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Seokho; Lee, Sangjin; Jin, Yoon-Su; Oh, Yunsang; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes the design specifications and performance of a real toroid-type high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The target inductance of the HTS DC reactor was 400 mH. The expected operating temperature was under 20 K. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. Performances of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor were analyzed through experiments conducted under the steady-state and charge conditions. The fundamental design specifications and the data obtained from this research will be applied to the design of a commercial-type HTS DC reactor.

  6. AGR-1 Compact 5-3-1 Post-Irradiation Examination Results

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Jason Harp; Phil Winston; Scott A. Ploger

    2016-12-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program was established to perform the requisite research and development on tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel to support deployment of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The work continues as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) TRISO Fuel program. The overarching program goal is to provide a baseline fuel qualification data set to support licensing and operation of an HTGR. To achieve these goals, the program includes the elements of fuel fabrication, irradiation, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance, and fission product transport (INL 2015). A series of fuel irradiation experiments is being planned and conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These experiments will provide data on fuel performance under irradiation, support fuel process development, qualify the fuel for normal operating conditions, provide irradiated fuel for safety testing, and support the development of fuel performance and fission product transport models. The first of these irradiation tests, designated AGR-1, began in the ATR in December 2006 and ended in November 2009. This experiment was conducted primarily to act as a shakedown test of the multicapsule test train design and provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development. It also provided samples for post-irradiation safety testing, where fission product retention of the fuel at high temperatures will be experimentally measured. The capsule design and details of the AGR-1 experiment have been presented previously.

  7. Is there a clinical association of vancomycin MIC creep, agr group II locus, and treatment failure in MRSA bacteremia?

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Jorgelina T; Swami, Aditi; Sawarynski, Kara; Gerasymchuk, Ludmyla; Powell, Kim; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara; Carpenter, Christopher F; Sims, Matthew D

    2011-09-01

    The association of vancomycin treatment failure with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) creep is concerning, as most isolates are still considered to be in the susceptible range. Several studies have suggested that the accessory gene regulator (agr) group II polymorphism is predictive of vancomycin treatment failure. We assessed the associations between increased vancomycin MIC, agr group II locus, and vancomycin treatment failure in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremias. MRSA isolates from 99 inpatient bacteremias were studied. Susceptibility testing was conducted by an automated method (MicroScan) and by the gradient diffusion method (E-test). Vancomycin MICs were stratified into 3 groups for analysis: MIC ≤ 1, MIC > 1 but ≤ 2, and MIC >2 μg/mL. Strains were typed by repetitive-polymerase chain reaction analysis and the agr locus was identified by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Failure of vancomycin treatment was defined as persistent bacteremia after 72 hours, death at 30 days, or treatment change due to clinical failure. Among 99 bacteremic patients, there were 82 agr group II and 15 agr group I isolates. There was no relationship between higher vancomycin MICs and isolate agr II loci (42 of 82) (P=0.59). Earlier vancomycin exposure was significantly associated with increased MIC (P=0.03). Vancomycin treatment failure was observed in 12 patients: 3 required an alternate regimen, 4 had persistent positive cultures, and 5 whose deaths were attributable to MRSA infection. Survival in agr group II was 57 of 82 (69%) versus agr group I in which it was 14 of 15 (93%), (P=0.06). We did not identify any significant association between MIC creep and vancomycin failure or between higher vancomycin MICs and agr group II. However, a higher mortality was seen in agr group II than agr group I.

  8. A master-follower type distributed scheme for reactor inlet temperature control

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, H.E.; Dean, E.M.; Vilim, R.B.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a computer-based controller for regulating reactor inlet temperature in a pool-type power plant. The elements of the control system are organized in a master-follower hierarchical architecture that takes advantage of existing in-plant hardware and software to minimize the need for plant modifications. Low level control algorithms are executed on existing local digital controllers (followers) with the high level algorithms executed on a new plant supervisory computer (master). A distributed computing strategy provides integration of the existing and additional computer platforms. The control system operates by having the master controller first estimate the secondary sodium flow needed to achieve a given reactor inlet temperature. The estimated flow is then used as a setpoint by the follower controller to regulate sodium flow using a motor-generator pump set. The control system has been implemented in a Hardware-In-the-Loop (FM) setup and qualified for operation in the Experimental Breader reactor 11 of Argonne National Laboratory. Some HIL results are provided.

  9. AgrAbility: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... About AgrAbility State Projects Directory The Toolbox AT Database Resources Veterans & Beginning Farmers Communities of Interest News ... 800) 825-4264 Home About The Toolbox AT Database Resources Online Training Contact Us You are here: ...

  10. Preliminary Reactor Physics Assessment of the HTR Module with 14% Enriched UCO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Hans D. Gougar

    2013-03-01

    The high temperature reactor (HTR) Module (Lohnert, 1990) is a graphite-moderated, helium cooled pebble bed design that has been extensively used as a reference template for the former South African (Matzner, 2004) and current Chinese (Zhang et al., 2009) HTR programs. This design utilizes spherical fuel elements packed into a dynamic pebble bed, consisting of tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) coated uranium oxide (UO2) 500 µm fuel kernels with a U-235 enrichment of 7.8% and a heavy metal loading of 7 g per pebble. This fuel type was previously qualified for use in Germany for pebble bed HTRs, as well as undergoing re-qualification in South Africa for the PBMR project. It is also the fuel type being tested for use in the high temperature reactor (HTR-PM) under construction in China. In the United States, however, a different TRISO fuel form is the subject of a qualification program. The U.S. experience with HTRs has been focused upon the batch-fueled prismatic reactor in which TRISO particles are embedded in cylindrical compacts and stacked inside the graphite blocks which comprise the core. Under this type of operating regime, a smaller TRISO with a different composition and enrichment performs better than the fuel historically used in PBRs. Fuel kernels and compacting techniques more suited to prismatic core duty are currently being developed and qualified under the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel development program and in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Interest in the pebble bed concept remains high, however, and a study was undertaken by the authors to assess the viability of using AGR fuel in a pebble bed reactor. Using the German HTR Module as the reference plant, key neutronic and thermal-hydraulic parameters were compared between the nominal design and one fueled with the fuel that is the focus of the AGR program.

  11. Lattice Cell Calculations, Slowing Down Theory and Computer Code Wims; Vver Type Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, J.; Brekke, A.; Hall, C.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * WIMS AS A TOOL FOR REACTOR CORE CALCULATIONS * GENERAL STRUCTURE OF THE WIMS CODE * WIMS APPROACH TO THE SLOWING DOWN CALCULATIONS * MULTIGROUP OSCOPIC CROSS SECTIONS, RESONANCE TREATMENT * DETERMINATION OF MULTIGROUP SPECTRA * PHYSICAL MODELS IN MAIN TRANSPORT CALCULATIONS * BURNUP CALCULATIONS * APPLICATION OF WIMSD-4 TO VVER TYPE LATTICES * FINAL REMARKS * REFERENCES * APPENDIX A: DANCOFF FACTOR - STANDARD APPROACH * APPENDIX B: FORMULAS FOR DANCOFF AND BELL FACTORS CALCULATIONS APPLIED IN PREWIM * APPENDIX C: CALCULATION OF ONE GROUP PROBABILITIES Pij IN AN ANNULAR SYSTEM * APPENDIX D: SCHAEFER'S METHOD

  12. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in Soil Requires AgrA-Mediated Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vivant, Anne-Laure; Garmyn, Dominique; Gal, Laurent; Hartmann, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper, we demonstrated that inactivation of the Agr system affects the patterns of survival of Listeria monocytogenes (A.-L. Vivant, D. Garmyn, L. Gal, and P. Piveteau, Front Cell Infect Microbiol 4:160, http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2014.00160). In this study, we investigated whether the Agr-mediated response is triggered during adaptation in soil, and we compared survival patterns in a set of 10 soils. The fate of the parental strain L. monocytogenes L9 (a rifampin-resistant mutant of L. monocytogenes EGD-e) and that of a ΔagrA deletion mutant were compared in a collection of 10 soil microcosms. The ΔagrA mutant displayed significantly reduced survival in these biotic soil microcosms, and differential transcriptome analyses showed large alterations of the transcriptome when AgrA was not functional, while the variations in the transcriptomes between the wild type and the ΔagrA deletion mutant were modest under abiotic conditions. Indeed, in biotic soil environments, 578 protein-coding genes and an extensive repertoire of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) were differentially transcribed. The transcription of genes coding for proteins involved in cell envelope and cellular processes, including the phosphotransferase system and ABC transporters, and proteins involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptides was affected. Under sterilized soil conditions, the differences were limited to 86 genes and 29 ncRNAs. These results suggest that the response regulator AgrA of the Agr communication system plays important roles during the saprophytic life of L. monocytogenes in soil. PMID:26002901

  13. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in Soil Requires AgrA-Mediated Regulation.

    PubMed

    Vivant, Anne-Laure; Garmyn, Dominique; Gal, Laurent; Hartmann, Alain; Piveteau, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    In a recent paper, we demonstrated that inactivation of the Agr system affects the patterns of survival of Listeria monocytogenes (A.-L. Vivant, D. Garmyn, L. Gal, and P. Piveteau, Front Cell Infect Microbiol 4:160, http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2014.00160). In this study, we investigated whether the Agr-mediated response is triggered during adaptation in soil, and we compared survival patterns in a set of 10 soils. The fate of the parental strain L. monocytogenes L9 (a rifampin-resistant mutant of L. monocytogenes EGD-e) and that of a ΔagrA deletion mutant were compared in a collection of 10 soil microcosms. The ΔagrA mutant displayed significantly reduced survival in these biotic soil microcosms, and differential transcriptome analyses showed large alterations of the transcriptome when AgrA was not functional, while the variations in the transcriptomes between the wild type and the ΔagrA deletion mutant were modest under abiotic conditions. Indeed, in biotic soil environments, 578 protein-coding genes and an extensive repertoire of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) were differentially transcribed. The transcription of genes coding for proteins involved in cell envelope and cellular processes, including the phosphotransferase system and ABC transporters, and proteins involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptides was affected. Under sterilized soil conditions, the differences were limited to 86 genes and 29 ncRNAs. These results suggest that the response regulator AgrA of the Agr communication system plays important roles during the saprophytic life of L. monocytogenes in soil.

  14. The agr Locus Regulates Virulence and Colonization Genes in Clostridium difficile 027

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Melissa J.; Clare, Simon; Goulding, David; Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Barquist, Lars; Browne, Hilary P.; Pettit, Laura; Dougan, Gordon; Lawley, Trevor D.

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator AgrA, a member of the LytTR family of proteins, plays a key role in controlling gene expression in some Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. AgrA is encoded by the agrACDB global regulatory locus, and orthologues are found within the genome of most Clostridium difficile isolates, including the epidemic lineage 027/BI/NAP1. Comparative RNA sequencing of the wild type and otherwise isogenic agrA null mutant derivatives of C. difficile R20291 revealed a network of approximately 75 differentially regulated transcripts at late exponential growth phase, including many genes associated with flagellar assembly and function, such as the major structural subunit, FliC. Other differentially regulated genes include several involved in bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis and toxin A expression. C. difficile 027 R20291 agrA mutant derivatives were poorly flagellated and exhibited reduced levels of colonization and relapses in the murine infection model. Thus, the agr locus likely plays a contributory role in the fitness and virulence potential of C. difficile strains in the 027/BI/NAP1 lineage. PMID:23772065

  15. The agr locus regulates virulence and colonization genes in Clostridium difficile 027.

    PubMed

    Martin, Melissa J; Clare, Simon; Goulding, David; Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Barquist, Lars; Browne, Hilary P; Pettit, Laura; Dougan, Gordon; Lawley, Trevor D; Wren, Brendan W

    2013-08-01

    The transcriptional regulator AgrA, a member of the LytTR family of proteins, plays a key role in controlling gene expression in some Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. AgrA is encoded by the agrACDB global regulatory locus, and orthologues are found within the genome of most Clostridium difficile isolates, including the epidemic lineage 027/BI/NAP1. Comparative RNA sequencing of the wild type and otherwise isogenic agrA null mutant derivatives of C. difficile R20291 revealed a network of approximately 75 differentially regulated transcripts at late exponential growth phase, including many genes associated with flagellar assembly and function, such as the major structural subunit, FliC. Other differentially regulated genes include several involved in bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis and toxin A expression. C. difficile 027 R20291 agrA mutant derivatives were poorly flagellated and exhibited reduced levels of colonization and relapses in the murine infection model. Thus, the agr locus likely plays a contributory role in the fitness and virulence potential of C. difficile strains in the 027/BI/NAP1 lineage.

  16. [Continuous dry fermentation of pig manure using up plug-flow type anaerobic reactor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuang; Deng, Liang-Wei; Xin, Xin; Zheng, Dan; Liu, Yi; Kong, Chui-Xue

    2012-03-01

    To solve the problems of ammonia inhibition and discharging difficulty in continuous dry fermentation of pig manure, under the experimental conditions of temperature of (25 +/- 2) degrees C and organic loading rate (TS) of 4.44 g x (L x d) (-1), a lab-scale up plug-flow type anaerobic reactor (UPAR) was setup to investigate biogas production, ammonia inhibition, effluent liquidity, and the feasibility of continuous dry fermentation of pig manure using up plug-flow type anaerobic reactor. The experiment was operated for 160 days using the pig manure with four different TS mass fractions (20%, 25%, 30%, 35%) as feeding. Results showed that the feeding TS mass fraction exerted a significant influence on the dry fermentation of pig manure; the stable volumetric biogas production rates of four different feeding TS mass fractions were 2.40, 1.73, 0.89, and 0.62 L x (L x d)(-1), respectively; the biogas producing efficiencies of the reactors with feeding TS mass fractions of 20%, 25% and 30% were obviously superior to that with feeding TS of 35%. With feeding TS mass fraction increased from 20% to 35%, obvious inhibition to biogas producing occurred when concentration of ammonia nitrogen reached more than 2 300 mg x L(-1). When the feeding TS mass fraction was 35%, the concentration of ammonia nitrogen could accumulate to 3 800 mg x L(-1) but biogas production rate decreased 74.1% of that with feeding TS of 20%. Additionally, while the feeding TS mass fraction was 35%, the effluent TS mass fraction achieved 17.1%, and the velocity of effluent was less than 0.002 m x s(-1) the effluent of UPAR could not be smoothly discharged.

  17. Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) Induced Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Signaling Is Essential for Murine Pancreatitis-Associated Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wodziak, Dariusz; Dong, Aiwen; Basin, Michael F; Lowe, Anson W

    2016-01-01

    A recently published study identified Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) as a regulator of EGFR signaling by promoting receptor presentation from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. AGR2 also promotes tissue regeneration in amphibians and fish. Whether AGR2-induced EGFR signaling is essential for tissue regeneration in higher vertebrates was evaluated using a well-characterized murine model for pancreatitis. The impact of AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling on tissue regeneration was evaluated using the caerulein-induced pancreatitis mouse model. EGFR signaling and cell proliferation were examined in the context of the AGR2-/- null mouse or with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG1478. In addition, the Hippo signaling coactivator YAP1 was evaluated in the context of AGR2 expression during pancreatitis. Pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression enabled EGFR translocation to the plasma membrane, the initiation of cell signaling, and cell proliferation. EGFR signaling and tissue regeneration were partially inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, but absent in the AGR2-/- null mouse. AG1478-treated and AGR2-/- null mice with pancreatitis died whereas all wild-type controls recovered. YAP1 activation was also dependent on pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression. AGR2-induced EGFR signaling was essential for tissue regeneration and recovery from pancreatitis. The results establish tissue regeneration as a major function of AGR2-induced EGFR signaling in adult higher vertebrates. Enhanced AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling are also universally present in human pancreatic cancer, which support a linkage between tissue injury, regeneration, and cancer pathogenesis.

  18. Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) Induced Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Signaling Is Essential for Murine Pancreatitis-Associated Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wodziak, Dariusz; Dong, Aiwen; Basin, Michael F.; Lowe, Anson W.

    2016-01-01

    A recently published study identified Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) as a regulator of EGFR signaling by promoting receptor presentation from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. AGR2 also promotes tissue regeneration in amphibians and fish. Whether AGR2-induced EGFR signaling is essential for tissue regeneration in higher vertebrates was evaluated using a well-characterized murine model for pancreatitis. The impact of AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling on tissue regeneration was evaluated using the caerulein-induced pancreatitis mouse model. EGFR signaling and cell proliferation were examined in the context of the AGR2-/- null mouse or with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG1478. In addition, the Hippo signaling coactivator YAP1 was evaluated in the context of AGR2 expression during pancreatitis. Pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression enabled EGFR translocation to the plasma membrane, the initiation of cell signaling, and cell proliferation. EGFR signaling and tissue regeneration were partially inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, but absent in the AGR2-/- null mouse. AG1478-treated and AGR2-/- null mice with pancreatitis died whereas all wild-type controls recovered. YAP1 activation was also dependent on pancreatitis-induced AGR2 expression. AGR2-induced EGFR signaling was essential for tissue regeneration and recovery from pancreatitis. The results establish tissue regeneration as a major function of AGR2-induced EGFR signaling in adult higher vertebrates. Enhanced AGR2 expression and EGFR signaling are also universally present in human pancreatic cancer, which support a linkage between tissue injury, regeneration, and cancer pathogenesis. PMID:27764193

  19. Issues of intergranular embrittlement of VVER-type nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabusov, O.

    2016-04-01

    In light of worldwide tendency to extension of service life of operating nuclear power plants - VVER-type in the first place - recently a special attention is concentrated on phenomena taking place in reactor pressure vessel materials that are able to lead to increased level of mechanical characteristics degradation (resistibility to brittle fracture) during long term of operation. Formerly the hardening mechanism of degradation (increase in the yield strength under influence of irradiation) mainly had been taken into consideration to assess pressure vessel service life limitations, but when extending the service life up to 60 years and more the non-hardening mechanism (intergranular embrittlement of the steels) must be taken into account as well. In this connection NRC “Kurchatov Institute” has initiated a number of works on investigations of this mechanism contribution to the total embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The main results of these investigations are described in this article. Results of grain boundary phosphorus concentration measurements in specimens made of first generation of VVER-type pressure vessels materials as well as VVER-1000 surveillance specimens are presented. An assessment of non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total ductile-to- brittle transition temperature shift is given.

  20. NOx removal using a wet type plasma reactor based on a three-electrode device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolibois, J.; Takashima, K.; Mizuno, A.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a wet type plasma reactor based on a three electrode device is investigated experimentally in order to remove NO and NOx at low flow rate. First, a comparison of cleaning performances of gas exhaust has been performed when the surface discharge operates in DBD or SD modes. From these previous results, the second part of study has consisted to improve the electrochemical conversion of the wet type plasma reactor by adding a coil between the AC HV power supply and the surface discharge. The parametric study has been performed with 100 ppm of NO content in gas flow at room temperature and atmospheric pressure for a flow rate of 1 L/min. For each electrical parameter tested, an electric characterization and measurement of NOx content via FT-IR has been conducted. The results highlight a better cleaning of gas exhaust when the surface discharge operates in DBD mode. Moreover, the presence of solution promotes the arc transition when the operating mode is SD, resulting a reliability reduction of plasma device. In addition, the measurements show that the insertion of coil in the electrical circuit improves the NOx removal at a given power consumption for the DBD operating mode.

  1. AGR-5/6/7 LEUCO Kernel Fabrication Readiness Review

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Douglas W.; Bailey, Kirk W.

    2015-02-01

    In preparation for forming low-enriched uranium carbide/oxide (LEUCO) fuel kernels for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel development and qualification program, Idaho National Laboratory conducted an operational readiness review of the Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group – Lynchburg (B&W NOG-L) procedures, processes, and equipment from January 14 – January 16, 2015. The readiness review focused on requirements taken from the American Society Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Nuclear Quality Assurance Standard (NQA-1-2008, 1a-2009), a recent occurrence at the B&W NOG-L facility related to preparation of acid-deficient uranyl nitrate solution (ADUN), and a relook at concerns noted in a previous review. Topic areas open for the review were communicated to B&W NOG-L in advance of the on-site visit to facilitate the collection of objective evidences attesting to the state of readiness.

  2. Analysis of Fission Products on the AGR-1 Capsule Components

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Jason M. Harp; Philip L. Winston; Scott A. Ploger

    2013-03-01

    The components of the AGR-1 irradiation capsules were analyzed to determine the retained inventory of fission products in order to determine the extent of in-pile fission product release from the fuel compacts. This includes analysis of (i) the metal capsule components, (ii) the graphite fuel holders, (iii) the graphite spacers, and (iv) the gas exit lines. The fission products most prevalent in the components were Ag-110m, Cs 134, Cs 137, Eu-154, and Sr 90, and the most common location was the metal capsule components and the graphite fuel holders. Gamma scanning of the graphite fuel holders was also performed to determine spatial distribution of Ag-110m and radiocesium. Silver was released from the fuel components in significant fractions. The total Ag-110m inventory found in the capsules ranged from 1.2×10 2 (Capsule 3) to 3.8×10 1 (Capsule 6). Ag-110m was not distributed evenly in the graphite fuel holders, but tended to concentrate at the axial ends of the graphite holders in Capsules 1 and 6 (located at the top and bottom of the test train) and near the axial center in Capsules 2, 3, and 5 (in the center of the test train). The Ag-110m further tended to be concentrated around fuel stacks 1 and 3, the two stacks facing the ATR reactor core and location of higher burnup, neutron fluence, and temperatures compared with Stack 2. Detailed correlation of silver release with fuel type and irradiation temperatures is problematic at the capsule level due to the large range of temperatures experienced by individual fuel compacts in each capsule. A comprehensive Ag 110m mass balance for the capsules was performed using measured inventories of individual compacts and the inventory on the capsule components. For most capsules, the mass balance was within 11% of the predicted inventory. The Ag-110m release from individual compacts often exhibited a very large range within a particular capsule.

  3. Alloy development for first wall materials used in water-cooling type fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Ishiyama, T.; Hishinuma, A.

    1991-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steels with high resistance to IASCC were developed for the first wall used in a water cooling type fusion reactor. New alloys with ultra low carbon content were designed to improve all-round properties relevant to the reliability below 450°C, by enhancing the austenite phase stability and purifying the austenite matrix. For this purpose, these were manufactured by means of controlling minor elements, adjusting principal elements and applying SAR thermomechanical treatment. The major characteristics of these alloys were compared with that of Type 316 and JPCA. These alloys showed a good swelling resistance to electron irradiation and high cracking resistance to high heat fluxes of hydrogen beam. The ductility loss and decrease of tensile strength at the objective temperature were also minimized.

  4. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Scott Ploger; John Hunn

    2012-05-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Five irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These five compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The five compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. Approximately 40 to 80 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to mid-plane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 830 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  5. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Scott Ploger; John Hunn; Jay S. Kehn

    2012-09-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Six irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These six compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The six compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. From 36 to 79 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to midplane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 931 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  6. Proposal for a novel type of small scale aneutronic fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, J.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a novel scheme for a small scale aneutronic fusion reactor. This new reactor type makes use of the advantages of combining laser driven plasma acceleration and electrostatic confinement fusion. An intense laser beam is used to create a lithium-proton plasma with high density, which is then collimated and focused into the centre of the fusion reaction chamber. The basic concept presented here is based on the 7Li-proton fusion reaction. However, the physical and technological fundamentals may generally as well be applied to 11B-proton fusion. The former fusion reaction path offers higher energy yields while the latter has larger fusion cross sections. Within this paper a technological realisation of such a fusion device, which allows a steady state operation with highly energetic, well collimated ion beam, is presented. It will be demonstrated that the energetic break even can be reached with this device by using a combination of already existing technologies.

  7. Transmutation and activation analysis for divertor materials in a HCLL-type fusion power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Möslang, A.; Rieth, M.

    2009-04-01

    The activation and transmutation of tungsten and tantalum as plasma facing materials was assessed for a helium cooled divertor irradiated in a typical fusion power reactor based on the use of Helium-cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) blankets. 3D activation calculations were performed by applying a programme system linking the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP and the fusion inventory code FISPACT through an appropriate interface. Special attention was given to the proper treatment of the resonance shielding of tungsten and tantalum by using reaction rates provided directly by MCNP on the basis of continuous energy activation cross-section data. It was shown that the long-term activation behaviour is dominated by activation products of the assumed tramp material while the short-term behaviour is due to the activation of the stable Ta and W isotopes. The recycling limit for remote handling of 100 mSv/h can be achieved after decay times of 10 and 50 years for Ta and W, respectively. The elemental transmutation rates of Ta and W were shown to be on a moderate level for the HCLL-type fusion power reactor.

  8. AGR-3/4 Final Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 151A through 155B-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh T.

    2015-03-01

    This report provides the qualification status of experimental data for the entire Advanced Gas Reactor 3/4 (AGR 3/4) fuel irradiation. AGR-3/4 is the third in a series of planned irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program, which supports development of the advanced reactor technology under the INL ART Technology Development Office (TDO). The main objective of AGR-3/4 irradiation is to provide a known source of fission products for subsequent transport through compact matrix and structural graphite materials due to the presence of designed-to-fail fuel particles. Full power irradiation of the AGR 3/4 test began on December 14, 2011 (ATR Cycle 151A), and was completed on April 12, 2014 (end of ATR Cycle 155B) after 369.1 effective full power days of irradiation. The AGR-3/4 test was in the reactor core for eight of the ten ATR cycles between 151A and 155B. During the unplanned outage cycle, 153A, the experiment was removed from the ATR northeast flux trap (NEFT) location and stored in the ATR canal. This was to prevent overheating of fuel compacts due to higher than normal ATR power during the subsequent Powered Axial Locator Mechanism cycle, 153B. The AGR 3/4 test was inserted back into the ATR NEFT location during the outage of ATR Cycle 154A on April 26, 2013. Therefore, the AGR-3/4 irradiation data received during these 2 cycles (153A and 153B) are irrelevant and their qualification status isnot included in this report. Additionally, during ATR Cycle 152A the ATR core ran at low power for a short enough duration that the irradiation data are not used for physics and thermal calculations. However, the qualification status of irradiation data for this cycle is still covered in this report. As a result, this report includes data from 8 ATR Cycles: 151A, 151B, 152A, 152B, 154A, 154B, 155A, and 155B, as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and

  9. Post-irradiation Examination and Fission Product Inventory Analysis of AGR-1 Irradiation Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    J M Harp; P D Demkowicz; S A Ploger

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment was the first in a series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments designed to test TRISO fuel under High Temperature Gas Reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post-irradiation examination (PIE) at INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). The inventory and distribution of fission products, especially Ag-110m, was assessed and analyzed for all the components of the AGR-1 capsules. This data should help inform the study of fission product migration in coated particle fuel. Gamma spectrometry was used to measure the activity of various different fission products in the different components of the AGR-1 test train. Each capsule contained: 12 fuel compacts, a graphite holder that kept the fuel compacts in place, graphite spacers that were above and below the graphite holders and fuel compacts, gas lines through which a helium neon gas mixture flowed in and out of each capsule, and the stainless steel shell that contained the experiment. Gamma spectrometry results and the experimental techniques used to capture these results will be presented for all the capsule components. The components were assayed to determine the total activity of different fission products present in or on them. These totals are compared to the total expected activity of a particular fission product in the capsule based on predictions from physics simulation. Based on this metric, a significant fraction of the Ag-110m was detected outside the fuel compacts, but the amount varied highly between the 6 capsules. Very small fractions of Cs-137 (<2E-5), Cs-134 (<1e-5), and Eu-154 (<4e-4) were detected outside of the fuel compacts. Additionally, the distribution of select fission products in some of the components including the fuel compacts and the graphite holders were measured and will be discussed.

  10. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Pre-Production Test: NUCO350-75T-Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D; Lowden, Richard Andrew; Pappano, Peter J

    2006-03-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for compact lot NUCO350-75T-Z. This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite NUCO350-75T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 m natural uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (NUCO). The compacts and coated particles were produced as part of a development effort at ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The kernels were obtained from BWXT and were identified as composite G73B-NU-69300. The BWXT kernel lot G73B-NU-69300 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating. The ORNL identification for these kernel sublots was NUCO350-## (where ## were a series of integers beginning with 01). NUCO350-75T-Z was produced as part of the ORNL AGR development effort and is not fully representative of a final product. This compact lot was the first run through of the entire ORNL AGR-1 irradiation test fuel production process involving coating, characterization, and compacting of TRISO-coated 350 m NUCO. The results of this exercise were used to fine tune the irradiation test fuel production process and as a basis for the decision to proceed with the production of the baseline fuel for the AGR-1 irradiation test.

  11. Lessons learned from application of the LBB concept to the NPPs with VVER 440 type 213 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Pecinka, L.; Zdarek, J.

    1995-12-01

    Based on the high safety significance of the Leak Before Break (LBB) concept for nuclear power plants (NPPS) with Soviet Pressure Water Reactors with electrical power 440 MW denominated as VVER 440 type 230, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has decided to pay more attention to this important issue in order to assist countries operating these first generation VVERs. As part of the safety enhancement of nuclear power plants with VVER type 213 reactors, the leak before break concept has been applied to all NPPs operated in Czech and Slovak Republics. Lessons learned through statistical and mechanistic evaluations are presented.

  12. Synthesis of layered double hydroxide nanosheets by coprecipitation using a T-type microchannel reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiujiang; Sun, Meiyu; Ma, Xiuming; Hou, Wanguo

    2014-02-01

    The synthesis of Mg2Al-NO3 layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets by coprecipitation using a T-type microchannel reactor is reported. Aqueous LDH nanosheet dispersions were obtained. The LDH nanosheets were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and particle size analysis, and the transmittance and viscosity of LDH nanosheet dispersions were examined. The two-dimensional LDH nanosheets consisted of 1-2 brucite-like layers and were stable for ca. 16 h at room temperature. In addition, the co-assembly between LDH nanosheets and dodecyl sulfate (DS) anions was carried out, and a DS intercalated LDH nanohybrid was obtained. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of LDH nanosheets being directly prepared in bulk aqueous solution. This simple, cheap method can provide naked LDH nanosheets in high quantities, which can be used as building blocks for functional materials.

  13. Declassification of radioactive water from a pool type reactor after nuclear facility dismantling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, J. M.; Sancho, M.; García-Fayos, B.; Verdú, G.; Serrano, C.; Ruiz-Martínez, J. T.

    2017-09-01

    This work is aimed to the treatment of the radioactive water from a dismantled nuclear facility with an experimental pool type reactor. The main objective of the treatment is to declassify the maximum volume of water and thus decrease the volume of radioactive liquid waste to be managed. In a preliminary stage, simulation of treatment by the combination of reverse osmosis (RO) and evaporation have been performed. Predicted results showed that the combination of membrane and evaporation technologies would result in a volume reduction factor higher than 600. The estimated time to complete the treatment was around 650 h (25-30 days). For different economical and organizational reasons which are explained in this paper, the final treatment of the real waste had to be reduced and only evaporation was applied. The volume reduction factor achieved in the real treatment was around 170, and the time spent for treatment was 194 days.

  14. High Purity and Yield of Boron Nitride Nanotubes Using Amorphous Boron and a Nozzle-Type Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaewoo; Seo, Duckbong; Yoo, Jeseung; Jeong, Wanseop; Seo, Young-Soo; Kim, Jaeyong

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of the production yield of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with high purity was achieved using an amorphous boron-based precursor and a nozzle-type reactor. Use of a mixture of amorphous boron and Fe decreases the milling time for the preparation of the precursor for BNNTs synthesis, as well as the Fe impurity contained in the B/Fe interdiffused precursor nanoparticles by using a simple purification process. We also explored a nozzle-type reactor that increased the production yield of BNNTs compared to a conventional flow-through reactor. By using a nozzle-type reactor with amorphous boron-based precursor, the weight of the BNNTs sample after annealing was increased as much as 2.5-times with much less impurities compared to the case for the flow-through reactor with the crystalline boron-based precursor. Under the same experimental conditions, the yield and quantity of BNNTs were estimated as much as ~70% and ~1.15 g/batch for the former, while they are ~54% and 0.78 g/batch for the latter. PMID:28788161

  15. High Purity and Yield of Boron Nitride Nanotubes Using Amorphous Boron and a Nozzle-Type Reactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaewoo; Seo, Duckbong; Yoo, Jeseung; Jeong, Wanseop; Seo, Young-Soo; Kim, Jaeyong

    2014-08-11

    Enhancement of the production yield of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with high purity was achieved using an amorphous boron-based precursor and a nozzle-type reactor. Use of a mixture of amorphous boron and Fe decreases the milling time for the preparation of the precursor for BNNTs synthesis, as well as the Fe impurity contained in the B/Fe interdiffused precursor nanoparticles by using a simple purification process. We also explored a nozzle-type reactor that increased the production yield of BNNTs compared to a conventional flow-through reactor. By using a nozzle-type reactor with amorphous boron-based precursor, the weight of the BNNTs sample after annealing was increased as much as 2.5-times with much less impurities compared to the case for the flow-through reactor with the crystalline boron-based precursor. Under the same experimental conditions, the yield and quantity of BNNTs were estimated as much as ~70% and ~1.15 g/batch for the former, while they are ~54% and 0.78 g/batch for the latter.

