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Sample records for agricultural fungicide mancozeb

  1. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paro, Rita; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Buccione, Roberto

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNAmore » and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.« less

  2. Validation of a GC-MS method for the estimation of dithiocarbamate fungicide residues and safety evaluation of mancozeb in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Mujawar, Sumaiyya; Utture, Sagar C; Fonseca, Eddie; Matarrita, Jessie; Banerjee, Kaushik

    2014-05-01

    A sensitive and rugged residue analysis method was validated for the estimation of dithiocarbamate fungicides in a variety of fruit and vegetable matrices. The sample preparation method involved reaction of dithiocarbamates with Tin(II) chloride in aqueous HCl. The CS2 produced was absorbed into an isooctane layer and estimated by GC-MS selected ion monitoring. Limit of quantification (LOQ) was ⩽40μgkg(-1) for grape, green chilli, tomato, potato, brinjal, pineapple and chayote and the recoveries were within 75-104% (RSD<15% at LOQ). The method could be satisfactorily applied for analysis of real world samples. Dissipation of mancozeb, the most-used dithiocarbamate fungicide, in field followed first+first order kinetics with pre-harvest intervals of 2 and 4days in brinjal, 7 and 10days in grapes and 0day in chilli at single and double dose of agricultural applications. Cooking practices were effective for removal of mancozeb residues from vegetables. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of the fungicides mancozeb and chlorothalonil on fluxes of CO2, N2O, and CH4 in a fertilized Colorado grassland soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinney, C.A.; Mosier, A.R.; Ferrer, I.; Furlong, E.T.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2004-01-01

    Management of agricultural soil plays an important role in present and future atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4). Pesticides are used as management tools in crop production, but little is known about their effects on soil-atmosphere exchange of CO2, N2O, and CH4. Field studies described in this paper determined the effect of two commonly used fungicides, mancozeb and chlorothalonil, on trace gas exchange. Separate experimental plots, 1 m2, were established in nitrogen fertilized no-tilled native grassland and tilled soils with and without fungicide application. Two studies were conducted. The first study was initiated in June 1999 and lasted for 1 year with monthly flux measurements from tilled and no-till soils. The second study commenced in August 2001 with twelve weekly measurements from tilled soils only. From both studies mancozeb suppressed emissions of CO2 and N2O in the tilled soil by an average of 28% and 47%, respectively. This suppression corresponded with efficacy periods of 14-29 and 56-77 days, respectively. From the no-till soils mancozeb decreased CO2 and N2O emissions by 33% and 80% for periods of 29 and 94 days, respectively. Mancozeb inhibited CH4 consumption in the first study by 46% and 71% in the tilled and no-till soil for periods of 8 and 29 days, respectively, but had no effect in the second study. From both studies chlorothalonil initially suppressed CO2 and N2O emissions and enhanced CH4 uptake in the tilled soil by an average of 37%, 40%, and 115%, respectively. These effects corresponded with efficacy periods of 14-29, 21-56, and 1-14 days, respectively. In the no-till soil chlorothalonil inhibited CO2 and N2O emissions and enhanced CH4 uptake by 29%, 48%, and 86% for periods of 29, 56, and 56 days, respectively. Following the initial period of suppression, chlorothalonil subsequently enhanced N2O emissions in the tilled soil by an average of 51% and in the no

  4. Potential of agricultural fungicides for antifungal drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Jampilek, Josef

    2016-01-01

    While it is true that only a small fraction of fungal species are responsible for human mycoses, the increasing prevalence of fungal diseases has highlighted an urgent need to develop new antifungal drugs, especially for systemic administration. This contribution focuses on the similarities between agricultural fungicides and drugs. Inorganic, organometallic and organic compounds can be found amongst agricultural fungicides. Furthermore, fungicides are designed and developed in a similar fashion to drugs based on similar rules and guidelines, with fungicides also having to meet similar criteria of lead-likeness and/or drug-likeness. Modern approved specific-target fungicides are well-characterized entities with a proposed structure-activity relationships hypothesis and a defined mode of action. Extensive toxicological evaluation, including mammalian toxicology assays, is performed during the whole discovery and development process. Thus modern agrochemical research (design of modern agrochemicals) comes close to drug design, discovery and development. Therefore, modern specific-target fungicides represent excellent lead-like structures/models for novel drug design and development.

  5. Famoxadone: the discovery and optimisation of a new agricultural fungicide.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, J A; Geffken, D; Adams, J B; Pöstages, R; Sternberg, C G; Campbell, C L; Moberg, W K

    2001-02-01

    Famoxadone (3-anilino-5-methyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-1,3-oxazolidine-2,4-dione), is a new agricultural fungicide recently commercialized by DuPont under the trade name Famoxate. Famoxadone is a member of a new class of oxazolidinone fungicides that demonstrate excellent control of plant pathogens in the Ascomycete, Basidiomycete, and Oomycete classes that infect grapes, cereals, tomatoes, potatoes and other crops. DuPont's entry into the oxazolidinone area resulted from the procurement of 5-methyl-5-phenyl-3-phenylamino-2-thioxo-4-oxazolidinone (1) from Professor Detlef Geffken, then at the University of Bonn. An extensive analog program was initiated immediately after the fungicidal activity of 1 was discovered through routine greenhouse testing. The discovery program in the oxazolidinone area eventually culminated in the advancement of famoxadone to commercial development in the early 1990s. The synthesis of various oxazolidinone ring systems and the development of the structure-activity relationships that led to the discovery of famoxadone are described.

  6. Recent Trends in Studies on Botanical Fungicides in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mi-Young; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Plants are attacked by various phytopathogenic fungi. For many years, synthetic fungicides have been used to control plant diseases. Although synthetic fungicides are highly effective, their repeated use has led to problems such as environmental pollution, development of resistance, and residual toxicity. This has prompted intensive research on the development of biopesticides, including botanical fungicides. To date, relatively few botanical fungicides have been registered and commercialized. However, many scientists have reported isolation and characterization of a variety of antifungal plant derivatives. Here, we present a survey of a wide range of reported plant-derived antifungal metabolites. PMID:25288923

  7. Fate and transport of agriculturally applied fungicidal compounds, azoxystrobin and propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul G; Murphy, Tracye M; Lydy, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Fungicidal active ingredients azoxystrobin and propiconazole, individually and in combination, have been marketed worldwide in a range of fungicide treatment products for preventative and curative purposes, respectively. Their presence in streams located throughout the midwestern and southeastern United States warrant the need for research into the potential routes of transport of these fungicides in an agricultural field setting. Potential canopy penetration and drift effects of these fungicides during aerial and ground applications were studied in the current project. Canopy penetration was observed for both application types, however drift was associated only with the aerial application of these fungicides. Azoxystrobin and propiconazole persisted in the soil up to 301 d, with peak concentrations occurring approximately 30 d after application. The predominant mode of transport for these compounds was agricultural runoff water, with the majority of the fungicidal active ingredients leaving the target area during the first rain event following application. The timing of application in relation to the first rain event significantly affected the amount of loss that occurred, implying application practices should follow manufacturer recommended guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioremediation of fungicides by spent mushroom substrate and its associated microflora.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, O P; Gupta, Pardeep; Kumar, Satish; Sharma, D K; Ahlawat, K

    2010-10-01

    Experiments were conducted both under in vitro and in situ conditions to determine the biodegradation potential of button mushroom spent substrate (SMS) and its dominating microbes (fungi and bacteria) for carbendazim and mancozeb, the commonly used agricultural fungicides. During 6 days of incubation at 30 ± 2°C under broth culture conditions, highest degradation of carbendazim (17.45%) was recorded with B-1 bacterial isolate, while highest degradation of mancozeb (18.05%) was recorded with Trichoderma sp. In fungicide pre-mixed sterilized SMS, highest degradation of carbendazim (100.00-66.50 μg g(-1)) was recorded with mixed inoculum of Trichoderma sp. and Aspergillus sp., whereas highest degradation of mancozeb (100.00-50.50 μg g(-1)) was with mixed inoculum of Trichoderma sp., Aspergillus sp. and B-I bacterial isolate in 15 days of incubation at 30 ± 2°C. All these microbes both individually as well as in different combinations grew well and produced extracellular lignolytic enzymes on SMS, which helped in fungicides degradation. Under in situ conditions, among three different proportions of SMS (10, 20 and 30%, w/w) mixed with fungicide pre-mixed soil (100 μg g(-1) of soil), the degradation of carbendazim was highest in 30% SMS treatment, while for mancozeb it was in 20% SMS treatment. The residue levels of both fungicides decreased to half of their initial concentration after 1 month of SMS mixing.

  9. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma risk and insecticide, fungicide and fumigant use in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Farming and pesticide use have previously been linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM). We evaluated agricultural use of specific insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants and risk of NHL and NHL-subtypes (including CLL an...

  10. Enumeration and Identification of Coliform Bacteria Injured by Chlorine or Fungicide Mixed with Agricultural Water.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hidemi; Nakata, Yuji; Inoue, Ayano

    2016-10-01

    Chemical sanitizers may induce no injury (bacteria survive), sublethal injury (bacteria are injured), or lethal injury (bacteria die). The proportion of coliform bacteria that were injured sublethally by chlorine and fungicide mixed with agricultural water (pond water), which was used to dilute the pesticide solution, was evaluated using the thin agar layer (TAL) method. In pure cultures of Enterobacter cloacae , Escherichia coli , and E. coli O157:H7 (representing a human pathogen), the percentage of chlorine-injured cells was 69 to 77% for dilute electrolyzed water containing an available chlorine level of 2 ppm. When agricultural water was mixed with electrolyzed water, the percentage of injured coliforms in agricultural water was 75%. The isolation and identification of bacteria on TAL and selective media suggested that the chlorine stress caused injury to Enterobacter kobei . Of the four fungicide products tested, diluted to their recommended concentrations, Topsin-M, Sumilex, and Oxirane caused injury to coliform bacteria in pure cultures and in agricultural water following their mixture with each pesticide, whereas Streptomycin did not induce any injury to the bacteria. The percentage of injury was 45 to 97% for Topsin-M, 80 to 87% for Sumilex, and 50 to 97% for Oxirane. A comparison of the coliforms isolated from the pesticide solutions and then grown on either TAL or selective media indicated the possibility of fungicide-injured Rahnella aquatilis , Yersinia mollaretii , and E. coli . These results suggest the importance of selecting a suitable sanitizer and the necessity of adjusting the sanitizer concentration to a level that will kill the coliforms rather than cause sanitizer-induced cell injury that can result in the recovery of the coliforms.

  11. Manganese concentrations in drinking water from villages near banana plantations with aerial mancozeb spraying in Costa Rica: Results from the Infants' Environmental Health Study (ISA).

    PubMed

    van Wendel de Joode, Berna; Barbeau, Benoit; Bouchard, Maryse F; Mora, Ana María; Skytt, Åsa; Córdoba, Leonel; Quesada, Rosario; Lundh, Thomas; Lindh, Christian H; Mergler, Donna

    2016-08-01

    Elevated manganese (Mn) in drinking water has been reported worldwide. While, naturally occurring Mn in groundwater is generally the major source, anthropogenic contamination by Mn-containing fungicides such as mancozeb may also occur. The main objective of this study was to examine factors associated with Mn and ethylenethiourea (ETU), a degradation product of mancozeb, in drinking water samples from villages situated near banana plantations with aerial spraying of mancozeb. Drinking water samples (n = 126) were obtained from 124 homes of women participating in the Infants' Environmental Health Study (ISA, for its acronym in Spanish), living nearby large-scale banana plantations. Concentrations of Mn, iron (Fe), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and ethylenethiourea (ETU), a degradation product of mancozeb, were measured in water samples. Only six percent of samples had detectable ETU concentrations (limit of detection (LOD) = 0.15 μg/L), whereas 94% of the samples had detectable Mn (LOD = 0.05 μg/L). Mn concentrations were higher than 100 and 500 μg/L in 22% and 7% of the samples, respectively. Mn was highest in samples from private and banana farm wells. Distance from a banana plantation was inversely associated with Mn concentrations, with a 61.5% decrease (95% CI: -97.0, -26.0) in Mn concentrations for each km increase in distance. Mn concentrations in water transported with trucks from one village to another were almost 1000 times higher than Mn in water obtained from taps in houses supplied by the same well but not transported, indicating environmental Mn contamination. Elevated Mn in drinking water may be partly explained by aerial spraying of mancozeb; however, naturally occurring Mn in groundwater, and intensive agriculture may also contribute. Drinking water risk assessment for mancozeb should consider Mn as a health hazard. The findings of this study evidence the need for health-based World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on Mn in

  12. Fungicide application practices and personal protective equipment use among orchard farmers in the agricultural health study.

