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Sample records for agricultura tropical ciat

  1. Genomic basis of broad host range and environmental adaptability of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Rhizobium sp. PRF 81 which are used in inoculants for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Rhizobium sp. PRF 81 are α-Proteobacteria that establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses with a range of legume hosts. These strains are broadly used in commercial inoculants for application to common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in South America and Africa. Both strains display intrinsic resistance to several abiotic stressful conditions such as low soil pH and high temperatures, which are common in tropical environments, and to several antimicrobials, including pesticides. The genetic determinants of these interesting characteristics remain largely unknown. Results Genome sequencing revealed that CIAT 899 and PRF 81 share a highly-conserved symbiotic plasmid (pSym) that is present also in Rhizobium leucaenae CFN 299, a rhizobium displaying a similar host range. This pSym seems to have arisen by a co-integration event between two replicons. Remarkably, three distinct nodA genes were found in the pSym, a characteristic that may contribute to the broad host range of these rhizobia. Genes for biosynthesis and modulation of plant-hormone levels were also identified in the pSym. Analysis of genes involved in stress response showed that CIAT 899 and PRF 81 are well equipped to cope with low pH, high temperatures and also with oxidative and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, the genomes of CIAT 899 and PRF 81 had large numbers of genes encoding drug-efflux systems, which may explain their high resistance to antimicrobials. Genome analysis also revealed a wide array of traits that may allow these strains to be successful rhizosphere colonizers, including surface polysaccharides, uptake transporters and catabolic enzymes for nutrients, diverse iron-acquisition systems, cell wall-degrading enzymes, type I and IV pili, and novel T1SS and T5SS secreted adhesins. Conclusions Availability of the complete genome sequences of CIAT 899 and PRF 81 may be exploited in further efforts to understand the interaction of tropical rhizobia with common bean

  2. Multiple copies of nodD in Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 and BR816.

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn, P J; Feys, B; Verreth, C; Vanderleyden, J

    1993-01-01

    Rhizobium tropici strains are able to nodulate a wide range of host plants: Phaseolus vulgaris, Leucaena spp., and Macroptilium atropurpureum. We studied the nodD regulatory gene for nodulation of two R. tropici strains: CIAT899, the reference R. tropici type IIb strain, and BR816, a heat-tolerant strain isolated from Leucaena leucocephala. A survey revealed several nodD-hybridizing DNA regions in both strains: five distinct regions in CIAT899 and four distinct regions in BR816. Induction experiments of a nodABC-uidA fusion in combination with different nodD-hybridizing fragments in the presence of root exudates of the different hosts indicate that one particular nodD copy contributes to nodulation gene induction far more than any other nodD copy present. The nucleotide sequences of both nodD genes are reported here and show significant homology to those of the nodD genes of other rhizobia and a Bradyrhizobium strain. A dendrogram based on the protein sequences of 15 different NodD proteins shows that the R. tropici NodD proteins are linked most closely to each other and then to the NodD of Rhizobium phaseoli 8002. Images PMID:8419293

  3. NrcR, a New Transcriptional Regulator of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 Involved in the Legume Root-Nodule Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, Pablo; Rolla-Santos, Amanda A P; Valderrama-Fernández, Rocío; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Bellogín, Ramón A; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Megías, Manuel; Hungría, Mariangela; Ollero, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium-legume symbioses requires a highly complex cascade of events. In this molecular dialogue the bacterial NodD transcriptional regulators in conjunction with plant inducers, mostly flavonoids, are responsible for the biosynthesis and secretion of Nod factors which are key molecules for successful nodulation. Other transcriptional regulators related to the symbiotic process have been identified in rhizobial genomes, including negative regulators such as NolR. Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 is an important symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and its genome encompasses intriguing features such as five copies of nodD genes, as well as other possible transcriptional regulators including the NolR protein. Here we describe and characterize a new regulatory gene located in the non-symbiotic plasmid pRtrCIAT899c, that shows homology (46% identity) with the nolR gene located in the chromosome of CIAT 899. The mutation of this gene, named nrcR (nolR-like plasmid c Regulator), enhanced motility and exopolysaccharide production in comparison to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the number and decoration of Nod Factors produced by this mutant were higher than those detected in the wild-type strain, especially under salinity stress. The nrcR mutant showed delayed nodulation and reduced competitiveness with P. vulgaris, and reduction in nodule number and shoot dry weight in both P. vulgaris and Leucaena leucocephala. Moreover, the mutant exhibited reduced capacity to induce the nodC gene in comparison to the wild-type CIAT 899. The finding of a new nod-gene regulator located in a non-symbiotic plasmid may reveal the existence of even more complex mechanisms of regulation of nodulation genes in R. tropici CIAT 899 that may be applicable to other rhizobial species. PMID:27096734

  4. NrcR, a New Transcriptional Regulator of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 Involved in the Legume Root-Nodule Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Pablo; Rolla-Santos, Amanda A. P.; Valderrama-Fernández, Rocío; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Bellogín, Ramón A.; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Megías, Manuel; Hungría, Mariangela; Ollero, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium-legume symbioses requires a highly complex cascade of events. In this molecular dialogue the bacterial NodD transcriptional regulators in conjunction with plant inducers, mostly flavonoids, are responsible for the biosynthesis and secretion of Nod factors which are key molecules for successful nodulation. Other transcriptional regulators related to the symbiotic process have been identified in rhizobial genomes, including negative regulators such as NolR. Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 is an important symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and its genome encompasses intriguing features such as five copies of nodD genes, as well as other possible transcriptional regulators including the NolR protein. Here we describe and characterize a new regulatory gene located in the non-symbiotic plasmid pRtrCIAT899c, that shows homology (46% identity) with the nolR gene located in the chromosome of CIAT 899. The mutation of this gene, named nrcR (nolR-like plasmid c Regulator), enhanced motility and exopolysaccharide production in comparison to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the number and decoration of Nod Factors produced by this mutant were higher than those detected in the wild-type strain, especially under salinity stress. The nrcR mutant showed delayed nodulation and reduced competitiveness with P. vulgaris, and reduction in nodule number and shoot dry weight in both P. vulgaris and Leucaena leucocephala. Moreover, the mutant exhibited reduced capacity to induce the nodC gene in comparison to the wild-type CIAT 899. The finding of a new nod-gene regulator located in a non-symbiotic plasmid may reveal the existence of even more complex mechanisms of regulation of nodulation genes in R. tropici CIAT 899 that may be applicable to other rhizobial species. PMID:27096734

  5. NrcR, a New Transcriptional Regulator of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 Involved in the Legume Root-Nodule Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, Pablo; Rolla-Santos, Amanda A P; Valderrama-Fernández, Rocío; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Bellogín, Ramón A; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Megías, Manuel; Hungría, Mariangela; Ollero, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium-legume symbioses requires a highly complex cascade of events. In this molecular dialogue the bacterial NodD transcriptional regulators in conjunction with plant inducers, mostly flavonoids, are responsible for the biosynthesis and secretion of Nod factors which are key molecules for successful nodulation. Other transcriptional regulators related to the symbiotic process have been identified in rhizobial genomes, including negative regulators such as NolR. Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 is an important symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and its genome encompasses intriguing features such as five copies of nodD genes, as well as other possible transcriptional regulators including the NolR protein. Here we describe and characterize a new regulatory gene located in the non-symbiotic plasmid pRtrCIAT899c, that shows homology (46% identity) with the nolR gene located in the chromosome of CIAT 899. The mutation of this gene, named nrcR (nolR-like plasmid c Regulator), enhanced motility and exopolysaccharide production in comparison to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the number and decoration of Nod Factors produced by this mutant were higher than those detected in the wild-type strain, especially under salinity stress. The nrcR mutant showed delayed nodulation and reduced competitiveness with P. vulgaris, and reduction in nodule number and shoot dry weight in both P. vulgaris and Leucaena leucocephala. Moreover, the mutant exhibited reduced capacity to induce the nodC gene in comparison to the wild-type CIAT 899. The finding of a new nod-gene regulator located in a non-symbiotic plasmid may reveal the existence of even more complex mechanisms of regulation of nodulation genes in R. tropici CIAT 899 that may be applicable to other rhizobial species.

  6. Tropical Whitefly IPM Project.

    PubMed

    Morales, Francisco J

    2007-01-01

    The Tropical Whitefly IPM Project (TWFP) is an initiative of the Systemwide IPM Programme of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), financed by the Department for International Development (DFID) of the United Kingdom, the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Agency for International Development (USAID), the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), and the New Zealand Agency for International Development (NZAID), to manage whitefly pests and whitefly-transmitted viruses in the Tropics. Participating CGIAR and other international centers include the Centre for International Tropical Agriculture (CIAT); the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA); The International Potato Centre (CIP); the Asian Vegetable Research and Development Centre (AVRDC); and the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), in close collaboration with the National Resources Institute (NRI-UK); national agricultural research institutions; agricultural universities; and advanced agricultural research laboratories in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Pacific Region, and the Americas. The TWFP was launched in 1996 as five separate but closely linked subprojects targeting: (1) Bemisia tabaci as a vector of viruses affecting cassava and sweet potato in sub-Saharan Africa (IITA, NRI, CIP, CIAT); (2) B. tabaci as a vector of viruses in mixed cropping systems of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean (CIAT); (3) B. tabaci as a vector of viruses in mixed cropping systems of eastern and southern Africa (ICIPE, AVRDC); (4) B. tabaci as a vector of viruses in mixed cropping systems of Southeast Asia (AVRDC); (5) Trialeurodes vaporariorum as a pest in mixed cropping systems of the Andean highlands (CIAT); and (6) whiteflies as pests of cassava in South America (CIAT). Diagnostic surveys conducted in Phase I (1997-2000) clearly showed that the two main

  7. Tropical Whitefly IPM Project.

    PubMed

    Morales, Francisco J

    2007-01-01

    The Tropical Whitefly IPM Project (TWFP) is an initiative of the Systemwide IPM Programme of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), financed by the Department for International Development (DFID) of the United Kingdom, the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Agency for International Development (USAID), the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), and the New Zealand Agency for International Development (NZAID), to manage whitefly pests and whitefly-transmitted viruses in the Tropics. Participating CGIAR and other international centers include the Centre for International Tropical Agriculture (CIAT); the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA); The International Potato Centre (CIP); the Asian Vegetable Research and Development Centre (AVRDC); and the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), in close collaboration with the National Resources Institute (NRI-UK); national agricultural research institutions; agricultural universities; and advanced agricultural research laboratories in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Pacific Region, and the Americas. The TWFP was launched in 1996 as five separate but closely linked subprojects targeting: (1) Bemisia tabaci as a vector of viruses affecting cassava and sweet potato in sub-Saharan Africa (IITA, NRI, CIP, CIAT); (2) B. tabaci as a vector of viruses in mixed cropping systems of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean (CIAT); (3) B. tabaci as a vector of viruses in mixed cropping systems of eastern and southern Africa (ICIPE, AVRDC); (4) B. tabaci as a vector of viruses in mixed cropping systems of Southeast Asia (AVRDC); (5) Trialeurodes vaporariorum as a pest in mixed cropping systems of the Andean highlands (CIAT); and (6) whiteflies as pests of cassava in South America (CIAT). Diagnostic surveys conducted in Phase I (1997-2000) clearly showed that the two main

  8. The structure and molecular mechanics calculations of the cyclic (1 → 2)-β- D-glucan secreted by Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil Serrano, Antonio M.; Franco-Rodríguez, Guillermo; González-Jiménez, Isabel; Tejero-Mateo, Pilar; Molina, José Molina; Dobado, J. A.; Megías, Manuel; Romero, Maria Jesús

    1993-12-01

    The structure of the extracellular cyclic (1 → 2)-β- D-glucan secreted by Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 has been studied by methylation analysis, 1D and 2D NMR experiments, HPLC and FAB-MS. Molecular mechanics (MM2) and theoretical 3JHH coupling constants calculations were performed.

  9. Combined inoculation with Glomus intraradices and Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 increases phosphorus use efficiency for symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tajini, Fatma; Trabelsi, Mustapha; Drevon, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the response of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and rhizobia strain inoculation. Two common bean genotypes i.e. CocoT and Flamingo varying in their effectiveness for nitrogen fixation were inoculated with Glomus intraradices and Rhizobium tropici CIAT899, and grown for 50 days in soil–sand substrate in glasshouse conditions. Inoculation of common bean plants with the AM fungi resulted in a significant increase in nodulation compared to plants without inoculation. The combined inoculation of AM fungi and rhizobia significantly increased various plant growth parameters compared to simple inoculated plants. In addition, the combined inoculation of AM fungi and rhizobia resulted in significantly higher nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation in the shoots of common bean plants and improved phosphorus use efficiency compared with their controls, which were not dually inoculated. It is concluded that inoculation with rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could improve the efficiency in phosphorus use for symbiotic nitrogen fixation especially under phosphorus deficiency. PMID:23961175

  10. Combined inoculation with Glomus intraradices and Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 increases phosphorus use efficiency for symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Tajini, Fatma; Trabelsi, Mustapha; Drevon, Jean-Jacques

    2012-04-01

    This study compared the response of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and rhizobia strain inoculation. Two common bean genotypes i.e. CocoT and Flamingo varying in their effectiveness for nitrogen fixation were inoculated with Glomus intraradices and Rhizobium tropici CIAT899, and grown for 50 days in soil-sand substrate in glasshouse conditions. Inoculation of common bean plants with the AM fungi resulted in a significant increase in nodulation compared to plants without inoculation. The combined inoculation of AM fungi and rhizobia significantly increased various plant growth parameters compared to simple inoculated plants. In addition, the combined inoculation of AM fungi and rhizobia resulted in significantly higher nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation in the shoots of common bean plants and improved phosphorus use efficiency compared with their controls, which were not dually inoculated. It is concluded that inoculation with rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could improve the efficiency in phosphorus use for symbiotic nitrogen fixation especially under phosphorus deficiency. PMID:23961175

  11. Tropical malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, B S; Venkataraman, S; Mukhopadhya, A

    2006-01-01

    Malabsorption is an important clinical problem both in visitors to the tropics and in native residents of tropical countries. Infections of the small intestine are the most important cause of tropical malabsorption. Protozoal infections cause malabsorption in immunocompetent hosts, but do so more commonly in the setting of immune deficiency. Helminth infections occasionally cause malabsorption or protein‐losing enteropathy. Intestinal tuberculosis, chronic pancreatitis and small‐bowel bacterial overgrowth are important causes of tropical malabsorption. In recent years, inflammatory bowel disease and coeliac disease have become major causes of malabsorption in the tropics. Sporadic tropical sprue is still an important cause of malabsorption in adults and in children in South Asia. Investigations to exclude specific infective, immunological or inflammatory causes are important before considering tropical sprue as a diagnosis. This article briefly reviews the management of tropical sprue and presents an algorithm for its investigation and management. PMID:17148698

  12. Tropical malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, B S; Venkataraman, S; Mukhopadhya, A

    2006-12-01

    Malabsorption is an important clinical problem both in visitors to the tropics and in native residents of tropical countries. Infections of the small intestine are the most important cause of tropical malabsorption. Protozoal infections cause malabsorption in immunocompetent hosts, but do so more commonly in the setting of immune deficiency. Helminth infections occasionally cause malabsorption or protein-losing enteropathy. Intestinal tuberculosis, chronic pancreatitis and small-bowel bacterial overgrowth are important causes of tropical malabsorption. In recent years, inflammatory bowel disease and coeliac disease have become major causes of malabsorption in the tropics. Sporadic tropical sprue is still an important cause of malabsorption in adults and in children in South Asia. Investigations to exclude specific infective, immunological or inflammatory causes are important before considering tropical sprue as a diagnosis. This article briefly reviews the management of tropical sprue and presents an algorithm for its investigation and management.

  13. Tropical Rainforests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigh, Ronald B.; Nations, James D.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a summary of scientific knowledge about the rainforest environment, a tropical ecosystem in danger of extermination. Topics include the current state of tropical rainforests, the causes of rainforest destruction, and alternatives of rainforest destruction. (BT)

  14. Tropical myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    A large number of causal agents produce spinal cord lesions in the tropics. Most etiologies found in temperate regions also occur in the tropics including trauma, herniated discs, tumors, epidural abscess, and congenital malformations. However, infectious and nutritional disorders occur with higher prevalence in tropical regions. Among the most common infectious etiologies are tuberculous Pott's disease, brucellosis, and neuroborreliosis. Parasitic diseases such as schistosomiasis, neurocysticercosis, and eosinophilic meningitis are frequent causes of nontraumatic paraplegia. The retrovirus HTLV-1 is a cause of tropical spastic paraparesis. Nutritional causes of paraparesis include deficiencies of vitamin B12 and folate; endemic clusters of konzo and tropical ataxic myeloneuropathy are associated in Africa with malnutrition and excessive consumption of cyanide-containing bitter cassava. Other toxic etiologies of tropical paraplegia include lathyrism and fluorosis. Nutritional forms of myelopathy are associated often with optic and sensory neuropathy, hence the name tropical myeloneuropathies. Acute transverse myelopathy is seen in association with vaccination, infections, and fibrocartilaginous embolism of the nucleus pulposus. Multiple sclerosis and optic myelopathy occur in the tropics but with lesser prevalence than in temperate regions. The advent of modern imaging in the tropics, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has allowed better diagnosis and treatment of these conditions that are a frequent cause of death and disability. PMID:24365434

  15. Tropical myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    A large number of causal agents produce spinal cord lesions in the tropics. Most etiologies found in temperate regions also occur in the tropics including trauma, herniated discs, tumors, epidural abscess, and congenital malformations. However, infectious and nutritional disorders occur with higher prevalence in tropical regions. Among the most common infectious etiologies are tuberculous Pott's disease, brucellosis, and neuroborreliosis. Parasitic diseases such as schistosomiasis, neurocysticercosis, and eosinophilic meningitis are frequent causes of nontraumatic paraplegia. The retrovirus HTLV-1 is a cause of tropical spastic paraparesis. Nutritional causes of paraparesis include deficiencies of vitamin B12 and folate; endemic clusters of konzo and tropical ataxic myeloneuropathy are associated in Africa with malnutrition and excessive consumption of cyanide-containing bitter cassava. Other toxic etiologies of tropical paraplegia include lathyrism and fluorosis. Nutritional forms of myelopathy are associated often with optic and sensory neuropathy, hence the name tropical myeloneuropathies. Acute transverse myelopathy is seen in association with vaccination, infections, and fibrocartilaginous embolism of the nucleus pulposus. Multiple sclerosis and optic myelopathy occur in the tropics but with lesser prevalence than in temperate regions. The advent of modern imaging in the tropics, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has allowed better diagnosis and treatment of these conditions that are a frequent cause of death and disability.

  16. [Tropical sprue].

    PubMed

    Bourée, Patrice

    2007-04-01

    Tropical sprue associates prolonged diarrhea, a malabsorption syndrome, and nutritional deficiency in patients who live in or have visited tropical areas. Pathogenesis is still unknown but an infectious cause is suspected. Macrocytic anemia and hypoalbuminemia are present, together with progressive villus atrophy of the small intestine. Treatment with tetracycline, folic acid and proper nutritional support generally results in full recovery.

  17. Tropical sprue.

    PubMed

    Nath, Samir Kumar

    2005-10-01

    Tropical sprue (TS) is a clinical entity of unknown etiology characterized by an acquired chronic diarrheal illness and malabsorption that affects indigenous inhabitants and expatriates, either long-term residents or short-term visitors, in the tropical countries. The exact pathogenetic sequence of TS remains incompletely characterized. Bacterial overgrowth, disturbed gut motility, and hormonal and histopathologic abnormalities contribute to the development of TS in a susceptible host. Treatment with tetracycline and folate is effective in some patients, although relapses after treatment are common. Research in the areas of microbial factors, pathogenesis, immunogenetics, and hormonal and immune regulation, using modern diagnostic techniques, may be able to settle some of the unanswered issues and open new venues for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of tropical sprue.

  18. Tropical Deforestation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Peter H.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the deforestation problem and some efforts for solving the problem. Considers the impact of population growth, poverty, and ignorance. Includes a discussion of the current rapid decline in tropical forests, the consequences of destruction, and an outlook for the future. (YP)

  19. Morpho-anatomical adaptations to waterlogging by germplasm accessions in a tropical forage grass

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Juan Andrés; Rincón, Joisse; Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Noguera, Diana; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2013-01-01

    Soil waterlogging reduces gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere, leading to oxygen deprivation in the rhizosphere. Brachiaria spp. are the most widely sown forage grasses in tropical America. Among commercial Brachiaria grasses, B. humidicola shows superior tolerance to waterlogged soils based on maintenance of growth and reduced leaf chlorophyll loss and senescence. However, little is known about the underlying traits of waterlogging tolerance in B. humidicola or their intraspecific variation. For this purpose, an outdoor study was conducted using 12 germplasm accessions of B. humidicola that were grown in soil cylinders under drained or waterlogged soil conditions for 21 days. Dry mass production and morpho-anatomical responses (aerenchyma in shoots and roots, root diameter, proportional area of stele in roots, number of nodal and lateral roots, and length of the longest root) were determined. All accessions showed shorter roots and reduced root dry mass under waterlogged soil conditions. All accessions showed aerenchyma in shoots and roots under drained conditions but were further increased under waterlogging. All accessions showed a reduction in the proportional area of stele of roots in response to waterlogging. The accession (CIAT 26570) that showed a higher proportion of aerenchyma in shoots and roots and an increased number of nodal roots (with higher diameter and a reduction in the number of lateral roots) showed longer roots, less reduction in root dry mass and increased shoot growth under waterlogged conditions. We conclude that superior growth of one accession (CIAT 26570) under waterlogged soil conditions is probably a result of morpho-anatomical traits acting together to enhance root aeration and shoot ventilation. Further research is needed to test the ability to recover from waterlogging in B. humidicola accessions.

  20. Tropical Convection's Roles in Tropical Tropopause Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Matthew T.; Starr, David OC.; Verlinde, Johannes; Lee, Sukyoung

    2002-01-01

    The results presented here show that tropical convection plays a role in each of the three primary processes involved in the in situ formation of tropopause cirrus. First, tropical convection transports moisture from the surface into the upper troposphere. Second, tropical convection excites Rossby waves that transport zonal momentum toward the ITCZ, thereby generating rising motion near the equator. This rising motion helps transport moisture from where it is detrained from convection to the cold-point tropopause. Finally, tropical convection excites vertically propagating tropical waves (e.g. Kelvin waves) that provide one source of large-scale cooling near the cold-point tropopause, leading to tropopause cirrus formation.

  1. Tropical Storm Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... title:  Cloud Spirals and Outflow in Tropical Storm Katrina     View Larger Image ... heights and cloud-tracked wind velocities for Tropical Storm Katrina, as the center of the storm was situated over the Tennessee ...

  2. Tropical Convection's Roles in Tropical Tropopause Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Matthew T.; Starr, David OC.; Verlinde, Johannes; Lee, Sukyoung

    2002-01-01

    Remote sensing observations reveal the frequent occurrence of tropopause cirrus, thin cirrus layers located near the tropical cold-point tropopause. Here, we present a theory in which tropical convection plays several important roles in tropopause cirrus formation. First, tropical convection is the primary means by which the moisture required for tropopause cirrus formation is transported into the upper troposphere. However, previous studies suggest that this convection rarely penetrates to the altitudes at which tropopause cirrus layers are observed, suggesting that additional vertical moisture transport is required to explain tropopause cirrus formation. We propose a mechanism for explaining this transport in which tropical convection plays the key role. According to this hypothesis, the transport is accomplished by meridional circulations that develop within the tropopause transition layer (TTL) in response to momentum transport by Rossby waves generated by tropical convection. Results of a series of global scale model runs designed to test this hypothesis will be presented. In addition, reanalyses vertical velocity data will be examined for evidence of the expected correlation between large-scale rising motion within the TTL and tropical convection. Once moisture is present near the cold-point tropopause, large-scale cooling is required to initiate tropopause cirrus formation. One source of this cooling is stratospheric tropical waves induced by tropical convection, as we will show using a time series of radiosonde temperature data superimposed with data on cloud occurrence from the DOE ARM Nauru99 field experiment. Observations of the global characteristics of these waves from a longer time series of reanalysis data will also be presented.

  3. Tropical pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Bovornkitti, S

    1996-03-01

    The term 'tropical' refers to the region of the Earth lying between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn. Located between these equatorial parallels demarcating the Torrid Zone are several underdeveloped and developing countries: Thailand, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, southern India, Sri Lanka, Brazil, Cuba, Ethiopia, Sudan and Nigeria, to name but a few considered to be 'tropical'. The climate in most of these countries is characterized by high temperatures and high humidity. The tropical climate and general state of socio-economic underdevelopment in such countries provide an ideal environment for pathogenic organisms, their vectors and intermediate hosts to flourish. Furthermore, the cultural habits and educational background of the people living in such countries expose them to pathogens and, when these people become infected, they readily become reservoirs for, or carriers of, those organisms. Ultimately, the adverse socioeconomic conditions of underdeveloped countries impede attempts to eradicate or control tropical diseases.

  4. [Tropical or non-tropical sprue?].

    PubMed

    Sankatsing, S U C; Leguit, R J; ten Kate, F J W; Wetsteyn, J C F M

    2005-10-15

    A 57-year-old Dutch man presented with weight loss and fatigue 6 months after a visit to West Papua, when he had suffered from serious diarrhoea. Macrocytic anaemia and vitamin B12 deficiency were diagnosed. A gastroduodenoscopy with biopsies of the small intestine was performed revealing no macroscopic abnormalities but partial villous atrophy was found microscopically, suggesting tropical sprue or coeliac disease. Antibodies against endomysium and tissue transglutaminase were negative, ruling out coeliac disease. The patient was successfully treated with vitamin B12, folic acid and doxycycline. This case shows that tropical sprue should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic diarrhoea in patients with a history of travel in tropical regions. The most frequent medical problem that travelers to the tropics experience is diarrhoea with an incidence of 30%. A small proportion of these patients eventually present with chronic diarrhoea. At that moment, the relation to their previous travelling may not be immediately clear. One of the causes of this chronic diarrhoea to be considered is tropical sprue.

  5. [Vacation and tropical dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Reinel, D

    2012-05-01

    Besides fever and diarrhea, skin diseases are the third most common cause of morbidity in returning travelers after a stay in a tropical country. Approximately one- quarter of these dermatological symptoms can be referred to a classical tropical disease. The majority are of infectious origin. Often only the clinical appearance leads to the diagnosis of a tropical disease as myiasis, cutaneous larva migrans, tungiasis or cutaneous leishmaniasis. Not infrequently the dermatological symptoms lead to the diagnosis of a primarily systemic tropical disease. For example, an eschar with or without a rash might lead to the diagnosis of a South African tick bite fever caused by Rickettsia africae days before serology may turn positive. Less common tropical skin diseases such as lymphatic filariasis and loiasis need to be considered in returning long-term travelers and immigrants. PMID:22532262

  6. Dysgammaglobulinaemia in Tropical Sprue

    PubMed Central

    Jarnum, S.; Jeejeebhoy, K. N.; Singh, B.

    1968-01-01

    Study of immunoglobulin levels in 16 Indian control subjects showed that, compared with a Danish control series, they had a significantly higher mean level of IgG, but not of IgA or IgM. By contrast, the IgG levels in eight patients with tropical sprue were decreased or low normal in six cases and raised in only one case. Two patients with tropical sprue had agamma-A-globulinaemia. Turnover studies with 125I-labelled IgG showed a high rate of synthesis in three Indian controls and an appreciably reduced or low rate in seven of the eight cases of tropical sprue. PMID:4176829

  7. Tropical Storm Faxai

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's TRMM Satellite provided data of developing Tropical Storm Faxai to make this 3-D image that showed some towering thunderstorms in the area were reaching altitudes of up to 15.5km/~9.6 m...

  8. Tropical Storm Dolly Develops

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Aug. 31-Sept. 2 shows the movement of a low pressure area from the western Caribbean Sea over the Yucatan Peninsula as it becomes Tropical Storm ...

  9. Tropical Cyclone Nargis: 2008

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new animation, developed with the help of NASA's Pleiades supercomputer, illustrates how tropical cyclone Nargis formed in the Indian Ocean's Bay of Bengal over several days in late April 2008...

  10. Tropical Storm Don

    NASA Video Gallery

    GOES-13 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard that shows the development of Tropical Storm Don in the southern Gulf of Mexico, west of Cuba. The animation run...

  11. Tropical Storm Bud

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  A Strengthening Eastern Pacific Storm     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) show then Tropical Storm Bud as it was intensifying toward hurricane status, which it acquired ...

  12. [Ivermectin and tropical dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Caumes, E

    1997-01-01

    Among tropical dermatoses, the main indications of ivermectine are tropical parasitoses such as filariasis and cosmopolitan diseases due to ectoparasites such as scabies. The efficacy and tolerance of ivermectine in filariasis (onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, loiasis) have been the topic of numerous articles and reviews. More recent studies showed that ivermectin was also efficient in the therapy of scabies, cutaneous larva migrans and larva currens. PMID:9264749

  13. [Research in tropical medicine].

    PubMed

    Dumas, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2013-10-01

    In France, research in tropical medicine is carried out by the Institute for Research and Development (IRD), university-affiliated institutes, and other research organizations such as INSERM, CNRS and the Pasteur Institute. Currently, this research is highly fragmented and therefore inefficient. As a result, despite significant financial means, French research in this field is not sufficiently competitive. This research activity should be coordinated by creating a "federation ", that would 1) facilitate the sharing of material and human resources, thereby improving efficiency and resulting in cost savings; 2) valorize French research in tropical medicine and its expert know-how, thus favoring the nomination of French experts in large international research programs (French experts in tropical medicine are currently under-recognized); 3) attract young researchers from France and elsewhere; and 4) adapt to the ongoing demographic and economic evolution of tropical countries. The creation of a Federation of French researchers would also make research in tropical medicine more visible. The objectives to which it leads already must include 1) a better understanding of the priorities of countries in the southern hemisphere, taking into account the social, cultural and economic contexts and ensuring the consistency of current and future projects ; 2) strengthening of research networks in close and equal partnership with researchers in the southern hemisphere, with pooling of resources (scientific, human and material) to reach the critical mass required for major projects ; 3) promoting the emergence of centers of excellence for health research in tropical countries ; and 4) contributing more effectively to training, because there can be no training without research, and no research without training This consolidation will help to empower research in tropical medicine, as in other Western countries, and will allow France to recover the place it deserves. The specific

  14. Grey swan tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ning; Emanuel, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    We define `grey swan’ tropical cyclones as high-impact storms that would not be predicted based on history but may be foreseeable using physical knowledge together with historical data. Here we apply a climatological-hydrodynamic method to estimate grey swan tropical cyclone storm surge threat for three highly vulnerable coastal regions. We identify a potentially large risk in the Persian Gulf, where tropical cyclones have never been recorded, and larger-than-expected threats in Cairns, Australia, and Tampa, Florida. Grey swan tropical cyclones striking Tampa, Cairns and Dubai can generate storm surges of about 6 m, 5.7 m and 4 m, respectively, with estimated annual exceedance probabilities of about 1/10,000. With climate change, these probabilities can increase significantly over the twenty-first century (to 1/3,100-1/1,100 in the middle and 1/2,500-1/700 towards the end of the century for Tampa). Worse grey swan tropical cyclones, inducing surges exceeding 11 m in Tampa and 7 m in Dubai, are also revealed with non-negligible probabilities, especially towards the end of the century.

  15. Advances in tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramos-E-Silva, M; Silveira Lima, T

    2011-10-01

    There are six diseases that WHO considers as the major threat in developing countries, leprosy, filariasis, malaria, schistosomiasis, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis; and of these only malaria does not present skin lesions. These diseases are among the so called tropical diseases found in countries of tropical climate, usually infections and infestations considered exotic and rare in European and North American countries. It is extremely important for doctors of all countries to be able to provide correct pre travel counseling and to make early diagnosis and treatment, thus avoiding dissemination of these dieases to non endemic areas. The authors review some important tropical diseases seen in Brazil, as paracoccidiodomycosis, lobomycosis, myiasis, tungiasis, and cutaneous schistosomiasis and discuss new information about them. PMID:21956272

  16. Tropical cyclone formation

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1993-01-15

    The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level atmospheric data. Recent observations suggest that tropical cyclones are initiated by asymmetric interactions associated with migratory upper-level potential vorticity disturbances and low-level disturbances. Favored theories of cyclones formation, however, focus on internal processes associated with cumulus convection and/or air-sea interaction. This work focuses on external mechanisms of cyclone formation and, using both a two- and three-dimensional moist geostrophic momentum model, investigates the role of upper-level potential vorticity disturbances on the formation process. A conceptual model of tropical cyclone formation is proposed, and implications of the theory are discussed. 71 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Tropical rainfall affects the lives and economics of a majority of the Earth's population. Tropical rain systems, such as hurricanes, typhoons, and monsoons, are crucial to sustaining the livelihoods of those living in the tropics. Excess rainfall can cause floods and great property and crop damage, whereas too little rainfall can cause drought and crop failure. The latent heat release during the process of precipitation is a major source of energy that drives the atmospheric circulation. This latent heat can intensify weather systems, affecting weather thousands of kilometers away, thus making tropical rainfall an important indicator of atmospheric circulation and short-term climate change. Tropical forests and the underlying soils are major sources of many of the atmosphere's trace constituents. Together, the forests and the atmosphere act as a water-energy regulating system. Most of the rainfall is returned to the atmosphere through evaporation and transpiration, and the atmospheric trace constituents take part in the recycling process. Hence, the hydrological cycle provides a direct link between tropical rainfall and the global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, all important trace materials for the Earth's system. Because rainfall is such an important component in the interactions between the ocean, atmosphere, land, and the biosphere, accurate measurements of rainfall are crucial to understanding the workings of the Earth-atmosphere system. The large spatial and temporal variability of rainfall systems, however, poses a major challenge to estimating global rainfall. So far, there has been a lack of rain gauge networks, especially over the oceans, which points to satellite measurement as the only means by which global observation of rainfall can be made. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of

  18. Tropical errors and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtold, P.; Bauer, P.; Engelen, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical convection is analysed in the ECMWF Integrated Forecast System (IFS) through tropical errors and their evolution during the last decade as a function of model resolution and model changes. As the characterization of these errors is particularly difficult over tropical oceans due to sparse in situ upper-air data, more weight compared to the middle latitudes is given in the analysis to the underlying forecast model. Therefore, special attention is paid to available near-surface observations and to comparison with analysis from other Centers. There is a systematic lack of low-level wind convergence in the Inner Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the IFS, leading to a spindown of the Hadley cell. Critical areas with strong cross-equatorial flow and large wind errors are the Indian Ocean with large interannual variations in forecast errors, and the East Pacific with persistent systematic errors that have evolved little during the last decade. The analysis quality in the East Pacific is affected by observation errors inherent to the atmospheric motion vector wind product. The model's tropical climate and its variability and teleconnections are also evaluated, with a particular focus on the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) during the Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC). The model is shown to reproduce the observed tropical large-scale wave spectra and teleconnections, but overestimates the precipitation during the South-East Asian summer monsoon. The recent improvements in tropical precipitation, convectively coupled wave and MJO predictability are shown to be strongly related to improvements in the convection parameterization that realistically represents the convection sensitivity to environmental moisture, and the large-scale forcing due to the use of strong entrainment and a variable adjustment time-scale. There is however a remaining slight moistening tendency and low-level wind imbalance in the model that is responsible for the Asian Monsoon bias and for too

  19. Tropical parasitic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K

    2008-01-01

    Though parasitic lung diseases are frequently seen in tropical countries, these are being increasingly reported from many parts of the world due to globalisation and travel across the continents. In addition, the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the frequent use of immunosuppressive drugs in many diseases and the increasing numbers of organ transplantations have resulted in a renewed interest in many tropical parasitic lung diseases. This review outlines the recent developments in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of common and rare parasitic lung diseases.

  20. [Tropical sprue (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gras, C; Chapoy, P; Aubry, P

    1981-01-01

    Tropical sprue is a disease of the small intestine characterized by a malabsorption syndrome with a subtotal or partial mucosal atrophy. It is observed in Asia and Central America. It appears to be rare in Africa but its real frequency is unknown as small bowel biopsys are not routinely done. Bacterial overgrowth as well as giardiasis may be trigger factors of the disease the pathogenesis of which is still incompletely understood. The disease beginning as chronic diarrhea is later on characterized by an aphtoïd stomatitis and a macrocytic anemia. Treatment with antibiotics and folic acid is efficient and has a diagnostic value. If treatment is started lately, vitamin B 12 is then also necessary. In any intestinal syndrome observed in tropical areas without an ascertained etiologic diagnosis, peroral biopsie of the small intestine is requested. However, with the use of pediatric endoscope it will be possible to appreciate the respective incidence of tropical sprue and asymptomatic tropical sprue in Africa South of the Sahara.

  1. Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures." Contents are organized into the following…

  2. Mountains and Tropical Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naiman, Z.; Goodman, P. J.; Krasting, J. P.; Malyshev, S.; Russell, J. L.; Stouffer, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Observed tropical convection exhibits zonal asymmetries that strongly influence spatial precipitation patterns. The drivers of changes to this zonally-asymmetric Walker circulation on decadal and longer timescales have been the focus of significant recent research. Here we use two state-of-the-art earth system models to explore the impact of earth's mountains on the Walker circulation. When all land-surface topography is removed, the Walker circulation weakens by 33-59%. There is a ~30% decrease in global, large-scale upward vertical wind velocities in the middle of the troposphere, but only minor changes in global average convective mass flux, precipitation, surface and sea-surface temperatures. The zonally symmetric Hadley circulation is also largely unchanged. Following the spatial pattern of changes to large-scale vertical wind velocities, precipitation becomes less focused over the tropics. The weakening of the Walker circulation, but not the Hadley circulation, is similar to the behavior of climate models during radiative forcing experiments: in our simulations, the weakening is associated with changes in vertical wind velocities, rather than the hydrologic cycle. These results indicate suggest that mountain heights may significantly influence the Walker circulation on geologic time scales, and observed changes in tropical precipitation over millions of years may have been forced by changes in tropical orography.

  3. People & Tropical Rain Forests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses ways people who live in rain forests make a living and some of the products that enrich our lives. Provides activities covering forest people, tropical treats, jungle in the pantry, treetop explorers, and three copyable pages to accompany activities. (Author/RT)

  4. Teaching Traditional Tropical Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Maintains that the teaching of traditional tropical agriculture through the presentation of large numbers of categories or types tends to overemphasize superficial differences at the expense of comprehending the inner essence of life as it exists for the majority of the world's farmers. Offers an alternative approach which claims to foster greater…

  5. Aspects of tropical paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hendrickse, R G

    1976-01-01

    Malnutrition interacting with infectious and parasitic diseases are the main causes of the appalling mortality in childhood in the tropics. The most important single safeguard against these in infancy is breast feeding and the trend now evident to abandon this is a disaster which demands urgent attention. Reasons for this trend are discussed. Efforts to control infectious diseases, other than smallpox, have had little success and the emergence and spread of dengue haemorrhagic fever in S.E. Asia have added new dimensions to the problem. Malaria is still widely prevalent in the tropics and falciparum malaria, holoendemic in much of Africa, remains a major cause of death with its most serious impact on pregnant women and children. The emergence and spread of drug resistant strains of this parasite in parts of the world is a cause for serious concern. Quartan malaria is also an insidious corruptor of health in childhood and commonly causes the nephrotic syndrome. Neonatal jaundice, often associated with G6PD deficiency, is increasing in frequency in urban areas of Africa and now constitutes a significant hazard to the newborn and requires urgent investigation. These problems in tropical paediatrics indicate the need for urgent reappraisal of our role as a profession in the affairs of the tropical developing world.

  6. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J.; Czajkowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    Landfalling tropical cyclones impact large coastal and inland areas causing direct damage due to winds, storm-surge flooding, tornadoes, and precipitation; as well as causing substantial indirect damage such as electrical outages and business interruption. The likely climate change impact of increased tropical cyclone intensity, combined with increases in exposure, bring the possibility of increased damage in the future. A considerable amount of research has focused on modeling economic damage due to tropical cyclones, and a series of indices have been developed to assess damages under climate change. We highlight a number of ways this research can be improved through a series of case study analyses. First, historical loss estimates are revisited to properly account for; time, impacted regions, the source of damage by type, and whether the damage was direct/indirect and insured/uninsured. Second, the drivers of loss from both the socio-economic and physical side are examined. A case is made to move beyond the use of maximum wind speed to more stable metrics and the use of other characteristics of the wind field such as direction, degree of gustiness, and duration is explored. A novel approach presented here is the potential to model losses directly as a function of climate variables such as sea surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols. This work is the first stage in the development of a tropical cyclone loss model to enable projections of losses under scenarios of both socio-economic change (such as population migration or altered policy) and physical change (such as shifts in tropical cyclone activity one from basin to another or within the same basin).

  7. Tropical myeloneuropathies: the hidden endemias.

    PubMed

    Román, G C; Spencer, P S; Schoenberg, B S

    1985-08-01

    Tropical myeloneuropathies include tropical ataxic neuropathy and tropical spastic paraparesis. These disorders occur in geographic isolates in several developing countries and are associated with malnutrition, cyanide intoxication from cassava consumption, tropical malabsorption (TM), vegetarian diets, and lathyrism. TM-malnutrition was a probable cause of myeloneuropathies among Far East prisoners of war in World War II. Clusters of unknown etiology occur in India, Africa, the Seychelles, several Caribbean islands, Jamaica, and Colombia. Treponemal infection (yaws) could be an etiologic factor in the last two. Tropical myeloneuropathies, a serious health problem, are multifactorial conditions that provide unsurpassed opportunities for international cooperation and neurologic research. PMID:2991814

  8. Advances in commercial application of gamma radiation in tropical fruits at Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabato, S. F.; Silva, J. M.; Cruz, J. N.; Broisler, P. O.; Rela, P. R.; Salmieri, S.; Lacroix, M.

    2009-07-01

    All regions of Brazil are potential areas for growing tropical fruits. As this country is already a great producer and exporter of tropical fruits, ionizing radiation has been the subject of studies in many commodities. An important project has been carried out to increase the commercial use of gamma radiation in our country. Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN)-CNEN/SP together with field producers in northeast region and partners like International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), CIC, Empresa Brasileira Pesquisa na Agricultura (EMBRAPA) joined to demonstrate this technology, its application and commercial feasibility. The objective of this study is to show advances in feasibility demonstrate the quality of the irradiated fruits in an international consignment from Brazil to Canada. In this work, Tommy Atkins mangoes harvested in northeast region of Brazil were sent to Canada. The fruits were treated in a gamma irradiation facility at doses 0.4 and 1.0 kGy. The control group was submitted to hydrothermal treatment (46 °C for 110 min). The fruits were stored at 11 °C for 10 days until the international transportation and kept at an environmental condition (22 °C) for 12 days, where their physical-chemical and sensorial properties were evaluated. The financial part of the feasibility study covers the scope of the investment, including the net working capital and production costs.

  9. [Edema and the tropics].

    PubMed

    Holzer, B R

    2004-11-01

    People visiting or living in tropical or subtropical regions are exposed to various factors, which can lead to edema. Tourists staying for only a short time in the tropics are exposed to different risks, with other disease patterns, than people living in the tropics or immigrants from tropical regions. The differential diagnosis of edema and swelling is extensive and it can sometimes be difficult to distinguish classical edema with fluid retention in the extravascular interstitial space, from lymphedema or swelling due to other aetiologies. The patients often connect the edema to their stay in the tropics although it may have been pre-existing with no obvious relation to their travels. Already the long trip in the plane can lead to an "economy class syndrome" due to deep venous thrombosis. Contacts with animal or plant toxins, parasites or parasitic larvae can produce peripheral edema. The diagnosis can often only be made by taking a meticulous history, checking for eosinophilia and with the help of serological investigations. Chronic lymphedema or elephantiasis of the limbs is often due to blocked lymph vessels by filarial worms. It has to be distinguished from other forms as e.g. podoconiosis due to blockage by mineral particles in barefoot walking people. The trend to book adventure and trekking holidays at high altitude leads to high altitude peripheral edema or non-freezing cold injuries such as frostbites and trench foot. Edema can be an unwanted side effect of a range of drugs e.g. nifedipine, which is used to prevent and treat high altitude pulmonary edema. Protein malnutrition, (Kwashiorkor), and vitamin B6 deficiency, (Beri-Beri) are very rarely observed in immigrants and almost never in tourists. A very painful swelling of fingers and hands in children and young adults of African origin can be observed during a sickle cell crisis. Many protein loosing nephropathies connected with plant and animal toxins but also bacterial, viral or parasitic agents, can

  10. Seasonal Variation of Ozone in the Tropical Lower Stratosphere: Southern Tropics are Different from Northern Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wang, Lei,; Oman, Luke D.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the seasonal behavior of ozone by using measurements from various instruments including ozonesondes, Aura Microwave Limb Sounder, and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II. We find that the magnitude of the annual variation in ozone, as a percentage of the mean ozone, exhibits a maximum at or slightly above the tropical tropopause. The maximum is larger in the northern tropics than in the southern tropics, and the annual maximum of ozone in the southern tropics occurs 2 months later than that in the northern tropics, in contrast to usual assumption that the tropics can be treated as a horizontally homogeneous region. The seasonal cycles of ozone and other species in this part of the lower stratosphere result from a combination of the seasonal variation of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the seasonal variation of tropical and midlatitude mixing. In the Northern Hemisphere, the impacts of upwelling and mixing between the tropics and midlatitudes on ozone are in phase and additive. In the Southern Hemisphere, they are not in phase. We apply a tropical leaky pipe model independently to each hemisphere to examine the relative roles of upwelling and mixing in the northern and southern tropical regions. Reasonable assumptions of the seasonal variation of upwelling and mixing yield a good description of the seasonal magnitude and phase in both the southern and northern tropics. The differences in the tracers and transport between the northern and southern tropical stratospheres suggest that the paradigm of well-mixed tropics needs to be revised to consider latitudinal variations within the tropics.

  11. Seasonal variation of ozone in the tropical lower stratosphere: Southern tropics are different from northern tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wang, Lei; Oman, Luke D.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2014-05-01

    We examine the seasonal behavior of ozone by using measurements from various instruments including ozonesondes, Aura Microwave Limb Sounder, and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II. We find that the magnitude of the annual variation in ozone, as a percentage of the mean ozone, exhibits a maximum at or slightly above the tropical tropopause. The maximum is larger in the northern tropics than in the southern tropics, and the annual maximum of ozone in the southern tropics occurs 2 months later than that in the northern tropics, in contrast to usual assumption that the tropics can be treated as a horizontally homogeneous region. The seasonal cycles of ozone and other species in this part of the lower stratosphere result from a combination of the seasonal variation of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the seasonal variation of tropical and midlatitude mixing. In the Northern Hemisphere, the impacts of upwelling and mixing between the tropics and midlatitudes on ozone are in phase and additive. In the Southern Hemisphere, they are not in phase. We apply a tropical leaky pipe model independently to each hemisphere to examine the relative roles of upwelling and mixing in the northern and southern tropical regions. Reasonable assumptions of the seasonal variation of upwelling and mixing yield a good description of the seasonal magnitude and phase in both the southern and northern tropics. The differences in the tracers and transport between the northern and southern tropical stratospheres suggest that the paradigm of well-mixed tropics needs to be revised to consider latitudinal variations within the tropics.

  12. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okpara, TC; Ezeala-Adikaibe, BA; Omire, O; Nwonye, E; Maluze, J

    2015-01-01

    Any adult with diabetes in the tropics with hand cellulitis, infection and gangrene qualifies for tropical diabetic hand syndrome (TDHS). We reviewed a 39-year-old woman with a 3-week history of swelling of the left index finger following an insect bite. The swelling progressively increased in size, was very painful, and extended to the palm. There was no history or symptoms suggestive of chronic complications of diabetes. Random blood sugar on presentation was above 600 mg/dl using a glucometer. Examination revealed an edematous left palm draining pus from multiple sinuses, necrotic and gangrenous left index finger extending down to just above the thenar eminence. A diagnosis of TDHS in a patient with hyperosmolar state was made. She was managed accordingly and subsequently underwent aggressive debridement and desloughing. Two fingers were amputated and the wound was allowed to heal by secondary intention. PMID:27057390

  13. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okpara, T C; Ezeala-Adikaibe, B A; Omire, O; Nwonye, E; Maluze, J

    2015-01-01

    Any adult with diabetes in the tropics with hand cellulitis, infection and gangrene qualifies for tropical diabetic hand syndrome (TDHS). We reviewed a 39-year-old woman with a 3-week history of swelling of the left index finger following an insect bite. The swelling progressively increased in size, was very painful, and extended to the palm. There was no history or symptoms suggestive of chronic complications of diabetes. Random blood sugar on presentation was above 600 mg/dl using a glucometer. Examination revealed an edematous left palm draining pus from multiple sinuses, necrotic and gangrenous left index finger extending down to just above the thenar eminence. A diagnosis of TDHS in a patient with hyperosmolar state was made. She was managed accordingly and subsequently underwent aggressive debridement and desloughing. Two fingers were amputated and the wound was allowed to heal by secondary intention. PMID:27057390

  14. Microbial safety of tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    Strawn, Laura K; Schneider, Keith R; Danyluk, Michelle D

    2011-02-01

    There are approximately 140 million tons of over 3,000 types of tropical fruits produced annually worldwide. Tropical fruits, once unfamiliar and rare to the temperate market, are now gaining widespread acceptance. Tropical fruits are found in a variety of forms, including whole, fresh cut, dried, juice blends, frozen, pulp, and nectars in markets around the world. Documented outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with tropical fruits have occurred. Norovirus and Salmonella are the leading viral and bacterial pathogens, respectively, documented to have caused outbreaks of infections associated with consumption of tropical fruits. Sources of contamination of tropical fruit have been identified in the production environment and postharvest handling, primarily related to sanitation issues. Limited data exist on the specific route of transmission from these sources. Research on the microbial safety of tropical fruits is minimal; with the growing market for tropical fruit expected to increase by 33% in 2010 this research area needs to be addressed. The aim of this review is to discuss the foodborne pathogen outbreaks associated tropical fruit consumption, research previously completed on pathogen behavior on tropical fruits, preventive strategies for pathogen contamination, and research needs.

  15. Tropical fevers: Management guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Sunit; Chaudhary, Dhruva; Varghese, George M.; Bhalla, Ashish; Karthi, N.; Kalantri, S.; Peter, J. V.; Mishra, Rajesh; Bhagchandani, Rajesh; Munjal, M.; Chugh, T. D.; Rungta, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Tropical fevers were defined as infections that are prevalent in, or are unique to tropical and subtropical regions. Some of these occur throughout the year and some especially in rainy and post-rainy season. Concerned about high prevalence and morbidity and mortality caused by these infections, and overlapping clinical presentations, difficulties in arriving at specific diagnoses and need for early empiric treatment, Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) constituted an expert committee to develop a consensus statement and guidelines for management of these diseases in the emergency and critical care. The committee decided to focus on most common infections on the basis of available epidemiologic data from India and overall experience of the group. These included dengue hemorrhagic fever, rickettsial infections/scrub typhus, malaria (usually falciparum), typhoid, and leptospira bacterial sepsis and common viral infections like influenza. The committee recommends a ‘syndromic approach’ to diagnosis and treatment of critical tropical infections and has identified five major clinical syndromes: undifferentiated fever, fever with rash / thrombocytopenia, fever with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), fever with encephalopathy and fever with multi organ dysfunction syndrome. Evidence based algorithms are presented to guide critical care specialists to choose reliable rapid diagnostic modalities and early empiric therapy based on clinical syndromes. PMID:24678147

  16. Tropical Anvil Cirrus Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.; Schmitt, C.; Baumgardner, D.; Poellot, M.; Twohy, C.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. T.; Sayres, D.; Avallone, L.; Hallar, G.

    2003-12-01

    This study synthesizes data collected during a number of field campaigns by in-situ aircraft to characterize the microphysical properties of tropical, convectively-generated cirrus. The field campaigns include the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission KWAJEX campaign near Kwajalein, M. I., KAMP (the Keys Area Microphysics Project) and the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers (CRYSTAL) Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (FACE), both over southern Florida, and CAMEX-4 (the fourth convection and moisture experiment), studying hurricanes off the east coast of Florida. The measurements include particle size distribution and particle shape information, direct measurements of the condensed water content (CRYSTAL-FACE), and radar imagery. We examine the temperature dependence and vertical variability of the ice water content (IWC), extinction, and effective radii, and deduce the ensemble-mean ice particle densities. Data obtained in quiescent regions outside of convection are compared to observations within convective cells. The relationship between the properties of the particle size distributions and proximity to convection are examined. The IWCs show a strong temperature dependence and dependence on distance below cloud top. The IWCs are larger in the convective regions than in the quiescent regions, and the particle size distributions are markedly broader. Ensemble-mean ice particle densities are a strong function of the breadth of the particle size distributions.

  17. Tropical ecotoxicology: The state of the environment in the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Lacher, T.E. Jr. |; Goldstein, M.I.

    1995-12-31

    Ecotoxicology has focused almost exclusively on temperate zone countries and ecosystems. Tropical ecosystems, including rain forest, tropical dry forest, savanna, wetlands and freshwater ecosystems, have been neglected. These ecosystems combined might contain as much as 75% of global biodiversity. Tropical ecosystems are under increasing threat of development and alteration. The major causes of habitat degradation in the tropics include population growth and urbanization, agricultural expansion, deforestation, and mining. Some of these activities (in particular agriculture, mining, and the manufacturing and chemical industries) also lead to the release of toxic substances into the environment. Little research in ecotoxicology has been done in tropical environments and techniques and procedures developed for temperate environments are often applied, even though physical and chemical environmental parameters in the tropics can be very different. The regulatory environment also varies from country to country. The authors present an extensive literature review of tropical ecotoxicology, with a focus on Latin America and the Caribbean. Most research has focused on water quality and aquatic toxicology. Virtually no research has been done on the effects of toxic substance on tropical wildlife. They present a protocol for tropical ecotoxicology that addresses the special problems associated with doing ecotoxicological research in the tropics. The authors discuss the issue of adapting temperate zone principles and methods to tropical environments. Finally, they discuss priority areas for immediate research. These include large scale agricultural activities, especially bananas, pineapples, and soybeans and gold mining with the associated heavy use of mercury. The authors also present a prioritization of tropical wildlife that appear to be at highest risk of exposure to toxic substances.