  16. Preoperative Albumin to Globulin Ratio (AGR) as Prognostic Factor in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobo; Guo, Shengjie; Chen, Dong; Yang, Guangwei; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yijun; He, Qiuming; Qin, Zike; Liu, Zhuowei; Xue, Yunfei; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ruiwu; Zhou, Fangjian; Han, Hui; Yao, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition and systemic inflammatory response are frequently associated with prognosis in patients with several types of cancer, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The study is aimed to investigate the ability of preoperative serum albumin to globulin ratio (AGR) to predict the long-term mortality of RCC patients. Methods: The study is a retrospective study of an unselected cohort of 895 RCC patients who underwent a curative radical or partial nephrectomy at the Department of Urology in the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center between January 2000 and December 2012 and had documented preoperative serum total protein and albumin (ALB) levels. The preoperative AGR was calculated as the ratio of ALB to (total protein-ALB) and its association with other clinical indices was assessed using survival analysis. Results: Low preoperative AGR was associated with older population, lower hemoglobin, higher total protein, lower ALB, lower body mass index and advanced stage. The univariate and multivariate Cox analyses demonstrated that preoperative AGR was an independent prognostic indicator of overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio (HR): 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.43 to 0.93, P=0.022). In addition, patients with low preoperative AGR at pT1-2, pT3-4, pN0, pN1, pM0 and pM1 stages had significantly shorter OS than patients with high preoperative AGR. Conclusion: Preoperative AGR is a proven objective, reproducible, inexpensive survival predictor of RCC patients following surgical resection and should be considered for routine clinical use. PMID:28243330

  17. Limitations in the use of PSMγ, agr, RNAIII, and biofilm formation as biomarkers to define invasive Staphylococcus epidermidis from chronic biomedical device-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Harris, Llinos G; Dudley, Ed; Rohde, Holger; Frommelt, Lars; Siemssen, Nicolaus; Wilkinson, Thomas S; Mack, Dietrich

    2017-10-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common cause of biomedical device-associated infections. Agr is the major quorum sensing system in staphylococci and regulates virulence factors. Four agr-specificity groups exist in S. epidermidis, and chronic S. epidermidis infections are hypothesised to select for agr-negative phenotypes. Therefore, we investigated S. epidermidis strains from prosthetic joint- and catheter-associated infections to establish i) whether an infection selects for an agr-negative phenotype; ii) the importance of PSMγ and iii) if the agr-specificity group is infection dependent. S. epidermidis nasal isolates from healthy volunteers were used as controls. The distribution of agr-specificity groups was significantly different between infection and control episodes, but did not distinguish between the infection types. PSMγ secretion was used to determine agr-activity and HPLC analysis showed that 44% of prosthetic and 32% of catheter-associated episodes produced no PSMγ in comparison to 8% of the control strains. However, PSMγ expression did not always correlate with RNAIII up-regulation, indicating that PSMγ synthesis is likely influenced by additional post-transcriptional control. The data suggests chronic S. epidermidis infections favour agr-specificity group 1 but the results suggest that they do not select for an agr-negative phenotype. Further studies are required to explore the mechanisms underlying the selection and survival of these S. epidermidis phenotypes isolated from biomedical device-associated infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a

  19. Design and fabrication of a fixed-bed batch type pyrolysis reactor for pilot scale pyrolytic oil production in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Mohammad Abdul; Al-khulaidi, Rami Ali; Rashid, MM; Islam, M. R.; Rashid, MAN

    2017-03-01

    In this research, a development and performance test of a fixed-bed batch type pyrolysis reactor for pilot scale pyrolysis oil production was successfully completed. The characteristics of the pyrolysis oil were compared to other experimental results. A solid horizontal condenser, a burner for furnace heating and a reactor shield were designed. Due to the pilot scale pyrolytic oil production encountered numerous problems during the plant’s operation. This fixed-bed batch type pyrolysis reactor method will demonstrate the energy saving concept of solid waste tire by creating energy stability. From this experiment, product yields (wt. %) for liquid or pyrolytic oil were 49%, char 38.3 % and pyrolytic gas 12.7% with an operation running time of 185 minutes.

  20. Bubbling Reactor Technology for Rapid Synthesis of Uniform, Small MFI-Type Zeolite Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Rao, Yuxiang; Wan, Haiying; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.

    2011-06-27

    MFI-type zeolite is an important family of materials used in today’s industries as catalysts and adsorbents. Preparation of this type of zeolite material as uniform and pure crystals of sizes from tens of nanometer to hundreds of nanometer are not only desired by current catalytic and adsorption processes for enhanced reaction kinetics and/or selectivity, but also much needed by some new applications, such as CO2 capture adsorbents and composite materials. However, it has been a major challenge in the zeolite synthesis field to prepare small crystals of MFI-type zeolite over a range of Si/Al ratio with very high throughput. In this work, a gas-bubbling flow reactor is used to conduct hydrothermal growth of the zeolite crystals with controllable Si/Al ratio and crystal sizes. Distinctive, uniform ZSM-5 crystals are successfully synthesized within two hours of reaction time, exceptionally short compared to the conventional synthesis process. The crystals are small enough to form a stable milk-like suspension in water. The Si/Al ratio can be controlled by adjusting the growth solution composition and reaction conditions over a range from about 9 to infinity. Characterization by SEM/EDS, XRD, TEM, N2 adsorption/desorption, and NMR confirms ZSM-5 crystal structures and reveals presence of meso-porosity in the resulting crystals.

  1. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Ploger; Paul Demkowicz; John Hunn; Robert Morris

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3×105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Five compacts have been examined so far, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose between approximately 40-80 individual particles on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer-IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, over 800 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in approximately 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel swelling into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer-IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only three particles, all in conjunction with IPyC-SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures, IPyC-SiC debonds, and SiC fractures.

  2. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Scott A. Ploger; Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Jay S. Kehn

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak compact-average burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3 x 105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Six compacts have been examined, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose from 36 to 79 individual particles near midplane on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer–IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, 981 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel protrusion into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer–IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only four classified particles, all in conjunction with IPyC–SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures and IPyC–SiC debonds.

  3. The cefazolin inoculum effect in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus blood isolates: their association with dysfunctional accessory gene regulator (agr).

    PubMed

    Wi, Yu Mi; Park, Young Kyoung; Moon, Chisook; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Lee, Hyuck; Ki, Hyun Kyun; Cheong, Hae Suk; Son, Jun Seong; Lee, Jin Seo; Kwon, Ki Tae; Kim, June Myong; Ha, Young Eun; Kang, Cheol In; Ko, Kwan Soo; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated the clinical significance of the cefazolin inoculum effect (CIE) in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolates. In total, 146 isolates were recovered from patients with MSSA bacteremia at 9 hospitals in Korea. The CIE was observed in 16 MSSA isolates, and while type A was the only detected β-lactamase in MSSA isolates exhibiting the CIE, no strains expressing type B, C, or D β-lactamases exhibited this effect. The CIE was only observed in agr group III and I isolates and was significantly more common in isolates with agr dysfunction than in those with functional agr (P<0.001). Even among isolates producing type A β-lactamase, the CIE was also prevalent in isolates with dysfunctional agr than in isolates with functional agr (P=0.025). This study demonstrates an association between the CIE of MSSA isolates and agr dysfunction, in addition to those between the CIE and type A β-lactamase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of VVER type reactors at long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of the spent nuclear fuel of VVER-1000 type reactors are calculated during storage time up to 300,000 y. Decay heat power of radioactive waste (radwaste) determines parameters of the heat removal system for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. Radiotoxicity determines the radiological hazard of radwaste after its leakage and penetration into the environment.

  5. Formation of a nuclear reactor's molten core bath in a crucible-type corium catcher for a nuclear power station equipped with VVER reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshta, S. V.; Vitol', S. A.; Granovskii, V. S.; Kalyago, E. K.; Kovtunova, S. V.; Krushinov, E. V.; Sulatskaya, M. B.; Sulatskii, A. A.; Khabenskii, V. B.; Al'Myashev, V. I.; Gusarov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    Results from a calculation study on analyzing the formation of a melt bath in a crucible-type catcher for the conditions of a severe accident at a nuclear power station equipped with VVER-1000 reactors are presented. It is shown that the heat loads exerted on the water-cooled walls of the corium catcher shell are limited to a permissible level at which the necessary margins to nucleate boiling crisis and to destruction are ensured under the conditions of thermal and mechanical loading of the shell. An important role of sacrificial material in the efficient operation of the corium catcher is pointed out.

  6. Experimental evaluation of two different types of reactors for CO2 removal from gaseous stream by bottom ash accelerated carbonation.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, L; Carnevale, E A; Pecorini, I

    2016-12-01

    Low methane content landfill gas may be enriched by removing carbon dioxide. An innovative process, based on carbon dioxide capture and storage by means of accelerated carbonation of bottom ash is proposed and studied for the above purpose. Within this research framework we devoted a preliminary research activity to investigate the possibility of improving the way the contact between bottom ash and landfill gas takes place: this is the scope of the work reported in this paper. Two different types of reactors - fixed bed and rotating drum - were designed and constructed for this purpose. The process was investigated at laboratory scale. As the aim of this phase was the comparison of the performances of the two different reactors, we used a pure stream of CO2 to preliminarily evaluate the reactor behaviors in the most favorable condition for the process (i.e. maximum CO2 partial pressure at ambient condition). With respect to the simple fixed bed reactor concept, some modifications were proposed, consisting of separating the ash bed in three layers. With the three layer configuration we would like to reduce the possibility for the gas to follow preferential paths through the ash bed. However, the results showed that the process performances are not significantly influenced by the multiple layer arrangement. As an alternative to the fixed bed reactor, the rotating drum concept was selected in order to provide continuous mixing of the solids. Two operating parameters were considered and varied during the tests: the filling ratio and the rotating speed. Better performances were observed for lower filling ratio while the rotating speed showed minor importance. Finally the performances of the two reactors were compared. The rotating drum reactor is able to provide improved carbon dioxide removal with respect to the fixed bed one, especially when the rotating reactor is operated at low filling ratio values and slow rotating speed values. Comparing the carbon dioxide

  7. Steam feed and effect of steam-thermal seal in thermolysis of tire shreds in a screw-type reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalitko, V. A.

    2010-05-01

    On the basis of experience in commercial operation, the effect of steam seal in tire-shred pyrolysis in a screw-type reactor with superheated steam has been considered and analytically substantiated; there, local steam feed produces the above effect at the total reduced pressure and keeps air from entering the reactor without sluices or valves used for hermetization of its loading and unloading. It has been shown that the increase in the production rate of pyrolysis due to the heating by steam amounts to 10-15% and is limited by the diffusion transfer in the reactor’s charge bed.

  8. AGR-1 Compact 1-3-1 Post-Irradiation Examination Results

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program was established to perform the requisite research and development on tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel to support deployment of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The work continues as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) TRISO Fuel program. The overarching program goal is to provide a baseline fuel qualification data set to support licensing and operation of an HTGR. To achieve these goals, the program includes the elements of fuel fabrication, irradiation, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport (INL 2015). A series of fuel irradiation experiments is being planned and conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These experiments will provide data on fuel performance under irradiation, support fuel process development, qualify the fuel for normal operating conditions, provide irradiated fuel for safety testing, and support the development of fuel performance and fission product transport models. The first of these irradiation tests, designated AGR-1, began in the ATR in December 2006 and ended in November 2009. This experiment was conducted primarily to act as a shakedown test of the multicapsule test train design and provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development. It also provided samples for post-irradiation safety testing, where fission product retention of the fuel at high temperatures will be experimentally measured. The capsule design and details of the AGR-1 experiment have been presented previously (Grover, Petti, and Maki 2010, Maki 2009).

  9. Physics concept on the constellation type fissile fuels and its application to the prospective Th-{sup 233}U reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jiahua Zhange

    1994-12-31

    In contrast with the conventional nuclear reactor which usually fuelled with one single fissile nuclide, a constellation type fissile fuels reactor consists of a parent nuclide such as {sup 232}Th or {sup 238}U and its whole family of neutron generated daughter nuclides. All of them are regarded as fissile fuels but of quite different fission ability. The concentration of each daughter nuclide is determined by its saturate concentration ratio with the parent nuclide. In such fuel system, the whole fuel consumed by neutron reaction almost completely results in fission production. In this article, some interesting properties of such fuel system, determination of the saturate concentration of each daughter nuclide and applicability to Th-{sup 233}U reactor will be discussed.

  10. The effect of birthrate granularity on the release-to-birth ratio for the AGR-1 in-core experiment

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Scates; J. B. Walter; J. T. Maki; J. W. Sterbentz; J. R. Parry

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) tristructural-isotropic-particle fuel experiment underwent 13 irradiation intervals from December 2006 until November 2009 within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant program. During this multi-year experiment, release-to-birth rate ratios were computed at the end of each operating interval to provide information about fuel performance. Fission products released during irradiation were tracked daily by the Fission Product Monitoring System using 8-h measurements. Birth rate calculated by MCNP with ORIGEN for as-run conditions were computed at the end of each irradiation interval. Each time step in MCNP provided neutron flux, reaction rates and AGR-1 compact composition, which were used to determine birth rate using ORIGEN. The initial birth-rate data, consisting of four values for each irradiation interval at the beginning, end, and two intermediate times, were interpolated to obtain values for each 8-h activity. The problem with this method is that any daily changes in heat rates or perturbations, such as shim control movement or core/lobe power fluctuations, would not be reflected in the interpolated data and a true picture of the system would not be presented. At the conclusion of the AGR-1 experiment, great efforts were put forth to compute daily birthrates, which were reprocessed with the 8-h release activity. The results of this study are presented in this paper.

  11. The Effect of Birthrate Granularity on the Release- to- Birth Ratio for the AGR-1 In-core Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn Scates; John Walter

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) tristructural-isotropic-particle fuel experiment underwent 13 irradiation intervals from December 2006 until November 2009 within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant program. During this multi-year experiment, release-to-birth rate ratios were computed at the end of each operating interval to provide information about fuel performance. Fission products released during irradiation were tracked daily by the Fission Product Monitoring System using 8-hour measurements. Birth rates calculated by MCNP with ORIGEN for as-run conditions were computed at the end of each irradiation interval. Each time step in MCNP provided neutron flux, reaction rates and AGR-1 compact composition, which were used to determine birth rates using ORIGEN. The initial birth-rate data, consisting of four values for each irradiation interval at the beginning, end, and two intermediate times, were interpolated to obtain values for each 8-hour activity. The problem with this method is that any daily changes in heat rates or perturbations, such as shim control movement or core/lobe power fluctuations, would not be reflected in the interpolated data and a true picture of the system would not be presented. At the conclusion of the AGR-1 experiment, great efforts were put forth to compute daily birthrates, which were reprocessed with the 8-hour release activity. The results of this study are presented in this paper.

  12. Implications of reactor type and conditions on first-order hydrolysis rate assessment of maize silage.

    PubMed

    Pabón Pereira, C P; Zeeman, G; Zhao, J; Ekmekci, B; van Lier, J B

    2009-01-01

    The biodegradability and first-order hydrolysis coefficient of maize silage have been assessed from batch experiments using different types of inoculum and substrate to inocula (S/I) ratios, and from CSTRs working at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). In the batch experiments, the assessed maximum biodegradability of the maize silage was 68 (+/-2.7)% and 73(+/-2.9)% while the first order hydrolysis was 0.26 (+/-0.01) and 0.27(+/-0.02) d(-1), using granular and a mixture of granular and suspended inoculum, respectively. In the CSTR experiment biodegradability ranged from 41-65% depending on the HRT applied whereas the calculated first order hydrolysis coefficient was 0.32 d(-1). It is concluded that batch experiments can be used to assess first order hydrolysis constants and biodegradability provided that a well balanced inoculum is guaranteed. Further, it is shown that CSTR reactors digesting maize silage and operating at HRTs as low as 20 days can attain 88% of maximum biodegradability as long as pH fluctuations are minimized. 2 mmol NaHCO3 per gram maize silage was calculated to suffice for the purpose.

  13. Adsorption and transformation of PAHs from water by a laccase-loading spider-type reactor.

    PubMed

    Niu, Junfeng; Dai, Yunrong; Guo, Huiyuan; Xu, Jiangjie; Shen, Zhenyao

    2013-03-15

    The remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) polluted waters has become a concern as a result of the widespread use of PAHs and their adverse impacts on water ecosystems and human health. To remove PAHs rapidly and efficiently in situ, an active fibrous membrane, laccase-loading spider-type reactor (LSTR) was fabricated by electrospinning a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PDLGA)/laccase emulsion. The LSTR is composed of beads-in-string structural core-shell fibers, with active laccase encapsulated inside the beads and nanoscale pores on the surface of the beads. This structure can load more laccase and retains higher activity than do linear structural core-shell fibers. The LSTR achieves the efficient removal/degradation of PAHs in water, which is attributed to not only the protection of the laccase activity by the core-shell structure but also the pre-concentration (adsorption) of PAHs on the surface of the LSTR and the concentration of laccase in the beads. Moreover, the effects of pH, temperature and dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration on the removal of PAHs by the LSTR, in comparison with that by free laccase, have been taken into account. A synergetic mechanism including adsorption, directional migration and degradation for PAH removal is proposed.

  14. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the U.S. Capsules in the AGR-2 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lybeck, Nancy; Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Pham, Binh T.; Hawkes, Grant L.

    2015-03-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation experiments are being conducted within the Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The main objectives of the fuel experimental campaign are to provide the necessary data on fuel performance to support fuel process development, qualify a fuel design and fabrication process for normal operation and accident conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes (PLN-3636). The AGR-2 test was inserted in the B-12 position in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in June 2010 and successfully completed irradiation in October 2013, resulting in irradiation of the TRISO fuel for 559.2 effective full power days (EFPDs) during approximately 3.3 calendar years. The AGR-2 data, including the irradiation data and calculated results, were qualified and stored in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) (Pham and Einerson 2014). To support the U.S. TRISO fuel performance assessment and to provide data for validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, the daily as-run thermal analysis has been performed separately on each of four AGR-2 U.S. capsules for the entire irradiation as discussed in (Hawkes 2014). The ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal model predicts the daily average volume-average fuel temperature and peak fuel temperature in each capsule. This thermal model involves complex physical mechanisms (e.g., graphite holder and fuel compact shrinkage) and properties (e.g., conductivity and density). Therefore, the thermal model predictions are affected by uncertainty in input parameters and by incomplete knowledge of the underlying physics leading to modeling assumptions. Therefore, alongside with the deterministic predictions from a set of input thermal conditions, information about prediction uncertainty is instrumental for the ART

  15. AgrAbility mental/behavioral health for farm/ranch families with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Roberta A; Deboy, Gail R; Jones, Paul J; Field, William E

    2011-04-01

    Farmers and their families are at high risk for work-related stressors and incidents that may result in physically disabling conditions. Coping with the acute and chronic results of disability has been documented to contribute to mental and behavioral health issues. Improvements in the ability to cope with the impact of stressors and adjustment to living with a severe disability can enhance quality of life and well-being and decrease long-term emotional complications. Due to the unique characteristics of many rural or agricultural communities (including isolation, low population density, and lack of transportation services), residents with disabilities are at significant risk for mental/behavioral health issues complicated by the lack of mental/behavioral health services and resources. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) AgrAbility Program was authorized by Congress as part of the 1990 Farm Bill to assist farmers, ranchers, their workers, and families who are impacted by disability. Initially AgrAbility services targeted physical disabilities; but as the need has become more apparent, efforts are being made to expand mental/behavioral health-related services, including referrals to appropriate sources of treatment. A survey was conducted in 2009 by the National AgrAbility Project (NAP) to identify the types of mental/behavioral health services and resources that the 21 USDA-funded State and Regional AgrAbility Projects (SRAPs) provide for their clients. Resources were also identified from three other experts in the rural mental/behavioral health field who are associated with the AgrAbility Program. The purpose of this article is to report a summary of those services and resources that are currently available through the AgrAbility network. Recommendations for the NAP concerning mental/behavioral health initiatives and implementation strategies for the SRAPs are also presented.

  16. Operating characteristic analysis of a 400 mH class HTS DC reactor in connection with a laboratory scale LCC type HVDC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Kwangmin; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Lee, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) devices are being developed due to their advantages. Most line commutated converter based high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission systems for long-distance transmission require large inductance of DC reactor; however, generally, copper-based reactors cause a lot of electrical losses during the system operation. This is driving researchers to develop a new type of DC reactor using HTS wire. The authors have developed a 400 mH class HTS DC reactor and a laboratory scale test-bed for line-commutated converter type HVDC system and applied the HTS DC reactor to the HVDC system to investigate their operating characteristics. The 400 mH class HTS DC reactor is designed using a toroid type magnet. The HVDC system is designed in the form of a mono-pole system with thyristor-based 12-pulse power converters. In this paper, the investigation results of the HTS DC reactor in connection with the HVDC system are described. The operating characteristics of the HTS DC reactor are analyzed under various operating conditions of the system. Through the results, applicability of an HTS DC reactor in an HVDC system is discussed in detail.

  17. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor) subassembly types

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-09-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel.

  18. Analysis of steam explosions in plate-type, uranium-aluminum fuel test reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P. )

    1989-01-01

    The concern over steam explosions in nuclear reactors can be traced to prompt critical nuclear excursions in aluminum-clad/fueled test reactors, as well as to explosive events in aluminum, pulp, and paper industries. The Reactor Safety Study prompted an extensive analytical and experimental effort for over a decade. This has led to significant improvements in their understanding of the steam explosion issue for commercial light water reactors. However, little progress has been made toward applying the lessons learned from this effort to the understanding and modeling of steam explosion phenomena in aluminum-clad/fueled research and test reactors. The purposes of this paper are to (a) provide a preliminary analysis of the destructive events in test reactors, based on current understandings of steam explosions; (b) provide a proposed approach for determining the likelihood of a steam explosion event under scenarios in which molten U-Al fuel drops into a water-filled cavity; and (c) present a benchmarking study conducted to estimate peak pressure pulse magnitudes.

  19. Analysis of the Genetic Variability of Genes Encoding the RNA III-Activating Components Agr and TRAP in a Population of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Cows with Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Gilot, Philippe; Lina, Gérard; Cochard, Thierry; Poutrel, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    The expression of Staphylococcus aureus virulence proteins is under the control of RNA III, a central pleiotropic regulator transcribed from the agr locus. RNA III is activated by at least two two-component systems, one encoded by the agr locus (AgrC-AgrA) and another encoded outside of this locus (TRAP-RAP). In this work, we developed new typing methods based on genes encoding these two systems, which we used to characterize a nonclonal population of S. aureus bovine mastitis isolates. Twelve agr restriction types were identified in this population, but the majority of strains (56.3%) were grouped in the R III-A1 type. No strain isolated from humans, whose agr sequence is available from GenBank, was found to belong to this major type. Restriction maps constructed for all of those agr variants allowed the linking of all types in an evolution scheme and their grouping in one of the four agr interference groups. This analysis indicates that groups 2, 3, and 4 probably evolved from the more frequently encountered type, which belongs to group 1. agr group 1 was also found to be the most prevalent (69.0% of the strains) and the most polymorphic interference group. By developing an agr group-specific multiplex PCR, we confirmed the above classification of strains in the agr interference groups. Four allelic variants of trap were also identified, indicating that this two-component system is also polymorphic. The majority of strains was grouped in the trap 1 type (71.8%). Whereas no relationships between agr group and trap types were found, strains of similar agr restriction type were also of similar trap type (with the exception of strains belonging to the agr R IV-A5 and R VI-A8 types). Our analysis indicates that S. aureus isolated from cows has predominantly a clonal structure and that the highly prevalent agr R III-A1, trap 1 type (56.3% of the strains) probably possesses a genetic background which endows it with superior ability to infect the bovine mammary gland

  20. The technique and preliminary results of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel testing in the MIR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Izhutov, A.L.; Starkov, V.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Fedoseev, V.Ye.; Dobrikova, I.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Suprun, V.B.; Kartashov, Ye.F.; Lukichev, V.A.; Troyanov, V.M.; Enin, A.A.; Tkachev, A.A.

    2008-07-15

    In March 2007 in-pile testing of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel elements was started in the MIR reactor. Four prototype fuel elements for Uzbekistan WWR SM reactor are being tested simultaneously - two of tube type design and two of pin type design. The dismountable irradiation devices were constructed for intermediate reloading and inspection of fuel elements during reactor testing. The objective of the test is to obtain the experimental results for determination of more reliable design and licensing fuel elements for conversion of the WWR SM reactor. The heat power of fuel elements is measured on-line by thermal balance method. The distribution of fission density and burn-up of uranium in the volume of elements are calculated by using the MIR reactor MCU code (Monte-Carlo) model. In this paper the design of fuel elements, the technique, main parameters and preliminary results are described. (author)

  1. Microflora evaluation of two agro-industrial effluents treated by the JACTO jet-loop type reactor system.

    PubMed

    Eusébio, A; Mateus, M; Baeta-Hall, L; Almeida-Vara, E; Duarte, J C

    2005-01-01

    Jet-loop type reactors developed in our group have been successfully used for biological treatment of winery and olive oil wastewaters. The objective of the present work was to study the influence of the reactor hydrodynamics, causing high shear stress applied on the nozzle and its influence on the composition of the microbial population. Winery and olive oil industry effluents were treated and analysed. Microbial consortia were enriched and selected under different bio-treatment conditions of the effluents. In the case of the winery wastewaters, the isolates identified belong to the genera of Pseudomonas and Bacillus. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also present in the consortia but no filamentous fungi were detected. In the case of the olive oil wastewaters, Bacillus megaterium 2 was the predominant microorganism. It was not detected any type of fungi.

  2. Low drift type N thermocouples in out-of-pile advanced gas reactor mock-up test: metallurgical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Scervini, M.; Palmer, J.; Haggard, D.C.; Swank, W.D.

    2015-07-01

    Thermocouples are the most commonly used sensors for temperature measurement in nuclear reactors. They are crucial for the control of current nuclear reactors and for the development of GEN IV reactors. In nuclear applications thermocouples are strongly affected by intense neutron fluxes. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. Thermocouple drift can be very significant for in-pile temperature measurements and may render the temperature sensors unreliable after exposure to nuclear radiation for relatively short times compared to the life required for temperature sensors in nuclear applications. Previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of Nickel based thermocouples is limited to temperatures lower than 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. As part of a collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the University of Cambridge a variety of Type N thermocouples have been exposed at INL in an Advanced Gas Reactor mock-up test at 1150 deg. C for 2000 h, 1200 deg. C for 2000 h, 125 deg. C for 200 h and 1300 deg. C for 200 h, and later analysed metallurgically at the University of Cambridge. The use of electron microscopy allows to identify the metallurgical changes occurring in the thermocouples during high temperature exposure and correlate the time dependent thermocouple drift with the microscopic changes experienced by the thermoelements of different thermocouple designs. In this paper conventional Inconel 600 sheathed type N thermocouples and a type N using a customized sheath developed at the University of

  3. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Haydary, J.; Susa, D.; Dudáš, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of aseptic packages was carried out in a laboratory flow reactor. ► Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields was obtained. ► Composition of the pyrolysis products was estimated. ► Secondary thermal and catalytic decomposition of tars was studied. ► Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  4. Lessons Learned From Gen I Carbon Dioxide Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Shropshire

    2004-04-01

    This paper provides a review of early gas cooled reactors including the Magnox reactors originating in the United Kingdom and the subsequent development of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). These early gas cooled reactors shared a common coolant medium, namely carbon dioxide (CO2). A framework of information is provided about these early reactors and identifies unique problems/opportunities associated with use of CO2 as a coolant. Reactor designers successfully rose to these challenges. After years of successful use of the CO2 gas cooled reactors in Europe, the succeeding generation of reactors, called the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR), were designed with Helium gas as the coolant. Again, in the 21st century, with the latest reactor designs under investigation in Generation IV, there is a revived interest in developing Gas Cooled Fast Reactors that use CO2 as the reactor coolant. This paper provides a historical perspective on the 52 CO2 reactors and the reactor programs that developed them. The Magnox and AGR design features and safety characteristics were reviewed, as well as the technologies associated with fuel storage, reprocessing, and disposal. Lessons-learned from these programs are noted to benefit the designs of future generations of gas cooled nuclear reactors.

  5. Properties of bio-oil generated by a pyrolysis of forest cedar residuals with the movable Auger-type reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Shun; Ebitani, Kohki; Miyazato, Akio

    2016-02-01

    Our research project has developed the new movable reactor for bio-oil production in 2013 on the basis of Auger-type system. This package would be a great impact due to the concept of local production for local consumption in the hilly and mountainous area in not only Japan but also in the world. Herein, we would like to report the properties of the bio-oil generated by the developing Auger-type movable reactor. The synthesized bio-oil possessed C: 46.2 wt%, H: 6.5 wt%, N: wt%, S: <0.1 wt%, O: 46.8 wt% and H{sub 2}O: 18.4 wt%, and served a good calorific value of 18.1 MJ/kg. The spectroscopic and mass analyses such as FT-IR, GC-MS, {sup 13}C-NMR and FT-ICR MS supported that the bio-oil was composed by the fine mixtures of methoxy phenols and variety of alcohol or carboxylic acid functional groups. Thus, it is suggested that the bio-oil generated by the new movable Auger-type reactor has a significant potential as well as the existing bio-oil reported previously.

  6. Properties of bio-oil generated by a pyrolysis of forest cedar residuals with the movable Auger-type reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shun; Miyazato, Akio; Ebitani, Kohki

    2016-02-01

    Our research project has developed the new movable reactor for bio-oil production in 2013 on the basis of Auger-type system. This package would be a great impact due to the concept of local production for local consumption in the hilly and mountainous area in not only Japan but also in the world. Herein, we would like to report the properties of the bio-oil generated by the developing Auger-type movable reactor. The synthesized bio-oil possessed C: 46.2 wt%, H: 6.5 wt%, N: wt%, S: <0.1 wt%, O: 46.8 wt% and H2O: 18.4 wt%, and served a good calorific value of 18.1 MJ/kg. The spectroscopic and mass analyses such as FT-IR, GC-MS, 13C-NMR and FT-ICR MS supported that the bio-oil was composed by the fine mixtures of methoxy phenols and variety of alcohol or carboxylic acid functional groups. Thus, it is suggested that the bio-oil generated by the new movable Auger-type reactor has a significant potential as well as the existing bio-oil reported previously.

  7. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition.

    PubMed

    Haydary, J; Susa, D; Dudáš, J

    2013-05-01

    Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H2, CO, CH4, CO2 and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  8. Comparison of silver release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-2 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Harp, Jason M.; Hunn, John D.

    2016-11-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict silver release from tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and compacts during the second irradiation experiment (AGR-2) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-2 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 559 days of irradiation to calculate the release of fission product silver from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-2 compacts and individual fuel particles containing either mixed uranium carbide/oxide (UCO) or 100% uranium dioxide (UO2) kernels. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements were performed to provide data on release of silver from these compacts and individual fuel particles. The available experimental fractional releases of silver were compared to their corresponding PARFUME predictions. Preliminary comparisons show that PARFUME under-predicts the PIE results in UCO compacts and is in reasonable agreement with experimental data for UO2 compacts. The accuracy of PARFUME predictions is impacted by the code limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature across the compacts. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie within the same order of magnitude.

  9. Improving Thermal Model Prediction Through Statistical Analysis of Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Data from AGR Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Grant L. Hawkes; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2014-05-01

    As part of the High Temperature Reactors (HTR) R&D program, a series of irradiation tests, designated as Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR), have been defined to support development and qualification of fuel design, fabrication process, and fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The AGR tests employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule and instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in graphite blocks enabling temperature control. While not possible to obtain by direct measurements in the tests, crucial fuel conditions (e.g., temperature, neutron fast fluence, and burnup) are calculated using core physics and thermal modeling codes. This paper is focused on AGR test fuel temperature predicted by the ABAQUS code's finite element-based thermal models. The work follows up on a previous study, in which several statistical analysis methods were adapted, implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS), and applied for qualification of AGR-1 thermocouple data. Abnormal trends in measured data revealed by the statistical analysis are traced to either measuring instrument deterioration or physical mechanisms in capsules that may have shifted the system thermal response. The main thrust of this work is to exploit the variety of data obtained in irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) for assessment of modeling assumptions. As an example, the uneven reduction of the control gas gap in Capsule 5 found in the capsule metrology measurements in PIE helps identify mechanisms other than TC drift causing the decrease in TC readings. This suggests a more physics-based modification of the thermal model that leads to a better fit with experimental data, thus reducing model uncertainty and increasing confidence in the calculated fuel temperatures of the AGR-1 test.

  10. Shelding analysis for a manned Mars rover powered by an Sp-100 type reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, N.J.; El-Genk, M.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Shield design is one of the most crucial tasks in the integration of a nuclear reactor power system to a manned Mars rover. A multilayered W and LiH shield is found to minimize the shield mass and satisfy the dose rate limit of 30 rem/y to the rover crew. The effect on dose rate of tungsten layers thicknesses and position within the lithium hydride shields is investigated. Due to the large cross section for the W (n,{gamma}) reaction, secondary gammas become a significant radiation source. The man-rated shield mass for the Mars rover vehicle is correlated to the reactor thermal power. The correlation fits to within 9% of the calculated shield mass and results in an uncertainty of {lt}4% in the overall rover mass. The shield mass varied from 8600 kg to 20580 kg for a reactor thermal power of 100 to 1000 kW{sub t}, respectively.

  11. Shielding analysis for a manned Mars rover powered by an SP-100 type reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Nicholas J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1991-01-01

    Shield design is one of the most crucial tasks in the integration of a nuclear reactor power system to a manned Mars rover. A multilayered W and LiH shield is found to minimize the shield mass and satisfy the dose rate limit of 30 rem/y to the rover crew. The effect on dose rate of tungsten layers thicknesses and position within the lithium hydride shields is investigated. Due to the large cross section for the W (n,gamma) reaction, secondary gammas become a significant radiation source. The man-rated shield mass for the Mars rover vehicle is correlated to the reactor thermal power. The correlation fits to within 9 percent of the calculated shield mass and results in an uncertainty of below 4 percent in the overall rover mass. The shield mass varied from 8600 kg to 20580 kg for a reactor thermal power of 100 to 1000 kW(t), respectively.