    PubMed

    Hines, C J; Deddens, J A; Coble, J; Alavanja, M C R

    2007-04-01

    Fungicides are routinely applied to deciduous tree fruits for disease management. Seventy-four private orchard applicators enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study participated in the Orchard Fungicide Exposure Study in 2002-2003. During 144 days of observation, information was obtained on chemicals applied and applicator mixing, application, personal protective, and hygiene practices. At least half of the applicators had orchards with <100 trees. Air blast was the most frequent application method used (55%), followed by hand spray (44%). Rubber gloves were the most frequently worn protective equipment (68% mix; 59% apply), followed by respirators (45% mix; 49% apply), protective outerwear (36% mix; 37% apply), and rubber boots (35% mix; 36% apply). Eye protection was worn while mixing and applying on only 35% and 41% of the days, respectively. Bivariate analyses were performed using repeated logistic or repeated linear regression. Mean duration of mixing, pounds of captan applied, total acres sprayed, and number of tank mixes sprayed were greater for air blast than for hand spray (p < 0.05). Spraying from a tractor/vehicle without an enclosed cab was associated with wearing some type of coverall (p < 0.05). Applicators often did not wash their hands after mixing (77%), a finding not explained by glove use. Glove use during mixing was associated with younger age, while wearing long-sleeve shirts was associated with older age (p < 0.05 each). Self-reported unusually high fungicide exposures were more likely on days applicators performed repairs (p < 0.05). These data will be useful for evaluating fungicide exposure determinants among orchard applicators.

  13. A pesticide paradox: Fungicides indirectly increase fungal infections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, Jason R.; Brown, Jenise; Battaglin, William A.; McMahon, Teagan A.; Reylea, Rick A.

    2017-01-01

    There are many examples where the use of chemicals have had profound unintended consequences, such as fertilizers reducing crop yields (paradox of enrichment) and insecticides increasing insect pests (by reducing natural biocontrol). Recently, the application of agrochemicals, such as agricultural disinfectants and fungicides, has been explored as an approach to curb the pathogenic fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which is associated with worldwide amphibian declines. However, the long-term, net effects of early-life exposure to these chemicals on amphibian disease risk have not been thoroughly investigated. Using a combination of laboratory experiments and analysis of data from the literature, we explored the effects of fungicide exposure on Bd infections in two frog species. Extremely low concentrations of the fungicides azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, and mancozeb were directly toxic to Bd in culture. However, estimated environmental concentrations of the fungicides did not reduce Bd on Cuban tree frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) tadpoles exposed simultaneously to any of these fungicides and Bd, and fungicide exposure actually increased Bd-induced mortality. Additionally, exposure to any of these fungicides as tadpoles resulted in higher Bd abundance and greater Bd-induced mortality when challenged with Bd post-metamorphosis, an average of 71 d after their last fungicide exposure. Analysis of data from the literature revealed that previous exposure to the fungicide itraconazole, which is commonly used to clear Bd infections, made the critically endangered booroolong frog (Litoria booroolongensis) more susceptible to Bd. Finally, a field survey revealed that Bd prevalence was positively associated with concentrations of fungicides in ponds. Although fungicides show promise for controlling Bd, these results suggest that, if fungicides do not completely eliminate Bd or if Bd recolonizes, exposure to fungicides has the potential

  14. Presence of Fungicides Used to Control Asian Soybean Rust in Streams in Agricultural Areas in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, M. W.; Battaglin, W. A.

    2007-05-01

    Concentrations of 11 fungicides were measured in stream samples during 2 years in agricultural areas in the United States that grow predominantly corn and soybean. The fungicides are registered for control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR), which entered the United States in 2004. Many of these fungicides were registered under an emergency exemption because evaluation of environmental risks related to their widespread use on soybeans had not been completed. Some of these fungicides are considered moderately to highly toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates. We developed a solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for determining the fungicides at low concentrations (ng/L). Stream samples were collected 2 to 4 times at study areas during the late spring through fall season when fungicides are applied. Six fungicides registered for control of ASR (Phakospora pachyrhizi) in 2005 were measured in streams in Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Mississippi during August-November, 2005. One or more fungicides were detected in 8 of the 12 streams sampled. Azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, propiconazole, tebuconazole, and myclobutanil were found in at least one of the 40 samples collected, while chlorothalonil was not found. Azoxystrobin was detected most frequently, in 35 percent of the samples. In 2006, five additional fungicides registered for use in control of ASR were included in the analytical method. One or more of the fungicides (azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin, metconazole, propiconazole, tebuconazole, tetraconazole, myclobutanil) were detected in 12 of the 16 streams sampled from areas in the South and Midwest during May-September, 2006. Azoxystrobin was detected most frequently (40 percent of the samples) and the highest concentration was 1.1 μg/L in a small predominantly cotton and soybean watershed. The highest concentrations of azoxystrobin were measured prior to the spread of ASR in 2006, and the detections

  15. Non-target impact of fungicide tetraconazole on microbial communities in soils with different agricultural management.

    PubMed

    Sułowicz, Sławomir; Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-08-01

    Effect of the fungicide tetraconazole on microbial community in silt loam soils from orchard with long history of triazole application and from grassland with no known history of fungicide usage was investigated. Triazole tetraconazole that had never been used on these soils before was applied at the field rate and at tenfold the FR. Response of microbial communities to tetraconazole was investigated during 28-day laboratory experiment by determination of changes in their biomass and structure (phospholipid fatty acids method-PLFA), activity (fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis-FDA) as well as changes in genetic (DGGE) and functional (Biolog) diversity. Obtained results indicated that the response of soil microorganisms to tetraconazole depended on the management of the soils. DGGE patterns revealed that both dosages of fungicide affected the structure of bacterial community and the impact on genetic diversity and richness was more prominent in orchard soil. Values of stress indices-the saturated/monounsaturated PLFAs ratio and the cyclo/monounsaturated precursors ratio, were almost twice as high and the Gram-negative/Gram-positive ratio was significantly lower in the orchard soil compared with the grassland soil. Results of principal component analysis of PLFA and Biolog profiles revealed significant impact of tetraconazole in orchard soil on day 28, whereas changes in these profiles obtained for grassland soil were insignificant or transient. Obtained results indicated that orchards soil seems to be more vulnerable to tetraconazole application compared to grassland soil. History of pesticide application and agricultural management should be taken into account in assessing of environmental impact of studied pesticides.

  16. Effects of agricultural fungicides on microorganisms associated with floral nectar: susceptibility assays and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Bartlewicz, Jacek; Pozo, María I; Honnay, Olivier; Lievens, Bart; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2016-10-01

    Pesticides have become an inseparable element of agricultural intensification. While the direct impact of pesticides on non-target organisms, such as pollinators, has recently received much attention, less consideration has been given to the microorganisms that are associated with them. Specialist yeasts and bacteria are known to commonly inhabit floral nectar and change its chemical characteristics in numerous ways, possibly influencing pollinator attraction. In this study, we investigated the in vitro susceptibility of nectar yeasts Metschnikowia gruessi, Metschnikowia reukaufii, and Candida bombi to six widely used agricultural fungicides (prothioconazole, tebuconazole, azoxystrobin, fenamidone, boscalid, and fluopyram). Next, a commercial antifungal mixture containing tebuconazole and trifloxystrobin was applied to natural populations of the plant Linaria vulgaris and the occurrence, abundance, and diversity of nectar-inhabiting yeasts and bacteria was compared between treated and untreated plants. The results showed that prothioconazole and tebuconazole were highly toxic to nectar yeasts, inhibiting their growth at concentrations varying between 0.06 and 0.5 mg/L. Azoxystrobin, fenamidone, boscalid, and fluopyram on the other hand exhibited considerably lower toxicity, inhibiting yeast growth at concentrations between 1 and 32 mg/L or in many cases not inhibiting microbial growth at all. The application of the antifungal mixture in natural plant populations resulted in a significant decrease in the occurrence and abundance of yeasts in individual flowers, but this did not translate into noticeable changes in bacterial incidence and abundance. Yeast and bacterial species richness and distribution did not also differ between treated and untreated plants. We conclude that the application of fungicides may have negative effects on the abundance of nectar yeasts in floral nectar. The consequences of these effects on plant pollination processes in agricultural

  17. The Impact of Three Commonly Used Fungicides on Typhlodromus pyri (Acari: Phytoseiidae) in European Vineyards.

    PubMed

    Kemmitt, G; Valverde-Garcia, P; Hufnagl, A; Bacci, L; Zotz, A

    2015-04-01

    The impact of the fungicides mancozeb, myclobutanil, and meptyldinocap on populations of Typhlodromus pyri Scheuten was evaluated under field conditions, when applied following the good agricultural practices recommended for their use. Two complementary statistical models were used to analyze the population reduction compared to the control: a linear mixed model to estimate the mean effect of the fungicide, and a generalized linear mixed model (proportional odds mixed model) to estimate the cumulative probability for those effects being equal or less than a specific IOBC class (International Organization for Biological and Integrated Control of Noxious Animal and Plants). Findings from 27 field experiments in a range of different vine-growing regions in Europe indicated that the use of mancozeb, myclobutanil, and meptyldinocap caused minimal impact on naturally occurring populations of T. pyri. Both statistical models confirmed that although adverse effects on T. pyri can occur under certain conditions after several applications of any of the three fungicides studied, the probability of the effects occurring is low and they will not persist. These methods demonstrated how data from a series of trials could be used to evaluate the variability of the effects caused by the chemical rather than relying on the worst-case findings from a single trial. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Environmental behavior of the enantiomers of the chiral fungicide metalaxyl in Mediterranean agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Celis, R; Gámiz, B; Adelino, M A; Hermosín, M C; Cornejo, J

    2013-02-01

    Improving the existing knowledge on the enantioselectivity of processes affecting chiral pesticide enantiomers in the environment is necessary to maximize the efficacy and minimize the environmental impact caused by the use of pesticides with chiral properties. In this work, the enantioselectivity of the sorption, degradation, and leaching processes of the chiral fungicide metalaxyl in three slightly alkaline, agricultural soils from southern Spain was studied. Batch sorption experiments indicated that the sorption of racemic-metalaxyl on soils, their clay (<2 μm) fractions, and a number of model sorbents simulating naturally-occurring soil colloidal particles was non-enantioselective; the S-enantiomer was sorbed to the same extent as the R-enantiomer on all soil materials. Soil incubation experiments revealed that the R-enantiomer of metalaxyl was degraded faster than the S-enantiomer in all three soils, but the extent and enantioselectivity of metalaxyl degradation was soil-dependent, occurring more slowly and with less enantioselectivity in the fine-textured soil (soil 1) than in the coarse-textured soils (soils 2 and 3). For soils 2 and 3, S- and R-metalaxyl dissipation data were very well described by single first-order kinetics, whereas for soil 1 dissipation data were better fitted by two coupled first-order equations. It is suggested that sorption and entrapment of metalaxyl enantiomers in the abundant small-size pores of soil 1 (i.e., pore radius<100 nm) could have resulted in a fraction of the fungicide of reduced bioavailability, and consequently, protected from enantioselective degradation. Metalaxyl leaching through soil columns was also enantioselective; the concentration of S-metalaxyl in all leachates collected was greater than that of R-metalaxyl. Despite being non-enantioselective, sorption influenced the enantioselectivity of metalaxyl leaching, as it determined the residence time of the fungicide within the soil column, and consequently, the

  19. Quantitative analysis of fungicide azoxystrobin in agricultural samples with rapid, simple and reliable monoclonal immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiki; Miyake, Shiro

    2013-01-15

    This work presents analytical performance of a kit-based direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dc-ELISA) for azoxystrobin detection in agricultural products. The dc-ELISA was sufficiently sensitive for analysis of residue levels close to the maximum residue limits. The dc-ELISA did not show cross-reactivity to other strobilurin analogues. Absorbance decreased with the increase of methanol concentration in sample solution from 2% to 40%, while the standard curve became most linear when the sample solution contained 10% methanol. Agricultural samples were extracted with methanol, and the extracts were diluted with water to 10% methanol adequate. No significant matrix interference was observed. Satisfying recovery was found for all of spiked samples and the results were well agreed with the analysis with liquid chromatography. These results clearly indicate that the kit-based dc-ELISA is suitable for the rapid, simple, quantitative and reliable determination of the fungicide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-omnia moriantur-toxicity of mancozeb on dead wood microarthropod fauna.

    PubMed

    Adamski, Zbigniew; Bloszyk, Jerzy; Bruin, Jan; Ziemnicki, Kazimierz

    2007-01-01

    The effect of Dithane M-45 (dithiocarbamate fungicide; active substance: mancozeb) was studied on microarthropod fauna inhabiting dead wood. Although the exposure was almost never 100% lethal for the majority of observed taxa, almost all (Mesostigmata, Oribatida, some Uropodina, Actinedida, Collembola and Diplopoda) showed very high correlation between concentration of the fungicide and mortality (r > 0.86). Only Stigmaeidae showed low correlation (r = 0.293). For the majority of taxa LC(50 )values were close to the concentrations used during agrochemical activities in woods. Only Trachytes aegrota showed full susceptibility to the fungicide within the range of recommended field concentrations used in forestry (characterised by the low LC(95 )value). Tolerance of mesostigmatid and oribatid mites was found to differ between juveniles and adults, but not consistently. Related Uropodina species varied in susceptibility to the fungicide.