  18. Tropical sprue in southern India.

    PubMed

    Mathan, V I

    1988-01-01

    Tropical sprue, a primary malabsorption syndrome affecting residents and visitors to several tropical regions, occurs in southern India in endemic and epidemic forms. The stomach, the small intestine and colon are affected and malabsorption results in nutrient deficiency. Enterocyte damage, the primary lesion in southern Indian tropical sprue, is the result of a persistent lesion of the stem cell compartment. This lesion occurs on a background of tropical enteropathy and the available evidence suggests that an immunity conferring agent may be responsible for initiating the damage.

  19. An Examination of Tropical Neurasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Culpin, Millais

    1933-01-01

    The nineteenth century conception of neurasthenia is giving way to a psychological ætiology and classification. Quotations show that the older conception dies hard, and varied physical factors are invoked as causes of tropical neurasthenia. Australian experience shows the physical factors present without “neurasthenia.” It is suggested that mal-adjustment is not physiological but sociological. The possibility of psychoneuroses appearing in the guise of tropical diseases. Effect of selection of personnel in reducing breakdown. The writer doubts the existence of a neurasthenia special to the tropics, and urges that the use of the phrase “tropical neurasthenia” should be discontinued. PMID:19989324

  20. Tropical Storm near Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This unnamed tropical storm near Bermuda (26.5N, 59.5W) was the result of a strong mid-latitude low pressure system that formed over the Gulf Stream near Cape Hatteras. It rapidly developed into a spiral gyre with internal wind speeds of up to 50 knots and whipped up the sea surface with swells of 15 to 20 feet creating dangerous boating conditions. These sub-hurricane storms are frequent occurances in this region during the fall, winter and spring.

  1. Cloudsat tropical cyclone database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourville, Natalie D.

    CloudSat (CS), the first 94 GHz spaceborne cloud profiling radar (CPR), launched in 2006 to study the vertical distribution of clouds. Not only are CS observations revealing inner vertical cloud details of water and ice globally but CS overpasses of tropical cyclones (TC's) are providing a new and exciting opportunity to study the vertical structure of these storm systems. CS TC observations are providing first time vertical views of TC's and demonstrate a unique way to observe TC structure remotely from space. Since December 2009, CS has intersected every globally named TC (within 1000 km of storm center) for a total of 5,278 unique overpasses of tropical systems (disturbance, tropical depression, tropical storm and hurricane/typhoon/cyclone (HTC)). In conjunction with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), each CS TC overpass is processed into a data file containing observational data from the afternoon constellation of satellites (A-TRAIN), Navy's Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System Model (NOGAPS), European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) model and best track storm data. This study will describe the components and statistics of the CS TC database, present case studies of CS TC overpasses with complementary A-TRAIN observations and compare average reflectivity stratifications of TC's across different atmospheric regimes (wind shear, SST, latitude, maximum wind speed and basin). Average reflectivity stratifications reveal that characteristics in each basin vary from year to year and are dependent upon eye overpasses of HTC strength storms and ENSO phase. West Pacific (WPAC) basin storms are generally larger in size (horizontally and vertically) and have greater values of reflectivity at a predefined height than all other basins. Storm structure at higher latitudes expands horizontally. Higher vertical wind shear (≥ 9.5 m/s) reduces cloud top height (CTH) and the intensity of precipitation cores, especially in HTC strength storms

  2. Seven Guideposts for Tropical Rain Forest Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Identifies seven guideposts for tropical rain forest education. Aids teachers in finding structure and creating educational experiences that promote more complete understanding of tropical rain forests. (CCM)

  3. Combating tropical deforestation in Haiti

    SciTech Connect

    Pellek, R.

    1990-09-01

    This article outlines the findings of Tropical Forestry Action Plan (TFAP), which was part of an international initiative on tropical deforestation. Ten specific recommendations are addressed. Haiti has lost more than 97% of its forestland, so emphasis should be placed on replenishing the forest cover.

  4. Botany, Chemistry, and Tropical Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headrick, Daniel R.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the role played by botany and chemistry in the development, exploitation, and later deterioration of tropical economies. Although near equals in 19th-century international trade, the development of synthetics by European scientists in the early 20th century crippled the tropical economies. Research, innovation, and investment protected…

  5. Tropical Rainforest Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    This digest provides four guideposts for tropical rainforest education: (1) structure; (2) location and climate; (3) importance; and (4) conservation of resources. Research is cited and background information provided about the layers of life and the adaptations of life within the tropical rain forest. Aspects of life within and near rain forests…

  6. Conservation of tropical plant species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book is designed to provide a review of the methods and current status of conservation of many tropical plant species. Future perspectives of conservation of tropical species will also be discussed. The section on methods covers the range of conservation techniques, in situ, seed banking, in vi...

  7. Tropical Cyclone Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, P. Peggy; Knosp, Brian W.; Vu, Quoc A.; Yi, Chao; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Tropical Cyclone Infor ma tion System (TCIS) is a Web portal (http://tropicalcyclone.jpl.nasa.gov) that provides researchers with an extensive set of observed hurricane parameters together with large-scale and convection resolving model outputs. It provides a comprehensive set of high-resolution satellite (see figure), airborne, and in-situ observations in both image and data formats. Large-scale datasets depict the surrounding environmental parameters such as SST (Sea Surface Temperature) and aerosol loading. Model outputs and analysis tools are provided to evaluate model performance and compare observations from different platforms. The system pertains to the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storm, the air-sea interaction processes, and the larger-scale environment as depicted by ocean heat content and the aerosol loading of the environment. Currently, the TCIS is populated with satellite observations of all tropical cyclones observed globally during 2005. There is a plan to extend the database both forward in time till present as well as backward to 1998. The portal is powered by a MySQL database and an Apache/Tomcat Web server on a Linux system. The interactive graphic user interface is provided by Google Map.

  8. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  9. Tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fueglistaler, S.; Dessler, A. E.; Dunkerton, T. J.; Folkins, I.; Fu, Q.; Mote, P. W.

    2009-03-01

    Observations of temperature, winds, and atmospheric trace gases suggest that the transition from troposphere to stratosphere occurs in a layer, rather than at a sharp "tropopause." In the tropics, this layer is often called the "tropical tropopause layer" (TTL). We present an overview of observations in the TTL and discuss the radiative, dynamical, and chemical processes that lead to its time-varying, three-dimensional structure. We present a synthesis definition with a bottom at 150 hPa, 355 K, 14 km (pressure, potential temperature, and altitude) and a top at 70 hPa, 425 K, 18.5 km. Laterally, the TTL is bounded by the position of the subtropical jets. We highlight recent progress in understanding of the TTL but emphasize that a number of processes, notably deep, possibly overshooting convection, remain not well understood. The TTL acts in many ways as a "gate" to the stratosphere, and understanding all relevant processes is of great importance for reliable predictions of future stratospheric ozone and climate.

  10. Endemic tropical sprue in Rhodesia.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G; Clain, D J

    1976-01-01

    The existence of tropical sprue in Africa is controversial. In this paper we present 31 cases seen in Rhodesia over a 15 month period. They have the clinical features, small intestinal morphology, malabsorption pattern, and treatment response of tropical sprue. Other causes of malabsorption, and primary malnutrition, have been excluded. The severity of the clinical state and intestinal malabsorption distinguish these patients from those we have described with tropical enteropathy. The previous work on tropical sprue in Africa is reviewed and it is apparent that, when it has been adequately looked for, it has been found. It is clear that the question of tropical sprue in Africa must be re-examined and that it existence may have hitherto been concealed by the assumption that primary malnutrition is responsible for the high prevalence of deficiency states. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1001977

  11. Endemic tropical sprue in Rhodesia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G; Clain, D J

    1976-11-01

    The existence of tropical sprue in Africa is controversial. In this paper we present 31 cases seen in Rhodesia over a 15 month period. They have the clinical features, small intestinal morphology, malabsorption pattern, and treatment response of tropical sprue. Other causes of malabsorption, and primary malnutrition, have been excluded. The severity of the clinical state and intestinal malabsorption distinguish these patients from those we have described with tropical enteropathy. The previous work on tropical sprue in Africa is reviewed and it is apparent that, when it has been adequately looked for, it has been found. It is clear that the question of tropical sprue in Africa must be re-examined and that it existence may have hitherto been concealed by the assumption that primary malnutrition is responsible for the high prevalence of deficiency states.

  12. Bradyrhizobium tropiciagri sp. nov. and Bradyrhizobium embrapense sp. nov., nitrogen-fixing symbionts of tropical forage legumes.

    PubMed

    Delamuta, Jakeline Renata Marçon; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Parma, Marcia Maria; Melo, Itamar Soares; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2015-12-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is a key process for agricultural production and environmental sustainability, but there are comparatively few studies of symbionts of tropical pasture legumes, as well as few described species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, although it is the predominant rhizobial genus in the tropics. A detailed polyphasic study was conducted with two strains of the genus Bradyrhizobium used in commercial inoculants for tropical pastures in Brazil, CNPSo 1112T, isolated from perennial soybean (Neonotonia wightii), and CNPSo 2833T, from desmodium (Desmodium heterocarpon). Based on 16S-rRNA gene phylogeny, both strains were grouped in the Bradyrhizobium elkanii superclade, but were not clearly clustered with any known species. Multilocus sequence analysis of three (glnII, gyrB and recA) and five (plus atpD and dnaK) housekeeping genes confirmed that the strains are positioned in two distinct clades. Comparison with intergenic transcribed spacer sequences of type strains of described species of the genus Bradyrhizobium showed similarity lower than 93.1 %, and differences were confirmed by BOX-PCR analysis. Nucleotide identity of three housekeeping genes with type strains of described species ranged from 88.1 to 96.2 %. Average nucleotide identity of genome sequences showed values below the threshold for distinct species of the genus Bradyrhizobium ( < 90.6 %), and the value between the two strains was also below this threshold (91.2 %). Analysis of nifH and nodC gene sequences positioned the two strains in a clade distinct from other species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Morphophysiological, genotypic and genomic data supported the description of two novel species in the genus Bradyrhizobium, Bradyrhizobium tropiciagri sp. nov. (type strain CNPSo 1112T = SMS 303T = BR 1009T = SEMIA 6148T = LMG 28867T) and Bradyrhizobium embrapense sp. nov. (type strain CNPSo 2833T = CIAT 2372T = BR 2212T = SEMIA 6208T = U674T

  13. Gut hormones in tropical malabsorption.

    PubMed Central

    Besterman, H S; Cook, G C; Sarson, D L; Christofides, N D; Bryant, M G; Gregor, M; Bloom, S R

    1979-01-01

    Concentrations of various gut hormones were measured after a test breakfast in eight patients with severe tropical malabsorption and 12 controls. The patients with tropical malabsorption had greatly raised basal plasma motilin and enteroglucagon concentrations, but their postprandial release of both gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin was significantly reduced. The pattern of gut hormone release differed from that found in coeliac disease. The measurement of gut hormones, each of which has a specific site and function, thus throws new light on the pathophysiology of tropical malabsorption and may suggest approaches of treatment. PMID:519400

  14. Stratospheric Water Vapor, Tropical Tropopause Temperatures and Tropical Upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenlof, K. H.; Neely, R.; Davis, S. M.; Butler, A. H.; Hurst, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    A body of work has shown that there are trends and variability in stratospheric water vapor closely related to variability in tropical tropopause temperatures, upwelling variations, the quasi-biennial oscillation, volcanic aerosol loading and sea surface temperatures. Prior studies have also shown that stratospheric water vapor has a small but non-negligible effect on global radiative forcing; therefore it is key to understand both trends and long-term variations. In this presentation, we will examine both the relationship between tropical tropopause temperatures and stratospheric water for the time period where we have global lower stratosphere water vapor measurements (primarily since the early 1990s), as well as the relationship between tropical tropopause temperatures and assorted atmospheric indices for the longer time period where we only have temperature measurements. We will present results from climate model runs testing the impact of volcanic aerosol loading on UTLS temperatures, stratospheric water vapor and tropical upwelling. Using our climate model runs, we also isolate the impact of the QBO on tropical upwelling in the lower stratosphere. With WACCM, we found that the tropical tropopause temperature annual cycle amplitude was smaller than observed by ~30% in a case run without QBO nudging; in this presentation we explore the reasons for that and its impact on stratospheric water vapor.

  15. Tropical Storm Faxai's Rainfall Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows Tropical Storm Faxai's rainfall rates on March 2 from a TRMM TMI/PR rainfall analysis being faded in over infrared cloud data from the TRMM VIRS instrument. Credit: SSAI/NASA, ...

  16. Tropical Storm Lee to Newfoundland

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Tropical Storm Lee as it made landfall in Louisiana and Mississippi on September 4, 2011. This storm produced flooding and tornadoes to the southern states all the way to flooding ...

  17. Cloudsat Dissects Tropical Storm Ileana

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's CloudSat satellite's Cloud Profiling Radar captured a sideways look across Tropical Storm Ileana on Aug. 27 at 20:40 UTC. The colors indicate intensity of reflected radar energy. The blue ar...

  18. Before Departure: Advising Tropical Travellers

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Advising travellers to tropical and subtropical countries before their departure requires physician use of regularly updated information sources. The author outlines an approach to risk assessment and presents an overview of important issues and some information sources. PMID:21233911

  19. GPM: Hurricanes Beyond the Tropics

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission, or GPM, a joint NASA/JAXA mission, will provide rainfall data on storms and hurricanes like Irene that move out of the tropics. The data will be ava...

  20. Ecology: The Tropical Deforestation Debt.

    PubMed

    Norris, Ken

    2016-08-22

    Tropical deforestation is a significant cause of global carbon emissions and biodiversity loss. A new study shows that deforestation today leaves a carbon and biodiversity debt to be paid over subsequent years. This has potentially profound implications for forest conservation.

  1. Enteric pathogens in tropical aquaria.

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, D.; Burge, S. H.; Hutchings, P. G.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 100 tropical aquaria from six pet shops were sampled for the presence of Salmonella, Campylobacter and Aeromonas species. Eight fish tanks contained unusual serotypes of salmonella. None had been used to house terrapins. One hundred and three isolates of Aeromonas species were obtained from 98 tanks. One tank contained Plesiomonas shigelloides. No Campylobacter species were isolated. It is suggested that a tropical aquarium may constitute an infection hazard. PMID:3428370

  2. Tropical Cyclone Indlala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On March 14, 2007, storm-weary Madagascar braced for its fourth land-falling tropical cyclone in as many months. Cyclone Indlala was hovering off the island's northeast coast when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this photo-like image at 1:40 p.m. local time (10:40 UTC). Just over a hundred kilometers offshore, the partially cloudy eye at the heart of the storm seems like a vast drain sucking in a disk of swirling clouds. According to reports from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued less than three hours after MODIS captured this image, Indlala had winds of 115 knots (132 miles per hour), with gusts up to 140 knots (161 mph). Wave heights were estimated to be 36 feet. At the time of the report, the storm was predicted to intensify through the subsequent 12-hour period, to turn slightly southwest, and to strike eastern Madagascar as a Category 4 storm with sustained winds up to 125 knots (144 mph), and gusts up to 150 knots (173 mph). According to Reuters AlertNet news service, Madagascar's emergency response resources were taxed to their limit in early March 2007 as a result of extensive flooding in the North, drought and food shortages in the South, and three previous hits from cyclones in the preceding few months: Bondo in December 2006, Clovis in January 2007, and Gamede in February.

  3. Antioxidants from tropical herbs.

    PubMed

    Razab, Rasyidah; Abdul-Aziz, Azlina

    2010-03-01

    Plants that contain high amounts of polyphenolic compounds are potential candidates for natural antioxidant sources. Studies are on going in the search for new sources of antioxidants. Not much data are available on the antioxidant capacity of tropical herbs. With this in mind, 19 commonly consumed Malaysian herbs were analyzed for their polyphenolic content and antioxidant activities. A majority of these plants have never been studied before with regards to their polyphenolic content and antioxidant activities. The shoots of Anacardium occidentale, the shoots and fruits of Barringtonia racemosa, Pithecellobium jiringa and Parkia speciosa had high polyphenolic contents (> 150 microg gallic acid equivalents/mg dried plant) and antioxidant activities when measured using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) (>1.2 mM) and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays (>2.4 mM). A strong correlation was observed between the two antioxidant assays (FRAP vs TEAC) implying that the plants could both scavenge free radicals and reduce oxidants. There was also a strong correlation between the antioxidant activities and polyphenolic content suggesting the observed antioxidant activities were contributed mainly by the polyphenolics in the plants. PMID:20420325

  4. Animation of Flood Potential from Two Australian Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Video Gallery

    Merged precipitation data from NASA-JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and other satellites was used to calculate flood potential withrainfall from Tropical Cyclone Lam and Tropical ...

  5. Tropical cyclone activity over the Southwest Tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jessica M.; Subrahmanyam, Bulusu; Nyadjro, Ebenezer S.; Murty, V. S. N.

    2016-08-01

    The Southwest Tropical Indian Ocean (SWTIO) is a key region for air-sea interaction. Tropical cyclones (TCs) regularly form over the SWTIO and subsurface ocean variability influences the cyclogenesis of this region. Tropical cyclone days for this region span from November through April, and peak in January and February during austral summer. Past research provides evidence for more tropical cyclone days over the SWTIO during austral summer (December-June) with a deep thermocline ridge than in austral summer with a shallow thermocline ridge. We have analyzed the Argo temperature data and HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) outputs while focusing on the austral summer of 2012/2013 (a positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) year and neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) year) when seven named tropical cyclones developed over the SWTIO region. This study reveals that the climatic events like the IOD and ENSO influence the cyclonic activity and number of TC days over the SWTIO. We ascertain that the IOD events have linkages with the Barrier Layer Thickness (BLT) in the SWTIO region through propagating Rossby waves, and further show that the BLT variability influences the cyclonic activity in this region.

  6. Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncrieff, M. W.; Waliser, D. E.

    2009-05-01

    Tropical convection and the multi-scale organization of precipitating convection are associated with scale interactions that are fundamental to the atmospheric circulation and its interaction with the ocean. The realistic representation of tropical convection and its multi-scale organization is a long-standing challenge for numerical weather prediction and climate models. Incomplete knowledge and practical issues disadvantage the representation of important phenomena and processes in global models, such as the ITCZ, monsoons, MJO, and easterly waves and tropical cyclones. The tropical-extratropical interactions of tropical convection are key aspects of the Predictability and Dynamical Processes of THORPEX. The WCRP and WWRP/THORPEX are jointly coordinating a year of observing, modeling, and forecasting with a focus on the multi-scale organization of tropical convection, prediction, and predictability: Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC). Satellite, in-situ, and field-campaign measurements (e.g., TPARC), operational prediction, and cloud-system resolving models will be utilized. The temporal scales addressed, up to seasonal, enables the above phenomena to be modeled at high resolution, and seamless prediction issues at the intersection of weather and climate addressed. The 'Year', the period 1 May 2008 - 31 October 2009, began with the archiving of ECMWF T799 (i.e., 25 km) products: i) complete global analysis; ii) deterministic forecasts; and iii) special diagnostics. Plans are underway to obtain similar NCEP and NASA GEOS-5 data, and to integrate various multi-sensor satellite products. The YOTC Science Plan, which is available at http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/wwrp/new/documents/ YOTC_Science_Plan.pdf, has been published as a WMO Technical Document. The YOTC Implementation Plan, presently being drafted, will be discussed and finalized at an international workshop in July 2009. This talk summarizes programmatic aspects; science issues involving the multiscale

  7. Aetiology and pathogenesis of postinfective tropical malabsorption (tropical sprue).

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    1984-03-31

    Postinfective tropical malabsorption (TM; tropical sprue) starts with an acute intestinal infection (bacterial, viral, or parasitic) which can affect predominantly the small or the large intestine. Miscellaneous invasive pathogens cause subsequent enterocyte damage affecting the entire small intestine and, to a lesser extent, the colon. Enteroglucagon, a tropic hormone, is then liberated and reaches a high plasma concentration. Small-intestinal stasis results. Further bacterial colonisation (in the lumen and also at the enterocyte surface) is encouraged. Continuing enterocyte damage is worsened by coexistent folate depletion, which is initiated at the onset of disease; body stores of folate reach a low concentration by 3 or 4 months. The cycle continues until the bacterial overgrowth is eliminated with an antibiotic (eg, tetracycline), or mucosal integrity recovers (hastened by oral folic-acid supplements), or both.

  8. Tropical Cyclogenesis in a Tropical Wave Critical Layer: Easterly Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, T. J.; Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, is identified herein as the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The recirculating Kelvin cat's eye within the critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis at the center of the cat's eye, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally the associated Lagrangian motions, one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. In this co-moving frame, streamlines are approximately equivalent to particle trajectories. The closed circulation is quasi-stationary, and a dividing streamline separates air within the cat's eye from air outside.

  9. Maize, tropical (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Assem, Shireen K

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the third most important food crop globally after wheat and rice. In sub-Saharan Africa, tropical maize has traditionally been the main staple of the diet; 95 % of the maize grown is consumed directly as human food and as an important source of income for the resource-poor rural population. The biotechnological approach to engineer biotic and abiotic traits implies the availability of an efficient plant transformation method. The production of genetically transformed plants depends both on the ability to integrate foreign genes into target cells and the efficiency with which plants are regenerated. Maize transformation and regeneration through immature embryo culture is the most efficient system to regenerate normal transgenic plants. However, this system is highly genotype dependent. Genotypes adapted to tropic areas are difficult to regenerate. Therefore, transformation methods used with model genotypes adapted to temperate areas are not necessarily efficient with tropical lines. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is the method of choice since it has been first achieved in 1996. In this report, we describe a transformation method used successfully with several tropical maize lines. All the steps of transformation and regeneration are described in details. This protocol can be used with a wide variety of tropical lines. However, some modifications may be needed with recalcitrant lines.

  10. Heating rates in tropical anvils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Valero, Francisco P. J.; Pfister, Leonhard; Liou, Kuo-Nan

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of infrared and solar radiation with tropical cirrus anvils is addressed. Optical properties of the anvils are inferred from satellite observations and from high-altitude aircraft measurements. An infrared multiple-scattering model is used to compute heating rates in tropical anvils. Layer-average heating rates in 2 km thick anvils were found to be on the order of 20 to 30 K/day. The difference between heating rates at cloud bottom and cloud top ranges from 30 to 200 K/day, leading to convective instability in the anvil. The calculations are most sensitive to the assumed ice water content, but also are affected by the vertical distribution of ice water content and by the anvil thickness. Solar heating in anvils is shown to be less important than infrared heating but not negligible. The dynamical implications of the computed heating rates are also explored and it is concluded that the heating may have important consequences for upward mass transport in the tropics. The potential impact of tropical cirrus on the tropical energy balance and cloud forcing are discussed.

  11. APR-2 Tropical Cyclone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S. L.; Tanelli, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Second Generation Airborne Precipitation Radar (APR-2) participated in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in August and September of 2010, collecting a large volume of data in several tropical systems, including Hurricanes Earl and Karl. Additional measurements of tropical cyclone have been made by APR-2 in experiments prior to GRIP (namely, CAMEX-4, NAMMA, TC4); Table 1 lists all the APR-2 tropical cyclone observations. The APR-2 observations consist of the vertical structure of rain reflectivity at 13.4 and 35.6 GHz, and at both co-polarization and crosspolarization, as well as vertical Doppler measurements and crosswind measurements. APR-2 normally flies on the NASA DC-8 aircraft, as in GRIP, collecting data with a downward looking, cross-track scanning geometry. The scan limits are 25 degrees on either side of the aircraft, resulting in a roughly 10-km swath, depending on the aircraft altitude. Details of the APR-2 observation geometry and performance can be found in Sadowy et al. (2003).The multiparameter nature of the APR-2 measurements makes the collection of tropical cyclone measurements valuable for detailed studies of the processes, microphysics and dynamics of tropical cyclones, as well as weaker systems that are associated with tropical cyclone formation. In this paper, we give a brief overview of how the APR-2 data are processed. We also discuss use of the APR-2 cross-track winds to estimate various quantities of interest in in studies of storm intensification. Finally, we show examples of the standard products and derived information.

  12. Tropical Storm Debby Moves into Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 25-27, 2012. The animation shows that Tropical Storm Debby's center move from the northeastern Gulf of...

  13. Satellite Sees Birth of Tropical Storm Gordon

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from August 13-16, 2012, shows the birth of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season's eighth tropical depression that strengthens into Tropical Storm Gordon. This...

  14. Anthocyanins Present in Some Tropical Fruits.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many tropical fruits are rich in anthocyanins, though limited information is available about the characterization and quantification of these anthocyanins. The identification of anthocyanin pigments in four tropical fruits was determined by ion trap mass spectrometry. Fruits studied included acero...

  15. Tropical Depression Alex hits Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM spacecraft observed this view of Tropical Depression Alex on June 27, 2010 at 2214 UTC (6:14 PM EST). Tropical depression Alex was near the western coast of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. ...

  16. [Hurricanes and tropical coastal biodiversity].

    PubMed

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2002-06-01

    Tropical coastal biodiversity has been modulated by tropical storms during a long time and it is currently facing a heavy human impact. The purpose of this review is to compile the available information to improve our understanding of hurricane impacts and to promote the establishment of coastal landscape monitoring, because that is the best way to assess these impacts. Although generalizations on hurricane effects are elusive, some historical dynamics and temporal relationships are included and some details are presented on the impacts by resuspension and movement of sediments, storm waves, and breaking off of coral reef organisms. Some effects on marine turtles and coastal forests are also briefly pointed out.

  17. Glacial climate in the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.

    1996-06-28

    New findings have caused ideas about the Earth`s climate during the Pleistocene glaciation to change. A consensus seems to be forming that during times of glaciation, climatic conditions in the tropics were quite different from those today. However still to be explained is why strontium-calcium measurements on corals and moble gas measurements of ground water suggest a tropical cooling of 4-6 C while foraminiferal speciation, oxygen isotope, and alkenone results suggest a cooling of no more than 3 C. This article discusses different aspects of the debate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Black Swan Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, K.; Lin, N.

    2012-12-01

    Virtually all assessments of tropical cyclone risk are based on historical records, which are limited to a few hundred years at most. Yet stronger TCs may occur in the future and at places that have not been affected historically. Such events lie outside the realm of historically based expectations and may have extreme impacts. Their occurrences are also often made explainable after the fact (e.g., Hurricane Katrina). We nickname such potential future TCs, characterized by rarity, extreme impact, and retrospective predictability, "black swans" (Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2007). As, by definition, black swan TCs have yet to happen, statistical methods that solely rely on historical track data cannot predict their occurrence. Global climate models lack the capability to predict intense storms, even with a resolution as high as 14 km (Emanuel et al. 2010). Also, most dynamic downscaling methods (e.g., Bender et al. 2010) are still limited in horizontal resolution and are too expensive to implement to generate enough events to include rare ones. In this study, we apply a simpler statistical/deterministic hurricane model (Emanuel et al. 2006) to simulate large numbers of synthetic storms under a given (observed or projected) climate condition. The method has been shown to generate realistic extremes in various basins (Emanuel et al. 2008 and 2010). We also apply a hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC; Luettich et al. 1992) to simulate the storm surges generated by these storms. We then search for black swan TCs, in terms of the joint wind and surge damage potential, in the generated large databases. Heavy rainfall is another important TC hazard and will be considered in a future study. We focus on three areas: Tampa Bay in the U.S., the Persian Gulf, and Darwin in Australia. Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge as it is surrounded by shallow water and low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. High surges are generated by storms with a broad

  19. Tropical Storm Erin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Location: The Atlantic Ocean 210 miles south of Galveston, Texas Categorization: Tropical Storm Sustained Winds: 40 mph (60 km/hr)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared ImageMicrowave Image

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned the color blue

  20. Skin Diseases in the Tropics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahe, Antoine; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Common skin diseases are prevalent in tropical countries because of extreme weather conditions, mediocre hygiene, and lack of adequate treatment of infectious dermatoses. This guide describes the major endemic skin diseases and their signs for the purpose of helping unspecialized health agents train themselves and determine when a patient should…

  1. Small satellites for tropical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montpetit, Marie-Jose; Bonn, Ferdinand

    1993-11-01

    A number of mission studies were performed to assess the suitability of small satellite systems for tropical data acquisition. These studies took into account the specifics of the tropical user communities and were focused on remote sensing and resource management issues. The requirements and potential solutions for four application areas are discussed. For monitoring of forest and agricultural vegetation, a small synthetic aperture radar is considered with P, C, or X band imaging, possibly supplemented by a high resolution multispectral imager. The radar would have the capability to monitor below cloud cover which is often found in tropical regions. Optical, microwave, or spectrographic imaging would also be useful in small satellites for disaster monitoring (notably of floods), land management, and air pollution monitoring. A small satellite with data storage and forwarding capability is also envisioned to collect data from dependable, low-power, and low-cost ground sensors via a simple ultrahigh frequency uplink and download the data on a very high frequency downlink. All the small satellites would be launched in low inclination orbits to ensure a number of consecutive passes over the targeted tropical area.

  2. Ecology: The Tropical Deforestation Debt.

    PubMed

    Norris, Ken

    2016-08-22

    Tropical deforestation is a significant cause of global carbon emissions and biodiversity loss. A new study shows that deforestation today leaves a carbon and biodiversity debt to be paid over subsequent years. This has potentially profound implications for forest conservation. PMID:27554658

  3. Tropical Biological Drawings with Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchelmore, June A.

    The annotated illustrations of biological specimens useful for illustrating the "tropical" topics dealt with in African secondary school biology courses are designed to serve a two-fold purpose. The diagrams are intended to show the pupil the structures he should be looking for in his laboratory work, with the textual material being an addition to…

  4. Tropical Animal Tour Packet. Metro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metro Washington Park Zoo, Portland, OR. Educational Services Div.

    This packet is designed to assist teachers in creating a tropical animals lesson plan that centers around a visit to the zoo. A teacher packet is divided into eight parts: (1) goals and objectives; (2) what to expect at the zoo; (3) student activities (preparatory activities, on-site activities, and follow-up activities); (4) background…

  5. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001. Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. Image courtesy NASA/JPL/GSFC/LaRC, MISR Team

  6. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images.

    The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image.

    The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image.

    Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation.

    Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  7. Tropical cyclogenesis in a tropical wave critical layer: easterly waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerton, T. J.; Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.

    2009-08-01

    The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, is identified herein as the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The recirculating Kelvin cat's eye within the critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis at the center of the cat's eye, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally the associated Lagrangian motions, one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. In this co-moving frame, streamlines are approximately equivalent to particle trajectories. The closed circulation is quasi-stationary, and a dividing streamline separates air within the cat's eye from air outside. The critical layer equatorward of the easterly jet axis is important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i) a region of cyclonic vorticity and weak deformation by the

  8. Tropical cyclogenesis in a tropical wave critical layer: easterly waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerton, T. J.; Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.

    2008-06-01

    The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, resembles the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development within the critical layer is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally this "marsupial paradigm" one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. This translation requires an appropriate "gauge" that renders translating streamlines and isopleths of translating stream function approximately equivalent to flow trajectories. In the translating frame, the closed circulation is stationary, and a dividing streamline effectively separates air within the critical layer from air outside. The critical layer equatorward of the easterly jet axis is important to tropical cyclogenesis because it provides (i) a region of

  9. Past glaciation in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastenrath, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Tropical glaciers are considered along three meridional profiles, for the Australasian sector, Africa and the Americas. Evaluated are the annual mean freezing level 0 °C, modern equilibrium line altitude MEL, and past equilibrium line altitude PEL. The calculation of 0 °C is based on a 1958-1997 global data set; MEL refers to estimates concerning the first half of the 20th century; and the timing of the PEL is not generally known. 0 °C stands around 4000-5000 m, with lower levels in the outer tropics. MEL is reached in the Australasian sector on four mountains, and in Africa on three mountains, near the Equator, near or above 0 °C. In the American cordilleras many peaks are still glaciated, above 0 °C, but in the arid southern tropical Andes even summits above 6000 m do not reach MEL. The PEL stands between 3000 m and 5000 m, high in the equatorial zone, but highest in the arid southern tropical Andes. The height difference between MEL and PEL is of order 1000 m, with regional differences. Deglaciation dates range between 15,000 and 8000 years BP, with later timing towards the higher elevations. This synopsis suggests priority targets for further research: morphological mapping and age determination in the High Atlas of Morocco; timing of deglaciation in the High Semyen of Ethiopia and the Altos de Cuchumatanes of Guatemala; exploration in the highlands of Lesotho and of the Dominican Republic; and glaciation in the arid southern tropical Andes.

  10. Remote tropical and sub-tropical responses to Amazon deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Andrew M.; Dirmeyer, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Replacing natural vegetation with realistic tropical crops over the Amazon region in a global Earth system model impacts vertical transport of heat and moisture, modifying the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free atmosphere. Vertical velocity is decreased over a majority of the Amazon region, shifting the ascending branch and modifying the seasonality of the Hadley circulation over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific oceans. Using a simple model that relates circulation changes to heating anomalies and generalizing the upper-atmosphere temperature response to deforestation, agreement is found between the response in the fully-coupled model and the simple solution. These changes to the large-scale dynamics significantly impact precipitation in several remote regions, namely sub-Saharan Africa, Mexico, the southwestern United States and extratropical South America, suggesting non-local climate repercussions for large-scale land use changes in the tropics are possible.

  11. Nutritional disorders in tropical neurology.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2013-01-01

    About three-fourths of the total world population live in the tropics but consume only 6% of worldwide food production and contribute 15% of the world's net revenue explaining the short life expectancy, high infantile mortality, and poor daily caloric intake; moreover, lack of clean drinking water and deficient sanitation promote water-borne infections, diarrhea, and risk of malabsorption that contribute to the prevalence of malnutrition in the tropics. One-third of the world's population consumes insufficient iodine increasing the risk for mental retardation and deafness due to maternal hypothyroidism. The main nutritional syndromes comprise protein-energy malnutrition (marasmus and kwashiorkor); nutritional neuropathies, myelopathies and neuromyelopathies, as well as specific deficiencies of vitamins and micronutrients including iodine, iron, zinc, and selenium. PMID:23829926

  12. Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, E.C.; Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C.; Richmond, R.H.; Power, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

  13. Rain from Tropical Storm Noel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Though not the most powerful storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane season, Tropical Storm Noel was among the most deadly. Only Category 5 Hurricane Felix and its associated flooding had a higher toll. The slow-moving Tropical Storm Noel inundated the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, and the Bahamas with heavy rain between October 28 and November 1, 2007. The resulting floods and mudslides left at least 115 dead and thousands homeless throughout the Caribbean, reported the Associated Press on November 2, 2007. This image shows the distribution of the rainfall that made Noel a deadly storm. The image shows rainfall totals as measured by the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from October 26 through November 1, 2007. The analysis is based on measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas, northeast of Noel's center. Areas of dark red show that rainfall totals over the south-central Dominican Republic and parts of the Bahamas were over 551 millimeters (21 inches). Much of eastern Hispaniola, including both the Dominican Republic and Haiti received at least 200 mm (about 8 inches) of rain, shown in yellow. Rainfall totals over Haiti and Cuba were less, with a range of at least 50 mm (2 inches) to over 200 mm (8 inches).

  14. Medical geochemistry of tropical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, C. B.; Chandrajith, Rohana

    1999-10-01

    Geochemically, tropical environments are unique. This uniqueness stems from the fact that these terrains are continuously subjected to extreme rainfall and drought with resulting strong geochemical fractionation of elements. This characteristic geochemical partitioning results in either severe depletion of elements or accumulation to toxic levels. In both these situations, the effect on plant, animal and human health is marked. Medical geochemistry involves the study of the relationships between the geochemistry of the environment in which we live and the health of the population living in this particular domain. Interestingly, the relationships between geochemistry and health are most marked in the tropical countries, which coincidentally are among the poorest in the world. The very heavy dependence on the immediate environment for sustainable living in these lands enables the medical geochemist to observe correlations between particular geochemical provinces and the incidence of certain diseases unique to these terrains. The aetiology of diseases such as dental and skeletal fluorosis, iodine deficiency disorders, diseases of humans and animals caused by mineral imbalances among others, lie clearly in the geochemical environment. The study of the chemistry of the soils, water and stream sediments in relation to the incidence of geographically distributed diseases in the tropics has not only opened up new frontiers in multidisciplinary research, but has offered new challenges to the medical profession to seriously focus attention on the emerging field of medical geochemistry with the collaboration of geochemists and epidemiologists.

  15. [Cutaneous mycoses as a problem of the tropics. II. Subcutaneous tropical mycoses].

    PubMed

    Jeske, J

    2001-01-01

    Cutaneous mycoses are third among diseases after parasitic and infectious ones that pose problems for persons returning from the tropics. The paper presents semiotics of the following tropical subcutaneous mycoses: sporotrichosis, chromoblastomycosis, maduromycosis, pheohyphomycosis, zygomycosis and lobomycosis.

  16. Tropical forest preservation using economic incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Katzman, M.T. ); Cale, W.G. Jr. )

    1990-12-01

    The authors address the problem of deforestation of the tropical forests in terms of economic factors. They outline the global effects, such as hydrological and climatological changes, that apparently small scale deforestation has, when the forest is destroyed in many different places. The authors suggest that industrialized nations should offer economic incentives for tropical nations to save their forests, since all the world will suffer the effects of tropical deforestation.

  17. [Tropical spastic paraparesis in a non tropical region].

    PubMed

    Pias-Peleteiro, L; Pias-Peleteiro, J M; Arias, M

    2015-10-16

    Introduccion. El virus linfotropo humano de celulas T tipo 1 (HTLV-1) es el agente causal de la paraparesia espastica tropical. Su prevalencia, elevada en determinadas areas tropicales, es baja en Europa y Norteamerica. Casos clinicos. Se describen dos casos de paraparesia espastica tropical en varones naturales y residentes en Galicia. Se realizaron estudios analiticos en la sangre y el liquido cefalorraquideo (LCR), examenes neurofisiologicos y resonancia magnetica craneal y medular. En ambos pacientes, la presentacion clinica fue la de una mielopatia cronica, con cuadro torpido y progresivo que evoluciono a paraparesia espastica. Un paciente desarrollo uveitis antes de la clinica neurologica. En los dos casos, el estudio del LCR demostro leve pleocitosis linfoide, ligera hiperproteinorraquia, bandas oligoclonales negativas y anticuerpos anti-HTLV-1 positivos. La reaccion en cadena de la polimerasa para HTLV-1 resulto positiva en ambos casos. La resonancia magnetica raquidea resulto normal en un paciente y mostro en el otro hiperseñal medular dorsal, que desaparecio tras el tratamiento. No se demostraron datos de polineuropatia periferica. Recibieron corticoides e interferon alfa, con leve mejoria y estabilizacion del cuadro clinico. La anamnesis dirigida revelo antecedentes de contactos sexuales de riesgo en regiones endemicas de HTLV-1. Conclusiones. La uveitis asociada a HTLV-1 podria ser predictora de paraparesia espastica tropical. Esta es probablemente una entidad infradiagnosticada (alto porcentaje de portadores asintomaticos, clinica insidiosa y bajo indice de sospecha en areas no endemicas). Debe considerarse su diagnostico en zonas no tropicales que reciben inmigrantes de areas endemicas y tambien en regiones con una tradicional emigracion a regiones tropicales.

  18. [Tropical medicine/tropical dermatology training in Tanzania and Ghana: Personal experience and selected case reports].

    PubMed

    Völker, K

    2015-05-01

    As a consultant for dermatology with special interested in tropical diseases, I accepted my employers offer (German Armed Forces) to start my training in tropical medicine and tropical dermatology in Africa. The dermatological part of the training was completed at the Regional Dermatology Training Centre (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania. This was followed by tropical medicine training at the Presbyterian Hospital in Agogo, Ghana. In this article, I report on my experiences in Africa and present selected case reports.

  19. The ecology of tropical lakes and rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    This is self-contained text reviewing tropical limnology. It discusses a number of communities in detail, including plankton, benthic regions, and the water margins. It introduces the characteristic types and assemblies of animals and plants from tropical communities. The measurement and relative magnitude of such quantifiable aspects as abundance, biomass, primary production, secondary production, and decomposition are all outlined, drawing together the diverse threads of freshwater ecology over one of the earth's climatic belts. Deals with use and abuse of water in the tropics and looks at problems of diversity and diversification in tropical waters.

  20. Interactions between climate and tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    For the last 50 years, there have been two major thrusts in tropical cyclone research: determining the state of the atmosphere and ocean that is suitable for the formation of tropical storms (the genesis criteria) and short-term forecasting of the track and intensity of storms. Efforts to forecast seasonal storm activity, especially in the North Atlantic Ocean, have been undertaken through empirical means and, more recently, using low-resolution climate models. Climate model results have been exceptionally encouraging suggesting that the tropical cyclogenesis factors are predictable and are part of the large scale tropical circulation. During the last few years, a spate of papers has noted the relationship between changes in sea-surface temperature (SST) and tropical cyclone intensity and frequency. A critical issue is determining to what degree the frequency of hurricanes, as well as their intensity distribution, will change in a warming world. We discuss recent research regarding the interactions of the climate system with tropical cyclones, including the role of climate in determining the genesis of tropical cyclones and the role of tropical cyclones in the heat balance of the planet. Specifically: (i) We re-examine the genesis criteria of tropical cyclones and add two new criteria based on the behavior of waves in a flow varying in longitude and the inertial instability of equatorial flow in a cross-equatorial pressure gradient environment. Tropical cyclones are seen to form where the stretching deformation is negative and where large-scale waves transform into tight smaller and highly energetic scale vortices. We also discuss the tendency for storms to develop and intensify where the near-equatorial flow is inertially unstable. (ii) Tropical cyclones act to cool the tropical oceans by > 1K/year by evaporation of ocean surface water and by entrainment mixing with cooler water from below the mixed layer. We suggest that tropical cyclones are important part of

  1. Nitrous oxide flux following tropical land clearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luizao, Flavio; Luizao, Regina; Matson, Pamela; Livingston, Gerald; Vitousek, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The importance of seasonal cycles of N2O flux from tropical ecosystems and the possibility that tropical deforestation could contribute to the ongoing global increase in N2O concentrations were assessed by measuring N2O flux from forest, cleared land, and pasture over an annual cycle in the central Amazon. A pasture that had been converted from tropical forest had threefold greater annual N2O flux than a paired forest site; similar results were obtained in spot measurements in other pastures. If these results are general, such tropical pastures represent a globally significant source of increased N2O.

  2. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Alexey

    2013-12-07

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  3. Methane Emission from Tropical Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawakuchi, H. O.; Rasera, M. F. F. L.; Krusche, A. V.; Ballester, M. V. R.

    2012-04-01

    Inland water is already known as an important source of methane to atmosphere. Methane is produced in anaerobic environments usually find in lakes and floodplain bottom sediment. It is the main reason that almost all information regarding methane flux come from this environments. However, while floodplain dries during low water season reducing methanogenesis, rivers keep the capacity to emit methane throughout the year. Here we present preliminary results of CH4 flux measurements done in 6 large tropical rivers within the Amazon basin. We measured 17 areas using floating chamber during dry (low water) season, between September and November of 2011, in Amazon river mainstem, Araguaia, Xingu, Tapajós, Madeira, and Negro Rivers. Measured fluxes of all rivers ranged from 59.3 to 2974.4 mmol m-2 yr-1. Geomorphologic structure of channels is one important factor that contributes to this high heterogeneity due to development of low flow velocity depositional settings allowing formation of anoxic zones in rivers. Hydraulic and sediment barriers in the confluence of river channels promote the generation of natural dams which function as a trap for the suspension load favoring the deposition of organic rich muds. This kind of environment is very different from common river channels and has a stronger potential of methane emission. Average values of our flux measurements for this two river environments show that depositional areas can have much higher fluxes than the main channel, 1089.6 and 163.1 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively. Hence, CH4 flux from these depositional zones is similar to some tropical floodplain lakes and reservoirs. Although the low flux from channel, the area covered by water is very large resulting in a significant contribution to the regional methane emission to the atmosphere. Moreover, mapping the area of these depositional river zones will give us a better idea of the magnitude of methane flux from tropical rivers.

  4. Tropical Storm Iniki, Central Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Tropical Storm Iniki in the North Pacific (40.5N, 152.5W) was dissipating from hurricane status when this photo was taken. Two days prior, as a full fledged hurricane, with winds of about 150 mph and waves of over 15 ft., it swept over the Hawaiian island of Kauai. But, as Iniki moved over the colder waters of the North Pacific, it began to weaken as can be seen by the lack of a tight spiral gyre and the absence of an eye in the center.

  5. Satellite detection of tropical burning in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Michael; Holben, Brent

    1987-01-01

    Tropical burning often occurs in remote areas of the world. Satellite remote sensing is the only practical solution for detecting and monitoring this burning. The capability of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration polar orbiting satellites to detect tropical fire activity in the Manaus, Brazil area is demonstrated.

  6. Tropical Forests. Global Issues Education Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, Amy E.

    Tropical forests provide the world with many products and an incredible diversity of plant and animal life. These forests also provide watershed areas, soil control, climate regulation, and winter homes for migrating birds from North America. It is believed that about 40% of tropical forests have already been destroyed in the last 20-30 years,…

  7. Use of tropical maize for bioethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical maize is an alternative energy crop being considered as a feedstock for bioethanol production in the North Central and Midwest United States. Tropical maize is advantageous because it produces large amounts of soluble sugars in its stalks, creates a large amount of biomass, and requires lo...

  8. Mission Investigates Tropical Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenson, Eric; Starr, David; Toon, Owen B.

    2004-02-01

    It has been a year since NASA conducted the highly successful Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment Study (CRYSTAL-FACE). The measurement campaign was designed to investigate the physical properties and formation processes of tropical cirrus clouds. CRYSTAL-FACE was sponsored by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise as an integral component of its Earth observation research strategy, and included substantial collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and the Naval Research Laboratory. During July 2002, the mission's six aircraft (NASA ER-2, NASA WB-57, Scaled Composites Proteus, University of North Dakota Citation, NSF-supported NRL P-3, and NRL Twin Otter) operated from the Key West Naval Air Facility. In addition, ground sites were located at the Tamiami airport on the east coast of Florida and near Everglades City on the west coast of Florida. Aircraft and ground site measurements are listed in Table 1. Data archiving is complete, and the data are now available to the general scientific community. Detailed instrument descriptions as well as the final data can be found on the CRYSTAL-FACE Web site (http://cloud1.arc.nasa.gov/crystalface/).

  9. Simulation of Tropical Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Guo, Zitian

    1998-01-01

    The work proposed was carried out as planned. The work described in this final report formed the basis for a follow-on research grant research grant from NASA Ames Research Center. The research objectives that were achieved during the course of our studies include the following: (1) the evaluation of several components of MM5 (Meteorological Model 5 version 2) and the Global/Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Event Simulator (GRACES) combined modeling system; (2) improved calculations of the transport of tracers for both NASA airborne missions, Study of Ozone and Nitrogen oxides experiment (SONEX) and Pacific Exploratory MIssion in the Tropics (PEM-Tropics); (3) improved source strength estimates for isoprene, dust and similar emissions from the Earth's surface. This required the use of newly available databases on the Earth's surface and vegetation; (4) completed atmospheric chemistry simulations of radicals and nitrogen oxide species; (5)improved the handling of cumulonimbus convection by modifying the existing scheme; (6) identified the role of the African Intertropical Front, using MM5's nesting capability to refine model resolution in crucial areas; modified the MM5 trajectory program to allow it to work much better for a parcel crossing the west/east boundaries.

  10. Neglected tropical diseases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lindoso, José Angelo L; Lindoso, Ana Angélica B P

    2009-01-01

    Poverty is intrinsically related to the incidence of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs). The main countries that have the lowest human development indices (HDI) and the highest burdens of NTDs are located in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Among these countries is Brazil, which is ranked 70th in HDI. Nine out of the ten NTDs established by the World Health Organization (WHO) are present in Brazil. Leishmaniasis, tuberculosis, dengue fever and leprosy are present over almost the entire Brazilian territory. More than 90% of malaria cases occur in the Northern region of the country, and lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis occur in outbreaks in a particular region. The North and Northeast regions of Brazil have the lowest HDIs and the highest rates of NTDs. These diseases are considered neglected because there is not important investment in projects for the development of new drugs and vaccines and existing programs to control these diseases are not sufficient. Another problem related to NTDs is co-infection with HIV, which favors the occurrence of severe clinical manifestations and therapeutic failure. In this article, we describe the status of the main NTDs currently occurring in Brazil and relate them to the HDI and poverty.

  11. Plate tectonics drive tropical reef biodiversity dynamics.

    PubMed

    Leprieur, Fabien; Descombes, Patrice; Gaboriau, Théo; Cowman, Peter F; Parravicini, Valeriano; Kulbicki, Michel; Melián, Carlos J; de Santana, Charles N; Heine, Christian; Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R; Pellissier, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The Cretaceous breakup of Gondwana strongly modified the global distribution of shallow tropical seas reshaping the geographic configuration of marine basins. However, the links between tropical reef availability, plate tectonic processes and marine biodiversity distribution patterns are still unknown. Here, we show that a spatial diversification model constrained by absolute plate motions for the past 140 million years predicts the emergence and movement of diversity hotspots on tropical reefs. The spatial dynamics of tropical reefs explains marine fauna diversification in the Tethyan Ocean during the Cretaceous and early Cenozoic, and identifies an eastward movement of ancestral marine lineages towards the Indo-Australian Archipelago in the Miocene. A mechanistic model based only on habitat-driven diversification and dispersal yields realistic predictions of current biodiversity patterns for both corals and fishes. As in terrestrial systems, we demonstrate that plate tectonics played a major role in driving tropical marine shallow reef biodiversity dynamics. PMID:27151103

  12. Plate tectonics drive tropical reef biodiversity dynamics.

    PubMed

    Leprieur, Fabien; Descombes, Patrice; Gaboriau, Théo; Cowman, Peter F; Parravicini, Valeriano; Kulbicki, Michel; Melián, Carlos J; de Santana, Charles N; Heine, Christian; Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R; Pellissier, Loïc

    2016-05-06

    The Cretaceous breakup of Gondwana strongly modified the global distribution of shallow tropical seas reshaping the geographic configuration of marine basins. However, the links between tropical reef availability, plate tectonic processes and marine biodiversity distribution patterns are still unknown. Here, we show that a spatial diversification model constrained by absolute plate motions for the past 140 million years predicts the emergence and movement of diversity hotspots on tropical reefs. The spatial dynamics of tropical reefs explains marine fauna diversification in the Tethyan Ocean during the Cretaceous and early Cenozoic, and identifies an eastward movement of ancestral marine lineages towards the Indo-Australian Archipelago in the Miocene. A mechanistic model based only on habitat-driven diversification and dispersal yields realistic predictions of current biodiversity patterns for both corals and fishes. As in terrestrial systems, we demonstrate that plate tectonics played a major role in driving tropical marine shallow reef biodiversity dynamics.

  13. Plate tectonics drive tropical reef biodiversity dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leprieur, Fabien; Descombes, Patrice; Gaboriau, Théo; Cowman, Peter F.; Parravicini, Valeriano; Kulbicki, Michel; Melián, Carlos J.; de Santana, Charles N.; Heine, Christian; Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R.; Pellissier, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The Cretaceous breakup of Gondwana strongly modified the global distribution of shallow tropical seas reshaping the geographic configuration of marine basins. However, the links between tropical reef availability, plate tectonic processes and marine biodiversity distribution patterns are still unknown. Here, we show that a spatial diversification model constrained by absolute plate motions for the past 140 million years predicts the emergence and movement of diversity hotspots on tropical reefs. The spatial dynamics of tropical reefs explains marine fauna diversification in the Tethyan Ocean during the Cretaceous and early Cenozoic, and identifies an eastward movement of ancestral marine lineages towards the Indo-Australian Archipelago in the Miocene. A mechanistic model based only on habitat-driven diversification and dispersal yields realistic predictions of current biodiversity patterns for both corals and fishes. As in terrestrial systems, we demonstrate that plate tectonics played a major role in driving tropical marine shallow reef biodiversity dynamics. PMID:27151103

  14. Plate tectonics drive tropical reef biodiversity dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprieur, Fabien; Descombes, Patrice; Gaboriau, Théo; Cowman, Peter F.; Parravicini, Valeriano; Kulbicki, Michel; Melián, Carlos J.; de Santana, Charles N.; Heine, Christian; Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R.; Pellissier, Loïc

    2016-05-01

    The Cretaceous breakup of Gondwana strongly modified the global distribution of shallow tropical seas reshaping the geographic configuration of marine basins. However, the links between tropical reef availability, plate tectonic processes and marine biodiversity distribution patterns are still unknown. Here, we show that a spatial diversification model constrained by absolute plate motions for the past 140 million years predicts the emergence and movement of diversity hotspots on tropical reefs. The spatial dynamics of tropical reefs explains marine fauna diversification in the Tethyan Ocean during the Cretaceous and early Cenozoic, and identifies an eastward movement of ancestral marine lineages towards the Indo-Australian Archipelago in the Miocene. A mechanistic model based only on habitat-driven diversification and dispersal yields realistic predictions of current biodiversity patterns for both corals and fishes. As in terrestrial systems, we demonstrate that plate tectonics played a major role in driving tropical marine shallow reef biodiversity dynamics.

  15. Global trends in tropical cyclone risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peduzzi, P.; Chatenoux, B.; Dao, H.; de Bono, A.; Herold, C.; Kossin, J.; Mouton, F.; Nordbeck, O.

    2012-04-01

    The impact of tropical cyclones on humans depends on the number of people exposed and their vulnerability, as well as the frequency and intensity of storms. How will the cumulative effects of climate change, demography and vulnerability affect risk? Conventionally, reports assessing tropical cyclone risk trends are based on reported losses, but these figures are biased by improvements to information access. Here we present a new methodology based on thousands of physically observed events and related contextual parameters. We show that mortality risk depends on tropical cyclone intensity, exposure, levels of poverty and governance. Despite the projected reduction in the frequency of tropical cyclones, projected increases in both demographic pressure and tropical cyclone intensity over the next 20 years can be expected to greatly increase the number of people exposed per year and exacerbate disaster risk, despite potential progression in development and governance.

  16. [Training in tropical medicine in France].