  12. Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects in Plate Type Nuclear Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bodey, Isaac T

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent flow coupled with heat transfer is investigated for a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel plate. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Models are used for fluid dynamics and the transfer of heat from a thermal nuclear fuel plate using the Multi-physics code COMSOL. Simulation outcomes are compared with experimental data from the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop. The computational results for the High Flux Isotope Reactor core system provide a more physically accurate simulation of this system by modeling the turbulent flow field in conjunction with the diffusion of thermal energy within the solid and fluid phases of the model domain. Recommendations are made regarding Nusselt number correlations and material properties for future thermal hydraulic modeling efforts

  13. Conceptual design of the bimodal nuclear power system based on the ``Romashka'' type reactor with thermionic energy conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponmarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Usov, Veniamin A.; Nikolaev, Yuri V.; Yeriemin, Stanislav A.; Zhabotinski, Yevgeny Ye.; Galkin, Anatoly Ya.; Avdoshyn, Yevgeny D.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents conceptual design of the bimodal space nuclear power system (NPS) based on the high-temperature reactor of ROMASHKA type with thermoninic energy conversion system. At the heart of the design is an employment of close-spaced thermionic diodes, operating in a quasi-vacuum mode. The paper gives preliminary estimates of the NPS neutron-physical, electric, thermophysical and mass-dimensional parameters for the reactor electric power of 25 kW and propulsive thrust of about 80 N. Discussed are peculiarities of the combined mode wherein electric power is generated along with propulsive thrust. The paper contains results of the design studies performed by the Small Business ``NP Energotech'' under the Agreement with Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division and according to the Rocketdyne Division provided Design Requirements. Involved in the work was the team of specialists of RRC ``Kurchatov Institute'', ``Red Star'' State Enterprise and Research Institute of SPA ``Luch''

  14. Application of a novel type impinging streams reactor in solid-liquid enzyme reactions and modeling of residence time distribution using GDB model.

    PubMed

    Fatourehchi, Niloufar; Sohrabi, Morteza; Dabir, Bahram; Royaee, Sayed Javid; Haji Malayeri, Adel

    2014-02-05

    Solid-liquid enzyme reactions constitute important processes in biochemical industries. The isomerization of d-glucose to d-fructose, using the immobilized glucose isomerase (Sweetzyme T), as a typical example of solid-liquid catalyzed reactions has been carried out in one stage and multi-stage novel type of impinging streams reactors. Response surface methodology was applied to determine the effects of certain pertinent parameters of the process namely axial velocity (A), feed concentration (B), nozzles' flow rates (C) and enzyme loading (D) on the performance of the apparatus. The results obtained from the conversion of glucose in this reactor were much higher than those expected in conventional reactors, while residence time was decreased dramatically. Residence time distribution (RTD) in a one-stage impinging streams reactor was investigated using colored solution as the tracer. The results showed that the flow pattern in the reactor was close to that in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Based on the analysis of flow region in the reactor, gamma distribution model with bypass (GDB) was applied to study the RTD of the reactor. The results indicated that RTD in the impinging streams reactor could be described by the latter model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear reactor with internal thimble-type delayed neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Poloncsik, John; Lambert, John D. B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention teaches improved apparatus for the method of detecting a breach in cladded fuel used in a nuclear reactor. The detector apparatus is located in the primary heat exchanger which conveys part of the reactor coolant past at least three separate delayed-neutron detectors mounted in this heat exchanger. The detectors are spaced apart such that the coolant flow time from the core to each detector is different, and these differences are known. The delayed-neutron activity at the detectors is a function of the delay time after the reaction in the fuel until the coolant carrying the delayed-neutron emitter passes the respective detector. This time delay is broken down into separate components including an isotopic holdup time required for the emitter to move through the fuel from the reaction to the coolant at the breach, and two transit times required for the emitter now in the coolant to flow from the breach to the detector loop and then via the loop to the detector. At least two of these time components are determined during calibrated operation of the reactor. Thereafter during normal reactor operation, repeated comparisons are made by the method of regression approximation of the third time component for the best-fit line correlating measured delayed-neutron activity against activity that is approximated according to specific equations. The equations use these time-delay components and known parameter values of the fuel and of the part and emitting daughter isotopes.

  16. Compact Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-01

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  17. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  18. Determination of the Quantity of I-135 Released from the AGR Experiment Series

    SciTech Connect

    Scates, Dawn Marie; Walter, John Bradley; Reber, Edward Lawrence; Sterbentz, James William; Petti, David Andrew

    2014-10-01

    A series of three Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). From 2006 through 2014, these experiments supported the development and qualification of the new U.S. tri structural isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Each AGR experiment consisted of multiple fueled capsules, each plumbed for independent temperature control using a mix of helium and neon gases. The gas leaving a capsule was routed to individual Fission Product Monitor (FPM) detectors. For intact fuel particles, the TRISO particle coatings provide a substantial barrier to fission product release. However, particles with failed coatings, whether because of a minute percentage of initially defective particles, those which fail during irradiation, or those designed to fail (DTF) particles, can release fission products to the flowing gas stream. Because reactive fission product elements like iodine and cesium quickly deposit on cooler capsule components and piping structures as the effluent gas leaves the reactor core, only the noble fission gas isotopes of Kr and Xe tend to reach FPM detectors. The FPM system utilizes High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors coupled with a thallium activated sodium iodide NaI(Tl) scintillator. The germanium detector provides individual isotopic information, while the NaI(Tl) scintillator is used as a gross count rate meter. During irradiation, the 135mXe concentration reaching the FPM detectors is from both direct fission and by decay of the accumulated 135I. About ~2.5 hours after irradiation (ten 15.3 minute 135mXe half lives) the directly produced 135mXe has decayed and only the longer lived 135I remains as a source. Decay systematics dictate that 135mXe will be in secular equilibrium with its 135I parent, such that it’s production rate very nearly equals the decay rate of the parent, and its concentration in the flowing gas stream will appear to

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  20. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  1. Identification of the agr Peptide of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zetzmann, Marion; Sánchez-Kopper, Andrés; Waidmann, Mark S.; Blombach, Bastian; Riedel, Christian U.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is an important food-borne human pathogen that is able to strive under a wide range of environmental conditions. Its accessory gene regulator (agr) system was shown to impact on biofilm formation and virulence and has been proposed as one of the regulatory mechanisms involved in adaptation to these changing environments. The Lm agr operon is homologous to the Staphylococcus aureus system, which includes an agrD-encoded autoinducing peptide that stimulates expression of the agr genes via the AgrCA two-component system and is required for regulation of target genes. The aim of the present study was to identify the native autoinducing peptide (AIP) of Lm using a luciferase reporter system in wildtype and agrD deficient strains, rational design of synthetic peptides and mass spectrometry. Upon deletion of agrD, luciferase reporter activity driven by the PII promoter of the agr operon was completely abolished and this defect was restored by co-cultivation of the agrD-negative reporter strain with a producer strain. Based on the sequence and structures of known AIPs of other organisms, a set of potential Lm AIPs was designed and tested for PII-activation. This led to the identification of a cyclic pentapeptide that was able to induce PII-driven luciferase reporter activity and restore defective invasion of the agrD deletion mutant into Caco-2 cells. Analysis of supernatants of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing AgrBD identified a peptide identical in mass and charge to the cyclic pentapeptide. The Lm agr system is specific for this pentapeptide since the AIP of Lactobacillus plantarum, which also is a pentapeptide yet with different amino acid sequence, did not induce PII activity. In summary, the presented results provide further evidence for the hypothesis that the agrD gene of Lm encodes a secreted AIP responsible for autoregulation of the agr system of Lm. Additionally, the structure of the native Lm AIP was identified. PMID

  2. Identification of the putative staphylococcal AgrB catalytic residues involving the proteolytic cleavage of AgrD to generate autoinducing peptide.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Rongde; Pei, Wuhong; Zhang, Linsheng; Lin, Jianqun; Ji, Guangyong

    2005-04-29

    The P2 operon of the staphylococcal accessory gene regulator (agr) encodes four genes (agrA, -B, -C, and -D) whose products compose a quorum sensing system: AgrA and AgrC resemble a two-component signal transduction system of which AgrC is a sensor kinase and AgrA is a response regulator; AgrD, a polypeptide that is integrated into the cytoplasmic membrane via an amphipathic alpha-helical motif in its N-terminal region, is the propeptide for an autoinducing peptide that is the ligand for AgrC; and AgrB is a novel membrane protein that involves in the processing of AgrD propeptide and possibly the secretion of the mature autoinducing peptide. In this study, we demonstrated that AgrB had endopeptidase activity, and identified 2 amino acid residues in AgrB (cysteine 84 and histidine 77) that might form a putative cysteine endopeptidase catalytic center in the proteolytic cleavage of AgrD at its C-terminal processing site. Computer analysis revealed that the cysteine and histidine residues were conserved among the potential AgrB homologous proteins, suggesting that the Agr quorum sensing system homologues might also exist in other Gram-positive bacteria.

  3. Development of a resonant-type microwave reactor and its application to the synthesis of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Yusuke; Ohneda, Noriyuki; Odajima, Hiro; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-10-01

    Microwave technology has been successfully applied to enhance the effectiveness of radiolabeling reactions. The use of a microwave as a source of heat energy can allow chemical reactions to proceed over much shorter reaction times and in higher yields than they would do under conventional thermal conditions. A microwave reactor developed by Resonance Instrument Inc. (Model 520/521) and CEM (PETWave) has been used exclusively for the synthesis of radiolabeled agents for positron emission tomography by numerous groups throughout the world. In this study, we have developed a novel resonant-type microwave reactor powered by a solid-state device and confirmed that this system can focus microwave power on a small amount of reaction solution. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the rapid and facile radiosynthesis of 16α-[(18)F]fluoroestradiol, 4-[(18)F]fluoro-N-[2-(1-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl-N-2-pyridinylbenzamide, and N-succinimidyl 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate using our newly developed microwave reactor. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Study of coolant activation and dose rates with flow rate and power perturbations in pool-type research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, N.M.; Mirza, S.M.; Ahmad, N. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on a computer code using the multigroup diffusion theory based LEOPARD and ODMUG programs that has been developed to calculate the activity in the coolant leaving the core of a pool-type research reactor. Using this code, the dose rates at various locations along the coolant path with varying coolant flow rate and reactor power perturbations are determined. A flow rate decrease from 1000 to 145 m{sup 3}/h is considered. The results indicate that a flow rate decrease leads to an increase in the coolant outlet temperature, which affects the neutron group constants and hence the group fluxes. The activity in the coolant leaving the core increases with flow rate decrease. However, at the inlet of the holdup tank, the total dose rate first increases, then passes through a maximum at {approximately} 500 m{sup 3}/h, and finally decreases with flow rate decrease. The activity at the outlet of the holdup tank is mainly due to {sup 24}Na and {sup 56}Mn, and it increases by {approximately} 2% when the flow rate decreases from 1000 to 145 m{sup 3}/h. In an accidental power rise at constant flow rate, the activity in the coolant increases, and the dose rates at all the points along the coolant path show a slight nonlinear rise as the reactor power density increases.

  5. Validation of the Physics Analysis used to Characterize the AGR-1 TRISO Fuel Irradiation Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James W.; Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Chang, Gray S.

    2015-05-01

    The results of a detailed physics depletion calculation used to characterize the AGR-1 TRISO-coated particle fuel test irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory are compared to measured data for the purpose of validation. The particle fuel was irradiated for 13 ATR power cycles over three calendar years. The physics analysis predicts compact burnups ranging from 11.30-19.56% FIMA and cumulative neutron fast fluence from 2.21?4.39E+25 n/m2 under simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor conditions in the ATR. The physics depletion calculation can provide a full characterization of all 72 irradiated TRISO-coated particle compacts during and post-irradiation, so validation of this physics calculation was a top priority. The validation of the physics analysis was done through comparisons with available measured experimental data which included: 1) high-resolution gamma scans for compact activity and burnup, 2) mass spectrometry for compact burnup, 3) flux wires for cumulative fast fluence, and 4) mass spectrometry for individual actinide and fission product concentrations. The measured data are generally in very good agreement with the calculated results, and therefore provide an adequate validation of the physics analysis and the results used to characterize the irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel.

  6. Fluid-Structure Interaction for Coolant Flow in Research-type Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Franklin G; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is scheduled to undergo a conversion of the fuel used and this proposed change requires an extensive analysis of the flow through the reactor core. The core consists of 540 very thin and long fuel plates through which the coolant (water) flows at a very high rate. Therefore, the design and the flow conditions make the plates prone to dynamic and static deflections, which may result in flow blockage and structural failure which in turn may cause core damage. To investigate the coolant flow between fuel plates and associated structural deflections, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) module in COMSOL will be used. Flow induced flutter and static deflections will be examined. To verify the FSI module, a test case of a cylinder in crossflow, with vortex induced vibrations was performed and validated.

  7. Safety Related Investigations of the VVER-1000 Reactor Type by the Coupled Code System TRACE/PARCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Wadim; Espinoza, Victor Hugo Sánchez; Lischke, Wolfgang

    This study was performed at the Institute of Reactor Safety at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. It is embedded in the ongoing investigations of the international code assessment and maintenance program (CAMP) for qualification and validation of system codes like TRACE(1) and PARCS(2). The chosen reactor type used to validate these two codes was the Russian designed VVER-1000 because the OECD/NEA VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 2(3) includes detailed information of the Bulgarian nuclear power plant (NPP) Kozloduy unit 6. The post-test investigations of a coolant mixing experiment have shown that the predicted parameters (coolant temperature, pressure drop, etc.) are in good agreement with the measured data. The coolant mixing pattern, especially in the downcomer, has been also reproduced quiet well by TRACE. The coupled code system TRACE/PARCS which was applied on a postulated main steam line break (MSLB) provided good results compared to reference values and the ones of other participants of the benchmark. The results show that the developed three-dimensional nodalization of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is appropriate to describe the coolant mixing phenomena in the downcomer and the lower plenum of a VVER-1000 reactor. This phenomenon is a key issue for investigations of MSLB transient where the thermal hydraulics and the core neutronics are strongly linked. The simulation of the RPV and core behavior for postulated transients using the validated 3D TRACE RPV model, taking into account boundary conditions at vessel in- and outlet, indicates that the results are physically sound and in good agreement to other participant's results.

  8. Multiphase telomerisation of butadiene with phenol: optimisation and scale-up in different reactor types.

    PubMed

    Behr, Arno; Beckmann, Thomas; Nachtrodt, Henrik

    2009-08-21

    The telomerisation with phenol is an efficient way to convert the well accessible 1,3-butadiene into products of higher value. This article describes the optimisation of this reaction both on a laboratory scale using a novel multiphase semi-batch mode and in a loop reactor as an alternative concept for a continuous operation mode. The optimised parameters are applied in a miniplant offering an interesting salt-free route to octadienylphenols.

  9. Effect of sonication conditions: solvent, time, temperature and reactor type on the preparation of micron sized vermiculite particles.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farman; Reinert, Laurence; Levêque, Jean-Marc; Duclaux, Laurent; Muller, Fabrice; Saeed, Shaukat; Shah, Syed Sakhawat

    2014-05-01

    The effects of temperature, time, solvent and sonication conditions under air and Argon are described for the preparation of micron and sub-micron sized vermiculite particles in a double-jacketed Rosett-type or cylindrical reactor. The resulting materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, BET surface area analysis, chemical analysis (elemental analysis), Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and Laser Granulometry. The sonicated vermiculites displayed modified particle morphologies and reduced sizes (observed by scanning electron microscopy and laser granulometry). Under the conditions used in this work, sub-micron sized particles were obtained after 5h of sonication, whereas longer times promoted aggregation again. Laser granulometry data revealed also that the smallest particles were obtained at high temperature while it is generally accepted that the mechanical effects of ultrasound are optimum at low temperatures according to physical/chemical properties of the used solvent. X-ray diffraction results indicated a reduction of the crystallite size along the basal direction [001]; but structural changes were not observed. Sonication at different conditions also led to surface modifications of the vermiculite particles brought out by BET surface measurements and Infrared Spectroscopy. The results indicated clearly that the efficiency of ultrasound irradiation was significantly affected by different parameters such as temperature, solvent, type of gas and reactor type.

  10. Accumulation of radioactive corrosion products on steel surfaces of VVER-type nuclear reactors. II. 60Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Kálmán; Hirschberg, Gábor; Németh, Zoltán; Myburg, Gerrit; Schunk, János; Tilky, Péter

    2001-10-01

    In the case of intact fuel claddings, the predominant source of radioactivity in the primary circuits of water-cooled nuclear reactors is the activation of corrosion products in the core. The most important corrosion product radionuclides in the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are 60Co, 58Co, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe (as well as 110mAg in some Soviet-made VVER-type reactor). The second part of this series is focused on the complex studies of the formation and build-up of 60Co-containing species on an austenitic stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOST 5632-61) and magnetite-covered carbon steel often to be used in Soviet-planned VVERs. The kinetics and mechanism of the cobalt accumulation were studied by a combination (coupling) of an in situ radiotracer method and voltammetry in a model solution of the primary circuit coolant. In addition, independent techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and ICP-OES are also used to analyze the chemical state of Co species in the passive layer formed on stainless steel as well as the chemical composition of model solution. The experimental results have revealed that: (i) The passive behavior of the austenitic stainless steel at open-circuit conditions, the slightly alkaline pH and the reducing water chemistry can be considered to be optimal to minimize the 60Co contamination. (ii) The highly potential dependent deposition of various Co-oxides at E>1.10 V (vs. RHE) offers a unique possibility to elaborate a novel electrochemical method for the decrease or removal of cobalt traces from borate-containing coolants contaminated with 60Co and/or 58Co radionuclides.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  12. Effect of different types of nanofluids on free convection heat transfer around spherical mini-reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayhooni, S. M. H.; Rahimpour, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper, free convection fluid flow and heat transfer of various water based nanofluids has been investigated numerically around a spherical mini-reactor. This numerical simulation is a finite-volume, steady, two dimensions, elliptic and multi-grid solver. The wall of the spherical mini-reactor are maintained at constant temperature TH and the temperature of nanofluid far from it is considered constant (TC). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used for solving the relevant mathematical expressions for free convection heat transfer around it. The numerical simulation and available correlation are valid for based fluid. The effects of pertinent parameters, such as, Rayleigh number, and the volume fraction of the nanoparticles in the fluid flow and heat transfer around the spherical mini-reactor are investigated. This study has been carried out for the pertinent parameters in the following ranges: the Rayleigh number of base fluid is assumed to be less than 109 (Ra < 109). Besides, the percentages of the volumetric fraction of nanoparticle which is used for preparing the nanofluids, are between 0 and 4 (0 ⩽ φ ⩽ 4%). The obtained results show that the average Nusselt number for a range of the solid volume fraction of the nanofluid increases by increasing the Rayleigh number. Finally, the heat transfer has been enhanced not only by increasing the particle volume fraction but also by decreasing the size of particle diameter. Moreover, the Churchill's correlation is approximately appropriate for predicting the free convection heat transfer inside diverse kinds of nanofluids especially for high range of Rayleigh numbers.

  13. Processing and microstructural characterisation of a UO2-based ceramic for disposal studies on spent AGR fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiezl, Z.; Hambley, D. I.; Padovani, C.; Lee, W. E.

    2015-01-01

    Preparation and characterisation of a Simulated Spent Nuclear Fuel (SIMFuel), which replicates the chemical state and microstructure of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) discharged from a UK Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) after a cooling time of 100 years is described. Given the relatively small differences in radionuclide inventory expected over longer time periods, the SIMFuel studied in this work is expected to be also representative of spent fuel after significantly longer periods (e.g. 1000 years). Thirteen stable elements were added to depleted UO2 and sintered to simulate the composition of fuel pellets after burn-ups of 25 and 43 GWd/tU and, as a reference, pure UO2 pellets were also investigated. The fission product distribution was calculated using the FISPIN code provided by the UK National Nuclear Laboratory. SIMFuel pellets were up to 92% dense and during the sintering process in H2 atmosphere Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd metallic precipitates and grey-phase ((Ba, Sr)(Zr, RE) O3 oxide precipitates) formed within the UO2 matrix. These secondary phases are present in real PWR and AGR SNF. Metallic precipitates are generally spherical and have submicron particle size (0.8 ± 0.7 μm). Spherical oxide precipitates in SIMFuel measured up to 30 μm in diameter, but no data were available in the public domain to compare this to AGR SNF. The grain size of actual AGR SNF (∼ 3-30 μm) is larger than that measured in AGR SIMFuel (∼ 2-5 μm).

  14. AGR-2 Final Data Qualification Report for U.S. Capsules - ATR Cycles 147A Through 154B

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh T.; Einerson, Jeffrey J.

    2014-07-01

    This report provides the data qualification status of AGR-2 fuel irradiation experimental data in four U.S. capsules from all 15 Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycles 147A, 148A, 148B, 149A, 149B, 150A, 150B, 151A, 151B, 152A, 152B, 153A, 153B, 154A, and 154B, as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). Thus, this report covers data qualification status for the entire AGR-2 irradiation and will replace four previously issued AGR-2 data qualification reports (e.g., INL/EXT-11-22798, INL/EXT-12-26184, INL/EXT-13-29701, and INL/EXT-13-30750). During AGR-2 irradiation, two cycles, 152A and 153A, occurred when the ATR core was briefly at low power, so AGR-2 irradiation data are not used for physics and thermal calculations. Also, two cycles, 150A and 153B, are Power Axial Locator Mechanism (PALM) cycles when the ATR power is higher than during normal cycles. During the first PALM cycle, 150A, the experiment was temporarily moved from the B-12 location to the ATR water canal and during the second PALM cycle, 153B, the experiment was temporarily moved from the B-12 location to the I-24 location to avoid being overheated. During the “Outage” cycle, 153A, seven flow meters were installed downstream from seven Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) monitors to measure flows from the monitors and these data are included in the NDMAS database.

  15. Cloning of an agr homologue of Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Sakinc, Türkan; Kulczak, Pawel; Henne, Karsten; Gatermann, Sören G

    2004-08-01

    An agr homologue of Staphylococcus saprophyticus was identified, cloned and sequenced. The gene locus shows homologies to other staphylococcal agr systems, especially to those of S. epidermidis and S. lugdunensis. A putative RNAIII was identified and found to be differentially expressed during the growth phases. In contrast to the RNAIII molecules of S. epidermidis and S. aureus it does not contain an open reading frame that codes for a protein with homologies to the delta-toxin. Using PCR, the agr was found to be present in clinical isolates of S. saprophyticus.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  17. Improving Thermal Model Prediction Through Statistical Analysis of Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Data from AGR Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Binh T. Pham; Grant L. Hawkes; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2012-10-01

    As part of the Research and Development program for Next Generation High Temperature Reactors (HTR), a series of irradiation tests, designated as Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR), have been defined to support development and qualification of fuel design, fabrication process, and fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The AGR tests employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule and instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in graphite blocks enabling temperature control. The data representing the crucial test fuel conditions (e.g., temperature, neutron fast fluence, and burnup) while impossible to obtain from direct measurements are calculated by physics and thermal models. The irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) experimental data are used in model calibration effort to reduce the inherent uncertainty of simulation results. This paper is focused on fuel temperature predicted by the ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal models. The work follows up on a previous study, in which several statistical analysis methods were adapted, implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS), and applied for improving qualification of AGR-1 thermocouple data. The present work exercises the idea that the abnormal trends of measured data observed from statistical analysis may be caused by either measuring instrument deterioration or physical mechanisms in capsules that may have shifted the system thermal response. As an example, the uneven reduction of the control gas gap in Capsule 5 revealed by the capsule metrology measurements in PIE helps justify the reduction in TC readings instead of TC drift. This in turn prompts modification of thermal model to better fit with experimental data, thus help increase confidence, and in other word reduce model uncertainties in thermal simulation results of the AGR-1 test.

  18. Root-cause analysis of the better performance of the coarse-mesh finite-difference method for CANDU-type reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.

    2012-07-01

    Recent assessment results indicate that the coarse-mesh finite-difference method (FDM) gives consistently smaller percent differences in channel powers than the fine-mesh FDM when compared to the reference MCNP solution for CANDU-type reactors. However, there is an impression that the fine-mesh FDM should always give more accurate results than the coarse-mesh FDM in theory. To answer the question if the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors was just a coincidence (cancellation of errors) or caused by the use of heavy water or the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation, three benchmark problems were set up with three different fuel lattices: CANDU, HWR and PWR. These benchmark problems were then used to analyze the root cause of the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors. The analyses confirm that the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors is mainly caused by the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the sub-meshes of the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation. Based on the analyses, it is recommended to use 2 x 2 coarse-mesh FDM to analyze CANDU-type reactors when lattice-homogenized cross sections are used in the core analysis. (authors)

  19. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  20. Structure-Function Analysis of Peptide Signaling in the Clostridium perfringens Agr-Like Quorum Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Menglin; Li, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accessory growth regulator (Agr)-like quorum sensing (QS) system of Clostridium perfringens controls the production of many toxins, including beta toxin (CPB). We previously showed (J. E. Vidal, M. Ma, J. Saputo, J. Garcia, F. A. Uzal, and B. A. McClane, Mol Microbiol 83:179–194, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07925.x) that an 8-amino-acid, AgrD-derived peptide named 8-R upregulates CPB production by this QS system. The current study synthesized a series of small signaling peptides corresponding to sequences within the C. perfringens AgrD polypeptide to investigate the C. perfringens autoinducing peptide (AIP) structure-function relationship. When both linear and cyclic ring forms of these peptides were added to agrB null mutants of type B strain CN1795 or type C strain CN3685, the 5-amino-acid peptides, whether in a linear or ring (thiolactone or lactone) form, induced better signaling (more CPB production) than peptide 8-R for both C. perfringens strains. The 5-mer thiolactone ring peptide induced faster signaling than the 5-mer linear peptide. Strain-related variations in sensing these peptides were detected, with CN3685 sensing the synthetic peptides more strongly than CN1795. Consistent with those synthetic peptide results, Transwell coculture experiments showed that CN3685 exquisitely senses native AIP signals from other isolates (types A, B, C, and D), while CN1795 barely senses even its own AIP. Finally, a C. perfringens AgrD sequence-based peptide with a 6-amino-acid thiolactone ring interfered with CPB production by several C. perfringens strains, suggesting potential therapeutic applications. These results indicate that AIP signaling sensitivity and responsiveness vary among C. perfringens strains and suggest C. perfringens prefers a 5-mer AIP to initiate Agr signaling. IMPORTANCE Clostridium perfringens possesses an Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system that regulates virulence, sporulation, and toxin production. The

  1. Structure-function analysis of peptide signaling in the Clostridium perfringens Agr-like quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menglin; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2015-05-01

    The accessory growth regulator (Agr)-like quorum sensing (QS) system of Clostridium perfringens controls the production of many toxins, including beta toxin (CPB). We previously showed (J. E. Vidal, M. Ma, J. Saputo, J. Garcia, F. A. Uzal, and B. A. McClane, Mol Microbiol 83:179-194, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07925.x) that an 8-amino-acid, AgrD-derived peptide named 8-R upregulates CPB production by this QS system. The current study synthesized a series of small signaling peptides corresponding to sequences within the C. perfringens AgrD polypeptide to investigate the C. perfringens autoinducing peptide (AIP) structure-function relationship. When both linear and cyclic ring forms of these peptides were added to agrB null mutants of type B strain CN1795 or type C strain CN3685, the 5-amino-acid peptides, whether in a linear or ring (thiolactone or lactone) form, induced better signaling (more CPB production) than peptide 8-R for both C. perfringens strains. The 5-mer thiolactone ring peptide induced faster signaling than the 5-mer linear peptide. Strain-related variations in sensing these peptides were detected, with CN3685 sensing the synthetic peptides more strongly than CN1795. Consistent with those synthetic peptide results, Transwell coculture experiments showed that CN3685 exquisitely senses native AIP signals from other isolates (types A, B, C, and D), while CN1795 barely senses even its own AIP. Finally, a C. perfringens AgrD sequence-based peptide with a 6-amino-acid thiolactone ring interfered with CPB production by several C. perfringens strains, suggesting potential therapeutic applications. These results indicate that AIP signaling sensitivity and responsiveness vary among C. perfringens strains and suggest C. perfringens prefers a 5-mer AIP to initiate Agr signaling. Clostridium perfringens possesses an Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system that regulates virulence, sporulation, and toxin production. The current study used

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1957-09-24

    Reactors of the type employing plates of natural uranium in a moderator are discussed wherein the plates are um-formly disposed in parallel relationship to each other thereby separating the moderator material into distinct and individual layers. Each plate has an uninterrupted sunface area substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the active portion of the reactor, the particular size of the plates and the volume ratio of moderator to uranium required to sustain a chain reaction being determinable from the known purity of these materials and other characteristics such as the predictable neutron losses due to the formation of radioactive elements of extremely high neutron capture cross section.

  3. Biofiltration of paint solvent mixtures in two reactor types: overloading by hydrophobic components.

    PubMed

    Paca, Jan; Halecky, Martin; Misiaczek, Ondrej; Jones, Kim; Kozliak, Evguenii; Sobotka, Miroslav

    2010-12-01

    Steady-state performance characteristics of a trickle bed reactor (TBR) and a biofilter (BF) in loading experiments with increasing toluene/xylenes inlet concentrations while maintaining a constant loading rate of hydrophilic components (methyl ethyl and methyl isobutyl ketones, acetone, and n-butyl acetate) of 4 g m⁻³ h⁻¹ were evaluated and compared, along with the systems' dynamic responses. At the same combined substrate loading of 55 g m⁻³ h⁻¹ for both reactors, the TBR achieved more than 1.5 times higher overall removal efficiency (RE(W)) than the BF. Increasing the loading rate of aromatics resulted in a gradual decrease of their REs. The degradation rates of acetone and n-butyl acetate were also inhibited at higher loads of aromatics, thus revealing a competition in cell catabolism. A step-drop in loading of aromatics resulted in an immediate increase of RE(W) with variations in the TBR, while the new steady-state value in the BF took 6-7 h to achieve. The TBR consistently showed a greater performance than BF in removing toluene and xylenes. Increasing the loading rate of aromatics resulted in a gradual decrease of their REs. The degradation rates of acetone and n-butyl acetate were also lower at higher OL(AROM), revealing a competition in the cell catabolism. The results obtained are consistent with the proposed hypothesis of greater toxic effects under low water content, i.e., in the biofilter, caused by aromatic hydrocarbons in the presence of polar ketones and esters, which may improve the hydrocarbon partitioning into the aqueous phase.

  4. Design analysis of the molten core confinement within the reactor vessel in the case of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with a reactor of the VVER type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvonaryov, Yu. A.; Budaev, M. A.; Volchek, A. M.; Gorbaev, V. A.; Zagryazkin, V. N.; Kiselyov, N. P.; Kobzar', V. L.; Konobeev, A. V.; Tsurikov, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reports the results of the preliminary design estimate of the behavior of the core melt in vessels of reactors of the VVER-600 and VVER-1300 types (a standard optimized and informative nuclear power unit based on VVER technology—VVER TOI) in the case of beyond-design-basis severe accidents. The basic processes determining the state of the core melt in the reactor vessel are analyzed. The concept of molten core confinement within the vessel based on the idea of outside cooling is discussed. Basic assumptions and models, as well as the results of calculation of the interaction between molten materials of the core and the wall of the reactor vessel performed by means of the SOCRAT severe accident code, are presented and discussed. On the basis of the data obtained, the requirements on the operation of the safety systems are determined, upon the fulfillment of which there will appear potential prerequisites for implementing the concept of the confinement of the core melt within the reactor in cases of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors.

  5. Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with Cintichem-type targets installed in the central region of the core

    SciTech Connect

    PARMA JR.,EDWARD J.

    2000-01-01

    Production of the molybdenum-99 isotope at the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched, uranium oxide loaded targets to be irradiated for several days in the high neutron-flux region of the core. This report presents the safety analysis for the irradiation of up to seven Cintichem-type targets in the central region of the core and compares the results to the Annular Core Research Reactor Safety Analysis Report. A 19 target grid configuration is presented that allows one to seven targets to be irradiated, with the remainder of the grid locations filled with aluminum ''void'' targets. Analyses of reactor, neutronic, thermal hydraulics, and heat transfer calculations are presented. Steady-state operation and accident scenarios are analyzed with the conclusion that the reactor can be operated safely with seven targets in the grid, and no additional risk to the public.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1957-10-01

    A reactor of the type which preferably uses plutonium as the fuel and a liquid moderator, preferably ordinary water, and which produces steam within the reactor core due to the heat of the chain reaction is described. In the reactor shown the fuel elements are essentially in the form of trays and are ventically stacked in spaced relationship. The water moderator is continuously supplied to the trays to maintain a constant level on the upper surfaces of the fuel element as it is continually evaporated by the heat. The steam passes out through the spaces between the fuel elements and is drawn off at the top of the core. The fuel elements are clad in aluminum to prevent deterioration thereof with consequent contamimation of the water.

  8. POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1958-07-01

    A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

  9. Cryogenic distillation: a fuel enrichment system for near-term tokamak-type D-T fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, B.; Davis, J.F.

    1980-02-01

    The successful operation and economic viability of deuterium-tritium- (D-T-) fueled tokamak-type commercial power fusion reactors will depend to a large extent on the development of reliable tritium-containment and fuel-recycle systems. Of the many operating steps in the fuel recycle scheme, separation or enrichment of the isotropic species of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation is one of the most important. A parametric investigation was carried out to study the effects of the various operating conditions and the composition of the spent fuel on the degree of separation. A computer program was developed for the design and analysis of a system of interconnected distillation columns for isotopic separation such that the requirements of near-term D-T-fueled reactors are met. The analytical results show that a distillation cascade consisting of four columns is capable of reprocessing spent fuel varying over a wide range of compositions to yield reinjection-grade fuel with essentially unlimited D/T ratio.