  1. Mechanisms and significance of fungicide resistance†

    PubMed Central

    Deising, Holger B.; Reimann, Sven; Pascholati, Sérgio F.

    2008-01-01

    In this review article, we show that occurrence of fungicide resistance is one of the most important issues in modern agriculture. Fungicide resistance may be due to mutations of genes encoding fungicide targets (qualitative fungicide resistance) or to different mechanisms that are induced by sub-lethal fungicide stress. These mechanisms result in different and varying levels of resistance (quantitative fungicide resistance). We discuss whether or not extensive use of fungicides in agricultural environments is related to the occurrence of fungicide resistance in clinical environments. Furthermore, we provide recommendations of how development of fungicide resistant pathogen populations may be prevented or delayed. PMID:24031218

  2. DNA damage and apoptosis induction by the pesticide Mancozeb in rat cells: Involvement of the oxidative mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Calviello, Gabriella; Piccioni, Elisabetta; Boninsegna, Alma

    The DNA damaging and proapoptotic effects of Mancozeb, a widely used fungicide of the ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate (EBDC) group, were studied in RAT-1 fibroblasts cultured in vitro and in peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) isolated from Wistar rats. After 1 h exposition to Mancozeb (up to 500 ng/ml), cells produced a dose-dependent induction in DNA single strand break (SSB) formation, measured by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Concomitantly, a concentration-dependent increase in the levels of the oxidative markers of DNA oxidation, the DNA adduct 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed, suggesting a prooxidant action of Mancozeb. PBMC weremore » less responsive than fibroblasts to the oxidative insult carried out by Mancozeb, as shown by the lower increase in the levels of ROS, 8-OHdG adducts and SSB measured in these cells after exposure to the pesticide. A 4-h treatment with Mancozeb induced also apoptosis in both PBMC and RAT-1 cells, even though leukocytes were less sensitive than fibroblasts to the proapoptotic action. This effect was dose-dependent and was inhibited by the action of the antioxidant {alpha}-tocopherol. The proapoptotic effect was accompanied by the altered expression of several proteins involved in the regulation of apoptosis, such as the prosurvival protein BCL-2 and the proapoptotic protein c-MYC. Exposition of cells to higher concentrations of Mancozeb or for longer periods (>4 h) caused post-apoptotic, necrotic alterations in cell membrane integrity. The data herein presented demonstrate the oxidative effect of Mancozeb and suggest that its prooxidant action may be involved in the proapoptotic effect exerted by this compound in rat cells. It appears possible that the observed oxidative and genotoxic damage may be involved in the pathogenesis of various pathologies associated with the chronic exposition to Mancozeb, including cancer. On the other hand, the proapoptotic

  3. 75 FR 50902 - Mancozeb; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ..., peppers and broccoli (PP 4F4333). Therefore, based on these changes, EPA conducted an additional risk...-2005-0541 titled ``Mancozeb: Human Health Risk Assessment to Support Proposed New Uses on Broccoli..., cabbage, leaf lettuce, peppers and broccoli). In the meantime, EPA is moving forward to establish a time...

  4. 76 FR 18906 - Mancozeb; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... from mancozeb and ETU in food as follows: i. Acute exposure. Quantitative acute dietary exposure and.... Cancer. EPA determines whether quantitative cancer exposure and risk assessments are appropriate for a... quantitative cancer risk assessment is appropriate, cancer risk may be quantified using a linear or nonlinear...

  5. 78 FR 44444 - Mancozeb; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... regulation establishes tolerances for residues of mancozeb in or on walnuts and tangerines. United Phosphorus... pesticide petition (PP 1F7935) by United Phosphorus, Inc., 630 Freedom Business Center, King of Prussia, PA... summary of the petition prepared by United Phosphorus, the registrant, which is available in the docket...

  6. Effectiveness of agricultural oils alongside fungicides in the late dormant treatment for suppression of peach scab in Georgia, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficacy of different fungicide applications for control of peach scab was tested on cv Flameprince. The fungicidal applications were applied with an airblast sprayer with a spray volume of 100 gal/A. Control treatment regimens included a non-treated control, a standard fungicidal spray program ...

  7. Occupational use of insecticides, fungicides ~and fumigants and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and nultiplc myeloma in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Farming and exposure to pesticides have been linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and multiple myeloma (MM) in previous studies. We evaluated use of insecticides, fungicides and fumigants and risk of NHL, including MM and other NHL sub-types in the Agricultural Health Study, a ...

  8. Efficacy of Combined Formulations of Fungicides with Different Modes of Action in Controlling Botrytis Gray Mold Disease in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, M. H.; Hossain, M. Ashraf; Kashem, M. A.; Kumar, Shiv; Rafii, M. Y.; Latif, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis gray mold (BGM) caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. Ex. Fr. is an extremely devastating disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and has a regional as well as an international perspective. Unfortunately, nonchemical methods for its control are weak and ineffective. In order to identify an effective control measure, six fungicides with different modes of action were evaluated on a BGM susceptible chickpea variety BARIchhola-1 at a high BGM incidence location (Madaripur) in Bangladesh for three years (2008, 2009, and 2010). Among the six fungicides tested, one was protectant [Vondozeb 42SC, a.i. mancozeb (0.2%)], two systemic [Bavistin 50 WP, a.i. carbendazim (0.2%), and Protaf 250EC, propiconazole (0.05%)], and three combination formulations [Acrobat MZ690, dimethomorph 9% + mancozeb 60%, (0.2%); Secure 600 WG, phenomadone + mancozeb (0.2%); and Companion, mancozeb 63% + carbendazim 12% (0.2%)]. The results showed superiority of combination formulations involving both protectant and systemic fungicides over the sole application of either fungicide separately. Among the combination fungicides, Companion was most effective, resulting in the lowest disease severity (3.33 score on 1–9 scale) and the highest increase (38%) of grain yield in chickpea. Therefore, this product could be preferred over the sole application of either solo protectant or systemic fungicides to reduce yield losses and avoid fungicide resistance. PMID:24723819

  9. Eco-friendly PEG-based controlled release nano-formulations of Mancozeb: Synthesis and bioefficacy evaluation against phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria solani and Sclerotium rolfsii.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Sujan; Shakil, Najam A; Kumar, Jitendra; Banerjee, Tirthankar; Sinha, Parimal; Singh, Braj B; Garg, Parul

    2016-12-01

    Controlled release (CR) nano-formulations of Mancozeb (manganese-zinc double salt of N,N-bisdithiocarbamic acid), a protective fungicide, have been prepared using laboratory-synthesized poly(ethylene glycols) (PEGs)-based functionalized amphiphilic copolymers without using any surfactants or external additives. The release kinetics of the developed Mancozeb CR formulations were studied and compared with that of commercially available 42% suspension concentrate and 75% wettable powder. Maximum amount of Mancozeb was released on 42nd day for PEG-600 and octyl chain, PEG-1000 and octyl chain, and PEG-600 and hexadecyl chain, on 35th day for PEG-1000 and hexadecyl chain, on 28th day for PEG-1500 and octyl chain, PEG-2000 and octyl chain, PEG-1500 and hexadecyl chain, and PEG-2000 and hexadecyl chain in comparison to both commercial formulations (15th day). The diffusion exponent (n value) of Mancozeb in water ranged from 0.42 to 0.62 in tested formulations. The half-release (t 1/2 ) values ranged from 17.35 to 35.14 days, and the period of optimum availability of Mancozeb ranged from 18.54 to 35.42 days. Further, the in vitro bioefficacy evaluation of developed formulations was done against plant pathogenic fungi Alternaria solani and Sclerotium rolfsii by poison food technique. Effective dose for 50% inhibition in mgL -1 (ED 50 ) values of developed formulations varied from 1.31 to 2.79 mg L -1 for A. solani, and 1.60 to 3.14 mg L -1 for S. rolfsii. The present methodology is simple, economical, and eco-friendly for the development of environment-friendly CR formulations of Mancozeb. These formulations can be used to optimize the release of Mancozeb to achieve disease control for the desired period depending upon the matrix of the polymer used. Importantly, the maximum amount of active ingredient remains available for a reasonable period after application. In addition, the developed CR formulations were found to be suitable for fungicidal applications, allowing

  10. THE USE OF CHEMICALS AS FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES AND NEMATOCIDES. AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS TECHNOLOGY, NUMBER 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE IS TO ASSIST TEACHERS IN PREPARING POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION STUDENTS FOR AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL OCCUPATIONS. ONE OF A SERIES FOR THESE OCCUPATIONS, THIS MODULE WAS DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE ON THE BASIS OF DATA FROM STATE STUDIES. SECTIONS ARE (1) PLANT DISEASE AND NEMATODE PREVENTION, CONTROL, OR ERADICATION WITH…

  11. A Nontoxic Polypeptide Oligomer with a Fungicide Potency under Agricultural Conditions Which Is Equal or Greater than That of Their Chemical Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Sara; Carreira, Alexandra; Freitas, Regina; Pinheiro, Ana Margarida; Ferreira, Ricardo Boavida

    2015-01-01

    There are literally hundreds of polypeptides described in the literature which exhibit fungicide activity. Tens of them have had attempted protection by patent applications but none, as far as we are aware, have found application under real agricultural conditions. The reasons behind may be multiple where the sensitivity to the Sun UV radiation can come in first place. Here we describe a multifunctional glyco-oligomer with 210 kDa which is mainly composed by a 20 kDa polypeptide termed Blad that has been previously shown to be a stable intermediary product of β-conglutin catabolism. This oligomer accumulates exclusively in the cotyledons of Lupinus species, between days 4 and 12 after the onset of germination. Blad-oligomer reveals a plethora of biochemical properties, like lectin and catalytic activities, which are not unusual per si, but are remarkable when found to coexist in the same protein molecule. With this vast range of chemical characteristics, antifungal activity arises almost as a natural consequence. The biological significance and potential technological applications of Blad-oligomer as a plant fungicide to agriculture, its uniqueness stems from being of polypeptidic in nature, and with efficacies which are either equal or greater than the top fungicides currently in the market are addressed. PMID:25849076

  12. Prenatal Mancozeb Exposure, Excess Manganese, and Neurodevelopment at 1 Year of Age in the Infants' Environmental Health (ISA) Study.

    PubMed

    Mora, Ana María; Córdoba, Leonel; Cano, Juan Camilo; Hernandez-Bonilla, David; Pardo, Larissa; Schnaas, Lourdes; Smith, Donald R; Menezes-Filho, José A; Mergler, Donna; Lindh, Christian H; Eskenazi, Brenda; van Wendel de Joode, Berna

    2018-05-01

    Although growing evidence suggests that early-life excess manganese (Mn) impairs neurodevelopment, data on the neurodevelopmental effects of mancozeb, a fungicide containing Mn, and its main metabolite ethylenethiourea (ETU) are limited. We examined whether prenatal mancozeb exposure and excess Mn were associated with neurodevelopment in 355 1-y-old infants living near banana plantations with frequent aerial mancozeb spraying in Costa Rica. We measured urinary ETU, hair Mn, and blood Mn concentrations in samples collected 1-3 times during pregnancy from mothers enrolled in the Infants' Environmental Health (ISA) study. We then assessed neurodevelopment in their 1-y-old infants using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd edition (BSID-III). We estimated exposure-outcome associations using linear regression models adjusted for maternal education, parity, gestational age at birth, child age, Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment score, and location of neurodevelopmental assessment. Median (P25-P75) urinary ETU, hair Mn, and blood Mn measured during pregnancy were 3.3 μg/L (2.4-4.9; specific gravity-corrected), 1.7 μg/g (0.9-4.1), and 24.0 μg/L (20.3-28.0), respectively. Among girls, higher ETU was associated with lower social-emotional scores [β per 10-fold increase=-7.4 points (95% CI: -15.2, 0.4)], whereas higher hair Mn was associated with lower cognitive scores [-3.0 (-6.1, 0.1)]. Among boys, higher hair Mn was associated with lower social-emotional scores [-4.6 (-8.5, -0.8)]. We observed null associations for blood Mn, language, and motor outcomes. Our findings indicate that maternal exposure to mancozeb and excess Mn during pregnancy may have adverse and sex-specific effects on infant neurodevelopment. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1955.