    PubMed

    Touze, Jean-Étienne; Laroche, Roland

    2013-10-01

    Tropical medicine was a key element of the medical structures provided by France to our former colonies and, later; to countries within the scope of our international cooperation. hI recent decades, France has drastically reduced its bilateral commitments to countries in the tropics, and especially in sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, the teaching of tropical medicine, which was highly regarded even beyond our borders, has lost a good deal of its expertise. Initially available in a few large French centers, and ensured by teachers with extensive field experience, training in tropical medicine is now offered in many universities. However; their programs and educational objectives, focusing mainly on infectious and parasitic diseases, no longer meet the healthcare priorities of southern countries, which are facing an epidemiological transition and the rise of non communicable diseases. Few teachers now have recognized expertise in tropical medicine. These changes have had negative consequences for research programs in tropical medicine and for the image of French assistance to developing countries. In this context, the followving perspectives should be considered: 1) training in tropical medicine should be enhanced by the creation of a national diploma recognized by international bodies. 2) The creation of a doctoral course in tropical medicine is a prerequisite for achieving this goal, and the future diploma must include a significant research component. 3) Teaching in tropical medicine must become more practical and be ensured by teachers with extensive field experience. 4) Training in tropical medicine should be part of a bilateral relationship with countries in the tropics, each party contributing its expertise while respecting that of its partners. 5) Training in tropical medicine should be backed uip by high-level scientific research based on enhanced synergy of our current networks (Institute for Research and Development, Network of overseas Pasteur

  17. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  18. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  19. Thermal comfort in tropical classrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, A.G.

    1998-10-01

    This paper examines the comfort criteria of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55-1992 for their applicability in tropical classrooms. A field study conducted in Hawaii used a variety of methods to collect the data: survey questionnaires, physical measurements, interviews, and behavioral observations. A total of 3,544 students and teachers completed questionnaires in 29 naturally ventilated and air-conditioned classrooms in six schools during two seasons. The majority of classrooms failed to meet the physical specifications of the Standard 55 comfort zone. Thermal neutrality, preference, and acceptability results are compared with other field studies and the Standard 55 criteria. Acceptability votes by occupants of both naturally ventilated and air-conditioned classrooms exceeded the standard`s 80% acceptability criteria, regardless of whether physical conditions were in or out of the comfort zone. Responses from these two school populations suggest not only a basis for separate comfort standards but energy conservation opportunities through raising thermostat set points.

  20. CHROMOBLASTOMYCOSIS: A NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    QUEIROZ-TELLES, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromoblastomycosis (CMB) is a chronic fungal infection of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue caused by a transcutaneous traumatic inoculation of a specific group of dematiaceous fungi occurring mainly in tropical and subtropical zones worldwide. If not diagnosed at early stages, patients with CBM require long term therapy with systemic antifungals, sometimes associated with physical methods. Unlike other neglected endemic mycoses, comparative clinical trials have not been performed for this disease. Nowadays, therapy is based on a few open trials and on expert opinion. Itraconazole either as monotherapy or associated with other drugs, or with physical methods, is widely used. Recently, photodynamic therapy has been successfully employed in combination with antifungals in patients presenting with CBM. In the present revision the most used therapeutic options against CBM are reviewed as well as the several factors that may have impact on the patient's outcome. PMID:26465369

  1. CHROMOBLASTOMYCOSIS: A NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Queiroz-Telles, Flavio

    2015-09-01

    Chromoblastomycosis (CMB) is a chronic fungal infection of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue caused by a transcutaneous traumatic inoculation of a specific group of dematiaceous fungi occurring mainly in tropical and subtropical zones worldwide. If not diagnosed at early stages, patients with CBM require long term therapy with systemic antifungals, sometimes associated with physical methods. Unlike other neglected endemic mycoses, comparative clinical trials have not been performed for this disease. Nowadays, therapy is based on a few open trials and on expert opinion. Itraconazole either as monotherapy or associated with other drugs, or with physical methods, is widely used. Recently, photodynamic therapy has been successfully employed in combination with antifungals in patients presenting with CBM. In the present revision the most used therapeutic options against CBM are reviewed as well as the several factors that may have impact on the patient's outcome.

  2. Predictability of the tropical atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of the deterministic predictability for tropics and middle-latitudes separately indicates that the theoretical upper limit of deterministic predictability for low latitudes is shorter than that for middle latitudes. Variability of time averages in low latitudes is mainly determined by the location and intensity of the large-scale Hadley and Walker circulations. Since these are largely influenced by the slowly varying boundary conditions of sea surface temperature and soil moisture, and since synoptic instabilities are not strong enough to change drastically the large scale flow, there is larger potential for predictability of monthly and seasonal means in low latitudes. It is conjectured that for short and medium range deterministic prediction, a prescribed diabatic heating field due to moist convection may be more useful than their explicit calculation from the evolving flow.

  3. Microphysical Characteristics of Tropical Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grainger, Cedric A.; Anderson, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the analysis of data collected by the University of North Dakota Citation II measurement platform during three TRMM Field measurement campaigns. The Citation II made cloud measurements during TEFLUN B in Florida, the LBA program in Brazil, and KWAJEX in Kwajalein. The work performed can be divided into two parts. The first part consisted of reformatting the Citation data into a form more easily used to compare to the satellite information. The second part consisted of examination of the cloud data in order to characterize the properties of the tropical clouds. The reformatting of the Citation data was quite labor intensive and, due to the fact that the aircraft was involved in three of the field campaigns, it required a substantial number of person-hours to complete. Much of the analysis done on the second part was done in conjunction with the thesis work of Nicholas Anderson, then a graduate student at the University of North Dakota.

  4. [Melioidosis: an emerging tropical disease].

    PubMed

    Valade, E; Thibault, F M; Biot, F V; Vidal, D R

    2009-10-01

    Melioidosis is an infection affecting both human and animal health. The causative agent is Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative soil bacterium. Melioidosis is endemic in tropical areas of Southeast Asia and Northern Australia, and sporadic in many other countries. Clinical presentation is variable ranging from acute septicemia, isolated pulmonary infection, or chronic granulomatous lesions to asymptomatic forms with positive serology. There is no vaccine and treatment is difficult because B. pseudomallei is resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. Relapses are common. B. pseudomallei is listed as a biological risk class 3 and considered as a potential bioterrorism agent due to its high virulence by inhalation, to the difficulty of treatment, and to the lack of vaccine. PMID:20025169

  5. Acute kidney injury in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; George, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most challenging problems faced by clinicians in the tropics owing to its fast-changing burden. AKI in the tropics is strikingly different from that in the developed world in terms of etiology and presentation. In addition, there is a stark contrast between well-developed and poor areas in the tropics. The true epidemiological picture of AKI in the tropics is not well understood due to the late presentation of patients to tertiary centers. Infections remain the major culprit in most cases of AKI, with high mortality rates in the tropics. Human immunodeficiency virus–related AKI, related to nephrotoxicity due to antiretroviral therapy, is on the rise. Acute tubular necrosis and thrombotic microangiopathy are the most common mechanisms of AKI. A notable problem in the tropics is the scarcity of resources in health centers to support patients who require critical care due to AKI. This article reviews the unique and contrasting nature of AKI in the tropics and describes its management in each situation. PMID:21911980

  6. Anthropogenic Aerosols and Tropical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Kim, D.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Barth, M. C.; Rasch, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols can affect the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system and precipitation by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) and thus modifying the optical and microphysical properties as well as lifetimes of clouds. Recent studies have also suggested that the direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols, particularly absorbing aerosols, can perturb the large-scale circulation and cause a significant change in both quantity and distribution of critical tropical precipitation systems ranging from Pacific and Indian to Atlantic Oceans. This effect of aerosols on precipitation often appears in places away from aerosol-concentrated regions and current results suggest that the precipitation changes caused by it could be much more substantial than that by the microphysics-based aerosol effect. To understand the detailed mechanisms and strengths of such a "remote impact" and the climate response/feedback to anthropogenic aerosols in general, an interactive aerosol-climate model has been developed based on the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) of NCAR. Its aerosol module describes size, chemical composition, and mixing states of various sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols. Several model processes are derived based on 3D cloud-resolving model simulations. We have conducted a set of long integrations using the model driven by radiative effects of different combinations of various carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols and their mixtures. The responses of tropical precipitation systems to the forcing of these aerosols are analyzed using both model and observational data. Detailed analyses on the aerosol-precipitation causal relations of two systems: i.e., the Indian summer monsoon and Pacific ITCZ will be specifically presented.

  7. Equatorial refuge amid tropical warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, Kristopher B.; Cohen, Anne L.

    2012-07-01

    Upwelling across the tropical Pacific Ocean is projected to weaken in accordance with a reduction of the atmospheric overturning circulation, enhancing the increase in sea surface temperature relative to other regions in response to greenhouse-gas forcing. In the central Pacific, home to one of the largest marine protected areas and fishery regions in the global tropics, sea surface temperatures are projected to increase by 2.8°C by the end of this century. Of critical concern is that marine protected areas may not provide refuge from the anticipated rate of large-scale warming, which could exceed the evolutionary capacity of coral and their symbionts to adapt. Combining high-resolution satellite measurements, an ensemble of global climate models and an eddy-resolving regional ocean circulation model, we show that warming and productivity decline around select Pacific islands will be mitigated by enhanced upwelling associated with a strengthening of the equatorial undercurrent. Enhanced topographic upwelling will act as a negative feedback, locally mitigating the surface warming. At the Gilbert Islands, the rate of warming will be reduced by 0.7+/-0.3°C or 25+/-9% per century, or an overall cooling effect comparable to the local anomaly for a typical El Niño, by the end of this century. As the equatorial undercurrent is dynamically constrained to the Equator, only a handful of coral reefs stand to benefit from this equatorial island effect. Nevertheless, those that do face a lower rate of warming, conferring a significant advantage over neighbouring reef systems. If realized, these predictions help to identify potential refuges for coral reef communities from anticipated climate changes of the twenty-first century.

  8. Tropical medicine: Telecommunications and technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legters, Llewellyn J.

    1991-01-01

    The potential for global outbreaks of tropical infectious diseases, and our ability to identify and respond to such outbreaks is a major concern. Rapid, efficient telecommunications is viewed as part of the solution to this set of problems - the means to link a network of epidemiological field stations via satellite with U.S. academic institutions and government agencies, for purposes of research, training in tropical medicine, and observation of and response to epidemic emergencies. At a workshop, telecommunications and technology transfer were addressed and applications of telecommunications technology in long-distance consultation, teaching and disaster relief were demonstrated. Applications in teaching and consultation in tropical infectious diseases is discussed.

  9. Variability in subtropical-tropical cells drives oxygen levels in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duteil, Olaf; Böning, Claus W.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies found a negative trend in oxygen concentrations in tropical regions during the last decades. Employing a biogeochemical circulation model, we highlight the importance of wind-driven ocean transport associated with the Subtropical-Tropical Cells (STCs) in setting the oxygen levels in the tropical ocean. The observed and simulated slowdown of the STCs by 30% from the 1960s to the 1990s caused a decrease in oxygen transport to the tropics. Transport of phosphate was similarly reduced, decreasing export production and respiration. The effects of physical transport and biological consumption partly compensate, damping oxygen interannual and decadal variability. Our results suggest that the observed residual oxygen trend in the tropical Pacific is mainly driven by changes in oxygen transport. Accordingly, the observed recent strengthening of the STCs leads us to expect a pause in the oxygen decrease or even an increase of tropical Pacific oxygen values in the near future.

  10. Variability in subtropical-tropical cells drives oxygen levels in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duteil, Olaf; Böning, Claus W.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies found a negative trend in oxygen concentrations in tropical regions during the last decades. Employing a biogeochemical circulation model, we highlight the importance of wind-driven ocean transport associated with the Subtropical-Tropical Cells (STCs) in setting the oxygen levels in the tropical ocean. The observed and simulated slowdown of the STCs by 30% from the 1960s to the 1990s caused a decrease in oxygen transport to the tropics. Transport of phosphate was similarly reduced, decreasing export production and respiration. The effects of physical transport and biological consumption partly compensate, damping oxygen interannual and decadal variability. Our results suggest that the observed residual oxygen trend in the tropical Pacific is mainly driven by changes in oxygen transport. Accordingly, the observed recent strengthening of the STCs leads us to expect a pause in the oxygen decrease or even an increase of tropical Pacific oxygen values in the near future.

  11. Tropical deep convective cloud morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igel, Matthew R.

    A cloud-object partitioning algorithm is developed. It takes contiguous CloudSat cloudy regions and identifies various length scales of deep convective clouds from a tropical, oceanic subset of data. The methodology identifies a level above which anvil characteristics become important by analyzing the cloud object shape. Below this level in what is termed the pedestal region, convective cores are identified based on reflectivity maxima. Identifying these regions allows for the assessment of length scales of the anvil and pedestal of the deep convective clouds. Cloud objects are also appended with certain environmental quantities from the ECMWF reanalysis. Simple geospatial and temporal assessments show that the cloud object technique agrees with standard observations of local frequency of deep-convective cloudiness. Additionally, the nature of cloud volume scale populations is investigated. Deep convection is seen to exhibit power-law scaling. It is suggested that this scaling has implications for the continuous, scale invariant, and random nature of the physics controlling tropical deep convection and therefore on the potentially unphysical nature of contemporary convective parameterizations. Deep-convective clouds over tropical oceans play important roles in Earth's climate system. The response of tropical, deep convective clouds to sea surface temperatures (SSTs) is investigated using this new data set. Several previously proposed feedbacks are examined: the FAT hypothesis, the Iris hypothesis, and the Thermostat hypothesis. When the data are analyzed per cloud object, each hypothesis is broadly found to correctly predict cloud behavior in nature, although it appears that the FAT hypothesis needs a slight modification to allow for cooling cloud top temperatures with increasing SSTs. A new response that shows that the base temperature of deep convective anvils remains approximately constant with increasing SSTs is introduced. These cloud-climate feedbacks are

  12. Global barotropic response to a tropical forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Mcguirk, James P.

    1993-01-01

    Zonally varying flow has been used to initialize numerical models and has been shown to play an important role in strong localized responses both in extratropics and the tropics. In this study, a climatological 200 mb January mean is used as a steady basic state of a barotropical model which consists of shallow water equations and a mass source centered at 4 deg S/120 deg E to simulate convective heating over Indonesia region. In the experiment, tropical responses appear not only over the western Pacific, where the forcing is located, but also over the eastern Pacific where the response is related to the zonally varying basic state. The westward propagating equatorial Rossby waves excited by the forcing interact with waves out of and into the tropics and the positive and negative phase of the Rossby waves result in blocking circulation over North America and tropical plumes over equatorial eastern Pacific, respectively.

  13. GPM Flyby of Tropical Cyclone Uriah

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Feb. 15, GPM saw rain was falling at a rate of over 127 mm (5 inches) per hour in a band of intense storms south of Tropical Cyclone Uriah's center. Thunderstorms moving around the southwestern ...

  14. Source of microbaroms from tropical cyclone waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Justin E.; Cheung, Kwok Fai; GarcéS, Milton A.; Fee, David

    2011-03-01

    Microbaroms are continuous infrasonic signals with a dominant frequency around 0.2 Hz produced by ocean surface waves. Monitoring stations around the globe routinely detect strong microbaroms in the lee of tropical cyclones. We utilize a parametric wind model and a spectral wave model to construct the tropical cyclone wave field and a theoretical acoustic source model to describe the intensity, spatial distribution, and dynamics of microbarom sources. This approach excludes ambient wave conditions and facilitates a parametric analysis to elucidate the source mechanism within the storm. A stationary tropical cyclone produces the strongest microbarom signals at the center, where the waves generated by the cyclonic winds converge. As the tropical cyclone moves forward, the converging wave field becomes less coherent and lags and expands behind the storm center. The models predict a direct relation between the storm forward speed and the location of maximum microbarom source intensity consistent with the infrasonic observations from Hurricane Felicia 2009 in the North Central Pacific.

  15. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Adam H; Camargo, Suzana J; Hall, Timothy M; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K; Wing, Allison A

    2016-07-15

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  16. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Adam H; Camargo, Suzana J; Hall, Timothy M; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K; Wing, Allison A

    2016-07-15

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities. PMID:27418502

  17. Tropical Storm Gilma in Eastern Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Gilma from August 7-10, 2012, along the coast of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This visualization was created by the NASA...

  18. Tropical Cyclone Jack in Satellite 3-D

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D flyby from NASA's TRMM satellite of Tropical Cyclone Jack on April 21 shows that some of the thunderstorms were shown by TRMM PR were still reaching height of at least 17 km (10.5 miles). ...

  19. GMI Rainfall Data on Tropical Storm Adjali

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows GMI rainfall data on Tropical Storm Adjali on Nov. 19, 2014 combined with cloud data from the METEOSAT-7 satellite. Rainfall was found to be falling at a rate of over 69 mm/hr ...

  20. Isaac's Remnants; Tropical Storms Kirk, Michael

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of GOES-13 satellite observations from Sept. 1-4, 2012, showing Isaac's remnants move from the central to eastern U.S., Tropical Storm Leslie nearing Bermuda, Kirk fading in the No. Atlan...

  1. Tropical Deforestation in the Bolivian Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Compton J.; Steininger, Marc K.; Townshend, John R. G.; Killeen, Timothy R.; Desch, Arthur

    2000-01-01

    Landsat satellite images from the mid-1980s and early 1990s were used to map tropical forest extent and deforestation in approximately 800,000 sq km of Amazonian Bolivia. Forest cover extent, including tropical deciduous forest, totalled 472,000 sq km while the area of natural non-forest formations totalled 298,000 sq km. The area deforested totalled 15,000 sq km in the middle 1980s and 28,800 sq km by the early 1990s. The rate of tropical deforestation in the >1,000 mm/y precipitation forest zone of Bolivia was 2,200 sq km/y from 1985-1986 to 1992-1994. We document a spatially-concentrated "deforestation zone" in Santa Cruz Department where >60% of the Bolivian deforestation is occurring at an accelerating rate in areas of tropical deciduous dry forest.

  2. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  3. Tropical Storm Wali Seen by GOESWest

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from July 15 to 18 shows the birth of Tropical Storm Wali southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii on July 17. Credit: NA...

  4. GOES video of Tropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation shows the development of System 91L into Tropical Storm Andrea over the course of 3 days from June 4 to June 6, just after Andrea was officially designated a...

  5. Tropical Storm Gil - July 31, 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM satellite traveled above intensifying Tropical Storm Gil on July 31 at 12:55 a.m. EDT. The TRMM satellite pass showed that Gil was already very well organized with intense bands of rain...

  6. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas–driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  7. Human Influence on Tropical Cyclone Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity.We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  8. GOES Movie of Tropical Storm Danielle

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from June 18 to 20 shows the development and movement Tropical Storm Danielle from the western Caribbean Sea into the Bay of Campeche/Gulf of Mexic...

  9. GPM Video of Tropical Depression Ida

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's GPM Analyzes Rainfall in Tropical Storm Ida This flyover animation was created from data taken on Sept. 24, when NASA/JAXA's GPM satellite saw some storms in Ida were dropping heavy rainfall...

  10. Infective Causes of Stroke in Tropical Regions

    PubMed Central

    Moghtaderi, Ali; Alavi-Naini, Roya

    2012-01-01

    Vascular diseases of the brain are the second reason of the death and the first cause of morbidity and disability worldwide. In tropical areas stroke has some particular features related to the nature of torrid zones. There are some special causes of the stroke, mainly infectious, although some of them are non-infectious. The most important etiologies are malaria, tuberculosis, cysticercosis, syphilis, and Chagas’ disease. The mean age of the patients with stroke in tropical areas seems to be less than that in developed countries, and the disease is more prevalent in younger adults. Prevention and/or treatment of the classic risk factors as well as factors related to tropical zones are the mainstays of controlling the disease. It has to be mentioned that lack of human as well as financial resources makes it difficult to control and treat the disease properly. Herein, the etiologies and risk factors of the cerebrovascular diseases in tropical regions will be reviewd. PMID:23115446

  11. Pathology of renal diseases in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Boonpucknavig, Vijitr; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh

    2003-01-01

    Renal diseases unique to the tropics are those that occur in association with infectious diseases including dengue hemorrhagic fever, typhoid fever, shigellosis, leptospirosis, lepromatous leprosy, malaria, opisthorchiasis, and schistosomiasis. These renal complications can be classified on the basis of their clinical and pathologic characteristics into acute transient reversible glomerulonephritis, chronic progressive irreversible glomerulonephritis, amyloidosis, and acute renal failure (ARF) resulting from acute tubular necrosis, acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, and thrombotic microangiopathy. Certain primary glomerular diseases including immunoglobulin (Ig) M nephropathy and focal segmental and global glomerulosclerosis are prevalent in some tropical countries. Renal complications of venomous snakebites also are common in the tropics. This article discusses and summarizes important works in the literature in respect to the clinical syndromes, pathologic features, and pathogenesis of tropical renal diseases both in humans and experimental animal models.

  12. How can tropical cyclones survive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi

    2013-04-01

    How can tropical cyclones survive? It is important for understanding the development of tropical cyclones to be able to quantify the exchange of enthalpy and momentum between air and water. Air-sea fluxes are often formulated as drag CD and enthalpy CK exchange coefficients. Emanuel, 1986, derived an expression for potential intensity that depends on local environment parameters and is proportional to the ratio of enthalpy and drag coefficients. This ratio should be larger than 0.75 for a cyclone to develop. There are no direct surface measurements of CK/ CD under hurricane conditions and extrapolation from most open-ocean measurements at 25 m/s gives values of CK/ CD< 0.75 and in that case no cyclone could survive and Emanuel's theory must be wrong. However there are measurements of CK taken over the Baltic Sea and Lake Ontario showing increasing values of CK up to 2.5 for wind speeds around 12 m/s. If this can be implemented for hurricane conditions the ratio CK/ CD>0.75 is in accordance with Emanuel's prediction. The high CK values are observed during situations when there is a regime shift of the structure of turbulence in the boundary layer. From spectral analysis it was found that as the boundary layer approaches neutral stratification, smaller-scale eddies become increasingly important in the turbulent transport of humidity and sensible heat and thus enhance the exchange coefficient CK. This turbulence regime is called the UVCN regime and require high wind speed, small temperature difference between air and water, sufficiently strong wind gradients and growing sea condition ( Smedman et al., 2007, Sahlee et al., 2008). What is the difference between world oceans and enclosed seas? The answer is the waves. The wave field over the open oceans is swell dominated but in enclosed seas and coastal areas swell is restricted mainly to low wind speed conditions, and swell is short lived because of short distances to the shores. When swell is present the MABL will be

  13. Promoting the confluence of tropical cyclone research.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Contributions of biologists to tropical cyclone research may improve by integrating concepts from other disciplines. Employing accumulated cyclone energy into protocols may foster greater integration of ecology and meteorology research. Considering experienced ecosystems as antifragile instead of just resilient may improve cross-referencing among ecological and social scientists. Quantifying ecosystem capital as distinct from ecosystem services may improve integration of tropical cyclone ecology research into the expansive global climate change research community.

  14. Objective classification of historical tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenoweth, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Preinstrumental records of historical tropical cyclone activity require objective methods for accurately categorizing tropical cyclone intensity. Here wind force terms and damage reports from newspaper accounts in the Lesser Antilles and Jamaica for the period 1795-1879 are compared with wind speed estimates calculated from barometric pressure data. A total of 95 separate barometric pressure readings and colocated simultaneous wind force descriptors and wind-induced damage reports are compared. The wind speed estimates from barometric pressure data are taken as the most reliable and serve as a standard to compare against other data. Wind-induced damage reports are used to produce an estimated wind speed range using a modified Fujita scale. Wind force terms are compared with the barometric pressure data to determine if a gale, as used in the contemporary newspapers, is consistent with the modern definition of a gale. Results indicate that the modern definition of a gale (the threshold point separating the classification of a tropical depression from a tropical storm) is equivalent to that in contemporary newspaper accounts. Barometric pressure values are consistent with both reported wind force terms and wind damage on land when the location, speed and direction of movement of the tropical cyclone are determined. Damage reports and derived wind force estimates are consistent with other published results. Biases in ships' logbooks are confirmed and wind force terms of gale strength or greater are identified. These results offer a bridge between the earlier noninstrumental records of tropical cyclones and modern records thereby offering a method of consistently classifying storms in the Caribbean region into tropical depressions, tropical storms, nonmajor and major hurricanes.

  15. Parvalbumin--the major tropical fish allergen.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dawn Li-Chern; Neo, Keng Hwee; Yi, Fong Cheng; Chua, Kaw Yan; Goh, Denise Li-Meng; Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi; Giam, Yoke Chin; Van Bever, Hugo P S; Lee, Bee Wah

    2008-08-01

    Fish allergy is common in countries where consumption is high. Asian nations are amongst the world's largest consumers of fish but the allergen profiles of tropical fish are unknown. This study sought to evaluate the allergenicity of four commonly consumed tropical fish, the threadfin (Polynemus indicus), Indian anchovy (Stolephorus indicus), pomfret (Pampus chinensis) and tengirri (Scomberomorus guttatus). Immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity with parvalbumin of cod fish (Gad c 1), the major fish allergen, was also studied. Detection of tropical fish and cod specific-IgE was performed by UniCap assay, and skin prick tests were also carried out. The IgE-binding components of tropical fish were identified using IgE immunoblot techniques, and cross-reactivity with Gad c 1 was assessed by ELISA inhibition and IgE immunoblot inhibition. Clinically, nine of 10 patients studied were allergic to multiple fish. All patients exhibited detectable specific-IgE to cod fish (10 of 10 skin prick test positive, eight of 10 UniCap assay positive) despite lack of previous exposure. The major allergen of the four tropical fish was the 12-kDa parvalbumin. IgE cross-reactivity of these allergens to Gad c 1 was observed to be moderate to high in the tropical fish studied. Parvalbumins are the major allergens in commonly consumed tropical fish. They are cross-reactive with each other as well as with Gad c 1. Commercial tests for cod fish appear to be sufficient for the detection of tropical fish specific-IgE.

  16. Promoting the confluence of tropical cyclone research

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Contributions of biologists to tropical cyclone research may improve by integrating concepts from other disciplines. Employing accumulated cyclone energy into protocols may foster greater integration of ecology and meteorology research. Considering experienced ecosystems as antifragile instead of just resilient may improve cross-referencing among ecological and social scientists. Quantifying ecosystem capital as distinct from ecosystem services may improve integration of tropical cyclone ecology research into the expansive global climate change research community. PMID:26480001

  17. Phenology of temperate trees in tropical climates.

    PubMed

    Borchert, Rolf; Robertson, Kevin; Schwartz, Mark D; Williams-Linera, Guadalupe

    2005-09-01

    Several North American broad-leaved tree species range from the northern United States at approximately 47 degrees N to moist tropical montane forests in Mexico and Central America at 15-20 degrees N. Along this gradient the average minimum temperatures of the coldest month (T (Jan)), which characterize annual variation in temperature, increase from -10 to 12 degrees C and tree phenology changes from deciduous to leaf-exchanging or evergreen in the southern range with a year-long growing season. Between 30 and 45 degrees N, the time of bud break is highly correlated with T (Jan) and bud break can be reliably predicted for the week in which mean minimum temperature rises to 7 degrees C. Temperature-dependent deciduous phenology-and hence the validity of temperature-driven phenology models-terminates in southern North America near 30 degrees N, where T (Jan)>7 degrees C enables growth of tropical trees and cultivation of frost-sensitive citrus fruits. In tropical climates most temperate broad-leaved species exchange old for new leaves within a few weeks in January-February, i.e., their phenology becomes similar to that of tropical leaf-exchanging species. Leaf buds of the southern ecotypes of these temperate species are therefore not winter-dormant and have no chilling requirement. As in many tropical trees, bud break of Celtis, Quercus and Fagus growing in warm climates is induced in early spring by increasing daylength. In tropical climates vegetative phenology is determined mainly by leaf longevity, seasonal variation in water stress and day length. As water stress during the dry season varies widely with soil water storage, climate-driven models cannot predict tree phenology in the tropics and tropical tree phenology does not constitute a useful indicator of global warming.

  18. Which statistics should tropical biologists learn?

    PubMed

    Loaiza Velásquez, Natalia; González Lutz, María Isabel; Monge-Nájera, Julián

    2011-09-01

    Tropical biologists study the richest and most endangered biodiversity in the planet, and in these times of climate change and mega-extinctions, the need for efficient, good quality research is more pressing than in the past. However, the statistical component in research published by tropical authors sometimes suffers from poor quality in data collection; mediocre or bad experimental design and a rigid and outdated view of data analysis. To suggest improvements in their statistical education, we listed all the statistical tests and other quantitative analyses used in two leading tropical journals, the Revista de Biología Tropical and Biotropica, during a year. The 12 most frequent tests in the articles were: Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Chi-Square Test, Student's T Test, Linear Regression, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient, Mann-Whitney U Test, Kruskal-Wallis Test, Shannon's Diversity Index, Tukey's Test, Cluster Analysis, Spearman's Rank Correlation Test and Principal Component Analysis. We conclude that statistical education for tropical biologists must abandon the old syllabus based on the mathematical side of statistics and concentrate on the correct selection of these and other procedures and tests, on their biological interpretation and on the use of reliable and friendly freeware. We think that their time will be better spent understanding and protecting tropical ecosystems than trying to learn the mathematical foundations of statistics: in most cases, a well designed one-semester course should be enough for their basic requirements.

  19. Characterization of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, C.A.; Penteado, P.; Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.; Jaumann, R.; Sotin, C.

    2009-01-01

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 ??m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8??-20?? S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape. ?? 2009. The American Astronomical Society.

  20. Tracer exchange between tropics and middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard; Douglass, Anne; Weaver, Clark

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between the tropics and middle latitudes is studied using a tracer emitted at 50 hPa along a great circle route between Los Angeles, USA and Sydney, Australia. Though designed to examine the impact of stratospheric aircraft, the study more generally addresses the transport between tropics and middle latitudes for a three month period from January through March 1989. The results show that air is transported from the tropics to middle latitudes by planetary scale and tropospheric cyclonic scale waves. Except for intrusions by these wave events, the tropics are substantially isolated throughout the lower stratosphere. These waves draw material out of the tropics which ends up in the middle latitude westerly jets, with little material entering the winter polar latitudes prior to the springtime transition. The summer Southern Hemisphere is characterized by tracer being drawn out in streamers that extend from north and west to south and east. The material in the tropics is zonally asymmetric. The material that reaches the troposphere comes down in the synoptic scale eddies and is concentrated in the middle latitude jet stream. These characteristics are similar to those observed during the dispersion of volcanic clouds.

  1. Tropical skin diseases in British military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Skin complaints are common in travellers to foreign countries and are responsible for up to 25% of medical consultations by military personnel during deployments in the tropics. They also have relatively high rates of field hospital admission, medical evacuation and referral to UK Role 4 healthcare facilities. Non-infectious tropical skin diseases include sunburn, heat rash, arthropod bites, venomous bites, contact dermatitis and phytophotodermatitis. During tropical deployments skin infections that commonly occur in military personnel may become more frequent, severe and difficult to treat. Several systemic tropical infections have cutaneous features that can be useful in making early diagnoses. Tropical skin infections such as cutaneous larva migrans, cutaneous myiasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis and leprosy do occur in British troops and require specialist clinical management. This illustrated review focuses on the most significant tropical skin diseases that have occurred in British military personnel in recent years. Clinical management of these conditions on deployments would be improved and medical evacuations could be reduced if a military dermatology 'reach-back' service (including a telemedicine facility) was available.

  2. Thermal Performance of Tropical Atrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharvand, Mohammad; Bin Ahmad, Mohd Hamdan; Safikhan, Tabassom; Mirmomtaz, Sayyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2013-12-01

    Atrium is a popular architectural feature utilized widely by building designers and owners to bring various benefits such as adequate daylight, circulation spaces and surfaces for landscape applications. But atrium problems in tropical climates such as excessive daylight, glare and high temperature, which lead to increase building energy demand, have been reported. To avoid and reduce these unpleasant features, a side-lit atrium has been suggested. Although researchers proposed side-lit atrium to prevent common problems of atria, the lack of precedent research on this issue compels these authors to study atrium performance in hot and humid climate. So the research aims to examine two different atrium roof form types in terms of temperature and ventilation impacts in hot and humid climate of Malaysia using DesignBuilder as a simulation program. The results indicate lower temperature of side-lit model with better airflow pattern in comparison with top-lit model while the top-lit model provides higher air velocity at the air inlet and outlet.

  3. [Dangerous sharks in tropical seas].

    PubMed

    Maslin, J; Menard, G; Drouin, C; Pollet, L

    2000-01-01

    Sightseeing travel in tropical zones is a growing industry. The risks incurred by travelers depend on the destination, duration of stay, individual behavior, and type of leisure activity. Water sports expose visitors to encounters with dangerous marine animals. Shark attacks are rare but always serious occurrences. Divers should handle any shark, regardless of size, with due precaution. Prevention of shark attack depends on avoiding encounters by not attracting the attention of the shark and knowing the proper attitude to adopt in case an encounter should occur. Active and passive protection can be used, but each method has advantages and disadvantages depending on the situation. Rescue operations are difficult due to the gravity of injuries and their occurrence in a marine environment. This along with the nature of the aggressor explain that many attacks are immediately fatal. Wounds are often deep with involvement of bone, blood vessels, and nerves. A possible source of complication in survivors is infection, which can involve uncommon microorganisms associated with bacteria in sharks mouth or marine environment.

  4. LCSs in tropical cyclone genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, B.; Montgomery, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic most often occurs at the intersection of the wave trough axis of a westward propagating African easterly wave and the wave critical latitude. Viewed in a moving reference frame with the wave, a cat's eye region of cyclonic recirculation can be seen in streamlines prior to genesis. The cat's eye recirculation region has little strain deformation and its center serves as the focal point for aggregation of convectively generated vertical vorticity. Air inside the cat's eye is repeatedly moistened by convection and is protected from the lateral intrusion of dry air. Since the flow is inherently time-dependent, we contrast the time-dependent structures with Eulerian structures of the wave-relative frame. Time-dependence complicates the kinematic structure of the recirculation region as air masses from the outer environment are allowed to interact with the interior of the cat's eye. LCSs show different boundaries of the cat's eye than the streamlines in the wave-relative frame. These LCSs are particularly important for showing the pathways of air masses that interact with the developing vortex, as moist air promotes development by supporting deep convection, while interaction with dry air impedes development. We primarily use FTLEs to locate the LCSs, and show the role of LCSs in both developing and non-developing storms. In addition, we discuss how the vertical coherence of LCSs is important for resisting the effects of vertical wind shear.

  5. Tropical infections in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Vatsal M; Karnad, Dilip R; Bichile, Lata S

    2006-04-01

    Certain arthropod-borne infections are common in tropical regions because of favorable climatic conditions. Water-borne infections like leptospirosis are common due to contamination of water especially during the monsoon floods. Infections like malaria, leptospirosis, dengue fever and typhus sometimes cause life threatening organ dysfunction and have several overlapping features. Most patients present with classicial clinical syndromes: fever and thrombocytopenia are common in dengue, malaria and leptospirosis; coagulopathy is frequent in leptospirosis and viral hepatitis. Hepatorenal syndrome is seen in leptospirosis, falciparum malaria and scrub typhus. The pulmonary renal syndrome is caused by falciparium malaria, leptospirosis, Hantavirus infection and scrub typhus. Fever with altered mental status is produced by bacterial meningitis, Japanese B encephalitis, cerebral malarial, typhoid encephalopathy and fulminant hepatic failure due to viral hepatitis. Subtle differences in features of the organ failure exist among these infections. The diagnosis in some of these diseases is made by demonstration of antibodies in serum, and these may be negative in the first week of the illness. Hence empiric therapy for more than one disorder may be justified in a small proportion of cases. In addition to specific anti-infective therapy, management of organ dysfunction includes use of mechanical ventilation, vasopressor drugs, continuous renal replacement therapy and blood products. Timely transfer of these patients to well-equipped ICUs with experience in managing these cases can considerably decrease mortality and morbidity. PMID:16944613

  6. Tropical infections in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Vatsal M; Karnad, Dilip R; Bichile, Lata S

    2006-04-01

    Certain arthropod-borne infections are common in tropical regions because of favorable climatic conditions. Water-borne infections like leptospirosis are common due to contamination of water especially during the monsoon floods. Infections like malaria, leptospirosis, dengue fever and typhus sometimes cause life threatening organ dysfunction and have several overlapping features. Most patients present with classicial clinical syndromes: fever and thrombocytopenia are common in dengue, malaria and leptospirosis; coagulopathy is frequent in leptospirosis and viral hepatitis. Hepatorenal syndrome is seen in leptospirosis, falciparum malaria and scrub typhus. The pulmonary renal syndrome is caused by falciparium malaria, leptospirosis, Hantavirus infection and scrub typhus. Fever with altered mental status is produced by bacterial meningitis, Japanese B encephalitis, cerebral malarial, typhoid encephalopathy and fulminant hepatic failure due to viral hepatitis. Subtle differences in features of the organ failure exist among these infections. The diagnosis in some of these diseases is made by demonstration of antibodies in serum, and these may be negative in the first week of the illness. Hence empiric therapy for more than one disorder may be justified in a small proportion of cases. In addition to specific anti-infective therapy, management of organ dysfunction includes use of mechanical ventilation, vasopressor drugs, continuous renal replacement therapy and blood products. Timely transfer of these patients to well-equipped ICUs with experience in managing these cases can considerably decrease mortality and morbidity.

  7. Climatic Variability In Tropical Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seneviratne, L. W.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction Droughts in tropical countries are proved as periodic and its occurrence is shown remarkable in 9.25 year cycles as explained by the author. These cycles exist as soon or late around the central point. In the tropical regions monsoons or trade winds has a definite origin and pattern of advancing towards land mass. Ocean evaporation is the main source of rain clouds, which is drifted on to low vapour pressure zones. In the drought situation low vapour pressure zones are reduced and high vapour pressure zones are increased. Evaporation is reduced and incident solar radiation (insolation) is relatively reduced. Wind effect needed to form a cloud is low. Dry wind is passing along the land mass. Most rainy lands are subjected to prolonged droughts and hence cultivation is affected. Drought impacts create severe losses to irrigation projects. Civilization is affected by lack of food production. Lack of drinking water entirely eliminates the living animals and creatures. Eco system slowly changes to dried jungles and abandoned skeletons. Tropical conditions Sri Lanka experienced drought in 2001. Hambanthota District suffered for entire year 2000 with low rainfall. This area is not in line with monsoons and mountain ranges are not available to form dynamic cooling of air. So as the Puttalam and Mannar Districts Rainfall is very low in these areas. Drought continued for 2001 and half of 2002 in the main land. Hambanthota District is still continuing with low rainfall. The central mountains are well placed to bring monsoon rains. This position is not purely effective to form sufficient precipitation in drought years. The reason is highly stable atmosphere in this region. Due to global warming of 1deg C in 60 years and high carbon dioxide gas creating high density in low atmospheres, evaporation and rainmaking has a general reduction. It is identified by the author that the common plane episode of Moon and Earth, which occurs in 9.25 years is creating stable

  8. Disaggregating tropical disease prevalence by climatic and vegetative zones within tropical West Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical infectious disease prevalence is dependent on many socio-cultural determinants. However, rainfall and temperature frequently underlie overall prevalence, particularly for vector-borne diseases. As a result these diseases have increased prevalence in tropical as compared to temperate regions...

  9. [Cutaneous mycoses as a problem of the tropics. I. Superficial tropical mycoses].

    PubMed

    Jeske, J

    2001-01-01

    Cutaneous mycoses are third among diseases after parasitic and infectious ones that pose problems for persons returning from the tropics. The paper presents semiotics of the following tropical superficial mycoses: tinea imbricata, infections with Scytalidium, tinea nigra, zakazenia grzybami Scytalidium, lupieZ czarny, black piedra, white piedra. Treatment, diagnostics and prophylaxis are discussed.

  10. Tropical deforestation and the global carbon budget

    SciTech Connect

    Melillo, J.M.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Houghton, R.A.; McGuire, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    The CO{sub 2} concentration of the atmosphere has increased by almost 30% since 1800. This increase is due largely to two factors: the combustion of fossil fuel and deforestation to create croplands and pastures. Deforestation results in a net flux of carbon to the atmospheric because forests contain 20--50 times more carbon per unit area than agricultural lands. In recent decades, the tropics have been the primary region of deforestation.The annual rate of CO{sub 2} released due to tropical deforestation during the early 1990s has been estimated at between 1.2 and 2.3 gigatons C. The range represents uncertainties about both the rates of deforestation and the amounts of carbon stored in different types of tropical forests at the time of cutting. An evaluation of the role of tropical regions in the global carbon budget must include both the carbon flux to the atmosphere due to deforestation and carbon accumulation, if any, in intact forests. In the early 1990s, the release of CO{sub 2} from tropical deforestation appears to have been mostly offset by CO{sub 2} uptake occurring elsewhere in the tropics, according to an analysis of recent trends in the atmospheric concentrations of O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}. Interannual variations in climate and/or CO{sub 2} fertilization may have been responsible for the CO{sub 2} uptake in intact forests. These mechanisms are consistent with site-specific measurements of net carbon fluxes between tropical forests and the atmosphere, and with regional and global simulations using process-based biogeochemistry models. 86 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  11. Methyl Chloride Emission from Tropical Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Ikeda, M.; Inuzuka, Y.; Yukawa, T.

    2001-12-01

    We studied CH3Cl emissions from tropical plants in Tropical Rainforest Glasshouse (25 m x 20 m x 10-24 m high) in Tsukuba Botanical Gardens, where more than 200 representative species from lowland tropical forests of Southeast Asia grow. CH3Cl concentrations were always higher in the glasshouse than outside and increased significantly when the windows were closed. The fluxes of CH3Cl from the tropical rainforest system in the glasshouse were calculated from the averages of their accumulation rates when the windows were closed (average; 142 pptv”h-1) with the dimension of the glasshouse. Emission rates per unit area for CH3Cl was 5.4 mg m-2 h-1. In order to determine which of the plants or whether the soil is responsible for the increase of CH3Cl, flux measurements were done by using an enclosure method. The soil was found to take up CH3Cl at a small rate. On the other hand, some plants from the Marattiaceae, Cyatheaceae (tree fern), Dicksoniaceae, and Dipterocarpaceae families were found to significantly emit CH3Cl. The first three families are ferns commonly growing in tropical forests, and Dipterocarpaceae species are dominant in the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia. The average CH3Cl emission rate from the 9 plants in these families was around 0.5 mg (g dry leaf)-1”h-1. As for Cyatheaceae, we conducted a flux measurement from Cyathea lepifera E.Copel. in a subtropical forest in Okinawa and detected high emissions of CH3Cl amounting to 1.1 mg (g dry leaf)-1”h-1. Strong emissions of CH3Cl from tropical forests raises questions about the trends of chlorine compounds in the future and in the past.

  12. Forty years experience in developing and using rainfall simulators under tropical and Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Nacci, Silvana

    2010-05-01

    obtained with small size 500-1000 cm2, easily dismantled, drop former simulators, than with larger, nozzle, or more sophisticated equipments. In this contribution there are presented some of the rainfall simulators developed and used by the main author, and some of the results obtained in different studies of practical problems under tropical and Mediterranean conditions. References Pla, I.,G.Campero, y R.Useche.1974.Physical degradación of agricultural soils in the Western Plains of Venezuela. "Trans.10th Int.Cong.Soil.Sci.Soc". 1:231-240. .Moscú Pla, I. 1975.Effects of bitumen emulsion and polyacrilamide on some physical properties of Venezuelan soils. En "Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Special Publication"• 7. 35-46. Madison. Wisconsin . (USA). Pla, I. 1977.Aggregate size and erosion control on sloping land treated with hydrophobic bitumen emulsion."Soil Conservation and Management in the Humid Tropics".109-115. John Wiley & Sons. Pla, I.1981.Simuladores de lluvia para el estudio de relaciones suelo-agua bajo agricultura de secano en los trópicos. Rev. Fac. Agron. XII(1-2):81-93.Maracay (Venezuela) Pla, I. 1986.A routine laboratory index to predict the effects of soil sealing on soil and water conservation. En "Assesment of Soil Surface Sealing and Crusting". 154-162.State Univ. of Ghent.Gante (Bélgica Pla, I., M.C. Ramos, S. Nacci, F. Fonseca y X. Abreu. 2005. Soil moisture regime in dryland vineyards of Catalunya (Spain) as influenced by climate, soil and land management. "Integrated Soil and Water Management for Orchard Development". FAO Land and Water Bulletin 10. 41-49. Roma (Italia).

  13. Pacific Exploratory Mission in the Tropical Pacific: PEM-Tropics B, March-April 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raper, James L.; Kleb, Mary M.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Davis, Douglas D.; Newell, Reginald E.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Bendura, Richard J.; Hoell, James M.; McNeal, Robert J.

    2001-12-01

    The Pacific Exploratory Mission - Tropics B (PEM-Tropics B) was conducted by the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) over the tropical Pacific Ocean in March-April 1999. It used the NASA DC-8 and P-3B aircraft equipped with extensive instrumentation for measuring numerous chemical compounds and gases. Its central objective was to improve knowledge of the factors controlling ozone, OH, aerosols, and related species over the tropical Pacific. Geographical coverage ranged from 38°N to 36°S and 148°W to 76°E. Major deployment sites included Hilo, Hawaii, Christmas Island, Tahiti, Fiji, and Easter Island. PEM-Tropics B was a sequel to PEM-Tropics A, which was conducted in September-October 1996 and encountered considerable biomass burning. PEM-Tropics B, conducted in the wet season of the southern tropics, observed an exceedingly clean atmosphere over the South Pacific but a variety of pollution influences over the tropical North Pacific. Photochemical ozone loss over both the North and the South Pacific exceeded local photochemical production by about a factor of 2, implying a major deficit in the tropospheric ozone budget. Dedicated flights investigated the sharp air mass transitions at the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). Extensive OH observations permitted the first large-scale comparisons with photochemical model predictions. High concentrations of oxygenated organics were observed ubiquitously in the tropical Pacific atmosphere and may have important implications for global HOx and NOx budgets. Extensive equatorial measurements of dimethyl sulfide and OH suggest that important aspects of marine sulfur chemistry are still poorly understood.

  14. Tropical sprue: revisiting an underrecognized disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian S; Bettington, Andrew; Bettington, Mark; Rosty, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Tropical sprue is an acquired chronic diarrheal disorder of unclear etiology affecting residents of and visitors to tropical regions. Patients usually present with profuse diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption, notably of vitamin B12 and folate. The histologic changes typically resemble that of gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Reports of tropical sprue have become infrequent in the literature, and the diagnosis is often not considered either clinically or pathologically. This disease may, however, cause significant morbidity, although it is eminently treatable with broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this study, we report the clinical presentation of 12 tropical sprue patients along with the histologic changes of the intestinal mucosa and compare it with those of a series of 150 cases of gluten-sensitive enteropathy, the condition with which it is most frequently misdiagnosed. The cohort comprised 6 men and 6 women with a median age of 59 years (range, 38 to 78 y) with a history of residence or visitation in South Asia or Papua New Guinea. Partial villous blunting in the duodenal mucosa was present in 75% of cases, and a marked intraepithelial lymphocytosis was observed in all cases (mean per 100 epithelial cells 77.3; range, 42 to 124). A villous tip accentuation of intraepithelial lymphocytosis was not appreciable in most cases. No case of complete villous blunting (Marsh stage 3c) was identified in tropical sprue, contrasting with 25% in gluten-sensitive enteropathy cases. A duodenal mucosa eosinophil infiltrate was present in all cases with significantly higher counts compared with untreated gluten-sensitive enteropathy patients (26.6/HPF vs. 14.6/HPF; P=0.009). The ileal mucosa displayed more severe villous blunting with higher Marsh stages than in the corresponding duodenum from 5 patients. There was a mild intraepithelial lymphocytosis and eosinophil infiltrate in the colonic mucosa of half of the cases. Follow-up biopsies in 6 patients demonstrated a histologic

  15. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.; Habib, Emad; Kasparis, Takis

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the raindrop size distribution in seven tropical cyclones have been studied through impact-type disdrometer measurements at three different sites during the 2004-06 Atlantic hurricane seasons. One of the cyclones has been observed at two different sites. High concentrations of small and/or midsize drops were observed in the presence or absence of large drops. Even in the presence of large drops, the maximum drop diameter rarely exceeded 4 mm. These characteristics of raindrop size distribution were observed in all stages of tropical cyclones, unless the storm was in the extratropical stage where the tropical cyclone and a midlatitude frontal system had merged. The presence of relatively high concentrations of large drops in extratropical cyclones resembled the size distribution in continental thunderstorms. The integral rain parameters of drop concentration, liquid water content, and rain rate at fixed reflectivity were therefore lower in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones. In tropical cyclones, at a disdrometercalculated reflectivity of 40 dBZ, the number concentration was 700 plus or minus 100 drops m(sup -3), while the liquid water content and rain rate were 0.90 plus or minus 0.05 g m(sup -3) and 18.5 plus or minus 0.5 mm h(sup -1), respectively. The mean mass diameter, on the other hand, was 1.67 plus or minus 0.3 mm. The comparison of raindrop size distributions between Atlantic tropical cyclones and storms that occurred in the central tropical Pacific island of Roi-Namur revealed that the number density is slightly shifted toward smaller drops, resulting in higher-integral rain parameters and lower mean mass and maximum drop diameters at the latter site. Considering parameterization of the raindrop size distribution in tropical cyclones, characteristics of the normalized gamma distribution parameters were examined with respect to reflectivity. The mean mass diameter increased rapidly with reflectivity, while the normalized

  16. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of some tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Moryś, Joanna M; Jeżewska, Maria; Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Some tropical diseases are the direct cause of severe disturbances of cerebral function while others affect only finer cerebral systems controlling fears, anxiety and personality traits. The mechanisms by which psychiatric symptoms are produced in tropical disorders are not any different from the mechanisms that relate to any physical disorders. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may be caused by a number of different mechanisms including bacterial toxins, release of cytokines, hyperthermia, shock (poor perfusion), acute renal insufficiency, pulmonary failure (shock lung), coagulopathy, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, and/or the nest of pathogens into the central nervous system. The following tropical illnesses can be associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms: neurocysticercosis, malaria, trypanosomiasis, dengue, and schistosomiasis. Neurological and psychiatric impairments induced by tropical diseases both represent a major category of invalidating disorders, which cause profound changes in the nervous system functions, often associated with severe sequels or late-onset disturbances. It is therefore important to disseminate knowledge of the neuropsychiatric symptoms accompanying tropical diseases in order to increase the awareness of these problems and challenges.

  17. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne; Kummerow, Christian D.; Meneghini, Robert; Hou, Arthur; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Barkstrom, Bruce; Wielicki, Bruce; Goodman, Steven J.; Christian, Hugh; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of rain in the tropics and the accompanying latent heat release, NASA for the U.S. and NASDA for Japan have partnered in the design, construction and flight of an Earth Probe satellite to measure tropical rainfall and calculate the associated heating. Primary mission goals are: 1) the understanding of crucial links in climate variability by the hydrological cycle, 2) improvement in the large-scale models of weather and climate, and 3) improvement in understanding cloud ensembles and their impacts on larger scale circulations. The linkage with the tropical oceans and landmasses are also emphasized. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was launched in November 1997 with fuel enough to obtain a four to five year data set of rainfall over the global tropics from 37 deg N to 37 deg S. This paper reports progress from launch date through the spring of 1999. The data system and its products and their access is described, as are the algorithms used to obtain the data. Some exciting early results from TRMM are described. Some important algorithm improvements are shown. These will be used in the first total data reprocessing, scheduled to be complete in early 2000. The reader is given information on how to access and use the data.

  18. Holocene Hydrologic Changes in the Tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, J. P.; Zhang, Z.; Smittenberg, R.; Saenger, C.; Sachse, D.

    2006-12-01

    The tropical Pacific Ocean plays a central role in the climate system by providing massive fluxes of sensible and latent heat to the atmosphere that have the potential to drive global climate changes. Though some abrupt climate events in the late Pleistocene and Holocene were likely forced from the North Atlantic region, it is entirely possible that some had their trigger in the tropics. A paucity of paleoclimate records from the tropical Pacific region has hampered efforts to evaluate this possibility. Here we present highly resolved and well-dated molecular and isotopic records of rainfall from Palau (western Pacific), Kiribati (central Pacific) and Galapagos (eastern Pacific) lake sediments that indicate large hydrologic changes on decadal to millennial time scales throughout the Holocene. We note that some of the largest events in our records occurred during the last millennium. Implications for the mean state of the tropical climate, the position of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ), and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) system will be addressed.

  19. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne

    1999-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of rain in the tropics and the accompanying latent heat release, NASA for the U.S. and NASDA for Japan have partnered in the design, construction and flight of an Earth Probe satellite to measure tropical rainfall and calculate the associated heating. Primary mission goals are 1) the understanding of crucial links in climate variability by the hydrological cycle, 2) improvement in the large-scale models of weather and climate 3) improvement in understanding cloud ensembles and their impacts on larger scale circulations. The linkage with the tropical oceans and landmasses are also emphasized. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was launched in November 1997 with fuel enough to obtain a four to five year data set of rainfall over the global tropics from 37 N to 37 S. This paper reports progress from launch date through the spring of 1999. The data system and its products and their access is described, as are the algorithms used to obtain the data. Some exciting early results from TRMM are described. Some important algorithm improvements are shown. These will be used in the first total data reprocessing, scheduled to be complete in early 2000. The reader is given information on how to access and use the data.