  10. Environmental impact assessment of a package type IFAS reactor during construction and operational phases: a life cycle approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nitin Kumar; Singh, Rana Pratap; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach was used to analyse the environmental impacts associated with the construction and operational phases of an integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) reactor treating municipal wastewater. This study was conducted within the boundaries of a research project that aimed to investigate the implementation related challenges of a package type IFAS reactor from an environmental perspective. Along with the LCA results of the construction phase, a comparison of the LCA results of seven operational phases is also presented in this study. The results showed that among all the inputs, the use of stainless steel in the construction phase caused the highest impact on environment, followed by electricity consumption in raw materials production. The impact of the construction phase on toxicity impact indicators was found to be significant compared to all operational phases. Among the seven operational phases of this study, the dissolved oxygen phase III, having a concentration of ∼4.5 mg/L, showed the highest impact on abiotic depletion, acidification, global warming, ozone layer depletion, human toxicity, fresh water eco-toxicity, marine aquatic eco-toxicity, terrestrial eco-toxicity, and photochemical oxidation. However, better effluent quality in this phase reduced the eutrophication load on environment.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  12. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  13. Electrochemical incineration of vinasse in filter-press-type FM01-LC reactor using 3D BDD electrode.

    PubMed

    Nava, J L; Recéndiz, A; Acosta, J C; González, I

    2008-01-01

    This work shows results obtained in the electrochemical incineration of a synthetic vinasse with initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 75.096 g L(-1) in aqueous media (which resembles vinasse industrial wastewater). Electrolyses in a filter-press-type FM01-LC electrochemical reactor equipped with a three-dimensional (3D) boron doped diamond electrode (BDD) were performed at Reynolds values between 22

  14. Heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary particle-bed-type fusion-reactor blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Nietert, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    The heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary packed-particle beds have recently become of interest in connection with conceptual designs of fusion reactor blankets. A detailed literature survey has shown that the processes taking place in such beds are not fully understood despite their widespread use in the chemical industry and other engineering disciplines for more than five decades. In this study, two experimental investigations were pursued. In the first, a heat-transfer loop was constructed through which glass microspheres were allowed to flow by rgravity at controlled rates through an electrically heated stainless steel tubular test section. In the second, an annular packed bed was constructed in which heat was applied through the outer wall by electric heating of a stainless steel tube. Cooling occurred at the inner wall of the annular bed by flowing air through the central tube. A second air stream was allowed to flow through the voids of the packed bed. An error-minimization technique was utilized in order to obtain the two-dimensional one-parameter effective conductivity for the bed by comparing the experimental and theoretically predicted temperature profiles. Experiments were conducted for various modified Reynolds numbers less than ten.

  15. Development and verification of two-phase pressure drop correlations for RBMK-type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvinys, Evaldas

    The available two-phase frictional pressure drop correlations are reviewed and compared, extending their applicability range to include the thermal-hydraulic conditions prevailing in RBMK reactor fuel channels. It is shown that the Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Service (HTFS) pressure drop correlation used in RELAP5 MOD 3.2.1.2 code has shortcomings. From the list of alternative correlations the Osmachkin and Friedel correlations are selected. The behavior of the above two correlations is explained and the shortcomings of the Osmachkin correlation are noted. In order to improve the Osmachkin correlation, a new concept of the free flow fraction is introduced. It is shown that using the free flow fraction one can predict the quality at which the homogeneous equilibrium model case pressure drop is approached. A computational algorithm for two-phase pressure drop multiplier is developed using the transition criteria based on the free flow fraction and also on the Friedel and Osmachkin two-phase pressure drop relations. This algorithm is implemented into the RELAP5 code. The performance of the updated code version is verified using the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant data base of operation parameters. The comparison reveals that the "updated" code version shows a better agreement with data. The performance of the updated and standard code versions is also investigated by modeling a group distribution header guillotine rupture in the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. Although the calculated results show differences, the deviation between the two code versions is within the engineering uncertainty range.

  16. Influence of steel type on the activation and decay of fusion-reactor first walls

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, J.A.; Lasche, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    Five steels (PCA, HT-9, thermally stabilized 2.25 Cr-1 Mo, Nb stabilized 2.25 Cr-1 Mo, and 2.25 Cr-1 V) are compared as a function of time from the viewpoints of activation, afterheat, inhalation biological hazard potential (bhp), ingestion bhp, and feasibility of disposal by shallow land burial. An additional case uses the 2.25 Cr-1 V steel with a metal wall (LMW) protective shield between the neutron source and the wall. (This geometry is feasible for inertial confinement fusion reactors.) The PCA steel is the worst choice and the LMW protected 2.25 Cr-1 V is the best choice by substantial margins from all five viewpoints. The HT-9 and two versions of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo are roughly the same at intermediate values. The 2.25 Cr-1 V has about the same afterheat as those three steels, but its waste disposal feasibility is considerably better. Under NRC's proposed low level waste disposal rule (10CFR61), only the 2.25 Cr-1 V could be considered low level waste suitable for shallow land burial.

  17. AGR-3/4 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 151A, 151B, 152A, 152B, 154A, and 154B

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham

    2014-02-01

    This data report provides the qualification status of Advanced Gas Reactor-3/4 (AGR-3/4) fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycles 151A, 151B, 152A, 152B, 154A, and 154B, as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). Of these cycles, ATR Cycle 152A is a low power cycle that occurred when the ATR core was briefly at low power. The irradiation data are not used for physics and thermal calculation, but the qualification status of these cycle data is still covered in this report. On the other hand, during ATR Cycles 153A (unplanned Outage cycle) and 153B (Power Axial Locator Mechanism [PALM] cycle), the AGR-3/4 was pulled out from the ATR core and stored in the canal to avoid being overheated. Therefore, qualification of the AGR-3/4 irradiation data from these 2 cycles was excluded in this report. By the end of ATR Cycle 154B, AGR-3/4 was irradiated for a total of 264.1 effective full power days. The AGR-3/4 data streams addressed in this report include thermocouple (TC) temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rates, pressure, and moisture content), and Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) data (release rates and release-to-birth rate ratios [R/Bs]) for each of the twelve capsules in the AGR-3/4 experiment. The final data qualification status for these data streams is determined by a Data Review Committee (DRC) composed of AGR technical leads, Sitewide Quality Assurance (QA), and NDMAS analysts. The DRC convened on February 12, 2014, reviewed the data acquisition process, and considered whether the data met the requirements for data collection as specified in QA-approved Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) data collection plans. The DRC also examined the results of NDMAS data testing and statistical analyses, and confirmed the qualification status of the data as given in this report.

  18. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John b. Walter

    2010-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  19. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K Hartwell; John B. Walter

    2008-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  20. Post-irradiation Examination of the AGR-1 Experiment: Plans and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz

    2001-10-01

    Abstract – The AGR-1 irradiation experiment contains seventy-two individual cylindrical fuel compacts (25 mm long x 12.5 mm diameter) each containing approximately 4100 TRISO-coated uranium oxycarbide fuel particles. The experiment accumulated 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory with peak burnups exceeding 19% FIMA. An extensive post-irradiation examination campaign will be performed on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature accident testing. PIE experiments will include dimensional measurements of fuel and irradiated graphite, burnup measurements, assessment of fission metals release during irradiation, evaluation of coating integrity using the leach-burn-leach technique, microscopic examination of kernel and coating microstructures, and accident testing of the fuel in helium at temperatures up to 1800°C. Activities completed to date include opening of the irradiated capsules, measurement of fuel dimensions, and gamma spectrometry of selected fuel compacts.

  1. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 149B, 150A, 150B, 151A, and 151B

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Abbott; Binh T. Pham

    2012-06-01

    This report provides the data qualification status of AGR-2 fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) cycles 149B, 150A, 150B, 151A, and 151B), as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). The AGR-2 data streams addressed include thermocouple temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rate, pressure, and moisture content), and fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data for each of the six capsules in the experiment. A total of 3,307,500 5-minute thermocouple and sweep gas data records were received and processed by NDMAS for this period. There are no AGR-2 data for cycle 150A because the experiment was removed from the reactor. Of these data, 82.2% were determined to be Qualified based on NDMAS accuracy testing and data validity assessment. There were 450,557 Failed temperature records due to thermocouple failures, and 138,528 Failed gas flow records due to gas flow cross-talk and leakage problems that occurred in the capsules after cycle 150A. For FPMS data, NDMAS received and processed preliminary release rate and release-to-birth rate ratio (R/B) data for the first three reactor cycles (cycles 149B, 150B, and 151B). This data consists of 45,983 release rate records and 45,235 R/B records for the 12 radionuclides reported. The qualification status of these FPMS data has been set to In Process until receipt of QA-approved data generator reports. All of the above data have been processed and tested using a SAS®-based enterprise application software system, stored in a secure Structured Query Language database, and made available on the NDMAS Web portal (http://ndmas.inl.gov) for both internal and external VHTR project participants.

  2. Biofiltration of paint solvent mixtures in two reactor types: overloading by polar components.

    PubMed

    Paca, Jan; Halecky, Martin; Misiaczek, Ondrej; Kozliak, Evguenii I; Jones, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Steady-state performances of a trickle bed reactor (TBR) and a biofilter (BF) in loading experiments with increasing inlet concentrations of polar solvents, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone and n-butyl acetate, were investigated, along with the system's dynamic responses. Throughout the entire experimentation time, a constant loading rate of aromatic components of 4 g(c)·m(-3)·h(-1) was maintained to observe the interactions between the polar substrates and aromatic hydrocarbons. Under low combined substrate loadings, the BF outperformed TBR not only in the removal of aromatic hydrocarbons but also in the removal of polar substrates. However, increasing the loading rate of polar components above the threshold value of 31-36 g(c)·m(-3)·h(-1) resulted in a steep and significant drop in the removal efficiencies of both polar (except for butyl acetate) and hydrophobic components, which was more pronounced in the BF; so the relative TBR/BF efficiency became reversed under such overloading conditions. A step-drop of the overall OL(POLAR) (combined loading by polar air pollutants) from overloading values to 7 g(c)·m(-3)·h(-1) resulted in an increase of all pollutant removal efficiencies, although in TBR the recovery was preceded by lag periods lasting between 5 min (methyl ethyl ketone) to 3.7 h (acetone). The occurrence of lag periods in the TBR recovery was, in part, due to the saturation of mineral medium with water-soluble polar solvents, particularly, acetone. The observed bioreactor behavior was consistent with the biological steps being rate-limiting.

  3. Proteotyping of biogas plant microbiomes separates biogas plants according to process temperature and reactor type.

    PubMed

    Heyer, R; Benndorf, D; Kohrs, F; De Vrieze, J; Boon, N; Hoffmann, M; Rapp, E; Schlüter, Andreas; Sczyrba, Alexander; Reichl, U

    2016-01-01

    Methane yield and biogas productivity of biogas plants (BGPs) depend on microbial community structure and function, substrate supply, and general biogas process parameters. So far, however, relatively little is known about correlations between microbial community function and process parameters. To close this knowledge gap, microbial communities of 40 samples from 35 different industrial biogas plants were evaluated by a metaproteomics approach in this study. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (Orbitrap Elite™ Hybrid Ion Trap-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer) of all 40 samples as triplicate enabled the identification of 3138 different metaproteins belonging to 162 biological processes and 75 different taxonomic orders. The respective database searches were performed against UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and seven metagenome databases. Subsequent clustering and principal component analysis of these data allowed for the identification of four main clusters associated with mesophile and thermophile process conditions, the use of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors and BGP feeding with sewage sludge. Observations confirm a previous phylogenetic study of the same BGP samples that was based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing by De Vrieze et al. (Water Res 75:312-323, 2015). In particular, we identified similar microbial key players of biogas processes, namely Bacillales, Enterobacteriales, Bacteriodales, Clostridiales, Rhizobiales and Thermoanaerobacteriales as well as Methanobacteriales, Methanosarcinales and Methanococcales. For the elucidation of the main biomass degradation pathways, the most abundant 1 % of metaproteins was assigned to the KEGG map 1200 representing the central carbon metabolism. Additionally, the effect of the process parameters (i) temperature, (ii) organic loading rate (OLR), (iii) total ammonia nitrogen (TAN), and (iv) sludge retention time (SRT) on these pathways was investigated. For example, high TAN correlated with hydrogenotrophic

  4. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations.

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-08-19

    A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

  6. Analysis of operation of filters for post-accident decontamination of pressurized rooms of a nuclear power plants with a type VVER-440 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaichik, L. I.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Rotinov, A. G.; Sidorov, A. S.; Silina, N. N.; Chalyi, R. F.

    2007-05-01

    Operation of filters of postaccident decontamination of pressurized rooms of a nuclear power plant with a type-VVER-440 reactor is analyzed. The distribution of radioactive nuclides over filter stages, the time variation of the thermal state of filter, and the characteristic features of the processes of sorption in the section of fine cleaning are considered.

  7. Sonochemical Reactors.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation.

  8. Secretion of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 confers tumorigenic properties

    PubMed Central

    Fessart, Delphine; Domblides, Charlotte; Avril, Tony; Eriksson, Leif A; Begueret, Hugues; Pineau, Raphael; Malrieux, Camille; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Lucchesi, Carlo; Chevet, Eric; Delom, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an instrumental role in determining the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and the formation of lumens in glandular tissues during morphogenesis. Here, we show that the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-resident protein anterior gradient-2 (AGR2), a soluble protein-disulfide isomerase involved in ER protein folding and quality control, is secreted and interacts with the ECM. Extracellular AGR2 (eAGR2) is a microenvironmental regulator of epithelial tissue architecture, which plays a role in the preneoplastic phenotype and contributes to epithelial tumorigenicity. Indeed, eAGR2, is secreted as a functionally active protein independently of its thioredoxin-like domain (CXXS) and of its ER-retention domain (KTEL), and is sufficient, by itself, to promote the acquisition of invasive and metastatic features. Therefore, we conclude that eAGR2 plays an extracellular role independent of its ER function and we elucidate this gain-of-function as a novel and unexpected critical ECM microenvironmental pro-oncogenic regulator of epithelial morphogenesis and tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13887.001 PMID:27240165

  9. Secretion of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 confers tumorigenic properties.

    PubMed

    Fessart, Delphine; Domblides, Charlotte; Avril, Tony; Eriksson, Leif A; Begueret, Hugues; Pineau, Raphael; Malrieux, Camille; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Lucchesi, Carlo; Chevet, Eric; Delom, Frederic

    2016-05-30

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an instrumental role in determining the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and the formation of lumens in glandular tissues during morphogenesis. Here, we show that the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-resident protein anterior gradient-2 (AGR2), a soluble protein-disulfide isomerase involved in ER protein folding and quality control, is secreted and interacts with the ECM. Extracellular AGR2 (eAGR2) is a microenvironmental regulator of epithelial tissue architecture, which plays a role in the preneoplastic phenotype and contributes to epithelial tumorigenicity. Indeed, eAGR2, is secreted as a functionally active protein independently of its thioredoxin-like domain (CXXS) and of its ER-retention domain (KTEL), and is sufficient, by itself, to promote the acquisition of invasive and metastatic features. Therefore, we conclude that eAGR2 plays an extracellular role independent of its ER function and we elucidate this gain-of-function as a novel and unexpected critical ECM microenvironmental pro-oncogenic regulator of epithelial morphogenesis and tumorigenesis.

  10. Integral fast reactor concept. [Pool type; metal fuel; integral fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Key features of the IFR consist of a pool-type plant arrangement, a metal fuel-based core design, and an integral fuel cycle with colocated fuel cycle facility. Both the basic concept and the technology base have been demonstrated through actual integral cycle operation in EBR-II. This paper discusses the inherent safety characteristics of the IFR concept. (DLC)

  11. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SAFETY TESTING OF IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Stempien, John D.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Chrisensen, Cad L.

    2016-11-01

    High-Temperature Safety Testing of Irradiated AGR-1 TRISO Fuel John D. Stempien, Paul A. Demkowicz, Edward L. Reber, and Cad L. Christensen Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Corresponding Author: john.stempien@inl.gov, +1-208-526-8410 Two new safety tests of irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel have been completed in the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In the first test, three fuel compacts from the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation experiment (AGR-1) were simultaneously heated in the FACS furnace. Prior to safety testing, each compact was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to a burnup of approximately 15 % fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a fast fluence of 3×1025 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV), and a time-average volume-average (TAVA) irradiation temperature of about 1020 °C. In order to simulate a core-conduction cool-down event, a temperature-versus-time profile having a peak temperature of 1700 °C was programmed into the FACS furnace controllers. Gaseous fission products (i.e., Kr-85) were carried to the Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) by a helium sweep gas and captured in cold traps featuring online gamma counting. By the end of the test, a total of 3.9% of an average particle’s inventory of Kr-85 was detected in the FGMS traps. Such a low Kr-85 activity indicates that no TRISO failures (failure of all three TRISO layers) occurred during the test. If released from the compacts, condensable fission products (e.g., Ag-110m, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-154, Eu-155, and Sr-90) were collected on condensation plates fitted to the end of the cold finger in the FACS furnace. These condensation plates were then analyzed for fission products. In the second test, five loose UCO fuel kernels, obtained from deconsolidated particles from an irradiated AGR-1 compact, were heated in the FACS furnace to a peak temperature of 1600 °C. This test had two

  12. Commercial-Scale Performance Predictions for High-Temperature Electrolysis Plants Coupled to Three Advanced Reactor Types

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2007-09-01

    This report presents results of system analyses that have been developed to assess the hydrogen production performance of commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plants driven by three different advanced reactor – power-cycle combinations: a high-temperature helium cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle, a supercritical CO2-cooled reactor coupled to a direct recompression cycle, and a sodium-cooled fast reactor coupled to a Rankine cycle. The system analyses were performed using UniSim software. The work described in this report represents a refinement of previous analyses in that the process flow diagrams include realistic representations of the three advanced reactors directly coupled to the power cycles and integrated with the high-temperature electrolysis process loops. In addition, this report includes parametric studies in which the performance of each HTE concept is determined over a wide range of operating conditions. Results of the study indicate that overall thermal-to- hydrogen production efficiencies (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) in the 45 - 50% range can be achieved at reasonable production rates with the high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept, 42 - 44% with the supercritical CO2-cooled reactor and about 33 - 34% with the sodium-cooled reactor.

  13. Bellows-Type Accumulators for Liquid Metal Loops of Space Reactor Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-20

    In many space nuclear power systems, the primary and/or secondary loops use liquid metal working fluids, and require accumulators to accommodate the change in the liquid metal volume and maintain sufficient subcooling to avoid boiling. This paper developed redundant and light-weight bellows-type accumulators with and without a mechanical spring, and compared the operating condition and mass of the accumulators for different types of liquid metal working fluids and operating temperatures: potassium, NaK-78, sodium and lithium loops of a total capacity of 50 liters and nominal operating temperatures of 840 K, 860 K, 950 K and 1340 K, respectively. The effects of using a mechanical spring and different structural materials on the design, operation and mass of the accumulators are also investigated. The structure materials considered include SS-316, Hastelloy-X, C-103 and Mo-14Re. The accumulator without a mechanical spring weighs 23 kg and 40 kg for a coolant subcooling of 50 K and 100 K, respectively, following a loss of the fill gas. The addition of a mechanical spring comes with a mass penalty, in favor of higher redundancy and maintaining a higher liquid metal subcooling.

  14. Bellows-Type Accumulators for Liquid Metal Loops of Space Reactor Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    In many space nuclear power systems, the primary and/or secondary loops use liquid metal working fluids, and require accumulators to accommodate the change in the liquid metal volume and maintain sufficient subcooling to avoid boiling. This paper developed redundant and light-weight bellows-type accumulators with and without a mechanical spring, and compared the operating condition and mass of the accumulators for different types of liquid metal working fluids and operating temperatures: potassium, NaK-78, sodium and lithium loops of a total capacity of 50 liters and nominal operating temperatures of 840 K, 860 K, 950 K and 1340 K, respectively. The effects of using a mechanical spring and different structural materials on the design, operation and mass of the accumulators are also investigated. The structure materials considered include SS-316, Hastelloy-X, C-103 and Mo-14Re. The accumulator without a mechanical spring weighs 23 kg and 40 kg for a coolant subcooling of 50 K and 100 K, respectively, following a loss of the fill gas. The addition of a mechanical spring comes with a mass penalty, in favor of higher redundancy and maintaining a higher liquid metal subcooling.

  15. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Ruano, W.J.

    1957-12-10

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

  16. Scaled-up bioconversion of fish waste to liquid fertilizer using a 5 L ribbon-type reactor.

    PubMed

    Dao, Van Thingoc; Kim, Joong Kyun

    2011-10-01

    A scaled-up conversion process of fish waste to liquid fertilizer was performed in a 5 L ribbon-type reactor. Biodegradation was performed by inoculation of autoclaved fish waste with 5.84 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1) of mixed microorganisms for 96 h. As a result, the pH changed from 6.92 to 5.72, the cell number reached 7.28 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1), and approximately 430 g (28.3%) of fish waste was degraded. Analyses indicated that the 96 h culture of inoculated fish waste possessed comparable fertilizing ability to commercial fertilizers in hydroponic culture with amino acid contents of 6.91 g 100 g(-1). Therefore, the scaled-up production achieved a more satisfactory fish waste degradation rate (3.61 g h(-1)) than the flask-scale production (0.24 g h(-1)). The biodegraded broth of fish waste at room temperature did not undergo putrefaction for 6 months due to the addition of 1% lactate.

  17. Microbial community changes during the start-up of an anaerobic/aerobic/anoxic-type sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; He, Jiajie; Wang, Hongyu; Ma, Fang; Yang, Kai; Wang, Jingbo

    2013-01-01

    An anaerobic/aerobic/anoxic-type sequencing batch reactor was started up during a summer rainy season to obtain enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), and its sludge microbial community was also monitored in the hope of observing the microbial community evolution of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs). During the start-up process, a total of 17 bands of highest species richness were detected in the sludge microbial community, including Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma- Proteobacteria, as well as Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes. Major microbial community structural change was observed in Rhodocyclus-related and Acinetobacter-related PAOs, glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), and Actinobacteria. In contrast to the current belief that enrichment of PAOs is essential for the establishment of EBPR, PAOs were not favourably enriched in this study. Instead, Actinobacteria and GAOs overwhelmingly flourished. The overall conclusion of this study challenges the conventional view that EBPR cannot live without traditional PAOs. However, it suggests an non-negligible role of denitrifying phosphorus-accumulating bacteria in EBPR systems, as well as other uncultured bacteria.

  18. Improvement of hydrogen production via ethanol-type fermentation in an anaerobic down-flow structured bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Anzola-Rojas, Mélida del Pilar; Zaiat, Marcelo; De Wever, Heleen

    2016-02-01

    Although a novel anaerobic down-flow structured bed reactor has shown feasibility and stable performance for a long-term compared to other anaerobic fixed bed systems for continuous hydrogen production, the volumetric rates and yields have so far been too low. In order to improve the performance, an operation strategy was applied by organic loading rate (OLR) variation (12-96 g COD L(-1) d(-1)). Different volumetric hydrogen rates, and yields at the same OLR indicated that the system was mainly driven by the specific organic load (SOL). When SOL was kept between 3.8 and 6.2 g sucrose g(-1) VSS d(-1), the volumetric rates raised from 0.1 to 8.9 L H2 L(-1) d(-1), and the yields were stable around 2.0 mol H2 mol(-1) converted sucrose. Furthermore, hydrogen was produced mainly via ethanol-type fermentation, reaching a total energy conversion rate of 23.40 kJ h(-1) L(-1) based on both hydrogen and ethanol production.

  19. Irradiation damage analysis on the flat plate type target plate of the divertor for fusion experimental reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, S.; Akiba, M.; Eto, M.

    1996-04-01

    To design the relevant plasma facing components of fusion experimental reactors such as ITER, irradiation damage analysis, especially on divertor structures exposed to high heat flux and heavy neutron irradiation, is one of the most important problems. This paper presents finite element analytical results of the thermal and irradiation induced stresses which occurred in the divertor structures which are exposed to neutron irradiation at 0-1 dpa with a high heat flux up to 15 MW/m 2. A type of target plate model of the divertor structure studied in present study e.g. flat plate model has bonded structure of one-dimensional high thermal conductivity carbon-carbon composite (C/C) and oxygen-free high conductivity copper (OFHC), as armor and substrate/heat sink materials, respectively. These results show that irradiation induced stresses at edges of bonded interface between an armor and a substrate/heat sink, become higher with increase of dpa and reach up to the critical values of the materials at 0 and 1 dpa. This indicates that drop-off of armor tiles from substrate structure is one of very serious problems for the safety design of target plate; thus the reduction of service conditions and change of divertor materials are important to extend lifetime of the model.

  20. Effect of neutron irradiation on tensile properties of materials for pressure vessel internals of WWER type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Margolin, B. Z.; Kursevich, I. P.; Minkin, A. J.; Neustroev, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels used for pressure vessel internals of WWER type reactors (18Cr-10Ni-Ti steel and its weld metal) in the initial and irradiated conditions were investigated. Based on the presented original investigations and generalization of the available experimental data the dependences of yield strength and ultimate strength on a neutron damage dose up to 108 dpa, irradiation temperature range 320-450 °C and test temperature range 20-450 °C were obtained. The method of determination of the stress-strain curve parameters was proposed which does not require uniform elongation of a specimen as an input parameter. The dependences was proposed allowing one to calculate the stress-strain curve parameters for 18Cr-10Ni-Ti steel and its weld metal for different test temperatures, different irradiation temperatures and doses. The dependences were obtained to describe the fracture strain decrease under irradiation at a temperature range 320-340 °C when irradiation swelling is absent.

  1. Validation of deterministic and Monte Carlo codes for neutronics calculation of the IRT-type research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchurovskaya, M. V.; Alferov, V. P.; Geraskin, N. I.; Radaev, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the validation of a research reactor calculation using Monte Carlo and deterministic codes against experimental data and based on code-to-code comparison are presented. The continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCU-PTR and the nodal diffusion-based deterministic code TIGRIS were used for full 3-D calculation of the IRT MEPhI research reactor. The validation included the investigations for the reactor with existing high enriched uranium (HEU, 90 w/o) fuel and low enriched uranium (LEU, 19.7 w/o, U-9%Mo) fuel.

  2. Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Pisanti, O.

    The following sections are included: * Elementary Considerations * The Integral Equation to the Neutron Distribution * The Critical Size for a Fast Reactor * Supercritical Reactors * Problems and Exercises

  3. Accumulation of radioactive corrosion products on steel surfaces of VVER type nuclear reactors. I. 110mAg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Gábor; Baradlai, Pál; Varga, Kálmán; Myburg, Gerrit; Schunk, János; Tilky, Péter; Stoddart, Paul

    Formation, presence and deposition of corrosion product radionuclides (such as 60Co, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe and/or 110mAg) in the primary circuits of water-cooled nuclear reactors (PWRs) throw many obstacles in the way of normal operation. During the course of the work presented in this series, accumulations of such radionuclides have been studied at austenitic stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOST 5632-61) surfaces (this austenitic stainless steel corresponds to AISI 321). Comparative experiments have been performed on magnetite-covered carbon steel (both materials are frequently used in some Soviet VVER type PWRs). For these laboratory-scale investigations a combination of the in situ radiotracer `thin gap' method and voltammetry is considered to be a powerful tool due to its high sensitivity towards the detection of the submonolayer coverages of corrosion product radionuclides. An independent technique (XPS) is also used to characterize the depth distribution and chemical state of various contaminants in the passive layer formed on austenitic stainless steel. In the first part of the series the accumulation of 110mAg has been investigated. Potential dependent sorption of Ag + ions (cementation) is found to be the predominant process on austenitic steel, while in the case of magnetite-covered carbon steel the silver species are mainly depleted in the form of Ag 2O. The XPS depth profile of Ag gives an evidence about the embedding of metallic silver into the entire passive layer of the austenitic stainless steel studied.

  4. MBE growth of Sb-based type-II strained layer superlattice structures on multiwafer production reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubyshev, Dmitri; Fastenau, Joel M.; Gu, Xing; Liu, Amy W. K.; Prineas, John; Koerperick, Edwin J.; Olesberg, Jonathon T.; Jackson, Eric M.; Nolde, Jill A.; Yi, Changhyun; Aifer, Edward H.

    2010-04-01

    Ga(In)Sb/InAs-based strained-layer superlattices (SLS) have received considerable attention recently for their potential in infrared (IR) applications. These heterostructures create a type-II band alignment such that the conduction band of InAs layer is lower than the valence band of Ga(In)Sb layer. By varying the thickness and composition of the constituent materials, the bandgap of these SLS structures can be tailored to cover a wide range of the mid-wave and long-wave infrared (MWIR and LWIR) absorption bands. Suppression of Auger recombination and reduction of tunneling current can also be realized through careful design of the Type-II band structure. The growth of high-quality Ga(In)Sb/InAs-based SLS epiwafers is challenging due to the complexity of growing a large number of alternating thin layers with mixed group V elements. In this paper, the development of a manufacturable growth process by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a multi-wafer production reactor will be discussed. Various techniques were used to analyze the quality of the epitaxial material. Structural properties were evaluated by high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Optical properties were assessed by low-temperature photoluminescence measurements (PL). Surface morphology and roughness data as measured by Nomarski optical microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM) will be presented. Device characteristics such as dynamic impedance, responsivity, quantum efficiency, and J-V characteristics of photodiodes fabricated using our SLS epiwafers will be discussed.

  5. 15 CFR 740.18 - Agricultural commodities (AGR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... required). In the case of multiple partial shipments, all such shipments must be made within the 12 months... procedures set forth in paragraph (c) of this section. If you intend to engage in multiple shipments during... reexport (or prior to the first of multiple shipments) under License Exception AGR. (2) Procedures....

  6. 15 CFR 740.18 - Agricultural commodities (AGR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... required). In the case of multiple partial shipments, all such shipments must be made within the 12 months... procedures set forth in paragraph (c) of this section. If you intend to engage in multiple shipments during... reexport (or prior to the first of multiple shipments) under License Exception AGR. (2) Procedures....

  7. 15 CFR 740.18 - Agricultural commodities (AGR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... procedures set forth in paragraph (c) of this section. If you intend to engage in multiple shipments during the one-year period after the signing of the contract, you need only notify BIS prior to the first... reexport (or prior to the first of multiple shipments) under License Exception AGR. (2) Procedures....

  8. High Genetic Variability of the agr Locus in Staphylococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Philippe; Jarraud, Sophie; Vandenesch, Francois; Greenland, Timothy; Novick, Richard P.; Bes, Michele; Etienne, Jerome; Lina, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    The agr quorum-sensing and signal transduction system was initially described in Staphylococcus aureus, where four distinct allelic variants have been sequenced. Western blotting suggests the presence of homologous loci in many other staphylococci, and this has been confirmed for S. epidermidis and S. lugdunensis. In this study we isolated agr-like loci from a range of staphylococci by using PCR amplification from primers common to the six published agr sequences and bracketing the most variable region, associated with quorum-sensing specificity. Positive amplifications were obtained from 14 of 34 staphylococcal species or subspecies tested. Sequences of the amplicons identified 24 distinct variants which exhibited extensive sequence divergence with only 10% of the nucleotides absolutely conserved on multiple alignment. This variability involved all three open reading frames involved in quorum sensing and signal transduction. However, these variants retained several protein signatures, including the conserved cysteine residue of the autoinducing peptide, with the exception of S. intermedius of pigeon origin, which contained a serine in place of cysteine at this position. We discuss hypotheses on the mode of action and the molecular evolution of the agr locus based on comparisons between the newly determined sequences. PMID:11807079

  9. Daily thermal predictions of the AGR-1 experiment with gas gaps varying with time

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, G.; Sterbentz, J.; Maki, J.; Pham, B.

    2012-07-01

    A new daily as-run thermal analysis was performed at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) test experiment number one at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This thermal analysis incorporates gas gaps changing with time during the irradiation experiment. The purpose of this analysis was to calculate the daily average temperatures of each compact to compare with experimental results. Post irradiation examination (PIE) measurements of the graphite holder and fuel compacts showed the gas gaps changed from the beginning of life. The control temperature gas gap and the fuel compact - graphite holder gas gaps were modeled with a linear change from the original fabrication gap dimensions to the end of irradiation measurements. A steady-state thermal analysis was performed for each daily calculation with the commercial finite element heat transfer code ABAQUS. These new thermal predictions more closely match the experimental data taken during the experiment than previous analyses. Results are presented comparing normalized compact average temperatures to normalized log(R/B) Kr-85m. The R/B term is the measured release rate divided by the predicted birth rate for the isotope Kr-85m. Correlations between these two normalized values are presented. (authors)

  10. Daily Thermal Predictions of the AGR-1 Experiment with Gas Gaps Varying with Time

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James Sterbentz; John Maki; Binh Pham

    2012-06-01

    A new daily as-run thermal analysis was performed at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) test experiment number one at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This thermal analysis incorporates gas gaps changing with time during the irradiation experiment. The purpose of this analysis was to calculate the daily average temperatures of each compact to compare with experimental results. Post irradiation examination (PIE) measurements of the graphite holder and fuel compacts showed the gas gaps varying from the beginning of life. The control temperature gas gap and the fuel compact – graphite holder gas gaps were linearly changed from the original fabrication dimensions, to the end of irradiation measurements. A steady-state thermal analysis was performed for each daily calculation. These new thermal predictions more closely match the experimental data taken during the experiment than previous analyses. Results are presented comparing normalized compact average temperatures to normalized log(R/B) Kr-85m. The R/B term is the measured release rate divided by the predicted birth rate for the isotope Kr-85m. Correlations between these two normalized values are presented.

  11. Initial Gamma Spectrometry Examination of the AGR-3/4 Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Stempien, John D.