  13. Biochemical changes induced by fungicides in nitrogen fixing Nostoc sp.

    PubMed

    Deviram, G V N S; Pant, Gaurav; Prasuna, R Gyana

    2013-01-01

    The present study indicates the effect of fungicides (approved by WHO) and their behavior on nitrogen fixer of rice eco system Nostoc sp. Application of plant protecting chemicals at recommended levels braced up the growth of blue green algae thereby enhancing heterocyst formation and nitrogenase activity. Nostoc sp demoed varying degrees of sensitivity to fungicides. Biomass yield, protein, carbohydrate content reduced after 3pg/mL concentration. Heterocyst damage was observed from 4μg/mL, Proline content increased with increase in fungicide concentration, utmost yellowing of the culture started from 4μg/mL. The decreasing order of the toxicity to Nostoc sp with fungicides was Mancozeb> Ediphenphos> Carbendazim> Hexaconazole.

  14. Efficacy of agricultural oil and fungicide combinations as a late dormant treatment for control of peach scab in Alabama, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungicides were evaluated for control of scab in a mid-ripening peach experimental block (‘Ruston Red’) located at the Chilton Area Research and Extension Center in Clanton, AL. Chemical formulations were applied with an airblast sprayer (112.5 gal/A spray volume). Treatment regimens included a non-...

  15. Effects of fungicides and biofungicides on population density and community structure of soil oribatid mites.

    PubMed

    Al-Assiuty, Abdel-Naieem I M; Khalil, Mohamed A; Ismail, Abdel-Wahab A; van Straalen, Nico M; Ageba, Mohamed F

    2014-01-01

    To compare the side-effects of chemical versus biofungicides on non-target organisms in agricultural soil, a study of population structure, spatial distribution and fecundity of oribatid mites, a diverse and species-rich group of microarthropods indicative of decomposer activity in soil was done. Plots laid out in agricultural fields of a research station in Egypt, were cultivated with cucumber and treated with two chemical fungicides: Ridomil Plus 50% wp (active ingredients=metalaxyl and copper oxychloride) and Dithane M-45 (active ingredient=mancozeb), and two biofungicides: Plant Guard (containing the antagonistic fungus Trichoderma harzianum) and Polyversum (containing the fungi-parasitic oomycete Pythium oligandrum). All treatments were done using both low-volume and high-volume spraying techniques to check whether any effects were dependent on the method of application. Oribatid mite communities were assessed from soil core samples collected during the growing season. Total abundance of oribatids was not different across the plots, but some species decreased in number, while one species increased. Species diversity and community equitability decreased with the application of chemical and biofungicides especially when using high-volume spraying. In control plots most oribatid species showed a significant degree of aggregation, which tended to decrease under fungicide treatment. Ridomil Plus, Plant Guard and Polyversum had a negative effect on the gravid/ungravid ratio of some species. Egg number averaged over the whole adult population was not directly related to the application of chemical and biofungicides but it showed a species-specific relationship with population density. In general biofungicides had a smaller effect on population size and community structure of oribatid mite species than chemical fungicides. The results indicate that biofungicides may be the preferred option when aiming to prevent side-effects on sensitive groups among the species

  16. Phytotoxicity of pesticides mancozeb and chlorpyrifos: correlation with the antioxidative defence system in Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Firdos; Verma, Sonam; Kamal, Aisha; Srivastava, Alka

    2018-02-01

    Pesticides are a group of chemical substances which are widely used to improve agricultural production. However, these substances could be persistent in soil and water, accumulative in sediment or bio-accumulative in biota depending on their solubility, leading to different types of environmental pollution. The present study was done to assess the impact of pesticides-mancozeb and chlorpyrifos, via morphological and physiological parameters using Allium cepa test system. Phytotoxic effects of pesticides were examined via germination percentage, survival percentage, root and shoot length, root shoot length ratio, seedling vigor index, percentage of phytotoxicity and tolerance index. Oxidative stress on Allium seedlings caused by pesticides was also assessed by investigating the activity of antioxidative enzymes viz. catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Correlation was worked out between morphological parameters and antioxidative enzymes to bring out the alliance between them. Mancozeb and chlorpyrifos concentrations were significantly and positively correlated with the activity of antioxidative enzymes and negatively correlated with morphological parameters. Significant positive correlation between various morphological parameters showed their interdependency. However, negative correlation was obtained between activity of antioxidative enzymes and morphological parameters. The enzymes however, showed positive correlation with each other. Based on our result we can conclude that all morphological parameters were adversely affected by the two pesticides as reflected by phytotoxicity in Allium . Their negative correlation with activity of antioxidative enzymes indicates that upregulation of antioxidative enzymes is not sufficient to overcome the toxic effect, thereby signifying the threat being caused by the regular use of these pesticides.

  17. Determination of manganese- and manganese-containing fungicides with lucigenin-Tween-20-enhanced chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Mohammad; Asghar, Mohammad; Nabi, Abdul

    2015-11-01

    A flow-injection (FI) method is reported for the determination of Mn(II), maneb and mancozeb fungicides based on the catalytic effect of Mn(II) on the oxidation of lucigenin and dissolved oxygen in a basic solution. The Tween-20 surfactant has been reported for first time to enhance lucigenin chemiluminescence (CL) intensity in the presence of Mn(II) (53%) and maneb and mancozeb (89%). The calibration graphs were linear in the concentration range of 0.001-1.5 mg L(-1) (R(2) = 0.9982 (n = 11) with a limit of detection (S/N = 3) of 0.1 µg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.01-3.0 mg L(-1) [R(2) = 0.9989 and R(2) = 0.9992 (n = 6)] with a limit of detection (S/N =3) of 1.0 µg L(-1) for maneb and mancozeb respectively. Injection throughputs of 90 and 120 h(-1) for Mn(II) and maneb and mancozeb respectively, and relative standard deviations of 1.0-3.4% were obtained in the concentration range studied. The experimental variables, e.g., reagents concentrations, flow rates, sample volume, and photomultiplier tube voltage, were optimized and potential interferences were investigated. The analysis of Mn(II) in river water reference materials (SLRS-4 and SLRS-5) showed good agreement with the certified values incorporating an on-line 8-hydroxyquinoline chelating column in the manifold for removing interfering metal ions. Recoveries for maneb and mancozeb were in the range of 92 ± 5 to 104 ± 3% and 91 ± 2 to 100 ± 4% (n = 3) respectively. The effect of 30 other pesticides (fungicides, herbicides and insecticides) was also examined in the lucigenin-Tween-20 CL system. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Analysis of Dithiocarbamate Fungicides in Vegetable Matrices Using HPLC-UV Followed by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Al-Alam, Josephine; Bom, Laura; Chbani, Asma; Fajloun, Ziad; Millet, Maurice

    2017-04-01

    A simple method combining ion-pair methylation, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis with detection at 272 nm and atomic absorption spectrometry was developed in order to determine 10 dithiocarbamate fungicides (Dazomet, Metam-sodium, Ferbam, Ziram, Zineb, Maneb, Mancozeb, Metiram, Nabam and Propineb) and distinguish ethylenbisdithiocarbamates (EBDTCs) Zineb, Maneb and Mancozeb in diverse matrices. This method associates reverse phase analysis by HPLC analysis with detection at 272 nm, with atomic absorption spectrometry in order to distinguish, with the same extraction protocol, Maneb, Mancozeb and Zineb. The limits of detection (0.4, 0.8, 0.5, 1.25 and 1.97) and quantification (1.18, 2.5, 1.52, 4.2 and 6.52) calculated in injected nanogram, respectively, for Dazomet, Metam-Na, dimethyldithiocarbamates (DMDTCs), EBDTCs and propylenebisdithiocarbamates (PBDTCs) justify the sensitivity of the method used. The coefficients of determination R2 were 0.9985, 0.9978, 0.9949, 0.988 and 0.9794, respectively, for Dazomet, Metam-Na, DMDTCs, EBDTCs and PBDTCs, and the recovery from fortified apple and leek samples was above 90%. Results obtained with the atomic absorption method in comparison with spectrophotometric analysis focus on the importance of the atomic absorption as a complementary specific method for the distinction between different EBDTCs fungicides. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Determination and validation of an aquatic Maximum Acceptable Concentration-Environmental Quality Standard (MAC-EQS) value for the agricultural fungicide azoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elsa Teresa; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Gante, Cristiano; Loureiro, João; Lopes, Isabel

    2017-02-01

    The main goal of the present study was to determine and validate an aquatic Maximum Acceptable Concentration-Environmental Quality Standard (MAC-EQS) value for the agricultural fungicide azoxystrobin (AZX). Assessment factors were applied to short-term toxicity data using the lowest EC 50 and after the Species Sensitivity Distribution (SSD) method. Both ways of EQS generation were applied to a freshwater toxicity dataset for AZX based on available data, and to marine toxicity datasets for AZX and Ortiva ® (a commercial formulation of AZX) obtained by the present study. A high interspecific variability in AZX sensitivity was observed in all datasets, being the copepoda Eudiaptomus graciloides (LC 50,48h  = 38 μg L -1 ) and the gastropod Gibbula umbilicalis (LC 50,96h  = 13 μg L -1 ) the most sensitive freshwater and marine species, respectively. MAC-EQS values derived using the lowest EC 50 (≤0.38 μg L -1 ) were more protective than those derived using the SSD method (≤3.2 μg L -1 ). After comparing the MAC-EQS values estimated in the present study to the smallest AA-EQS available, which protect against the occurrence of prolonged exposure of AZX, the MAC-EQS values derived using the lowest EC 50 were considered overprotective and a MAC-EQS of 1.8 μg L -1 was validated and recommended for AZX for the water column. This value was derived from marine toxicity data, which highlights the importance of testing marine organisms. Moreover, Ortiva affects the most sensitive marine species to a greater extent than AZX, and marine species are more sensitive than freshwater species to AZX. A risk characterization ratio higher than one allowed to conclude that AZX might pose a high risk to the aquatic environment. Also, in a wider conclusion, before new pesticides are approved, we suggest to improve the Tier 1 prospective Ecological Risk Assessment by increasing the number of short-term data, and apply the SSD approach, in order to ensure the safety of

  20. The Effect of Fungicides on Mycelial Growth and Conidial Germination of the Ginseng Root Rot Fungus, Cylindrocarpon destructans

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Fu, Teng; Park, Kyeong Hun

    2017-01-01

    Ginseng root rot caused by Cylindrocarpon destructans is the most destructive disease of ginseng. Six different fungicides (thiophanate-methyl, benomyl, prochloraz, mancozeb, azoxystrobin, and iprodione) were selected to evaluate the inhibitory effect on the mycelial growth and conidial germination of C. destructans isolates. Benomyl and prochloraz were found to be the most effective fungicides in inhibiting mycelial growth of all tested isolates, showing 64.7% to 100% inhibition at a concentration of 10 µg/mL, whereas thiophanate-methyl was the least effective fungicide, showing less than 50% inhibition even at a higher concentration of 100 µg/mL. The tested fungicides exhibited less than 20% inhibition of conidium germination at concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, and 1 µg/mL. However, the inhibition effect of mancozeb on condium germination of C. destructans was significantly increased to 92% to 99% at a higher concentration of 100 µg/mL, while the others still showed no higher than 30% inhibition. PMID:29138629

  1. [Susceptibility of Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) adults to fungicides used to control apple diseases].

    PubMed

    Manzon, Cristiane G; Grützmacher, Anderson D; Giolo, Fabrizio P; de Lima, Crislaine A B Lima; Nörnberg, Sandro D; Müller, Cristiane; da R Härter, Wagner

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the susceptibility under laboratory conditions of Trichogrammapretiosum Riley adults to fungicides recommended by the Integrated Production of Apple (IPA). The bioassays were carried out using the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC), West Palearctic Regional Section (WPRS) standard protocols. Twelve selected fungicides were studied in the doses (g or ml active ingredient/100 L) captan 1 (0.115), captan 2 (0.120), kresoxim-methyl (0.010), sulphur 1 (AG) (0.480), sulphur 2 (0.480), folpet (0.105), mancozeb (0.160), pyraclostrobin (0.010), tebuconazole (0.010), tetraconazole (0.005), thiophanate-methyl (0.050) and triforine (0.024). Distilled water was used as the blank treatment and the insecticide triclorfon (0.150) as a positive control. The parasitoids were exposed to dry residues applied on glass plates. The reduction in the capacity of parasitism was used to measure the effect of the chemical in comparison to the blank treatment. Each treatment was replicated four times. The results allowed us to classify the fungicides tested in four categories: 1, harmless (< 30%); 2, slightly harmful (30-79%); 3, moderately harmful (80-99%); and 4, harmful (> 99%). 75% of the tested substances were classified as selective (classes 1 and 2) to the parasitoid. The fungicides captan 1, captan 2, kresoxim-methyl, folpet, pyraclostrobin, tebuconazole, thiophanate-methyl and triforine were harmless; mancozeb was slightly harmful; sulphur 1 (AG) and tetraconazole were moderately harmful and sulphur 2 was harmful. These findings should be taken into account when selecting fungicides to spray apple orchards against fungi diseases to preserve the egg parasitoid T. pretiosum.