  20. Mercury in tropical and subtropical coastal environments

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Monica F.; Landing, William M.; Kehrig, Helena A.; Barletta, Mário; Holmes, Christopher D.; Barrocas, Paulo R. G.; Evers, David C.; Buck, David G.; Vasconcellos, Ana Claudia; Hacon, Sandra S.; Moreira, Josino C.; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities influence the biogeochemical cycles of mercury, both qualitatively and quantitatively, on a global scale from sources to sinks. Anthropogenic processes that alter the temporal and spatial patterns of sources and cycling processes are changing the impacts of mercury contamination on aquatic biota and humans. Human exposure to mercury is dominated by the consumption of fish and products from aquaculture operations. The risk to society and to ecosystems from mercury contamination is growing, and it is important to monitor these expanding risks. However, the extent and manner to which anthropogenic activities will alter mercury sources and biogeochemical cycling in tropical and sub-tropical coastal environments is poorly understood. Factors as (1) lack of reliable local/regional data; (2) rapidly changing environmental conditions; (3) governmental priorities and; (4) technical actions from supra-national institutions, are some of the obstacles to overcome in mercury cycling research and policy formulation. In the tropics and sub-tropics, research on mercury in the environment is moving from an exploratory “inventory” phase towards more process-oriented studies. Addressing biodiversity conservation and human health issues related to mercury contamination of river basins and tropical coastal environments are an integral part of paragraph 221 paragraph of the United Nations document “The Future We Want” issued in Rio de Janeiro in June 2012. PMID:22901765

  1. Particularities of allergy in the Tropics.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Luis; Zakzuk, Josefina; Lee, Bee Wah; Acevedo, Nathalie; Soh, Jian Yi; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Hossny, Elham; García, Elizabeth; Rosario, Nelson; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Puerta, Leonardo; Sánchez, Jorge; Cardona, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are distributed worldwide and their risk factors and triggers vary according to geographical and socioeconomic conditions. Allergies are frequent in the Tropics but aspects of their prevalence, natural history, risk factors, sensitizers and triggers are not well defined and some are expected to be different from those in temperate zone countries. The aim of this review is to investigate if allergic diseases in the Tropics have particularities that deserve special attention for research and clinical practice. Such information will help to form a better understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of allergic diseases in the Tropics. As expected, we found particularities in the Tropics that merit further study because they strongly affect the natural history of common allergic diseases; most of them related to climate conditions that favor permanent exposure to mite allergens, helminth infections and stinging insects. In addition, we detected several unmet needs in important areas which should be investigated and solved by collaborative efforts led by the emergent research groups on allergy from tropical countries. PMID:27386040

  2. Particularities of allergy in the Tropics.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Luis; Zakzuk, Josefina; Lee, Bee Wah; Acevedo, Nathalie; Soh, Jian Yi; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Hossny, Elham; García, Elizabeth; Rosario, Nelson; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Puerta, Leonardo; Sánchez, Jorge; Cardona, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases are distributed worldwide and their risk factors and triggers vary according to geographical and socioeconomic conditions. Allergies are frequent in the Tropics but aspects of their prevalence, natural history, risk factors, sensitizers and triggers are not well defined and some are expected to be different from those in temperate zone countries. The aim of this review is to investigate if allergic diseases in the Tropics have particularities that deserve special attention for research and clinical practice. Such information will help to form a better understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of allergic diseases in the Tropics. As expected, we found particularities in the Tropics that merit further study because they strongly affect the natural history of common allergic diseases; most of them related to climate conditions that favor permanent exposure to mite allergens, helminth infections and stinging insects. In addition, we detected several unmet needs in important areas which should be investigated and solved by collaborative efforts led by the emergent research groups on allergy from tropical countries.

  3. Tropical Skin Infections Among Israeli Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Michal; Benenson, Shmuel; Baum, Sharon; Schwartz, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Infectious skin disorders are common dermatologic illnesses in travelers. Knowledge of post-travel–related infectious skin disorders will allow for effective pre- and post-travel counseling. All cases of returning travelers seen in our center seeking care for infectious skin diseases were included in this study. For a comparison, data on returned travelers with non-infectious skin diseases and healthy travelers who had pre-travel consultations in our institution were also analyzed. Altogether, skin-related diagnosis was reported in 540 ill travelers, and among them, 286 (53%) had infectious skin diseases. Tropical skin infection was diagnosed in 64% of the infectious cases. Travelers returning from Latin America were significantly more ill with tropical skin infections than those traveling to Asia and Africa, The most common diagnoses were cutaneous leishmaniasis, myiasis, and cutaneous larva migrans. In conclusion, tropical skin infections are common among Israeli travelers, especially among those who visited Latin America. PMID:22049040

  4. Tropical cyclone intensities from satellite microwave data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Kidder, S. Q.

    1980-01-01

    Radial profiles of mean 1000 mb to 250 mb temperature from the Nimbus 6 scanning microwave spectrometer (SCAMS) were constructed around eight intensifying tropical storms in the western Pacific. Seven storms showed distinct inward temperature gradients required for intensification; the eighth displayed no inward gradient and was decaying 24 hours later. The possibility that satellite data might be used to forecast tropical cyclone turning motion was investigated using estimates obtained from Nimbus 6 SCAMS data tapes of the mean 1000 mb to 250 mb temperature field around eleven tropical storms in 1975. Analysis of these data show that for turning storms, in all but one case, the turn was signaled 24 hours in advance by a significant temperature gradient perpendicular to the storm's path, at a distance of 9 deg to 13 deg in front of the storm. A thresholding technique was applied to the North Central U.S. during the summer to estimate precipitation frequency. except

  5. Monitoring tropical vegetation succession with LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, V. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    The shadowing problem, which is endemic to the use of LANDSAT in tropical areas, and the ability to model changes over space and through time are problems to be addressed when monitoring tropical vegetation succession. Application of a trend surface analysis model to major land cover classes in a mountainous region of the Phillipines shows that the spatial modeling of radiance values can provide a useful approach to tropical rain forest succession monitoring. Results indicate shadowing effects may be due primarily to local variations in the spectral responses. These variations can be compensated for through the decomposition of the spatial variation in both elevation and MSS data. Using the model to estimate both elevation and spectral terrain surface as a posteriori inputs in the classification process leads to improved classification accuracy for vegetation of cover of this type. Spatial patterns depicted by the MSS data reflect the measurement of responses to spatial processes acting at several scales.

  6. Solar and anthropogenic forcing of tropical hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Faluvegi, Greg; Miller, Ron L.; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Hansen, James E.; Sun, Shan

    2006-12-01

    Holocene climate proxies suggest substantial correlations between tropical meteorology and solar variations, but these have thus far not been explained. Using a coupled ocean-atmosphere-composition model forced by sustained multi-decadal irradiance increases, we show that greater tropical temperatures alter the hydrologic cycle, enhancing the climatological precipitation maxima in the tropics while drying the subtropical subsidence regions. The shift is enhanced by tropopause region ozone increases, and the model captures the pattern inferred from paleoclimate records. The physical process we describe likely affected past civilizations, including the Maya, Moche, and Ancestral Puebloans who experienced drought coincident with increased irradiance during the late medieval (~900-1250). Similarly, decreased irradiance may have affected cultures via a weakened monsoon during the Little Ice Age (~1400-1750). Projections of 21st-century climate change yield hydrologic cycle changes via similar processes, suggesting a strong likelihood of increased subtropical drought as climate warms.

  7. Tropical Pacific climate trends since 1960

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posmentier, Eric S.; Cane, Mark A.; Zebiak, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    Merchant ship observations appear to indicate an increase in the strength of the surface winds in the tropical Pacific and elsewhere in recent decades. Here, trends in tropical Pacific sea surface temperature and sea level, which has repeatedly been shown to be closely related to the winds, are investigated. The results suggest that sea levels since 1960 have been rising oceanwide at about 3.5 cm/decade, while simultaneously tilting about 2 cm/decade higher in the east and lower in the west, and that surface temperatures have been rising about 0.6 C/decade. These results are not consistent with the apparent wind change; rather, they support the contention that the apparent wind changes are an artifact introduced by changes in measurement technique, and suggest that tropical Pacific winds may have actually decreased in strength.

  8. Paleoceanography of the tropical eastern pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Grigg, R W; Hey, R

    1992-01-10

    The East Pacific Barrier (EPB) is the most effective marine barrier to dispersal of tropical shallow-water fauna in the world today. The fossil record of corals in the eastern Pacific suggests this has been true throughout the Cenozoic. In the Cretaceous, the EPB was apparently less effective in limiting dispersal. Equatorial circulation in the Pacific then appears to have been primarily east to west and the existence of oceanic atolls (now drowned guyots) in the eastern Pacific probably aided dispersal. Similarly, in the middle and early Mesozoic and late Paleozoic, terranes in the central tropical Pacific likely served as stepping stones to dispersal of tropical shelf faunas, reducing the isolating effect of an otherwise wider Pacific Ocean (Panthalassa).

  9. The Impacts of Droughts in Tropical Forests.

    PubMed

    Corlett, Richard T

    2016-07-01

    Tropical forests exchange more carbon dioxide (CO2) with the atmosphere than any other vegetation type and, thus, form a crucial component of the global carbon cycle. However, the impacts of anthropogenic climate change on drought occurrence and intensity could weaken the tropical forest carbon sink, with resulting feedback to future climates. We urgently need a better understanding of the mechanisms and processes involved to predict future responses of tropical forest carbon sequestration to climate change. Recent progress has been made in the study of drought responses at the molecular, cellular, organ, individual, species, community, and landscape levels. Although understanding of the mechanisms is incomplete, the models used to predict drought impacts could be significantly improved by incorporating existing knowledge.

  10. Paleoceanography of the tropical eastern pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Grigg, R W; Hey, R

    1992-01-10

    The East Pacific Barrier (EPB) is the most effective marine barrier to dispersal of tropical shallow-water fauna in the world today. The fossil record of corals in the eastern Pacific suggests this has been true throughout the Cenozoic. In the Cretaceous, the EPB was apparently less effective in limiting dispersal. Equatorial circulation in the Pacific then appears to have been primarily east to west and the existence of oceanic atolls (now drowned guyots) in the eastern Pacific probably aided dispersal. Similarly, in the middle and early Mesozoic and late Paleozoic, terranes in the central tropical Pacific likely served as stepping stones to dispersal of tropical shelf faunas, reducing the isolating effect of an otherwise wider Pacific Ocean (Panthalassa). PMID:17756067

  11. The Impacts of Droughts in Tropical Forests.

    PubMed

    Corlett, Richard T

    2016-07-01

    Tropical forests exchange more carbon dioxide (CO2) with the atmosphere than any other vegetation type and, thus, form a crucial component of the global carbon cycle. However, the impacts of anthropogenic climate change on drought occurrence and intensity could weaken the tropical forest carbon sink, with resulting feedback to future climates. We urgently need a better understanding of the mechanisms and processes involved to predict future responses of tropical forest carbon sequestration to climate change. Recent progress has been made in the study of drought responses at the molecular, cellular, organ, individual, species, community, and landscape levels. Although understanding of the mechanisms is incomplete, the models used to predict drought impacts could be significantly improved by incorporating existing knowledge. PMID:26994658

  12. The influence of the tropics on the prediction of ultralong waves. I - Tropical wind field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. E.; Paegle, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of tropical wind data from the FGGE and tropical latent heating on numerical modeling of ultralong waves are considered in a two-part study. The model studied is the global fourth-order GLAS general circulation model, an energy-conserving format with horizontal differences calculated with fourth-order accuracy. Data assimilation experiments were performed with and without the wind data, with account taken of eastward and northward wind components, the geopotential height, and the relative humidity, all over pressure surfaces. The initial conditions were used to generate six pairs of forecasts, and the tropical wind error decreased after two days of prediction when the initial conditions contained the wind data. The deviations from the measured planetary wave data were attributed to differences in the initial rotational wind field, which varied on a three-day basis. The latent heat initial data had a five-day period and extended its influence beyond the tropical zone. The tropical heat sources sustained the tropical westerlies in the GLAS model, and removal of the tropical heat sources reversed the wind to easterlies.

  13. Measuring Stress in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Wind is air in motion and stress is the turbulent transport of momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere. There was no large-scale measurement of stress before the scatterometer and the stress we used was almost entirely derived from wind through a drag coefficient. While the strong wind of a tropical cyclone (TC) causes destruction at landfall, it is the surface stress that drags down the TC. The relations that were established to retrieve moderate wind speeds from the normalized radar cross-section, or backscatter power, measured by Ku-band and C-band scatterometers do not apply well to TC-scale winds. Even if we have good wind measurements, there is a large uncertainty in the drag coefficient in TC. We will give credence to our hypothesis that there is no distinct physics of radar backscatter from ocean surface for weather phenomenon like the TC. The relation between backscatter and surface roughness or stress does not change under TC, and the same retrieval algorithm can be extended to the TC. The need for changes in wind retrieval algorithm is explained through the change of the drag coefficient. We separate the sensor parameters that affect backscatter, such as, incident angle, azimuth angle, polarization and backscatter frequencies, from the secondary factors related to the physics of the air-sea interface and turbulent transport, such as air stability (shear and buoyance), air density, sea states, and sea sprays, and establish a simple approximation of surface stress from the backscatter averaged over the relevant spatial and temporal scales. We established a relation between backscatter and surface stress over a moderate range of wind speed, where wind measurements coincident with satellite observations are abundant, and the drag coefficient is well established to convert wind measurements to stress. This relation is applied to retrieve stress from the scatterometer measurement in the high wind range of TC. With abundant stress measurements by the

  14. Extratropical Influence on Tropical Intraseasonal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    Intraseasonal variability in the tropics is characterized by propagating signals that interact with convection. Their signature in space-time spectra can be associated with Rossby and Kelvin waves and the MJO. The fidelity of current model simulations of these modes depends on multiple factors, including resolution, convection, simulation of mean winds, SST distributions and atmosphere-ocean coupling. In this presentation I will concentrate on the potential role of influence from the extratropics. Previous work shows evidence of coherence between tropical and midlatitude propagating signals, indicating either global modes or tropical-extratropical coupling. Some evidence has also been found for explicit extratropical influence. Regional modelling experiments will be presented that are designed to asses the importance of incoming midlatitude signals. However, our experiments can encounter problems of interpretation. Does the variability imposed at the boundary actually originate from the extratropics ? How far from the equator should the boundaries be placed ? How do we design an experiment that isolates the internal tropical variability from the boundary influence ? Results will be shown from the WRF model in tropical channel mode with a selection of boundary conditions. We find that our configuration of WRF produces a clearly propagating dynamical signal in the Indo-Pacific region with relatively poor coupling to convection. Differences between twin experiments are examined to reveal the part of the model variability that is formally independent of the boundary conditions. Experiments are also shown with filtered boundary conditions to asses the importance of intraseasonal timescales. The runs presented are long enough (20-years) to provide a generic view of the variability. Our results suggest that most of the local propagation characteristics are inherent to the tropical system, but that the initiation of active phases of the MJO is subject to extratropical

  15. Tropical Storm Debby: June 23-25, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 23-25, 2012. The animation begins 12 hours after Debby became a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico, ...

  16. NASA's 3-D Animation of Tropical Storm Ulika from Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animated 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ulika using GPM's Radar data showed some strong convective storms inside the tropical storm were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 187 mm (7.4 inches)...

  17. GOES-West Video of Tropical Storm Blas

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from July 9 to July 11 shows Tropical Storm Blas weakening to a remnant (left) followed by a strengthening Tropical Cy...

  18. Out of the Tropical Lowlands: Latitude versus Elevation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2016-10-01

    Temperate plant communities have been assembled from tropical, lowland floras through different evolutionary pathways with respect to invading more recent cool environments at higher latitudes (niche conservatism) and occupying older cool environments at higher elevations within the tropics (niche convergence).

  19. Satellite Movie Shows Birth of Atlantic's Tropical Storm Lorenzo

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Oct. 20 to 22 shows the development and strengthening of Tropical Depression 13L into Tropical Storm Lorenzo in the Atlantic (far right), a...

  20. NASA Sees Heavy Rainfall, Hot Towers in Tropical Cyclone Nathan

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA-JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite showed that the heaviest rainfall occurring in Tropical Cyclone Nathan on March 18 at 0758 UTC (3:58 a.m. EDT) was falling at a rat...

  1. NASA Analyzes Rainfall in Strengthening Tropical Depression 2

    NASA Video Gallery

    As Tropical Depression 2 continued to organize and strengthen late on May 27, the GPM core satellite saw Tropical Depression 2 rain falling at a rate of over 57 mm (1.3 inches) per hour in an area ...

  2. Bile salt metabolism in tropical sprue.

    PubMed

    Bevan, G; Engert, R; Klipstein, F A; Maldonado, N; Rubulis, A; Turner, M D

    1974-04-01

    Mean and peak jejunal bile salt concentrations during digestion of a standard fat meal were found to be significantly lower in six Puerto Rican patients with untreated tropical sprue, all of whom had steatorrhoea, than in six asymptomatic subjects who had normal fat absorption. Bile salt pool size and turnover time did not differ significantly in the two groups.It is suggested that bile salt concentrations may be reduced in the proximal small intestine of patients with tropical sprue as a result of excessive dilution by intestinal fluid. The finding of low bile salt concentrations in two asymptomatic subjects indicates that bile salt lack alone may not be sufficient to produce steatorrhoea.

  3. The Saptarishis Calendar: 'The Indian tropical Zodiac'!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indrasena, Buddhike S. H.

    2015-07-01

    The Saptarishis Calendar of ancient India is based on precession of the equinoxes. It employs the tropical zodiac of the Greeks and the precessional rate of Hipparchus. The Saptarishis era has to be determined by naked eye observation of the sky. Currently, the line of reference goes through the stars Dubhe and Merak in the constellation of Ursa Major, touching both of them, and crosses the ecliptic in the sidereal Purvaphalguni Nakshatra of Simha Rashi at a point close to the star 59 Leonis. The angular difference between this 'Saptarishis pointer' and the vernal equinox gives the tropical lunar mansion in which Saptarishis resides at a given point in time.

  4. Climatic Teleconnections Recorded By Tropical Mountain Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. G.; Permana, D.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; Davis, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Information from ice cores from the world's highest mountains in the Tropics demonstrates both local climate variability and a high degree of teleconnectivity across the Pacific basin. Here we examine recently recovered ice core records from glaciers near Puncak Jaya in Papua, Indonesia, which lie on the highest peak between the Himalayas and the South American Andes. These glaciers are located on the western side of the Tropical Pacific warm pool, which is the "center of action" for interannual climate variability dominated by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). ENSO either directly or indirectly affects most regions of Earth and their populations. In 2010, two ice cores measuring 32.13 m and 31.25 m were recovered to bedrock from the East Northwall Firn ice field. Both have been analyzed in high resolution (~3 cm sample length, 1156 and 1606 samples, respectively) for stable isotopes, dust, major ions and tritium concentrations. To better understand the controls on the oxygen isotopic (δ18 O) signal for this region, daily rainfall samples were collected between January 2013 and February 2014 at five weather stations over a distance of ~90 km ranging from 9 meters above sea level (masl) on the southern coast up to 3945 masl. The calculated isotopic lapse rate for this region is 0.24 ‰/100m. Papua, Indonesian ice core records are compared to ice core records from Dasuopu Glacier in the central Himalayas and from Quelccaya, Huascarán, Hualcán and Coropuna ice fields in the tropical Andes of Peru on the eastern side of the Pacific Ocean. The composite of the annual isotopic time series from these cores is significantly (R2 =0.53) related to tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs), reflecting the strong linkage between tropical Pacific SSTs associated with ENSO and tropospheric temperatures in the low latitudes. New data on the already well-documented concomitant loss of ice on Quelccaya, Kilimanjaro in eastern Africa and the ice fields near Puncak

  5. Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Operation Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nio, Tomomi; Saito, Susumu; Stocker, Erich; Pawloski, James H.; Murayama, Yoshifumi; Ohata, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) is a joint U.S. and Japan mission to observe tropical rainfall, which was launched by H-II No. 6 from Tanegashima in Japan at 6:27 JST on November 28, 1997. After the two-month commissioning of TRMM satellite and instruments, the original nominal mission lifetime was three years. In fact, the operations has continued for approximately 17.5 years. This paper provides a summary of the long term operations of TRMM.

  6. Progress toward seasonal prediction in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaff, John Albert

    Seasonal prediction in the tropics has been a slowly developing, yet very important topic in Atmospheric Science. Its slow evolution is a product of its history, a history determined by the rise and fall of empires, technological advances, and scientific opinions, but motivated ultimately by profit. In recent years, long-lead forecasting techniques in the tropics have again become popular. The occurrence of strong El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, droughts, floods, and intense landfalling tropical cyclones, has again prompted the meteorological community to use their knowledge to create useful seasonal forecasts for several regions of the tropics. Such forecasts will facilitate better management of natural resources, disaster preparation, and economic growth in these regions. Much has been learned about seasonal forecasting in the tropics in the last 125 years and much will be learned in the future, but progress is gained slowly by the piecing together of a great number of observation studies. This paper details but a few such studies. Within, the history of seasonal prediction in the tropics is discussed. Following this discussion the paper examines the physical implications of summertime sea level pressure anomalies (SLPAs) in the tropical Atlantic, the development of a simple regression model to predict June through September SLPAs in the Caribbean Sea region, and the development of a statistical ENSO prediction method which is based entirely on the optimal combination of persistence, trends of initial conditions and climatology. The future of seasonal forecasting in the tropics is bright. New technology along with improved datasets is allowing diagnostic and predictive studies that were once thought too exhaustive to be undertaken. This optimistic opinion must be tempered by this fields long history. Public and scientific opinion can rapidly change if seasonal prediction is not approached responsibly. This responsibility entails a rigorous definition

  7. [Otitis externa in tropical diving and swimming].

    PubMed

    Haider, T; Stanek, G

    1992-01-01

    Studies of the microflora of the external auditory canal should help to clarify the frequent acute diffuse external otitis which may occur in recreational scuba-divers and swimmers during a stay in the tropics. We found that colonisation with facultatively pathogenic microorganisms increased after exposure. Apart from this contamination, indirect factors such as the tropical climate and intensive exposure to water may play an important role in the aetiology of the external otitis. For individual preventive measures, topical application of paraffin-oil before, and an aqueous solution of alcohol and acetic acid after exposure are recommended.

  8. The neuroepidemiology of tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Román, G C

    1988-01-01

    Recent neuroepidemiological studies of endemic tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) have confirmed the existence of high-prevalence foci in several tropical islands, including Jamaica and Martinique in the Caribbean, Tumaco off the Pacific coast of Colombia, and the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean. There is a net preponderance of TSP in persons of Black African ancestry, although Caucasian, Hindu, Amerindian, and Orientals have been affected. The epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and neuropathological features of TSP are reviewed here, as well as the evidence in favor of its retroviral origin.

  9. Imported tropical virus infections in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, H; Emmerich, P; ter Meulen, J

    1996-01-01

    Our routine tests for tropical viruses document that several hundreds of Dengue fever cases are imported into Germany every year. In contrast, hemorrhagic fever cases are rarely diagnosed in Germany. Our investigations suggest that this low number is due to the different living conditions of the local population in the tropics compared with that of travellers from Europe or North America. Improved methods for detecting Dengue virus infections, e.g. three different antibody tests and the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of viral RNA, have been developed.

  10. EDITORIAL: Tropical deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Holly K.; Herold, Martin

    2007-10-01

    Carbon emissions from tropical deforestation have long been recognized as a key component of the global carbon budget, and more recently of our global climate system. Tropical forest clearing accounts for roughly 20% of anthropogenic carbon emissions and destroys globally significant carbon sinks (IPCC 2007). Global climate policy initiatives are now being proposed to address these emissions and to more actively include developing countries in greenhouse gas mitigation (e.g. Santilli et al 2005, Gullison et al 2007). In 2005, at the Conference of the Parties (COP) in Montreal, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) launched a new initiative to assess the scientific and technical methods and issues for developing policy approaches and incentives to reduce emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) in developing countries (Gullison et al 2007). Over the last two years the methods and tools needed to estimate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation have quickly evolved, as the scientific community responded to the UNFCCC policy needs. This focus issue highlights those advancements, covering some of the most important technical issues for measuring and monitoring emissions from deforestation and forest degradation and emphasizing immediately available methods and data, as well as future challenges. Elements for effective long-term implementation of a REDD mechanism related to both environmental and political concerns are discussed in Mollicone et al. Herold and Johns synthesize viewpoints of national parties to the UNFCCC on REDD and expand upon key issues for linking policy requirements and forest monitoring capabilities. In response to these expressed policy needs, they discuss a remote-sensing-based observation framework to start REDD implementation activities and build historical deforestation databases on the national level. Achard et al offer an assessment of remote sensing measurements across the world

  11. Trampling resistance of tropical rainforest soils and vegetation in the wet tropics of north east Australia.

    PubMed

    Talbot, L M; Turton, S M; Graham, A W

    2003-09-01

    Controlled trampling was conducted to investigate the trampling resistance of contrasting high fertility basaltic and low fertility rhyolitic soils and their associated highland tropical rainforest vegetation in north east Australia's Wet Tropics. Although this approach has been taken in numerous studies of trampling in a variety of ecosystem types (temperate and subtropical forest, alpine shrubland, coral reef and seagrass beds), the experimental method does not appear to have been previously applied in a tropical rainforest context. Ground vegetation cover and soil penetration resistance demonstrated variable responses to trampling. Trampling, most noticeably after 200 and 500 passes reduced organic litter cover. Bulk density increased with trampling intensity, particularly on basalt soils as rhyolite soils appeared somewhat resistant to the impacts of trampling. The permeability of the basalt and rhyolite soils decreased markedly with increased trampling intensity, even after only 75 passes. These findings suggest physical and hydrological changes may occur rapidly in tropical rainforest soils following low levels of trampling, particularly on basalt soils.

  12. Satellite Views Tropical Storm Katia in Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from Aug. 27 at 10:45 p.m. EDT through Aug. 31 at 10:45 a.m. EDT shows the birth of Tropical Storm Katia. Katia began as an area of low pressure that moved aw...

  13. GPM Rain Rates in Tropical Cyclone Pam

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA-JAXA's GPM Satellite Close-up of Cyclone Pam's Rainfall NASA-JAXA's GPM core satellite captured rain rates in Tropical Cyclone Pam at 03:51 UTC (2:51 p.m. local time) on March 14, 2015. Heavie...

  14. Climate Science: Tropical Expansion by Ocean Swing

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    The tropical belt has become wider over the past decades, but climate models fall short of capturing the full rate of the expansion. The latest analysis of the climate simulations suggests that a long-term swing of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is the main missing cause.

  15. Solar energy applications in the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.B.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a seminar on the use of solar energy in tropical regions. Topics considered at the seminar included solar decision making, solar radiation measurement, solar air conditioning, solar refrigeration, solar collectors, solar water heaters, photovoltaics, solar architecture, solar heating systems, research programs, solar drying, and performance testing.

  16. Tuberculosis in Tropical Areas and Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Bartalesi, Filippo; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    About 95% of cases and 98% of deaths due to tuberculosis (TB) occur in tropical countries while, in temperate low incidence countries, a disproportionate portion of TB cases is diagnosed in immigrants. Urbanization, poverty, poor housing conditions and ventilation, poor nutritional status, low education level, the HIV co-epidemic, the growing impact of chronic conditions such as diabetes are the main determinants of the current TB epidemiology in tropical areas. TB care in these contests is complicated by several barriers such as geographical accessibility, educational, cultural, sociopsychological and gender issues. High quality microbiological and radiological facilities are not widely available, and erratic supply of anti-TB drugs may affect tropical areas from time to time. Nevertheless in recent years, TB control programs reached major achievements in tropical countries as demonstrated by several indicators. Migrants have a high risk of acquire TB before migration. Moreover, after migration, they are exposed to additional risk factors for acquiring or reactivating TB infection, such as poverty, stressful living conditions, social inequalities, overcrowded housing, malnutrition, substance abuse, and limited access to health care. TB mass screening programs for migrants have been implemented in low endemic countries but present several limitations. Screening programs should not represent a stand-alone intervention, but a component of a wider approach integrated with other healthcare activities to ensure the health of migrants. PMID:24959340

  17. Nuclear power plant risk from tropical cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Tropical cyclones are considered to have a potential for contributing to the overall core-melt frequency at Turkey Point. A tropical cyclone is known to have the four main hazards associated with it: wind, tidal surge, wind-generated missiles, and precipitation. To understand the contribution to overall core-melt risk at Turkey Point, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of these hazards and their relative importance. The results are bounded by the hurricane surge scenario, where the frequency of core melt is equal to the frequency of the surge reaching 19 ft NGVD (National Geographic Vertical Datum). This could be mitigated by potential recovery actions for the tropical cyclone scenario. The probability of the storm surge reaching 19 ft NVGD is estimated to be 1 x 10{sup {minus}4}. The data associated with the tropical cyclones as discussed in detail in the body of this paper are lacking in quantity and quality. By taking the conservative approach in creating the wind/frequency, wind/surge, and surge/frequency relationships, the conclusion that the results are worst case is reasonable. With this in mind, it is logical to conclude that the value of further hazard analysis to narrow down the built-in conservative margin using the existing data and technology is doubtful. Thus, a recovery approach to driving the risk level down is the most pragmatic step to be taken.

  18. In vitro genebanks for preserving tropical biodiversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation of plant biodiversity can be accomplished in many ways. Tropical plants often cannot be stored as seeds and must be conserved as growing plants. These plants are at risk from disease and environmental factors such as climate change so it is important to provide secondary backups of any ...

  19. Porifera: sudden sperm release by tropical Demonspongiae.

    PubMed

    Reiswig, H M

    1970-10-30

    Three tropical marine demosponges inhabiting the deep coral reefs of Jamaica expel immense clouds of milky fluid from exhalant apertures. Analysis of samples shows this fluid to contain mature male gametes. The behavior is an individual or a population event in different species.

  20. Environmental synergisms and extinctions of tropical species.

    PubMed

    Laurance, William F; Useche, Diana C

    2009-12-01

    Environmental synergisms may pose the greatest threat to tropical biodiversity. Using recently updated data sets from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List, we evaluated the incidence of perceived threats to all known mammal, bird, and amphibian species in tropical forests. Vulnerable, endangered, and extinct species were collectively far more likely to be imperiled by combinations of threats than expected by chance. Among 45 possible pairwise combinations of 10 different threats, 69%, 93%, and 71% were significantly more frequent than expected for threatened mammals, birds, and amphibians, respectively, even with a stringent Bonferroni-corrected probability value (p= 0.003). Based on this analysis, we identified five key environmental synergisms in the tropics and speculate on the existence of others. The most important involve interactions between habitat loss or alteration (from agriculture, urban sprawl, infrastructure, or logging) and other anthropogenic disturbances such as hunting, fire, exotic-species invasions, or pollution. Climatic change and emerging pathogens also can interact with other threats. We assert that environmental synergisms are more likely the norm than the exception for threatened species and ecosystems, can vary markedly in nature among geographic regions and taxa, and may be exceedingly difficult to predict in terms of their ultimate impacts. The perils posed by environmental synergisms highlight the need for a precautionary approach to tropical biodiversity conservation. PMID:20078643

  1. Defaunation affects carbon storage in tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Carolina; Galetti, Mauro; Pizo, Marco A.; Magnago, Luiz Fernando S.; Rocha, Mariana F.; Lima, Renato A. F.; Peres, Carlos A.; Ovaskainen, Otso; Jordano, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Carbon storage is widely acknowledged as one of the most valuable forest ecosystem services. Deforestation, logging, fragmentation, fire, and climate change have significant effects on tropical carbon stocks; however, an elusive and yet undetected decrease in carbon storage may be due to defaunation of large seed dispersers. Many large tropical trees with sizeable contributions to carbon stock rely on large vertebrates for seed dispersal and regeneration, however many of these frugivores are threatened by hunting, illegal trade, and habitat loss. We used a large data set on tree species composition and abundance, seed, fruit, and carbon-related traits, and plant-animal interactions to estimate the loss of carbon storage capacity of tropical forests in defaunated scenarios. By simulating the local extinction of trees that depend on large frugivores in 31 Atlantic Forest communities, we found that defaunation has the potential to significantly erode carbon storage even when only a small proportion of large-seeded trees are extirpated. Although intergovernmental policies to reduce carbon emissions and reforestation programs have been mostly focused on deforestation, our results demonstrate that defaunation, and the loss of key ecological interactions, also poses a serious risk for the maintenance of tropical forest carbon storage. PMID:26824067

  2. Modelling tropical forests response to logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzolla Gatti, Roberto; Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Tropical rainforests are among the most threatened ecosystems by large-scale fragmentation due to human activity such as heavy logging and agricultural clearance. Although, they provide crucial ecosystem goods and services, such as sequestering carbon from the atmosphere, protecting watersheds and conserving biodiversity. In several countries forest resource extraction has experienced a shift from clearcutting to selective logging to maintain a significant forest cover and understock of living biomass. However the knowledge on the short and long-term effects of removing selected species in tropical rainforest are scarce and need to be further investigated. One of the main effects of selective logging on forest dynamics seems to be the local disturbance which involve the invasion of open space by weed, vines and climbers at the expense of the late-successional state cenosis. We present a simple deterministic model that describes the dynamics of tropical rainforest subject to selective logging to understand how and why weeds displace native species. We argue that the selective removal of tallest tropical trees carries out gaps of light that allow weeds, vines and climbers to prevail on native species, inhibiting the possibility of recovery of the original vegetation. Our results show that different regime shifts may occur depending on the type of forest management adopted. This hypothesis is supported by a dataset of trees height and weed/vines cover that we collected from 9 plots located in Central and West Africa both in untouched and managed areas.

  3. TRMM Satellite Flyby of Tropical Storm Halong

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM Satellite 3-D Flyby of Tropical Storm Halong On July 31, NASA's TRMM Satellite showed rain was falling at a rate of over 85.6 mm (about 3.4 inches) per hour in bands wrapping around Hal...

  4. [Audio-visual aids and tropical medicine].

    PubMed

    Morand, J J

    1989-01-01

    The author presents a list of the audio-visual productions about Tropical Medicine, as well as of their main characteristics. He thinks that the audio-visual educational productions are often dissociated from their promotion; therefore, he invites the future creator to forward his work to the Audio-Visual Health Committee.

  5. Chapter 50: history of tropical neurology.

    PubMed

    Ogunniyi, Adesola

    2010-01-01

    Tropical neurology began less than two centuries ago. Consumption of dietary toxins predominated at the beginning and gave birth to the geographic entity. The story moved from lathyrism through Jamaican neuropathy to cassava-induced epidemic neuropathy, which was contrasted with Konzo, also associated with cassava. Other tropical diseases enumerated with chronological details include: Chaga's diseases, kwashiorkor, Madras type of motor neuron disease, atlanto-axial dislocation, Burkitt's lymphoma and Kuru, associated with cannibalism among the Fore linguistic group in New Guinea. More recent documentation includes the Cuban neuropathy in 1991 with an epidemic of visual loss and neuropathy, Anaphe venata entomophagy in Nigeria presenting as seasonal ataxia, and neurological aspects of the human immunodeficiency virus infection complete the picture. With time, professional associations were formed and the pioneers were given prominence. The World Federation of Neurology featured Geographic Neurology as a theme in 1977 and Tropical Neurology was given prominence at its 1989 meeting in New Delhi, India. The situation remains unchanged with regards to rare diseases like Meniere's, multiple sclerosis, hereditary disorders. However, with westernization and continued urbanization, changing disease patterns are being observed and tropical neurology may depart from dietary toxins to more western world-type disorders. PMID:19892153

  6. Hurricane Emilia Chases Tropical Storm Daniel

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from July 8 (6:00 p.m. EDT) to July 11 (1:30 p.m. EDT), 2012, shows Hurricane Daniel as it loses its hurricane eye and become a tropical storm as it heads tow...

  7. Defaunation affects carbon storage in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Bello, Carolina; Galetti, Mauro; Pizo, Marco A; Magnago, Luiz Fernando S; Rocha, Mariana F; Lima, Renato A F; Peres, Carlos A; Ovaskainen, Otso; Jordano, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage is widely acknowledged as one of the most valuable forest ecosystem services. Deforestation, logging, fragmentation, fire, and climate change have significant effects on tropical carbon stocks; however, an elusive and yet undetected decrease in carbon storage may be due to defaunation of large seed dispersers. Many large tropical trees with sizeable contributions to carbon stock rely on large vertebrates for seed dispersal and regeneration, however many of these frugivores are threatened by hunting, illegal trade, and habitat loss. We used a large data set on tree species composition and abundance, seed, fruit, and carbon-related traits, and plant-animal interactions to estimate the loss of carbon storage capacity of tropical forests in defaunated scenarios. By simulating the local extinction of trees that depend on large frugivores in 31 Atlantic Forest communities, we found that defaunation has the potential to significantly erode carbon storage even when only a small proportion of large-seeded trees are extirpated. Although intergovernmental policies to reduce carbon emissions and reforestation programs have been mostly focused on deforestation, our results demonstrate that defaunation, and the loss of key ecological interactions, also poses a serious risk for the maintenance of tropical forest carbon storage.

  8. Defaunation affects carbon storage in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Bello, Carolina; Galetti, Mauro; Pizo, Marco A; Magnago, Luiz Fernando S; Rocha, Mariana F; Lima, Renato A F; Peres, Carlos A; Ovaskainen, Otso; Jordano, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage is widely acknowledged as one of the most valuable forest ecosystem services. Deforestation, logging, fragmentation, fire, and climate change have significant effects on tropical carbon stocks; however, an elusive and yet undetected decrease in carbon storage may be due to defaunation of large seed dispersers. Many large tropical trees with sizeable contributions to carbon stock rely on large vertebrates for seed dispersal and regeneration, however many of these frugivores are threatened by hunting, illegal trade, and habitat loss. We used a large data set on tree species composition and abundance, seed, fruit, and carbon-related traits, and plant-animal interactions to estimate the loss of carbon storage capacity of tropical forests in defaunated scenarios. By simulating the local extinction of trees that depend on large frugivores in 31 Atlantic Forest communities, we found that defaunation has the potential to significantly erode carbon storage even when only a small proportion of large-seeded trees are extirpated. Although intergovernmental policies to reduce carbon emissions and reforestation programs have been mostly focused on deforestation, our results demonstrate that defaunation, and the loss of key ecological interactions, also poses a serious risk for the maintenance of tropical forest carbon storage. PMID:26824067

  9. Periodical Literature of Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawani, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    In order to foster improvements in bibliographical control, this study attempts to provide some information on the periodicals in which articles on tropical and subtropical agriculture are published. The periodicals in which publications most frequently appear are listed, and the extent of bibliographic scattering and language of publication are…

  10. Tropics of Arrangement: A Theory of "Dispositio."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Angelo, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a theoretical model of organizing texts that uses four "master" tropes (metaphor, metonymy, synecdoche, and irony) as a conceptual framework to represent the processes of selecting, ordering, and placing words, ideas, and images into a text. Discusses possible practical application of tropical operations to nonfictional discourse. (SR)

  11. The Origins of Tropical Rainforest Hyperdiversity.

    PubMed

    Pennington, R Toby; Hughes, Mark; Moonlight, Peter W

    2015-11-01

    Traditional models for tropical species richness contrast rainforests as "museums" of old species or "cradles" of recent speciation. High plant species diversity in rainforests may be more likely to reflect high episodic evolutionary turnover of species--a scenario implicating high rates of both speciation and extinction through geological time.

  12. TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission): A satellite mission to measure tropical rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is presented. TRMM is a satellite program being studied jointly by the United States and Japan which would carry out the systematic study of tropical rainfall required for major strides in weather and climate research. The scientific justification for TRMM is discussed. The implementation process for the scientific community, NASA management, and the other decision-makers and advisory personnel who are expected to evaluate the priority of the project is outlined.

  13. Tropical pacing of Antarctic sea ice increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    One reason why coupled climate model simulations generally do not reproduce the observed increase in Antarctic sea ice extent may be that their internally generated climate variability does not sync with the observed phases of phenomena like the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and ENSO. For example, it is unlikely for a free-running coupled model simulation to capture the shift of the PDO from its positive to negative phase during 1998, and the subsequent ~15 year duration of the negative PDO phase. In previously presented work based on atmospheric models forced by observed tropical SSTs and stratospheric ozone, we demonstrated that tropical variability is key to explaining the wind trends over the Southern Ocean during the past ~35 years, particularly in the Ross, Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, the regions of the largest trends in sea ice extent and ice season duration. Here, we extend this idea to coupled model simulations with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in which the evolution of SST anomalies in the central and eastern tropical Pacific is constrained to match the observations. This ensemble of 10 "tropical pacemaker" simulations shows a more realistic evolution of Antarctic sea ice anomalies than does its unconstrained counterpart, the CESM Large Ensemble (both sets of runs include stratospheric ozone depletion and other time-dependent radiative forcings). In particular, the pacemaker runs show that increased sea ice in the eastern Ross Sea is associated with a deeper Amundsen Sea Low (ASL) and stronger westerlies over the south Pacific. These circulation patterns in turn are linked with the negative phase of the PDO, characterized by negative SST anomalies in the central and eastern Pacific. The timing of tropical decadal variability with respect to ozone depletion further suggests a strong role for tropical variability in the recent acceleration of the Antarctic sea ice trend, as ozone depletion stabilized by late 1990s, prior to the most

  14. Effect of Convection on the Tropical Tropopause Layer over the Tropical Americas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, Jasna; Robertson, Franklin

    2007-01-01

    Water vapor and ozone are the most important gases that regulate the radiative balance of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Their radiative contribution dictates the height within the TTL and the rate at which air either ascends into the tropical stratosphere or subsides back to the tropical troposphere. The details of the mechanisms that control their concentration, however, are poorly understood. One of such mechanisms is convection that reaches into the TTL. ill this study, we will present evidence from space-borne observations of the impact that convection has on water vapor, ozone, and temperature in the TTL over the Tropical Americas where deep and overshooting convection have the highest frequency of occurrence in the tropics. We explore the effect of convective systems such as hurricanes during the 2005 season using the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on Aura version 1.5 data and more recent tropical systems using the newly released version 2 data with higher vertical resolution. ill order to provide the horizontal extent and the vertical structure of the convective systems, we use data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Aqua, the Microwave Humidity Sensor (MHS) on NOAA18, and CloudSat when available.

  15. A tropical cyclone application for virtual globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph Turk, F.; Hawkins, Jeff; Richardson, Kim; Surratt, Mindy

    2011-01-01

    Within the past ten years, a wide variety of publicly available environmental satellite-based data have become available to users and gained popular exposure in meteorological applications. For example, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has maintained a well accepted web-based tropical cyclone (TC) website (NRL TC-Web) with a diverse selection of environmental satellite imagery and products covering worldwide tropical cyclones extending back to 1997. The rapid development of virtual globe technologies provides for an effective framework to efficiently demonstrate meteorological and oceanographic concepts to not only specialized weather forecasters but also to students and the general public. With their emphasis upon geolocated data, virtual globes represent the next evolution beyond the traditional web browser by allowing one to define how, where, and when various data are displayed and dynamically updated. In this article, we describe a virtual globe implementation of the NRL TC-Web satellite data processing system. The resulting NRL Tropical Cyclones on Earth (TC-Earth) application is designed to exploit the capabilities of virtual globe technology to facilitate the display, animation, and layering of multiple environmental satellite imaging and sounding sensors for effective visualization of tropical cyclone evolution. As with the NRL TC-Web, the TC-Earth application is a dynamic, realtime application, driven by the locations of active and historical tropical cyclones. TC-Earth has a simple interface that is designed around a series of placemarks that follow the storm track history. The position coordinates along the storm track are used to map-register imagery and subset other types of information, allowing the user a wide range of freedom to choose data types, overlay combinations, and animations with a minimum number of clicks. TC-Earth enables the user to quickly select and navigate to the storm of interest from the multiple TCs active at anytime around

  16. Biogenic VOC Emissions from Tropical Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A.; Greenberg, J.; Harley, P.; Otter, L.; Vanni Gatti, L.; Baker, B.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic VOC have an important role in determining the chemical composition of atmosphere. As a result, these compounds are important for visibility, biogeochemical cycling, climate and radiative forcing, and the health of the biosphere. Tropical landscapes are estimated to release about 80% of total global biogenic VOC emissions but have been investigated to lesser extent than temperate regions. Tropical VOC emissions are particularly important due to the strong vertical transport and the rapid landuse change that is occurring there. This presentation will provide an overview of field measurements of biogenic VOC emissions from tropical landscapes in Amazonia (Large-scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia, LBA) Central (EXPRESSO) and Southern (SAFARI 2000) Africa, Asia and Central America. Flux measurement methods include leaf-scale (enclosure measurements), canopy-scale (above canopy tower measurements), landscape-scale (tethered balloon), and regional-scale (aircraft measurements) observations. Typical midday isoprene emission rates for different landscapes vary by more than a factor of 20 with the lowest emissions observed from degraded forests. Emissions of alpha-pinene vary by a similar amount with the highest emissions associated with landscapes dominated by light dependent monoterpene emitting plants. Isoprene emissions tend to be higher for neotropical forests (Amazon and Costa Rica) in comparison to Africa and Asian tropical forests but considerable differences are observed within regions. Strong seasonal variations were observed in both the Congo and the Amazon rainforests with peak emissions during the dry seasons. Substantial emissions of light dependent monoterpenes, methanol and acetone are characteristic of at least some tropical landscapes.

  17. Tropical diseases: definition, geographic distribution, transmission, and classification.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Ustianowski, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    The term tropical diseases encompasses all diseases that occur principally in the tropics. This term covers all communicable and noncommunicable diseases, genetic disorders, and disease caused by nutritional deficiencies or environmental conditions (such as heat, humidity, and altitude) that are encountered in areas that lie between, and alongside, the Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn belts. In tropical countries, apart from noncommunicable diseases, a severe burden of disease is caused by an array of different microorganisms, parasites, land and sea animals, and arthropods.

  18. Tropical diseases: definition, geographic distribution, transmission, and classification.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Ustianowski, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    The term tropical diseases encompasses all diseases that occur principally in the tropics. This term covers all communicable and noncommunicable diseases, genetic disorders, and disease caused by nutritional deficiencies or environmental conditions (such as heat, humidity, and altitude) that are encountered in areas that lie between, and alongside, the Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn belts. In tropical countries, apart from noncommunicable diseases, a severe burden of disease is caused by an array of different microorganisms, parasites, land and sea animals, and arthropods. PMID:22632634

  19. Tropical cyclone rainfall area controlled by relative sea surface temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanluan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Tropical cyclone rainfall rates have been projected to increase in a warmer climate. The area coverage of tropical cyclones influences their impact on human lives, yet little is known about how tropical cyclone rainfall area will change in the future. Here, using satellite data and global atmospheric model simulations, we show that tropical cyclone rainfall area is controlled primarily by its environmental sea surface temperature (SST) relative to the tropical mean SST (that is, the relative SST), while rainfall rate increases with increasing absolute SST. Our result is consistent with previous numerical simulations that indicated tight relationships between tropical cyclone size and mid-tropospheric relative humidity. Global statistics of tropical cyclone rainfall area are not expected to change markedly under a warmer climate provided that SST change is relatively uniform, implying that increases in total rainfall will be confined to similar size domains with higher rainfall rates. PMID:25761457

  20. Delayed small-intestinal transit in tropical malabsorption.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G C

    1978-01-01

    The time of breath hydrogen appearance (T) after oral lactulose was determined in 98 patients in London who had been to the tropics. Fifty-six controls from three different ethnic groups had no evidence of gastrointestinal disease; 23 had tropical malabsorption, which was severe in 10; and 19 had chronic diarrhoea without malabsorption. Mean T was significantly delayed in patients with tropical malabsorption compared with controls, indicating that their mouth-caecum transit rate was abnormally slow. In six patients with tropical malabsorption who were reinvestigated after treatment a fall in the value for T seemed to parallel clinical improvement. Three patients with diarrhoea due to chronic colonic disease had delayed T. Patients with tropical malabsorption have bacterial colonisation of the small intestine, which is important in the pathogenesis of the disease. Bacterial overgrowth, which sometimes occurs after infective diarrhoea in the tropics and gives rise to tropical sprue, is a result of stasis. PMID:678884

  1. [Tropical veterinary medicine and education in The Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Uilenberg, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    in this lecture an overview is given of the development of tropical veterinary medicine and education in The Netherlands after the Dutch colonial period. The starting point is the development of tropical veterinary medicine in general, especially in Europe and Africa. It is pointed out that just now it is very important to have specialists in tropical diseases not only in the tropics but also in the western world since globalization involves the import of a lot of tropical diseases. The speaker is an advocate of a course on tropical veterinary medicine on an European level, but at the same time he is sceptical about it. In the second part he gives an overview of the education programme on tropical veterinary medicine from the foundation of the Institute at Utrecht University in 1948 until its decline.

  2. Geographical Variablity of the Width of the Tropical Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currey, B.

    2014-12-01

    A number of recent studies have found evidence for a widening of the earth's tropical belt (Seidel et al). Most studies focus on the annual mean zonal mean tropical belt width. The purpose of this research, however, is to determine the longitudinal variability of the width of the tropical belt. We study how well defined the boundaries of the tropical belt are in both hemispheres as a function of longitude as well as season. The sharpness of the tropical boundaries as a function of longitude can provide information, which is otherwise hidden in the more commonly studied zonal averages. Localized widening of the tropical belt is expected to have a bigger climatic impact for a very sharp tropical boundary encompassing a drastic distinction between the climates of the tropics versus the subtropics. An improved understanding of the morphology of the tropical belt can help us determine any changes regarding these regions surrounding the edges of the tropics. By locating the subtropical tropopause break, a region where the tropopauses' altitude drastically shifts, the boundaries of the tropical belt can be observed. By finding the gradient of the tropopause break, we can determine the sharpness of the tropical boundaries. It was found that during each hemisphere's respective summer season the tropical belt edge over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans can display a tendency to be very fickle and thus poorly defined. For all times of the year, however, it is shown that the tropopause break in each hemisphere's respective winter and over land has the tendency to create a well-defined and sharp tropical edge.

  3. Understanding Precessional Variations in Tropical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigchelaar, M.; Timmermann, A.

    2012-12-01

    Various records of Pleistocene tropical paleoclimate as well as numerous modeling experiments show strong precessional variability in (annual mean) tropical precipitation. The occurrence of annual mean precessional climate signals is remarkable given the fact that the precessional cycle is associated with a zero annual mean forcing. This points at the existence of nonlinear rectification mechanisms, translating the zero-annual-mean forcing into a non-zero-annual-mean response. While the need for such mechanisms in the climate system has been previously acknowledged, little work has been done to specifically identify and understand them. We hypothesize a number of nonlinear rectification mechanisms that can introduce precessional variability into the different types of tropical precipitation: 1. Positive definite statistics: The most obvious nonlinearity associated with precipitation is the fact that precipitation is a positive definite variable: one cannot have negative precipitation. An increase in seasonality somehow increasing precipitation in part of the year might not equally diminish precipitation in another part of the year, leading to a change in annual mean precipitation. This nonlinearity will be especially important in areas with little precipitation or with a large seasonal cycle. 2. Nonlinear relationship between tropical SSTs and precipitation: In the tropics a nonlinear relationship exists between SSTs and convective precipitation, suggesting that a change in the seasonality of tropical SSTs might translate into a change in annual mean precipitation. This mechanism will play an important role in areas where precipitation is locally driven, although the anomalous diabatic forcing associated with these local changes might also drive remote precipitation changes. This temperature-moisture nonlinearity could also be important for the monsoon systems, which have been suggested to be driven by a moisture-advection feedback. 3. Mid- and high-latitude albedo

  4. Current status of tropical fruit breeding and genetics for three tropical fruit species cultivated in Japan: pineapple, mango, and papaya.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tatsushi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Shoda, Moriyuki; Urasaki, Naoya; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Tropical fruit crops are predominantly produced in tropical and subtropical developing countries, but some are now grown in southern Japan. Pineapple (Ananas comosus), mango (Mangifera indica) and papaya (Carica papaya) are major tropical fruits cultivated in Japan. Modern, well-organized breeding systems have not yet been developed for most tropical fruit species. Most parts of Japan are in the temperate climate zone, but some southern areas such as the Ryukyu Islands, which stretch from Kyushu to Taiwan, are at the northern limits for tropical fruit production without artificial heating. In this review, we describe the current status of tropical fruit breeding, genetics, genomics, and biotechnology of three main tropical fruits (pineapple, mango, and papaya) that are cultivated and consumed in Japan. More than ten new elite cultivars of pineapple have been released with improved fruit quality and suitability for consumption as fresh fruit. New challenges and perspectives for obtaining high fruit quality are discussed in the context of breeding programs for pineapple.

  5. Hydroxylated ornithine lipids increase stress tolerance in Rhizobium tropici CIAT899

    PubMed Central

    Vences-Guzmán, Miguel Ángel; Guan, Ziqiang; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; González-Silva, Napoleón; López-Lara, Isabel M.; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Geiger, Otto; Sohlenkamp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Ornithine lipids (OLs) are widespread among gram-negative bacteria. Their basic structure consists of a 3-hydroxy fatty acyl group attached in amide linkage to the α-amino group of ornithine and a second fatty acyl group ester-linked to the 3-hydroxy position of the first fatty acid. OLs can be hydroxylated within the secondary fatty acyl moiety and this modification has been related to increased stress tolerance. Rhizobium tropici, a nodule-forming α-proteobacterium known for its stress tolerance, forms four different OLs. Studies of the function of these OLs have been hampered due to lack of knowledge about their biosynthesis. Here we describe that OL biosynthesis increases under acid stress and that OLs are enriched in the outer membrane. Using a functional expression screen, the OL hydroxylase OlsE was identified, which in combination with the OL hydroxylase OlsC is responsible for the synthesis of modified OLs in R. tropici. Unlike described OL hydroxylations, the OlsE-catalyzed hydroxylation occurs within the ornithine moiety. Mutants deficient in OlsE or OlsC and double mutants deficient in OlsC/OlsE were characterized. R. tropici mutants deficient in OlsC-mediated OL hydroxylation are more susceptible to acid and temperature stress. All three mutants lacking OL hydroxylases are affected during symbiosis. PMID:21205018

  6. Tropical Cyclones and the Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, N. L.; Emanuel, K.

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between tropical cyclones and the carbon cycle poses an interesting question: tropical surface waters are generally quite warm and poor in nutrients, but the mixing in tropical cyclones entrains potentially large amounts of cold, nutrient-rich water. As the cold anomaly warms, there is a tendency toward over-saturation of carbon dioxide, and thus a net outgassing from the ocean to the atmosphere, but because nutrients are mixed into the photic zone, there is a simultaneous phytoplankton bloom which removes carbon from the mixed layer. The amount of carbon taken up into biota by the induced biological activity can in some cases create a net undersaturation of carbon dioxide in spite of the warming of entrained cold water, and therefore cause a net ingassing of carbon in the wake of a tropical cyclone. This is, however, only a short-term effect. Phytoplankton have a short life cycle, and the detritus they leave behind sinks and remineralizes; that which remineralizes below the climatological mixed layer represents a long-term sink of carbon from the atmosphere to the mixed layer, but the remainder will quickly return to the atmosphere. Both the warming of the mixed layer and the induced phytoplankton bloom are easily observable, but neither the sign nor the magnitude of the net effect is intuitive. To illuminate the question, a simple one-dimensional model is formulated which simulates the behavior of the upper few hundred meters of the ocean in response to tropical cyclone-induced mixing. Phytoplankton (and its remains), Nitrate, and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon are tracked, and the model is both initialized and forced with the best possible approximation to real chemical concentrations, winds, and heat fluxes, and the effect of the storm is estimated by comparing model behavior with the storm included and with the storm removed from observations. It is shown that the model performs acceptably well compared to such observations as exist. The model is

  7. [Medical aspects of diving in the tropics].