    2016-11-01

    The initial results from gamma spectrometry examination of the different components from the combined third and fourth US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiation tests (AGR-3/4) have been analyzed. This experiment was designed to provide information about in-pile fission product migration. In each of the 12 capsules, a single stack of four compacts with designed-to-fail particles surrounded by two graphitic diffusion rings (inner and outer) and a graphite sink were irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Advanced Test Reactor. Gamma spectrometry has been used to evaluate the gamma-emitting fission product inventory of compacts from the irradiation and evaluate the burnup of these compacts based on the activity of the radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) in the compacts. Burnup from gamma spectrometry compares well with predicted burnup from simulations. Additionally, inner and outer rings were also examined by gamma spectrometry both to evaluate the fission product inventory and the distribution of gamma-emitting fission products within the rings using gamma emission computed tomography. The cesium inventory of the scanned rings compares acceptably well with the expected inventory from fission product transport modeling. The inventory of the graphite fission product sinks is also being evaluated by gamma spectrometry.

  12. Systematic mutational analysis of the LytTR DNA binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus virulence gene transcription factor AgrA

    PubMed Central

    Nicod, Sophie S.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.; Burchell, Lynn; Escalera-Maurer, Andres; James, Ellen H.; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh

    2014-01-01

    Most DNA-binding bacterial transcription factors contact DNA through a recognition α-helix in their DNA-binding domains. An emerging class of DNA-binding transcription factors, predominantly found in pathogenic bacteria interact with the DNA via a relatively novel type of DNA-binding domain, called the LytTR domain, which mainly comprises β strands. Even though the crystal structure of the LytTR domain of the virulence gene transcription factor AgrA from Staphylococcus aureus bound to its cognate DNA sequence is available, the contribution of specific amino acid residues in the LytTR domain of AgrA to transcription activation remains elusive. Here, for the first time, we have systematically investigated the role of amino acid residues in transcription activation in a LytTR domain-containing transcription factor. Our analysis, which involves in vivo and in vitro analyses and molecular dynamics simulations of S. aureus AgrA identifies a highly conserved tyrosine residue, Y229, as a major amino acid determinant for maximal activation of transcription by AgrA and provides novel insights into structure–function relationships in S. aureus AgrA. PMID:25352558

  13. Discrimination of source reactor type by multivariate statistical analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopic concentrations in unknown irradiated nuclear fuel material.

    PubMed

    Robel, Martin; Kristo, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The problem of identifying the provenance of unknown nuclear material in the environment by multivariate statistical analysis of its uranium and/or plutonium isotopic composition is considered. Such material can be introduced into the environment as a result of nuclear accidents, inadvertent processing losses, illegal dumping of waste, or deliberate trafficking in nuclear materials. Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition were analyzed using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA) of the concentrations of nine U and Pu isotopes in fuel as a function of burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of (234)U and (236)U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was incorporated. The U and Pu were also analyzed separately, with results that suggest that, even after reprocessing or environmental fractionation, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the source reactor type and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination.

  14. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  15. Hybrid reactors. [Fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-09-09

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of /sup 233/U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m/sup -2/, and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  17. Successful scaling-up of self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass under pool-type reactor.

    PubMed

    Idris, Juferi; Shirai, Yoshihito; Andou, Yoshito; Mohd Ali, Ahmad Amiruddin; Othman, Mohd Ridzuan; Ibrahim, Izzudin; Yamamoto, Akio; Yasuda, Nobuhiko; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    An appropriate technology for waste utilisation, especially for a large amount of abundant pressed-shredded oil palm empty fruit bunch (OFEFB), is important for the oil palm industry. Self-sustained pyrolysis, whereby oil palm biomass was combusted by itself to provide the heat for pyrolysis without an electrical heater, is more preferable owing to its simplicity, ease of operation and low energy requirement. In this study, biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass in the form of oil palm empty fruit bunch was tested in a 3-t large-scale pool-type reactor. During the pyrolysis process, the biomass was loaded layer by layer when the smoke appeared on the top, to minimise the entrance of oxygen. This method had significantly increased the yield of biochar. In our previous report, we have tested on a 30-kg pilot-scale capacity under self-sustained pyrolysis and found that the higher heating value (HHV) obtained was 22.6-24.7 MJ kg(-1) with a 23.5%-25.0% yield. In this scaled-up study, a 3-t large-scale procedure produced HHV of 22.0-24.3 MJ kg(-1) with a 30%-34% yield based on a wet-weight basis. The maximum self-sustained pyrolysis temperature for the large-scale procedure can reach between 600 °C and 700 °C. We concluded that large-scale biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis was successfully conducted owing to the comparable biochar produced, compared with medium-scale and other studies with an electrical heating element, making it an appropriate technology for waste utilisation, particularly for the oil palm industry. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. An Assessment of ORNL PIE Capabilities for the AGR Program Capsule Post Irradiation Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert Noel

    2006-09-01

    ORNL has facilities and experienced staff that can execute +the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) task. While the specific PIE breakdown needs to be more formally defined, the basic outline is clear and the existing capabilities can be assessed within the needs of the tasks defined in the program plan. A one-to-one correspondence between the program plan tasks and the current ORNL PIE status was conducted and while some shortcomings were identified, the general capability is available. Specific upgrade needs were identified and reviewed. A path forward was formulated. Building 3525 is available for this work and this building is currently receiving renewed attention from management so that it will be in good working order prior to the expected PIE start date. This building is equipped with the tools necessary for PIEs of this nature, but the long hiatus in coated particle fuel work has left it with aging analysis tools. This report identified several of these tools and rough estimates of what would be required to update and replace them. In addition, other ORNL buildings are available to support Building 3525 in specialized tasks along with the normal laboratory infrastructure. Before the AGR management embarks on any equipment development effort, the PIE tasks should be updated against current program (modeling and data) needs and better defined so that the items to be measured, their measurement uncertainties, and thru-put needs can be reviewed. A Data Task Matrix (DTM) should be prepared so that the program data needs can be compared against the identified PIE tasks and what is practical in the hot cell environment to make sure nothing is overlooked. Finally, thought should be given to the development of standardized equipment designs between sites to avoid redundant design efforts and different measurement techniques. This is a potentially cost saving effort that can also avoid data inconsistencies.

  19. Thermohydraulic model experiments on the transition from forced to natural circulation for pool-type fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Marten, K.; Weinberg, D. )

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, thermohydraulic studies on the transition from forced to natural convection are carried out using the 1:20 scale RAMONA three-dimensional reactor model with water as the simulant fluid. In the investigations, a scram from 40% load operation of a fast reactor is simulated. The core mass flows and the core as well as the hot plenum temperatures are measured as a function of time for various core power levels, coastdown curves of the primary- and secondary-side pumps, and for various delay times for the start of the immersion coolers after a scram. These parameters influence the onset of the natural circulation in the reactor tank. The main result is that the longer the intermediate heat exchanger coolability is ensured and the later the immersion coolers start to operate, the higher is the natural-circulation flow and, hence, the lower are the core temperatures.

  20. Influence of Sae-regulated and Agr-regulated factors on the escape of Staphylococcus aureus from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Münzenmayer, Lisa; Geiger, Tobias; Daiber, Ellen; Schulte, Berit; Autenrieth, Stella E; Fraunholz, Martin; Wolz, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is not a classical intracellular pathogen, it can survive within phagocytes and many other cell types. However, the pathogen is also able to escape from cells by mechanisms that are only partially understood. We analysed a series of isogenic S. aureus mutants of the USA300 derivative JE2 for their capacity to destroy human macrophages from within. Intracellular S. aureus JE2 caused severe cell damage in human macrophages and could efficiently escape from within the cells. To obtain this full escape phenotype including an intermittent residency in the cytoplasm, the combined action of the regulatory systems Sae and Agr is required. Mutants in Sae or mutants deficient in the Sae target genes lukAB and pvl remained in high numbers within the macrophages causing reduced cell damage. Mutants in the regulatory system Agr or in the Agr target gene psmα were largely similar to wild-type bacteria concerning cell damage and escape efficiency. However, these strains were rarely detectable in the cytoplasm, emphasizing the role of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) for phagosomal escape. Thus, Sae-regulated toxins largely determine damage and escape from within macrophages, whereas PSMs are mainly responsible for the escape from the phagosome into the cytoplasm. Damage of macrophages induced by intracellular bacteria was linked neither to activation of apoptosis-related caspase 3, 7 or 8 nor to NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation.

  1. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  2. A new type of bromate oscillator: the bromate-iodide reaction in a stirred-flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Alamgir, M.; De Kepper, P.; Orban, M.; Epstein, I.R.

    1983-05-04

    Sustained oscillations and bistability have been observed in the reaction between bromate and iodide in acidic solution in a stirred tank reactor at 25/sup 0/C. This reaction appears to be the first bromate oscillator that requires a mechanism more analogous to that of chlorite oscillators than to that of other bromate systems such as the Belousov-Zhobotinskii reaction.

  3. Thermohydraulic model experiments and calculations on the transition from forced to natural circulation for pool-type fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Marten, K.; Weinberg, D.; Kamide, H.

    1990-01-01

    After a reactor scram, the decay heat removal (DHR) is of decisive importance for the safety of the plant. A fully passive DHR system based on natural circulation alone is independent of any power source. The DHE system consists of immersion coolers (ICs) installed in the hot plenum and connected to air coolers, each via intermediate circuits. During the postscram phase, the decay heat is to be removed by natural circulation from the core into the hot plenum and via the ICs and intermediate loops to the air coolers. The function of this DHR system is investigated and demonstrated in model tests with a geometry similar to the reactor, though on a different scale RAMONA is such a three-dimensional model set up on a 1:20 scale. It is operated with water. The steady-state tests for natural-circulation DHR operations have been conducted over a wide range of operational and geometric parameters. To study the transition from nominal to DHR conditions, experiments were defined to investigate the onset of natural circulation in the postscram phase (transient tests). The experiments were analyzed using the one-dimensional LEDHER code. LEDHER is a network analysis code for the long-term DHR of a fast reactor developed at Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation in Japan. The results of the experiments and conclusions are summarized.

  4. Loss of hemolysin expression in Staphylococcus aureus agr mutants correlates with selective survival during mixed infections in murine abscesses and wounds.

    PubMed

    Schwan, William R; Langhorne, Michael H; Ritchie, Heather D; Stover, C Kendall

    2003-08-18

    During the screening of a Staphylococcus aureus signature-tagged mutagenesis library, it was noted that nonhemolytic bacteria became more abundant as time passed in murine abscess and wound models, but not within organ tissues associated with systemic infections. To examine this further, a mixed population of hyperhemolytic, hemolytic, and nonhemolytic S. aureus strain RN6390 cells were inoculated into mice using abscess, wound, and systemic models of infection. After 7 days in the abscess, the hyperhemolytic group markedly declined, whereas the nonhemolytic population increased significantly. A similar phenomenon occurred in murine wounds, but not during the systemic infection. Sequencing of several of the signature-tagged mutants indicated mutations in the agrC gene or within the agrA-agrC intergenic region. Both alpha-hemolysin and delta-hemolysin activity was curtailed in these mutants, but beta-hemolysin activity was unaffected. Single strain comparisons between wild-type strain 8325-4 and strain DU1090 (hla-) as well as between strain RN6911 (agr) and wild-type strain RN6390 were performed using the same three animal models of infection. The agr mutant strain and the hla mutant strain showed no difference in bacterial counts in murine wounds compared to their respective parent strains. The same held true in murine abscesses at day 4, but strain RN6911 counts then declined at day 7. Considerable clearing of the hla mutant strain and the agr mutant strain occurred in the systemic model of infection. Mixed infections with the DU1090 and 8325-4 strains in the abscess model showed a slight advantage given to the DU1090 population, but a distinct selection for the parental 8325-4 strain in the liver. These results suggest that agr mutations cause reductions in the expression of several secreted proteins, including alpha- and delta-hemolysin, which in turn contribute to a growth advantage of this agr mutant group within a mixed population of S. aureus cells residing

  5. KEY RESULTS FROM IRRADIATION AND POST-IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF AGR-1 UCO TRISO FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Petti, David A.; Morris, Robert N.

    2016-11-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment was performed as the first test of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel in the US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The experiment consisted of 72 right cylinder fuel compacts containing approximately 3×105 coated fuel particles with uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) fuel kernels. The fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor for a total of 620 effective full power days. Fuel burnup ranged from 11.3 to 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom and time average, volume average irradiation temperatures of the individual compacts ranged from 955 to 1136°C. This paper focuses on key results from the irradiation and post-irradiation examination, which revealed a robust fuel with excellent performance characteristics under the conditions tested and have significantly improved the understanding of UCO coated particle fuel irradiation behavior within the US program. The fuel exhibited a very low incidence of TRISO coating failure during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing at temperatures up to 1800°C. Advanced PIE methods have allowed particles with SiC coating failure to be isolated and meticulously examined, which has elucidated the specific causes of SiC failure in these specimens. The level of fission product release from the fuel during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing has been studied in detail. Results indicated very low release of krypton and cesium through intact SiC and modest release of europium and strontium, while also confirming the potential for significant silver release through the coatings depending on irradiation conditions. Focused study of fission products within the coating layers of irradiated particles down to nanometer length scales has provided new insights into fission product transport through the coating layers and the role various fission products may have on coating integrity. The broader implications of these results and the application of

  6. Peter Agre, 2003 Nobel Prize winner in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Knepper, Mark A; Nielsen, Soren

    2004-04-01

    Peter C. Agre, an American Society of Nephrology member, is the recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery of the aquaporin water channels. The function of many cells requires that water move rapidly into and out of them. There was only indirect evidence that proteinaceous channels provide this vital activity until Agre and colleagues purified aquaporin-1 from human erythrocytes and reported its cDNA sequence. They proved that aquaporin-1 is a specific water channel by cRNA expression studies in Xenopus oocytes and by functional reconstitution of transport activity in liposomes after the incorporation of the purified protein. These findings sparked a veritable explosion of work that affects several long-standing areas of investigation such as the biophysics of water permeation across cell membranes, the structural biology of integral membrane proteins, the physiology of fluid transport in the kidney and other organs, and the pathophysiological basis of inherited and acquired disorders of water balance. Agre's discovery of the first water channel has spurred a revolution in animal and plant physiology and in medicine.

  7. Targeting agr- and agr-Like Quorum Sensing Systems for Development of Common Therapeutics to Treat Multiple Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Brian; Hall, Pamela; Gresham, Hattie

    2013-01-01

    Invasive infection by the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is controlled by a four gene operon, agr that encodes a quorum sensing system for the regulation of virulence. While agr has been well studied in S. aureus, the contribution of agr homologues and analogues in other Gram-positive pathogens is just beginning to be understood. Intriguingly, other significant human pathogens, including Clostridium perfringens, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis contain agr or analogues linked to virulence. Moreover, other significant human Gram-positive pathogens use peptide based quorum sensing systems to establish or maintain infection. The potential for commonality in aspects of these signaling systems across different species raises the prospect of identifying therapeutics that could target multiple pathogens. Here, we review the status of research into these agr homologues, analogues, and other peptide based quorum sensing systems in Gram-positive pathogens as well as the potential for identifying common pathways and signaling mechanisms for therapeutic discovery. PMID:23598501

  8. Targeting agr- and agr-Like quorum sensing systems for development of common therapeutics to treat multiple gram-positive bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gray, Brian; Hall, Pamela; Gresham, Hattie

    2013-04-18

    Invasive infection by the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is controlled by a four gene operon, agr that encodes a quorum sensing system for the regulation of virulence. While agr has been well studied in S. aureus, the contribution of agr homologues and analogues in other Gram-positive pathogens is just beginning to be understood. Intriguingly, other significant human pathogens, including Clostridium perfringens, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis contain agr or analogues linked to virulence. Moreover, other significant human Gram-positive pathogens use peptide based quorum sensing systems to establish or maintain infection. The potential for commonality in aspects of these signaling systems across different species raises the prospect of identifying therapeutics that could target multiple pathogens. Here, we review the status of research into these agr homologues, analogues, and other peptide based quorum sensing systems in Gram-positive pathogens as well as the potential for identifying common pathways and signaling mechanisms for therapeutic discovery.

  9. BOILING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  10. XerC Contributes to Diverse Forms of Staphylococcus aureus Infection via agr-Dependent and agr-Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Karen E.; Loughran, Allister J.; Meeker, Daniel G.; Lantz, Tamara L.; Graham, Justin W.; Spencer, Horace J.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that mutation of xerC, which reportedly encodes a homologue of an Escherichia coli recombinase, limits biofilm formation in the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain LAC and the methicillin-sensitive strain UAMS-1. This was not due to the decreased production of the polysaccharide intracellular adhesin (PIA) in either strain because the amount of PIA was increased in a UAMS-1 xerC mutant and undetectable in both LAC and its isogenic xerC mutant. Mutation of xerC also resulted in the increased production of extracellular proteases and nucleases in both LAC and UAMS-1, and limiting the production of either class of enzymes increased biofilm formation in the isogenic xerC mutants. More importantly, the limited capacity to form a biofilm was correlated with increased antibiotic susceptibility in both strains in the context of an established biofilm in vivo. Mutation of xerC also attenuated virulence in a murine bacteremia model, as assessed on the basis of the bacterial loads in internal organs and overall lethality. It also resulted in the decreased accumulation of alpha toxin and the increased accumulation of protein A. These findings suggest that xerC may impact the functional status of agr. This was confirmed by demonstrating the reduced accumulation of RNAIII and AgrA in LAC and UAMS-1 xerC mutants. However, this cannot account for the biofilm-deficient phenotype of xerC mutants because mutation of agr did not limit biofilm formation in either strain. These results demonstrate that xerC contributes to biofilm-associated infections and acute bacteremia and that this is likely due to agr-independent and -dependent pathways, respectively. PMID:26857575

  11. XerC Contributes to Diverse Forms of Staphylococcus aureus Infection via agr-Dependent and agr-Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Danielle N; Beenken, Karen E; Loughran, Allister J; Meeker, Daniel G; Lantz, Tamara L; Graham, Justin W; Spencer, Horace J; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that mutation of xerC, which reportedly encodes a homologue of an Escherichia coli recombinase, limits biofilm formation in the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain LAC and the methicillin-sensitive strain UAMS-1. This was not due to the decreased production of the polysaccharide intracellular adhesin (PIA) in either strain because the amount of PIA was increased in a UAMS-1xerC mutant and undetectable in both LAC and its isogenic xerC mutant. Mutation of xerC also resulted in the increased production of extracellular proteases and nucleases in both LAC and UAMS-1, and limiting the production of either class of enzymes increased biofilm formation in the isogenic xerC mutants. More importantly, the limited capacity to form a biofilm was correlated with increased antibiotic susceptibility in both strains in the context of an established biofilm in vivo. Mutation of xerC also attenuated virulence in a murine bacteremia model, as assessed on the basis of the bacterial loads in internal organs and overall lethality. It also resulted in the decreased accumulation of alpha toxin and the increased accumulation of protein A. These findings suggest that xerC may impact the functional status of agr. This was confirmed by demonstrating the reduced accumulation of RNAIII and AgrA in LAC and UAMS-1xerC mutants. However, this cannot account for the biofilm-deficient phenotype of xerC mutants because mutation of agr did not limit biofilm formation in either strain. These results demonstrate that xerC contributes to biofilm-associated infections and acute bacteremia and that this is likely due to agr-independent and -dependent pathways, respectively.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-09-01

    A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

  14. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Peter Agre, Chemistry 2003

    PubMed Central

    Agre, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Peter Agre, born in 1949 in Northfield Minnesota, shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Roderick MacKinnon for his discovery of aquaporins, the channel proteins that allow water to cross the cell membrane. Agre's interest medicine was inspired by the humanitarian efforts of the Medical Missionary program run by the Norwegians of his home community in Minnesota. Hoping to provide new treatments for diseases affecting the poor, he joined a cholera laboratory during medical school at Johns Hopkins. He found that he enjoyed biomedical research, and continued his laboratory studies for an additional year after medical school. Agre completed his clinical training at Case Western Hospitals of Cleveland and the University of North Carolina, and returned to Johns Hopkins in 1981. There, his serendipitous discovery of aquaporins was made while pursuing the identity of the Rhesus (Rh) antigen. For a century, physiologists and biophysicists had been trying to understand the mechanism by which fluid passed across the cell's plasma membrane. Biophysical evidence indicated a limit to passive diffusion of water, suggesting the existence of another mechanism for water transport across the membrane. The putative "water channel," however, could not be identified. In 1988, while attempting to purify the 30kDa Rh protein, Agre and colleagues began investigating a 28 kDa contaminant that they believed to be a proteolytic fragment of the Rh protein. Subsequent studies over the next 3-4 years revealed that the contaminant was a membrane-spanning oligomeric protein, unrelated to the Rh antigen, and that it was highly abundant in renal tubules and red blood cells. Still, they could not assign a function to it. The breakthrough came following a visit with his friend and former mentor John Parker. After Agre described the properties of the mysterious 28 kDa protein, Parker suggested that it might be the long-sought-after water channel. Agre and colleagues tested this idea by

  15. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Peter Agre, Chemistry 2003.

    PubMed

    Agre, Peter

    2009-12-09

    Peter Agre, born in 1949 in Northfield Minnesota, shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Roderick MacKinnon for his discovery of aquaporins, the channel proteins that allow water to cross the cell membrane. Agre's interest medicine was inspired by the humanitarian efforts of the Medical Missionary program run by the Norwegians of his home community in Minnesota. Hoping to provide new treatments for diseases affecting the poor, he joined a cholera laboratory during medical school at Johns Hopkins. He found that he enjoyed biomedical research, and continued his laboratory studies for an additional year after medical school. Agre completed his clinical training at Case Western Hospitals of Cleveland and the University of North Carolina, and returned to Johns Hopkins in 1981. There, his serendipitous discovery of aquaporins was made while pursuing the identity of the Rhesus (Rh) antigen. For a century, physiologists and biophysicists had been trying to understand the mechanism by which fluid passed across the cell's plasma membrane. Biophysical evidence indicated a limit to passive diffusion of water, suggesting the existence of another mechanism for water transport across the membrane. The putative "water channel," however, could not be identified. In 1988, while attempting to purify the 30 kDa Rh protein, Agre and colleagues began investigating a 28 kDa contaminant that they believed to be a proteolytic fragment of the Rh protein. Subsequent studies over the next 3-4 years revealed that the contaminant was a membrane-spanning oligomeric protein, unrelated to the Rh antigen, and that it was highly abundant in renal tubules and red blood cells. Still, they could not assign a function to it. The breakthrough came following a visit with his friend and former mentor John Parker. After Agre described the properties of the mysterious 28 kDa protein, Parker suggested that it might be the long-sought-after water channel. Agre and colleagues tested this idea by

  16. Bimodal space nuclear power system with fast reactor and Topaz II-type single-cell TFE

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Usov, V.A.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I.; Klimov, A.V.; Kirillov, E.Y.; Shumov, D.P.; Radchenko, I.S.; Nicolaev, Y.V.

    1996-03-01

    The paper deals with characteristics and conceptual studies of a bimodal space thermionic system with a fast reactor and single-cell TFEs which is designed to operate in two modes: rated power mode providing power supply to space vehicle-mounted systems with energy consumption level of 10{endash}80 kW(e) and forced thermal propulsion mode with thrust of 2200 N. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Influence of the type and source of inoculum on the start-up of anammox sequencing batch reactors (SBRs).

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Lorna; Van Diest, Federico; Barahona, Andrea; Montalvo, Silvio; Borja, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) is an attractive option for the treatment of wastewaters with a low carbon/nitrogen ratio. This is due to its low operating costs when compared to the classical nitrification-denitrification processes. However, one of the main disadvantages of the Anammox process is slow biomass growth, meaning a relatively slow reactor start-up. This becomes even more complicated when Anammox microorganisms are not present in the inoculum. Four inocula were studied for the start-up of Anammox sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) 2 L in volume agitated at 100 rpm, one of them using zeolite as a microbial support. Two inocula were taken from UASB reactors and two from aerobic reactors (activated sludge and SBR). The Anammox SBRs studied were operated at 36 ± 0.5°C. The results showed that the only inoculum that enabled the enrichment of the Anammox biomass came from an activated sludge plant treating wastewaters from a poultry slaughterhouse. This plant was designed for organic matter degradation and nitrogen removal (nitrification). This could explain the presence of Anammox microorganisms. This SBR operated without zeolite and achieved nitrite and ammonium removals of 96.3% and 68.4% respectively, at a nitrogen loading rate (NLR) of 0.1 kg N/m(3)/d in both cases. The lower ammonium removal was due to the fact that a sub-stoichiometric amount of nitrite (1 molar ratio) was fed. The specific Anammox activity (SAA) achieved was 0.18 g N/g VSS/d.

  18. Type B investigation of the iridium contamination event at the High Flux Isotope Reactor on September 7, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    On the title date, at ORNL, area radiation alarms sounded during a routine transfer of a shielding cask (containing 60 Ci{sup 192}Ir) from the HFIR pool side to a transport truck. Small amounts of Ir were released from the cask onto the reactor bay floor. The floor was cleaned, and the cask was shipped to a hot cell at Building 3047 on Oct. 3, 1993. The event was caused by rupture of one of the Ir target rods after it was loaded into the cask for normal transport operations; the rupture was the result of steam generation in the target rod soon after it was placed in the cask (water had entered the target rod through a tiny defect in a weld while it was in the reactor under pressure). While the target rods were in the reactor and reactor pool, there was sufficient cooling to prevent steam generation; when the target rod was loaded into the dry transport cask, the temperature increased enough to result in boiling of the trapped water and produced high enough pressure to result in rupture. The escaping steam ejected some of the Ir pellets. The event was reported as Occurrence Report Number ORO--MMES-X10HFIR-1993-0030, dated Sept. 8, 1993. Analysis indicated that the following conditions were probable causes: less than adequate welding procedures, practices, or techniques, material controls, or inspection methods, or combination thereof, could have led to weld defects, affecting the integrity of target rod IR-75; less than adequate secondary containment in the cask allowed Ir pellets to escape.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1959-02-10

    A reactor system incorporating a reactor of the heterogeneous boiling water type is described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a core submerged adwater in the lower half of a pressure vessel and two distribution rings connected to a source of water are disposed within the pressure vessel above the reactor core, the lower distribution ring being submerged adjacent to the uppcr end of the reactor core and the other distribution ring being located adjacent to the top of the pressure vessel. A feed-water control valve, responsive to the steam demand of the load, is provided in the feedwater line to the distribution rings and regulates the amount of feed water flowing to each distribution ring, the proportion of water flowing to the submerged distribution ring being proportional to the steam demand of the load. This invention provides an automatic means exterior to the reactor to control the reactivity of the reactor over relatively long periods of time without relying upon movement of control rods or of other moving parts within the reactor structure.

  20. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  1. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  2. Research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world`s research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    McGarry, R.J.

    1958-04-22

    Fluid-cooled nuclear reactors of the type that utilize finned uranium fuel elements disposed in coolant channels in a moderater are described. The coolant channels are provided with removable bushings composed of a non- fissionable material. The interior walls of the bushings have a plurality of spaced, longtudinal ribs separated by grooves which receive the fins on the fuel elements. The lands between the grooves are spaced from the fuel elements to form flow passages, and the size of the now passages progressively decreases as the dlstance from the center of the core increases for the purpose of producing a greater cooling effect at the center to maintain a uniform temperature throughout the core.

  5. Design and Expected Performance of the AGR-1 Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS)

    SciTech Connect

    John K. Hartwell; Dawn M. Scates

    2005-09-01

    The effluent from each test capsule of the AGR-1 experiment will be monitored by a detector system consisting of a gamma-ray spectrometer and a gross radiation detector. This collection of radiation measurement systems will be known as the AGR-1 Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). Proper design and functioning of the FPMS is critical to the success of the AGR-1 fuel test experiment.This document describes the AGR-1 FPMS and presents calculations indicating that this design will meet the pertinent test requirements.

  6. TYPE A VERIFICATION REPORT FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR STACK AND GROUNDS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-08-0

    SciTech Connect

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-11-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA).

  7. COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Binner, C.R.; Wilkie, C.B.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to a design for a reactor of the type in which a fluid coolant is flowed through the active portion of the reactor. This design provides for the cooling of the shielding material as well as the reactor core by the same fluid coolant. The core structure is a solid moderator having coolant channels in which are disposed the fuel elements in rod or slug form. The coolant fluid enters the chamber in the shield, in which the core is located, passes over the inner surface of said chamber, enters the core structure at the center, passes through the coolant channels over the fuel elements and out through exhaust ducts.

  8. Retrofit Russian research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, W.

    1993-04-01

    A likely source for enriched uranium for production of a gun-type bomb might be a research reactor. A state or terrorist organization would find the technical process for separating uranium from the reactor fuel plates is simple and well-published. An unguarded research reactor could be found in the former Soviet Union. Russia and the former republics have seen an increasing number of terrorist incidents, including hijackings and bombings. Recognizing the danger, Russia and the U.S. have explored means of safeguarding former Soviet weapons materials. This article describes some of the plans to reduce the risk of nuclear materials being obtained for illicit weapons production.

  9. CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

    1959-03-31

    S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

  10. Type A verification report for the high flux beam reactor stack and grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Harpenau, Evan M.

    2012-01-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The HFBR Stack and Grounds surveys began in June 2011 and were completed in September 2011. Survey activities by BSA included gamma walkover scans and sampling of the as-left soils in accordance with the BSA Work Procedure (BNL 2010a). The Field Sampling Plan - Stack and Remaining HFBR Outside Areas (FSP) stated that gamma walk-over surveys would be conducted with a bare sodium iodide (NaI) detector, and a collimated detector would be used to check areas with elevated count rates to locate the source of the high readings (BNL 2010b). BSA used the Mult- Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) principles for determining the classifications of each survey unit. Therefore, SUs 6 and 7 were identified as Class 1 and SU 8 was deemed Class 2 (BNL 2010b). Gamma walkover surveys of SUs 6, 7, and 8 were completed using a 2X2 NaI detector coupled to a data-logger with a global positioning system (GPS). The 100% scan surveys conducted prior to the final status survey (FSS) sampling identified two general soil areas and two isolated soil locations with elevated radioactivity. The general areas of elevated activity identified

  11. Fission Product Inventory and Burnup Evaluation of the AGR-2 Irradiation by Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Stempien, John D.

    2016-11-01

    Gamma spectrometry has been used to evaluate the burnup and fission product inventory of different components from the US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program's second TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiation test (AGR-2). TRISO fuel in this irradiation included both uranium carbide / uranium oxide (UCO) kernels and uranium oxide (UO2) kernels. Four of the 6 capsules contained fuel from the US Advanced Gas Reactor program, and only those capsules will be discussed in this work. The inventories of gamma-emitting fission products from the fuel compacts, graphite compact holders, graphite spacers and test capsule shell were evaluated. These data were used to measure the fractional release of fission products such as Cs-137, Cs-134, Eu-154, Ce-144, and Ag-110m from the compacts. The fraction of Ag-110m retained in the compacts ranged from 1.8% to full retention. Additionally, the activities of the radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) have been used to evaluate the burnup of all US TRISO fuel compacts in the irradiation. The experimental burnup evaluations compare favorably with burnups predicted from physics simulations. Predicted burnups for UCO compacts range from 7.26 to 13.15 % fission per initial metal atom (FIMA) and 9.01 to 10.69 % FIMA for UO2 compacts. Measured burnup ranged from 7.3 to 13.1 % FIMA for UCO compacts and 8.5 to 10.6 % FIMA for UO2 compacts. Results from gamma emission computed tomography performed on compacts and graphite holders that reveal the distribution of different fission products in a component will also be discussed. Gamma tomography of graphite holders was also used to locate the position of TRISO fuel particles suspected of having silicon carbide layer failures that lead to in-pile cesium release.

  12. Fission Product Inventory and Burnup Evaluation of the AGR-2 Irradiation by Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason Michael; Stempien, John Dennis; Demkowicz, Paul Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Gamma spectrometry has been used to evaluate the burnup and fission product inventory of different components from the US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program's second TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiation test (AGR-2). TRISO fuel in this irradiation included both uranium carbide / uranium oxide (UCO) kernels and uranium oxide (UO2) kernels. Four of the 6 capsules contained fuel from the US Advanced Gas Reactor program, and only those capsules will be discussed in this work. The inventories of gamma-emitting fission products from the fuel compacts, graphite compact holders, graphite spacers and test capsule shell were evaluated. These data were used to measure the fractional release of fission products such as Cs-137, Cs-134, Eu-154, Ce-144, and Ag-110m from the compacts. The fraction of Ag-110m retained in the compacts ranged from 1.8% to full retention. Additionally, the activities of the radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) have been used to evaluate the burnup of all US TRISO fuel compacts in the irradiation. The experimental burnup evaluations compare favorably with burnups predicted from physics simulations. Predicted burnups for UCO compacts range from 7.26 to 13.15 % fission per initial metal atom (FIMA) and 9.01 to 10.69 % FIMA for UO2 compacts. Measured burnup ranged from 7.3 to 13.1 % FIMA for UCO compacts and 8.5 to 10.6 % FIMA for UO2 compacts. Results from gamma emission computed tomography performed on compacts and graphite holders that reveal the distribution of different fission products in a component will also be discussed. Gamma tomography of graphite holders was also used to locate the position of TRISO fuel particles suspected of having silicon carbide layer failures that lead to in-pile cesium release.

  13. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides.