  2. Signum, a new fungicide for control of leaf diseases in outdoor vegetables.

    PubMed

    Callens, D; Sarrazyn, R; Evens, W

    2005-01-01

    During three years, the new fungicide Signum, containing 6.7% pyraclostrobine + 26.7 % boscalid and developed by BASF. has been evaluated in leek, carrots and cabbages in several outdoor field experiments under practical conditions and during one year in outdoor lettuce. In leek, Phytophthora porri is one of the major leaf diseases causing lesions on differ ent places on the leaves, resulting in at least extra labour costs for trimming or even worse sometimes resulting in complete crop loss. So far, crop protection consists of repeated applications of fungicides especially during autumn and winter. Pyraclostrobin + boscalid has been evaluated in comparison with the fungicides mancozeb, mancozeb + metalaxyl-M and azoxystrobin. The progress of the disease during the growth season is discussed. For all parameters evaluated, pyraclostrobin + boscalid gave comparable or even better results than reference products. Especially during 2003, a small drop of the activity of benalaxyl against P. porri has been observed after repeated applications. In carrots, Erisiphe heraclei and Alternaria dauci are both the most common leaf diseases causing yield and quality loss. During periods of very high pressure of A. dauci, pyraclostrobin + boscalid, applied in a three weeks interval, revealed a superior activity compared with triazole references or compared with azoxystrobin. Against E. heraclei, a good control but also a clear dose response activity have been observed with pyraclostrobin + boscalid. Yield gain was approximately 30 ton /ha compared wih untreated. In Brussels sprouts, good efficacy was obtained against Mycosphaerella spp., Albugo candida and Alternaria spp. In outdoor lettuce Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are the most important diseases causing crop damage and reducing the quality of the heads. Pyraclostrobin + boscalid was evaluated in comparison with the standard fungicide iprodione. The plant protection was better with the new fungicide

  3. Chemical management in fungicide sensivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Barragan, Alejandra; García-Torres, Ana Elisa; Odriozola-Casas, Olga; Macedo-Raygoza, Gloria; Ogura, Tetsuya; Manzo-Sánchez, Gilberto; James, Andrew C.; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Beltrán-García, Miguel J.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet) requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM) without applications and Intensive management (IM) more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L−1 for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for β-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L−1 for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices. PMID:24948956

  4. TOXICITY PROFILES IN MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles comprise a class of fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. The fungicidal properties of conazoles are due to their inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Certain conazoles are tumorigenic in rodents; both propiconazole and triadimefon are hepatot...

  5. In vivo mutagenicity of conazole fungicides correlates with tumorigenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity te...

  6. Aerial Application of Mancozeb and Urinary Ethylene Thiourea (ETU) Concentrations among Pregnant Women in Costa Rica: The Infants’ Environmental Health Study (ISA)

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Ana María; Córdoba, Leonel; Cano, Juan Camilo; Quesada, Rosario; Faniband, Moosa; Wesseling, Catharina; Ruepert, Clemens; Öberg, Mattias; Eskenazi, Brenda; Mergler, Donna; Lindh, Christian H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mancozeb and its main metabolite ethylene thiourea (ETU) may alter thyroid function; thyroid hormones are essential for fetal brain development. In Costa Rica, mancozeb is aerially sprayed at large-scale banana plantations on a weekly basis. Objectives: Our goals were to evaluate urinary ETU concentrations in pregnant women living near large-scale banana plantations, compare their estimated daily intake (EDI) with established reference doses (RfDs), and identify factors that predict their urinary ETU concentrations. Methods: We enrolled 451 pregnant women from Matina County, Costa Rica, which has large-scale banana production. We visited 445 women up to three times during pregnancy to obtain urine samples (n = 872) and information on factors that possibly influence exposure. We determined urinary ETU concentrations using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results: Pregnant women’s median urinary ETU concentrations were more than five times higher than those reported for other general populations. Seventy-two percent of the women had EDIs above the RfD. Women who lived closest (1st quartile, < 48 m) to banana plantations on average had a 45% (95% CI: 23, 72%) higher urinary ETU compared with women who lived farthest away (4th quartile, ≥ 565 m). Compared with the other women, ETU was also higher in women who washed agricultural work clothes on the day before sampling (11%; 95% CI: 4.9, 17%), women who worked in agriculture during pregnancy (19%; 95% CI: 9.3, 29%), and immigrant women (6.2%; 95% CI: 1.0, 13%). Conclusions: The pregnant women’s urinary ETU concentrations are of concern, and the principal source of exposure is likely to be aerial spraying of mancozeb. The factors predicting ETU provide insight into possibilities for exposure reduction. Citation: van Wendel de Joode B, Mora AM, Córdoba L, Cano JC, Quesada R, Faniband M, Wesseling C, Ruepert C, Öberg M, Eskenazi B, Mergler D, Lindh CH. 2014. Aerial application of mancozeb and

  7. Annual Fungicide Loadings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticides, Herbicides, Fungicides...etc, are used for a variety of purposes, including control of household, lawn, and garden pests; for control of mosquitoes and other insect vectors of animal and human diseases; for control of brush in rangelands, on roadsides, and along power line rights-of-way; as wood preservatives; as disinfectants; and in golf courses, parks and forest lands. The toxicity that makes pesticides useful in agriculture, silviculture, disease vector, and nuisance control can, however, also endanger humans, nontarget wildlife, and ecosystems. EPA carries the mandated responsibility for solving this policy and regulatory dilemma, first through registering pesticides so that their labels explain how to avoid unreasonable risks when using them, and second by setting allowable levels of pesticide residues to ensure the safety of drinking water and the food supply (Schierow 1996). More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  8. REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY OF EXPOSURE TO CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES IN THE FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazole fungicides are used extensively in pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. Although some conazoles have been investigated extensively for toxicological effects, there is little published information on the reproductive toxicity of many of the agriculturally importa...

  9. Effects of Insecticides and Fungicides Commonly Used in Tomato Production on Phytoseiulus persimilis (Acari: Phtyoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Ditillo, J L; Kennedy, G G; Walgenbach, J F

    2016-12-01

    The twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), is an important pest of tomatoes in North Carolina. Resident populations of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis have recently been detected on field-grown tomatoes in central North Carolina, and potentially can be a useful biological control agent against T. urticae Laboratory bioassays were used to assess lethal and reproductive effects of 10 insecticides and five fungicides commonly used in commercial tomato production (chlorantraniliprole, spinetoram, permethrin, imidacloprid, dimethoate, dinotefuran, thiamethoxam, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, boscalid, cyazofamid, and mancozeb) on P. persimilis adult females and eggs. Insecticides were tested using concentrations equivalent to 1×, 0.5×, and 0.1× of the recommended field rates. Fungicides were tested at the 1× rate only. Dimethoate strongly impacted P. persimilis with high adult mortality, reduced fecundity, and reduced hatch of eggs laid by treated adults, particularly at high concentrations. The pyrethroids lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, and fenpropathrin were associated with repellency and reproductive effects at high concentrations. Bifenthrin additionally caused increased mortality at high concentrations. Chlorantraniliprole, dinotefuran, and permethrin did not significantly affect mortality or reproduction. Imidacloprid significantly reduced fecundity and egg viability, but was not lethal to adult P. persimilis Thiamethoxam negatively impacted fecundity at the 1× rate. There were no negative effects associated with fungicide exposure with the exception of mancozeb, which impacted fecundity. Field trials were conducted to explore the in vivo impacts of screened insecticides on P. persimilis populations in the field. Field trials supported the incompatibility of dimethoate with P. persimilis populations. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  10. Toxicity of metalaxyl, azoxystrobin, dimethomorph, cymoxanil, zoxamide and mancozeb to Phytophthora infestans isolates from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Rekanović, Emil; Potočnik, Ivana; Milijašević-Marčić, Svetlana; Stepanović, Miloš; Todorović, Biljana; Mihajlović, Milica

    2012-01-01

    A study of the in vitro sensitivity of 12 isolates of Phytophthora infestans to metalaxyl, azoxystrobin, dimethomorph, cymoxanil, zoxamide and mancozeb, was conducted. The isolates derived from infected potato leaves collected at eight different localities in Serbia during 2005-2007. The widest range of EC(50) values for mycelial growth of the isolates was recorded for metalaxyl. They varied from 0.3 to 3.9 μg mL(-1) and were higher than those expected in a susceptible population of P. infestans. The EC(50) values of the isolates were 0.16-0.30 μg mL(-1) for dimethomorph, 0.27-0.57 μg mL(-1) for cymoxanil, 0.0026-0.0049 μg mL(-1) for zoxamide and 2.9-5.0 μg mL(-1) for mancozeb. The results indicated that according to effective concentration (EC(50)) the 12 isolates of P. infestans were sensitive to azoxystrobin (0.019-0.074 μg mL(-1)), and intermediate resistant to metalaxyl, dimethomorph and cymoxanil. According to resistance factor, all P. infestans isolates were sensitive to dimethomorph, cymoxanil, mancozeb and zoxamide, 58.3% of isolates were sensitive to azoxystrobin and 50% to metalaxyl. Gout's scale indicated that 41.7% isolates were moderately sensitive to azoxystrobin and 50% to metalaxyl.

  11. Development and evaluation of adverse outcome pathways predicting adverse effects of conazole fungicides on avian species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides commonly used in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals to prevent the spread of fungus through inhibition of cytochrome P450 14á-demethylase (CYP51). However these fungicides are known to act promiscuously on other cytochrome P450 enzymes (...

  12. Effects of the azole fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) steroidogenesis pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Azole fungicides, used for both agriculture and human therapeutic applications may disrupt endocrine function of aquatic life. Azole fungicides are designed to inhibit the fungal enzyme lanosterol 14 á-demethylase (cytochrome P450 [CYP] 51). However, they can also interact...

  13. Agriculture

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA Agriculture Resource Directory offers comprehensive, easy-to-understand information about environmental stewardship on farms and ranches; commonsense, flexible approaches that are both environmentally protective and agriculturally sound.

  14. IN VIVO MUTAGENICITY OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES CORRELATES WITH TUMORIGENICITY-JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity t...

  15. USING PHARMACOKINETIC DATA TO INTERPRET METABOLOMIC CHANGES IN CD-1 MICE TREATED WITH TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triazoles are a class of fungicides widely used in both pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. These compounds elicit a variety of toxic effects including disruption of normal metabolic processes such as steroidogenesis. Metabolomics is used to measure dynamic changes in e...

  16. Pesticides in mixture disrupt metabolic regulation: in silico and in vivo analysis of cumulative toxicity of mancozeb and imidacloprid on body weight of mice.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Rakesh; Mohanty, Banalata

    2014-09-01

    Pesticides acting as endocrine disrupting chemicals disrupt the homeostasis of body metabolism. The present study elucidated that the low dose coexposure of thyroid disrupting dithiocarbamate fungicide mancozeb (MCZ) and neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid (IMI) during lactation increased the risk of body weight gain in mice later in life. Body weight gain has been linked to pesticide-induced hypothyroidism and hyperprolactinemia and alteration of lipid profiles. In vivo results were substantiated with in silico molecular docking (MD) analysis that predicted the binding affinity of pesticides with thyroid hormone receptors (TRα and TRβ) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), the major nuclear receptors of peripheral fat metabolism. Binding potency of MCZ and IMI was compared with that of T3, and its antagonist ethylene thiourea (ETU) as well as PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) and antagonist (HL005). MD simulation predicted that both MCZ and IMI may compete with T3 for binding with TRs. Imidazole group of IMI formed hydrogen bonds with TRs like that of ETU. MCZ may compete with rosiglitazone and HL005 for PPARγ, but IMI showed no affinity. Thus while both MCZ and IMI could disrupt the TRs functioning, MCZ alone may affect PPARγ. Coexposure of pesticides decreased the plasma thyroid hormones and increased the cholesterol and triglyceride. Individual pesticide exposure in low dose might not exert the threshold response to affect the receptors signaling further to cause hormonal/metabolic impairment. Thus, cumulative response of the mixture of thyroid disrupting pesticides can disrupt metabolic regulation through several pathways and contribute to gain in body weight. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Occurrence and persistence of fungicides in bed sediments and suspended solids from three targeted use areas in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    To document the environmental occurrence and persistence of fungicides, a robust and sensitive analytical method was used to measure 34 fungicides and an additional 57 current-use pesticides in bed sediments and suspended solids collected from areas of intense fungicide use within three geographic areas across the United States. Sampling sites were selected near or within agricultural research farms using prophylactic fungicides at rates and types typical of their geographic location. At least two fungicides were detected in 55% of the bed and 83% of the suspended solid samples and were detected in conjunction with herbicides and insecticides. Six fungicides were detected in all samples including pyraclostrobin (75%), boscalid (53%), chlorothalonil (41%) and zoxamide (22%). Pyraclostrobin, a strobilurin fungicide, used frequently in the United States on a variety of crops, was detected more frequently than p,p′-DDE, the primary degradate of p,p′-DDT, which is typically one of the most frequently occurring pesticides in sediments collected within highly agricultural areas. Maximum fungicide concentrations in bed sediments and suspended solids were 198 and 56.7 μg/kg dry weight, respectively. There is limited information on the occurrence, fate, and persistence of many fungicides in sediment and the environmental impacts are largely unknown. The results of this study indicate the importance of documenting the persistence of fungicides in the environment and the need for a better understanding of off-site transport mechanisms, particularly in areas where crops are grown that require frequent treatments to prevent fungal diseases.