    PubMed

    Muth, C M; Müller, P; Kemmer, A

    2005-07-01

    Scuba diving vacations in tropical surroundings belong to the repertoire of most divers. In addition to carefully making travel plans and taking care of the necessary vaccinations and appropriate malaria prophylaxis, the following points also must be observed. The flight itself affects diving safety. In particular, a too short time interval between diving and the return flight can lead to decompression problems. Because most of the diving areas are reached by ship, many divers need a prophylaxis against motion sickness. Moreover, external otitis occurs more frequently while diving in the tropics. Finally, there is potential danger from the sea inhabitants, primarily from scorpion fishes, Portuguese Man-of-Wars, box jellyfishes as well as cone snails.

  8. Bile salt metabolism in tropical sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bevan, G.; Engert, R.; Klipstein, F. A.; Maldonado, N.; Rubulis, A.; Turner, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    Mean and peak jejunal bile salt concentrations during digestion of a standard fat meal were found to be significantly lower in six Puerto Rican patients with untreated tropical sprue, all of whom had steatorrhoea, than in six asymptomatic subjects who had normal fat absorption. Bile salt pool size and turnover time did not differ significantly in the two groups. It is suggested that bile salt concentrations may be reduced in the proximal small intestine of patients with tropical sprue as a result of excessive dilution by intestinal fluid. The finding of low bile salt concentrations in two asymptomatic subjects indicates that bile salt lack alone may not be sufficient to produce steatorrhoea. PMID:4834549

  9. New Permian fauna from tropical Gondwana

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Juan C.; Marsicano, Claudia; Angielczyk, Kenneth D.; Smith, Roger M. H.; Richter, Martha; Fröbisch, Jörg; Kammerer, Christian F.; Sadleir, Rudyard W.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial vertebrates are first known to colonize high-latitude regions during the middle Permian (Guadalupian) about 270 million years ago, following the Pennsylvanian Gondwanan continental glaciation. However, despite over 150 years of study in these areas, the biogeographic origins of these rich communities of land-dwelling vertebrates remain obscure. Here we report on a new early Permian continental tetrapod fauna from South America in tropical Western Gondwana that sheds new light on patterns of tetrapod distribution. Northeastern Brazil hosted an extensive lacustrine system inhabited by a unique community of temnospondyl amphibians and reptiles that considerably expand the known temporal and geographic ranges of key subgroups. Our findings demonstrate that tetrapod groups common in later Permian and Triassic temperate communities were already present in tropical Gondwana by the early Permian (Cisuralian). This new fauna constitutes a new biogeographic province with North American affinities and clearly demonstrates that tetrapod dispersal into Gondwana was already underway at the beginning of the Permian. PMID:26537112

  10. Quaternary Tipping Points in Tropical Northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Patrick; Dunbar, Gavin; Croke, Jacky; Katunar, Rosie

    2016-04-01

    Tropical northern Queensland, particularly the volcanic Atherton Tableland, contains some of the most detailed and longest terrestrial palaeoenvironmental archives in Australia and when combined with adjacent marine sediment records provides key insight into potential environmental 'tipping points' for the entire Quaternary period and beyond. This presentation will provide an overview of some of the key tipping points (i.e. significant landscape transformation) that have occurred within the tropical northern Australian region over the Quaternary, as well as discussing potential causes and subsequent impacts of these transformation episodes. These events include the development of the Great Barrier Reef, transition from obliquity to eccentricity dominated glacial-interglacial cycles, the Mid-Brunhes event, the Oxygen Isotope Stage 6 episode, the arrival of people into the region, Last Glacial-Interglacial Transition and European settlement.

  11. Management of hypereosinophilia in tropical settings

    PubMed Central

    Law, Arjun Datt; Varma, Subhash Chander

    2014-01-01

    Hypereosinophilia includes a group of commonly encountered clinical situations with symptoms ranging from mild and clinically innocuous to devastating presentations with high morbidity and mortality. The presentations and complications can be easily missed if the clinician is unaware of the diverse entities responsible for hypereosinophilia. The hypereosinophilic syndromes encompass entities that are associated with varying degrees of organ dysfunction either directly due to eosinophilic infiltration or as a result of substances secreted by the eosinophils. These conditions may be neoplastic or reactive in aetiology and a diligent search for secondary causes is essential. Evaluation and management algorithms in the tropical setting and in developing countries may differ from elsewhere. A review of hypereosinophilia and hypereosinophilic syndromes is presented with a diagnostic and therapeutic decision making algorithm modified for use in the tropical setting. PMID:25609866

  12. Experiment to Characterize Tropical Cloud Systems

    SciTech Connect

    May, Peter T.; Mather, Jim H.; Jakob, Christian

    2005-08-02

    A major experiment to study tropical convective cloud systems and their impacts will take place around Darwin, Northern Australia in early 2006. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) is a collaboration including the DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) and ARM-UAV programs, NASA centers, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, and universities in the USA, Australia, Japan, the UK, and Canada. TWP-ICE will be preceded in November/December 2004 by a collaborating European aircraft campaign involving the EU SCOUT-O3 and UK NERC ACTIVE projects. Detailed atmospheric measurements will be made in the Darwin area through the whole Austral summer, giving unprecedented coverage through the pre-monsoon and monsoon periods.

  13. New Permian fauna from tropical Gondwana.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Juan C; Marsicano, Claudia; Angielczyk, Kenneth D; Smith, Roger M H; Richter, Martha; Fröbisch, Jörg; Kammerer, Christian F; Sadleir, Rudyard W

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial vertebrates are first known to colonize high-latitude regions during the middle Permian (Guadalupian) about 270 million years ago, following the Pennsylvanian Gondwanan continental glaciation. However, despite over 150 years of study in these areas, the biogeographic origins of these rich communities of land-dwelling vertebrates remain obscure. Here we report on a new early Permian continental tetrapod fauna from South America in tropical Western Gondwana that sheds new light on patterns of tetrapod distribution. Northeastern Brazil hosted an extensive lacustrine system inhabited by a unique community of temnospondyl amphibians and reptiles that considerably expand the known temporal and geographic ranges of key subgroups. Our findings demonstrate that tetrapod groups common in later Permian and Triassic temperate communities were already present in tropical Gondwana by the early Permian (Cisuralian). This new fauna constitutes a new biogeographic province with North American affinities and clearly demonstrates that tetrapod dispersal into Gondwana was already underway at the beginning of the Permian. PMID:26537112

  14. Beta-Diversity in Tropical Forest Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condit, Richard; Pitman, Nigel; Leigh, Egbert G.; Chave, Jérôme; Terborgh, John; Foster, Robin B.; Núñez V., Percy; Aguilar, Salomón; Valencia, Renato; Villa, Gorky; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Losos, Elizabeth; Hubbell, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    The high alpha-diversity of tropical forests has been amply documented, but beta-diversity-how species composition changes with distance-has seldom been studied. We present quantitative estimates of beta-diversity for tropical trees by comparing species composition of plots in lowland terra firme forest in Panama, Ecuador, and Peru. We compare observations with predictions derived from a neutral model in which habitat is uniform and only dispersal and speciation influence species turnover. We find that beta-diversity is higher in Panama than in western Amazonia and that patterns in both areas are inconsistent with the neutral model. In Panama, habitat variation appears to increase species turnover relative to Amazonia, where unexpectedly low turnover over great distances suggests that population densities of some species are bounded by as yet unidentified processes. At intermediate scales in both regions, observations can be matched by theory, suggesting that dispersal limitation, with speciation, influences species turnover.

  15. Imported tropical infectious ulcers in travelers.

    PubMed

    Zeegelaar, Jim E; Faber, William R

    2008-01-01

    Skin ulcers are a commonly encountered problem at departments of tropical dermatology in the Western world. Furthermore, the general dermatologist is likely to be consulted more often for imported chronic skin ulcers because of the ever-increasing travel to and from tropical countries. The most common cause of chronic ulceration throughout the world is probably pyoderma. However, in some parts of the world, cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most prevalent causes. Mycobacterium ulcerans is an important cause of chronic ulcers in West Africa. Bacterial infections include pyoderma, mycobacterial infections, diphtheria, and anthrax. Pyoderma is caused by Staphylococcus aureus and/or beta-hemolytic streptococci group A. This condition is a common cause of ulcerative skin lesions in tropical countries and is often encountered as a secondary infection in travelers. The diagnosis is often made on clinical grounds. Antibacterial treatment for pyoderma should preferably be based on culture outcome. Floxacillin is generally active against S. aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococci. Infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, M. marinum, and M. tuberculosis may cause ulcers. Buruli ulcers, which are caused by M. ulcerans, are endemic in foci in West Africa and have been reported as an imported disease in the Western world. Treatment is generally surgical, although a combination of rifampin (rifampicin) and streptomycin may be effective in the early stage. M. marinum causes occasional ulcerating lesions in humans. Treatment regimens consist of combinations containing clarithromycin, rifampin, or ethambutol. Cutaneous tuberculosis is rare in travelers but may be encountered in immigrants from developing countries. Treatment is with multiple drug regimens consisting of isoniazid, ethambutol, pyrazinamide, and rifampin. Cutaneous diphtheria is still endemic in many tropical countries. Cutaneous diphtheria ulcers are nonspecific and erythromycin and penicillin are both effective

  16. The natural way. A tropical contraceptive.

    PubMed

    1994-05-18

    It's not news for the women of the Indian subcontinent. For generations, they've been well aware that papaya and pregnancy don't mix. But now researchers at Britain's University of Sussex have proven the contraceptive qualities of the tropical fruit. "Women in Sri Lanka use papaya fruit as contraceptives because they are cheap and natural," says Tharmalingam Senthilomohan. "If they want to become pregnant, they simply avoid eating them." His findings: abortion can be induced by eating unripe papaya for three consecutive days. And daily consumption of ripe fruit can be an effective contraceptive. Senthilomohan has two theories on what gives papaya its contraceptive qualities. The tropical fruit contains an enzyme called papain which suppresses progesterone, a sex hormone needed to prepare the uterus for conception and to maintain the pregnancy. Another possibility is that papain, which can be used to tenderize meat, may break down a membrane vital to the development of the fetus. PMID:12288101

  17. Diagnostic radiology in the tropics: technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; McLean, Ian Donald

    2011-11-01

    An estimated two thirds of the world's population is currently without access to diagnostic radiology services, and most of them live in resource-limited tropical regions with harsh environments. Most patients are diagnosed and treated in poorly equipped government-funded hospitals and clinics that have insufficiently trained staff and are barely operational. Any available imaging equipment is likely to be functioning suboptimally and be poorly maintained. The root of the problem is usually a lack of know-how and a quality culture, combined with insufficient basic equipment and infrastructure. Radiological imaging is an essential aspect of primary care and used in the critical diagnosis and management of trauma, tuberculosis, pneumonia, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, cancer, and other respiratory and abdominal diseases. Considerations such as quality management and infrastructure, personnel, equipment, and radiation protection and safety are important to ensure the proper functioning and rational use of a diagnostic radiology facility in the tropics.

  18. [Medical aspects of diving in the tropics].

    PubMed

    Muth, C M; Müller, P; Kemmer, A

    2005-07-01

    Scuba diving vacations in tropical surroundings belong to the repertoire of most divers. In addition to carefully making travel plans and taking care of the necessary vaccinations and appropriate malaria prophylaxis, the following points also must be observed. The flight itself affects diving safety. In particular, a too short time interval between diving and the return flight can lead to decompression problems. Because most of the diving areas are reached by ship, many divers need a prophylaxis against motion sickness. Moreover, external otitis occurs more frequently while diving in the tropics. Finally, there is potential danger from the sea inhabitants, primarily from scorpion fishes, Portuguese Man-of-Wars, box jellyfishes as well as cone snails. PMID:16041936

  19. COSMIC Observations of the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.; Randel, W. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) is a collaborative satellite project operated by the National Space Organization in Taiwan and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research in the United States. The mission consists of six microsatellites launched in April 2006 that utilize the global positioning system radio-occultation limb sounding technique to provide high-precision temperature observations in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS). There are between 1000-2500 global occultation profiles taken daily with a vertical precision of approximately 200 metres in the UTLS. The global sampling coverage and precision of this data set is unprecedented and provides unique opportunities for the study of wave activity in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). COSMIC observations of the evolution of tropical waves will be shown with specific emphasis placed on latitudinal/longitudinal dependence and seasonality.

  20. [The geopolitics of tropical diseases: a geo-epidemiological perspective].

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Chan

    2005-12-01

    The objective of my article is to investigate how the West had strong interest in tropical diseases and developed tropical medicine and hygiene from the 1870s through the 1910s. Its focus is to identify the geopolitical conditions in which the West constructed 'tropical diseases' to extend its imperial interests into non-Western tropical regions. The article has several specific research tasks: first, I attempt to explore the way in which European people transformed their attitudes toward tropical diseases from the sixteenth century to the 1860s. A variety of writings by European physicians are discussed; the second part shows European change in its domestic sanitary situation in relation to its imperial interests in tropical regions. Sanitary hygiene in metropole and colonies are not separate, but interconnected; third, the paper illuminates how the West responded to the spread of 'Asiatic cholera' in the nineteenth century. Cholera provides a typical example for the West to perceive Asian origin of tropical diseases; finally, the article demonstrates that hygienic governance of tropical diseases is the key to imperial dominion over colonies by taking the Panama Canal as an example. Although several European countries such as Spain, Britain, Germany, and France had strong imperial interests in the Panama Canal that might facilitate trade between the Atlantic and the Pacific, they failed to occupy the canal because of their inability to control high prevalence of malaria and yellow fever. Taking advantage of 'tropical medicine,' the United States succeeded in taking up the canal by eradicating tropical diseases in the canal. It was owing to the scientific development of tropical hygiene and medicine that the West transformed its pessimistic into optimistic position about the colonization of tropical regions. Tropical diseases became the geopolitical reference for Western conceptualization of Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Pacific. PMID:17144195

  1. [The geopolitics of tropical diseases: a geo-epidemiological perspective].

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Chan

    2005-12-01

    The objective of my article is to investigate how the West had strong interest in tropical diseases and developed tropical medicine and hygiene from the 1870s through the 1910s. Its focus is to identify the geopolitical conditions in which the West constructed 'tropical diseases' to extend its imperial interests into non-Western tropical regions. The article has several specific research tasks: first, I attempt to explore the way in which European people transformed their attitudes toward tropical diseases from the sixteenth century to the 1860s. A variety of writings by European physicians are discussed; the second part shows European change in its domestic sanitary situation in relation to its imperial interests in tropical regions. Sanitary hygiene in metropole and colonies are not separate, but interconnected; third, the paper illuminates how the West responded to the spread of 'Asiatic cholera' in the nineteenth century. Cholera provides a typical example for the West to perceive Asian origin of tropical diseases; finally, the article demonstrates that hygienic governance of tropical diseases is the key to imperial dominion over colonies by taking the Panama Canal as an example. Although several European countries such as Spain, Britain, Germany, and France had strong imperial interests in the Panama Canal that might facilitate trade between the Atlantic and the Pacific, they failed to occupy the canal because of their inability to control high prevalence of malaria and yellow fever. Taking advantage of 'tropical medicine,' the United States succeeded in taking up the canal by eradicating tropical diseases in the canal. It was owing to the scientific development of tropical hygiene and medicine that the West transformed its pessimistic into optimistic position about the colonization of tropical regions. Tropical diseases became the geopolitical reference for Western conceptualization of Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Pacific.

  2. Salinity fronts in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsun-Ying; Lagerloef, Gary S E

    2015-01-01

    This study delineates the salinity fronts (SF) across the tropical Pacific, and describes their variability and regional dynamical significance using Aquarius satellite observations. From the monthly maps of the SF, we find that the SF in the tropical Pacific are (1) usually observed around the boundaries of the fresh pool under the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), (2) stronger in boreal autumn than in other seasons, and (3) usually stronger in the eastern Pacific than in the western Pacific. The relationship between the SF and the precipitation and the surface velocity are also discussed. We further present detailed analysis of the SF in three key tropical Pacific regions. Extending zonally around the ITCZ, where the temperature is nearly homogeneous, we find the strong SF of 1.2 psu from 7° to 11°N to be the main contributor of the horizontal density difference of 0.8 kg/m3. In the eastern Pacific, we observe a southward extension of the SF in the boreal spring that could be driven by both precipitation and horizontal advection. In the western Pacific, the importance of these newly resolved SF associated with the western Pacific warm/fresh pool and El Niño southern oscillations are also discussed in the context of prior literature. The main conclusions of this study are that (a) Aquarius satellite salinity measurements reveal the heretofore unknown proliferation, structure, and variability of surface salinity fronts, and that (b) the fine-scale structures of the SF in the tropical Pacific yield important new information on the regional air-sea interaction and the upper ocean dynamics. PMID:26213676

  3. Changes in rainfall seasonality in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Porporato, A. M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change has altered not only the overall magnitude of rainfall but also their seasonal distribution and interannual variability across the world. Such changes in the rainfall regimes will be most keenly felt in arid and semiarid regions, where the availability and timing of water are key factors controlling biogeochemical cycles, primary productivity, and phenology, in addition to regulating regional agricultural production and economic output. Nevertheless, due to the inherent complexity of the signals, a comprehensive framework to understand seasonal rainfall profiles across multiple timescales and geographical regions is still lacking. Here, we formulate a global measure of seasonality and investigate changes in the seasonal rainfall regime across the tropics in the past century. The seasonality index, which captures the effects of both the magnitude and concentration of the rainy season, is highest in the northeast region of Brazil, western and central Africa, northern Australia, and parts of the Caribbean and Southeast Asia (the seasonally dry tropics). Further decomposing rainfall seasonality into its magnitude, duration, and timing components using spectral techniques and information theory, we find marked increase in the interannual variability of seasonality over most of the dry tropics, implying increasing uncertainty in the intensity, duration, and arrival of seasonal rainfall over the past century. We also show that such increase in variability has occurred in conjunction with shifts in the seasonal timing and changes in its overall magnitude. Thus, it is importance to place the analysis of rainfall regimes in these regions into a seasonal context that is most relevant to local ecological and social processes. These changes, if sustained into the next century, will portend significant shifts in the timing of plant activities and ecosystem composition and distribution, with consequences for water and carbon cycling and water resource management in

  4. The underestimated biodiversity of tropical grassy biomes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brett P; Andersen, Alan N; Parr, Catherine L

    2016-09-19

    For decades, there has been enormous scientific interest in tropical savannahs and grasslands, fuelled by the recognition that they are a dynamic and potentially unstable biome, requiring periodic disturbance for their maintenance. However, that scientific interest has not translated into widespread appreciation of, and concern about threats to, their biodiversity. In terms of biodiversity, grassy biomes are considered poor cousins of the other dominant biome of the tropics-forests. Simple notions of grassy biomes being species-poor cannot be supported; for some key taxa, such as vascular plants, this may be valid, but for others it is not. Here, we use an analysis of existing data to demonstrate that high-rainfall tropical grassy biomes (TGBs) have vertebrate species richness comparable with that of forests, despite having lower plant diversity. The Neotropics stand out in terms of both overall vertebrate species richness and number of range-restricted vertebrate species in TGBs. Given high rates of land-cover conversion in Neotropical grassy biomes, they should be a high priority for conservation and greater inclusion in protected areas. Fire needs to be actively maintained in these systems, and in many cases re-introduced after decades of inappropriate fire exclusion. The relative intactness of TGBs in Africa and Australia make them the least vulnerable to biodiversity loss in the immediate future. We argue that, like forests, TGBs should be recognized as a critical-but increasingly threatened-store of global biodiversity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation'. PMID:27502382

  5. Estimating Mesophyll Conductance in the Tropical Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, I.

    2015-12-01

    In the current research modeling the carbon cycle, some of the biggest setbacks are methodological barriers to calculating the gross primary production (GPP) in the terrestrial biosphere. However, recent developments in high precision gas measurements now allow the use of COS as a potential tracer for determination of GPP, independently of CO2 .Since the tropics are implicated as being the source of the most significant reduction of carbon uptake by the majority of models, making accurate GPP measurements in the tropics is particularly important for carbon modeling. In order to constrain measurements of GPP in the tropics, carbonyl sulfide fluxes on a leaf chamber scale and a canopy-wide scale will be analyzed in a field site in the central Amazon. Accompanying this experiment, I am measuring the resistance of CO2 passing through the intercellular airspaces in the leaf to the sites of carboxylation, known as mesophyll conductance. Mesophyll conductance is poorly documented in the tropics, and remains a centrally limiting factor in plant uptake of COS and CO2 - with upward estimates of 40% of the CO2 diffusional limitation of photosynthesis hinging on mesophyll conductance (Warren, 2008). This makes mesophyll conductance comparable in magnitude to that of the stomatal conductance, suggesting that mesophyll conductance is one of the most fundamental measurements necessary for developing the predictive capacity of plants' response to ecosystem changes. Accurate measurements of the mesophyll conductance also lead to better informed models that can upscale assimilation measurements from leaf chambers, by providing quantitative constraints for modeling the uptake of carbonyl sulfide and carbon dioxide by the leaf. Additionally, since mesophyll conductance reacts to environmental variation, it can be used as an indicator for leaf stress. Measurements are taken using the 'variable J' technique, involving the use of combined fluorescence measurements and gas exchange data

  6. The underestimated biodiversity of tropical grassy biomes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brett P; Andersen, Alan N; Parr, Catherine L

    2016-09-19

    For decades, there has been enormous scientific interest in tropical savannahs and grasslands, fuelled by the recognition that they are a dynamic and potentially unstable biome, requiring periodic disturbance for their maintenance. However, that scientific interest has not translated into widespread appreciation of, and concern about threats to, their biodiversity. In terms of biodiversity, grassy biomes are considered poor cousins of the other dominant biome of the tropics-forests. Simple notions of grassy biomes being species-poor cannot be supported; for some key taxa, such as vascular plants, this may be valid, but for others it is not. Here, we use an analysis of existing data to demonstrate that high-rainfall tropical grassy biomes (TGBs) have vertebrate species richness comparable with that of forests, despite having lower plant diversity. The Neotropics stand out in terms of both overall vertebrate species richness and number of range-restricted vertebrate species in TGBs. Given high rates of land-cover conversion in Neotropical grassy biomes, they should be a high priority for conservation and greater inclusion in protected areas. Fire needs to be actively maintained in these systems, and in many cases re-introduced after decades of inappropriate fire exclusion. The relative intactness of TGBs in Africa and Australia make them the least vulnerable to biodiversity loss in the immediate future. We argue that, like forests, TGBs should be recognized as a critical-but increasingly threatened-store of global biodiversity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation'.

  7. Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar Anand

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the role of clouds is one of the highest priority science objectives in the global climate change program. In particular there has been a renewed interest in understanding the cloud radiative interactions in the tropical regions. Although a number of studies have emphasized the importance of cloud optical properties on the earth's radiative energy balance, information concerning cloud optical depth and particle size as a function of cloud type is lacking.

  8. Latent Heating Processes within Tropical Deep Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Mcgee, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    It has been suggested that latent heating above the freezing level plays an important role in reconciling Riehl and Malkus' Hot Tower Hypothesis (HTH) with observational evidence of diluted tropical deep convective cores. In this study, recent modifications to the HTH have been evaluated through the use of Lagrangian trajectory analysis of deep convective cores simulated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with sophisticated microphysical, surface and radiation parameterization schemes. Idealized, high-resolution simulations of a line of tropical convective cells have been conducted. A two-moment microphysical scheme was utilized, and the initial and lateral boundary grid conditions were obtained from a large-domain CRM simulation approaching radiative convective equilibrium. As the tropics are never too far from radiative convective equilibrium, such a framework is useful for investigating the relationships between radiation, thermodynamics and microphysics in tropical convection. Microphysical impacts on latent heating and equivalent potential temperature (θe) have been analyzed along trajectories ascending within convective regions. Changes in θe along backward trajectories are partitioned into contributions from latent heating due to ice processes and a residual term that is shown to be an approximate representation of mixing. It is apparent from the CRM simulations that mixing with dry environmental air decreases θe along ascending trajectories below the freezing level, while latent heating due to freezing and vapor deposition increase θe above the freezing level. The along-trajectory contributions to latent heating from cloud nucleation, condensation, evaporation, freezing, deposition, and sublimation have also been quantified. Finally, the source regions of trajectories reaching the upper troposphere have been identified. The analysis indicates that while much of the air ascending within convective

  9. [Biomedical research in Revista de Biologia Tropical].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, José María

    2002-01-01

    The contributions published in Revista de Biología Tropical in the area of Biomedical Sciences are reviewed in terms of number of contributions and scope of research subjects. Biomedical Sciences, particularly Parasitology and Microbiology, constituted the predominant subject in the Revista during the first decade, reflecting the intense research environment at the School of Microbiology of the University of Costa Rica and at Hospital San Juan de Dios. The relative weight of Biomedicine in the following decades diminished, due to the outstanding increment in publications in Biological Sciences; however, the absolute number of contributions in Biomedical Sciences remained constant throughout the last decades, with around 80 contributions per decade. In spite of the predominance of Parasitology as the main biomedical subject, the last decades have witnessed the emergence of new areas of interest in the Revista, such as Pharmacology of natural products, Toxinology, especially related to snake venoms, and Human Genetics. This retrospective analysis evidences that Biomedical Sciences, particularly those related to Tropical Medicine, were a fundamental component during the first years of Revista de Biología Tropical, and have maintained a significant presence in the scientific output of this journal, the most relevant scientific publication in biological sciences in Central America.

  10. Citizen scientists analyzing tropical cyclone intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    2012-10-01

    A new crowd sourcing project called CycloneCenter enables the public to analyze historical global tropical cyclone (TC) intensities. The primary goal of CycloneCenter, which launched in mid-September, is to resolve discrepancies in the recent global TC record arising principally from inconsistent development of tropical cyclone intensity data. The historical TC record is composed of data sets called "best tracks," which contain a forecast agency's best assessment of TC tracks and intensities. Best track data have improved in quality since the beginning of the geostationary satellite era in the 1960s (because TCs could no longer disappear from sight). However, a global compilation of best track data (International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS)) has brought to light large interagency differences between some TC best track intensities, even in the recent past [Knapp et al., 2010Knapp et al., 2010]. For example, maximum wind speed estimates for Tropical Cyclone Gay (1989) differed by as much as 70 knots as it was tracked by three different agencies.

  11. Intersecting solitons, amoeba, and tropical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohta, Kazutoshi; Sakai, Norisuke; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2008-11-15

    We study the generic intersection (or web) of vortices with instantons inside, which is a 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield state in the Higgs phase of five-dimensional N=1 supersymmetric U(N{sub C}) gauge theory on R{sub t}x(C*){sup 2}{approx_equal}R{sup 2,1}xT{sup 2} with N{sub F}=N{sub C} Higgs scalars in the fundamental representation. In the case of the Abelian-Higgs model (N{sub F}=N{sub C}=1), the intersecting vortex sheets can be beautifully understood in a mathematical framework of amoeba and tropical geometry, and we propose a dictionary relating solitons and gauge theory to amoeba and tropical geometry. A projective shape of vortex sheets is described by the amoeba. Vortex charge density is uniformly distributed among vortex sheets, and negative contribution to instanton charge density is understood as the complex Monge-Ampere measure with respect to a plurisubharmonic function on (C*){sup 2}. The Wilson loops in T{sup 2} are related with derivatives of the Ronkin function. The general form of the Kaehler potential and the asymptotic metric of the moduli space of a vortex loop are obtained as a by-product. Our discussion works generally in non-Abelian gauge theories, which suggests a non-Abelian generalization of the amoeba and tropical geometry.

  12. Entropy Convective Flux for Tropical Cyclone Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegahfar, Nafiseh; Gharaylou, Maryam; Ghafarian, Parvin

    2016-07-01

    It is well-known that the environmental factors control tropical cyclones (TCs). one of the most considered thermodynamical parameters is entropy that its significant role on tropical cyclogenesis and TC intensification has been professionally focused in some recent research studies. In the current work, two data sets including satellite data and NCEP-GFS data have been used to investigate the entropy parameter and its convective flux, during tropical cyclone Haiyan (TCH) occurred on 3-11 November 2013 and nominated as the strongest TC over Pacific Ocean before 2014. This purpose has been proceeded for three domain areas with different size. These domains cover inner, eyewall and rainbands, and environmental regions of TCH at various pressure levels. Also three terms of entropy vertical flux including dissipative heating, surface entropy flux and difference between entropy values over inner and outer regions have been analyzed. Our obtained results showed relatively similar behavior of averaged entropy over all selected domain, but with a delay and decrease in maximum values for the smaller domains. In addition our findings revealed different considerable contributions for three terms of entropy vertical flux.

  13. Anomalous cold in the Pangaean tropics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soreghan, G.S.; Soreghan, M.J.; Poulsen, C.J.; Young, R.A.; Eble, C.F.; Sweet, D.E.; Davogustto, O.C.

    2008-01-01

    The late Paleozoic archives the greatest glaciation of the Phanerozoic. Whereas high-latitude Gondwanan strata preserve widespread evidence for continental ice, the Permo-Carboniferous tropics have long been considered analogous to today's: warm and shielded from the highlatitude cold. Here, we report on glacial and periglacial indicators that record episodes of freezing continental temperatures in western equatorial Pangaea. An exhumed glacial valley and associated deposits record direct evidence for glaciation that extended to low paleoelevations in the ancestral Rocky Mountains. Furthermore, the Permo-Carboniferous archives the only known occurrence of widespread tropical loess in Earth's history; the volume, chemistry, and provenance of this loess(ite) is most consistent with glacial derivation. Together with emerging indicators for cold elsewhere in low-latitude Pangaea, these results suggest that tropical climate was not buffered from the high latitudes and may record glacial-interglacial climate shifts of very large magnitude. Coupled climate-ice sheet model simulations demonstrate that low atmospheric CO2 and solar luminosity alone cannot account for such cold, and that other factors must be considered in attempting to explain this 'best-known' analogue to our present Earth. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  14. The overlooked tropical oceanic CO2 sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibánhez, J. Severino P.; Araujo, Moacyr; Lefèvre, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The intense rainfall in the tropical Atlantic spatially overlaps with the spread of the Amazon plume. Based on remote-sensed sea surface salinity and rainfall, we removed the contribution of rainfall to the apparent Amazon plume area, thus refining the quantification of its extension (0.84 ± 0.06 × 106 km2 to 0.89 ± 0.06 × 106 km2). Despite the previous overestimation of the Amazon plume area due to the influence of rainfall (>16%), our calculated annual CO2 flux based on rainfall-corrected sea surface CO2 fugacity confirms that the Amazon River plume is an atmospheric CO2 sink of global importance (-7.61 ± 1.01 to -7.85 ± 1.02 Tg C yr-1). Yet we show that current sea-air CO2 flux assessments for the tropical Atlantic could be overestimated in about 10% by neglecting the CO2 sink associated to the Amazon plume. Thus, including the Amazon plume, the sea-air CO2 exchange for the tropical Atlantic is estimated to be 81.1 ± 1.1 to 81.5 ± 1.1 Tg C yr-1.

  15. Vaccines to combat the neglected tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Cole, Rhea N.; Guo, Xiaoti; Kamhawi, Shaden; Lightowlers, Marshall W.; Loukas, Alex; Petri, William; Reed, Steven; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Hotez, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) represent a group of parasitic and related infectious diseases such as amebiasis, Chagas disease, cysticercosis, echinococcosis, hookworm, leishmaniasis, and schistosomiasis. Together, these conditions are considered the most common infections in low- and middle-income countries, where they produce a level of global disability and human suffering equivalent to better known conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and malaria. Despite their global public health importance, progress on developing vaccines for NTD pathogens has lagged because of some key technical hurdles and the fact that these infections occur almost exclusively in the world’s poorest people living below the World Bank poverty line. In the absence of financial incentives for new products, the multinational pharmaceutical companies have not embarked on substantive research and development programs for the neglected tropical disease vaccines. Here, we review the current status of scientific and technical progress in the development of new neglected tropical disease vaccines, highlighting the successes that have been achieved (cysticercosis and echinococcosis) and identifying the challenges and opportunities for development of new vaccines for NTDs. Also highlighted are the contributions being made by non-profit product development partnerships that are working to overcome some of the economic challenges in vaccine manufacture, clinical testing, and global access. PMID:21198676

  16. Poverty and corruption compromise tropical forest reserves.

    PubMed

    Wright, S Joseph; Sanchez-Azofeifa, G Arturo; Portillo-Quintero, Carlos; Davies, Diane

    2007-07-01

    We used the global fire detection record provided by the satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to determine the number of fires detected inside 823 tropical and subtropical moist forest reserves and for contiguous buffer areas 5, 10, and 15 km wide. The ratio of fire detection densities (detections per square kilometer) inside reserves to their contiguous buffer areas provided an index of reserve effectiveness. Fire detection density was significantly lower inside reserves than in paired, contiguous buffer areas but varied by five orders of magnitude among reserves. The buffer: reserve detection ratio varied by up to four orders of magnitude among reserves within a single country, and median values varied by three orders of magnitude among countries. Reserves tended to be least effective at reducing fire frequency in many poorer countries and in countries beset by corruption. Countries with the most successful reserves include Costa Rica, Jamaica, Malaysia, and Taiwan and the Indonesian island of Java. Countries with the most problematic reserves include Cambodia, Guatemala, Paraguay, and Sierra Leone and the Indonesian portion of Borneo. We provide fire detection density for 3964 tropical and subtropical reserves and their buffer areas in the hope that these data will expedite further analyses that might lead to improved management of tropical reserves.

  17. Poverty and corruption compromise tropical forest reserves.

    PubMed

    Wright, S Joseph; Sanchez-Azofeifa, G Arturo; Portillo-Quintero, Carlos; Davies, Diane

    2007-07-01

    We used the global fire detection record provided by the satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to determine the number of fires detected inside 823 tropical and subtropical moist forest reserves and for contiguous buffer areas 5, 10, and 15 km wide. The ratio of fire detection densities (detections per square kilometer) inside reserves to their contiguous buffer areas provided an index of reserve effectiveness. Fire detection density was significantly lower inside reserves than in paired, contiguous buffer areas but varied by five orders of magnitude among reserves. The buffer: reserve detection ratio varied by up to four orders of magnitude among reserves within a single country, and median values varied by three orders of magnitude among countries. Reserves tended to be least effective at reducing fire frequency in many poorer countries and in countries beset by corruption. Countries with the most successful reserves include Costa Rica, Jamaica, Malaysia, and Taiwan and the Indonesian island of Java. Countries with the most problematic reserves include Cambodia, Guatemala, Paraguay, and Sierra Leone and the Indonesian portion of Borneo. We provide fire detection density for 3964 tropical and subtropical reserves and their buffer areas in the hope that these data will expedite further analyses that might lead to improved management of tropical reserves. PMID:17708206

  18. Sources of Deforestation in Tropical Developing Countries

    PubMed

    Tole

    1998-01-01

    / Key causes of tropical deforestation are investigated using cross-sectional data for 90 developing countries for the period 1981-1990. Regression results reveal that deforestation is associated with both development and scarcity. Deforestation accelerates with expanding infrastructure, trade, debt, investment in the human capital base, and resource-based economic expansion. On the other hand, absolute and relative scarcities-manifested by growing population pressures, food and land shortages, fuelwood dependency, and inequalities in access to land-are also key factors explaining forest loss. Thus, results point to a fundamental environmental conundrum: Development is required if countries are to alleviate scarcity-driven forms of forest exploitation but is itself a major cause of deforestation. Can countries balance development goals with forest protection? Setting aside the issue of its practical realization, the paper concludes that forest sustainable development cannot be achieved by implementing simple technical improvements in land-use practices alone. Securing the foundations for the sustainability of the forest base will require that countries address the underlying social processes driving tropical forest loss as well.KEY WORDS: Tropical deforestation; Developing countries; Rural land-use practices; Development; Scarcity.

  19. Anomalous cold in the Pangaean tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Soreghan, Michael J.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Young, Roger A.; Eble, Cortland F.; Sweet, Dustin E.; Davogustto, Oswaldo C.

    2008-08-01

    The late Paleozoic archives the greatest glaciation of the Phanerozoic.Whereas high-latitude Gondwanan strata preserve widespread evidencefor continental ice, the Permo-Carboniferous tropics have longbeen considered analogous to today's: warm and shielded fromthe high-latitude cold. Here, we report on glacial and periglacialindicators that record episodes of freezing continental temperaturesin western equatorial Pangaea. An exhumed glacial valley andassociated deposits record direct evidence for glaciation thatextended to low paleoelevations in the ancestral Rocky Mountains.Furthermore, the Permo-Carboniferous archives the only knownoccurrence of widespread tropical loess in Earth's history;the volume, chemistry, and provenance of this loess(ite) ismost consistent with glacial derivation. Together with emergingindicators for cold elsewhere in low-latitude Pangaea, theseresults suggest that tropical climate was not buffered fromthe high latitudes and may record glacial-interglacial climateshifts of very large magnitude. Coupled climate-ice sheetmodel simulations demonstrate that low atmospheric CO2 and solarluminosity alone cannot account for such cold, and that otherfactors must be considered in attempting to explain this "best-known"analogue to our present Earth.

  20. Mapping the spatial distribution of global anthropogenic mercury atmospheric emission inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Simon J.; Steenhuisen, Frits; Pacyna, Jozef M.; Pacyna, Elisabeth G.

    This paper describes the procedures employed to spatially distribute global inventories of anthropogenic emissions of mercury to the atmosphere, prepared by Pacyna, E.G., Pacyna, J.M., Steenhuisen, F., Wilson, S. [2006. Global anthropogenic mercury emission inventory for 2000. Atmospheric Environment, this issue, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2006.03.041], and briefly discusses the results of this work. A new spatially distributed global emission inventory for the (nominal) year 2000, and a revised version of the 1995 inventory are presented. Emissions estimates for total mercury and major species groups are distributed within latitude/longitude-based grids with a resolution of 1×1 and 0.5×0.5°. A key component in the spatial distribution procedure is the use of population distribution as a surrogate parameter to distribute emissions from sources that cannot be accurately geographically located. In this connection, new gridded population datasets were prepared, based on the CEISIN GPW3 datasets (CIESIN, 2004. Gridded Population of the World (GPW), Version 3. Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), Columbia University and Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT). GPW3 data are available at http://beta.sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/gpw/index.jsp). The spatially distributed emissions inventories and population datasets prepared in the course of this work are available on the Internet at www.amap.no/Resources/HgEmissions/

  1. Saharan dust, lightning and tropical cyclones in the eastern tropical Atlantic during NAMMA-06

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Gregory S.; Pratt, Aaron

    2008-06-01

    During the summer of 2006, the downstream component of African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses Campaign (NASA-AMMA (NAMMA)) examined African Easterly Waves (AEWs) emerging from the coast of Africa. Six of these disturbances went on to become named systems in the Tropical Atlantic. Two of the six systems (Tropical storm Debby and Hurricane Helene) developed in the extreme eastern Atlantic and were associated with dust outbreaks, elevated ice contents and frequent lightning. Here we show that in the early tropical cyclo-genesis stages of these systems there were thousands of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes as measured by a ground-lightning network. TRMM overpasses show high precipitation ice content above the freezing level and high latent heat release. Super-cooled water can be inferred in the lower parts of cloud systems in concert with observed high ice concentrations at high altitudes creating charge separation based on the large numbers of CG flashes.

  2. Observations of a tropical instability vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennan, Sean Christopher

    1997-11-01

    Observations of an upper ocean vortex associated with tropical instabilities in the tropical Pacific were made in the vicinity of the South Equatorial Current and North Equatorial Counter Current (SEC-NECC) shear at 140oW during November-December of 1990. The dynamic and thermohaline structure of the observed vortex is mapped in three dimensions using a suite of measurements from shipboard, hydrographic, and satellite sensors and drifting buoys. Evidence that the sampled flow field is steady in a frame of reference moving with the disturbance is used to study the underlying dynamical balances and the effects on heat, fresh water, and eddy energy fluxes in the region. The vortex translated westward at 30 cm/s (0.24o/day), less than half the speed of westward propagating meridional oscillations of the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) and SEC system. The associated flow deformed the North Equatorial Front through northward advection of cold equatorial water and southward entrainment of warmer tropical water, giving the surface temperature field the cusp-like pattern which is commonly associated with tropical instabilities. A dipole of convergence and divergence had magnitudes comparable to the local inertial frequency and confirms predictions by various numerical models. Relative vorticity advection balanced convergence at the front, allowing northward moving cold water to subduct beneath the warmer tropical water. The growth of the vortex appears to have been limited by the inertial frequency via a vortex instability mechanism. The same features are present in shear vortices in a general circulation model. The vortex transported heat and fresh water equatorward at rates of about 0.2 MW/m2 and 5 g/(m2s), respectively. The heat flux agrees with previous estimates from observations and models. The region from 2-5oN gained heat and fresh water at 2-5 W/m3 and 0.1 μg/(m3s). Eddy kinetic energy increased via barotropic instability at a rate of 0.15 mW/m3 and via baroclinic

  3. The Impact of the Saharan Air Layer on Tropical Cyclones and Tropical Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunion, J.

    2012-12-01

    Infrared and microwave satellite imagery has steadily improved our ability to detect low to mid-level dry air at tropical latitudes and in the environments of tropical disturbances. However, understanding how this dry air affects the tropical atmosphere and tropical systems remains a difficult challenge. This presentation will discuss the impacts of intraseasonal low to mid-level dry air sources (e.g. the Saharan Air Layer and mid-latitude dry air intrusions) on the mean atmospheric state of the tropical North Atlantic and present new mean soundings for this region of the world. Discussion will also include recent research that is examining how the tropical cyclone diurnal cycle and associated diurnal pulses might provide a means for helping environmental dry air influence the storm environment. Special infrared GOES imagery reveals that the timing of these diurnal pulses in the TC environment are remarkably predictable in both time and space and suggests that these features steadily propagate away from the storm each day. As these diurnal pulses reach peripheral TC radii where low to mid-level dry air is place, substantial arc clouds (100s of km in length and lasting for several hours) have been observed forming along the leading edge of the pulse. It is hypothesized that the processes leading to the formation of arc cloud events can significantly impact an AEW or TC (particularly smaller, less developed systems). Specifically, the cool, dry air associated with the convectively-driven downdrafts that form arc clouds can help stabilize the middle to lower troposphere and may even act to stabilize the boundary layer. The arc clouds themselves may also act to disrupt the storm. As they race away from the convective core region, they create low-level outflow in the quadrant/semicircle of the AEW or TC in which they form. This outflow pattern counters the typical low-level inflow that is vital for TC formation and maintenance.

  4. Tropical dendrochemistry: A novel approach for reconstructing seasonally-resolved growth rates from ringless tropical trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poussart, P. M.; Myneni, S. C.

    2005-12-01

    Although tropical forests play an active role in the global carbon cycle and are host to a variety of pristine paleoclimate archives, they remain poorly characterized as compared to other ecosystems on the planet. In particular, dating and reconstructing the growth rate history of tropical trees remains a challenge and continues to delay research efforts towards understanding tropical forest dynamics. Traditional dendrochronological techniques have found limited applications in the tropics because temperature seasonality is often too small to initiate the production of visible annual growth rings. Dendrometers, cambium scarring methods and sub-annual records of oxygen and carbon isotopes from tree cellulose may be used to estimate growth rate histories when growth rings are absent. However, dendrometer records rarely extend beyond the past couple of decades and the generation of seasonally-resolved isotopic records remains labour intensive, currently prohibiting the level of record replication necessary for statistical analysis. Here, we present evidence that Ca may also be used as a proxy for dating and reconstructing growth rates of trees lacking visible growth rings. Using the Brookhaven National Lab Synchrotron, we recover a radial record of cyclic variations in Ca from a Miliusa velutina tree from northern Thailand. We determine that the Ca cycles are seasonal based on a comparison between radiocarbon age estimates and a trace element age model, which agree within 2 years over the period of 1955 to 2000. The amplitude of the Ca annual cycle is significantly correlated with growth rate estimates, which are also correlated to the amount of dry season rainfall. The measurements at the Synchrotron are fast, non-destructive and require little sample preparation. Application of this technique in the tropics holds the potential to resolve longstanding questions about tropical forest dynamics and interannual to decadal changes in the carbon cycle.

  5. Disaggregating Tropical Disease Prevalence by Climatic and Vegetative Zones within Tropical West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Beckley, Carl S.; Shaban, Salisu; Palmer, Guy H.; Hudak, Andrew T.; Noh, Susan M.; Futse, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical infectious disease prevalence is dependent on many socio-cultural determinants. However, rainfall and temperature frequently underlie overall prevalence, particularly for vector-borne diseases. As a result these diseases have increased prevalence in tropical as compared to temperate regions. Specific to tropical Africa, the tendency to incorrectly infer that tropical diseases are uniformly prevalent has been partially overcome with solid epidemiologic data. This finer resolution data is important in multiple contexts, including understanding risk, predictive value in disease diagnosis, and population immunity. We hypothesized that within the context of a tropical climate, vector-borne pathogen prevalence would significantly differ according to zonal differences in rainfall, temperature, relative humidity and vegetation condition. We then determined if these environmental data were predictive of pathogen prevalence. First we determined the prevalence of three major pathogens of cattle, Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina and Theileria spp, in the three vegetation zones where cattle are predominantly raised in Ghana: Guinea savannah, semi-deciduous forest, and coastal savannah. The prevalence of A. marginale was 63%, 26% for Theileria spp and 2% for B. bigemina. A. marginale and Theileria spp. were significantly more prevalent in the coastal savannah as compared to either the Guinea savanna or the semi-deciduous forest, supporting acceptance of the first hypothesis. To test the predictive power of environmental variables, the data over a three year period were considered in best subsets multiple linear regression models predicting prevalence of each pathogen. Corrected Akaike Information Criteria (AICc) were assigned to the alternative models to compare their utility. Competitive models for each response were averaged using AICc weights. Rainfall was most predictive of pathogen prevalence, and EVI also contributed to A. marginale and B. bigemina prevalence

  6. Does Uncertainty in the Pattern of Tropical SST Changes Underlie Uncertainty Tropical Precipitation Trends?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, L. M.; Coelho, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    The provision of robust projections of regional precipitation changes from CMIP3 is a substantial challenge facing the climate community. The need for this information to inform adaptation planning is particularly important in tropical regions, where societal vulnerability to climate variability and change is greatest. Much uncertainty in how tropical precipitation variability may change has been tied to uncertainty in how ENSO events are likely to change. We show that CMIP3 models with a good representation of ENSO project no significant changes for the phenomenon by the end of the 21st century, as do a number of models that represent ENSO less faithfully. Furthermore, ENSO teleconnections are not projected to change in the future. Thus, things like future ENSO-related drought risk can be presented as a combination of precipitation trends, from the models, and precipitation variability, from observations. The question still remains: How best to assess precipitation trends? While the general pattern - wetter equatorial region, drier sub-tropics - is similar among models, the local details can vary considerably suggesting that these trends are not robust at the local-to-regional scale. However, we do find that the models that do ENSO well, agree with each other on spatial details of precipitation changes, more than other models. On the other hand, the patterns of change for tropical Pacific SST differ between these good ENSO models, and all differ from observed trends. Thus, we address the question, if reasonable ENSO variability is important in models for robust tropical precipitation trends, then is it important what tropical SST changes look like? If so, where? If not, what is it that makes this subset of models agree?

  7. Disaggregating Tropical Disease Prevalence by Climatic and Vegetative Zones within Tropical West Africa.

    PubMed

    Beckley, Carl S; Shaban, Salisu; Palmer, Guy H; Hudak, Andrew T; Noh, Susan M; Futse, James E

    2016-01-01

    Tropical infectious disease prevalence is dependent on many socio-cultural determinants. However, rainfall and temperature frequently underlie overall prevalence, particularly for vector-borne diseases. As a result these diseases have increased prevalence in tropical as compared to temperate regions. Specific to tropical Africa, the tendency to incorrectly infer that tropical diseases are uniformly prevalent has been partially overcome with solid epidemiologic data. This finer resolution data is important in multiple contexts, including understanding risk, predictive value in disease diagnosis, and population immunity. We hypothesized that within the context of a tropical climate, vector-borne pathogen prevalence would significantly differ according to zonal differences in rainfall, temperature, relative humidity and vegetation condition. We then determined if these environmental data were predictive of pathogen prevalence. First we determined the prevalence of three major pathogens of cattle, Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina and Theileria spp, in the three vegetation zones where cattle are predominantly raised in Ghana: Guinea savannah, semi-deciduous forest, and coastal savannah. The prevalence of A. marginale was 63%, 26% for Theileria spp and 2% for B. bigemina. A. marginale and Theileria spp. were significantly more prevalent in the coastal savannah as compared to either the Guinea savanna or the semi-deciduous forest, supporting acceptance of the first hypothesis. To test the predictive power of environmental variables, the data over a three year period were considered in best subsets multiple linear regression models predicting prevalence of each pathogen. Corrected Akaike Information Criteria (AICc) were assigned to the alternative models to compare their utility. Competitive models for each response were averaged using AICc weights. Rainfall was most predictive of pathogen prevalence, and EVI also contributed to A. marginale and B. bigemina prevalence

  8. Disaggregating Tropical Disease Prevalence by Climatic and Vegetative Zones within Tropical West Africa.

    PubMed

    Beckley, Carl S; Shaban, Salisu; Palmer, Guy H; Hudak, Andrew T; Noh, Susan M; Futse, James E

    2016-01-01

    Tropical infectious disease prevalence is dependent on many socio-cultural determinants. However, rainfall and temperature frequently underlie overall prevalence, particularly for vector-borne diseases. As a result these diseases have increased prevalence in tropical as compared to temperate regions. Specific to tropical Africa, the tendency to incorrectly infer that tropical diseases are uniformly prevalent has been partially overcome with solid epidemiologic data. This finer resolution data is important in multiple contexts, including understanding risk, predictive value in disease diagnosis, and population immunity. We hypothesized that within the context of a tropical climate, vector-borne pathogen prevalence would significantly differ according to zonal differences in rainfall, temperature, relative humidity and vegetation condition. We then determined if these environmental data were predictive of pathogen prevalence. First we determined the prevalence of three major pathogens of cattle, Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina and Theileria spp, in the three vegetation zones where cattle are predominantly raised in Ghana: Guinea savannah, semi-deciduous forest, and coastal savannah. The prevalence of A. marginale was 63%, 26% for Theileria spp and 2% for B. bigemina. A. marginale and Theileria spp. were significantly more prevalent in the coastal savannah as compared to either the Guinea savanna or the semi-deciduous forest, supporting acceptance of the first hypothesis. To test the predictive power of environmental variables, the data over a three year period were considered in best subsets multiple linear regression models predicting prevalence of each pathogen. Corrected Akaike Information Criteria (AICc) were assigned to the alternative models to compare their utility. Competitive models for each response were averaged using AICc weights. Rainfall was most predictive of pathogen prevalence, and EVI also contributed to A. marginale and B. bigemina prevalence

  9. The partition of energy associated with tropical heat sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva-Dias, P. L.; Paegle, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Data sets derived from observations during the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) have permitted the study of the behavior of the tropical atmosphere to an extent not possible before. The present summary discusses characteristics of the tropical atmosphere which may be a result of tropical heating. It is shown that the meridional component of the divergent wind is of the same order of magnitude an he rotational meridional wind for the planetary tropical scales. Furthermore, the first and second internal modes dominate over most of the tropics, and it is shown that gravity and Kelvin codes are the main contributors to the total tropical divergence. Comparison with averaged station precipitation data and heating estimates obtained from Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Science (GLAS)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) show good correspondence between areas with maximum internal mode energy and regions with pronounced latent heat release.

  10. The effects of SST Gradients on Tropical Convective Systems and Implications for Tropical Cyclogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, R.; Bourassa, M. A.; Hart, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that generally the warmer the sea surface temperature (SST), the more possible tropical cyclone (TC) genesis is, assuming the atmosphere is supportive. The conventional wisdom has been that - apart from what the TC cools through upwelling -- one value of SST represents the state of the ocean surface in the region of the storm's inner circulation. With the advent of the satellite era and fine resolution SST datasets now becoming available, we know that in reality there are gradients of SST across which developing TCs move. The influence of those gradients on tropical convection and TC genesis is largely unknown at this time. Previous studies have shown that SST gradients can significantly impact the overlying ocean surface winds leading to areas of enhanced convergence/divergence and Vorticity (Chelton et al. 2004; O'Neill et al. 2005, 2010). The magnitude of this effect approximately increases as the surface wind increases. Work by Minobe et al. (2008) concluded that a sharp SST Gradient, over the Gulf Stream for instance, could produce enough surface wind convergence to maintain a band of precipitation along the ocean front. An analysis of satellite derived SST data over the Atlantic shows that it is not uncommon for SST gradients of 2 C/200km or more to exist in the immediate environment of a Tropical System. The authors seek to understand whether the conclusions made in previous works can be applied in the case of a developing Tropical System and whether SST Gradients exist in the Tropical Atlantic to a degree that would influence the cyclogenesis process. To address this, the effects of SST gradients on tropical cyclogenesis processes are investigated using model simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). WRF is run at cloud permitting scales (2km) for real cases of co-location between a tropical system and an SST gradient exceeding 2 C/200km in the environment of the system. In subsequent runs to this control run

  11. Explosive supercell growth - A possible indicator for tropical storm intensification?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venne, Monique G.; Lyons, Walter A.; Keen, Cecil S.; Black, Peter G.; Gentry, R. Cecil

    1989-01-01

    Several tropical storm observations are discussed which support the hypothesis that bursts of cloud-to-ground lightning near the center of a developing tropical storm (also called convective exhaust clouds and supercells), indicative of organized deep convection, could provide a valuable diagnostic for intensification over the next 12-36 hours. It is emphasized that further research is required in order to establish the exact role of supercells in tropical storm intensification.