  14. UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION OF CALCULATED TEMPERATURES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh Thi-Cam; Hawkes, Grant Lynn; Einerson, Jeffrey James

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the quantification of uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory in support of the Advanced Reactor Technology Research and Development program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR tests, the results of the numerical simulations are used in combination with statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. The temperature simulation data for AGR tests are also used for validation of the fission product transport and fuel performance simulation models. These crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. To quantify the uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures, this study identifies and analyzes ABAQUS model parameters of potential importance to the AGR predicted fuel temperatures. The selection of input parameters for uncertainty quantification of the AGR calculated temperatures is based on the ranking of their influences on variation of temperature predictions. Thus, selected input parameters include those with high sensitivity and those with large uncertainty. Propagation of model parameter uncertainty and sensitivity is then used to quantify the overall uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures. Expert judgment is used as the basis to specify the uncertainty range for selected input parameters. The input uncertainties are dynamic accounting for the effect of unplanned events and changes in thermal properties of capsule components over extended exposure to high temperature and fast neutron irradiation. The sensitivity analysis performed in this work went beyond the traditional local sensitivity. Using experimental design, analysis of pairwise interactions of model parameters was performed to establish

  15. The use of U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum in plate-type fuel elements for research and test reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.; Hobbs, R.W.; Senn, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    A high-density fuel based on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum has been developed and tested for use in converting plate-type research and test reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. Results of preirradiation testing and the irradiation and postirradiation examination of miniature fuel plates and full-sized fuel elements are summarized. Swelling of the U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ fuel particles is a linear function of the fission density in the particle to well beyond the fission density achievable in low-enriched fuels. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ particle swelling rate is approximately the same as that of the commonly used UAl/sub x/ fuel particle. The presence of minor amounts of U/sub 3/Si or uranium solid solution in the fuel result in greater, but still acceptable, fuel swelling. Blister threshold temperatures are at least as high as those of currently used fuels. An exothermic reaction occurs near the aluminum melting temperature, but the measured energy releases were low enough not to substantially worsen the consequences of an accident. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-aluminum dispersion fuel with uranium densities up to at least 4.8 Mg/m/sup 3/ is a suitable LEU fuel for typical plate-type research and test reactors. 42 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Covalent immobilization of catalase onto spacer-arm attached modified florisil: characterization and application to batch and plug-flow type reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, Ozlem; Tükel, S Seyhan; Yildirim, Deniz; Alagöz, Dilek

    2011-12-10

    Catalase was covalently immobilized onto florisil via glutaraldehyde (GA) and glutaraldehyde+6-amino hexanoic acid (6-AHA) (as a spacer arm). Immobilizations of catalase onto modified supports were optimized to improve the efficiency of the overall immobilization procedures. The V(max) values of catalase immobilized via glutaraldehyde (CIG) and catalase immobilized via glutaraldehyde+6-amino hexanoic acid (CIG-6-AHA) were about 0.6 and 3.4% of free catalase, respectively. The usage of 6-AHA as a spacer arm caused about 40 folds increase in catalytic efficiency of CIG-6-AHA (8.3 × 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) as compared to that of CIG (2.1 × 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹). CIG and CIG-6-AHA retained 67 and 35% of their initial activities at 5 °C and 71 and 18% of their initial activities, respectively at room temperature at the end of 6 days. Operational stabilities of CIG and CIG-6-AHA were investigated in batch and plug-flow type reactors. The highest total amount of decomposed hydrogen peroxide (TAD-H₂O₂) was determined as 219.5 μmol for CIG-6-AHA in plug-flow type reactor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of an ELISA to detect the secreted prostate cancer biomarker AGR2 in voided urine.

    PubMed

    Wayner, Elizabeth A; Quek, Sue-Ing; Ahmad, Rumana; Ho, Melissa E; Loprieno, Michelle A; Zhou, Yong; Ellis, William J; True, Lawrence D; Liu, Alvin Y

    2012-06-15

    Comparative transcriptomics between sorted cells identified AGR2 as one of the highest up-regulated genes in cancer. Overexpression in primary tumors was verified by tissue microarray analysis. AGR2 encodes a 19-kDa secreted protein that might be found in urine. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against AGR2. One antibody pair, P1G4 (IgG1) to capture and P3A5 (IgG2a) to detect, showed good performance characteristics in a sandwich ELISA. This assay could detect AGR2 at sub ng/ml quantities. AGR2 was detected in tissue digestion media of tumor specimens and culture media of AGR2-secreting prostate cancer cell lines. Additional testings involved frozen section immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot analysis. Voided urine samples were collected from pre-operative cancer patients, and urinary protein was desalted and concentrated by filtration. The amount of AGR2 detected was scored as pg/100 µg total protein, and then converted to pg/ml urine. The developed ELISA detected AGR2 protein, ranging from 3.6 to 181 pg/ml, in an initial cohort of samples. AGR2 was not detected in the urine of non-cancer and a bladder cancer patient. For prostate cancer, an AGR2 urine test could be used for diagnosis. The data, although derived from a small number of samples assayed, showed that developing such a test for clinical application is viable because AGR2 is specific to cancer cells, and apparently secreted into urine. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A coupled radiation transport-thermal analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 type reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barattino, William J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; McDaniel, Patrick J.

    A coupled radiation transport-thermal analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using finite element codes developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratories. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MWt, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution were determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized only for radiation protection will fail because of LiH melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, and maximum temperature limits, and to minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  20. Reverse-Bumpy-Ball-Type-Nanoreactor-Loaded Nylon Membranes as Peroxidase-Mimic Membrane Reactors for a Colorimetric Assay for H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ying; Jiao, Xiangyu; Yang, Hankun; Wen, Yongqiang; Su, Lei; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-01-01

    Herein we report for the first time fabrication of reverse bumpy ball (RBB)-type-nanoreactor-based flexible peroxidase-mimic membrane reactors (MRs). The RBB-type nanoreactors with gold nanoparticles embedded in the inner walls of carbon shells were loaded on nylon membranes through a facile filtration approach. The as-prepared flexible catalytic membrane was studied as a peroxidase-mimic MR. It was found that the obtained peroxidase-mimic MR could exhibit several advantages over natural enzymes, such as facile and good recyclability, long-term stability and easy storage. Moreover, the RBB NS-modified nylon MRs as a peroxidase mimic provide a useful colorimetric assay for H2O2. PMID:27043575

  1. Reverse-Bumpy-Ball-Type-Nanoreactor-Loaded Nylon Membranes as Peroxidase-Mimic Membrane Reactors for a Colorimetric Assay for H₂O₂.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ying; Jiao, Xiangyu; Yang, Hankun; Wen, Yongqiang; Su, Lei; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-04-01

    Herein we report for the first time fabrication of reverse bumpy ball (RBB)-type-nanoreactor-based flexible peroxidase-mimic membrane reactors (MRs). The RBB-type nanoreactors with gold nanoparticles embedded in the inner walls of carbon shells were loaded on nylon membranes through a facile filtration approach. The as-prepared flexible catalytic membrane was studied as a peroxidase-mimic MR. It was found that the obtained peroxidase-mimic MR could exhibit several advantages over natural enzymes, such as facile and good recyclability, long-term stability and easy storage. Moreover, the RBB NS-modified nylon MRs as a peroxidase mimic provide a useful colorimetric assay for H₂O₂.

  2. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  3. Identification of Silver and Palladium in Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    van Rooyen, Y. J.; Lillo, T. M.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2014-03-01

    Evidence of the release of certain metallic fission product through intact tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles has been seen for decades around the world, as well as in the recent AGR-1 experiment at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). However, understanding the basic mechanism of transport is still lacking. This understanding is important because the TRISO coating is part of the high temperature gas reactor functional containment and critical for the safety strategy for licensing purposes. Our approach to identify fission products in irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM), has led to first-of-a-kind data at the nano-scale indicating the presence of silver at triple points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in the triple junctions. In this initial study, the silver was only identified in SiC grain boundaries and triple points on the edge of the SiC-IPyC interface up to a depth of approximately 0.5 um. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries. Additionally spherical nano-sized palladium rich precipitates were found inside the SiC grains. These nano-sized Pd precipitates were distributed up to a depth of 5 um away from the SiC-IPyC interlayer. No silver was found in the center of the micron-sized fission product precipitates using these techniques, although silver was found on the outer edge of one of the Pd-U-Si containing precipitates which was facing the IPyC layer. Only Pd-U containing precipitates were identified in the IPyC layer and no silver was identified in the IPyC layer. The identification of silver alongside the grain boundaries and the findings of Pd alongside grain boundaries as well as inside the grains, provide significant knowledge for understanding silver and palladium transport in TIRSO fuel, which has been

  4. Electrochemical oxidation of bio-refractory dye in a simulated textile industry effluent using DSA electrodes in a filter-press type FM01-LC reactor.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisca A; Mateo, María N; Aceves, Juan M; Rivero, Eligio P; González, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study on degradation of indigo carmine dye in a filter-press type FM01-LC reactor using Sb2O5-doped Ti/IrO2-SnO2 dimensionally stable anode (DSA) electrodes. Micro- and macroelectrolysis studies were carried out using solutions of 0.8 mM indigo carmine in 0.05 M NaCl, which resemble blue denim laundry industrial wastewater. Microelectrolysis results show the behaviour of DSA electrodes in comparison with the behaviour of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes. In general, dye degradation reactions are carried out indirectly through active chlorine generated on DSA, whereas in the case of BDD electrodes more oxidizing species are formed, mainly OH radicals, on the electrode surface. The well-characterized geometry, flow pattern and mass transport of the FM01-LC reactor used in macroelectrolysis experiments allowed the evaluation of the effect of hydrodynamic conditions on the chlorine-mediated degradation rate. Four values of Reynolds number (Re) (93, 371, 464 and 557) at four current densities (50, 100, 150 and 200 A/m2) were tested. The results show that the degradation rate is independent of Re at low current density (50 A/m2) but becomes dependent on the Re at high current density (200 A/m2). This behaviour shows the central role of mass transport and the reactor parameters and design. The low energy consumption (2.02 and 9.04 kWh/m3 for complete discolouration and chemical oxygen demand elimination at 50 A/m2, respectively) and the low cost of DSA electrodes compared to BDD make DSA electrodes promising for practical application in treating industrial textile effluents. In the present study, chlorinated organic compounds were not detected.

  5. The use of waveguide acoustic probes for void fraction measurement in the evaporator of BN-350-Type reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, V.I.; Nigmatulin, B.I.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper deals with some results of the experimental studies which have been carried out to investigate the steam generation dynamics in the Field tubes of sodium-water evaporators used in the BN-350 reactors. The void fraction measurements have been taken with the aid of waveguide acoustic transducers manufactured in accordance with a specially designed technology (waveguide acoustic transducers-WAT technology). Presented in this paper also the transducer design and calibration methods, as well as the diagram showing transducers arrengment in the evaporator. The transducers under test featured a waveguide of about 4 m in length and a 200-mm long sensitive element (probe). Besides, this paper specifies the void fraction data obtained through measurements in diverse points of the evaporator. The studies revealed that the period of observed fluctuations in the void fraction amounted to few seconds and was largely dependent on the level of water in the evaporator.

  6. On the shape of stress corrosion cracks in sensitized Type 304 SS in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant piping at 288 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kramer, Daniel; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2014-11-01

    Evolution of the shape of surface cracks in sensitized Type 304 SS in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuit piping at the reactor operating temperature of 288 °C is explored as a function of various environmental variables, such as electrochemical potential (ECP), solution conductivity, flow velocity, and multiplier for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) standard exchange current density (SECD), using the coupled environment fracture model (CEFM). For this work, the CEFM was upgraded by incorporating Shoji's model for calculating the crack tip strain rate and more advanced expressions were used for estimating the stress intensity factor for semi-elliptical surface cracks. This revised CEFM accurately predicts the dependence of the crack growth rate on stress intensity factor and offers an alternative explanation for the development of semi-elliptical cracks than that provided by fracture mechanics alone. The evolution of surface crack semi-elliptical shape depends strongly upon various environmental variables identified above, and the CEFM predicts that the minor axis of the ellipse should be oriented perpendicular to the surface, in agreement with observation. The development of the observed semi-elliptical cracks with the minor axis perpendicular to the surface is therefore attributed to the dependence of the crack growth rate on the electrochemical crack length.

  7. Influence of carbon source and inoculum type on anaerobic biomass adhesion on polyurethane foam in reactors fed with acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Renata P; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2011-04-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of carbon source and inoculum origin on the dynamics of biomass adhesion to an inert support in anaerobic reactors fed with acid mine drainage. Formic acid, lactic acid and ethanol were used as carbon sources. Two different inocula were evaluated: one taken from an UASB reactor and other from the sediment of a uranium mine. The values of average colonization rates and the maximum biomass concentration (C(max)) were inversely proportional to the number of carbon atoms in each substrate. The highest C(max) value (0.35 g TVS g(-1) foam) was observed with formic acid and anaerobic sludge as inoculum. Maximum colonization rates (v(max)) were strongly influenced by the type of inoculum when ethanol and lactic acid were used. For both carbon sources, the use of mine sediment as inoculum resulted in a v(max) of 0.013 g TVS g(-1) foam day(-1), whereas 0.024 g TVS g(-1) foam day(-1) was achieved with anaerobic sludge. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. AGR-3/4 Irradiation Test Train Disassembly and Component Metrology First Look Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stempien, John Dennis; Rice, Francine Joyce; Harp, Jason Michael; Winston, Philip Lon

    2016-03-01

    The AGR-3/4 experiment was designed to study fission product transport within graphitic matrix material and nuclear-grade graphite. To this end, this experiment consisted of 12 capsules, each fueled with 4 compacts containing UCO TRISO particles as driver fuel and 20 UCO designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles in each compact. The DTF fuel was fabricated with a thin pyrocarbon layer which was intended to fail during irradiation and provide a source of fission products. These fission products could then migrate through the compact and into the surrounding concentric rings of graphitic matrix material and/or nuclear graphite. Through post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the rings (including physical sampling and gamma scanning) fission product concentration profiles within the rings can be determined. These data can be used to elucidate fission product transport parameters (e.g. diffusion coefficients within the test materials) which will be used to inform and refine models of fission product transport. After irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) had been completed in April 2014, the AGR-3/4 experiment was shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for inspection, disassembly, and metrology. The AGR-3/4 test train was received at MFC in two separate shipments between February and April 2015. Visual examinations of the test train exterior did not indicate dimensional distortion, and only two small discolored areas were observed at the bottom of Capsules 8 and 9. No corresponding discoloration was found on the inside of these capsules, however. Prior to disassembly, the two test train sections were subject to analysis via the Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS), which did not indicate that any gross fuel relocation had occurred. A series of specialized tools (including clamps, cutters, and drills) had been designed and fabricated in order to carry out test train disassembly and recovery of capsule components (graphite

  9. AGR-3/4 Irradiation Test Train Disassembly and Component Metrology First Look Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stempien, John Dennis; Rice, Francine Joyce; Harp, Jason Michael; Winston, Philip Lon

    2016-09-01

    The AGR-3/4 experiment was designed to study fission product transport within graphitic matrix material and nuclear-grade graphite. To this end, this experiment consisted of 12 capsules, each fueled with 4 compacts containing UCO TRISO particles as driver fuel and 20 UCO designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles in each compact. The DTF fuel was fabricated with a thin pyrocarbon layer which was intended to fail during irradiation and provide a source of fission products. These fission products could then migrate through the compact and into the surrounding concentric rings of graphitic matrix material and/or nuclear graphite. Through post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the rings (including physical sampling and gamma scanning) fission product concentration profiles within the rings can be determined. These data can be used to elucidate fission product transport parameters (e.g. diffusion coefficients within the test materials) which will be used to inform and refine models of fission product transport. After irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) had been completed in April 2014, the AGR-3/4 experiment was shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for inspection, disassembly, and metrology. The AGR-3/4 test train was received at MFC in two separate shipments between February and April 2015. Visual examinations of the test train exterior did not indicate dimensional distortion, and only two small discolored areas were observed at the bottom of Capsules 8 and 9. No corresponding discoloration was found on the inside of these capsules, however. Prior to disassembly, the two test train sections were subject to analysis via the Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS), which did not indicate that any gross fuel relocation had occurred. A series of specialized tools (including clamps, cutters, and drills) had been designed and fabricated in order to carry out test train disassembly and recovery of capsule components (graphite

  10. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion of several types of spent livestock bedding in a batch leach-bed reactor: substrate characterization and process performance.

    PubMed

    Riggio, S; Torrijos, M; Debord, R; Esposito, G; van Hullebusch, E D; Steyer, J P; Escudié, R

    2017-01-01

    Spent animal bedding is a valuable resource for green energy production in rural areas. The properties of six types of spent bedding collected from deep-litter stables, housing either sheeps, goats, horses or cows, were compared and their anaerobic digestion in a batch Leach-Bed Reactor (LBR) was assessed. Spent horse bedding, when compared to all the other types, appeared to differ the most due to a greater amount of straw added to the litter and a more frequent litter change. Total solids content appeared to vary significantly from one bedding type to another, with consequent impact on the methane produced from the raw substrate. However, all the types of spent bedding had similar VS/TS (82.3-88.9)%, a C/N well-suited to anaerobic digestion (20-28, except that of the horse, 42) and their BMPs were in a narrow range (192-239NmLCH4/gVS). The anaerobic digestion in each LBR was stable and the pH always remained higher than 6.6 regardless of the type of bedding. In contrast to all the other substrates, spent goat bedding showed a stronger acidification resulting in a methane production lag phase. Finally, spent bedding of different origins reached, on average, (89±11)% of their BMP after 60days of operation. This means that this waste is well-suited for treatment in LBRs and that this is a promising process to recover energy from dry agricultural waste.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  12. Reactor building

    SciTech Connect

    Hista, J. C.

    1984-09-18

    Reactor building comprising a vessel shaft anchored in a slab which is peripherally locked. This reactor building comprises a confinement enclosure within which are positioned internal structures constituted by an internal structure floor, a vessel shaft, a slab being positioned between the general floor and the internal structure floor, the vesse

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.; Johnson, H.W.

    1961-04-01

    BS>A nuclear reactor incorporating fuel rods passing through a moderator and including tubes of a material of higher Thermal conductivity than the fuel in contact with the fuel is described. The tubes extend beyond the active portion of the reactor into contant with a fiuld coolant.

  14. AGR2 is associated with gastric cancer progression and poor survival

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUN; JIN, YONGMING; XU, SHAONAN; ZHENG, JIAYIN; ZHANG, QI; WANG, YUANYU; CHEN, JINPING; HUANG, YAZENG; HE, XUJUN; ZHAO, ZHONGSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Anterior gradient protein 2 (AGR2) has been reported as a novel biomarker with a potential oncogenic role. However, its association with the prognosis and survival rate of gastric cancer (GC) has not yet been determined. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the expression and prognostic significance of AGR2 in patients with GC. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze AGR2 and cathepsin D (CTSD) protein expression in 436 clinicopathologically characterized GC cases and 92 noncancerous tissue samples. AGR2 and CTSD expression were both elevated in GC lesions compared with noncancerous tissues. In 204/436 (46.8%) GC patients, high expression of AGR2 was positively correlated with the expression of CTSD (r=0.577, P<0.01). Furthermore, several clinicopathological parameters were significantly associated with AGR2 expression level, including tumor size, depth of invasion and TNM stage (P<0.05). Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, it was determined that the mean survival time of patients with low levels of AGR2 expression was significantly longer than those with high ARG2 expression (in stages I, II and III; P<0.05). For stage IV disease, no significant difference in survival time was identified. Multivariate survival analysis demonstrated that AGR2 was an independent prognostic factor and was associated in the progression of GC. The findings of the present study indicate that AGR2 expression is significantly associated with location and size of GC, depth of invasion, TNM stage, lymphatic metastasis, vessel invasion, distant metastasis, Lauren's classification, high CTSD expression and poor prognosis. Thus, AGR2 may be a novel GC marker and may present a potential therapeutic target for GC. PMID:26998125

  15. Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 cell surface structures and supernatant increase paracellular permeability through different pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Ranjita; Anderson, Rachel C; Altermann, Eric; McNabb, Warren C; Ganesh, Siva; Armstrong, Kelly M; Moughan, Paul J; Roy, Nicole C

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum is commonly found in food products, and some strains are known to have beneficial effects on human health. However, our previous research indicated that L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases in vitro intestinal barrier integrity. The hypothesis was that cell surface structures of AGR1487 are responsible for the observed in vitro effect. AGR1487 was compared to another human oral L. fermentum strain, AGR1485, which does not cause the same effect. The examination of phenotypic traits associated with the composition of cell surface structures showed that compared to AGR1485, AGR1487 had a smaller genome, utilized different sugars, and had greater tolerance to acid and bile. The effect of the two strains on intestinal barrier integrity was determined using two independent measures of paracellular permeability of the intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) assay specifically measures ion permeability, whereas the mannitol flux assay measures the passage of uncharged molecules. Both live and UV-inactivated AGR1487 decreased TEER across Caco-2 cells implicating the cell surfaces structures in the effect. However, only live AGR1487, and not UV-inactivated AGR1487, increased the rate of passage of mannitol, implying that a secreted component(s) is responsible for this effect. These differences in barrier integrity results are likely due to the TEER and mannitol flux assays measuring different characteristics of the epithelial barrier, and therefore imply that there are multiple mechanisms involved in the effect of AGR1487 on barrier integrity. PMID:25943073

  16. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This report documents comparisons between post-irradiation examination measurements and model predictions of silver (Ag), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) release from selected tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program that occurred from December 2006 to November 2009 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact) but it can be assessed at the particle level by adjusting the diffusivity in the fuel matrix to very high values. Furthermore, the diffusivity of each layer can be individually set to a high value (typically 10-6 m2/s) to simulate a failed layer with no capability of fission product retention. In this study, the comparison to PIE focused on fission product release and because of the lack of failure in the irradiation, the probability of particle failure was not calculated. During the AGR-1 irradiation campaign, the fuel kernel produced and released fission products, which migrated through the successive

  17. Investigation of the development of irradiation-induced precipitates in VVER-440 type reactor pressure vessel steels and weld metals after irradiation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, M.; Nitzsche, P.; Boehmert, J.; Brauer, G.

    1999-10-01

    The development of irradiation-induced precipitates in VVER-440 type reactor pressure vessel steels 15Kh2MFA and weld metals SV-10KhMFT during irradiation and post-irradiation annealing is studied by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering. The kinetic conditions for the precipitation of particles, which already exist in the unirradiated state, seem to be improved at temperatures of about 270 C due to the irradiation. The size distribution of the irradiation-induced precipitates depends on the copper content and differs between weld and base metal. A strong correlation between the formation of irradiation-induced precipitates and the irradiation hardening is found. The hardness nearly linearly depends on the number of these precipitates.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  19. agr receptor mutants reveal distinct modes of inhibition by staphylococcal autoinducing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Muir, Tom W.; Novick, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Through the agr quorum-sensing system, staphylococci secrete unique autoinducing peptides (AIPs) and detect their concentration via the AgrC transmembrane receptor, coordinating local bacterial population density with global changes in gene expression. Unique AIP and AgrC variants exist within and between species, and although autologous interactions lead to agr activation, heterologous interactions usually lead to cross-inhibition, resulting in natural quorum-sensing interference. To gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena at the level of the receptor, we used random mutagenesis to isolate variants of Staphylococcus aureus AgrC-I with constitutive activity. Constitutive mutations in the sensor domain of the receptor were localized to the last transmembrane helix, whereas those in the histidine kinase domain were mostly clustered to a region near the phosphorylation site histidine. Analysis of these mutants with a range of noncognate AIPs revealed that inhibition is manifested by inverse agonism in certain heterologous pairings and by neutral antagonism in others. In addition, we isolated and characterized an AgrC sensor domain mutant with dramatically broadened activation specificity and reduced sensitivity to inhibition, identifying a single amino acid as a critical determinant of ligand-mediated inhibition. These results suggest that certain noncognate AIPs stabilize an inhibitory receptor conformation that may be a critical feature of the ligand–receptor interaction not initially appreciated in previous analyses of agr inhibition. PMID:19147840

  20. Increasing AIP Macrocycle Size Reveals Key Features of agr Activation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey G; Wang, Boyuan; Debelouchina, Galia T; Novick, Richard P; Muir, Tom W

    2015-05-04

    The agr locus in the commensal human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, is a two-promoter regulon with allelic variability that produces a quorum-sensing circuit involved in regulating virulence within the bacterium. Secretion of unique autoinducing peptides (AIPs) and detection of their concentrations by AgrC, a transmembrane receptor histidine kinase, coordinates local bacterial population density with global changes in gene expression. The finding that staphylococcal virulence can be inhibited through antagonism of this quorum-sensing pathway has fueled tremendous interest in understanding the structure-activity relationships underlying the AIP-AgrC interaction. The defining structural feature of the AIP is a 16-membered, thiolactone-containing macrocycle. Surprisingly, the importance of ring size on agr activation or inhibition has not been explored. In this study, we address this deficiency through the synthesis and functional analysis of AIP analogues featuring enlarged and reduced macrocycles. Notably, this study is the first to interrogate AIP function by using both established cell-based reporter gene assays and newly developed in vitro AgrC-I binding and autophosphorylation activity assays. Based on our data, we present a model for robust agr activation involving a cooperative, three-points-of-contact interaction between the AIP macrocycle and AgrC.

  1. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    Safety tests were conducted on fourteen fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800°C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during the safety tests, and the predicted values were compared with experimental results. Preliminary comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination (PIE) results of the safety tests show different trends in the prediction of the fractional release depending on the species, and it leads to different conclusions regarding the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles: • For silver, the diffusivity in silicon carbide (SiC) might be over-estimated by a factor of at least 102 to 103 at 1600°C and 1700°C, and at least 10 to 102 at 1800°C. The diffusivity of silver in uranium oxy-carbide (UCO) might also be over-estimated, but the available data are insufficient to allow definitive conclusions to be drawn. • For cesium, the diffusivity in UCO might be over-estimated by a factor of at least 102 to 103 at 1600°C, 105 at 1700°C, and 103 at 1800°C. The diffusivity of cesium in SiC might also over-estimated, by a factor of 10 at 1600°C and 103 at 1700°C, based upon the comparisons between calculated and measured release fractions from intact particles. There is no available estimate at 1800°C since all the compacts heated up at 1800°C contain particles with failed SiC layers whose release dominates the release from intact particles. • For strontium, the diffusivity in SiC might be over-estimated by a factor of 10 to 102 at 1600 and 1700°C, and 102 to 103 at 1800°C. These

  2. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-11-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  3. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; ...

    2015-08-22

    Here, the PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compactsmore » and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional

  4. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; ...

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts andmore » fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  5. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release from

  6. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    Here, the PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  7. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2014-09-03

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry

  8. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; ...

    2014-09-03

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methodsmore » for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.

    1960-04-01

    A nuclear reactor is described consisting of blocks of graphite arranged in layers, natural uranium bodies disposed in holes in alternate layers of graphite blocks, and coolant tubes disposed in the layers of graphite blocks which do not contain uranium.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-11-22

    A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  12. Reactor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul

    1981-01-01

    A reactor apparatus for hydrocracking a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous feedstock to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the hydrocarbonaceous feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst.

  13. Chemical Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  14. Reactor Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lema, Juan M.; López, Carmen; Eibes, Gemma; Taboada-Puig, Roberto; Moreira, M. Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    In this chapter, the engineering aspects of processes catalyzed by peroxidases will be presented. In particular, a discussion of the existing technologies that utilize peroxidases for different purposes, such as the removal of recalcitrant compounds or the synthesis of polymers, is analyzed. In the first section, the essential variables controlling the process will be investigated, not only those that are common in any enzymatic system but also those specific to peroxidative reactions. Next, different reactor configurations and operational modes will be proposed, emphasizing their suitability and unsuitability for different systems. Finally, two specific reactors will be described in detail: enzymatic membrane reactors and biphasic reactors. These configurations are especially valuable for the treatment of xenobiotics with high and poor water solubility, respectively.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  16. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  17. A small, 1400 K, reactor for Brayton space power systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, E.; Mayo, W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine minimum dimensions and minimum weight obtainable in a design for a reactor using uranium-233 nitride or plutonium-239 nitride as fuel. Such a reactor had been considered by Krasner et al. (1971). Present space power status is discussed, together with questions of reactor design and power distribution in the reactor. The characteristics of various reactor types are compared, giving attention also to a zirconium hydride reactor.

  18. A small, 1400 K, reactor for Brayton space power systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, E.; Mayo, W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine minimum dimensions and minimum weight obtainable in a design for a reactor using uranium-233 nitride or plutonium-239 nitride as fuel. Such a reactor had been considered by Krasner et al. (1971). Present space power status is discussed, together with questions of reactor design and power distribution in the reactor. The characteristics of various reactor types are compared, giving attention also to a zirconium hydride reactor.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  20. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  1. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Breden, C.R.; Dietrich, J.R.

    1961-06-20

    A water-soluble non-volatile poison may be introduced into a reactor to nullify excess reactivity. The poison is removed by passing a side stream of the water containing the soluble poison to an evaporation chamber. The vapor phase is returned to the reactor to decrease the concentration of soluble poison and the liquid phase is returned to increase the concentration of soluble poison.

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  3. NERVA Reactor Based on NRX A1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This artist's concept from 1963 shows a proposed NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) incorporating the NRX-A1, the first NERVA-type cold flow reactor. The NERVA engine, based on Kiwi nuclear reactor technology, was intended to power a RIFT (Reactor-In-Flight-Test) nuclear stage, for which Marshall Space Flight Center had development responsibility.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Kesselring, K.A.; Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-12-01

    A reactor fuel element of the capillary tube type is described. The element consists of a thin walled tube, sealed at both ends, and having an interior coatlng of a fissionable material, such as uranium enriched in U-235. The tube wall is gas tight and is constructed of titanium, zirconium, or molybdenum.

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1963-06-11

    A fuel plate is designed for incorporation into control rods of the type utilized in high-flux test reactors. The fuel plate is designed so that the portion nearest the poison section of the control rod contains about one-half as much fissionable material as in the rest of the plate, thereby eliminating dangerous flux peaking in that portion. (AEC)

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1957-10-15

    Gas-cooled solid-moderator type reactors wherein the fissionable fuel and moderator materials are each in the form of solid pebbles, or discrete particles, and are substantially homogeneously mixed in the proper proportion and placed within the core of the reactor are described. The shape of these discrete particles must be such that voids are present between them when mixed together. Helium enters the bottom of the core and passes through the voids between the fuel and moderator particles to absorb the heat generated by the chain reaction. The hot helium gas is drawn off the top of the core and may be passed through a heat exchanger to produce steam.

  7. THERMAL NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fenning, F.W.; Jackson, R.F.

    1957-09-24

    Nuclear reactors of the graphite moderated air cooled type in which canned slugs or rods of fissile material are employed are discussed. Such a reactor may be provided with a means for detecting dust particles in the exhausted air. The means employed are lengths of dust absorbent cord suspended in vertical holes in the shielding structure above each vertical coolant flow channel to hang in the path of the cooling air issuing from the channels, and associated spindles and drive motors for hauling the cords past detectors, such as Geiger counters, for inspecting the cords periodically. This design also enables detecting the individual channel in which a fault condition may have occurred.

  8. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  9. Highly Stable, Amide-Bridged Autoinducing Peptide Analogues that Strongly Inhibit the AgrC Quorum Sensing Receptor in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tal-Gan, Yftah; Ivancic, Monika; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Yang, Tian; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-07-25

    Blocking quorum sensing (QS) pathways has attracted considerable interest as an approach to suppress virulence in bacterial pathogens. Toward this goal, we recently developed analogues of a native autoinducing peptide (AIP-III) signal that can inhibit AgrC-type QS receptors and attenuate virulence phenotypes in Staphylococcus aureus. Application of these compounds is limited, however, as they contain hydrolytically unstable thioester linkages and have only low aqueous solubilities. Herein, we report amide-linked AIP analogues with greatly enhanced hydrolytic stabilities and solubilities relative to our prior analogues, whilst maintaining strong potencies as AgrC receptor inhibitors in S. aureus. These compounds represent powerful tools for the study of QS. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Heat resistant reduced activation 12% Cr steel of 16Cr12W2VTaB type-advanced structural material for fusion and fast breeder power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A. G.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M. V.; Solonin, M. I.; Chernov, V. M.; Golovanov, V. N.; Shamardin, V. K.; Bulanova, T. M.; Povstyanko, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. E.

    2002-12-01

    Heat resistant 12% Cr steels of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type (12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B-0.16C) provide a reduced activation material that can be used as a structural material for fusion and fast breeder reactors. The composition under study meets scientific and engineering requirements and has an optimal base element composition to provide a δ-ferrite content of no more than 20%. It also has a minimum quantity of low melting impurity elements and non-metallic inclusions. Short-term tensile properties for the steel tested to 700 °C are provided after the standard heat treatment (normalization, temper). Rupture strength and creep properties for the steel depending on the initial heat treatment conditions are also given. The microstructural stability of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type steel at temperatures up to 650 °C is predicted to be good, and the properties of the steel after irradiation in BOR-60 are demonstrated.

  11. KGK-2-type detector of gamma-radiation power for diagnosis of nuclear reactor radiation fields within the range from 1 µGy/s to 100 Gy/s

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. S. Dovbysh, L. Ye.; Khoruzhy, V. Kh.; Chuklyaev, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    The construction of the KGK-2-type detector of γ-radiation power is briefly described. The diagnostic possibilities of the detector are shown by the example of results of the dose rate measurement in the energy start-ups of the BR-K1 and BR-1M reactors implemented in the mode of generating fission pulses on delayed neutrons. The possibilities of using the KGK-2 detector for postpulse γ diagnostics are demonstrated by the example of results of measurements in the fission pulse on prompt neutrons of the BR-1M reactor.

  12. Staphylococcus intermedius Produces a Functional agr Autoinducing Peptide Containing a Cyclic Lactone

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guangyong; Pei, Wuhong; Zhang, Linsheng; Qiu, Rongde; Lin, Jianqun; Benito, Yvonne; Lina, Gerard; Novick, Richard P.