  18. Nanosulfur: A Potent Fungicide Against Food Pathogen, Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Samrat Roy; Goswami, Arunava; Nair, Kishore K.

    2010-10-04

    Elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}), man's oldest eco-friendly fungicide for curing fungal infections in plants and animals, is registered in India as a non-systemic and contact fungicide. However due to its high volume requirement, Indian agrochemical industry and farmers could not effectively use this product till date. We hypothesize that intelligent nanoscience applications might increase the visibility of nanosulfur in Indian agriculture as a potent and eco-safe fungicide. Sulfur nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized bottom-up via a liquid synthesis method with average particle size in the range of 50-80 nm and the shapes of the NPs were spherical. A comparative study ofmore » elemental and nano-sulfur produced has been tested against facultative fungal food pathogen, Aspergillus niger. Results showed that nanosulfur is more efficacious than its elemental form.« less

  19. Impact of insecticide and fungicide residue contact on plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), mobility and mortality: implications for pest management

    PubMed Central

    Leskey, Tracy C; Wright, Starker E; Saguez, Julien; Vincent, Charles

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND An evaluation was made of the effects of seven neurotoxic insecticides (esfenvalerate, indoxacarb, clothianidin, thiacloprid, azinphosmethyl, phosmet and imidacloprid), one insect growth regulator (novaluron) and two fungicides (myclobutanin and mancozeb), with water as the control, on the horizontal mobility of plum curculios exposed to dried pesticide residues. Mobility was recorded over a 2 h period using ethological tracking software. Mortality was recorded immediately after horizontal mobility experiments and 24 h later. RESULTS Esfenvalerate had the greatest impact on mobility. Immediately after exposure to this compound, plum curculios moved significantly greater distances and for a significantly longer period of time compared with all other compounds. After 24 h, esfenvalerate also led to high mortality rates (>86.0%). Exposure to azinphosmethyl and phosmet also led to high rates of mortality, although the impact on mobility was less pronounced. Exposure to indoxacarb, thiacloprid, imidacloprid, novaluron, myclobutanin and mancozeb had no impact on mobility and resulted in little to no mortality. Clothianidin affected mobility after a 2 h exposure period, and high mortality (60%) was recorded after 24 h. CONCLUSIONS The results indicate that, in the context of a treated orchard, plum curculios exposed to dried pesticide residues may be capable of foraging before succumbing to toxicant exposure, while exposure to pesticides such as esfenvalerate may rapidly incapacitate adult plum curculios. PMID:23213003

  20. Efficacy of different fungicides against Rhizoctonia brown patch and Pythium blight on turfgrass in Italy.

    PubMed

    Mocioni, M; Titone, P; Garibaldi, A; Gullino, M L

    2003-01-01

    Brown patch, incited by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, and Pythium blight, caused by Pythium spp. are two of the diseases most frequently observed on turfgrass in high maintenance stands, as on golf courses. In such conditions the control strategies, based on chemicals, are particularly difficult due to the scarcity of fungicides registered for turf in Italy. The results obtained in experimental trials carried out to evaluate the efficacy of chemical and biological products against brown patch and Pythium blight are reported. On mature turfgrass, maintained under fairway conditions, azoxystrobin, and trifoxystrobin, not yet registered on turf, were very effective against brown patch. Tebuconazole, applied in three different formulations, was very effective against R. solani, while Trichoderma spp. and azadiractine did not control the pathogen. In greenhouse conditions on Agrostis stolonifera, in the presence of severe disease incidence, due to artificial inoculation, benalaxyl-M satisfactorily controlled Pythium blight; Trichoderma spp. as well as a commercial formulation of T. harzianum, applied one week before the inoculation, were not effective. Among the fungicides not yet registered for use on turfgrass in Italy, metalaxyl-M + mancozeb was effective against Pythium blight.

  1. Avoidance behaviour of Eisenia fetida to carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, mancozeb and metamidophos in natural soils from the highlands of Colombia.

    PubMed

    García-Santos, Glenda; Keller-Forrer, Karin

    2011-07-01

    Earthworm avoidance behaviour test is an important screening tool in soil eco-toxicology. This test has been developed and validated under North American and European conditions. However, little research has been performed on the avoidance test in the tropics. This work demonstrates the potential suitability of the avoidance behaviour test as screening method in the highlands of Colombia using Eisenia fetida as the bio-indicator species on contaminated soils with carbofuran and chlorpyrifos. Though for the two active ingredients 100% avoidance was not reached, a curve with six meaningful concentrations is provided. No significant avoidance behaviour trend was found for mancozeb and methamidophos. Tests were conducted in the field yielded similar results to the tests carried out in the laboratory for chlorpyrifos and mancozeb. However, for the case of carbofuran and methamidophos, differences of more than double in avoidance were obtained. Divergence might be explained by soil and temperature conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING IN THE LIVER OF CD-1 MICE TO CHARACTERIZE THE HEPATOTOXICITY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four triazole fungicides used in agricultural or pharmaceutical applications were examined for hepatotoxic effects in mouse liver. Besides organ weight, histopathology, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme induction, DNA microarrays were used to generate gene expression profiles and ...

  3. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING IN THE LIVER OF CD-1 MICE TO CHARACTERIZE THE HEPATOTOXICITY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four triazole fungicides used in agricultural or pharmaceutical applications were examined for hepatotoxic effects in mouse liver. Besides organ weight, histopathology, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme induction, DNA microarrays were used to generate gene expression profiles and ...

  4. COMPARATIVE LIVER P450 ENZYME ACTIVITY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY IN MICE TREATED WITH THE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: MYCLOBUTANIL, PROPICONAZOLE AND TRIADIMETON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles used in agriculture and pharmaceutical products comprise a class of chemicals which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis to act as fungicides. Both propiconazole and triadimefon are hepatotoxic and hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not a mouse liver tumorigen....

  5. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  6. DIFFERENTIATING TOXICITIES OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES THROUGH METABONOMIC ANALYSES OF MULTIPLE TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conazole fungicides represent a large group of compounds widely used agriculturally for the protection of crop plants (Hutson 1998) and pharmaceutically in the treatment of topical and systemic infections (Sheehan 1999). In 1999, the latest period for which agricultural usage...

  7. DIFFERENTIATING TOXICITIES OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES THROUGH METABONOMIC ANALYSES OF MULTIPLE TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conazole fungicides represent a large group of compounds widely used agriculturally for the protection of crop plants (Hutson 1998) and pharmaceutically in the treatment of topical and systemic infections(Sheehan 1999). In 1999, the latest period for which agricultural usage...

  8. REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES IN THE MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides used in pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. Three agricultural conazoles were selected, representing a range of reported cancer and reproductive effects, for a study exposing litters (16-20 per dose group) from gestation day 6to postn...

  9. Synthesis, fungicidal evaluation and 3D-QSAR studies of novel 1,3,4-thiadiazole xylofuranose derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Guanghui; Yan, Xiaojing; Bi, Jiawei; Jiang, Rui; Qin, Yinan; Yuan, Huizhu; Lu, Huizhe; Dong, Yanhong; Jin, Shuhui; Zhang, Jianjun

    2017-01-01

    1,3,4-Thiadiazole and sugar-derived molecules have proven to be promising agrochemicals with growth promoting, insecticidal and fungicidal activities. In the research field of agricultural fungicide, applying union of active group we synthesized a new set of 1,3,4-thiadiazole xylofuranose derivatives and all of the compounds were characterized by 1H NMR and HRMS. In precise toxicity measurement, some of compounds exhibited more potent fungicidal activities than the most widely used commercial fungicide Chlorothalonil, promoting further research and development. Based on our experimental data, 3D-QSAR (three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship) was established and investigated using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) techniques, helping to better understand the structural requirements of lead compounds with high fungicidal activity and environmental compatibility. PMID:28746366

  10. Toxicity interaction between chlorpyrifos, mancozeb and soil moisture to the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Rui G; Gomes, Pedro A D; Ferreira, Nuno G C; Cardoso, Diogo N; Santos, Miguel J G; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-02-01

    A main source of uncertainty currently associated with environmental risk assessment of chemicals is the poor understanding of the influence of environmental factors on the toxicity of xenobiotics. Aiming to reduce this uncertainty, here we evaluate the joint-effects of two pesticides (chlorpyrifos and mancozeb) on the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus under different soil moisture regimes. A full factorial design, including three treatments of each pesticide and an untreated control, were performed under different soil moisture regimes: 25%, 50%, and 75% WHC. Our results showed that soil moisture had no effects on isopods survival, at the levels assessed in this experiment, neither regarding single pesticides nor mixture treatments. Additivity was always the most parsimonious result when both pesticides were present. Oppositely, both feeding activity and biomass change showed a higher sensitivity to soil moisture, with isopods generally showing worse performance when exposed to pesticides and dry or moist conditions. Most of the significant differences between soil moisture regimes were found in single pesticide treatments, yet different responses to mixtures could still be distinguished depending on the soil moisture assessed. This study shows that while soil moisture has the potential to influence the effects of the pesticide mixture itself, such effects might become less important in a context of complex combinations of stressors, as the major contribution comes from its individual interaction with each pesticide. Finally, the implications of our results are discussed in light of the current state of environmental risk assessment procedures and some future perspectives are advanced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fungicidal activity of silver nanoparticles against Alternaria brassicicola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Deepika; Chauhan, Pratima

    2016-04-01

    This work highlighted the fungicidal properties of silver nanoparticles against Alternaria brassicicola. Alternaria brassicicola causes Black spot of Cauliflower, radish, cabbage, kale which results in sever agricultural loss. We treat the synthesised silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of 10, 25, 50, 100 and 110 ppm concentrations against Alternaria brassicicola on PDA containing Petri dish. We calculated inhibitory rate (%) in order to evaluate the antifungal efficacy of silver nanoparticles against pathogens. Treatment with 100ppm AgNPs resulted in maximum inhibition of Alternaria brassicicola i.e.92.2%. 110ppm of AgNPS also shows the same result, therefore 100ppm AgNPs was treated as optimize concentration. AgNPs effectively inhibited the growth of a Alternaria brassicicola, which suggests that AgNPs could be used as fungicide in plant disease management. Further research and development are necessary to translate this technology into plant disease management strategies.

  12. Colonies of Bumble Bees (Bombus impatiens) Produce Fewer Workers, Less Bee Biomass, and Have Smaller Mother Queens Following Fungicide Exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernauer, Olivia M; Gaines-Day, Hannah R; Steffan, Shawn A

    2015-06-01

    Bees provide vital pollination services to the majority of flowering plants in both natural and agricultural systems. Unfortunately, both native and managed bee populations are experiencing declines, threatening the persistence of these plants and crops. Agricultural chemicals are one possible culprit contributing to bee declines. Even fungicides, generally considered safe for bees, have been shown to disrupt honey bee development and impair bumble bee behavior. Little is known, however, how fungicides may affect bumble bee colony growth. We conducted a controlled cage study to determine the effects of fungicide exposure on colonies of a native bumble bee species (Bombus impatiens). Colonies of B. impatiens were exposed to flowers treated with field-relevant levels of the fungicide chlorothalonil over the course of one month. Colony success was assessed by the number and biomass of larvae, pupae, and adult bumble bees. Bumble bee colonies exposed to fungicide produced fewer workers, lower total bee biomass, and had lighter mother queens than control colonies. Our results suggest that fungicides negatively affect the colony success of a native bumble bee species and that the use of fungicides during bloom has the potential to severely impact the success of native bumble bee populations foraging in agroecosystems.