  12. Tropical boundary layer equilibrium in the last ice age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Ridgway, W.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative-convective boundary layer model is used to assess the effect of changing sea surface temperature, pressure, wind speed, and the energy export from the tropics on the boundary layer equilibrium equivalent potential temperature. It remains difficult to reconcile the observations that during the last glacial maximum (18,000 yr BP) the snowline on the tropical mountains fell 950 m, while the tropical sea surface temperatures fell only 1-2 K.

  13. Chilly ice-age tropics could signal climate sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1995-02-17

    A classic 1976 study, CLIMAP, indicated that the tropical ocean cooled less than 2C during the worst of the last ice age while the rest of the world experienced a 5C chill. However, this climatic buffering in the tropics has come under attack with new evidence and possible errors in the original study. This article discusses new evidence about climate sensitivity in the tropics and reinterpertation in climate models.

  14. 12. View north of Tropic Chamber. Natick Research & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View north of Tropic Chamber. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  15. Ocean barrier layers’ effect on tropical cyclone intensification

    PubMed Central

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, Ping; Saravanan, R.; Leung, L. Ruby; Xu, Zhao; Li, Mingkui; Hsieh, Jen-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Improving a tropical cyclone’s forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone’s path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are “quasi-permanent” features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity. PMID:22891298

  16. The Impact of Tropical Recirculation on Polar Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, S. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Steenrod, S. D.

    2009-01-01

    We derive the tropical modal age of air from an analysis of the water vapor tape recorder. We combine the observationally derived modal age with mean age of air from CO2 and SF6 to create diagnostics for the independent evaluation of the vertical transport rate and horizontal recirculation into the tropics between 16-32 km. These diagnostics are applied to two Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model (CTM) age tracer simulations to give new insights into the tropical transport characteristics of the meteorological fields from the GEOS4-GCM and the GEOS4-DAS. Both simulations are found to have modal ages that are in reasonable agreement with the empirically derived age (i.e ., transit times) over the entire altitude range. Both simulations show too little horizontal recirculation into the tropics above 22 km, with the GEOS4-DAS fields having greater recirculation. Using CH4 as a proxy for mean age, comparisons between HALOE and model CH4 in the Antarctic demonstrate how the strength of tropical recirculation affects polar composition in both CTM experiments. Better tropical recirculation tends to improve the CH4 simulation in the Antarctic. However, mean age in the Antarctic lower stratosphere can be compromised by poor representation of tropical ascent, tropical recirculation, or vortex barrier strength. The connection between polar and tropical composition shown in this study demonstrates the importance of diagnosing each of these processes separately in order to verify the adequate representation of the processes contributing to polar composition in models.

  17. What do fecal coliforms indicate in tropical waters

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    High densities of total and fecal coliform bacteria have been detected in pristine streams and in ground water samples collected from many tropical parts of the world, even in epiphytic vegetation 10 m above ground in the rain forest of Puerto Rico. Nucleic acid (DNA) analyses of Escherichia coli from pristine tropical environs has indicated that they are identical to clinical isolates of E. coli. Many tropical source waters have been shown to have enteric pathogens in the complete absence of coliforms. Diffusion chamber studies with E. coli at several tropical sites reveal that this bacterium can survive indefinitely in most freshwaters in Puerto Rico. An evaluation of methods for the enumeration of fecal coliforms showed that currently used media have poor reliability as a result of large numbers of false positive and false negative results when applied to tropical water samples. Total and fecal coliform bacteria are not reliable indicators of recent biological contamination of waters in tropical areas. Fecal streptococci and coliphages in tropical waters, violate the same under lying assumptions of indicator assays as the coliforms. Anaerobic bacteria like Bifidobacterium spp. and Clostridium perfringens show some promise in terms of survival but not in ease of enumeration and media specificity. The best course at present lies in using current techniques for direct enumeration of pathogens by fluorescent staining and nucleic acid analysis and developing tropical maximum containmant levels for certain resistant pathogens in tropical waters. 66 refs.

  18. Ocean barrier layers' effect on tropical cyclone intensification.

    PubMed

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, Ping; Saravanan, R; Leung, L Ruby; Xu, Zhao; Li, Mingkui; Hsieh, Jen-Shan

    2012-09-01

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are "quasi-permanent" features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  19. Medical Imaging of Neglected Tropical Diseases of the Americas.

    PubMed

    Jones, Patrick; Mazal, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases are a group of protozoan, parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases endemic in 149 countries causing substantial illness globally. Extreme poverty and warm tropical climates are the 2 most potent forces promoting the spread of neglected tropical diseases. These forces are prevalent in Central and South America, as well as the U.S. Gulf Coast. Advanced cases often require specialized medical imaging for diagnosis, disease staging, and follow-up. This article offers a review of epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis (with special attention to medical imaging), and treatment of neglected tropical diseases specific to the Americas.

  20. Impact of Ocean Barrier Layers on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, K.; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, L.

    2012-12-01

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are "quasi-permanent" features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.;

  1. [Common tropical infections with protozoans, worms and ectoparasites].

    PubMed

    Schliemann, S

    2014-10-01

    Infectious diseases of the skin have become rarer in industrialized nations, but they still affect a considerable part of the population in tropical regions. Skin diseases induced by protozoa, worms and ectoparasites are among the 17 "neglected tropical diseases" defined by the WHO (leishmaniasis, dracunculiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis). Skin symptoms in travellers returning from the tropics may challenge dermatologists in Germany regarding differential diagnostic assessment and therapy. Among the 12 most frequent skin diseases in travellers are cutaneous larva migrans, leishmaniasis and myiasis. In this review, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of some the most relevant tropical dermatoses due to protozoa, worms and ectoparasites are discussed.

  2. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  3. Tropical disturbances in relation to general circulation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estoque, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The initial results of an evaluation of the performance of the Goddard Laboratory of Atmospheric Simulation general circulation model depicting the tropical atmosphere during the summer are presented. Because the results show the existence of tropical wave disturbances throughout the tropics, the characteristics of synoptic disturbances over Africa were studied and a synoptic case study of a selected disturbance in this area was conducted. It is shown that the model is able to reproduce wave type synoptic disturbances in the tropics. The findings show that, in one of the summers simulated, the disturbances are predominantly closed vortices; in another summer, the predominant disturbances are open waves.

  4. Detecting Trends in Tropical Rainfall Characteristics, 1979-2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Wu, H. T.

    2006-01-01

    From analyses of blended space-based and ground-based global rainfall data, we found increasing trends in the occurrence of extreme heavy and light rain events, coupled to a decreasing trend in moderate rain events in the tropics during 1979-2003. The trends are consistent with a shift in the large-scale circulation associated with a) a relatively uniform increase in warm rain over the tropical oceans, b) enhanced ice-phase rain over the near-equatorial oceans, and c) reduced mixed-phase rain over the tropical ocean and land regions. Due to the large compensation among different rain categories, the total tropical rainfall trend remained undetectable.

  5. Trampling resistance of tropical rainforest soils and vegetation in the wet tropics of north east Australia.

    PubMed

    Talbot, L M; Turton, S M; Graham, A W

    2003-09-01

    Controlled trampling was conducted to investigate the trampling resistance of contrasting high fertility basaltic and low fertility rhyolitic soils and their associated highland tropical rainforest vegetation in north east Australia's Wet Tropics. Although this approach has been taken in numerous studies of trampling in a variety of ecosystem types (temperate and subtropical forest, alpine shrubland, coral reef and seagrass beds), the experimental method does not appear to have been previously applied in a tropical rainforest context. Ground vegetation cover and soil penetration resistance demonstrated variable responses to trampling. Trampling, most noticeably after 200 and 500 passes reduced organic litter cover. Bulk density increased with trampling intensity, particularly on basalt soils as rhyolite soils appeared somewhat resistant to the impacts of trampling. The permeability of the basalt and rhyolite soils decreased markedly with increased trampling intensity, even after only 75 passes. These findings suggest physical and hydrological changes may occur rapidly in tropical rainforest soils following low levels of trampling, particularly on basalt soils. PMID:12927152

  6. The Tropical Fruit Research Program of the USDA-ARS Tropical Agriculture Research Station

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical and subtropical fruit crops are of major importance in commercial and subsistence agriculture. The globalization of the economy and the increased demand for healthy and more diverse food products have opened a large market for many of these fruit crops. Despite this fact, increased produc...

  7. Helping Children in the Humid Tropics: Water Education. IHP Humid Tropics Programme Series, No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brelet-Rueff, Claudine

    Considering that, of the 250 million new cases of water-associated diseases reported every year, 75% occur in tropical, poor, rural areas and slum-outskirts of big cities, it becomes clear that water education is a priority. This booklet illustrates that early water education can benefit the entire community. Since habits related to water use are…

  8. Lessons learnt from tropical cyclone losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honegger, Caspar; Wüest, Marc; Zimmerli, Peter; Schoeck, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    Swiss Re has a long history in developing natural catastrophe loss models. The tropical cyclone USA and China model are examples for event-based models in their second generation. Both are based on basin-wide probabilistic track sets and calculate explicitly the losses from the sub-perils wind and storm surge in an insurance portfolio. Based on these models, we present two cases studies. China: a view on recent typhoon loss history Over the last 20 years only very few major tropical cyclones have caused severe insurance losses in the Pearl River Delta region and Shanghai, the two main exposure clusters along China's southeast coast. Several storms have made landfall in China every year but most struck areas with relatively low insured values. With this study, we make the point that typhoon landfalls in China have a strong hit-or-miss character and available insured loss experience is too short to form a representative view of risk. Historical storm tracks and a simple loss model applied to a market portfolio - all from publicly available data - are sufficient to illustrate this. An event-based probabilistic model is necessary for a reliable judgement of the typhoon risk in China. New York: current and future tropical cyclone risk In the aftermath of hurricane Sandy 2012, Swiss Re supported the City of New York in identifying ways to significantly improve the resilience to severe weather and climate change. Swiss Re provided a quantitative assessment of potential climate related risks facing the city as well as measures that could reduce those impacts.

  9. Precipitation controls isoprene emissions from tropical ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potosnak, M. J.; Gatti, L. V.; Guenther, A. B.; Karl, T.; Trostdorf, C. R.; Martins, W. C.; Rinne, H. J.; Yamazaki, A.

    2003-12-01

    Isoprene emissions from tropical regions account for a majority of isoprene produced globally. Current estimates of global isoprene emissions use meteorological inputs (temperature and light), ecosystem leaf area, and a time invariant, ecosystem specific emissions factor. This approach has been verified to work well for deciduous mid-latitude forests, but the approach has not been tested for tropical ecosystems where seasonality is induced by precipitation. Recent flux studies at two field stations in the tropics found strong effects of precipitation regime (dry vs. wet season) on isoprene emissions. A flux study conducted during the wet season (October 1999) at the La Selva Biological Station (10° 26' N, 83° 59' W, precipitation 4000 mm yr{-1}) found whole system isoprene emissions rates between 2--10 mg C m-2 h-1, while a second campaign during the dry season (April 2003) found values ranging 8--16 mg C m-2 h-1. This difference could not be explained by changes in ambient temperature or light using established emissions algorithms. The second field site near Santarém, Brazil in the Floresta Nacional do Tapajós (2° 51' S, 54° 58' W, precipitation 2000 mm yr{-1}), part of the Large scale Biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazônia (LBA), showed a similar pattern. Additionally, a 13 month isoprene concentration record at this station found a 4 fold increase during the dry season. Application of a one dimensional chemistry model predicts a similar change in isoprene source strength. A standard emission model using temperature and light could not account for these seasonal changes, but adding an empirical term that accounted for previous precipitation greatly enhanced the fit.

  10. Tropical Atlantic Impacts on the Decadal Climate Variability of the Tropical Ocean and Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Xie, S. P.; Gille, S. T.; Yoo, C.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies revealed atmospheric bridges between the tropical Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean. In particular, several recent works indicate that the Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) may contribute to the climate variability over the equatorial Pacific. Inspired by these studies, our work aims at investigating the impact of the tropical Atlantic on the entire tropical climate system, and uncovering the physical dynamics under these tropical teleconnections. We first performed a 'pacemaker' simulation by restoring the satellite era tropical Atlantic SST changes in a fully coupled model - the CESM1. Results reveal that the Atlantic warming heats the Indo-Western Pacific and cools the Eastern Pacific, enhances the Walker circulation and drives the subsurface Pacific to a La Niña mode, contributing to 60-70% of the above tropical changes in the past 30 years. The same pan-tropical teleconnections have been validated by the statistics of observations and 106 CMIP5 control simulations. We then used a hierarchy of atmospheric and oceanic models with different complexities, to single out the roles of atmospheric dynamics, atmosphere-ocean fluxes, and oceanic dynamics in these teleconnections. With these simulations we established a two-step mechanism as shown in the schematic figure: 1) Atlantic warming generates an atmospheric deep convection and induces easterly wind anomalies over the Indo-Western Pacific in the form of Kelvin waves, and westerly wind anomalies over the eastern equatorial Pacific as Rossby waves, in line with Gill's solution. This circulation changes warms the Indo-Western Pacific and cools the Eastern Pacific with the wind-evaporation-SST effect, forming a temperature gradient over the Indo-Pacific basins. 2) The temperature gradient further generates a secondary atmospheric deep convection, which reinforces the easterly wind anomalies over the equatorial Pacific and enhances the Walker circulation, triggering the Pacific to a La Ni

  11. OH vertical column abundance - Tropical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Clyde R.; Minschwaner, Kenneth R.; Burnett, Elizabeth B.

    1990-09-01

    Measurements of the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) have been made during the period 1987-1989 at the National Weather Service (NWS) station at Moen, Truk, Federated States of Micronesia (7 deg N, 152 deg E). A total of 384 independent data sets was obtained. Tropical OH abundance levels average about 22 percent above corresponding mid-latitude values, with OH levels during late winter and early spring up to 50 percent above those observed at 40 deg N. Stratospheric wind and temperature data obtained from the daily NWS radiosonde data are examined for correlations with the OH results.

  12. OH vertical column abundance - Tropical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Clyde R.; Minschwaner, Kenneth R.; Burnett, Elizabeth B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) have been made during the period 1987-1989 at the National Weather Service (NWS) station at Moen, Truk, Federated States of Micronesia (7 deg N, 152 deg E). A total of 384 independent data sets was obtained. Tropical OH abundance levels average about 22 percent above corresponding mid-latitude values, with OH levels during late winter and early spring up to 50 percent above those observed at 40 deg N. Stratospheric wind and temperature data obtained from the daily NWS radiosonde data are examined for correlations with the OH results.

  13. The dynamics and predictability of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippel, Jason Allen

    Through methodology unique for tropical cyclones in peer-reviewed literature, this study explores how the dynamics of moist convection affects the predictability of tropical cyclogenesis. Mesoscale models are used to perform short-range ensemble forecasts of a non-developing disturbance in 2004 and Hurricane Humberto in 2007; both of these cases were highly unpredictable. Taking advantage of discrepancies between ensemble members in short-range ensemble forecasts, statistical correlation is used to pinpoint sources of error in forecasts of tropical cyclone formation and intensification. Despite significant differences in methodology, storm environment and development, it is found in both situations that high convective instability (CAPE) and mid-level moisture are two of the most important factors for genesis. In the gulf low, differences in CAPE are related to variance in quasi-geostrophic lift, and in Humberto the differences are related to the degree of interaction between the cyclone and a nearby front. Regardless of the source of CAPE variance, higher CAPE and mid-level moisture combine to yield more active initial convection and more numerous and strong vortical hot towers (VHTs), which incrementally contribute to a stronger vortex. In both cases, strength differences between ensemble members are further amplified by differences in convection that are related to oceanic heat fluxes. Eventually the WISHE mechanism results in even larger ensemble spread, and in the case of Humberto, uncertainty related to the time of landfall drives spread even higher. It is also shown that initial condition differences much smaller than current analysis error can ultimately control whether or not a tropical cyclone forms. Furthermore, even smaller differences govern how the initial vortex is built. Differences in maximum winds and/or vorticity vary nonlinearly with initial condition differences and depend on the timing and intensity of small mesoscale features such as VHTs and

  14. Rethinking tropical design: Towards a strategic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, D.; Martinez, V.; Sanchez, D.; Moran, C.; Machado, M.V.; Mustieles, F.

    1999-07-01

    This paper shows four residential projects, carried out by the third year MGL + P Unit, at the Facultad de Arquitectura Universidad del Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela. The projects are adapted to a hot-humid climate, and assume bioclimatical responsibilities, according to an urban concept. This is how the Cinetic house, the Fissure house, the Infinite house and the Free house developed. In these projects, climatic and ecological variables like sunning, ventilation, illumination, thermal comfort, materials and bioclimatic landscape were given special consideration. The models have been tested in a heliodom and a wind tunnel looking for an architecture that conciliates space, climate and ecology in tropical regions of the Third World.

  15. W Photoprotection in Tropical Marine Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Roy A.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the earth's surface which results from stratospheric ozone depletions could have serious implications for terrestrial plants and for aquatic organisms within the euphotic zone. A documented 9% decline in ozone at mid-latitudes is considered to produce a 12% increase in harmful UV radiation. The biologically damaging effects of higher UV levels, particularly W-B (280-320 rim), could manifest earlier in the tropics because of the relative thinness of the earth's equatorial ozone layer. Tropical marine organisms are also living close to their upper tolerance levels of water temperature, However, despite the large potential effects on plants and animals, little is known about UV effects on tropical ecosystems. Long-term ecological studies are needed to quantify the effects of increased UV radiation on terrestrial and marine ecosystems and to produce reliable data for prediction. Plants have developed several mechanisms to protect themselves from harmful UV radiation, one of which is the production of secondary leaf pigments that absorb W-B radiation (screening pigments). A higher concentration of screening pigments (e.g. flavonoids) in leaves may be interpreted as a natural response to increased W radiation. If higher concentrations of flavonoids filter out the excessive W radiation, no damage will occur, as suggested by Caldwell et al. (1989) and Tevini (1993). Failure to screen all W-B may result in deleterious effects on photosynthesis, plant genetic material, and plant and leaf morphology and growth. Eventually this will have an impact on ecosystem processes, structure, species composition, and productivity. This paper describes an ongoing project that is assessing the responses of mangroves, seagrasses and corals to W radiation by studying pigment concentrations, biophysical parameters, and variations in spectral reflectance in the field and in W-reduction experiments. Preliminary results on the distribution

  16. Geographical information systems and tropical medicine

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, O. A.; DAVENHALL, W.; ALI, M.; CASTILLO-SALGADO, C.; VAZQUEZ-PROKOPEC, G.; KITRON, U.; SOARES MAGALHÃES, R. J.; CLEMENTS, A. C. A.

    2013-01-01

    In terms of their applicability to the field of tropical medicine, geographical information systems (GIS) have developed enormously in the last two decades. This article reviews some of the pertinent and representative applications of GIS, including the use of such systems and remote sensing for the mapping of Chagas disease and human helminthiases, the use of GIS in vaccine trials, and the global applications of GIS for health-information management, disease epidemiology, and pandemic planning. The future use of GIS as a decision-making tool and some barriers to the widespread implementation of such systems in developing settings are also discussed. PMID:20659391

  17. An Objective Climatology of Tropical Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Luise; Hohberger, Esther; Knippertz, Peter; Fink, Andreas H.

    2010-05-01

    Tropical Plumes (TPs) are continuous bands of high and mid-level clouds stretching over several thousand of kilometres from the Tropics pole- and eastward into the subtropics or even mid-latitudes. TP-related poleward moisture transports can lead to extreme precipitation events in the outer Tropics or subtropics, and the cloudiness associated with TPs affects the Earth's radiation budget. Previous TP studies were based on a subjective visual inspection of infrared satellite images and were therefore quite time consuming with respect to climatological investigations. Here we present a newly developed objective identification algorithm that allows a flexible and quick processing of large datasets. The new algorithm is applied to 10.8μm brightness temperatures (BTs) from the Cloud Archive User Service (CLAUS), which provides global data on a uniform latitude-longitude grid at a spatial resolution of 0.5 by 0.5 degrees and a temporal resolution of three hours for the time period July 1983 to June 2006. Following the classic definition by McGuirk et al. (1987, Mon. Wea. Rev.) TPs are defined as extended bands (length > 2000 km) with BT anomalies below -30 K that cross 15° North or South. Additionally a criterion for the elongatedness of TP is developed, which is based on the length-width ratio of the smallest rectangle that contains the TP. The detected systems are tracked in time based on spatial overlap and attributes such as lifetime are determined. For boreal winter (Oct.-March), the resulting climatology reveals that TP occurrence is largely confined to oceanic regions with the main maximum located over the Central South Pacific close to the South Pacific convergence zone. Other TP frequency maxima are found over the eastern parts of the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans and over the western part of the South Atlantic near the South Atlantic convergence zone. In boreal summer (April-Sep.) the geographical distribution of TP occurrence has a similar

  18. Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis of tropical African trees.

    PubMed

    Bâ, Amadou M; Duponnois, Robin; Moyersoen, Bernard; Diédhiou, Abdala G

    2012-01-01

    The diversity, ecology and function of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi and ectomycorrhizas (ECMs) on tropical African tree species are reviewed here. While ECMs are the most frequent mycorrhizal type in temperate and boreal forests, they concern an economically and ecologically important minority of plants in African tropical forests. In these African tropical forests, ECMs are found mainly on caesalpionioid legumes, Sarcolaenaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Asterpeiaceae, Phyllantaceae, Sapotaceae, Papilionoideae, Gnetaceae and Proteaceae, and distributed in open, gallery and rainforests of the Guineo-Congolian basin, Zambezian Miombo woodlands of East and South-Central Africa and Sudanian savannah woodlands of the sub-sahara. Overall, EM status was confirmed in 93 (26%) among 354 tree species belonging to EM genera. In addition, 195 fungal taxa were identified using morphological descriptions and sequencing of the ML5/ML6 fragment of sporocarps and ECMs from West Africa. Analyses of the belowground EM fungal communities mostly based on fungal internal transcribed spacer sequences of ECMs from Continental Africa, Madagascar and the Seychelles also revealed more than 350 putative species of EM fungi belonging mainly to 18 phylogenetic lineages. As in temperate forests, the /russula-lactarius and /tomentella-thelephora lineages dominated EM fungal flora in tropical Africa. A low level of host preference and dominance of multi-host fungal taxa on different African adult tree species and their seedlings were revealed, suggesting a potential for the formation of common ectomycorrhizal networks. Moreover, the EM inoculum potential in terms of types and density of propagules (spores, sclerotia, EM root fragments and fragments of mycelia strands) in the soil allowed opportunistic root colonisation as well as long-term survival in the soil during the dry season. These are important characteristics when choosing an EM fungus for field application. In this respect, Thelephoroid fungal sp

  19. [Problems caused by poisonous tropical marine animals].

    PubMed

    Lääveri, Tinja; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Jama, Timo

    2014-01-01

    A Finnish physician encounters problems caused by tropical marine animals either during her/his own travelling or while treating travelers who have returned home. Certain species of medusae and cone shells as well as the stings by some fish species are life-threateningly poisonous. A person stung or bitten by any of the most dangerous species must immediately be admitted to the hospital. Foreign material remaining in tissues after stings by echinoderms and spiky fish may cause problems months after the actual injury. The injuries become easily infected, and antimicrobial drug therapy must thus cover gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria as well.

  20. Mechanisms regulating tropical tropospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Minschwaner, K.

    2005-12-01

    We have analyzed tropical water vapor measurements made in the mid and upper troposphere by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. We compare the water vapor measurements to a simple trajectory simulation of water vapor, and show reasonable agreement. We conclude, in agreement with previous work, that the large-scale circulation is primarily responsible for the distribution of water vapor. By interpreting disagreements between AIRS and the model as being caused by processes not represented in the model, such as detailed microphysics, we can begin to get some idea of where in the atmosphere these missing processes are important.

  1. Effect of tropical cyclones on the tropical tropopause parameters observed using COSMIC GPS RO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S. Ravindra; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Basha, Ghouse; Krishnamurthy, B. V.; Venkateswara Rao, B.

    2015-05-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are deep convective synoptic scale systems and play an important role in modifying the thermal structure, tropical tropopause parameters and hence stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) processes. In the present study, high vertical resolution and high accuracy measurements from COSMIC Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) measurements are used to investigate and quantify the effect of tropical cyclones that occurred over Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea in last decade on the tropical tropopause parameters. The tropopause parameters include cold point tropopause altitude (CPH) and temperature (CPT), lapse rate tropopause altitude (LRH) and temperature (LRT) and the thickness of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), that is defined as the layer between convective outflow level (COH) and CPH, obtained from GPS RO data. From all the TCs events, we generate the mean cyclone-centered composite structure for the tropopause parameters and removed from climatological mean obtained from averaging the GPS RO data from 2002-2013. Since the TCs include eye, eye walls and deep convective bands, we obtained the tropopause parameters based on radial distance from cyclone eye. In general, decrease in the CPH in the eye is noticed as expected. However, as the distance from cyclone eye increases by 3, 4, and 5° an enhancement in CPH (CPT), LRH (LRT) are observed. Lowering of CPH (0.6 km) and LRH (0.4 km) values with coldest CPT and LRT (2-3 K) within the 500 km radius from the TC centre is noticed. Higher (2 km) COH leading to the lowering of TTL thickness (2-3 km) is clearly observed. There exists multiple tropopause structures in the profiles of temperature obtained within 1° from centre of TC. These changes in the tropopause parameters are expected to influence the water vapour transport from troposphere to lower stratosphere and ozone from lower stratosphere to the upper troposphere and hence STE processes.

  2. Fever after a stay in the tropics: diagnostic predictors of the leading tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bottieau, Emmanuel; Clerinx, Jan; Van den Enden, Erwin; Van Esbroeck, Marjan; Colebunders, Robert; Van Gompel, Alfons; Van den Ende, Jef

    2007-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of fever in travelers returning from the tropics is extremely diverse. Apart from the travel destination, other diagnostic predictors of tropical infections are poorly documented in returning travelers. From April 2000 to December 2005, we prospectively enrolled all patients presenting at our referral centers with fever within 1 year after visiting a tropical or subtropical area. For clinical relevance, the diagnostic predictors of the leading tropical conditions were particularly investigated in the febrile episodes occurring during travel or within 1 month after return (defined as early-onset fever). In total, 2071 fever episodes were included, occurring in 1962 patients. Most patients were western travelers (60%) or expatriates (15%). Regions of exposure were mainly sub-Saharan Africa (68%) and southern Asia/Pacific (14%). Early-onset fever accounted for 1619 episodes (78%). Most tropical infections were related to specific travel destinations. Malaria (mainly Plasmodium falciparum) was strongly predicted by the following features: enlarged spleen, thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 x 10(3)/microL), fever without localizing symptoms, and hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin level >or=1.3 mg/dL). When malaria had been ruled out, main predictors were skin rash and skin ulcer for rickettsial infection (mainly African tick bite fever); skin rash, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia (leukocyte count <4 x 10(3)/microL) for dengue; eosinophil count >or=0.5 x 10(3)/microL for acute schistosomiasis; and enlarged spleen and elevated alanine aminotransferase level (>or=70 IU/L) for enteric fever. The initial clinical and laboratory assessment can help in selecting appropriate investigations and empiric treatments for patients with imported fever. PMID:17220752

  3. Tropical strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Outcompete race 3 biovar 2 strains at lowland tropical temperatures.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Alejandra I; Milling, Annett; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-05-15

    Bacterial wilt, caused by members of the heterogenous Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, is an economically important vascular disease affecting many crops. Human activity has widely disseminated R. solanacearum strains, increasing their global agricultural impact. However, tropical highland race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands, even though they are virulent at warm temperatures. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature adaptation and competitive fitness explain the uneven geographic distribution of R. solanacearum strains. Using three phylogenetically and ecologically distinct strains, we measured competitive fitness at two temperatures following paired-strain inoculations of their shared host, tomato. Lowland tropical strain GMI1000 was only weakly virulent on tomato under temperate conditions (24°C for day and 19°C for night [24/19°C]), but highland tropical R3bv2 strain UW551 and U.S. warm temperate strain K60 were highly virulent at both 24/19°C and 28°C. Strain K60 was significantly more competitive than both GMI1000 and UW551 in tomato rhizospheres and stems at 28°C, and GMI1000 also outcompeted UW551 at 28°C. The results were reversed at cooler temperatures, at which highland strain UW551 generally outcompeted GMI1000 and K60 in planta. The superior competitive index of UW551 at 24/19°C suggests that adaptation to cool temperatures could explain why only R3bv2 strains threaten highland agriculture. Strains K60 and GMI1000 each produced different bacteriocins that inhibited growth of UW551 in culture. Such interstrain inhibition could explain why R3bv2 strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands.

  4. Tropical Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum Outcompete Race 3 Biovar 2 Strains at Lowland Tropical Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Huerta, Alejandra I.; Milling, Annett

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial wilt, caused by members of the heterogenous Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, is an economically important vascular disease affecting many crops. Human activity has widely disseminated R. solanacearum strains, increasing their global agricultural impact. However, tropical highland race 3 biovar 2 (R3bv2) strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands, even though they are virulent at warm temperatures. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature adaptation and competitive fitness explain the uneven geographic distribution of R. solanacearum strains. Using three phylogenetically and ecologically distinct strains, we measured competitive fitness at two temperatures following paired-strain inoculations of their shared host, tomato. Lowland tropical strain GMI1000 was only weakly virulent on tomato under temperate conditions (24°C for day and 19°C for night [24/19°C]), but highland tropical R3bv2 strain UW551 and U.S. warm temperate strain K60 were highly virulent at both 24/19°C and 28°C. Strain K60 was significantly more competitive than both GMI1000 and UW551 in tomato rhizospheres and stems at 28°C, and GMI1000 also outcompeted UW551 at 28°C. The results were reversed at cooler temperatures, at which highland strain UW551 generally outcompeted GMI1000 and K60 in planta. The superior competitive index of UW551 at 24/19°C suggests that adaptation to cool temperatures could explain why only R3bv2 strains threaten highland agriculture. Strains K60 and GMI1000 each produced different bacteriocins that inhibited growth of UW551 in culture. Such interstrain inhibition could explain why R3bv2 strains do not cause disease in tropical lowlands. PMID:25769835

  5. Simulated sensitivity of the tropical climate to extratropical thermal forcing: tropical SSTs and African land surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talento, Stefanie; Barreiro, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) response to extratropical thermal forcing applied to an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to slab ocean and land models. We focus on the relative roles of the atmosphere, tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and continental surface temperatures in the ITCZ response to the imposed forcing. The forcing consists of cooling in one hemisphere and warming in the other poleward of 40°, with zero global average. Three sets of experiments are performed: in the first the slab ocean and land models are applied globally; in the second the tropical SSTs are kept fixed while the slab land model is applied globally; in the third, in addition, surface temperatures over Africa are kept fixed. Realistic boundary surface conditions are used. We find that the ITCZ shifts towards the warmer hemisphere and that the stronger the forcing, the larger the shift. When the constraint of fixed tropical SST is imposed we find that the ITCZ response is strongly weakened, but it is still not negligible in particular over the Atlantic Ocean and Africa where the precipitation anomalies are of the order of 20 and 60 %, respectively, of the magnitude obtained without the SST restriction. Finally, when the constraint of the African surface temperature is incorporated we find that the ITCZ response completely vanishes, indicating that the ITCZ response to the extratropical forcing is not possible just trough purely atmospheric processes, but needs the involvement of either the tropical SST or the continental surface temperatures. The clear-sky longwave radiation feedback is highlighted as the main physical mechanism operating behind the land-based extratropical to tropical communication.

  6. Tropical Agroecosystems: These habitats are misunderstood by the temperate zones, mismanaged by the tropics.

    PubMed

    Janzen, D H

    1973-12-21

    I have listed some of the ways in which the lowland tropics are not such a warm and wonderful place for the farmer, some of the reasons why it may be unreasonable to expect him to cope with the problems, and some of the ways in which the temperate zones make his task more difficult. The tropics are very close to being a tragedy of the commons on a global scale (69, 103), and it is the temperate zone's shepherds and sheep who are among the greatest offenders (31). Given that the temperate zones have some limited amount of resources with which they are willing to repay the tropics, how can these resources best be spent? The first answer, without doubt, is education, and the incorporation of what is already known about the tropics into that education. Second should be the generation of secure psychological and physical resources for governments that show they are enthusiastic about the development of an SYTA. Third should be support of intensive research needed to generate the set of site-specific rules for specific, clearly identified SYTA's. The subject matter of youths' cultural programming is presumably determined by what they will need during the rest of their lives. A major component of this programming should be the teaching of the socioeconomic rules of a sustained-yield, nonexpanding economy, tuned to the concept of living within the carrying capacity of the country's or region's resources. Incorporating such a process into tropical school systems will cause a major upheaval, if for no other reason than that it will involve an evaluation of the country's resources, what standard of living is to be accepted by those living on them, and who is presently harvesting them. Of even greater impact, it will have to evaluate resources in terms of their ability to raise the standard of living by Y amount for X proportion of the people in the region, rather than in terms of their cash value on the world market. For such a change to be technologically successful, it will

  7. [Research Development of Diagnostic Techniques for Tropical Infectious Diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-mei

    2015-12-01

    Tropical infectious diseases remain predominant among emerging infectious diseases, and some of those are showing a spreading trend worldwide. Improvement of diagnostic techniques is a key to the control of tropical diseases. In this review, we provide an overview on research development of diagnostic techniques for the diseases, especially the development of immunological and molecular detection techniques.

  8. O the Dynamics of the Formation of Multiple Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Ferreira Rosana

    A nonlinear shallow water model on the sphere is used to study the early stages of tropical cyclone genesis, namely, the formation of tropical disturbances. Two particular cases in which one or more tropical disturbances are produced are studied: the ITCZ breakdown and the formation of disturbances that lead to twin tropical cyclones. The ITCZ breakdown is seen to be a plausible mechanism for the formation of tropical disturbances. This mechanism also offers an explanation for the observations of easterly waves outside the Atlantic basin. In the Eastern Pacific, in particular, the time and space clustering of tropical cyclone genesis lend support to the hypothesis that the ITCZ breakdown plays a role in their formation. Tropical cyclone twins are observed exclusively in the Indian Ocean and in the West Pacific near the dateline. They are believed to form in association with super cloud clusters that straddle the equator in those regions. Shallow water model results presented herein corroborate this hypothesis. The existence of preferred regions for their formation is proposed to be associated with the life cycle and movement of their parent super cloud clusters. The shallow water model proved to be a useful simple tool for investigating barotropic dynamical aspects of the formation of tropical cyclone disturbances.

  9. Biogas energy production from tropical biomass wastes by anaerobic digestion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an attractive technology in tropical regions for converting locally abundant biomass wastes into biogas which can be used to produce heat, electricity, and transportation fuels. However, investigations on AD of tropical forestry wastes, such as albizia biomass, and food w...

  10. Tropics accelerate the evolution of hybrid male sterility in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yukilevich, Roman

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the evolutionary mechanisms that facilitate speciation and explain global patterns of species diversity has remained a challenge for decades. The most general pattern of species biodiversity is the latitudinal gradient, whereby species richness increases toward the tropics. Although such a global pattern probably has a multitude of causes, recent attention has focused on the hypothesis that speciation and the evolution of reproductive isolation occur faster in the tropics. Here, I tested this prediction using a dataset on premating and postzygotic isolation between recently diverged Drosophila species. Results showed that while the evolution of premating isolation was not greater between tropical Drosophila relative to nontropical species, postzygotic isolation evolved faster in the tropics. In particular, hybrid male sterility was much greater among tropical Drosophila compared to nontropical species pairs of similar genetic age. Several testable explanations for the novel pattern are discussed, including greater role for sterility-inducing bacterial endosymbionts in the tropics and more intense sperm-sperm competition or sperm-egg sexual conflict in the tropics. The results imply that processes of speciation in the tropics may evolve at different rates or may even be somewhat different from those at higher latitudes.

  11. Global Warming Attenuates the Tropical Atlantic-Pacific Teleconnection

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fan; Wu, Lixin; Gan, Bolan; Cai, Wenju

    2016-01-01

    Changes in global sea surface temperature (SST) since the end of last century display a pattern of widespread warming intercepted by cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific and western coasts of the American continent. Studies have suggested that the cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific may be partly induced by warming in the North Atlantic. However, it remains unknown how stable this inter-tropical teleconnection will be under global warming. Here we show that the inter-tropical teleconnection from the tropical Atlantic to Pacific weakens substantially as the CO2 concentration increases. This reduced impact is related to the El Niño-like warming of the tropical Pacific mean state, which leads to limited seasonal migration of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and weakened ocean heat transport. A fast decay of the tropical Atlantic SST anomalies in a warmer climate also contributes to the weakened teleconnection. Our study suggests that as greenhouse warming continues, the trend in the tropical Pacific as well as the development of ENSO will be less frequently interrupted by the Atlantic because of this attenuation. The weakened teleconnection is also supported by CMIP5 models, although only a few of these models can capture this inter-tropical teleconnection. PMID:26838053

  12. Application of satellite data to tropic-subtropic moisture coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Aylmer H.; Mcguirk, James P.

    1987-01-01

    Common tropical synoptic events, called moisture bursts, have been defined in terms of their appearance in infrared satellite imagery. Their synoptic and climatological behavior over the tropical North Pacific Ocean is described using data from four cool seasons, including the 1982 to 1983 El Nino winter and the January and May of 1979.

  13. Global Warming Attenuates the Tropical Atlantic-Pacific Teleconnection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fan; Wu, Lixin; Gan, Bolan; Cai, Wenju

    2016-02-03

    Changes in global sea surface temperature (SST) since the end of last century display a pattern of widespread warming intercepted by cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific and western coasts of the American continent. Studies have suggested that the cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific may be partly induced by warming in the North Atlantic. However, it remains unknown how stable this inter-tropical teleconnection will be under global warming. Here we show that the inter-tropical teleconnection from the tropical Atlantic to Pacific weakens substantially as the CO2 concentration increases. This reduced impact is related to the El Niño-like warming of the tropical Pacific mean state, which leads to limited seasonal migration of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and weakened ocean heat transport. A fast decay of the tropical Atlantic SST anomalies in a warmer climate also contributes to the weakened teleconnection. Our study suggests that as greenhouse warming continues, the trend in the tropical Pacific as well as the development of ENSO will be less frequently interrupted by the Atlantic because of this attenuation. The weakened teleconnection is also supported by CMIP5 models, although only a few of these models can capture this inter-tropical teleconnection.

  14. An introductory perspective on non-tropical shelf carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Campbell S.

    1988-11-01

    This brief account introduces the topic of non-tropical shelf carbonate deposits, both modern and ancient, specific aspects of which are described and discussed in the 22 accompanying papers in this Special Issue of Sedimentary Geology. "Non-tropical" shelves are loosely defined as lying poleward of the present limit of development of hermatypic coral reefs, or beyond the mean annual surface-water isotherm of about 20°C, typically near 30° latitude. Most geoscientists have traditionally regarded shallow-water carbonate formation as a low-latitude phenomenon. However, wherever the rate and extent of terrigenous sediment dilution is small, the potential exists for extensive deposits of skeletal carbonate to accumulate on shelves beyond the (sub)tropics. The facies attributes of the modern non-tropical carbonates are distinctive and contrast significantly with the structural, lithological, faunal, floral, mineralogical and diagenetic character of their tropical counterparts. In the rock record, non-tropical limestones probably occur throughout the Phanerozoic, but generally remain to be identified and/or interpreted as such. They are presently described mainly from the Ordovician, Permian and Tertiary-Quaternary, periods of major continental glaciations and accentuated latitudinal thermal gradients. A uniformitarian approach to the recognition and interpretation of ancient shallow-marine limestones requires acceptance of both tropical and non-tropical carbonate facies models.

  15. An imperative need for global change research in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuhui; Fu, Yuling; Zhou, Lingyan; Li, Bo; Luo, Yiqi

    2013-09-01

    Tropical forests play a crucial role in regulating regional and global climate dynamics, and model projections suggest that rapid climate change may result in forest dieback or savannization. However, these predictions are largely based on results from leaf-level studies. How tropical forests respond and feedback to climate change is largely unknown at the ecosystem level. Several complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the effects of climate change on tropical forests, but the results are conflicting, largely due to confounding effects of multiple factors. Although altered precipitation and nitrogen deposition experiments have been conducted in tropical forests, large-scale warming and elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) manipulations are completely lacking, leaving many hypotheses and model predictions untested. Ecosystem-scale experiments to manipulate temperature and CO2 concentration individually or in combination are thus urgently needed to examine their main and interactive effects on tropical forests. Such experiments will provide indispensable data and help gain essential knowledge on biogeochemical, hydrological and biophysical responses and feedbacks of tropical forests to climate change. These datasets can also inform regional and global models for predicting future states of tropical forests and climate systems. The success of such large-scale experiments in natural tropical forests will require an international framework to coordinate collaboration so as to meet the challenges in cost, technological infrastructure and scientific endeavor.

  16. Model finds bigger, stronger tropical cyclones with warming seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-03-01

    In the wake of powerful tropical cyclones such as Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina and Typhoon Haiyan, questions about the likely effect of climate change on tropical cyclone activity are on the public's mind. The interactions between global warming and cyclone activity, however, are complex, with rising sea surface temperatures, changing energy distributions, and altered atmospheric dynamics all having some effect.

  17. Successful biological control of tropical soda apple in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple, Solanum viarum, is a small shrub native to tropical regions of Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina. This weed was first found in Florida in 1988. In May 2003, a leaf feeding beetle, Gratiana boliviana, from South America was released in Florida as a biological control agent of tro...

  18. An imperative need for global change research in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuhui; Fu, Yuling; Zhou, Lingyan; Li, Bo; Luo, Yiqi

    2013-09-01

    Tropical forests play a crucial role in regulating regional and global climate dynamics, and model projections suggest that rapid climate change may result in forest dieback or savannization. However, these predictions are largely based on results from leaf-level studies. How tropical forests respond and feedback to climate change is largely unknown at the ecosystem level. Several complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the effects of climate change on tropical forests, but the results are conflicting, largely due to confounding effects of multiple factors. Although altered precipitation and nitrogen deposition experiments have been conducted in tropical forests, large-scale warming and elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) manipulations are completely lacking, leaving many hypotheses and model predictions untested. Ecosystem-scale experiments to manipulate temperature and CO2 concentration individually or in combination are thus urgently needed to examine their main and interactive effects on tropical forests. Such experiments will provide indispensable data and help gain essential knowledge on biogeochemical, hydrological and biophysical responses and feedbacks of tropical forests to climate change. These datasets can also inform regional and global models for predicting future states of tropical forests and climate systems. The success of such large-scale experiments in natural tropical forests will require an international framework to coordinate collaboration so as to meet the challenges in cost, technological infrastructure and scientific endeavor. PMID:24128847

  19. Tropics, Income, and School Life Expectancy: An Intercountry Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ram, Rati

    1999-01-01

    Using UNESCO's recent data, explores effects of a country's income and "tropicality" on school life expectancy. Although income's effect is important, distance from the equator also matters. Effects of tropicality were larger in 1980 than in 1992. Implications are discussed. (13 references) (MLH)

  20. Out of the Tropical Lowlands: Latitude versus Elevation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2016-10-01

    Temperate plant communities have been assembled from tropical, lowland floras through different evolutionary pathways with respect to invading more recent cool environments at higher latitudes (niche conservatism) and occupying older cool environments at higher elevations within the tropics (niche convergence). PMID:27523604

  1. Habitat complexity, environmental change and personality: A tropical perspective.

    PubMed

    Pamela Delarue, Emma Michelle; Kerr, Sarah Emily; Lee Rymer, Tasmin

    2015-11-01

    Tropical rainforests are species-rich, complex ecosystems. They are increasingly being negatively affected by anthropogenic activity, which is rapidly and unpredictably altering their structure and complexity. These changes in habitat state may expose tropical animals to novel and unpredictable conditions, potentially increasing their extinction risk. However, an animal's ability to cope with environmental change may be linked to its personality. While numerous studies have investigated environmental influences on animal personalities, few are focused on tropical species. In this review, we consider how behavioural syndromes in tropical species might facilitate coping under, and adapting to, increasing disturbance. Given the complexity of tropical rainforests, we first discuss how habitat complexity influences personality traits and physiological stress in general. We then explore the ecological and evolutionary implications of personality in the tropics in the context of behavioural flexibility, range expansion and speciation. Finally, we discuss the impact that anthropogenic environmental change may have on the ecological integrity of tropical rainforests, positing scenarios for species persistence. Maintaining tropical rainforest complexity is crucial for driving behavioural flexibility and personality type, both of which are likely to be key factors facilitating long term persistence in disturbed habitats.

  2. Sherlock Holmes and tropical medicine: a centennial appraisal.

    PubMed

    Sodeman, W A

    1994-01-01

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle incorporated an unidentified tropical disease as a murder weapon in the Sherlock Holmes story, "The Dying Detective," written in 1913. Documentary and circumstantial evidence suggests that the disease mentioned was melioidosis. The description of the newly identified disease occurred shortly before Doyle's death. Doyle's other works at the time reflect a consistent interest in tropical disease.

  3. Study of the nutrient distribution in root tips of the tropical forage Brachiaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, C. A.; Wenzl, P.; Mayer, J.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Prozesky, V. M.

    1997-07-01

    A Brachiaria breeding project is being conducted at CIAT, Colombia to combine acid soil adaptation of B. decumbens with other favourable traits of Brachiaria species that are less adapted to acid soils. Micro-PIXE was applied to investigate nutrient uptake and distribution in root tips of different species grown in hydroponic culture under control and simulated acid soil stress conditions. Different sample measurement approaches were evaluated, including: (1) linear scans with single point measurements along the root axis; (2) mapping of whole root tips; and (3) mapping of root cross sections. Different tissue types could be distinguished on the base of differences in nutrient concentrations and/or Al stress. Al, if supplied under nutrient stress conditions, increased P accumulation in the central vascular tissue of the meristematic and elongation zone of B. decumbens and B. brizantha. Furthermore, a negative correlation was found between Al and Cl accumulation in the root cap of B. decumbens.

  4. Doing hydrology backwards in tropical humid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real Rangel, R.; Brena-Naranjo, J. A.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down approaches in hydrology offer the possibility to predict water fluxes at the catchment scale based on the interpretation of the observed hydrological response at the catchment itself. Doing hydrology backwards (inferring precipitation and evapotranspiration rates at the catchment scale from streamflow measurements, see Kirchner (2009)) can be a useful methodology for estimating water fluxes at the catchment and regional scales. Previous studies using this inverse modeling approach have been performed in regions (UK, Switzerland, France, Eastern US) where energy-limited (in winter and early spring) and water-limited conditions (in summer) prevail during a large period of the year. However, such approach has not been tested in regions characterized by a quasi-constant supply of water and energy (e.g. humid tropics). The objective of this work is to infer annual rates of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the last decade in 10 catchments located in Mexico's tropical humid regions. Hourly discharge measurements during recession periods were analyzed and parameters for the nonlinear storage-discharge relationship of each catchment were derived. Results showed large variability in both catchment-scale precipitation and evapotranspiration rates among the selected study sites. Finally, a comparison was done between such estimates and those obtained from remotely-sensed data (TRMM for precipitation and MOD16 for evapotranspiration).

  5. Who Neglects Neglected Tropical Diseases? - Korean Perspective.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min-Ho; Yu, Jae-Ran; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a group of tropical infectious diseases of poorest people. Of 17 NTDs managed by WHO, two, guinea worm disease (by 2015) and yaws (by 2020) are targeted for eradication, and four (blinding trachoma, human African trypanosomiasis, leprosy, and lymphatic filariasis) for elimination by 2020. The goals look promising but 11 others are still highly prevalent. Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) are one NTD which prevail over the world including temperate zones. They had been highly prevalent in Korea but are mostly disappearing at present through systematic and sustainable control activity. The successful experience of STH control enables Korean experts to develop many programs of NTD control in developing countries. Several programs of both official development aid and non-governmental organizations are now targeting NTDs. Most NTDs are low in health priority compared to their health threats because they are chronic, insidious, and of low mortality. No one, including the victims, raised priority of NTD control with a loud voice in the endemic field of the diseases. After the millennium development goals declared disease control over the world, NTDs are becoming less neglected globally. Even with limited resources, beginning a sustainable national program is the key for the control and elimination of NTDs. No more neglect, especially no more self-neglect, can eliminate diseases and upgrade quality of life of the neglected people.

  6. Tracer Transport in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, E. J.; Pfister, L.; Bergman, J. W.; Atlas, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Trace species such as carbon monoxide, ozone, and very short-lived halocarbons in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) are important for chemistry and the radiation budget. Also, these species can be used to diagnose transport pathways into and through the TTL. TTL tracer concentrations are controlled primarily by input from extreme deep convective systems that rapidly transport air from the lower troposphere into the TTL, rapid horizontal transport, and slow vertical transport, with the rapid convective transport directly to the uppermost TTL being particularly important for species with short lifetimes. The extreme deep convection overshooting to near the tropical tropopause is poorly represented by convective parameterizations used in global models. Here, we investigate tracer transport using trajectories along with explicit calculations of convective influence. The times and locations of convective influence on the trajectory parcels are determined by tracing the trajectories through two-dimensional, three-hourly fields of convective cloud top height from geostationary satellite and TRMM. The tracer simulations are constrained by measurements from the Aura MLS and ACE-FTS satellites, as well as measurements from recent high-altitude aircraft campaigns. The model is used to evaluate the sensitivity of TTL tracer concentrations to diabatic heating rate (approximately in balance with vertical motion) and the occurrence frequency of extreme convection.

  7. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward. PMID:26953963

  8. Tropical forests and the changing earth system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Simon L

    2005-01-01

    Tropical forests are global epicentres of biodiversity and important modulators of the rate of climate change. Recent research on deforestation rates and ecological changes within intact forests, both areas of recent research and debate, are reviewed, and the implications for biodiversity (species loss) and climate change (via the global carbon cycle) addressed. Recent impacts have most likely been: (i) a large source of carbon to the atmosphere, and major loss of species, from deforestation and (ii) a large carbon sink within remaining intact forest, accompanied by accelerating forest dynamism and widespread biodiversity changes. Finally, I look to the future, suggesting that the current carbon sink in intact forests is unlikely to continue, and that the tropical forest biome may even become a large net source of carbon, via one or more of four plausible routes: changing photosynthesis and respiration rates, biodiversity changes in intact forest, widespread forest collapse via drought, and widespread forest collapse via fire. Each of these scenarios risks potentially dangerous positive feedbacks with the climate system that could dramatically accelerate and intensify climate change. Given that continued land-use change alone is already thought to be causing the sixth mass extinction event in Earth's history, should such feedbacks occur, the resulting biodiversity and societal consequences would be even more severe. PMID:16553317

  9. A Simplified Model of Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    An axisymmetric model of tropical cyclone intensification is presented. The model is based on Salmon's wave-vortex approximation, which can describe flows with high Rossby number and low Froude number. After introducing an additional approximation designed to filter propagating inertia-gravity waves, the problem is reduced to the prediction of potential vorticity (PV) and the inversion of this PV to obtain the balanced wind and mass fields. This PV prediction/inversion problem is solved analytically for two types of forcing: a two-region model in which there is nonzero forcing in the cyclone core and zero forcing in the far-field; a three-region model in which there is non-zero forcing in both the cyclone core and the eyewall, with zero forcing in the far-field. The solutions of the two-region model provide insight into why tropical cyclones can have long incubation times before rapid intensification and how the size of the mature vortex can be influenced by the size of the initial vortex. The solutions of the three-region model provide insight into the formation of hollow PV structures and the inward movement of angular momentum surfaces across the radius of maximum wind.

  10. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    May, Peter T.; Mather, James H.; Vaughan, Geraint; Jakob, Christian; McFarquhar, Greg; Bower, Keith; Mace, Gerald G.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the area around Darwin, Northern Australia in January and February 2006. The aims of the experiment, which will be operated in conjunction with the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin, will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment will include an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing measurements. A crucial outcome of the experiment will be a data set suitable to provide the forcing and evaluation data required by cloud resolving and single column models as well as global climate models (GCMs) with the aim to contribute to parameterization development. This data set will provide the necessary link between the observed cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a large multi-agency experiment including substantial contributions from the United States DOE ARM program, ARM-UAV program, NASA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, EU programs and many universities.

  11. Tropical rat mites (Ornithonyssus bacoti) - serious ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Beck, Wieland; Fölster-Holst, Regina

    2009-08-01

    In Germany there is limited information available about the distribution of the tropical rat mite (Ornithonyssus bacoti) in rodents. A few case reports show that this hematophagous mite species may also cause dermatitis in man. Having close body contact to small rodents is an important question for patients with pruritic dermatoses. The definitive diagnosis of this ectoparasitosis requires the detection of the parasite, which is more likely to be found in the environment of its host (in the cages, in the litter or in corners or cracks of the living area) than on the hosts' skin itself. A case of infestation with tropical rat mites in a family is reported here. Three mice that had been removed from the home two months before were the reservoir. The mites were detected in a room where the cage with the mice had been placed months ago. Treatment requires the eradication of the parasites on its hosts (by a veterinarian) and in the environment (by an exterminator) with adequate acaricides such as permethrin. PMID:19508683

  12. Introducing tropical lianas in a vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, Hans; De Deurwaerder, Hannes; Brugnera, Manfredo di Procia e.; Krshna Moorthy Paravathi, Sruthi; Pausenberger, Nancy; Roels, Jana; kearsley, elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Tropical forests are essential components of the earth system and play a critical role for land surface feedbacks to climate change. These forests are currently experiencing large-scale structural changes, including the increase of liana abundance and biomass. This liana proliferation might have large impacts on the carbon cycle of tropical forests. However no single global vegetation model currently accounts for lianas. The TREECLIMBERS project (ERC starting grant) aims to introduce for the first time lianas into a vegetation model. The project attempts to reach this challenging goal by performing a global meta-analysis on liana data and by collecting new data in South American forests. Those new and existing datasets form the basis of a new liana plant functional type (PFT) that will be included in the Ecosystem Demography model (ED2). This presentation will show an overview of the current progress of the TREECLIMBERS project. Liana inventory data collected in French Guiana along a forest disturbance gradient show the relation between liana abundance and disturbance. Xylem water isotope analysis indicates that trees and lianas can rely on different soil water resources. New modelling concepts for liana PFTs will be presented and in-situ leaf gas exchange and sap flow data are used to parameterize water and carbon fluxes for this new PFT. Finally ongoing terrestrial LiDAR observations of liana infested forest will be highlighted.