    2005-01-01

    The agr system is a global regulator of accessory functions in staphylococci, including genes encoding exoproteins involved in virulence. The agr locus contains a two-component signal transduction module that is activated by an autoinducing peptide (AIP) encoded within the agr locus and is conserved throughout the genus. The AIP has an unusual partially cyclic structure that is essential for function and that, in all but one case, involves an internal thiolactone bond between a conserved cysteine and the C-terminal carboxyl group. The exceptional case is a strain of Staphylococcus intermedius that has a serine in place of the conserved cysteine. We demonstrate here that the S. intermedius AIP is processed by the S. intermedius AgrB protein to generate a cyclic lactone, that it is an autoinducer as well as a cross-inhibitor, and that all of five other S. intermedius strains examined also produce serine-containing AIPs. PMID:15838041

  13. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis peptide pheromones produced by the accessory gene regulator agr system.

    PubMed

    Otto, M

    2001-10-01

    The accessory gene regulator (agr) system of staphylococci regulates the expression of virulence factors in response to cell density. The extracellular signaling molecule encoded by this system is a thiolactone-containing pheromone peptide whose primary sequence varies among staphylococcal strains. A post-translational modification of the peptide is believed to be carried out by an enzyme with a novel function, AgrB. Staphylococcal pheromones show cross-inhibiting properties: Pheromones of self and pheromones of non-self induce and suppress the agr response, respectively, and have therefore been proposed as novel anti-staphylococcal drugs. As inhibition of agr leads to diminished expression of toxins, but to increased expression of colonization factors and biofilm formation, their therapeutic potential remains yet to be evaluated in depth.

  14. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  15. Target-induced nano-enzyme reactor mediated hole-trapping for high-throughput immunoassay based on a split-type photoelectrochemical detection strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Junyang; Tang, Dianyong; Lai, Wenqiang; Xu, Mingdi; Tang, Dianping

    2015-09-15

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection is an emerging and promising analytical tool. However, its actual application still faces some challenges like potential damage of biomolecules (caused by itself system) and intrinsic low-throughput detection. To solve the problems, herein we design a novel split-type photoelectrochemical immunoassay (STPIA) for ultrasensitive detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Initially, the immunoreaction was performed on a microplate using a secondary antibody/primer-circular DNA-labeled gold nanoparticle as the detection tag. Then, numerously repeated oligonucleotide sequences with many biotin moieties were in situ synthesized on the nanogold tag via RCA reaction. The formed biotin concatamers acted as a powerful scaffold to bind with avidin-alkaline phosphatase (ALP) conjugates and construct a nanoenzyme reactor. By this means, enzymatic hydrolysate (ascorbic acid) was generated to capture the photogenerated holes in the CdS quantum dot-sensitized TiO2 nanotube arrays, resulting in amplification of the photocurrent signal. To elaborate, the microplate-based immunoassay and the high-throughput detection system, a semiautomatic detection cell (installed with a three-electrode system), was employed. Under optimal conditions, the photocurrent increased with the increasing PSA concentration in a dynamic working range from 0.001 to 3 ng mL(-1), with a low detection limit (LOD) of 0.32 pg mL(-1). Meanwhile, the developed split-type photoelectrochemical immunoassay exhibited high specificity and acceptable accuracy for analysis of human serum specimens in comparison with referenced electrochemiluminescence immunoassay method. Importantly, the system was not only suitable for the sandwich-type immunoassay mode, but also utilized for the detection of small molecules (e.g., aflatoxin B1) with a competitive-type assay format.

  16. Comparison of Processes of Transmutation of Long-Lived Actinides in Different Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bergelson, B.R.; Gerasimov, A.S.; Kiselev, G.V.; Tikhomirov, G.V.

    2002-07-01

    Efficiency of transmutation of actinides was compared for different types of reactors-transmuters: light water VVER-1000 type reactor, fast breeder BN-600 and Super-Phenix type reactors, as well as high-flux subcritical ADS-800 type facility. Feed with minor actinides extracted from the reactor of VVER-1000 type was supposed. (authors)

  17. AGR-2 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    SciTech Connect

    Ploger, Scott; Demkowciz, Paul; Harp, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The AGR 2 irradiation experiment began in June 2010 and was completed in October 2013. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in July 2014 for post-irradiation examination (PIE). The first PIE activities included nondestructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and their graphite fuel holders. Dimensional metrology was then performed on the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsule shells. AGR 2 disassembly and metrology were performed with the same equipment used successfully on AGR 1 test train components. Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Disassembly of the AGR 2 test train and its capsules was conducted rapidly and efficiently by employing techniques refined during the AGR 1 disassembly campaign. Only one major difficulty was encountered while separating the test train into capsules when thermocouples (of larger diameter than used in AGR 1) and gas lines jammed inside the through tubes of the upper capsules, which required new tooling for extraction. Disassembly of individual capsules was straightforward with only a few minor complications. On the whole, AGR 2 capsule structural components appeared less embrittled than their AGR 1 counterparts. Compacts from AGR 2 Capsules 2, 3, 5, and 6 were in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor damage or markings were visible using high resolution photographic inspection. Compact dimensional measurements indicated radial shrinkage between 0.8 to 1.7%, with the greatest shrinkage observed on Capsule 2 compacts that were irradiated at higher temperature. Length shrinkage ranged from 0.1 to 0.9%, with by far the lowest axial shrinkage on Capsule 3 compacts

  18. REACTOR AND NOVEL METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-06-24

    A nuclear reactor of the type which uses a liquid fuel and a method of controlling such a reactor are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a tank for containing the liquid fuel such as a slurry of discrete particles of fissionnble material suspended in a heavy water moderator, and a control means in the form of a disc of neutron absorbirg material disposed below the top surface of the slurry and parallel thereto. The diameter of the disc is slightly smaller than the diameter of the tank and the disc is perforated to permit a flow of the slurry therethrough. The function of the disc is to divide the body of slurry into two separate portions, the lower portion being of a critical size to sustain a nuclear chain reaction and the upper portion between the top surface of the slurry and the top surface of the disc being of a non-critical size. The method of operation is to raise the disc in the reactor until the lower portion of the slurry has reached a critical size when it is desired to initiate the reaction, and to lower the disc in the reactor to reduce the size of the lower active portion the slurry to below criticality when it is desired to stop the reaction.

  19. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Resident Protein AGR3. Required for Regulation of Ciliary Beat Frequency in the Airway.

    PubMed

    Bonser, Luke R; Schroeder, Bradley W; Ostrin, Lisa A; Baumlin, Nathalie; Olson, Jean L; Salathe, Matthias; Erle, David J

    2015-10-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family members regulate protein folding and calcium homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The PDI family member anterior gradient (AGR) 3 is expressed in the airway, but the localization, regulation, and function of AGR3 are poorly understood. Here we report that AGR3, unlike its closest homolog AGR2, is restricted to ciliated cells in the airway epithelium and is not induced by ER stress. Mice lacking AGR3 are viable and develop ciliated cells with normal-appearing cilia. However, ciliary beat frequency was lower in airways from AGR3-deficient mice compared with control mice (20% lower in the absence of stimulation and 35% lower after ATP stimulation). AGR3 deficiency had no detectable effects on ciliary beat frequency (CBF) when airways were perfused with a calcium-free solution, suggesting that AGR3 is required for calcium-mediated regulation of ciliary function. Decreased CBF was associated with impaired mucociliary clearance in AGR3-deficient airways. We conclude that AGR3 is a specialized member of the PDI family that plays an unexpected role in the regulation of CBF and mucociliary clearance in the airway.

  20. The Agr communication system provides a benefit to the populations of Listeria monocytogenes in soil

    PubMed Central

    Vivant, Anne-Laure; Garmyn, Dominique; Gal, Laurent; Piveteau, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the Agr communication system of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes was involved in adaptation and competitiveness in soil. Alteration of the ability to communicate, either by deletion of the gene coding the response regulator AgrA (response-negative mutant) or the signal pro-peptide AgrD (signal-negative mutant), did not affect population dynamics in soil that had been sterilized but survival was altered in biotic soil suggesting that the Agr system of L. monocytogenes was involved to face the complex soil biotic environment. This was confirmed by a set of co-incubation experiments. The fitness of the response-negative mutant was lower either in the presence or absence of the parental strain but the fitness of the signal-negative mutant depended on the strain with which it was co-incubated. The survival of the signal-negative mutant was higher when co-cultured with the parental strain than when co-cultured with the response-negative mutant. These results showed that the ability to respond to Agr communication provided a benefit to listerial cells to compete. These results might also indicate that in soil, the Agr system controls private goods rather than public goods. PMID:25414837

  1. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  2. Bioconversion reactor

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  3. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  4. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  6. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein N.

    1988-01-01

    An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

  7. Short-term Influence of Two Types of Drilling Fluids on Wastewater Treatment Rate and Eukaryotic Organisms of Activated Sludge in Sequencing Batch Reactors.

    PubMed

    Babko, Roman; Jaromin-Gleń, Katarzyna; Łagód, Grzegorz; Danko, Yaroslav; Kuzmina, Tatiana; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Pawłowski, Artur

    2017-07-01

    This work presents the results of studies on the impact of spent drilling fluids cotreated with municipal wastewater on the rate of the wastewater treatment process and the structure of the community of eukaryotic organisms inhabiting an activated sludge. The studies were conducted under laboratory conditions in sequencing batch reactors. The effect of added polymer-potassium drilling fluid (DF1) and polymer drilling fluid (DF2) at dosages of 1 and 3% of wastewater volume on the rate of removal of total suspended solids, turbidity, chemical oxygen demand, and the content of total and ammonium nitrogen were analyzed, taking into account the values of these parameters measured at the end of each operating cycle. In addition to the impacts on the aforementioned physicochemical indices, the influence of drilling fluid on the biomass of various groups of eukaryotes in activated sludge was analyzed. The impact of the drilling fluid was highly dependent on its type and dosage. A noticeable slowdown in the rate of the wastewater treatment process and a negative effect on the organisms were observed after the addition of DF2. This effect intensified after an increase in fluid dose. However, no statistically significant negative changes were observed after the introduction of DF1. Conversely, the removal rate of some of the analyzed pollutant increased. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Fast pyrolysis of durian (Durio zibethinus L) shell in a drop-type fixed bed reactor: Pyrolysis behavior and product analyses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y L; Abdullah, A Z; Hameed, B H

    2017-06-23

    Durian shell (DS) was pyrolyzed in a drop-type fixed-bed reactor to study the physicochemical properties of the products. The experiment was carried out with different particle sizes (up to 5mm) and reaction temperatures (250-650°C). The highest bio-oil yield was obtained at 650°C (57.45wt%) with DS size of 1-2mm. The elemental composition and higher heating value of the feedstock, bio-oil (650°C), and bio-char (650°C) were determined and compared. The compositions of product gases were determined via gas chromatography with thermal conductivity detector. The chemical composition of bio-oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The bio-oil produced at lower temperature yields more alcohols, whereas the bio-oil produced at higher temperature contains more aromatics and carbonyls. Bio-oil has potential to be used as liquid fuel or fine chemical precursor after further upgrading. The results further showed the potential of bio-char as a solid fuel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Canovas, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S.; Andersen, Paal S.; Grzeskowiak, Piotr K.; Stegger, Marc; Damborg, Peter; Olsen, Christian A.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly

  10. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System.

    PubMed

    Canovas, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S; Andersen, Paal S; Grzeskowiak, Piotr K; Stegger, Marc; Damborg, Peter; Olsen, Christian A; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly

  11. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1958-10-01

    The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1959-10-27

    BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

  14. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  15. Effects of inoculum type and bulk dissolved oxygen concentration on achieving partial nitrification by entrapped-cell-based reactors.

    PubMed

    Rongsayamanont, Chaiwat; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Khan, Eakalak

    2014-07-01

    An entrapment of nitrifiers into gel matrix is employed as a tool to fulfill partial nitrification under non-limiting dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in bulk solutions. This study aims to clarify which of these two attributes, inoculum type and DO concentration in bulk solutions, is the decisive factor for partial nitrification in an entrapped-cell based system. Four polyvinyl alcohol entrapped inocula were prepared to have different proportions of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and nitrite-oxidizing activity. At a DO concentration of 3 mg l(-1), the number of active NOB cells in an inoculum was the decisive factor for partial nitrification enhancement. However, when the DO concentration was reduced to 2 mg l(-1), all entrapped cell inocula showed similar degrees of partial nitrification. The results suggested that with the lower bulk DO concentration, the preparation of entrapped cell inocula is not useful as the DO level becomes the decisive factor for achieving partial nitrification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolution of weld metals nanostructure and properties under irradiation and recovery annealing of VVER-type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Zabusov, O.; Prikhodko, K.; Zhurko, D.

    2013-03-01

    The results of VVER-440 steel Sv-10KhMFT and VVER-1000 steel SV-10KhGNMAA investigations by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger-electron spectroscopy and mechanical tests are presented in this paper. The both types of weld metals with different content of impurities and alloying elements were studied after irradiations to fast neutron (E > 0.5 MeV) fluences in the wide range below and beyond the design values, after recovery annealing procedures and after re-irradiation following the annealing. The distinctive features of embrittlement kinetics of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPV weld metals conditioned by their chemical composition differences were investigated. It is shown that the main contribution into radiation strengthening within the design fluence can be attributed to radiation-induced precipitates, on reaching the design or beyond design values of fast neutron fluencies the main contribution into VVER-440 welds strengthening is made by radiation-induced dislocation loops, and in case of VVER-1000 welds - radiation-induced precipitates and grain-boundary phosphorous segregations. Recovery annealing of VVER-440 welds at 475 °C during 100 h causes irradiation-induced defects disappearance, transformation of copper enriched precipitates into bigger copper-rich precipitates with lower number density and leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties followed by comparatively slow re-embrittlement rate. The recovery annealing temperature of VVER-1000 welds was higher - 565 °C during 100 h - to avoid temper brittleness. The annealing of VVER-1000 welds leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties due to irradiation-induced defects disappearance and decrease in precipitates number density and grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus. The re-embrittlement rate of VVER-1000 weld during subsequent re-irradiation is at least not higher than the initial rate.

  17. Evaluation of Corrosion of the Dummy “EE” Plate 19 in YA Type ATR Fuel Element During Reactor PALM Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, Jeffrey Owen; Glazoff, Michael Vasily; Eiden, Thomas John; Rezvoi, Aleksey Victor

    2016-08-01

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 153B-1 was a 14-day, high-power, powered axial locator mechanism (PALM) operating cycle that completed on April 12, 2013. Cycle 153B-1 was a typical operating cycle for the ATR and did not result in any unusual plant transients. ATR was started up and shut down as scheduled. The PALM drive physically moves the selected experiments into and out of the core to simulate reactor startup and heat up, and shutdown and cooldown transients, while the reactor remains in steady state conditions. However, after the cycle was over, several thousand of the flow-assisted corrosion pits and “horseshoeing” defects were readily observable on the surface of the several YA-type fuel elements (these are “dummy” plates that contain no fuel). In order understand these corrosion phenomena a thermal-hydraulic model of coolant channel 20 on a YA-M fuel element was generated. The boundaries of the model were the aluminum EE plate of a YA-M fuel element and a beryllium reflector block with 13 horizontal saw cuts which represented regions of zero flow. The heat generated in fuel plates 1 through 18 was modeled to be passing through the aluminum EE plate. The coolant channel 20 width was set at 0.058 in. (58 mils). It was established that the horizontal saw cuts had a significant effect on the temperature of the coolant. The flow, which was expected to vary linearly with gradual heating of the coolant as it passed through the channel, was extremely turbulent. The temperature rise, which was expected to be a smooth “S” curve, was represented by a series temperature rise “humps,” which occurred at each horizontal saw cut in the beryllium reflector block. Each of the 13 saw cuts had a chamfered edge which resulted in the coolant flow being re-directed as a jet across the coolant channel into the surface of the EE plate, which explained the temperature rise and the observed sscalloping and possibly pitting degradation on the YA-M fuel elements. In

  18. Evaluation of Erosion of the Dummy “EE” Plate 19 in YA Type ATR Fuel Element During Reactor PALM Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, Jeffrey O.; Glazoff, Michael V.; Eiden, Thomas J.; Rezvoi, Aleksey V.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 153B-1 was a 14-day, high-power, powered axial locator mechanism (PALM) operating cycle that completed on April 12, 2013. Cycle 153B-1 was a typical operating cycle for the ATR and did not result in any unusual plant transients. ATR was started up and shut down as scheduled. The PALM drive physically moves the selected experiments into and out of the core to simulate reactor startup and heat up, and shutdown and cooldown transients, while the reactor remains in steady state conditions. However, after the cycle was over, when the fuel elements were removed from the core and inspected, several thousand flow-assisted erosion pits and “horseshoeing” defects were readily observed on the surface of the several YA-type fuel elements (these are aluminum “dummy” plates that contain no fuel). In order to understand these erosion phenomena a thermal-hydraulic model of coolant channel 20 on a YA-M fuel element was generated. The boundaries of the model were the aluminum EE plate of a YA-M fuel element and a beryllium reflector block with 13 horizontal saw cuts which represented regions of zero flow. The heat generated in fuel plates 1 through 18 was modeled to be passing through the aluminum EE plate. The coolant channel 20 width was set at 0.058 in. (58 mils). It was established that the horizontal saw cuts had a significant effect on the temperature of the coolant. The flow, which was expected to vary linearly with gradual heating of the coolant as it passed through the channel, was extremely turbulent. The temperature rise, which was expected to be a smooth “S” curve, was represented by a series temperature rise “humps,” which occurred at each horizontal saw cut in the beryllium reflector block. Each of the 13 saw cuts had a chamfered edge which resulted in the coolant flow being re-directed as a jet across the coolant channel into the surface of the EE plate, which explained the temperature rise and the observed scalloping

  19. Population studies of methicillin-resistant and -sensitive Staphylococcus aureus strains reveal a lack of variability in the agrD gene, encoding a staphylococcal autoinducer peptide.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, W; van Nieuwenhuizen, W; Gijzen, C; Verbrugh, H; van Belkum, A

    2000-10-01

    The virulence of Staphylococcus aureus is controlled by the accessory gene regulator (agr) system, including an extracellular inducer encoded by agrD. Variable agr PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns of unique S. aureus strains (n = 192) were determined for a region comprising agrD and parts of the neighboring agrC and agrB genes. Twelve unique RFLP patterns were identified among S. aureus strains in general; these patterns were further specified by sequencing. All sequences could be catalogued in the three current agr groups. A major proportion of the S. aureus strains belong to agr group 1, whereas only 6% of the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains and 5% of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains belong to agr groups 2 and 3, respectively. The homology between groups varied from 75 to 80%, and within groups it varied from 96 to 100%. Different levels of sequence variability were observed in the different agr genes. agr-related bacterial interference among colonizing S. aureus strains in the noses of persistent and intermittent human carriers was studied. S. aureus strains belonging to different agr groups were encountered in the same individual. This may suggest that the activity of the agrD gene product does not define colonization dynamics, which is further substantiated by the rarity of agr group 2 and 3 strains.

  20. Selective chemical inhibition of agr quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus promotes host defense with minimal impact on resistance.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O; Alexander, Susan M; Femling, Jon K; Gray, Brian M; DeLeo, Frank R; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Horswill, Alexander R; Hall, Pamela R; Gresham, Hattie D

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  1. CodY-mediated regulation of the Staphylococcus aureus Agr system integrates nutritional and population density signals.

    PubMed

    Roux, Agnès; Todd, Daniel A; Velázquez, Jose V; Cech, Nadja B; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2014-03-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus Agr system regulates virulence gene expression by responding to cell population density (quorum sensing). When an extracellular peptide signal (AIP-III in strain UAMS-1, used for these experiments) reaches a concentration threshold, the AgrC-AgrA two-component regulatory system is activated through a cascade of phosphorylation events, leading to induction of the divergently transcribed agrBDCA operon and the RNAIII gene. RNAIII is a posttranscriptional regulator of numerous metabolic and pathogenesis genes. CodY, a global regulatory protein, is known to repress agrBDCA and RNAIII transcription during exponential growth in rich medium, but the mechanism of this regulation has remained elusive. Here we report that phosphorylation of AgrA by the AgrC protein kinase is required for the overexpression of the agrBDCA operon and the RNAIII gene in a codY mutant during the exponential-growth phase, suggesting that the quorum-sensing system, which normally controls AgrC activation, is active even in exponential-phase cells in the absence of CodY. In part, such premature expression of RNAIII was attributable to higher-than-normal accumulation of AIP-III in a codY mutant strain, as determined using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Although CodY is a strong repressor of the agr locus, CodY bound only weakly to the agrBDCA-RNAIII promoter region, suggesting that direct regulation by CodY is unlikely to be the principal mechanism by which CodY regulates agr and RNAIII expression. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that cell population density signals inducing virulence gene expression can be overridden by nutrient availability, a condition monitored by CodY.

  2. Selective Chemical Inhibition of agr Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus Promotes Host Defense with Minimal Impact on Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O.; Alexander, Susan M.; Femling, Jon K.; Gray, Brian M.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Hall, Pamela R.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  3. About the possibility of use of different types of targets as a neutron source for subcritical nuclear reactor driven by particle beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Avdeev, E.F.; Dorokhovich, S.L.; Chusov, I.A.

    1995-10-01

    The schemes of jet gas and liquid targets as well as the gastargets with a solid phase dispersion are introduced to use to receive the neutrons admitted to a subcritical reactor core. The possible variants of target position in the reactor are considered, target characteristics are calculated. The authors pay a great attention to the estimation of radioactive products yield receiving due to the interaction of the beam with the target.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  5. REACTOR UNLOADING

    DOEpatents

    Leverett, M.C.

    1958-02-18

    This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  7. REACTOR MONITORING

    DOEpatents

    Bugbee, S.J.; Hanson, V.F.; Babcock, D.F.

    1959-02-01

    A neutron density inonitoring means for reactors is described. According to this invention a tunnel is provided beneath and spaced from the active portion of the reactor and extends beyond the opposite faces of the activc portion. Neutron beam holes are provided between the active portion and the tunnel and open into the tunnel near the middle thereof. A carriage operates back and forth in the tunnel and is adapted to convey a neutron detector, such as an ion chamber, and position it beneath one of the neutron beam holes. This arrangement affords convenient access of neutron density measuring instruments to a location wherein direct measurement of neutron density within the piles can be made and at the same time affords ample protection to operating personnel.

  8. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  9. Plasma core reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall. Results of calculations for outward-directed radiant energy fluxes corresponding to radiating temperatures of 2000 to 5000 K indicate total operating pressures from 80 to 650 atm, centerline temperatures from 6900 to 30,000 K, and total radiated powers from 25 to 2500 MW, respectively. Applications are described for this type of reactor such as (1) high-thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) highly efficient systems for generation of electricity, and (3) hydrogen or synthetic fuel production systems using the intense radiant energy fluxes.

  10. Plasma core reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall. Results of calculations for outward-directed radiant energy fluxes corresponding to radiating temperatures of 2000 to 5000 K indicate total operating pressures from 80 to 650 atm, centerline temperatures from 6900 to 30,000 K, and total radiated powers from 25 to 2500 MW, respectively. Applications are described for this type of reactor such as (1) high-thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) highly efficient systems for generation of electricity, and (3) hydrogen or synthetic fuel production systems using the intense radiant energy fluxes.

  11. LOADING MACHINE FOR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Simon, S.L.

    1959-07-01

    An apparatus is described for loading or charging slugs of fissionable material into a nuclear reactor. The apparatus of the invention is a "muzzle loading" type comprising a delivery tube or muzzle designed to be brought into alignment with any one of a plurality of fuel channels. The delivery tube is located within the pressure shell and it is also disposed within shielding barriers while the fuel cantridges or slugs are forced through the delivery tube by an externally driven flexible ram.

  12. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Warren R.

    1978-05-30

    A graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels.

  13. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1961-01-24

    A core structure for neutronic reactors adapted for the propulsion of aircraft and rockets is offered. The core is designed for cooling by gaseous media, and comprises a plurality of hollow tapered tubular segments of a porous moderating material impregniated with fissionable fuel nested about a common axis. Alternate ends of the segments are joined. In operation a coolant gas passes through the porous structure and is heated.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

    1961-12-01

    An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

  16. Implications of Results from the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program on Licensing of Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti

    2001-10-01

    The high level of safety of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs is achieved by passively maintaining core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all envisioned accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude relative to other reactor types but is predicated on exceptionally high coated-particle fuel fabrication quality and excellent fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program decided to qualify for uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) TRISO coated-particle fuel in an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic modular HTGR options. By using a mixture of uranium oxide and uranium carbide, the kernel composition is engineered to minimize CO formation and fuel kernel migration, which is key to maintain to fuel integrity at the higher burnups, temperatures, and temperature gradients anticipated in prismatic HTGRs. Fuel fabrication conducted at both laboratory and engineering scale has demonstrated the ability to fabricate high quality UCO TRISO fuel with very low defects. The first irradiation (AGR 1) exposed about 300,000 TRISO fuel particles to a peak burnup of 19.6% FIMA, a peak fast-neutron fluence of about 4.3 × 1025 n/m2, and a maximum time-averaged fuel temperature of about 1,200°C without a single particle failure. The very low release of key metallic fission products (except silver) measured in post-irradiation examination (PIE) confirms the excellent performance measured under irradiation. Very low releases have been measured in accident simulation heatup testing (''safety testing'') after hundreds of hours at 1600 and 1700°C and no particle failures (no noble gas release measured) have been observed. Even after hundreds of hours at 1800°C, the releases are still very low

  17. Space reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranken, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in design studies and technology for the SP-100 Project - successor to the Space Power Advanced Reactor (SPAR) Project - is reported for the period October 1, 1981 to March 31, 1982. The basis for selecting a high-temperature, UO2-fueled, heat-pipe-cooled reactor with a thermoelectric conversion system as the 100/kW-sub e/ reference design has been reviewed. Although no change has been made in the general concept, design studies have been done to investigate various reactor/conversion system coupling methods and core design modifications. Thermal and mechanical finite element modeling and three dimensional Monte Carlo analysis of a core with individual finned fuel elements are reported. Studies of unrestrained fuel irradiation data are discussed that are relevant both to the core modeling work and to the design and fabrication of the first in-pile irradiation test, which is also reported. Work on lithium-filled core heat pipe development is described, including the attainment of 15.6 kW/sub t/ operation at 1525 K for a 2-m-long heat pipe with a 15.7-mm outside diameter. The successful operation of a 5.5-m-long, lightweight potassium/titanium heat pipe at 760 K is described, and test results of a thermoelectric module with GaP-modified SiGe thermoelectric elements are presented.

  18. Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor

    DOEpatents

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Terry, William K.; Gougar, Hans D.

    2008-07-22

    An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

  19. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H.

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  20. AGR-1 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Lance Cole; Scott Ploger; Philip Winston; Binh Pham; Michael Abbott

    2011-01-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment ended on November 6, 2009, after 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor, achieving a peak burnup of 19.6% FIMA. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in March 2010 for post-irradiation examination. The first PIE activities included non-destructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and the graphite fuel holders. Dimensional measurements of the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsules shells were performed using a custom vision measurement system (for outer diameters and lengths) and conventional bore gauges (for inner diameters). Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Neutron radiography of the intact Capsule 2 showed a high degree of detail of interior components and confirmed the observation that there was no major damage to the capsule. Disassembly of the capsules was initiated using procedures qualified during out-of-cell mockup testing. Difficulties were encountered during capsule disassembly due to irradiation-induced changes in some of the capsule components’ properties, including embrittled niobium and molybdenum parts that were susceptible to fracture and swelling of the graphite fuel holders that affected their removal from the capsule shells. This required various improvised modifications to the disassembly procedure to avoid damage to the fuel compacts. Ultimately the capsule disassembly was successful and only one compact from Capsule 4 (out of 72 total in the test train) sustained damage during the disassembly process, along with the associated graphite holder. The compacts were generally in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor

  1. Reactors for High Solid Loading Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Hou, Weiliang; Bao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The review summarized the types, the geometry, and the design principle of pretreatment reactors at high solid loading of lignocellulose material. Among the reactors used, the explosion reactors and the helical stirring reactors are to be considered as the practical form for high solids loading pretreatment operation; the comminution reactors and the extruder reactors are difficult to be used as an independent unit, but possible to be used in the combined form with other types of reactors. The principles of the pretreatment reactor design at high solid loading were discussed and several basic principles for the design were proposed. This review provided useful information for choosing the reactor types and designing the geometry of pretreatment operation at the high solids loading.

  2. Decommissioning of a university research reactor.

    PubMed

    Abelquist, E W; Huda, A; State, S; Takahashi, J

    1994-07-01

    The objective of the UCLA Boelter Reactor Decommissioning Project was the release of the Boelter reactor facility for unrestricted use. The facility included a 100 kW Argonaut type research reactor that operated from 1963 to 1985, providing general reactor research. The decommissioning was planned as a two-phase program. Phase I involved removal of the reactor core structure for better access and assessment of the biological shield. Phase II decommissioning activities included structural steel removal, activated concrete removal, process equipment pit piping dismantlement, and clean concrete removal. The final release survey of the Boelter reactor facility demonstrated that all areas satisfied the project's release criteria. The total person-Sv for the project was 3.87 x 10(-2) (3.87 person-rem), most of which was received during the structural steel and activated concrete removal tasks and the disassembly of the reactor core.

  3. Advances in reactor physics education: Visualization of reactor parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Snoj, L.; Kromar, M.; Zerovnik, G.

    2012-07-01

    Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for reactor operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and a typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software. (authors)

  4. Nuclear Reactors. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: How Reactors Work; Reactor Design; Research, Teaching, and Materials Testing; Reactors (Research, Teaching and Materials); Production Reactors; Reactors for Electric Power…

  5. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  7. ELECTRONUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.; McMillan, E.M.; Alvarez, L.W.

    1960-04-19

    An electronuclear reactor is described in which a very high-energy particle accelerator is employed with appropriate target structure to produce an artificially produced material in commercial quantities by nuclear transformations. The principal novelty resides in the combination of an accelerator with a target for converting the accelerator beam to copious quantities of low-energy neutrons for absorption in a lattice of fertile material and moderator. The fertile material of the lattice is converted by neutron absorption reactions to an artificially produced material, e.g., plutonium, where depleted uranium is utilized as the fertile material.

  8. REACTOR COMPONETN

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor fuel element comprised of a slug of fissionable material disposed in a sheath of corrosion resistantmaterial is described. The sheath is in the form of a tubular container closed at one end and is in tight-fitting engagement with the peripheral sunface of the slug. An inner cap is insented into the open end of the sheath against the slug, which end is then bent around the inner cap and welded thereto. An outer cap is then welded around its peripheny to the bent portion of the container.

  9. Photocatalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

    1999-01-19

    A photocatalytic reactor is described for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane. 4 figs.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.; Goett, J.J.

    1958-09-01

    A cover device is described for the fuel element receiving tube of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, water cooled type wherein said tubes are arranged in a moderator with their longitudinal axes vertical. The cover is provided with means to support a rod-type fuel element from the bottom thereof and means to lock the cover in place, the latter being adapted for remote operation. This cover device is easily removable and seals the opening in the upper end of the fuel tube against leakage of coolant.

  11. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  12. Estándar para la Protección del Trabajador Agrícola Revisado

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estas revisiones al Estándar de Protección a los Trabajadores Agrícolas, promulgado en 1992, proporcionarán protecciones de salud a los trabajadores agrícolas similares a las que ya disponen trabajadores en otras industrias.

  13. Cambios al Estándar de Protección a los Trabajadores Agrícolas de la EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estos cambios proporcionarán protecciones de salud a los trabajadores agrícolas similares a las que ya disponen trabajadores en otras industrias, teniendo en cuenta el entorno laboral único de muchos trabajos agrícolas.

  14. Computational Modeling of Multiphase Reactors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, J B; Nandakumar, K

    2015-01-01

    Multiphase reactors are very common in chemical industry, and numerous review articles exist that are focused on types of reactors, such as bubble columns, trickle beds, fluid catalytic beds, etc. Currently, there is a high degree of empiricism in the design process of such reactors owing to the complexity of coupled flow and reaction mechanisms. Hence, we focus on synthesizing recent advances in computational and experimental techniques that will enable future designs of such reactors in a more rational manner by exploring a large design space with high-fidelity models (computational fluid dynamics and computational chemistry models) that are validated with high-fidelity measurements (tomography and other detailed spatial measurements) to provide a high degree of rigor. Understanding the spatial distributions of dispersed phases and their interaction during scale up are key challenges that were traditionally addressed through pilot scale experiments, but now can be addressed through advanced modeling.

  15. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

    1959-02-17

    Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  17. AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1958-05-27

    A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

  18. ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    De Boisblanc, D.R.; Thomas, M.E.; Jones, R.M.; Hanson, G.H.

    1958-10-21

    Heterogeneous reactors of the type which is both cooled and moderated by the same fluid, preferably water, and employs highly enriched fuel are reported. In this design, an inner pressure vessel is located within a main outer pressure vessel. The reactor core and its surrounding reflector are disposed in the inner pressure vessel which in turn is surrounded by a thermal shield, Coolant fluid enters the main pressure vessel, fiows downward into the inner vessel where it passes through the core containing tbe fissionable fuel assemblies and control rods, through the reflector, thence out through the bottom of the inner vessel and up past the thermal shield to the discharge port in the main vessel. The fuel assemblles are arranged in the core in the form of a cross having an opening extending therethrough to serve as a high fast flux test facility.

  19. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  20. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  1. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  2. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  3. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-07-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  4. Control Means for Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Manley, J. H.

    1961-06-27

    An apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a tank just below the reactor, tubes extending from the tank into the reactor, and a thermally expansible liquid neutron absorbent material in the tank. The liquid in the tank is exposed to a beam of neutrons from the reactor which heats the liquid causing it to expand into the reactor when the neutron flux in the reactor rises above a predetermincd danger point. Boron triamine may be used for this purpose.