  13. Environmental fate of fungicides and other current-use pesticides in a central California estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Orlando, James L.; Phillips, Bryn M.; Anderson, Brian S.; Siegler, Katie; Hunt, John W.; Hamilton, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The current study documents the fate of current-use pesticides in an agriculturally-dominated central California coastal estuary by focusing on the occurrence in water, sediment and tissue of resident aquatic organisms. Three fungicides (azoxystrobin, boscalid, and pyraclostrobin), one herbicide (propyzamide) and two organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) were detected frequently. Dissolved pesticide concentrations in the estuary corresponded to the timing of application while bed sediment pesticide concentrations correlated with the distance from potential sources. Fungicides and insecticides were detected frequently in fish and invertebrates collected near the mouth of the estuary and the contaminant profiles differed from the sediment and water collected. This is the first study to document the occurrence of many current-use pesticides, including fungicides, in tissue. Limited information is available on the uptake, accumulation and effects of current-use pesticides on non-target organisms. Additional data are needed to understand the impacts of pesticides, especially in small agriculturally-dominated estuaries.

  14. Effects of two commonly used fungicides on the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hung T; Keough, Michael J; Long, Sara M; Pettigrove, Vincent J

    2017-03-01

    Fungicides are used widely in agriculture and have been detected in adjacent rivers and wetlands. However, relatively little is known about the potential effects of fungicides on aquatic organisms. The present study investigated the effects of 2 commonly used fungicides, the boscalid fungicide Filan ® and the myclobutanil fungicide Systhane ™ 400 WP, on life history traits (survival, growth, and reproduction) and energy reserves (lipid, protein, and glycogen content) of the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis under laboratory conditions, at concentrations detected in aquatic environments. Amphipods were exposed to 3 concentrations of Filan (1 μg active ingredient [a.i.]/L, 10 μg a.i./L, and 40 μg a.i./L) and Systhane (0.3 μg a.i./L, 3 μg a.i./L, and 30 μg a.i./L) over 56 d. Both fungicides had similar effects on the amphipod at the organism level. Reproduction was the most sensitive endpoint, with offspring produced in controls but none produced in any of the fungicide treatments, and total numbers of gravid females in all fungicide treatments were reduced by up to 95%. Female amphipods were more sensitive than males in terms of growth. Systhane had significant effects on survival at all concentrations, whereas significant effects of Filan on survival were observed only at 10 μg a.i./L and 40 μg a.i./L. The effects of fungicides on energy reserves of the female amphipod were different. Filan significantly reduced amphipod protein content, whereas Systhane significantly reduced the lipid content. The present study demonstrates wide-ranging effects of 2 common fungicides on an ecologically important species that has a key role in trophic transfer and nutrient recycling in aquatic environments. These results emphasize the importance of considering the long-term effects of fungicides in the risk assessment of aquatic ecosystems. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:720-726. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  15. CROSS-SPECIES COMPARISON OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDE METABOLITES USING RAT AND RAINBOW TROUT (ONCHORHYNCHUS MYKISS) HEPATIC MICROSOMES AND PURIFIED HUMAN CYTOCHROME P450 3A4

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles represent a unique class of azole-containing fungicides that are widely used in both pharmaceutical and agriculture applications. The antifungal property of conazoles occurs via complexation with cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP) responsible for mediating fungal cell...

  16. Identification of Coordinately Regulated Functional Modules in Thyroid Tissues from Rats Exposed to a Tumorigenic and a Non-Tumorigenic Conazole Fungicide Using Oncomine®

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are triazole- or imidazole-containing fungicides used in agriculture and medicine. Using transcriptomic analysis of rat thyroid tissues exposed to either tumorigenic or non-tumorigenic structurally related conazoles, we identified new findings on thyroid gene expressio...

  17. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY-BASED METABOLOMICS FOR DIFFERENTIATING TOXICITIES OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazole fungicides are widely used both agriculturally for the protection of crops, and pharmaceutically in the treatment of topical and systemic infections. Heavy usage has created concern over the impact these compounds may have through environmental exposure to humans and ot...

  18. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY-BASED METABOLOMICS FOR DIFFERENTIATING TOXICITIES OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazole fungicides are widely used both agriculturally for the protection of crops, and pharmaceutically in the treatment of topical and systemic infections. Heavy usage has created concern over the impact these compounds may have through environmental exposure to humans and ot...

  19. Conazole Fungicides as Chiral Environmental Contaminants: Enantiomer Analysis and Enantioselectivity in Soil Slurries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are triazole compounds, many of which are in wide use as agricultural and medicinal fungicides. Opportunities exist for them to contaminate the environment and, since they are all chiral molecules, they are apt to be degraded enantioselectively by indigenous microbes. T...

  20. TOXICITY PROFILES IN RATS TREATED WITH TUMORIGENIC AND NONTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of azole based fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. They have a common mode of antifungal action through inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Some members of this class have been shown to be hepatotoxic and will induce mouse hepa...

  1. EFFECTS OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES ON DEVELOPMENT AND PARTURITION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used extensively in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals. As part of an effort to evaluate the changes in gene expression corresponding to reproductive toxicity, we examined the effects of three conazoles on pregnancy and neonates. Wistar Han rats were expo...

  2. Foliar fungicides on alfalfa: 2012 University extension field trial results from Minnesota and Wisconsin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To answer the increasing number of questions received regarding the use of foliar fungicide on alfalfa, a group of Extension and USDA Agricultural Research Station staff in southeastern Minnesota and Wisconsin worked together to conduct field research trials to examine the benefit of using a foliar ...

  3. In vitro metabolism of the anti-androgenic fungicide vinclozolin by rat liver microsomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vinclozolin (V) is a fungicide used in agricultural settings. V administered to rats is hydrolyzed to 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (Ml) and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2). V, Ml and M2 have antiandrogenic properties by in...

  4. Effects of selected herbicides and fungicides on growth, sporulation and conidial germination of entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Celar, Franci A; Kos, Katarina

    2016-11-01

    The in vitro fungicidal effects of six commonly used fungicides, namely fluazinam, propineb, copper(II) hydroxide, metiram, chlorothalonil and mancozeb, and herbicides, namely isoxaflutole, fluazifop-P-butyl, flurochloridone, foramsulfuron, pendimethalin and prosulfocarb, on mycelial growth, sporulation and conidial germination of entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (ATCC 74040) were investigated. Mycelial growth rates and sporulation at 15 and 25 °C were evaluated on PDA plates containing 100, 75, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 and 0% of the recommended application rate of each pesticide. The tested pesticides were classified in four scoring categories based on reduction in mycelial growth and sporulation. All pesticides, herbicides and fungicides tested had fungistatic effects of varying intensity, depending on their rate in the medium, on B. bassiana. The most inhibitory herbicides were flurochloridone and prosulfocarb, and fluazinam and copper(II) hydroxide were most inhibitory among the fungicides, while the least inhibitory were isoxaflutole and chlorothalonil. Sporulation and conidial germination of B. bassiana were significantly inhibited by all tested pesticides compared with the control treatment. Flurochloridone, foramsulfuron, prosulfocarb and copper(II) hydroxide inhibited sporulation entirely at 100% rate (99-100% inhibition), and the lowest inhibition was shown by fluazifop-P-butyl (22%) and metiram (33%). At 100% dosage, all herbicides in the test showed a high inhibitory effect on conidial germination. Conidial germination inhibition ranged from 82% with isoxaflutole to 100% with fluorochloridone, pendimethalin and prosulfocarb. At 200% dosage, inhibition rates even increased (96-100%). All 12 pesticides tested had a fungistatic effect on B. bassiana of varying intensity, depending on the pesticide and its concentration. B. bassiana is highly affected by some herbicides and fungicides even at very low rates. Flurochloridone, foramsulfuron

  5. Non-target effects of fungicides on nectar-inhabiting fungi of almond flowers.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Robert N; Vannette, Rachel L; Brittain, Claire; Williams, Neal M; Fukami, Tadashi

    2017-04-01

    Nectar mediates interactions between plants and pollinators in natural and agricultural systems. Specialized microorganisms are common nectar inhabitants, and potentially important mediators of plant-pollinator interactions. However, their diversity and role in mediating pollination services in agricultural systems are poorly characterized. Moreover, agrochemicals are commonly applied to minimize crop damage, but may present ecological consequences for non-target organisms. Assessment of ecological risk has tended to focus on beneficial macroorganisms such as pollinators, with less attention paid to microorganisms. Here, using culture-independent methods, we assess the impact of two widely-used fungicides on nectar microbial community structure in the mass-flowering crop almond (Prunus dulcis). We predicted that fungicide application would reduce fungal richness and diversity, whereas competing bacterial richness would increase, benefitting from negative effects on fungi. We found that fungicides reduced fungal richness and diversity in exposed flowers, but did not significantly affect bacterial richness, diversity, or community composition. The relative abundance of Metschnikowia OTUs, nectar specialists that can impact pollination, was reduced by both fungicides. Given growing recognition of the importance of nectar microorganisms as mediators of plant-pollinator mutualisms, future research should consider the impact of management practices on plant-associated microorganisms and consequences for pollination services in agricultural landscapes. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. HSP90 and pCREB alterations are linked to mancozeb-dependent behavioral and neurodegenerative effects in a marine teleost

    SciTech Connect

    Zizza, Merylin

    The pesticide mancozeb (mz) is recognized as a potent inducer of oxidative stress due to its ability to catalyze the production of reactive oxygen species plus inhibiting mitochondrial respiration thus becoming an environmental risk for neurodegenerative diseases. Despite numerous toxicological studies on mz have been directed to mammals, attention on marine fish is still lacking. Thus, it was our intention to evaluate neurobehavioral activities of ornate wrasses (Thalassoma pavo) exposed to 0.2 mg/l of mz after a preliminary screening test (0.07–0.3 mg/l). Treated fish exhibited an evident (p < 0.001) latency to reach T-maze arms (> 1000%) while exploratory attitudesmore » (total arm entries) diminished (− 50%; p < 0.05) versus controls during spontaneous exploration tests. Moreover, they showed evident enhancements (+ 111%) of immobility in the cylinder test. Contextually, strong (− 88%; p < 0.01) reductions of permanence in light zone of the Light/Dark apparatus along with diminished crossings (− 65%) were also detected. Conversely, wrasses displayed evident enhancements (160%) of risk assessment consisting of fast entries in the dark side of this apparatus. From a molecular point of view, a notable activation (p < 0.005) of the brain transcription factor pCREB occurred during mz-exposure. Similarly, in situ hybridization supplied increased HSP90 mRNAs in most brain areas such as the lateral part of the dorsal telencephalon (Dl; + 68%) and valvula of the cerebellum (VCe; + 35%) that also revealed evident argyrophilic signals. Overall, these first indications suggest a possible protective role of the early biomarkers pCREB and HSP90 against fish toxicity. - Highlights: • Fish exposed to mancozeb exhibited an evident latency to reach T-maze arms. • Mancozeb caused immobility and reduction of explorative attitudes. • Fish exposed to mancozeb showed anxiogenic performances in the Light/Dark apparatus. • The brain of fish exposed to mancozeb

  7. Changes in antioxidants potential, secondary metabolites and plant hormones induced by different fungicides treatment in cotton plants.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Heba Ibrahim; Akladious, Samia Ageeb

    2017-10-01

    The use of fungicides for an effective control of plant diseases has become crucial in the last decades in the agriculture system. Seeds of cotton plants were treated with systemic and contact fungicides to study the efficiency of seed dressing fungicides in controlling damping off caused by Rhizoctonia solani under greenhouse conditions and its effect on plant growth and metabolism. The results showed that Mon-cut showed the highest efficiency (67.99%) while each of Tondro and Hemixet showed the lowest efficiency (31.99%) in controlling damping off. Rhizolex T, Mon-cut and Tondro fungicides caused significant decrease in plant height, dry weight of plant, phytohormones, photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, soluble proteins, total free amino acids but caused significant increases in total phenols, flavonoids, antioxidant enzymes, ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, MDA and hydrogen peroxide as compared with untreated plants. On the other hand, the other fungicides (Maxim, Hemixet and Flosan) increased all the above recorded parameters as compared with untreated plants. Our results indicated that the fungicides application could be a potential tool to increase plant growth, the antioxidative defense mechanisms and decreased infection with plant diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Concentration levels of new-generation fungicides in throughfall released by foliar wash-off from vineyards.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, P; Soto-Gómez, D; Paradelo, M; López-Periago, J E

    2017-12-01

    The presence of agricultural pesticides in the environment and their effects on ecosystems are major concerns addressed in a significant number of articles. However, limited information is available on the pesticide concentrations released from crops. This study reports losses of new-generation fungicides by foliar wash-off from vineyards and their potential impact on the concentrations of their main active substances (AS) in surface waters. Two experimental plots devoted to vineyards were treated with various combinations of commercial new-generation fungicide formulations. Then, up to sixteen throughfall collectors were installed under the canopy. Concentrations of sixteen different AS in throughfall were determined along nine rainfall episodes. Concentrations in throughfall far exceeded the maximum permissible levels for drinking water established by the European Union regulations. Dynamics of fungicide release indicated a first-flush effect in the wash-off founding the highest concentrations of AS in the first rain episodes after application of the fungicides. This article shows that foliar spray application of commercial formulations of new-generation fungicides does not prevent the release of their AS to soil or the runoff. Concentration data obtained in this research can be valuable in supporting the assessment of environmental effects of new-generation fungicides and modeling their environmental fate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Degradation of three fungicides following application on strawberry and a risk assessment of their toxicity under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Caixia; Cang, Tao; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xinquan; Yu, Ruixian; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Xueping

    2015-05-01

    The health risk to humans of pesticide application on minor crops, such as strawberry, requires quantification. Here, the dissipation and residual levels of three fungicides (pyraclostrobin, myclobutanil, and difenoconazole) were studied for strawberry under greenhouse conditions using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry after Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe extraction. This method was validated using blank samples, with all mean recoveries of these three fungicides exceeding 80%. The residues of all three fungicides dissipated following first-order kinetics. The half-lives of pyraclostrobin, myclobutanil, and difenoconazole were 1.69, 3.30, and 3.65 days following one time application and 1.73, 5.78, and 6.30 days following two times applications, respectively. Fungicide residue was determined by comparing the estimated daily intake of the three fungicides against the acceptable daily intake. The results indicate that the potential health risk of the three fungicides was not significant in strawberry when following good agricultural practices (GAP) under greenhouse conditions.