  13. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S M; Miles, T N; Seroka, G N; Xu, Y; Forney, R K; Yu, F; Roarty, H; Schofield, O; Kohut, J

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward. PMID:26953963

  14. Deforestation homogenizes tropical parasitoid-host networks.

    PubMed

    Laliberté, Etienne; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2010-06-01

    Human activities drive biotic homogenization (loss of regional diversity) of many taxa. However, whether species interaction networks (e.g., food webs) can also become homogenized remains largely unexplored. Using 48 quantitative parasitoid-host networks replicated through space and time across five tropical habitats, we show that deforestation greatly homogenized network structure at a regional level, such that interaction composition became more similar across rice and pasture sites compared with forested habitats. This was not simply caused by altered consumer and resource community composition, but was associated with altered consumer foraging success, such that parasitoids were more likely to locate their hosts in deforested habitats. Furthermore, deforestation indirectly homogenized networks in time through altered mean consumer and prey body size, which decreased in deforested habitats. Similar patterns were obtained with binary networks, suggesting that interaction (link) presence-absence data may be sufficient to detect network homogenization effects. Our results show that tropical agroforestry systems can support regionally diverse parasitoid-host networks, but that removal of canopy cover greatly homogenizes the structure of these networks in space, and to a lesser degree in time. Spatiotemporal homogenization of interaction networks may alter coevolutionary outcomes and reduce ecological resilience at regional scales, but may not necessarily be predictable from community changes observed within individual trophic levels. PMID:20583715

  15. Storms in the tropics of Titan.

    PubMed

    Schaller, E L; Roe, H G; Schneider, T; Brown, M E

    2009-08-13

    Methane clouds, lakes and most fluvial features on Saturn's moon Titan have been observed in the moist high latitudes, while the tropics have been nearly devoid of convective clouds and have shown an abundance of wind-carved surface features like dunes. The presence of small-scale channels and dry riverbeds near the equator observed by the Huygens probe at latitudes thought incapable of supporting convection (and thus strong rain) has been suggested to be due to geological seepage or other mechanisms not related to precipitation. Here we report the presence of bright, transient, tropospheric clouds in tropical latitudes. We find that the initial pulse of cloud activity generated planetary waves that instigated cloud activity at other latitudes across Titan that had been cloud-free for at least several years. These observations show that convective pulses at one latitude can trigger short-term convection at other latitudes, even those not generally considered capable of supporting convection, and may also explain the presence of methane-carved rivers and channels near the Huygens landing site.

  16. Tropical forests: present status and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Myers, N

    1991-09-01

    Tropical forests still cover almost 8 million km squared of the humid tropics but they are being destroyed at ever-more rapid rates. In 1989, the area deforested amounted to 142,200 km squared, or nearly 90% more than in 1979. Thus, whereas the 1989 amounted total to 1.8% of the remaining biome, the proportion could well continue to rise for the foreseeable future, until there is little forest in just a few decades. Deforestati on patterns are far from even throughout the biome. In much of the Southeast and Southern Asia, East and West Africa, and Central America, there is likely to be little forest left by the year 2000 or shortly thereafter. But in the Zaire basin, western Brazilian Amazonia, and the Guyana highlands, sizeable expanses of forest could persist a good while longer. The main agent of deforestation in the 'shifted cultivator' or displaced peasant, who, responding to land hunger and general lack of rural development in traditional farming areas of countries concerned, feels there is no alternative but to adopt a slash-and-burn lifestyle in forestlands. This person is now accounting for at least 60% of deforestation, a rapidly expanding proportion. However, he receives far less policy attention than the commercial logger, the cattle rancher, and other agents of deforestation. PMID:12317221

  17. Investigation of Tropical Transport with UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of trace constituents obtained by instruments aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) have been used to study transport processes associated with the quasi-biennial oscillation, laterally propagating Rossby waves, and upward propagating Kelvin waves in the tropical and subtropical upper troposphere and stratosphere. Mean vertical motions, vertical diffusivities and in-mixing rates were inferred from observations of the 'tape recorder' signal in near-equatorial stratospheric water vapor. The effect of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) on tracer distributions in the upper half of the stratosphere was seen in a spectacular 'staircase' pattern, predominantly in the winter hemisphere, revealing the latitudinally asymmetric nature of QBO transport due to induced mean meridional circulations and modulation of lateral mixing associated with planetary Rossby waves. The propagation of Rossby waves across the equator in the westerly phase of the QBO was seen in tracer fields and corroborating United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) analyses; a modeling study of the effect of these waves on typical QBO wind profiles was performed. Water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere was found to exhibit signatures of the tropical intraseasonal oscillation (TIO) and faster Kelvin waves in the two regions, respectively.

  18. Who Neglects Neglected Tropical Diseases? - Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min-Ho; Yu, Jae-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a group of tropical infectious diseases of poorest people. Of 17 NTDs managed by WHO, two, guinea worm disease (by 2015) and yaws (by 2020) are targeted for eradication, and four (blinding trachoma, human African trypanosomiasis, leprosy, and lymphatic filariasis) for elimination by 2020. The goals look promising but 11 others are still highly prevalent. Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) are one NTD which prevail over the world including temperate zones. They had been highly prevalent in Korea but are mostly disappearing at present through systematic and sustainable control activity. The successful experience of STH control enables Korean experts to develop many programs of NTD control in developing countries. Several programs of both official development aid and non-governmental organizations are now targeting NTDs. Most NTDs are low in health priority compared to their health threats because they are chronic, insidious, and of low mortality. No one, including the victims, raised priority of NTD control with a loud voice in the endemic field of the diseases. After the millennium development goals declared disease control over the world, NTDs are becoming less neglected globally. Even with limited resources, beginning a sustainable national program is the key for the control and elimination of NTDs. No more neglect, especially no more self-neglect, can eliminate diseases and upgrade quality of life of the neglected people. PMID:26617444

  19. Abrupt tropical climate change: Past and present

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lonnie G.; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen; Brecher, Henry; Davis, Mary; León, Blanca; Les, Don; Lin, Ping-Nan; Mashiotta, Tracy; Mountain, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Three lines of evidence for abrupt tropical climate change, both past and present, are presented. First, annually and decadally averaged δ18O and net mass-balance histories for the last 400 and 2,000 yr, respectively, demonstrate that the current warming at high elevations in the mid- to low latitudes is unprecedented for at least the last 2 millennia. Second, the continuing retreat of most mid- to low-latitude glaciers, many having persisted for thousands of years, signals a recent and abrupt change in the Earth’s climate system. Finally, rooted, soft-bodied wetland plants, now exposed along the margins as the Quelccaya ice cap (Peru) retreats, have been radiocarbon dated and, when coupled with other widespread proxy evidence, provide strong evidence for an abrupt mid-Holocene climate event that marked the transition from early Holocene (pre-5,000-yr-B.P.) conditions to cooler, late Holocene (post-5,000-yr-B.P.) conditions. This abrupt event, ≈5,200 yr ago, was widespread and spatially coherent through much of the tropics and was coincident with structural changes in several civilizations. These three lines of evidence argue that the present warming and associated glacier retreat are unprecedented in some areas for at least 5,200 yr. The ongoing global-scale, rapid retreat of mountain glaciers is not only contributing to global sea-level rise but also threatening freshwater supplies in many of the world’s most populous regions. PMID:16815970

  20. Tropical forests: present status and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Myers, N

    1991-09-01

    Tropical forests still cover almost 8 million km squared of the humid tropics but they are being destroyed at ever-more rapid rates. In 1989, the area deforested amounted to 142,200 km squared, or nearly 90% more than in 1979. Thus, whereas the 1989 amounted total to 1.8% of the remaining biome, the proportion could well continue to rise for the foreseeable future, until there is little forest in just a few decades. Deforestati on patterns are far from even throughout the biome. In much of the Southeast and Southern Asia, East and West Africa, and Central America, there is likely to be little forest left by the year 2000 or shortly thereafter. But in the Zaire basin, western Brazilian Amazonia, and the Guyana highlands, sizeable expanses of forest could persist a good while longer. The main agent of deforestation in the 'shifted cultivator' or displaced peasant, who, responding to land hunger and general lack of rural development in traditional farming areas of countries concerned, feels there is no alternative but to adopt a slash-and-burn lifestyle in forestlands. This person is now accounting for at least 60% of deforestation, a rapidly expanding proportion. However, he receives far less policy attention than the commercial logger, the cattle rancher, and other agents of deforestation.

  1. Climate change and tropical marine agriculture.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, M James C

    2009-01-01

    The coral reef ecosystem forms part of a 'seascape' that includes land-based ecosystems such as mangroves and forests, and ideally should form a complete system for conservation and management. Aquaculture, including artisanal fishing for fish and invertebrates, shrimp farming, and seaweed farming, is a major part of the farming and gleaning practices of many tropical communities, particularly on small islands, and depends upon the integrity of the reefs. Climate change is making major impacts on these communities, not least through global warming and high CO(2) concentrations. Corals grow within very narrow limits of temperature, provide livelihoods for millions of people in tropical areas, and are under serious threat from a variety of environmental and climate extremes. Corals survive and grow through a symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic algae: zooxanthellae. Such systems apply highly co-operative regulation to minimize the fluctuation of metabolite concentration profiles in the face of transient perturbations. This review will discuss research on how climate influences reef ecosystems, and how science can lead to conservation actions, with benefits for the human populations reliant on the reefs for their survival. PMID:19174458

  2. Fighting desires: Henry Miller's Queer Tropic.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Michael

    2002-01-01

    "Fighting Desires: Henry Miller's Queer Tropic" is an investigation of Tropic of Cancer that investigates the deeply repressed homoerotic desire that periodically surfaces. This reading is dependent upon an interpretation of Eve Sedgwick that proposes male sexuality as a continuum. By looking at the nature of the male-male relationships, as well as the lack of emotion and presence in the male-female relationships, I will show that the most intimate relationships are between men, and that these relationships are expressed through the telling of stories about (heterosexual) sex; this is the function of women within the novel: one has sex with a woman, not for the pleasure that the act brings, but for the pleasure that the recounting of the story to other men brings. Furthermore, I will look at Miller's use of puns within the novel and how they also contribute to a homoerotic reading. None of this is to argue that Miller was not homophobic and sexist--Miller very clearly was--the purpose of this essay is to show the complex nature of sexuality, even within a protagonist who asserts a very defined heterosexuality.

  3. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-03-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.

  4. Training and Operations Integrated Calendar Scheduler - TROPICS

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. Oppenlander; A.J. Levy; V.A. Arbige; A.H. Shoop

    2003-01-27

    TROPICS is a rule-based scheduling system that optimizes the training experience for students in a power (note this change should be everywhere, i.e. Not reactor) plant environment. The problem is complicated by the condition that plant resources and users' time must be simultaneously scheduled to make best use of both. The training facility is highly constrained in how it is used, and, as in many similar environments, subject to dynamic change with little or no advance notice. The flexibility required extends to changes resulting from students' actions such as absences. Even though the problem is highly constrained by plant usage and student objectives, the large number of possible schedules is a concern. TROPICS employs a control strategy for rule firing to prune the possibility tree and avoid combinatorial explosion. The application has been in use since 1996, first as a prototype for testing and then in production. Training Coordinators have a philosophical aspect to teaching students that has made the rule-based approach much more verifiable and satisfying to the domain experts than other forms of capturing expertise.

  5. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S M; Miles, T N; Seroka, G N; Xu, Y; Forney, R K; Yu, F; Roarty, H; Schofield, O; Kohut, J

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.

  6. Multiyear predictability of tropical marine productivity

    PubMed Central

    Séférian, Roland; Bopp, Laurent; Gehlen, Marion; Swingedouw, Didier; Mignot, Juliette; Guilyardi, Eric; Servonnat, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of decadal predictability simulations, research toward forecasting variations of the climate system now covers a large range of timescales. However, assessment of the capacity to predict natural variations of relevant biogeochemical variables like carbon fluxes, pH, or marine primary productivity remains unexplored. Among these, the net primary productivity (NPP) is of particular relevance in a forecasting perspective. Indeed, in regions like the tropical Pacific (30°N–30°S), NPP exhibits natural fluctuations at interannual to decadal timescales that have large impacts on marine ecosystems and fisheries. Here, we investigate predictions of NPP variations over the last decades (i.e., from 1997 to 2011) with an Earth system model within the tropical Pacific. Results suggest a predictive skill for NPP of 3 y, which is higher than that of sea surface temperature (1 y). We attribute the higher predictability of NPP to the poleward advection of nutrient anomalies (nitrate and iron), which sustain fluctuations in phytoplankton productivity over several years. These results open previously unidentified perspectives to the development of science-based management approaches to marine resources relying on integrated physical-biogeochemical forecasting systems. PMID:25071174

  7. Abrupt tropical climate change: past and present.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lonnie G; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen; Brecher, Henry; Davis, Mary; León, Blanca; Les, Don; Lin, Ping-Nan; Mashiotta, Tracy; Mountain, Keith

    2006-07-11

    Three lines of evidence for abrupt tropical climate change, both past and present, are presented. First, annually and decadally averaged delta(18)O and net mass-balance histories for the last 400 and 2,000 yr, respectively, demonstrate that the current warming at high elevations in the mid- to low latitudes is unprecedented for at least the last 2 millennia. Second, the continuing retreat of most mid- to low-latitude glaciers, many having persisted for thousands of years, signals a recent and abrupt change in the Earth's climate system. Finally, rooted, soft-bodied wetland plants, now exposed along the margins as the Quelccaya ice cap (Peru) retreats, have been radiocarbon dated and, when coupled with other widespread proxy evidence, provide strong evidence for an abrupt mid-Holocene climate event that marked the transition from early Holocene (pre-5,000-yr-B.P.) conditions to cooler, late Holocene (post-5,000-yr-B.P.) conditions. This abrupt event, approximately 5,200 yr ago, was widespread and spatially coherent through much of the tropics and was coincident with structural changes in several civilizations. These three lines of evidence argue that the present warming and associated glacier retreat are unprecedented in some areas for at least 5,200 yr. The ongoing global-scale, rapid retreat of mountain glaciers is not only contributing to global sea-level rise but also threatening freshwater supplies in many of the world's most populous regions.

  8. Tropical forests and the changing earth system.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Simon L

    2006-01-29

    Tropical forests are global epicentres of biodiversity and important modulators of the rate of climate change. Recent research on deforestation rates and ecological changes within intact forests, both areas of recent research and debate, are reviewed, and the implications for biodiversity (species loss) and climate change (via the global carbon cycle) addressed. Recent impacts have most likely been: (i) a large source of carbon to the atmosphere, and major loss of species, from deforestation and (ii) a large carbon sink within remaining intact forest, accompanied by accelerating forest dynamism and widespread biodiversity changes. Finally, I look to the future, suggesting that the current carbon sink in intact forests is unlikely to continue, and that the tropical forest biome may even become a large net source of carbon, via one or more of four plausible routes: changing photosynthesis and respiration rates, biodiversity changes in intact forest, widespread forest collapse via drought, and widespread forest collapse via fire. Each of these scenarios risks potentially dangerous positive feedbacks with the climate system that could dramatically accelerate and intensify climate change. Given that continued land-use change alone is already thought to be causing the sixth mass extinction event in Earth's history, should such feedbacks occur, the resulting biodiversity and societal consequences would be even more severe. PMID:16553317

  9. Nitrogen Cycling in Wet Tropical Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, W. R.; Taylor, P.; Cleveland, C. C.; Townsend, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    It is commonly assumed that nitrogen (N) cycles in excess of biological demand in many lowland tropical forests. Evidence supporting this generalization includes: high foliar N concentrations, elevated foliar and soil δ15N values, large soil NO3- pools, elevated NO3-: NH4+ ratios, and high rates of N loss in both soluble and gaseous forms. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these data come from forests occupying relatively dry portions of the biome (i.e., forests receiving < 2500 mm annual precipitation), with very few from wetter lowland sites. However, recent analyses from a wet tropical forest site (i.e., > 5000 mm y-1) on the Osa Peninsula in SW Costa Rica suggest that the paradigm of "N excess" may not hold across the full spectrum of precipitation that characterizes the tropical forest biome. Most previous studies in wet tropical forests have focused on montane ecosystems where low temperatures and heavy precipitation create low soil redox conditions, which slow litter decomposition and N mineralization. In contrast, soils in the lowland forests of the Osa Peninsula are well-drained and remain aerated despite high rainfall, which accelerates decomposition and nutrient regeneration processes. Specifically, results from a 15N pool dilution experiment show high rates of gross N mineralization (9.5 ± 1.8 μg N g soil-1 d-1, mean ± 1 SE) and nitrification (2.6 ± 0.4 μg N g soil-1 d-1). Though NH4 and NO3 supply is high, net mineralization accounts for only 2% of this flux, suggesting limited accumulation of inorganic N in excess of biological demand. Additionally, we observed relatively high rates of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA, 0.5 ± 0.1 μg N g soil-1 d-1), a mechanism that conserves inorganic N within the ecosystem. These patterns compliment other data that indicate relatively conservative N cycling in these very wet forests: relatively low δ15N values in foliage (bracketing 0 %) and soils (+4 %); small inorganic N pools dominated

  10. Tropical Skin Diseases in Children: A Review- Part I.

    PubMed

    García-Romero, Maria Teresa; Lara-Corrales, Irene; Kovarik, Carrie L; Pope, Elena; Arenas, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Because of travel and migration patterns, tropical skin diseases are now seen all around the world, not just in tropical or developing countries. Nutrition, housing, and environmental factors play an important role in these infectious diseases, so when they appear out of their normal environments, their classic presentation may vary. Tropical diseases can also present differently in childhood, making their recognition, diagnosis, and management a clinical challenge. Health care providers in developed countries need to be familiar with tropical skin diseases and be able to diagnose them in returning travelers or immigrants in order to optimize care. This article aims to review the epidemiologic, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of some of the most common tropical dermatologic conditions in children.

  11. Tropical Cyclone Signatures in Atmospheric Convective Available Potential Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studholme, Joshua; Gulev, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Tropical cyclones play an important role in the climate system providing transports of energy and water vapor, forcing the ocean, and also affecting mid-latitude circulation phenomena. Tropical cyclone tracks experience strong interannual variability and in addition, longer term trend-like changes in all ocean basins. Analysis of recent historical data reveal a poleward shift in the locations of tropical cyclone tracks in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres (Kossin et al. 2014, Nature, 509, 349-352). The physical consequences of these alterations are largely unconstrained. For example, the increasing encroachment of tropical cyclone activity into the extra-tropical environment presents a novel and still poorly understood paradigm for tropical-extratropical interactions. In this respect, the role that the atmospheric convective available potential energy (CAPE) plays in the dynamics of tropical cyclones is highly interesting. The two characteristic global-scale spatial patterns in CAPE are identified using EOF analysis. The first pattern shows an abundance of CAPE in the centre of the Pacific and corresponds to the El Nino Southern Oscillation. The second one is capturing positive CAPE anomalies in the oceanic tropics and negative anomalies over equatorial Africa. Associated with these buoyancy patterns, alterations in tropical cyclone activity occur in all basins forming both zonal and meridional patterns. Atmospheric buoyancy is the trigger for deep convection, and subsequently cyclone genesis. This is the mechanism of impact upon location at the start of cyclone tracks. It is found to have less impact upon where cyclones subsequently move, whether or not they undergo extratropical transition and when and where they experience lysis. It is shown that CAPE plays a critical role in the general circulation in the tropics which in turn is the larger steering context for embedded systems within the Walker and Hadley cells. So this lack of `latter life' impact

  12. Sea turtle species vary in their susceptibility to tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Pike, David A; Stiner, John C

    2007-08-01

    Severe climatic events affect all species, but there is little quantitative knowledge of how sympatric species react to such situations. We compared the reproductive seasonality of sea turtles that nest sympatrically with their vulnerability to tropical cyclones (in this study, "tropical cyclone" refers to tropical storms and hurricanes), which are increasing in severity due to changes in global climate. Storm surges significantly decreased reproductive output by lowering the number of nests that hatched and the number of hatchlings that emerged from nests, but the severity of this effect varied by species. Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) began nesting earliest and most offspring hatched before the tropical cyclone season arrived, resulting in little negative effect. Loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) nested intermediately, and only nests laid late in the season were inundated with seawater during storm surges. Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nested last, and their entire nesting season occurred during the tropical cyclone season; this resulted in a majority (79%) of green turtle nests incubating in September, when tropical cyclones are most likely to occur. Since this timing overlaps considerably with the tropical cyclone season, the developing eggs and nests are extremely vulnerable to storm surges. Increases in the severity of tropical cyclones may cause green turtle nesting success to worsen in the future. However, published literature suggests that loggerhead turtles are nesting earlier in the season and shortening their nesting seasons in response to increasing sea surface temperatures caused by global climate change. This may cause loggerhead reproductive success to improve in the future because more nests will hatch before the onset of tropical cyclones. Our data clearly indicate that sympatric species using the same resources are affected differently by tropical cyclones due to slight variations in the seasonal timing of nesting, a key life

  13. Sea turtle species vary in their susceptibility to tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Pike, David A; Stiner, John C

    2007-08-01

    Severe climatic events affect all species, but there is little quantitative knowledge of how sympatric species react to such situations. We compared the reproductive seasonality of sea turtles that nest sympatrically with their vulnerability to tropical cyclones (in this study, "tropical cyclone" refers to tropical storms and hurricanes), which are increasing in severity due to changes in global climate. Storm surges significantly decreased reproductive output by lowering the number of nests that hatched and the number of hatchlings that emerged from nests, but the severity of this effect varied by species. Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) began nesting earliest and most offspring hatched before the tropical cyclone season arrived, resulting in little negative effect. Loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) nested intermediately, and only nests laid late in the season were inundated with seawater during storm surges. Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nested last, and their entire nesting season occurred during the tropical cyclone season; this resulted in a majority (79%) of green turtle nests incubating in September, when tropical cyclones are most likely to occur. Since this timing overlaps considerably with the tropical cyclone season, the developing eggs and nests are extremely vulnerable to storm surges. Increases in the severity of tropical cyclones may cause green turtle nesting success to worsen in the future. However, published literature suggests that loggerhead turtles are nesting earlier in the season and shortening their nesting seasons in response to increasing sea surface temperatures caused by global climate change. This may cause loggerhead reproductive success to improve in the future because more nests will hatch before the onset of tropical cyclones. Our data clearly indicate that sympatric species using the same resources are affected differently by tropical cyclones due to slight variations in the seasonal timing of nesting, a key life

  14. Lightning and 85-GHz MCSs in the Global Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toracinta, E. Richard; Zipser, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    Numerous observations of tropical convection show that tropical continental mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are much more prolific lightning producers than their oceanic counterparts. Satellite-based climatologies using 85-GHz passive microwave ice-scattering signatures from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) indicate that MCSs of various size and intensity are found throughout the global tropics. In contrast, global lightning distributions show a strong land bias with an order of magnitude difference between land and ocean lightning. This is somewhat puzzling, since 85-GHz ice-scattering and the charge separation processes that lead to lightning are both thought to depend upon the existence of large graupel particles. The fact that low 85-GHz brightness temperatures are observed in tropical oceanic MCSs containing virtually no lightning leads to the postulate that tropical oceanic and tropical continental MCSs have fundamentally different hydrometeor profiles through the mixed phase region of the cloud (0 C <= T <= 20 C). Until recently, validation of this postulate has not been practicable on a global scale. Recent deployment of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite presents a unique opportunity for MCS studies. The multi-sensor instrument ensemble aboard TRMM, including a multi-channel microwave radiometer, the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), and the first space-borne radar, facilitates high-resolution case studies of MCS structure throughout the global tropics. An important precursor, however, is to better understand the distribution of MCSs and lightning in the tropics. With that objective in mind, this research undertakes a systematic comparison of 85-GHz-defined MCSs and lightning over the global tropics for a full year, as an initial step toward quantifying differences between land and ocean convective systems.

  15. Tropical forest phosphorus cycling under a changing precipitation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forests account for approximately one third of the World's soil carbon (C) pool, and have the highest soil respiration rates globally. These highly productive systems are typically considered phosphorous (P) limited, and P availability has been linked with various processes related to C cycling in tropical forests, such as forest productivity and soil respiration. It follows that the long-term stability of C stocks in tropical forests could depend, in part on the availability of soil P. Here I review our current understanding of moisture controls on soil P availability across a range of tropical forested ecosystems. Precipitation patterns in tropical regions are expected to change and thus understanding moisture controls on soil P availability could provide key information on the potential for nutrient feedbacks to C cycling. Research from multiple tropical forest sites suggest that the available soil P pool is highly dynamic, even in relatively a-seasonal tropical forests. Soil P availability and soil moisture availability tend to be correlated; however, the direction of the relationship is not consistent across tropical forest sites. In the iron (Fe) rich tropical soils, microbial demand, in addition to soil sorption capacity, can determine the partitioning of available P into biological vs. geochemical sinks. There is evidence that soil P availability and soil moisture are positively related in wet tropical forests, and this is hypothesized to be due in part to low redox conditions and the release of Fe-bound P. However, the reverse has been observed in dry tropical forest sites, with higher soil P during dry season months when P sorption to mineral soils is high and plant demand is low. High soil P during dry season months is hypothesized to be due to microbial biomass serving as a reserve of plant available soil P. Interestingly, findings from wet tropical forests support this hypothesis, with higher microbial biomass observed during wet season months

  16. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Maria O; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas; Cook, Bruce; Lefsky, Michael; Ducey, Mark; Saleska, Scott; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme; Schietti, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012) at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8%) as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0%). On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1). Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10% of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6% at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality) and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13% and 10%, respectively). At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal (23% versus 6

  17. Modeling Tropical Precipitation in a Single Column.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Bretherton, Christopher S.

    2000-12-01

    A modified formulation of the traditional single column model for representing a limited area near the equator is proposed. This formulation can also be considered a two-column model in the limit as the area represented by one of the columns becomes very large compared to the other. Only a single column is explicitly modeled, but its free tropospheric temperature, rather than its mean vertical velocity, is prescribed. This allows the precipitation and vertical velocity to be true prognostic variables, as in prior analytical theories of tropical precipitation. Two models developed by other authors are modified according to the proposed formulation. The first is the intermediate atmospheric model of J. D. Neelin and N. Zeng, but with the horizontal connections between columns broken, rendering it a set of disconnected column models. The second is the column model of N. O. Rennó, K. A. Emanuel, and P. H. Stone. In the first model, the set of disconnected column models is run with a fixed temperature that is uniform in the Tropics, and insolation, SST, and surface wind speed taken from a control run of the original model. The column models produce a climatological precipitation field that is grossly similar to that of the control run, despite that the circulation implied by the column models is not required to conserve mass. The addition of horizontal moisture advection by the wind from the control run substantially improves the simulation in dry regions. In the second model the sensitivity of the modeled steady-state precipitation and relative humidity to varying SST and wind speed is examined. The transition from shallow to deep convection is simulated in a `Lagrangian' calculation in which the column model is subjected to an SST that increases in time. In this simulation, the onset of deep convection is delayed to a higher SST than in the steady-state case, due to the effect of horizontal moisture advection (viewed in a Lagrangian reference frame). In both of the

  18. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Maria O.; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas; Cook, Bruce; Lefsky, Michael; Ducey, Mark; Saleska, Scott; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme; Schietti, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012) at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8 %) as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0 %). On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1). Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10 % of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6 % at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality) and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13 % and 10 %, respectively). At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal (23

  19. PROFILE: Management of Sedimentation in Tropical Watersheds.

    PubMed

    NAGLE; FAHEY; LASSOIE

    1999-05-01

    / The sedimentation of reservoirs is a serious problem throughout the tropics, yet most attempts to control sedimentation in large river basins have not been very successful. Reliable information on erosion rates and sources of sediments has been lacking. In regions where geologically unstable terrain combines with high rainfall, natural erosion rates might be so high that the effects of human activity are limited. Estimates of natural erosion in these situations often have been poor because of the episodic nature of most erosion during large storms and because mass-wasting may supply much of the sediment. The predominance of mass-wasting in some watersheds can result in an unexpectedly high ratio of bedload to suspended load, shifting sedimentation to "live" rather than "dead" storage within reservoirs. Furthermore, the inappropriate use of the Universal Soil Loss Equation to assess the effectiveness of erosion control measures has led to inaccurate estimates of the sediment reduction benefits that could accrue to watershed treatment efforts. Although reducing erosion from cultivated areas is desirable for other reasons, efforts aimed at reducing reservoir sedimentation by controlling agricultural sources of erosion may have limited benefits if the principal sources are of natural origin or are associated with construction of the dams and reservoirs and with rural roads and trails. Finally, the most appropriate locations for watershed rehabilitation depend on the magnitude of temporary storage of colluvium and alluvium within the river basin: Where storage volume is large and residence time of sediment very long, reducing agricultural erosion may have limited impacts on sedimentation within the expected life of a reservoir. Systematic development and analysis of sediment budgets for representative watersheds is needed to address these limitations and thereby improve both the planning of river basin development schemes and the allocation of resources towards

  20. Tropical cyclone Pam field survey in Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.; Pilarczyk, Jessica E.; Kosciuch, Thomas; Hong, Isabel; Rarai, Allan; Harrison, Morris J.; Jockley, Fred R.; Horton, Benjamin P.

    2016-04-01

    Severe tropical cyclone Pam (Cat. 5, SSHS) crossed the Vanuatu archipelago with sustained winds of 270 km/h on March 13 and 14, 2015 and made landfall on Erromango. Pam is the most intense tropical cyclone to make landfall on Vanuatu since the advent of satellite imagery based intensity estimates in the 1970s. Pam caused one of the worst natural disaster in Vanuatu's recorded history. Eleven fatalities were directly attributed to cyclone Pam and mostly due to lack of shelter from airborne debris. On March 6 Pam formed east of the Santa Cruz Islands causing coastal inundation on Tuvalu's Vaitupu Island located some 1100 km east of the cyclone center. Pam intensified while tracking southward along Vanuatu severely affecting the Shefa and Tafea Provinces. An international storm surge reconnaissance team was deployed to Vanuatu from June 3 to 17, 2015 to complement earlier local surveys. Cyclone Pam struck a remote island archipelago particularly vulnerable to the combined cyclonic multi-hazards encompassing extreme wind gusts, massive rainfall and coastal flooding due to a combination of storm surge and storm wave impacts. The team surveyed coastal villages on Epi, the Shepherd Islands (Tongoa and Mataso), Efate (including Lelepa), Erromango, and Tanna. The survey spanned 320 km parallel to the cyclone track between Epi and Tanna encompassing more than 45 sites including the hardest hit settlements. Coastal flooding profiles were surveyed from the shoreline to the limit of inundation. Maximum coastal flood elevations and overland flow depths were measured based on water marks on buildings, scars on trees, rafted debris and corroborated with eyewitness accounts. We surveyed 91 high water marks with characteristic coastal flood levels in the 3 to 7 m range and composed of storm surge with superimposed storm waves. Inundation distances were mostly limited to a few hundred meters but reached 800 m on Epi Island. Wrack lines containing pumice perfectly delineated the

  1. Overview of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Pfister, Leonhard

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) is a series of airborne campaigns focused on understanding physical processes in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) and their role in atmospheric chemistry and climate. ATTREX is using the high-altitude, long-duration NASA Global Hawk Unmanned Air System to make in situ and remote-sensing measurements spanning the Pacific. A particular ATIREX emphasis is to better understand the dehydration of air as it passes through the cold tropical tropopause region. The ATTREX payload contains 12 in situ and remote sensing instruments that measure water vapor, clouds, multiple gaseous tracers (CO, CO2, CH4, NMHC, SF6, CFCs, N2O), reactive chemical compounds (O3, BrO, NO2), meteorological parameters, and radiative fluxes. ATTREX flight series have been conducted in the fall of 2011 from Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) in California, in the winter of 2013 from AFRC, and in the winter/spring of 2014 from Guam. The first two f light series provided extensive sampling of the central and eastern Pacific, whereas the last flight series permitted sampling in the western Pacific. The sampling strategy has primarily involved repeated ascents and descents through the depth of the TTL (about 13-19 km). Over 100 TTL profiles were obtained on each flight series. The ATTREX dataset includes TTL water vapor measurements with unprecedented accuracy, ice crystal size distributions and habits. The cloud and water measurements provide unique information about TTL cloud formation, the persistence of supersaturation with respect to ice, and dehydration. The plethora of tracers measured on the Global Hawk flights are providing unique information about TTL transport pathways and time scales. The meteorological measurements are revealing dynamical phenomena controlling the TTL thermal structure, and the radiation measurements are providing information about heating rates associated with TTL clouds and water vapor. This presentation

  2. [Dengue: a growing risk to travellers to tropical and sub-tropical regions].

    PubMed

    da Silva-Voorham, Júlia M; Tami, Adriana; Juliana, Amadu E; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Wilschut, Jan C; Smit, Jolanda M

    2009-01-01

    Dengue is currently the most common arboviral infection worldwide. Due to global climate change and other factors, the vector of the virus - the Aedes mosquito - has spread considerably over the past decades. Dengue is endemic in almost all tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world; meaning that approximately 40% of the world population is at risk of acquiring a dengue infection. The clinical features of dengue vary from a non-specific febrile illness (dengue fever) to at times fatal serious conditions such as dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Considering the limited possibilities of prevention it is anticipated that the incidence of dengue will increase in the future. It is expected that health-care providers in non-endemic regions will encounter dengue-infected patients with increasing frequency in their practices.

  3. [Postinfectious tropical malabsorption and the differences from non-tropical sprue (celiac disease)].

    PubMed

    van Duijnhoven, E M; Rijken, J; Theunissen, P H

    1993-12-01

    The clinical course is described of a 69-year-old patient with a malabsorption syndrome since her stay in Indonesia. Besides chronic diarrhoea and weight loss she suffered from malnutrition and had partial villous atrophy. Coeliac disease was considered in the differential diagnosis but considering the endemic appearance of postinfectious tropical sprue (PTS) in Indonesia and the extreme vitamin B12 deficiency our patient experienced, PTS appeared more likely. A good response to the therapy prescribed for PTS confirmed the diagnosis.

  4. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission: Monitoring the Global Tropics for 3 Years and Beyond. 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Marshall; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) was launched in November 1997 as a joint U.S.-Japanese mission to advance understanding of the global energy and water cycle by providing distributions of rainfall and latent heating over the global tropics. As a part of NASA's Earth System Enterprise, TRMM seeks to understand the mechanisms through which changes in tropical rainfall influence global circulation. Additionally, a goal is to improve the ability to model these processes in order to predict global circulations and rainfall variability at monthly and longer time scales. Such understanding has implications for assessing climate processes related to El Nino/La Nina and Global Warming. TRMM has also provided unexpected and exciting new knowledge and applications in areas related to hurricane monitoring, lightning, pollution, hydrology, and other areas. This CD-ROM includes a self-contained PowerPoint presentation that provides an overview of TRMM and significant science results; a set of data movies or animation; and listings of current TRMM-related publications in the literature.

  5. Projecting global tropical cyclone economic damages with validation of tropical cyclone economic damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseri, Y.; Iwasaki, A.; Miyazaki, C.; Kanae, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) sometimes cause serious damages to human society and thus possible changes of TC properties in the future have been concerned. In fact, the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) mentions likely increasing in intensity and rain rate of TCs. In addition, future change of socioeconomic condition (e.g. population growth) might worsen TC impacts in the future. Thereby, in this study, we developed regression models to estimate economic damages by TCs (hereafter TC damage model), and employed those models to project TC economic damages under several future climate and socioeconomic scenarios. We developed the TC damage models for each of 4 regions; western North Pacific, North American, North Indian, and Southern Hemisphere. The inputs for TC damage model are tropical cyclone central pressure, populations in the area exposed by tropical cyclone wind, and GDP (Gross Domestic Product) per capita. The TC damage models we firstly developed tended to overestimate very low damages and also underestimate very high damages. Thereby we modified structure of TC damage models to improve model performance, and then executed extensive validation of the model. The modified model presented better performance in estimating very low and high TC damages. After the modification and validation of the model, we determined the structure of TC damage models and projected TC economic damages. The result indicated increase in TC economic damage in global scale, while TC economic damage against world GDP would decrease in the future, which result is consistent with previous study.

  6. Malabsorption of Folate Polyglutamates in Tropical Sprue

    PubMed Central

    Hoffbrand, A. V.; Necheles, T. F.; Maldonado, N.; Horta, E.; Santini, R.

    1969-01-01

    Malabsorption of folate polyglutamates prepared from yeast has been shown in eight patients with untreated tropical sprue and in three out of six patients receiving therapy for sprue. The absorptive defect for folate polyglutamates among these 14 patients occurred more frequently and in all but one patient more severely than for folic acid. Folate polyglutamates, the principal dietary form of folate, probably require deconjugation by the jejunal enzyme, folate conjugase, before absorption. The mean concentration of jejunal folate conjugase of 21 patients with untreated sprue and of 13 patients with sprue receiving therapy were both significantly less than the mean concentration in a control group. Nevertheless, all but five of the 34 patients had jejunal folate concentrations within the control range. There was no correlation in the individual patients between the jejunal folate conjugase concentration measured in vitro and the ability to absorb folate polyglutamates—nine patients having normal jejunal folate conjugase levels despite showing malabsorption of folate polyglutamates. PMID:5769888

  7. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mather, James

    2008-01-15

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  8. Agroforestry: a refuge for tropical biodiversity?

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Shonil A; Willis, Katherine J; Birks, H John B; Whittaker, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    As rates of deforestation continue to rise in many parts of the tropics, the international conservation community is faced with the challenge of finding approaches which can reduce deforestation and provide rural livelihoods in addition to conserving biodiversity. Much of modern-day conservation is motivated by a desire to conserve 'pristine nature' in protected areas, while there is growing recognition of the long-term human involvement in forest dynamics and of the importance of conservation outside protected areas. Agroforestry -- intentional management of shade trees with agricultural crops -- has the potential for providing habitats outside formally protected land, connecting nature reserves and alleviating resource-use pressure on conservation areas. Here we examine the role of agroforestry systems in maintaining species diversity and conclude that these systems can play an important role in biodiversity conservation in human-dominated landscapes.

  9. Methanol and the productivity of tropical crops

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, T.U.

    1995-12-31

    Studies are being conducted in Trinidad and Tobago, St. Lucia and St. Kitts/Nevis to determine the effect of aqueous solutions of methanol on the growth and yield of a wide range of vegetable, field and perennial crops. The paper presents a summary of results to data for ten of the crops studied. Six of these crops, lettuce, sweet pepper, tomato, mango and breadfruit, have shown significant increases in growth or yield with methanol application, while others such as pigeon pea, rice, banana and cocoa have shown more limited responses. There appears to be some potential for the use of methanol in tropical crop production but further studies are required before this apparent potential can be harnessed.

  10. Absolute geostrophic currents in global tropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-11-01

    A set of absolute geostrophic current (AGC) data for the period January 2004 to December 2012 are calculated using the P-vector method based on monthly gridded Argo profiles in the world tropical oceans. The AGCs agree well with altimeter geostrophic currents, Ocean Surface Current Analysis-Real time currents, and moored current-meter measurements at 10-m depth, based on which the classical Sverdrup circulation theory is evaluated. Calculations have shown that errors of wind stress calculation, AGC transport, and depth ranges of vertical integration cannot explain non-Sverdrup transport, which is mainly in the subtropical western ocean basins and equatorial currents near the Equator in each ocean basin (except the North Indian Ocean, where the circulation is dominated by monsoons). The identified non-Sverdrup transport is thereby robust and attributed to the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief of the bottom (JEBAR) and mesoscale eddy nonlinearity.

  11. Tropical cyclone recurvature: An intrinsic property?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kelvin T. F.; Chan, Johnny C. L.

    2016-08-01

    The typical track of a tropical cyclone (TC) in the Northern Hemisphere is an initial northwestward movement followed by an eventual turning toward the east. Such turning is referred to as recurvature and often explained by the change of the environmental flow that steers the TC. Here we show that even in the absence of background flow, a TC initiated at a high enough latitude can recurve itself. Differential horizontal advection of the planetary vorticity by the TC circulation at different vertical levels leads to the development of vertical wind shear, upper tropospheric anticyclone, and asymmetric distribution of convection. The flow associated with the upper tropospheric anticyclone on the equatorward side of the TC and the diabatic heating associated with the asymmetric convection combine to cause the TC to recurve. Such knowledge, an intrinsic recurvature property of the TC is important in forecasting the TC track when the environmental flow is weak.

  12. Arthropod diversity in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Basset, Yves; Cizek, Lukas; Cuénoud, Philippe; Didham, Raphael K; Guilhaumon, François; Missa, Olivier; Novotny, Vojtech; Ødegaard, Frode; Roslin, Tomas; Schmidl, Jürgen; Tishechkin, Alexey K; Winchester, Neville N; Roubik, David W; Aberlenc, Henri-Pierre; Bail, Johannes; Barrios, Héctor; Bridle, Jon R; Castaño-Meneses, Gabriela; Corbara, Bruno; Curletti, Gianfranco; Duarte da Rocha, Wesley; De Bakker, Domir; Delabie, Jacques H C; Dejean, Alain; Fagan, Laura L; Floren, Andreas; Kitching, Roger L; Medianero, Enrique; Miller, Scott E; Gama de Oliveira, Evandro; Orivel, Jérôme; Pollet, Marc; Rapp, Mathieu; Ribeiro, Sérvio P; Roisin, Yves; Schmidt, Jesper B; Sørensen, Line; Leponce, Maurice

    2012-12-14

    Most eukaryotic organisms are arthropods. Yet, their diversity in rich terrestrial ecosystems is still unknown. Here we produce tangible estimates of the total species richness of arthropods in a tropical rainforest. Using a comprehensive range of structured protocols, we sampled the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa from the soil to the forest canopy in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We collected 6144 arthropod species from 0.48 hectare and extrapolated total species richness to larger areas on the basis of competing models. The whole 6000-hectare forest reserve most likely sustains 25,000 arthropod species. Notably, just 1 hectare of rainforest yields >60% of the arthropod biodiversity held in the wider landscape. Models based on plant diversity fitted the accumulated species richness of both herbivore and nonherbivore taxa exceptionally well. This lends credence to global estimates of arthropod biodiversity developed from plant models.

  13. Increasing human dominance of tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Simon L; Edwards, David P; Galbraith, David

    2015-08-21

    Tropical forests house over half of Earth's biodiversity and are an important influence on the climate system. These forests are experiencing escalating human influence, altering their health and the provision of important ecosystem functions and services. Impacts started with hunting and millennia-old megafaunal extinctions (phase I), continuing via low-intensity shifting cultivation (phase II), to today's global integration, dominated by intensive permanent agriculture, industrial logging, and attendant fires and fragmentation (phase III). Such ongoing pressures, together with an intensification of global environmental change, may severely degrade forests in the future (phase IV, global simplification) unless new "development without destruction" pathways are established alongside climate change-resilient landscape designs. PMID:26293955

  14. Asymmetric and axisymmetric dynamics of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persing, J.; Montgomery, M. T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Smith, R. K.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of idealized numerical experiments to examine the difference between tropical cyclone evolution in three-dimensional (3-D) and axisymmetric (AX) model configurations. We focus on the prototype problem for intensification, which considers the evolution of an initially unsaturated AX vortex in gradient-wind balance on an f-plane. Consistent with findings of previous work, the mature intensity in the 3-D model is reduced relative to that in the AX model. In contrast with previous interpretations invoking barotropic instability and related horizontal mixing processes as a mechanism detrimental to the spin-up process, the results indicate that 3-D eddy processes associated with vortical plume structures can assist the intensification process by contributing to a radial contraction of the maximum tangential velocity and to a vertical extension of tangential winds through the depth of the troposphere. These plumes contribute significantly also to the azimuthally-averaged heating rate and the corresponding azimuthal-mean overturning circulation. The comparisons show that the resolved 3-D eddy momentum fluxes above the boundary layer exhibit counter-gradient characteristics and are generally not represented properly by the subgrid-scale parameterizations in the AX configuration. The resolved eddy fluxes act to support the contraction and intensification of the maximum tangential winds. The comparisons indicate fundamental differences between convective organization in the 3-D and AX configurations for meteorologically relevant forecast time scales. While the radial and vertical gradients of the system-scale angular rotation provide a hostile environment for deep convection in the 3-D model, with a corresponding tendency to strain the convective elements in the tangential direction, deep convection in the AX model does not suffer this tendency. Also, since during the 3-D intensification process the convection has not yet organized into annular rings

  15. Asymmetric and axisymmetric dynamics of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persing, J.; Montgomery, M. T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Smith, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of idealized numerical experiments to examine the difference between tropical cyclone evolution in three-dimensional (3-D) and axisymmetric (AX) model configurations. We focus on the prototype problem for intensification, which considers the evolution of an initially unsaturated AX vortex in gradient-wind balance on an f plane. Consistent with findings of previous work, the mature intensity in the 3-D model is reduced relative to that in the AX model. In contrast with previous interpretations invoking barotropic instability and related horizontal mixing processes as a mechanism detrimental to the spin-up process, the results indicate that 3-D eddy processes associated with vortical plume structures can assist the intensification process by contributing to a radial contraction of the maximum tangential velocity and to a vertical extension of tangential winds through the depth of the troposphere. These plumes contribute significantly also to the azimuthally averaged heating rate and the corresponding azimuthal-mean overturning circulation. The comparisons show that the resolved 3-D eddy momentum fluxes above the boundary layer exhibit counter-gradient characteristics during a key spin-up period, and more generally are not solely diffusive. The effects of these eddies are thus not properly represented by the subgrid-scale parameterizations in the AX configuration. The resolved eddy fluxes act to support the contraction and intensification of the maximum tangential winds. The comparisons indicate fundamental differences between convective organization in the 3-D and AX configurations for meteorologically relevant forecast timescales. While the radial and vertical gradients of the system-scale angular rotation provide a hostile environment for deep convection in the 3-D model, with a corresponding tendency to strain the convective elements in the tangential direction, deep convection in the AX model does not suffer this tendency. Also, since

  16. Space options for tropical cyclone hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicaire, Isabelle; Nakamura, Ryoko; Arikawa, Yoshihisa; Okada, Kazuyuki; Itahashi, Takamasa; Summerer, Leopold

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates potential space options for mitigating the impact of tropical cyclones on cities and civilians. Ground-based techniques combined with space-based remote sensing instrumentation are presented together with space-borne concepts employing space solar power technology. Two space-borne mitigation options are considered: atmospheric warming based on microwave irradiation and laser-induced cloud seeding based on laser power transfer. Finally technology roadmaps dedicated to the space-borne options are presented, including a detailed discussion on the technological viability and technology readiness level of our proposed systems. Based on these assessments, the space-borne cyclone mitigation options presented in this paper may be established in a quarter of a century.

  17. Leptospirosis in the Tropics and in Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by spirochetes of the genus Leptospira, has increasingly been recognized to affect travelers and residents in tropical settings. A zoonotic disease, leptospirosis is transmitted to humans through environmental surface waters contaminated by the urine of chronically infected mammals. Outcome of infection varies, ranging from acute febrile illness (including self-resolving undifferentiated fever) to aseptic meningitis to a fulminant syndrome of jaundice, oliguric renal failure, pulmonary hemorrhage, and refractory shock. Hospitalized cases have mortality rates as high as 25%. A recent clinical trial showed that third-generation cephalosporin is as effective as doxycycline and penicillin in the treatment of acute disease. Doxycycline is effective in preventing leptospirosis in travelers. No protective vaccine is currently available. PMID:16448601

  18. Melioidosis risk in a tropical industrial environment.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Levy, Avram; Merritt, Adam J; Hodge, Meredith; McDonald, Robert; Woods, Donald E

    2009-01-01

    An investigation into the risk of occupationally acquired melioidosis at a mine site in northern Australia found that 45 (13%) of 345 staff had serologic evidence of exposure and 14 (4%) had recent exposure to Burkholderia pseudomallei or closely related bacteria. There was only one culture-confirmed case of melioidosis in mine staff during the study period. The lack of overt infection directly attributable to work activities despite detectable B. pseudomallei on site, the absence of an association between positive serology and occupational activity on site, or duration of employment in the mining industry stand against a significant occupationally acquired infection risk on this industrial site. Workplace exposure to a dust-generating tropical environment in the melioidosis-endemic north of Australia did not appear to pose a measurable increase in infection risk. The effect of long-term climatic trends on this potential biologic threat requires further study.

  19. Building Blocks of Tropical Diabatic Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.

    2010-07-01

    Rotated EOF analyses are used to study the composition and variability of large-scale tropical diabatic heating profiles estimated from eight field campaigns. The results show that the profiles are composed of a pair of building blocks. These are the stratiform heating with peak heating near 400hpa and a cooling peak near 700hPa and convective heating with a heating maximum near 700hPa. Variations in the contributions of these building blocks account for the evolution of the large-scale heating profile. Instantaneous top (bottom) heavy large scale heating profiles associated with excess of stratiform (convective) heating evolve towards a stationary mean profile due to exponential decay of the excess stratiform (convective) heating.

  20. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theon, John S.

    1994-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is a cooperative effort between National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan and NASA of the USA. TRMM is designed to measure rain rates from space using a combination of high resolution radar, passive microwave radiometer and visible-infrared radiometer measurements from a spacecraft in a rapid precession, 350 km orbit inclined at 35 deg. These measurements, averaged over a 500 km grid for a month, are expected to provide monthly mean rainfall to an accuracy of 10 to 15 percent. TRMM will also make it possible to analyze the diurnal component of the rainfall and to derive the vertical distribution of latent heating. An accurate measure of the oceanic rainfall distribution will provide unprecedented insight into the halocline distribution and the stability of the oceanic surface layers. A status of the program is presented.

  1. Tropical forests: a call for action

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, F.

    1986-05-01

    This article is a review of a report called Tropical Forests: A Call for Action which was a report of an International Task Force convened by the World Resources Institute, World Bank, and the United Nations Development Programme. The report was put together because the forestry problems of developing countries can only be solved in the wider arena of public policies for rural development, and because forest conservation and development projects can earn rates of economic return high enough to be self-sustaining. This report is important because for the first time major development assistance agencies have collaborated in the preparation of a comprehensive and cost-specific forestry program for developing countries.

  2. Lacunarity as a texture measure for a tropical forest landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Haiping; Krummel, J.

    1996-01-01

    Fragmentation and loss of tropical forest cover alters terrestrial plant and animal population dynamics, reduces biodiversity and carbon storage capacity, and, as a global phenomenon could affect regional and global climate patterns. Lacunarity as a texture measure can offer a simple solution to characterize the texture of tropical forest landscape and determine spatial patterns associated with ecological processes. Lacunarity quantifies the deviation from translational invariance by describing the distribution of gaps within a binary image at multiple scales. As lacunarity increases, the spatial arrangement of tropical forest gaps will also increase. In this study, we used the Spatial Modeler in Imagine as a graphic programming tool to calculate lacunarity indices for a tropical forest landscape in Southern Mexico and Northern Guatemala. Lacunarity indices were derived from classified Landsat MSS images acquired in 1974 and 1984. Random-generated binary images were also used to derive lacunarity indices and compared with the lacunarity of forest patterns derived from the classified MSS images. Tropical forest area declined about 17%, with most of the forest areas converted into pasture/grassland for grazing. During this period, lacunarity increased about 25%. Results of this study suggest that tropical forest fragmentation could be quantified with lacunarity measures. The study also demonstrated that the Spatial Modeler can be useful as a programming tool to quantify spatial patterns of tropical forest landscape by using remotely sensed data.

  3. Primary forests are irreplaceable for sustaining tropical biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Luke; Lee, Tien Ming; Koh, Lian Pin; Brook, Barry W; Gardner, Toby A; Barlow, Jos; Peres, Carlos A; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Laurance, William F; Lovejoy, Thomas E; Sodhi, Navjot S

    2011-09-14

    Human-driven land-use changes increasingly threaten biodiversity, particularly in tropical forests where both species diversity and human pressures on natural environments are high. The rapid conversion of tropical forests for agriculture, timber production and other uses has generated vast, human-dominated landscapes with potentially dire consequences for tropical biodiversity. Today, few truly undisturbed tropical forests exist, whereas those degraded by repeated logging and fires, as well as secondary and plantation forests, are rapidly expanding. Here we provide a global assessment of the impact of disturbance and land conversion on biodiversity in tropical forests using a meta-analysis of 138 studies. We analysed 2,220 pairwise comparisons of biodiversity values in primary forests (with little or no human disturbance) and disturbed forests. We found that biodiversity values were substantially lower in degraded forests, but that this varied considerably by geographic region, taxonomic group, ecological metric and disturbance type. Even after partly accounting for confounding colonization and succession effects due to the composition of surrounding habitats, isolation and time since disturbance, we find that most forms of forest degradation have an overwhelmingly detrimental effect on tropical biodiversity. Our results clearly indicate that when it comes to maintaining tropical biodiversity, there is no substitute for primary forests.

  4. Primary forests are irreplaceable for sustaining tropical biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Luke; Lee, Tien Ming; Koh, Lian Pin; Brook, Barry W; Gardner, Toby A; Barlow, Jos; Peres, Carlos A; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Laurance, William F; Lovejoy, Thomas E; Sodhi, Navjot S

    2011-10-20

    Human-driven land-use changes increasingly threaten biodiversity, particularly in tropical forests where both species diversity and human pressures on natural environments are high. The rapid conversion of tropical forests for agriculture, timber production and other uses has generated vast, human-dominated landscapes with potentially dire consequences for tropical biodiversity. Today, few truly undisturbed tropical forests exist, whereas those degraded by repeated logging and fires, as well as secondary and plantation forests, are rapidly expanding. Here we provide a global assessment of the impact of disturbance and land conversion on biodiversity in tropical forests using a meta-analysis of 138 studies. We analysed 2,220 pairwise comparisons of biodiversity values in primary forests (with little or no human disturbance) and disturbed forests. We found that biodiversity values were substantially lower in degraded forests, but that this varied considerably by geographic region, taxonomic group, ecological metric and disturbance type. Even after partly accounting for confounding colonization and succession effects due to the composition of surrounding habitats, isolation and time since disturbance, we find that most forms of forest degradation have an overwhelmingly detrimental effect on tropical biodiversity. Our results clearly indicate that when it comes to maintaining tropical biodiversity, there is no substitute for primary forests. PMID:21918513

  5. Air-sea interaction in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J.; Steranka, J.; Holub, R. J.; Hansen, J.; Godshall, F. A.; Prabhakara, C.