  5. The Agr-Like Quorum Sensing System Is Required for Pathogenesis of Necrotic Enteritis Caused by Clostridium perfringens in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Lepp, Dion; Mehdizadeh Gohari, Iman; Wu, Tao; Zhou, Hongzhuan; Yin, Xianhua; Yu, Hai; Prescott, John F; Nie, Shao-Ping; Xie, Ming-Yong; Gong, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens encodes at least two different quorum sensing (QS) systems, the Agr-like and LuxS, and recent studies have highlighted their importance in the regulation of toxin production and virulence. The role of QS in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis (NE) in poultry and the regulation of NetB, the key toxin involved, has not yet been investigated. We have generated isogenic agrB-null and complemented strains from parent strain CP1 and demonstrated that the virulence of the agrB-null mutant was strongly attenuated in a chicken NE model system and restored by complementation. The production of NetB, a key NE-associated toxin, was dramatically reduced in the agrB mutant at both the transcriptional and protein levels, though not in a luxS mutant. Transwell assays confirmed that the Agr-like QS system controls NetB production through a diffusible signal. Global gene expression analysis of the agrB mutant identified additional genes modulated by Agr-like QS, including operons related to phospholipid metabolism and adherence, which may also play a role in NE pathogenesis. This study provides the first evidence that the Agr-like QS system is critical for NE pathogenesis and identifies a number of Agr-regulated genes, most notably netB, that are potentially involved in mediating its effects. The Agr-like QS system thus may serve as a target for developing novel interventions to prevent NE in chickens. © Crown copyright 2017.

  6. Analysis of Microbial Communities in Biofilms from CSTR-Type Hollow Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Autotrophic Nitrification and Hydrogenotrophic Denitrification.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Hun; Kim, Byung-Chun; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Hyunook; Sang, Byoung-In

    2015-10-01

    Two hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactors (HF-MBfRs) were operated for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification for over 300 days. Oxygen and hydrogen were supplied through the hollow fiber membrane for nitrification and denitrification, respectively. During the period, the nitrogen was removed with the efficiency of 82-97% for ammonium and 87-97% for nitrate and with the nitrogen removal load of 0.09-0.26 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d and 0.10-0.21 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)/d, depending on hydraulic retention time variation by the two HF-MBfRs for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification, respectively. Biofilms were collected from diverse topological positions in the reactors, each at different nitrogen loading rates, and the microbial communities were analyzed with partial 16S rRNA gene sequences in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Detected DGGE band sequences in the reactors were correlated with nitrification or denitrification. The profile of the DGGE bands depended on the NH4(+) or NO3(-) loading rate, but it was hard to find a major strain affecting the nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrospira-related phylum was detected in all biofilm samples from the nitrification reactors. Paracoccus sp. and Aquaspirillum sp., which are an autohydrogenotrophic bacterium and an oligotrophic denitrifier, respectively, were observed in the denitrification reactors. The distribution of microbial communities was relatively stable at different nitrogen loading rates, and DGGE analysis based on 16S rRNA (341f /534r) could successfully detect nitrate-oxidizing and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria but not ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the HF-MBfRs.

  7. Experimental studies of local coolant hydrodynamics using a scaled model of cassette-type fuel assembly of a KLT-40S reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. M.; Barinov, A. A.; Varentsov, A. V.; Doronkov, D. V.; Solntsev, D. N.; Khrobostov, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    The results of experimental studies of local hydrodynamic and mass exchange characteristics of the coolant flow behind the spacer grid in the fuel assembly of a KLT-40S reactor are presented. The experiments were aimed at the investigation of representative domains of the fuel assembly with three tracer injection regions. The studies were performed at the aerodynamic test facility using the tracer gas diffusion method. According to the theory of hydrodynamic similarity, the obtained experimental results can be transferred to full-scale coolant flow conditions in standard fuel assemblies. The analysis of the tracer concentration propagation made it possible to determine in detail the flow pattern and find the main regularities and specific features of the coolant flow behind the plate spacer grid of KLT-40S fuel assembly. The hydraulic resistance coefficient of the spacer grid was experimentally determined. The coefficients of mass exchange between cells for representative cells of the displacer region in the KLT-40S fuel assembly were calculated for the first time; these results are presented in the form of the "mixing matrix." The results of studies of local coolant flow hydrodynamics in the KLT-40S fuel assembly are used at AO Afrikantov OKBM for estimation of thermotechnical reliability of active cores for reactors of floating nuclear power stations. The experimental data on hydrodynamic and mass exchange characteristics are included in the database for verification of CDF codes and detailed cell-wise calculation of the active core for KLT-40S reactor installation. The results of these studies can be used at FSUE RFNC-VNIIEF for testing and verification of domestic three-dimensional hydrodynamic CFD codes ("Logos") that are applied for substantiation of newly designed reactor installations. Practical recommendations on the application of the obtained results in thermohydraulic calculations of the active core for the KLT-40S reactor will be worked out. Proposals

  8. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  9. NASA Reactor Facility Hazards Summary. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration proposes to build a nuclear research reactor which will be located in the Plum Brook Ordnance Works near Sandusky, Ohio. The purpose of this report is to inform the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission in regard to the design Lq of the reactor facility, the characteristics of the site, and the hazards of operation at this location. The purpose of this research reactor is to make pumped loop studies of aircraft reactor fuel elements and other reactor components, radiation effects studies on aircraft reactor materials and equipment, shielding studies, and nuclear and solid state physics experiments. The reactor is light water cooled and moderated of the MTR-type with a primary beryllium reflector and a secondary water reflector. The core initially will be a 3 by 9 array of MTR-type fuel elements and is designed for operation up to a power of 60 megawatts. The reactor facility is described in general terms. This is followed by a discussion of the nuclear characteristics and performance of the reactor. Then details of the reactor control system are discussed. A summary of the site characteristics is then presented followed by a discussion of the larger type of experiments which may eventually be operated in this facility. The considerations for normal operation are concluded with a proposed method of handling fuel elements and radioactive wastes. The potential hazards involved with failures or malfunctions of this facility are considered in some detail. These are examined first from the standpoint of preventing them or minimizing their effects and second from the standpoint of what effect they might have on the reactor facility staff and the surrounding population. The most essential feature of the design for location at the proposed site is containment of the maximum credible accident.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1962-12-18

    A power plant is described comprising a turbine and employing round cylindrical fuel rods formed of BeO and UO/sub 2/ and stacks of hexagonal moderator blocks of BeO provided with passages that loosely receive the fuel rods so that coolant may flow through the passages over the fuels to remove heat. The coolant may be helium or steam and fiows through at least one more heat exchanger for producing vapor from a body of fluid separate from the coolant, which fluid is to drive the turbine for generating electricity. By this arrangement the turbine and directly associated parts are free of particles and radiations emanating from the reactor. (AEC)

  11. AgrAbility Project: Promoting Success in Agriculture for People with Disabilities and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The AgrAbility Project offers education and assistance to farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural workers with physical and mental disabilities. The project also eliminates barriers and creates a favorable climate among rural service providers for people with disabilities. Disabilities and conditions covered are listed. Examples of the project's…

  12. Colorado's AgrAbility Project's Effects on KASA and Practice Changes with Agricultural Producers and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Jackman, Danielle M.

    2015-01-01

    Disability rates resulting from work-related injuries remain steadily high among farmers and ranchers. To address the gap in services within this population, USDA implemented AgrAbility nationally. Using part of Bennett's hierarchical model, the current study evaluated the KASA and practice change levels of 401 farmers and ranchers and compared…

  13. Colorado's AgrAbility Project's Effects on KASA and Practice Changes with Agricultural Producers and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Jackman, Danielle M.

    2015-01-01

    Disability rates resulting from work-related injuries remain steadily high among farmers and ranchers. To address the gap in services within this population, USDA implemented AgrAbility nationally. Using part of Bennett's hierarchical model, the current study evaluated the KASA and practice change levels of 401 farmers and ranchers and compared…

  14. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    DOEpatents

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  15. Reactor and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Wheeler, John A.

    1976-08-10

    A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

  16. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  17. COMPARTMENTED REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Cain, F.M. Jr.

    1962-09-11

    A method of making a nuclear reactor fuel element of the elongated red type is given wherein the fissionable fuel material is enclosed within a tubular metal cladding. The method comprises coating the metal cladding tube on its inside wall with a brazing alloy, inserting groups of cylindrical pellets of fissionable fuel material into the tube with spacing members between adjacent groups of pellets, sealing the ends of the tubes to leave a void space therewithin, heating the tube and its contents to an elevated temperature to melt the brazing alloy and to expand the pellets to their maximum dimensions under predetermined operating conditions thereby automatically positioning the spacing members along the tube, and finally cooling the tube to room temperature whereby the spacing disks become permanently fixed at their edges in the brazing alloy and define a hermetically sealed compartment for each fl group of fuel pellets. Upon cooling, the pellets contract thus leaving a space to accommodate thermal expansion of the pellets when in use in a reactor. The spacing members also provide lateral support for the tubular cladding to prevent collapse thereof when subjected to a reactor environment. (AEC)

  18. BOILER-SUPERHEATED REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Heckman, T.P.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear power reactor of the type in which a liquid moderator-coolant is transformed by nuclear heating into a vapor that may be used to drive a turbo- generator is described. The core of this reactor comprises a plurality of freely suspended tubular fuel elements, called fuel element trains, within which nonboiling pressurized liquid moderator-coolant is preheated and sprayed through orifices in the walls of the trains against the outer walls thereof to be converted into vapor. Passage of the vapor ovcr other unwetted portions of the outside of the fuel elements causes the steam to be superheated. The moderatorcoolant within the fuel elements remains in the liqUid state, and that between the fuel elements remains substantiaily in the vapor state. A unique liquid neutron-absorber control system is used. Advantages expected from the reactor design include reduced fuel element failure, increased stability of operation, direct response to power demand, and circulation of a minimum amount of liquid moderatorcoolant. (A.G.W.)

  19. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 151B-2, 152A, 152B, 153A, 153B and 154A

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2013-09-01

    This report documents the data qualification status of AGR-2 fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycles 152A, 152B, 153A, 153B, and 154A, as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). The AGR-2 data streams addressed include thermocouple (TC) temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rate, pressure, and moisture content), and fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data for each of the six capsules in the experiment. A total of 13,400,520 every minute instantaneous TC and sweep gas data records were received and processed by NDMAS for this period. Of these data, 8,911,791 records (66.5% of the total) were determined to be Qualified based on NDMAS accuracy testing and data validity assessment. For temperature, there were 4,266,081 records (74% of the total TC data) that were Failed due to TC instrument failures. For sweep gas flows, there were 222,648 gas flow records (2.91% of the flow data) that were Failed. The inlet gas flow failures due to gas flow cross-talk and leakage problems that occurred after Cycle 150A were corrected by using the same gas mixture in all six capsules and the Leadout. For FPMS data, NDMAS received and processed preliminary release rate and release-to-birth rate ratio (R/B) data for three reactor cycles (Cycles 149B, 150B, and 151A) . This data consists of 45,983 release rate records and 45,235 R/B records for the 12 radionuclides reported. The qualification status of these FPMS data has been set to In Process until receipt of Quality Assurance-approved data generator reports. All of the above data have been processed and tested using a SAS®-based enterprise application software system, stored in a secure Structured Query Language database, made available on the NDMAS Web portal (http://ndmas.inl.gov), and approved by the INL STIM for release to both internal and appropriate external Very High Temperature Reactor Program participants.

  20. Utilizing a one-dimensional multispecies model to simulate the nutrient reduction and biomass structure in two types of H2-based membrane-aeration biofilm reactors (H2-MBfR): model development and parametric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuowei; Xia, Siqing; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Chenhui

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a one-dimensional multispecies model (ODMSM) was utilized to simulate NO3(-)-N and ClO4(-) reduction performances in two kinds of H2-based membrane-aeration biofilm reactors (H2-MBfR) within different operating conditions (e.g., NO3(-)-N/ClO4(-) loading rates, H2 partial pressure, etc.). Before the simulation process, we conducted the sensitivity analysis of some key parameters which would fluctuate in different environmental conditions, then we used the experimental data to calibrate the more sensitive parameters μ1 and μ2 (maximum specific growth rates of denitrification bacteria and perchlorate reduction bacteria) in two H2-MBfRs, and the diversity of the two key parameters' values in two types of reactors may be resulted from the different carbon source fed in the reactors. From the simulation results of six different operating conditions (four in H2-MBfR 1 and two in H2-MBfR 2), the applicability of the model was approved, and the variation of the removal tendency in different operating conditions could be well simulated. Besides, the rationality of operating parameters (H2 partial pressure, etc.) could be judged especially in condition of high nutrients' loading rates. To a certain degree, the model could provide theoretical guidance to determine the operating parameters on some specific conditions in practical application.

  1. Integral fast reactor safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: (1) a pool-type primary system, (2) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (3) an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by (1) the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and (2) a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents.

  2. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; Abdullah, M. Adib

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  3. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  4. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  5. AGR2 promotes the proliferation, migration and regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Si-Rui; Mao, Liang; Deng, Wei-Wei; Li, Yi-Cun; Bu, Lin-Lin; Yu, Guang-Tao; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) is a common head and neck cancer with the propensity for local spread and distant metastasis. In our previous study, elevated expression of Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) was detected in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stemness. However, to date, the expression and function of AGR2 in AdCC has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, human AdCC tissue microarrays including 18 cases of normal salivary gland (NSG), 12 cases of pleomorphic adenoma (PMA) and 72 cases of AdCC were employed for immunohistochemical staining analysis. Results indicated that AGR2, which was remarkably correlated with Ki-67, transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) and CD147, was significantly elevated in human salivary AdCC tissues. Knockdown of AGR2 significantly repressed the proliferation and migration of human SACC-83 and SACC-LM cell lines. Additionally, AGR2 silencing obviously reversed the EMT phenomena induced by TGF-β1. Taken together, our present study revealed the potential pro-metastasis role of AGR2 in AdCC, indicating that AGR2 might be a novel therapeutic target of AdCC with distant metastasis. PMID:28337279

  6. Reactor safety method

    DOEpatents

    Vachon, Lawrence J.

    1980-03-11

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

  7. Fast neutron nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrillat, M. Th.; Lions, N.

    1985-01-08

    The invention relates to a fast neutron nuclear reactor of the integrated type comprising a cylindrical inner vessel. The inner vessel comprises two concentric ferrules and the connection between the hot collector defined within this vessel and the inlet port of the exchangers is brought about by a hot structure forming a heat baffle and supported by the inner ferrule and by a cold structure surrounding the hot structure, supported by the outer ferrule and sealingly connected to the exchanger. Application to the generation of electric power in nuclear power stations.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.F.; Tellefson, D.R.; Shimazaki, T.T.

    1962-04-10

    A plate type fuel element which is particularly useful for organic cooled reactors is described. Generally, the fuel element comprises a plurality of fissionable fuel bearing plates held in spaced relationship by a frame in which the plates are slidably mounted in grooves. Clearance is provided in the grooves to allow the plates to expand laterally. The plates may be rigidly interconnected but are floatingly supported at their ends within the frame to allow for longi-tudinal expansion. Thus, this fuel element is able to withstand large temperature differentials without great structural stresses. (AEC)

  9. AGR3 in breast cancer: prognostic impact and suitable serum-based biomarker for early cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Garczyk, Stefan; von Stillfried, Saskia; Antonopoulos, Wiebke; Hartmann, Arndt; Schrauder, Michael G; Fasching, Peter A; Anzeneder, Tobias; Tannapfel, Andrea; Ergönenc, Yavuz; Knüchel, Ruth; Rose, Michael; Dahl, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Blood-based early detection of breast cancer has recently gained novel momentum, as liquid biopsy diagnostics is a fast emerging field. In this study, we aimed to identify secreted proteins which are up-regulated both in tumour tissue and serum samples of breast cancer patients compared to normal tissue and sera. Based on two independent tissue cohorts (n = 75 and n = 229) and one serum cohort (n = 80) of human breast cancer and healthy serum samples, we characterised AGR3 as a novel potential biomarker both for breast cancer prognosis and early breast cancer detection from blood. AGR3 expression in breast tumours is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor α (P<0.001) and lower tumour grade (P<0.01). Interestingly, AGR3 protein expression correlates with unfavourable outcome in low (G1) and intermediate (G2) grade breast tumours (multivariate hazard ratio: 2.186, 95% CI: 1.008-4.740, P<0.05) indicating an independent prognostic impact. In sera analysed by ELISA technique, AGR3 protein concentration was significantly (P<0.001) elevated in samples from breast cancer patients (n = 40, mainly low stage tumours) compared to healthy controls (n = 40). To develop a suitable biomarker panel for early breast cancer detection, we measured AGR2 protein in human serum samples in parallel. The combined AGR3/AGR2 biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 64.5% and a specificity of 89.5% as shown by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve statistics. Thus our data clearly show the potential usability of AGR3 and AGR2 as biomarkers for blood-based early detection of human breast cancer.

  10. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  11. Catalog of experimental projects for a fissioning plasma reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzo, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were carried out to determine the feasibility of using a small scale fissioning uranium plasma as the power source in a driver reactor. The driver system is a light water cooled and moderated reactor of the MTR type. The eight experiments and proposed configurations for the reactor are outlined.

  12. Comparison of slurry versus fixed-bed reactor costs for indirect liquefaction applications. A supplement to final report: Design of slurry reactor for indirect liquefaction applications

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G.

    1991-12-01

    This work is a comparative evaluation of slurry reactors and fixed-bed reactors, with special emphasis on cost. Relative differences between slurry reactors and fixed-bed reactors have been pointed out in previous reviews; the differences pertinent to indirect liquefaction are summarized here. Design of both types is outlined.

  13. Photoneutron effects on pulse reactor kinetics for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR).

    SciTech Connect

    Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2009-06-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is a swimming-pool type pulsed reactor that maintains an epithermal neutron flux and a nine-inch diameter central dry cavity. One of its uses is neutron and gamma-ray irradiation damage studies on electronic components under transient reactor power conditions. In analyzing the experimental results, careful attention must be paid to the kinetics associated with the reactor to ensure that the transient behavior of the electronic device is understood. Since the ACRR fuel maintains a substantial amount of beryllium, copious quantities of photoneutrons are produced that can significantly alter the expected behavior of the reactor power, especially following a reactor pulse. In order to understand these photoneutron effects on the reactor kinetics, the KIFLE transient reactor-analysis code was modified to include the photoneutron groups associated with the beryllium. The time-dependent behavior of the reactor power was analyzed for small and large pulses, assuming several initial conditions including following several pulses during the day, and following a long steady-state power run. The results indicate that, for these types of initial conditions, the photoneutron contribution to the reactor pulse energy can have a few to tens of percent effect.

  14. Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

    2010-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

  15. The siting of UK nuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Grimston, Malcolm; Nuttall, William J; Vaughan, Geoff

    2014-06-01

    Choosing a suitable site for a nuclear power station requires the consideration and balancing of several factors. Some 'physical' site characteristics, such as the local climate and the potential for seismic activity, will be generic to all reactors designs, while others, such as the availability of cooling water, the area of land required and geological conditions capable of sustaining the weight of the reactor and other buildings will to an extent be dependent on the particular design of reactor chosen (or alternatively the reactor design chosen may to an extent be dependent on the characteristics of an available site). However, one particularly interesting tension is a human and demographic one. On the one hand it is beneficial to place nuclear stations close to centres of population, to reduce transmission losses and other costs (including to the local environment) of transporting electricity over large distances from generator to consumer. On the other it is advantageous to place nuclear stations some distance away from such population centres in order to minimise the potential human consequences of a major release of radioactive materials in the (extremely unlikely) event of a major nuclear accident, not only in terms of direct exposure but also concerning the management of emergency planning, notably evacuation.This paper considers the emergence of policies aimed at managing this tension in the UK. In the first phase of nuclear development (roughly speaking 1945-1965) there was a highly cautious attitude, with installations being placed in remote rural locations with very low population density. The second phase (1965-1985) saw a more relaxed approach, allowing the development of AGR nuclear power stations (which with concrete pressure vessels were regarded as significantly safer) closer to population centres (in 'semi-urban' locations, notably at Hartlepool and Heysham). In the third phase (1985-2005) there was very little new nuclear development, Sizewell

  16. Research reactor fork users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, S.T.; Menlove, H.O.; Bosler, G.E.; Dye, H.R.; Walton, G.; Halbig, J.K.; Siebelist, R.

    1993-11-01

    This manual describes the design features and operating characteristics of the research reactor fork. The system includes an ion chamber for gross gamma-ray counting, fission chambers for neutron counting, and a collimated high-resolution spectroscopy system for gamma-ray measurements. The neutron and ion chamber measurements are designed to be made underwater in spent-fuel cooling ponds. The neutron and gamma-ray detectors have been designed with high efficiencies to accommodate the relatively low emission rates of neutrons and gamma rays from low-burnup, research-type reactor fuel. This manual presents the design, performance, and test results for the system.

  17. A new steam-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, M.A.; Edlund, M.C.

    1985-08-01

    A new ultrasafe type of nuclear power plant is described that has a complete ''walk-awayfrom'' characteristic. That is, the reactor can safely dissipate its shutdown heat even if its powe and water supplies are cut off. The reactor is steam cooled and is designed to operate at one fixed steam density. Its reactivity characteristics are such that if the power level increases, the steam becomes less dense than the optimum and tends to shut the reactor off. Similarly, if the reactor is flooded wit water, the reactivity greatly decreases and also shuts the reactor down. The reactor can be operated as a burner, a high-efficiency converter, or a breeder, depending on the isotopic content of the fuel. The plant operates at low pressure and relatively high efficiency with an example given at 1000 psia and 35% efficiency. The reactor is enclosed in a conventional steel vessel resembling a boiling water reactor. The vessel is connected to a large atmospheric pressure pool of water, and shutdown consists of passively cou pling the pool to the reactor through the loss of steam flow. Shutdown cooling is provided by forced air and natural draft convection cooling of the pressure vessel. Sufficient water and passive cooling are provided by the pool for many months of shutdown water cooling. The plant piping is double walled, and all paths of radiation escape, including pressure-vessel cracking, are channeled through an on-line cleanup system.

  18. Neutron imaging on the VR-1 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crha, J.; Sklenka, L.; Soltes, J.

    2016-09-01

    Training reactor VR-1 is a low power research reactor with maximal thermal power of 1 kW. The reactor is operated by the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Due to its low power it suits as a tool for education of university students and training of professionals. In 2015, as part of student research project, neutron imaging was introduced as another type of reactor utilization. The low available neutron flux and the limiting spatial and construction capabilities of the reactor's radial channel led to the development of a special filter/collimator insertion inside the channel and choosing a nonstandard approach by placing a neutron imaging plate inside the channel. The paper describes preliminary experiments carried out on the VR-1 reactor which led to first radiographic images. It seems, that due to the reactor construction and low reactor power, the neutron imaging technique on the VR-1 reactor is feasible mainly for demonstration or educational and training purposes.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor and hot cell facility concepts. The reactor proposed is designed to be capable of producing 100% of the U.S. demand for the medical isotope {sup 99}Mo. The concept is novel in that the fuel for the reactor and the targets for the {sup 99}Mo production are the same. There is no driver core required. The fuel pins that are in the reactor core are processed on a 7 to 21 day irradiation cycle. The fuel is low enriched uranium oxide enriched to less than 20% {sup 235}U. The fuel pins are approximately 1 cm in diameter and 30 to 40 cm in height, clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy). Approximately 90 to 150 fuel pins are arranged in the core in a water pool {approx}30 ft deep. The reactor power level is 1 to 2 MW. The reactor concept is a simple design that is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days. The fuel fabrication, reactor design and operation, and {sup 99}Mo production processing use well-developed technologies that minimize the technological and licensing risks. There are no impediments that prevent this type of reactor, along with its collocated hot cell facility, from being designed, fabricated, and licensed today.

  20. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE BROOKHAVEN GRAPHITE RESEARCH REACTOR ENGINEERED CAP, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-07-0

    SciTech Connect

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-07-15

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Engineered Cap at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) have completed removal of affected soils and performed as-left surveys by BSA associated with the BGRR Engineered Cap. Sample results have been submitted, as required, to demonstrate that remediation efforts comply with the cleanup goal of {approx}15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years (BNL 2011a).

  1. Procedure of recovery of pin-by-pin fields of energy release in the core of VVER-type reactor for the BIPR-8 code

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, P. V. Kotsarev, A. V.; Lizorkin, M. P.

    2014-12-15

    The procedure of recovery of pin-by-pin energy-release fields for the BIPR-8 code and the algorithm of the BIPR-8 code which is used in nodal computation of the reactor core and on which the recovery of pin-by-pin fields of energy release is based are briefly described. The description and results of the verification using the module of recovery of pin-by-pin energy-release fields and the TVS-M program are given.

  2. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  3. The Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; David A. Petti

    2011-06-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) are types of nuclear power plants that, as the names imply, operate at temperatures above those of the conventional nuclear power plants that currently generate electricity in the US and other countries. Like existing nuclear plants, heat generated from the fission of uranium or plutonium atoms is carried off by a working fluid and can be used generate electricity. The very hot working fluid also enables the VHTR to drive other industrial processes that require high temperatures not achievable by conventional nuclear plants (Figure 1). For this reason, the VHTR is being considered for non-electrical energy applications. The reactor and power conversion system are constructed using special materials that make a core meltdown virtually impossible.

  4. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-01

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg of 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. A rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.

  5. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-30

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg of 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. In conclusion, a rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.

  6. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-30

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg ofmore » 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. In conclusion, a rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.« less

  7. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-30

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg of 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. In conclusion, a rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.

  8. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-28

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg of 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. A rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.

  9. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-28

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg ofmore » 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. A rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.« less

  10. Tokamak reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of tokamak reactor studies with particular attention to commercial reactor concepts developed within the last three years. Emphasis is placed on DT fueled reactors for electricity production. A brief history of tokamak reactor studies is presented. The STARFIRE, NUWMAK, and HFCTR studies are highlighted. Recent developments that have increased the commercial attractiveness of tokamak reactor designs are discussed. These developments include smaller plant sizes, higher first wall loadings, improved maintenance concepts, steady-state operation, non-divertor particle control, and improved reactor safety features.

  11. Bioelectrochemical sulphate reduction on batch reactors: Effect of inoculum-type and applied potential on sulphate consumption and pH.

    PubMed

    Gacitúa, Manuel A; Muñoz, Enyelbert; González, Bernardo

    2017-08-25

    Microbial electrolysis batch reactor systems were studied employing different conditions, paying attention on the effect that biocathode potential has on pH and system performance, with the overall aim to distinguish sulphate reduction from H2 evolution. Inocula from pure strains (Desulfovibrio paquesii and Desulfobacter halotolerans) were compared to a natural source conditioned inoculum. The natural inoculum possess the potential for sulphate reduction on serum bottles experiments due to the activity of mutualistic bacteria (Sedimentibacter sp. and Bacteroides sp.) that assist sulphate-reducing bacterial cells (Desulfovibrio sp.) present in the consortium. Electrochemical batch reactors were monitored at two different potentials (graphite-bar cathodes poised at -900 and -400mV versus standard hydrogen electrode) in an attempt to isolate bioelectrochemical sulphate reduction from hydrogen evolution. At -900mV all inocula were able to reduce sulphate with the consortium demonstrating superior performance (SO4(2-) consumption: 25.71gm(-2)day(-1)), despite the high alkalinisation of the media. At -400mV only the pure Desulfobacter halotolerans inoculated system was able to reduce sulphate (SO4(2-) consumption: 17.47gm(-2)day(-1)) and, in this potential condition, pH elevation was less for all systems, confirming direct (or at least preferential) bioelectrochemical reduction of sulphate over H2 production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Vancomycin modifies the expression of the agr system in multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Ochoa, Sara A.; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodea, Gerardo E.; Escalona, Gerardo; Olivares, Alma L.; Olivares-Trejo, José de Jesús; Velázquez-Guadarrama, Norma; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes human hosts and causes a wide variety of diseases. Two interacting regulatory systems called agr (accessory gene regulator) and sar (staphylococcal accessory regulator) are involved in the regulation of virulence factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vancomycin on hld and spa gene expression during the exponential and post-exponential growth phases in multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. aureus. Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by the standard microdilution method. The phylogenetic profile was obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Polymorphisms of agr and SCCmec (staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec) were analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The expression levels of hld and spa were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect protein A, and biofilm formation was analyzed via crystal violet staining. Results: In total, 60.60% (20/33) of S. aureus clinical isolates were MDR. Half (10/20) of the MDR S. aureus isolates were distributed in subcluster 10, with >90% similarity among them. In the isolates of this subcluster, a high prevalence (100%) for the agrII and the cassette SCCmec II polymorphisms was found. Our data showed significant increases in hld expression during the post-exponential phase in the presence and absence of vancomycin. Significant increases in spa expression, protein A production and biofilm formation were observed during the post-exponential phase when the MDR S. aureus isolates were challenged with vancomycin. Conclusion: The polymorphism agrII, which is associated with nosocomial isolates, was the most prevalent polymorphism in MDR S. aureus. Additionally, under our study conditions, vancomycin modified hld and spa expression in these clinical isolates. Therefore, vancomycin may regulate alternative systems that jointly participate in the regulation of

  13. National AgrAbility Project impact on farmers and ranchers with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R H; Fetsch, R J

    2006-11-01

    The impact of AgrAbility was evaluated through a survey of farmers and ranchers with disabilities who have been served by AgrAbility. The general demographics of the client population and assistance received were evaluated. Other information gathered included client ability pre- and post-onset of a disability and implications of self-reported outlook for the future. Eight states with AgrAbility programs participated in this cooperative survey with the National AgrAbility Project, with a 58.7% response rate (N = 618). The client population was mostly male (85.2%) with an average age of 53.3 with many working full-time (42.4%), part-time (27.6%), only off-farm (3%), or both off and on the farm (27%) in predominately row-crop (58.2%), cattle (not dairy) (46.6%), and hay or forage (41.4%) operations. Nearly half (48.2%) of the clients reported that the origin of the disability was due to a chronic health condition, as opposed to an injury. The majority of clients reported receiving information referring them to a funding source (42.0%) and receiving technical assistance with modifications around the farm or ranch (41.3%). Only two areas of farm operation were reported to have increased after the onset of disability (farm office from 43.8% to 61.2% and household chores from 30.9% to 36.0%). Field machinery operation continues to be the most common activity on the farm, with 73.3% reporting operating field machinery after the onset of disability. The present sample was more optimistic than expected. From a simultaneous multiple linear regression analysis, the factors contributing to positive future outlook include: ability to manage one's chores, machinery, and farm, F (5, 387) = 34.91, p < 0.001). Implications for safety professionals are included.

  14. SILICON CARBIDE GRAIN BOUNDARY DISTRIBUTIONS, IRRADIATION CONDITIONS, AND SILVER RETENTION IN IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.; Aguiar, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope was used to map grain orientation and ultimately determine grain boundary misorientation angle distributions, relative fractions of grain boundary types (random high angle, low angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related boundaries) and the distributions of CSL-related grain boundaries in the SiC layer of irradiated TRISO-coated fuel particles. Two particles from the AGR-1 experiment exhibiting high Ag-110m retention (>80%) were compared to a particle exhibiting low Ag-110m retention (<19%). Irradiated particles with high Ag-110m retention exhibited a lower fraction of random, high angle grain boundaries compared to the low Ag-110m retention particle. An inverse relationship between the random, high angle grain boundary fraction and Ag-110m retention is found and is consistent with grain boundary percolation theory. Also, comparison of the grain boundary distributions with previously reported unirradiated grain boundary distributions, based on SEM-based EBSD for similarly fabricated particles, showed only small differences, i.e. a greater low angle grain boundary fraction in unirradiated SiC. It was, thus, concluded that SiC layers with grain boundary distributions susceptible to Ag-110m release were present prior to irradiation. Finally, irradiation parameters were found to have little effect on the association of fission product precipitates with specific grain boundary types.

  15. The Virulence Regulator Agr Controls the Staphylococcal Capacity to Activate Human Neutrophils via the Formyl Peptide Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Dorothee; Nikola, Nele; Dürr, Manuela; Otto, Michael; Peschel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The Agr quorum-sensing system represents the master regulator for staphylococcal virulence factors and is known to have a strong impact on the release of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) molecules. Among the various staphylococcal PAMPs, phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides have attracted increasing interest because they are crucial for staphylococcal virulence and have neutrophil-recruiting properties. The latter depend on recognition of PSMs by the neutrophil formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2/ALX), for which PSMs are highly efficient agonists. We demonstrate that Agr inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus or S. epidermidis leads to strongly reduced neutrophil responses, which is in agreement with the previously reported strict control of PSM expression by Agr. Agr had a distinct and profound impact on activation of FPR2/ALX but not of the related FPR1 receptor that senses bacterial formylated peptides. S. epidermidis PSMs had similar FPR2/ALX-activating properties but differed in their dependence on N-terminal formylation compared to S. aureus PSMs. Moreover, S. aureus and S. epidermidis PSMs upregulated the neutrophil complement receptor CD11b via FPR2/ALX stimulation in an Agr-dependent fashion. Hence, Agr controls the capacity of staphylococcal pathogens to activate FPR2/ALX-dependent neutrophil responses, underscoring the crucial role of FPR2/ALX and PSMs in staphylococcus-host interaction. PMID:22067547

  16. The virulence regulator Agr controls the staphylococcal capacity to activate human neutrophils via the formyl peptide receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Dorothee; Nikola, Nele; Dürr, Manuela; Otto, Michael; Peschel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The Agr quorum-sensing system represents the master regulator for staphylococcal virulen