    1972-01-01

    Charts of 3-month sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean were produced for the period 1949 to 1970. The anomalies along the United States and South American west coasts and in the eastern tropical Pacific appeared to be oscillating in phase during this period. Similarly, the satellite-derived cloudiness for each of four quadrants of the Pacific Ocean (130 deg E to 100 deg W, 30 deg N to 25 deg S) appeared to be oscillating in phase. In addition, a global tropical cloudiness oscillation from 30 deg N to 30 deg S was noted from 1965 to 1970, by using monthly satellite television nephanalyses. The SST anomalies were found to have a good degree of correlation both positive and negative with the following monthly geophysical parameters: (1) satellite-derived cloudiness, (2) strength of the North and South Pacific semipermanent anticyclones, (3) tropical Pacific island rainfall, and (4) Darwin surface pressure. Several strong direct local and crossequatorial relationships were noted. In particular, the high degree of correlation between the tropical island rainfall and the SST anomalies (r = +0.93) permitted the derivation of SST's for the tropical Pacific back to 1905. The close occurrence of cold tropical SST and North Pacific 700-mb positive height anomalies with central United States drought conditions was noted.

  6. Clouds and temperature drive dynamic changes in tropical flower production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, Stephanie; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; Cook, Benjamin I.; Nytch, Christopher J.; Regetz, James; Zimmerman, Jess K.; Joseph Wright, S.

    2013-09-01

    Tropical forests are incredibly dynamic, showing rapid and longer-term changes in growth, mortality and net primary productivity. Tropical species may be highly sensitive to temperature increases associated with climate change because of their narrow thermal tolerances. However, at the ecosystem scale the competing effects of temperature, light and precipitation on tropical forest productivity have been difficult to assess. Here we quantify cloudiness over the past several decades to investigate how clouds, together with temperature and precipitation, affect flower production in two contrasting tropical forests. Our results show that temperature, rather than clouds, is critically important to tropical forest flower production. Warmer temperatures increased flower production over seasonal, interannual and longer timescales, contrary to recent evidence that some tropical forests are already near their temperature threshold. Clouds were primarily important seasonally, and limited production in a seasonally dry forest but enhanced production in an ever-wet forest. A long-term increase in flower production at the seasonally dry forest is not driven by clouds and instead may be tied to increasing temperatures. These relationships show that tropical forest productivity, which is not widely thought to be controlled by temperature, is indeed sensitive to small temperature changes (1-4°C) across multiple timescales.

  7. The Environmental Legacy of Modern Tropical Deforestation.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Isabel M D; Smith, Matthew J; Wearn, Oliver R; Purves, Drew; Ewers, Robert M

    2016-08-22

    Tropical deforestation has caused a significant share of carbon emissions and species losses, but historical patterns have rarely been explicitly considered when estimating these impacts [1]. A deforestation event today leads to a time-delayed future release of carbon, from the eventual decay either of forest products or of slash left at the site [2]. Similarly, deforestation often does not result in the immediate loss of species, and communities may exhibit a process of "relaxation" to their new equilibrium over time [3]. We used a spatially explicit land cover change model [4] to reconstruct the annual rates and spatial patterns of tropical deforestation that occurred between 1950 and 2009 in the Amazon, in the Congo Basin, and across Southeast Asia. Using these patterns, we estimated the resulting gross vegetation carbon emissions [2, 5] and species losses over time [6]. Importantly, we accounted for the time lags inherent in both the release of carbon and the extinction of species. We show that even if deforestation had completely halted in 2010, time lags ensured there would still be a carbon emissions debt of at least 8.6 petagrams, equivalent to 5-10 years of global deforestation, and an extinction debt of more than 140 bird, mammal, and amphibian forest-specific species, which if paid, would increase the number of 20(th)-century extinctions in these groups by 120%. Given the magnitude of these debts, commitments to reduce emissions and biodiversity loss are unlikely to be realized without specific actions that directly address this damaging environmental legacy.

  8. Tropical cirrus cloud radiative forcing: Sensitivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.; Kinne, S.; Toon, O.B.

    1994-09-01

    We have performed one dimensional radiative transfer calculations to evaluate the impact of cirrus clouds on the tropical radiation budget. We investigate the sensitivity of solar and infrared fluxes to cloud optical depth, particle size distributions, and cloud height. If the observed solar cloud forcing in excess of 100 W/sq m is to be attributed to cirrus anvils alone, then the optical depth of these anvils must be at least 5 (assuming 50% cloud cover and an ice crystal effective radius of 15 microns). The net radiative forcing of cirrus near the tropical tropopause is positive (heating) for cloud optical depths less than about 16 and negative (cooling) for larger optical depths. If cirrus clouds alone are responsible for the equal and opposite shortwave and longwave cloud forcing in excess of 100 W/sq m observed by Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), then the cirrus must typically take the form of deep, optically thick clouds with relatively small particles (radii of 10-20 microns) and cloud-tops well below the tropopause. The maintenance of this balance on monthly time scales can be attributed to a variety of correlations: The cloud cover of optically thick cirrus or thin cirrus overlying low-level stratus clouds could vary; or cirrus anvil height cloud increase along with a decrease in the ice crystal effective radius and an increase in optical depth. It would be of great interest to determine observationally which of these correlations is responsible for the observed lack of variation in cloud forcing.

  9. Celestial moderation of tropical seabird behavior.

    PubMed

    Pinet, Patrick; Jaeger, Audrey; Cordier, Emmanuel; Potin, Gaël; Le Corre, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    Most animals, including birds, have cyclic life histories and numerous studies generally conducted on captive animals have shown that photoperiod is the main factor influencing this periodicity. Moon cycles can also affect periodic behavior of birds. Few studies have investigated the influence of these environmental cues in natural settings, and particularly in tropical areas where the change in photoperiod is slight and some bird species keep cyclic behaviors. Using miniaturized light sensors, we simultaneously investigated under natural conditions the influence of photoperiod and moon phases on the migration dates and at-sea activity of a tropical seabird species, the Barau's petrel, throughout its annual cycle. Firstly, we found that birds consistently started their pre- and post-breeding migrations at precise dates corresponding in both cases to a day-duration of 12.5 hours, suggesting a strong influence of the photoperiod in the regulation of migration behavior. We also found that mean population arrival dates to the colony changed from year to year and they were influenced by moon phases. Returns at their colonies occurred around the last full moon of the austral winter, suggesting that moon cycle is used by birds to synchronize their arrival. Secondly, variations of day-time activity were sinusoidal and correlated to seasonal changes of daylength. We thus hypothesize that the photoperiod could directly affect the behavior of the birds at sea. Night-time at-sea activity exhibited a clear cycle of 29.2 days, suggesting that nocturnal foraging was highly regulated by moon phase, particularly during the non-breeding season. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document a mixed regulation of the behavior of a wild bird by photoperiod and moon phases throughout its annual cycle.

  10. Plant biodiversity changes in Carboniferous tropical wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleal, C. J.; Uhl, D.; Cascales-Miñana, B.; Thomas, B. A.; Bashforth, A. R.; King, S. C.; Zodrow, E. L.

    2012-08-01

    Using a combination of species richness, polycohort and constrained cluster analyses, the plant biodiversity of Pennsylvanian (late Carboniferous) tropical wetlands ("coal swamps") has been investigated in five areas in Western Europe and eastern North America: South Wales, Pennines, Ruhr, Saarland and Sydney coal basins. In all cases, species richness expansion followed an essentially logistic curve typical of that associated with ecologically closed habitats, with niche saturation being achieved in about three million years. The resulting steady-state ("climax") coal swamp vegetation had a local-scale (within an area of c. 0.1 ha) species diversity in South Wales of 16 ± 7 and Simpson Diversity Indices of 4.53 ± 2.55, which are very similar to values obtained from studies on North American coal swamp vegetation. Landscape diversity (within an area 105 km2) varied between 50 and 100 species in the lower to middle Westphalian Stage, falling to about 40-50 species in the upper Westphalian Stage. Regional-scale diversity (within an area > 105 km2) is difficult to estimate but was at least 120 species. Species turn-over was typically very low, at about 4 species per million years, but there were a number of intervals of more rapid species turn-over in the early Langsettian, late Duckmantian, early Bolsovian and middle Asturian times, which are recognised today as biozonal boundaries. The swamps were mostly subject to ecological stasis during early and middle Westphalian times, although they contracted locally in response to drying of substrates. Later in Westphalian times, however, the swamps were subject to regional-scale changes in composition and aerial extent, probably in response to climate change. The coal swamps had a much lower species diversity compared to modern-day tropical rain forests.

  11. Celestial moderation of tropical seabird behavior.

    PubMed

    Pinet, Patrick; Jaeger, Audrey; Cordier, Emmanuel; Potin, Gaël; Le Corre, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    Most animals, including birds, have cyclic life histories and numerous studies generally conducted on captive animals have shown that photoperiod is the main factor influencing this periodicity. Moon cycles can also affect periodic behavior of birds. Few studies have investigated the influence of these environmental cues in natural settings, and particularly in tropical areas where the change in photoperiod is slight and some bird species keep cyclic behaviors. Using miniaturized light sensors, we simultaneously investigated under natural conditions the influence of photoperiod and moon phases on the migration dates and at-sea activity of a tropical seabird species, the Barau's petrel, throughout its annual cycle. Firstly, we found that birds consistently started their pre- and post-breeding migrations at precise dates corresponding in both cases to a day-duration of 12.5 hours, suggesting a strong influence of the photoperiod in the regulation of migration behavior. We also found that mean population arrival dates to the colony changed from year to year and they were influenced by moon phases. Returns at their colonies occurred around the last full moon of the austral winter, suggesting that moon cycle is used by birds to synchronize their arrival. Secondly, variations of day-time activity were sinusoidal and correlated to seasonal changes of daylength. We thus hypothesize that the photoperiod could directly affect the behavior of the birds at sea. Night-time at-sea activity exhibited a clear cycle of 29.2 days, suggesting that nocturnal foraging was highly regulated by moon phase, particularly during the non-breeding season. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document a mixed regulation of the behavior of a wild bird by photoperiod and moon phases throughout its annual cycle. PMID:22110711

  12. A tropical influence on global climate

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1997-05-15

    A potential influence of tropical sea surface temperature on the global climate response to a doubling of the CO{sub 2} concentration is tested using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The warming is significantly reduced when sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue region between latitudes 2.25{degrees}N and 2.25{degrees}S are held at the control simulation values. Warming of the global mean temperature outside of the cold tongue region is reduced from 2.4{degrees}C in the unconstrained case to 1.9{degrees}C when the sea surface temperature constraint is applied. The decrease in the warming results from a positive net heat flux into the ocean cold tongue region and implicit heat storage in the subsurface ocean, induced by horizontal atmospheric heat fluxes. The reduced surface temperature warming outside of the cold tongue region is due to reduction in the downward longwave radiative flux at the surface, caused in turn by reduced atmospheric temperature and moisture. The global mean surface temperature responds to the heat storage in the ocean as if the global mean radiative forcing due to the doubled CO{sub 2} (approximately 4 W m{sup {minus}2}) was reduced by the value of the global mean heat flux into the ocean. This mechanism also provides a possible explanation for the observed high correlation on interannual timescales between the global mean tropospheric temperature and sea surface temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific. The results emphasize the importance of correctly modeling the dynamical processes in the ocean and atmosphere that help determine the sea surface temperature in the equatorial eastern Pacific, in addition to the thermodynamical processes, in projecting global warming. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Reviewing Dengue: Still a Neglected Tropical Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a “neglected tropical disease” (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003–2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  14. Spectral Trends of Titan's Tropical Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Penteado, Paulo F.; Turner, Jake; Montiel, Nicholas; Schoenfeld, Ashley; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Neish, Catherine; Radebaugh, Jani

    2016-10-01

    Titan's surface can be observed most clearly at 8 spectral regions that lie in between the strong methane bands in Titan's spectrum. Within these "windows", between 0.9 to 5 microns, the surface is nonetheless obscured by methane and haze, the latter of which is optically thick at lower wavelengths. Thus studies of Titan's surface must eliminate the effects of atmospheric extinction and extract the subtle spectral features that underlie the dominant spectral trends.To determine the subtle spectral features of Titan's tropical surface (30S--30N) we conducted a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the I/F at the 1.1, 1.3, 1.6 and 2.0 um wavelength windows, recorded by Cassini/VIMS. The PCA analysis identifies the spectral trend that defines the highest variance in the data (the principal component), as well as successively weaker orthogonal trends, without a priori assumptions about the surface composition, e.g. as needed in radiative transfer analyses.Our analysis derives the spectral features at the four wavelengths that describe Titan's tropical surface. We detect a large almost contiguous region that extends roughly 160 degrees in longitude and which exhibits absorption features at 1.6 and 2.0, as well as 2.8 um (characteristic of water ice). This vast and perhaps tectonic feature is, in part, associated with terrain that is hypothesized to be some of the oldest surfaces on Titan. In addition, the PCA analysis indicates at least 2 separate organic spectra signatures, potentially due to the separation of liquid and refractory sediments or to their chemically alteration over time. Here we discuss the PCA analysis and compare our derived compositional maps of Titan's surface with Radar maps of the topography and morphology, to entertain questions regarding the geology of Titan's surface the age of its atmosphere.

  15. Fast shrinkage of tropical glaciers in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Jorge Luis; Euscátegui, Christian; Ramírez, Jair; Cañon, Marcela; Huggel, Christian; Haeberli, Wilfried; Machguth, Horst

    As a consequence of ongoing atmospheric temperature rise, tropical glaciers belong to the unique and threatened ecosystems on Earth, as defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Houghton and others, 2001). Worldwide glacier monitoring, especially as part of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), includes the systematic collection of data on such perennial surface ice masses. Several peaks in the sierras of Colombia have lost their glacier cover during recent decades. Today, high-altitude glaciers still exist in Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, in Sierra Nevada del Cocuy and on the volcanoes of Nevados del Ruiz, de Santa Isabel, del Tolima and del Huila. Comparison of reconstructions of maximum glacier area extent during the Little Ice Age with more recent information from aerial photographs and satellite images clearly documents a fast-shrinking tendency and potential disappearance of the remaining glaciers within the next few decades. In the past 50 years, Colombian glaciers have lost 50% or more of their area. Glacier shrinkage has continued to be strong in the last 15 years, with a loss of 10-50% of the glacier area. The relationship between fast glacier retreat and local, regional and global climate change is now being investigated. Preliminary analyses indicate that the temperature rise of roughly 1° C in the last 30 years recorded at high-altitude meteorological stations exerts a primary control on glacier retreat. The investigations on the Colombian glaciers thus corroborate earlier findings concerning the high sensitivity of glaciers in the wet inner tropics to temperature rise. To improve understanding of fast glacier retreat in Colombia, a modern monitoring network has been established according to the multilevel strategy of the Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G) within GCOS. The observations are also contributions to continued assessments of hazards from the glacier-covered volcanoes and to integrated global change

  16. Pollinator recognition by a keystone tropical plant

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Matthew G.; Hadley, Adam S.; Kress, W. John

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms enabling coevolution in complex mutualistic networks remains a central challenge in evolutionary biology. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that a tropical plant species has the capacity to discriminate among floral visitors, investing in reproduction differentially across the pollinator community. After we standardized pollen quality in 223 aviary experiments, successful pollination of Heliconia tortuosa (measured as pollen tube abundance) occurred frequently when plants were visited by long-distance traplining hummingbird species with specialized bills (x¯ pollen tubes = 1.21 ± 0.12 SE) but was reduced 5.7 times when visited by straight-billed territorial birds (x¯ pollen tubes = 0.20 ± 0.074 SE) or insects. Our subsequent experiments revealed that plants use the nectar extraction capacity of tropical hummingbirds, a positive function of bill length, as a cue to turn on reproductively. Furthermore, we show that hummingbirds with long bills and high nectar extraction efficiency engaged in daily movements at broad spatial scales (∼1 km), but that territorial species moved only short distances (<100 m). Such pollinator recognition may therefore affect mate selection and maximize receipt of high-quality pollen from multiple parents. Although a diffuse pollinator network is implied, because all six species of hummingbirds carry pollen of H. tortuosa, only two species with specialized bills contribute meaningfully to its reproduction. We hypothesize that this pollinator filtering behavior constitutes a crucial mechanism facilitating coevolution in multispecies plant–pollinator networks. However, pollinator recognition also greatly reduces the number of realized pollinators, thereby rendering mutualistic networks more vulnerable to environmental change. PMID:25733902

  17. Pollinator recognition by a keystone tropical plant.

    PubMed

    Betts, Matthew G; Hadley, Adam S; Kress, W John

    2015-03-17

    Understanding the mechanisms enabling coevolution in complex mutualistic networks remains a central challenge in evolutionary biology. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that a tropical plant species has the capacity to discriminate among floral visitors, investing in reproduction differentially across the pollinator community. After we standardized pollen quality in 223 aviary experiments, successful pollination of Heliconia tortuosa (measured as pollen tube abundance) occurred frequently when plants were visited by long-distance traplining hummingbird species with specialized bills (mean pollen tubes = 1.21 ± 0.12 SE) but was reduced 5.7 times when visited by straight-billed territorial birds (mean pollen tubes = 0.20 ± 0.074 SE) or insects. Our subsequent experiments revealed that plants use the nectar extraction capacity of tropical hummingbirds, a positive function of bill length, as a cue to turn on reproductively. Furthermore, we show that hummingbirds with long bills and high nectar extraction efficiency engaged in daily movements at broad spatial scales (∼1 km), but that territorial species moved only short distances (<100 m). Such pollinator recognition may therefore affect mate selection and maximize receipt of high-quality pollen from multiple parents. Although a diffuse pollinator network is implied, because all six species of hummingbirds carry pollen of H. tortuosa, only two species with specialized bills contribute meaningfully to its reproduction. We hypothesize that this pollinator filtering behavior constitutes a crucial mechanism facilitating coevolution in multispecies plant-pollinator networks. However, pollinator recognition also greatly reduces the number of realized pollinators, thereby rendering mutualistic networks more vulnerable to environmental change.

  18. Pollinator recognition by a keystone tropical plant.

    PubMed

    Betts, Matthew G; Hadley, Adam S; Kress, W John

    2015-03-17

    Understanding the mechanisms enabling coevolution in complex mutualistic networks remains a central challenge in evolutionary biology. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that a tropical plant species has the capacity to discriminate among floral visitors, investing in reproduction differentially across the pollinator community. After we standardized pollen quality in 223 aviary experiments, successful pollination of Heliconia tortuosa (measured as pollen tube abundance) occurred frequently when plants were visited by long-distance traplining hummingbird species with specialized bills (mean pollen tubes = 1.21 ± 0.12 SE) but was reduced 5.7 times when visited by straight-billed territorial birds (mean pollen tubes = 0.20 ± 0.074 SE) or insects. Our subsequent experiments revealed that plants use the nectar extraction capacity of tropical hummingbirds, a positive function of bill length, as a cue to turn on reproductively. Furthermore, we show that hummingbirds with long bills and high nectar extraction efficiency engaged in daily movements at broad spatial scales (∼1 km), but that territorial species moved only short distances (<100 m). Such pollinator recognition may therefore affect mate selection and maximize receipt of high-quality pollen from multiple parents. Although a diffuse pollinator network is implied, because all six species of hummingbirds carry pollen of H. tortuosa, only two species with specialized bills contribute meaningfully to its reproduction. We hypothesize that this pollinator filtering behavior constitutes a crucial mechanism facilitating coevolution in multispecies plant-pollinator networks. However, pollinator recognition also greatly reduces the number of realized pollinators, thereby rendering mutualistic networks more vulnerable to environmental change. PMID:25733902

  19. The Environmental Legacy of Modern Tropical Deforestation.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Isabel M D; Smith, Matthew J; Wearn, Oliver R; Purves, Drew; Ewers, Robert M

    2016-08-22

    Tropical deforestation has caused a significant share of carbon emissions and species losses, but historical patterns have rarely been explicitly considered when estimating these impacts [1]. A deforestation event today leads to a time-delayed future release of carbon, from the eventual decay either of forest products or of slash left at the site [2]. Similarly, deforestation often does not result in the immediate loss of species, and communities may exhibit a process of "relaxation" to their new equilibrium over time [3]. We used a spatially explicit land cover change model [4] to reconstruct the annual rates and spatial patterns of tropical deforestation that occurred between 1950 and 2009 in the Amazon, in the Congo Basin, and across Southeast Asia. Using these patterns, we estimated the resulting gross vegetation carbon emissions [2, 5] and species losses over time [6]. Importantly, we accounted for the time lags inherent in both the release of carbon and the extinction of species. We show that even if deforestation had completely halted in 2010, time lags ensured there would still be a carbon emissions debt of at least 8.6 petagrams, equivalent to 5-10 years of global deforestation, and an extinction debt of more than 140 bird, mammal, and amphibian forest-specific species, which if paid, would increase the number of 20(th)-century extinctions in these groups by 120%. Given the magnitude of these debts, commitments to reduce emissions and biodiversity loss are unlikely to be realized without specific actions that directly address this damaging environmental legacy. PMID:27476593

  20. Celestial Moderation of Tropical Seabird Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pinet, Patrick; Jaeger, Audrey; Cordier, Emmanuel; Potin, Gaël; Le Corre, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    Most animals, including birds, have cyclic life histories and numerous studies generally conducted on captive animals have shown that photoperiod is the main factor influencing this periodicity. Moon cycles can also affect periodic behavior of birds. Few studies have investigated the influence of these environmental cues in natural settings, and particularly in tropical areas where the change in photoperiod is slight and some bird species keep cyclic behaviors. Using miniaturized light sensors, we simultaneously investigated under natural conditions the influence of photoperiod and moon phases on the migration dates and at-sea activity of a tropical seabird species, the Barau's petrel, throughout its annual cycle. Firstly, we found that birds consistently started their pre- and post-breeding migrations at precise dates corresponding in both cases to a day-duration of 12.5 hours, suggesting a strong influence of the photoperiod in the regulation of migration behavior. We also found that mean population arrival dates to the colony changed from year to year and they were influenced by moon phases. Returns at their colonies occurred around the last full moon of the austral winter, suggesting that moon cycle is used by birds to synchronize their arrival. Secondly, variations of day-time activity were sinusoidal and correlated to seasonal changes of daylength. We thus hypothesize that the photoperiod could directly affect the behavior of the birds at sea. Night-time at-sea activity exhibited a clear cycle of 29.2 days, suggesting that nocturnal foraging was highly regulated by moon phase, particularly during the non-breeding season. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document a mixed regulation of the behavior of a wild bird by photoperiod and moon phases throughout its annual cycle. PMID:22110711

  1. Holocene constraints on simulated tropical Pacific climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile-Geay, J.; Cobb, K. M.; Carre, M.; Braconnot, P.; Leloup, J.; Zhou, Y.; Harrison, S. P.; Correge, T.; Mcgregor, H. V.; Collins, M.; Driscoll, R.; Elliot, M.; Schneider, B.; Tudhope, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influences climate and weather worldwide, so uncertainties in its response to external forcings contribute to the spread in global climate projections. Theoretical and modeling studies have argued that such forcings may affect ENSO either via the seasonal cycle, the mean state, or extratropical influences, but these mechanisms are poorly constrained by the short instrumental record. Here we synthesize a pan-Pacific network of high-resolution marine biocarbonates spanning discrete snapshots of the Holocene (past 10, 000 years of Earth's history), which we use to constrain a set of global climate model (GCM) simulations via a forward model and a consistent treatment of uncertainty. Observations suggest important reductions in ENSO variability throughout the interval, most consistently during 3-5 kyBP, when approximately 2/3 reductions are inferred. The magnitude and timing of these ENSO variance reductions bear little resemblance to those sim- ulated by GCMs, or to equatorial insolation. The central Pacific witnessed a mid-Holocene increase in seasonality, at odds with the reductions simulated by GCMs. Finally, while GCM aggregate behavior shows a clear inverse relationship between seasonal amplitude and ENSO-band variance in sea-surface temperature, in agreement with many previous studies, such a relationship is not borne out by these observations. Our synthesis suggests that tropical Pacific climate is highly variable, but exhibited millennia-long periods of reduced ENSO variability whose origins, whether forced or unforced, contradict existing explanations. It also points to deficiencies in the ability of current GCMs to simulate forced changes in the tropical Pacific seasonal cycle and its interaction with ENSO, highlighting a key area of growth for future modeling efforts.

  2. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Simpson, J.

    2002-01-01

    The first measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within and around tropical cyclones were made with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) CCN spectrometer (Hudson 1909) from a NOAA P-3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft throughout the 2001 season. Two penetrations of the closed eye of Hurricane Erin off the northeast US coast on Sept. 10 showed concentrations consistently well in excess of 1000 per cubic cm at approximately 1.4% supersaturation. Simultaneous condensation nuclei (CN--total particle) concentrations were consistently well in excess of 2000 per cubic cm throughout these closed eye penetrations. These within eye measurements at 4 km altitude for exceeded CCN and CN measurements just outside of the storm at similar altitudes--300 and 600 per cubic cm respectively. These CCN and CN concentrations within this closed eye were far above concentrations in maritime air masses; they are characteristic of continental or polluted air masses. Although there was a possibility that Saharan duct may have gotten into this storm these sub tenth micrometer particles are much too small and much too numerous to be dust. Such high concentrations may have originated from European air pollution, which may have been transported by similar airflow patterns to those that carry Saharan dust across the Atlantic. These high concentrations may be a manifestation of descending air that brings higher concentrations that are often characteristic of the upper troposphere (Clarke and Kapustin 2002). Later in the month measurements in Humberto showed highly variable CCN and CN concentrations that ranged from lots than 5 per cubic cm to more than 1000 per Cubic cm over km scale distances within and around the open eye of this tropical storm/hurricane. These very low concentrations suggest strong cloud scavenging.

  3. Reviewing dengue: still a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-04-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a "neglected tropical disease" (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003-2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  4. Reviewing dengue: still a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-04-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a "neglected tropical disease" (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003-2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD.

  5. Urgent need for warming experiments in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Cavaleri, Molly A; Reed, Sasha C; Smith, W Kolby; Wood, Tana E

    2015-06-01

    Although tropical forests account for only a fraction of the planet's terrestrial surface, they exchange more carbon dioxide with the atmosphere than any other biome on Earth, and thus play a disproportionate role in the global climate. In the next 20 years, the tropics will experience unprecedented warming, yet there is exceedingly high uncertainty about their potential responses to this imminent climatic change. Here, we prioritize research approaches given both funding and logistical constraints in order to resolve major uncertainties about how tropical forests function and also to improve predictive capacity of earth system models. We investigate overall model uncertainty of tropical latitudes and explore the scientific benefits and inevitable trade-offs inherent in large-scale manipulative field experiments. With a Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 analysis, we found that model variability in projected net ecosystem production was nearly 3 times greater in the tropics than for any other latitude. Through a review of the most current literature, we concluded that manipulative warming experiments are vital to accurately predict future tropical forest carbon balance, and we further recommend the establishment of a network of comparable studies spanning gradients of precipitation, edaphic qualities, plant types, and/or land use change. We provide arguments for long-term, single-factor warming experiments that incorporate warming of the most biogeochemically active ecosystem components (i.e. leaves, roots, soil microbes). Hypothesis testing of underlying mechanisms should be a priority, along with improving model parameterization and constraints. No single tropical forest is representative of all tropical forests; therefore logistical feasibility should be the most important consideration for locating large-scale manipulative experiments. Above all, we advocate for multi-faceted research programs, and we offer arguments for what we consider the most

  6. Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC): Status and Research Agenda (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waliser, D. E.; Moncrieff, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    The realistic representation of tropical convection in our global atmospheric models is a long-standing grand challenge for numerical weather forecasts and global climate predictions. Our lack of fundamental knowledge and practical capabilities in this area leaves us disadvantaged in modeling and predicting prominent phenomena of the tropical atmosphere such as the ITCZ, ENSO, monsoons and their active/break periods, the MJO, subtropical stratus decks, near-surface ocean properties, tropical cyclones, and even the diurnal cycle. To address this the challenge of tropical convection, WCRP and WWRP/THORPEX are conducting a joint research activity consisting coordinated observing, modeling and forecasting of organized tropical convection. The timing, focus year approach and integrated framework of this effort is intended to exploit the vast amounts of existing observations, the expanding computational resources and the development of new, high-resolution modeling frameworks, with the objective of advancing the characterization, diagnosis, modeling, parameterization and prediction of multi-scale convective/dynamic interactions, including the two-way interaction between tropical and extra-tropical weather/climate. The target time frame for scientific focus is May 2008 to April 2010, and was chosen as a period that would leverage the most benefit from recent investments in Earth Science infrastructure and overlapping programmatic activities (e.g., AMY, T-PARC). Specific areas of emphasis identified in YOTC are: 1) MJO and convectively coupled waves, 2) diurnal cycle, 3) easterly waves and tropical cyclones, 4) tropical-extratropical interactions, and 5) monsoon. This presentation will describe the current status of YOTC’s science and implementation plans, available resources and research agenda.

  7. Urgent need for warming experiments in tropical forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calaveri, Molly A.; Reed, Sasha C.; Smith, W. Kolby; Wood, Tana E.

    2015-01-01

    Although tropical forests account for only a fraction of the planet's terrestrial surface, they exchange more carbon dioxide with the atmosphere than any other biome on Earth, and thus play a disproportionate role in the global climate. In the next 20 years, the tropics will experience unprecedented warming, yet there is exceedingly high uncertainty about their potential responses to this imminent climatic change. Here, we prioritize research approaches given both funding and logistical constraints in order to resolve major uncertainties about how tropical forests function and also to improve predictive capacity of earth system models. We investigate overall model uncertainty of tropical latitudes and explore the scientific benefits and inevitable trade-offs inherent in large-scale manipulative field experiments. With a Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 analysis, we found that model variability in projected net ecosystem production was nearly 3 times greater in the tropics than for any other latitude. Through a review of the most current literature, we concluded that manipulative warming experiments are vital to accurately predict future tropical forest carbon balance, and we further recommend the establishment of a network of comparable studies spanning gradients of precipitation, edaphic qualities, plant types, and/or land use change. We provide arguments for long-term, single-factor warming experiments that incorporate warming of the most biogeochemically active ecosystem components (i.e. leaves, roots, soil microbes). Hypothesis testing of underlying mechanisms should be a priority, along with improving model parameterization and constraints. No single tropical forest is representative of all tropical forests; therefore logistical feasibility should be the most important consideration for locating large-scale manipulative experiments. Above all, we advocate for multi-faceted research programs, and we offer arguments for what we consider the most

  8. A contemporary assessment of change in humid tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Rudel, Thomas K; Aide, T Mitchell; Defries, Ruth; Emerson, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    In recent decades the rate and geographic extent of land-use and land-cover change has increased throughout the world's humid tropical forests. The pan-tropical geography of forest change is a challenge to assess, and improved estimates of the human footprint in the tropics are critical to understanding potential changes in biodiversity. We combined recently published and new satellite observations, along with images from Google Earth and a literature review, to estimate the contemporary global extent of deforestation, selective logging, and secondary regrowth in humid tropical forests. Roughly 1.4% of the biome was deforested between 2000 and 2005. As of 2005, about half of the humid tropical forest biome contained 50% or less tree cover. Although not directly comparable to deforestation, geographic estimates of selective logging indicate that at least 20% of the humid tropical forest biome was undergoing some level of timber harvesting between 2000 and 2005. Forest recovery estimates are even less certain, but a compilation of available reports suggests that at least 1.2% of the humid tropical forest biome was in some stage of long-term secondary regrowth in 2000. Nearly 70% of the regrowth reports indicate forest regeneration in hilly, upland, and mountainous environments considered marginal for large-scale agriculture and ranching. Our estimates of the human footprint are conservative because they do not resolve very small-scale deforestation, low-intensity logging, and unreported secondary regrowth, nor do they incorporate other impacts on tropical forest ecosystems, such as fire and hunting. Our results highlight the enormous geographic extent of forest change throughout the humid tropics and the considerable limitations of the science and technology available for such a synthesis. PMID:20078639

  9. Effect of tropical cyclones on the tropical tropopause parameters observed using COSMIC GPS RO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S. Ravindra; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Basha, G.; Krishnamurthy, B. V.; Venkateswararao, B.

    2015-09-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are deep convective synoptic-scale systems that play an important role in modifying the thermal structure, tropical tropopause parameters and hence also modify stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) processes. In the present study, high vertical resolution and high accuracy measurements from COSMIC Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements are used to investigate and quantify the effect of tropical cyclones that occurred over Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea in the last decade on the tropical tropopause parameters. The tropopause parameters include cold-point tropopause altitude (CPH) and temperature (CPT), lapse-rate tropopause altitude (LRH) and temperature (LRT) and the thickness of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), that is defined as the layer between convective outflow level (COH) and CPH, obtained from GPS RO data. From all the TC events, we generate the mean cyclone-centred composite structure for the tropopause parameters and removed it from the climatological mean obtained from averaging the GPS RO data from 2002 to 2013. Since the TCs include eye, eye walls and deep convective bands, we obtained the tropopause parameters based on radial distance from the cyclone eye. In general, decrease in the CPH in the eye is noticed as expected. However, as the distance from the cyclone eye increases by 300, 400, and 500 km, an enhancement in CPH (CPT) and LRH (LRT) is observed. Lowering of CPH (0.6 km) and LRH (0.4 km) values with coldest CPT and LRT (2-3 K) within a 500 km radius of the TC centre is noticed. Higher (2 km) COH leading to the lowering of TTL thickness (2-3 km) is clearly observed. There are multiple tropopause structures in the profiles of temperature obtained within 100 km from the centre of the TC. These changes in the tropopause parameters are expected to influence the water vapour transport from the troposphere to the lower stratosphere, and ozone from the lower stratosphere to the upper

  10. Eddies and Tropical Instability Waves in the eastern tropical Pacific: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Cynthia S.; Leben, Robert R.; Lavín, Miguel F.

    2006-05-01

    Mesoscale eddies and tropical instability waves in the eastern tropical Pacific, first revealed by satellite infrared imagery, play an important role in the dynamics and biology of the region, and in the transfer of mass, energy, heat, and biological constituents from the shelf to the deep ocean and across the equatorial currents. From boreal late autumn to early spring, four to 18 cyclonic or anticyclonic eddies are formed off the coastal region between southern Mexico and Panama. The anticyclonic gyres, which tend to be larger and last longer than the cyclonic ones, are the best studied: they typically are ∼180-500 km in diameter, depress the pycnocline from ∼60 to 145 m at the eddy center, have swirl speeds in excess of 1 m s -1, migrate west at velocities ranging from 11 to 19 cm s -1 (with a slight southward component), and maintain a height signature of up to 30 cm. The primary generating agents for these eddies are the strong, intermittent wind jets that blow across the isthmus of Tehuantepec in Mexico, the lake district in Nicaragua and Costa Rica, and the Panama canal. Other proposed eddy-generating mechanisms are the conservation of vorticity as the North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC) turns north on reaching America, and the instability of coastally trapped waves/currents. Tropical Instability Waves (TIWs) are perturbations in the SST fronts on either side of the equatorial cold tongue. They produce SST variations on the order of 1-2 °C, have periods of 20-40 days, wavelengths of 1000-2000 km, phase speeds of around 0.5 m s -1 and propagate westward both north and south of the Equator. The Tropical Instability Vortices (TIVs) are a train of westward-propagating anticyclonic eddies associated with the TIWs. They exhibit eddy currents exceeding 1.3 m s -1, a westward phase propagation speed between 30 and 40 km d -1, a signature above the pycnocline, and eastward energy propagation. Like the TIWs, they result from the latitudinal barotropically

  11. Bacterial colonisation of jejunal mucosa in acute tropical sprue.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, A M; Drasar, B S; James, W P

    1975-01-11

    Fifteen of sixteen Caucasians with acute tropical sprue were founc to have numerous aerobic bacteria closely associated with the mucosal layer of the proximal jejunum. Four species of Enterobacteria were grown in eleven patients, and concentrations were higher in the mucosal patients than in the jejunal fluid. Only one of eight control cases with similar tropical exposure but without mucosal morphological abnormalities had any similar bacteria in the mucosal biopsy. In no case were Bacteroides isolated. Since clinical and biochemical improvement only occurred on treatment with tetracycline when enterobacteria were eliminated from the mucosa, it is suggested that these organisms may be responsible for persisting jejunal abnormalities in tropical sprue.

  12. Water hyacinth as indicator of heavy metal pollution the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, H.; Otero, M. ); Lodenius, M. )

    1989-12-01

    The water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is a common aquatic plant in many tropical countries. Its ability absorb nutrients and other elements from the water has made it possible to use it for water purification purposes. Eichhornia, especially stems and leaves, have been successfully used as indicators of heavy metal pollution in tropical countries. The uptake of heavy metals in this plant is stronger in the roots than in the floating shoots. Metallothionein-like compounds have been found from roots of this species after cadmium exposure. The purpose of this investigation was to study the possibilities of using roots of water hyacinth as a biological indicator of metal pollution in tropical aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Coastal flooding by tropical cyclones and sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Jonathan D; Irish, Jennifer L; Camargo, Suzana J

    2013-12-01

    The future impacts of climate change on landfalling tropical cyclones are unclear. Regardless of this uncertainty, flooding by tropical cyclones will increase as a result of accelerated sea-level rise. Under similar rates of rapid sea-level rise during the early Holocene epoch most low-lying sedimentary coastlines were generally much less resilient to storm impacts. Society must learn to live with a rapidly evolving shoreline that is increasingly prone to flooding from tropical cyclones. These impacts can be mitigated partly with adaptive strategies, which include careful stewardship of sediments and reductions in human-induced land subsidence.

  14. Current status of tropical fruit breeding and genetics for three tropical fruit species cultivated in Japan: pineapple, mango, and papaya

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Tatsushi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Shoda, Moriyuki; Urasaki, Naoya; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Tropical fruit crops are predominantly produced in tropical and subtropical developing countries, but some are now grown in southern Japan. Pineapple (Ananas comosus), mango (Mangifera indica) and papaya (Carica papaya) are major tropical fruits cultivated in Japan. Modern, well-organized breeding systems have not yet been developed for most tropical fruit species. Most parts of Japan are in the temperate climate zone, but some southern areas such as the Ryukyu Islands, which stretch from Kyushu to Taiwan, are at the northern limits for tropical fruit production without artificial heating. In this review, we describe the current status of tropical fruit breeding, genetics, genomics, and biotechnology of three main tropical fruits (pineapple, mango, and papaya) that are cultivated and consumed in Japan. More than ten new elite cultivars of pineapple have been released with improved fruit quality and suitability for consumption as fresh fruit. New challenges and perspectives for obtaining high fruit quality are discussed in the context of breeding programs for pineapple. PMID:27069392

  15. Current status of tropical fruit breeding and genetics for three tropical fruit species cultivated in Japan: pineapple, mango, and papaya.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tatsushi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Shoda, Moriyuki; Urasaki, Naoya; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Tropical fruit crops are predominantly produced in tropical and subtropical developing countries, but some are now grown in southern Japan. Pineapple (Ananas comosus), mango (Mangifera indica) and papaya (Carica papaya) are major tropical fruits cultivated in Japan. Modern, well-organized breeding systems have not yet been developed for most tropical fruit species. Most parts of Japan are in the temperate climate zone, but some southern areas such as the Ryukyu Islands, which stretch from Kyushu to Taiwan, are at the northern limits for tropical fruit production without artificial heating. In this review, we describe the current status of tropical fruit breeding, genetics, genomics, and biotechnology of three main tropical fruits (pineapple, mango, and papaya) that are cultivated and consumed in Japan. More than ten new elite cultivars of pineapple have been released with improved fruit quality and suitability for consumption as fresh fruit. New challenges and perspectives for obtaining high fruit quality are discussed in the context of breeding programs for pineapple. PMID:27069392

  16. A Technique for Estimating Recurrence Intervals of Tropical Cyclone-Related High Winds in the Tropics: Results for Guam.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, John A.; Lander, Mark A.

    1996-05-01

    The authors develop a technique that applies models of the radial profile of the wind in tropical cyclones to historical best-track databases of tropical cyclones, in order to estimate the wind (at 1-h intervals) experienced at any selected tropical location for any or all of the historical tropical cyclones affecting the location. When these estimated winds are condensed into a time series of the highest annual tropical cyclone-related wind, extreme value analysis can be applied in order to calculate the recurrence intervals of extreme wind speeds.The island of Guam, located at a low latitude in the western North Pacific, was selected as a site for testing the technique. Guam has historical measurements of tropical cyclone-related wind, from which an independent estimate of the recurrence intervals of extreme wind speeds was obtained. In addition, wind traces during the passage of three major typhoons that affected Guam were used to assess the ability of the technique to reproduce an accurate hourly time series of the winds experienced during the passage of these typhoons.For Guam, the recurrence intervals calculated from the time series of wind yielded by the authors' technique closely match those computed from the wind measurements. The technique also reproduces a reasonable wind trace for the three major typhoons affecting Guam. Given its successful validation when applied to Guam, we believe that this technique can be used to make useful estimates of the recurrence intervals of tropical cyclone-related high wind speeds at any coastal tropical location where in situ wind measurements may he lacking, but where an historical best-track archive of tropical cyclone track and intensity exists.

  17. N-Tropic variants obtained after co-infection with N- and B-tropic murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, N; Traktman, P; Whalen, K

    1976-04-01

    Sc-1 cells co-infected with small XC plaque-forming N-tropic and large XC plaque-forming B-tropic murine leukemia viruses produced, in addition to parental types, progeny with the phenotype, large XC plaque morphology, and N-tropism. This phenotype remained stable through end point titration and plaque purification on NIH/3T3 cells and growth on BALB/3T3 cells. These N-tropic viruses (XLP-N virus) grow to unusually high titer and make very large XC plaques.

  18. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Tropical Island Climates

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    Design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of K-12 schools in tropical island climates. By incorporating energy improvements into construction or renovation plans, schools can reduce energy consumption and costs.

  19. Satellite Sees Hurricane Leslie and Tropical Storm Michael in Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    A movie of satellite observations from Sept. 2-5, 2012, shows Leslie strengthen into a Hurricane on September 5 as it nears Bermuda, and tiny Tropical Storm Michael in the central Atlantic Ocean. T...

  20. 23. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. View west of Tropic Chamber refrigeration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. View west of Tropic Chamber refrigeration equipment, ca. 1955. (Source: NRDEC). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  1. 9. View to west of Tropic Dressing Room (typical). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View to west of Tropic Dressing Room (typical). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  2. 14. View north of Tropic wind tunnel and frontal view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View north of Tropic wind tunnel and frontal view of main fan (typical). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  3. 21. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. view north of Tropic Chamber, ca. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. view north of Tropic Chamber, ca. 1955. (Source: NRDEC). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  4. [Tropical dermatology training in the Bundeswehr: Deployment in Manaus, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M

    2015-05-01

    Training in tropical dermatology at the Fundação de Medicina tropical (FMT-AM) in Manaus, Brazil, offers an ideal opportunity to become familiar with the broad spectrum of tropical skin-diseases which are endemic in the tropical rainforest of the Amazon region. Besides frequently observed cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis of the new world, mucocutaneous forms of leishmaniasis and all entities of the different deep mycoses of South America are also regularly diagnosed. Of special importance in the dermatological care of the population is the early diagnosis of all clinical forms of leprosy and the long-term care of HIV patients. Modern diagnostics, including histopathology and molecular biology analytical methods, enable patients at the FMT-AM to be diagnosed without having to solely rely on clinical presentation and epidemiological data.

  5. [Tropical sprue: diagnostic difficulties. Apropos of 2 cases in Guadeloupe].

    PubMed

    Cnudde, F; Boulard, F; Teron-Aboud, B; Chevallier, J

    1994-09-01

    The authors report two cases of tropical sprue occurring in Guadeloupe, in the French Lesser Antilles, a region in which this disease had previously been reported only once. One of the patients was treated with quinolone (ofloxacin).

  6. Brazil's neglected tropical diseases: an overview and a report card.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Fujiwara, Ricardo T

    2014-08-01

    Today, the nation of Brazil leads the Western Hemisphere in terms of the number of its citizens living with neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). These diseases continue to trap Brazil's "bottom 20 million" in extreme poverty.

  7. A 3-D Look at Post-Tropical Cyclone Hermine

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D flyby animation of GPM imagery shows Post-Tropical Storm Hermine on Sept. 6. Rain was falling at a rate of over 1.1 inches (27 mm) per hour between the Atlantic coast and Hermine's center ...

  8. Satellite Movie Shows Three Tropical Cyclones in Eastern Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-Wast satellite imagery from August 2 through 4 shows the movement of Tropical Depression Genevieve (left) southwest of Hawaii, Hurricane Iselle (center) in the Eastern...

  9. Satellite Movie Shows Andres Weaken to a Tropical Storm

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from June 1 to 3 shows Hurricane Andres eye disappear and weaken to a tropical storm in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, south of Baja California...

  10. Rainfall Totals from the Tropical Cyclones Passing Over Philippines

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rainfall totals from the TRMM satellite of all tropical cyclones that passed through the Philippines from January through November 11, 2013. Red indicated areas where rainfall totals were greater t...

  11. Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Chantal Move Over Hispaniola

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation from July 6 to July 10 shows the development of Tropical Storm Chantal in the Atlantic Ocean and movement over Hispaniola by July 10. TRT 0:06 Credit: NASA/N...

  12. Tropical Cyclone Mahasen Rain Moving Into Bay Of Bengal

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animated TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis shows the rainfall that occurred with Tropical Cyclone Mahasen during the week of May 6 through 13, 2013 as it moved through the Bay of Beng...

  13. 46 CFR 42.30-20 - Seasonal Tropical Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Hong Kong to the Port of Sual (Luzon Island), and the west coasts of the Islands of Luzon, Samar, and... area within the Great Barrier Reef included in the Tropical Zone, and by the east coast of...

  14. 46 CFR 42.30-20 - Seasonal Tropical Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Hong Kong to the Port of Sual (Luzon Island), and the west coasts of the Islands of Luzon, Samar, and... area within the Great Barrier Reef included in the Tropical Zone, and by the east coast of...

  15. 46 CFR 42.30-20 - Seasonal Tropical Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Hong Kong to the Port of Sual (Luzon Island), and the west coasts of the Islands of Luzon, Samar, and... area within the Great Barrier Reef included in the Tropical Zone, and by the east coast of...

  16. 46 CFR 42.30-20 - Seasonal Tropical Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Hong Kong to the Port of Sual (Luzon Island), and the west coasts of the Islands of Luzon, Samar, and... area within the Great Barrier Reef included in the Tropical Zone, and by the east coast of...

  17. Satellite Shows Landfall and Movement of Tropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation shows the landfall and movement of Tropical Storm Andrea from June 5 to June 7. The video ends as Andrea's center was moving over South Carolina on its way u...

  18. A GPM Satellite Flyover of Tropical Storm Darby

    NASA Video Gallery

    The animated flyby from NASA's GPM satellite shows Tropical Storm Darby in 3-D on July 23. GPM saw a line of intense storms in Darby, located southeast of the big island of Hawaii was dropping rain...

  19. Tropical Storm Gordon Makes a U-Turn

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from August 14-17, 2012, shows the birth and strengthening of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Storm Gordon making a U-turn and heading back to the east. This vi...

  20. GOES-West animation of Tropical Storm Rick

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows the weakening of Tropical Storm Rick into a remnant low pressure area from Nov. 21 to Nov. 23. Credit: NASA/NOAA...

  1. Diagnosing the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Xiping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Matsui, Toshihisa; Xie, Shaocheng; Lang, Stephen; Zhang, Minghua; Starr, David O'C; Li, Xiaowen; Simpson, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    Recent modeling studies have revealed that ice crystal number concentration is one of the dominant factors in the effect of clouds on radiation. Since the ice crystal enhancement factor and ice nuclei concentration determine the concentration, they are both important in quantifying the contribution of increased ice nuclei to global warming. In this study, long-term cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations are compared with field observations to estimate the ice crystal enhancement factor in tropical and midlatitudinal clouds, respectively. It is found that the factor in tropical clouds is 10 3-104 times larger than that of mid-latitudinal ones, which makes physical sense because entrainment and detrainment in the Tropics are much stronger than in middle latitudes. The effect of entrainment/detrainment on the enhancement factor, especially in tropical clouds, suggests that cloud microphysical parameterizations should be coupled with subgrid turbulence parameterizations within CRMs to obtain a more accurate depiction of cloud-radiative forcing.

  2. NASA Sees Heavy Rain in Arabian Sea Tropical Cyclone

    NASA Video Gallery

    On June 29, GPM showed Tropical Cyclone 02A had a few powerful convective thunderstorms southwest of the center of circulation were dropping rain at the extreme rate of over 209 mm (8.2 inches) per...

  3. GOES-East Animation of Tropical Storm Erika

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of GOES-East visible and infrared imagery shows the development and track of Tropical Storm Erika from Aug. 25 to Aug. 28, 2015 ending in eastern Caribbean Sea. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOE...

  4. NASA's GPM Sees Towering Thunderstorms in Intensifying Tropical Storm Earl

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Global Precipitation Measurement mission, or GPM, core observatory satellite passed over intensifying tropical storm Earl in the Caribbean Sea northeast of Honduras on Aug. 2, 2016 at 11:56 p.m...

  5. GPM Satellite Sees Tropical Depression 9 Dropping Heavy Rainfall

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Aug. 29 at 2:56 a.m. EDT GPM showed that precipitation was intense in convective storms in Tropical Depression 9 over the western side of Cuba. GPM revealed that some showers were coming down at...

  6. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. We conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. We also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  7. Consequences of defaunation for a tropical tree community.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Rhett D; Tan, Sylvester; Plotkin, Joshua B; Slik, Ferry; Detto, Matteo; Brenes, Tania; Itoh, Akira; Davies, Stuart J

    2013-05-01

    Hunting affects a considerably greater area of the tropical forest biome than deforestation and logging combined. Often even large remote protected areas are depleted of a substantial proportion of their vertebrate fauna. However, understanding of the long-term ecological consequences of defaunation in tropical forests remains poor. Using tree census data from a large-scale plot monitored over a 15-year period since the approximate onset of intense hunting, we provide a comprehensive assessment of the immediate consequences of defaunation for a tropical tree community. Our data strongly suggest that over-hunting has engendered pervasive changes in tree population spatial structure and dynamics, leading to a consistent decline in local tree diversity over time. However, we do not find any support for suggestions that over-hunting reduces above-ground biomass or biomass accumulation rate in this forest. To maintain critical ecosystem processes in tropical forests increased efforts are required to protect and restore wildlife populations. PMID:23489437

  8. Saving Tropical Rain Forests through Teacher-Student Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Described are the formation, goals, and activities of a network of teachers and students designed to help raise consciousness about conservation topics. A two-week minicourse on tropical diversity, ecology, and society is outlined. (CW)

  9. Tropical rainforest response to marine sky brightening climate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muri, Helene; Niemeier, Ulrike; Kristjánsson, Jón Egill

    2015-04-01

    Tropical forests represent a major atmospheric carbon dioxide sink. Here the gross primary productivity (GPP) response of tropical rainforests to climate engineering via marine sky brightening under a future scenario is investigated in three Earth system models. The model response is diverse, and in two of the three models, the tropical GPP shows a decrease from the marine sky brightening climate engineering. Partial correlation analysis indicates precipitation to be important in one of those models, while precipitation and temperature are limiting factors in the other. One model experiences a reversal of its Amazon dieback under marine sky brightening. There, the strongest partial correlation of GPP is to temperature and incoming solar radiation at the surface. Carbon fertilization provides a higher future tropical rainforest GPP overall, both with and without climate engineering. Salt damage to plants and soils could be an important aspect of marine sky brightening.

  10. Satellite Movie Shows Development of Tropical Storm Julia

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Sept. 12 to Sept. 14 shows the development of Tropical Storm Julia over Florida and movement into Georgia. TRT 00:22 Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES...

  11. Satellite Tracks Tropical Storm Madeline and Hurricane Lester

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from August 30 to September 2 shows Tropical Storm Madeline move past Hawaii and weaken to a depression and Hurricane Lester approaching the Haw...

  12. TRMM Sees Rainfall Totals from Tropical Cyclone Guito

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of rainfall gathered from February 11-19, 2014 by NASA's TRMM satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Guito produced as much as 16.9 inches/430 mm of rainfall in the center of the M...

  13. Hypocrealean fungi from a tropical rainforest in Queensland, Australia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a weeklong Mycoblitz in the Atherton Tablelands of Queensland, Australia, many hypocrealean fungi were collected. Preliminary identifications indicate that many of these specimens are part of the pantropical hypocrealean biota. Some of the common tropical species collected include: Bionectria...

  14. NASA Sees Tropical Storm Malakas in 3-D

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animated 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Malakas was created by radar data from the GPM core satellite. On Sept. 13 at 0111 UTC GPM's instruments showed that Malakas contained exceptionally heavy ...

  15. Agricultural expansion and its impacts on tropical nature.

    PubMed

    Laurance, William F; Sayer, Jeffrey; Cassman, Kenneth G

    2014-02-01

    The human population is projected to reach 11 billion this century, with the greatest increases in tropical developing nations. This growth, in concert with rising per-capita consumption, will require large increases in food and biofuel production. How will these megatrends affect tropical terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and biodiversity? We foresee (i) major expansion and intensification of tropical agriculture, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa and South America; (ii) continuing rapid loss and alteration of tropical old-growth forests, woodlands, and semi-arid environments; (iii) a pivotal role for new roadways in determining the spatial extent of agriculture; and (iv) intensified conflicts between food production and nature conservation. Key priorities are to improve technologies and policies that promote more ecologically efficient food production while optimizing the allocation of lands to conservation and agriculture.

  16. 19. View northwest of Tropic Chamber reciprocal compressors (typical), in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View northwest of Tropic Chamber reciprocal compressors (typical), in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  17. 18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  18. 15. View northeast of main control panels, Arctic and Tropic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View northeast of main control panels, Arctic and Tropic Chambers, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  19. 17. View northwest of Tropic Chamber refrigeration equipment, in machine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. View northwest of Tropic Chamber refrigeration equipment, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  20. Directory of selected tropical forestry journals and newsletters

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, C.; Durst, P.B.; Freed, E.

    1994-01-01

    Heightened public and professional interest in tropical forestry has led in recent years to a large increase in the volume of information produced on the subject. The directory catalogues and describes 473 tropical forestry periodicals, ranging from scientific journals to informal newsletters. Entries are arranged alphabetically and provide information on each journals focus, audience, language, frequency of publication, availability, and cost, as well as address, and telephone, fax, and telex number. Includes subject, geographic, and language indexes.