  10. Occurrence and Environmental Effects of Boscalid and Other Fungicides in Three Targeted Use Areas in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, T. J.; Smalling, K. L.; Wilson, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    was derived from a mixture of fungicides. Ongoing studies are also evaluating the occurrence of fungicides in aquatic insect larvae and the effects of fungicides on the obligate endosymbiont fungi (Trichomycetes) which reside in their guts. Surface water samples and larval hosts of gut fungi were collected from impaired and reference sites between April and December 2010 in southwestern Idaho, USA. Several fungicides (including azoxystrobin, boscalid and pyraclostrobin) were detected in black fly larvae collected from streams adjacent to agricultural fields where fungicides were being applied throughout the growing season. Hosts from control sites contained gut fungi with higher density, diversity and spore production, while those collected from the two impacted sites typically had lower diversity and fecundity (spore production) of native gut fungi. This study provides one of the first multi-regional assessments of the environmental occurrence of fungicides in the US and indicates that fungicides directly affect the non-target fungal communities commonly found in the guts of stream invertebrates.

  11. The Synergistic Effects of Almond Protection Fungicides on Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Forager Survival.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Adrian; Coleman, Chet; Hoffmann, Clint; Fritz, Brad; Rangel, Juliana

    2017-06-01

    The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) contributes ∼$17 billion annually to the United States economy, primarily by pollinating major agricultural crops including almond, which is completely dependent on honey bee pollination for nut set. Almond growers face constant challenges to crop productivity owing to pests and pathogens, which are often controlled with a multitude of agrochemicals. For example, fungicides are often applied in combination with other products to control fungal pathogens during almond bloom. However, the effects of fungicides on honey bee health have been so far understudied. To assess the effects of some of the top fungicides used during the 2012 California almond bloom on honey bee forager mortality, we collected foragers from a local apiary and exposed them to fungicides (alone and in various combinations) at the label dose, or at doses ranging from 0.25 to 2 times the label dose rate. These fungicides were Iprodione 2SE Select, Pristine, and Quadris. We utilized a wind tunnel and atomizer set up with a wind speed of 2.9 m/s to simulate field-relevant exposure of honey bees to these agrochemicals during aerial application in almond fields. Groups of 40-50 foragers exposed to either untreated controls or fungicide-laden treatments were monitored daily over a 10-d period. Our results showed a significant decrease in forager survival resulting from exposure to simulated tank mixes of Iprodione 2SE Select, as well as synergistic detrimental effects of Iprodione 2SE Select in combination with Pristine and Quadris on forager survival. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Potential of Cerbera odollam as a bio-fungicide for post-harvest pathogen Penicilium digitatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harbant; Yin-Chu, Sue; Al-Samarrai, Ghassan; Syarhabil, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Postharvest diseases due to fungal infection contribute to economic losses in agriculture industry during storage, transportation or in the market. Penicillium digitatum is one of the common pathogen responsible for the postharvest rot in fruits. This disease is currently being controlled by synthetic fungicides such as Guazatine and Imazalil. However, heavy use of fungicides has resulted in environmental pollution, such as residue in fruit that expose a significant risk to human health. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop alternatives to synthetic fungicide to raise customer confidence. In the current research, different concentrations (500 to 3000 ppm) of ethanol extract of Cerbera odollam or commonly known as Pong-pong were compared with Neem and the controls (Positive control/Guazatine; Negative control/DMSO) for the anti-fungicide activity in PDA media contained in 10 cm diameter Petri dishes, using a modification of Ruch and Worf's method. The toxicity (Lc50) of the C.odollam extract was determined by Brine-shrimp test (BST). The results of the research indicated that crude extraction from C.odollam showed the highest inhibition rate (93%) and smallest colony diameter (0.63 cm) at 3000 ppm in vitro compared with Neem (inhibition rate: 88%; colony diameter: 1.33 cm) and control (Positive control/Guazatine inhibition rate: 79%, colony diameter: 1.9 cm; Negative control/DMSO inhibition rate: 0%, colony diameter: 9.2 cm). C.odollam recorded Lc50 value of 5 µg/ml which is safe but to be used with caution (unsafe level: below 2 µg/ml). The above anti-microbial activity and toxicity value results indicate that C.odollam has a potential of being a future bio-fungicide that could be employed as an alternative to synthetic fungicide.

  13. In vitro studies of cellular and molecular developmental toxicity of adjuvants, herbicides, and fungicides commonly used in Red River Valley, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Lin, N; Garry, V F

    2000-07-28

    Recent epidemiologic studies showed increased frequency of birth defects in pesticide applicators and general population of the Red River Valley, Minnesota. These studies further indicated that this crop growing area used more chlorophenoxy herbicides and fungicides than elsewhere in Minnesota. Based on frequency of use and known biology, certain herbicides, pesticide additives, fungicides, and mycotoxins are suspect agents. To define whether these agents affect developmental endpoints in vitro, 16 selected agrochemicals were examined using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In the flow cytometric assay, cell proliferation in this estrogen-responsive cell line indicates xenobiotic-mediated estrogenic effects. Cell viability, morphology, ploidy, and apoptosis were incorporated in this assay. Data showed that the adjuvants X-77 and Activate Plus induced significant cell proliferation at 0.1 and 1 microg/ml. The commercial-grade herbicides 2,4-D LV4 and 2,4-D amine induced cell proliferation at 1 and 10 microg/ml. The reagent-grade 2,4-D products failed to induce proliferation over the same concentration range, suggesting that other ingredients in the commercial products, presumably adjuvants, could be a factor in these results. The fungicides triphenyltin and mancozeb induced apoptosis at concentrations of 4.1 microg/ml (10(-5) M) and 50 microg/ml, respectively. Triphenyltin also induced aneuploidy (C2/M arrest) at 0.41 microg/ml (10(-6) M). Data provide a mechanistic step to understanding human reproductive and developmental effects in populations exposed to these agrochemicals, and initiative to focusing limited resources for future in vivo animal developmental toxicity studies.

  14. Comparative hygienic assessment of active ingredients content in the air environment after treatment of cereal spiked crops by combined fungicides.

    PubMed

    Kondratiuk, Mykola; Blagaia, Anna; Pelo, Ihor

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The quality of the air environment significantly affects the health of the population. Chemical plant protection products in the spring and summer time may be the main pollutants of the air environment in rural areas. Chemical plant protection products are dangerous substances of anthropogenic origin. If applying pesticides in high concentrations, the risk of poisoning by active ingredients of pesticide preparations in workers directly contacting with it increases. The aim: Comparative hygienic assessment of active ingredients content in the air environment after treatment of cereal spiked crops by combined fungicides was the aim of the work. Materials and methods: Active ingredients of the studied combined fungicides, samples of air, and swabs from workers' skin and stripes from overalls were materials of the research. Methods of full-scale in-field hygienic experiment, gas-liquid chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, as well as statistical and bibliographic methods were used in the research. Results and conclusions: Active ingredients of the studied combined fungicides were not detected in the working zone air and atmospheric air at the levels exceeding the limits of its detection by appropriate chromatography methods. Findings confirmed the air environment safety for agricultural workers and rural population if studied combined fungicides are applied following the hygienically approved suggested application rates and in accordance of good agricultural practice rules. However the possible complex risk for workers after certain studied fungicides application may be higher than acceptable due to the elevated values for dermal effects. The complex risk was higher than acceptable in еру case of aerial spraying of both studied fungicides, meanwhile only one combination of active ingredients revealed possible risk for workers applying fungicides by rod method of cereal spiked crops treatment.

  15. Stereoselective Metabolism of 1,2,4-Triazole Fungicides in Hepatic Microsomes and Implications for Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1,2,4-triazole fungicides (i.e., conazoles) are potent cytochrome P450 (CYP) modulators and have been used extensively in agriculture and medicine. Recently, emphasis has been placed on the potential adverse effects of these compounds on mammalian steroid biosynthesis and en...

  16. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES IN THYROID TISSUES FROM RATS TREATED WITH A TUMORIGENIC AND A NON-TUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides that are used in agriculture and medicine. Conazoles can induce follicular cell adenomas of the thyroid in rats after chronic bioassay and are considered to pose a hazard to humans. Pathways and networks of genes that were associated with thyroid cancer w...

  17. TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES IN LIVER FROM RATS TREATED WITH TUMORIGENIC AND NON-TUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides used as pharmaceutical and agricultural agents. In chronic bioassays in rats, triadimefon was hepatotoxic and induced follicular cell adenomas in the thyroid gland, whereas, propiconazole and myclobutanil were hepatotoxic but had no effect on t...

  18. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES IN THYROID TISSUES FROM RATS TREATED WITH A TUMORIGENIC AND A NON-TUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    What is the study?
    Conazoles are triazole- or imidazole-containing fungicides that are used in agriculture and medicine. Conazoles can induce follicular cell adenomas of the thyroid in rats after chronic bioassay. The goal of this study was to identify pathways and network...

  19. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Stereoselective Metabolism of the 1,2,4-Triazole Fungicide, Triadimefon, in Vertebrate Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Questions Agricultural and pharmaceutical 1,2,4-triazole fungicides are potent cytochrome P450 modulators that can disrupt mammalian steroid biosynthesis. Triadimefon [(RS)-1-(4-chlorophenoxy)-3,3-dimethyl-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butan-2-one] is unique with respect to tumorige...

  20. Mycotoxin and fungicide residues in wheat grains from fungicide-treated plants measured by a validated LC-MS method.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Suzane Rickes; Pazdiora, Paulo Cesar; Dallagnol, Leandro José; Dors, Giniani Carla; Chaves, Fábio Clasen

    2017-04-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is an annual crop, cultivated in the winter and spring and susceptible to several pathogens, especially fungi, which are managed with fungicides. It is also one of the most consumed cereals, and can be contaminated by mycotoxins and fungicides. The objective of this study was to validate an analytical method by LC-MS for simultaneous determination of mycotoxins and fungicide residues in wheat grains susceptible to fusarium head blight treated with fungicides, and to evaluate the relationship between fungicide application and mycotoxin production. All parameters of the validated analytical method were within AOAC and ANVISA limits. Deoxynivalenol was the prevalent mycotoxin in wheat grain and epoxiconazole was the fungicide residue found in the highest concentration. All fungicidal treatments induced an increase in AFB2 production when compared to the control (without application). AFB1 and deoxynivalenol, on the contrary, were reduced in all fungicide treatments compared to the control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of fungicides on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Cox; Lance H. Kosberg; Nancy L. Shaw; Stuart P. Hardegree

    2011-01-01

    Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different...

  2. Identification of Genes Related to Fungicide Resistance in Fusarium fujikuroi

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Younghae; Jung, Boknam; Li, Taiying

    2017-01-01

    We identified two genes related to fungicide resistance in Fusarium fujikuroi through random mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletions showed that survival factor 1 deletion resulted in higher sensitivity to fungicides, while deletion of the gene encoding F-box/WD-repeat protein increased resistance, suggesting that the genes affect fungicide resistance in different ways. PMID:28781543

  3. Reaction kinetics and mechanisms of organosilicon fungicide flusilazole with sulfate and hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Mercado, D Fabio; Bracco, Larisa L B; Arques, Antonio; Gonzalez, Mónica C; Caregnato, Paula

    2018-01-01

    Flusilazole is an organosilane fungicide used for treatments in agriculture and horticulture for control of diseases. The reaction kinetics and mechanism of flusilazole with sulfate and hydroxyl radicals were studied. The rate constant of the radicals with the fungicide were determined by laser flash photolysis of peroxodisulfate and hydrogen peroxide. The results were 2.0 × 10 9 s -1 M -1 for the reaction of the fungicide with HO and 4.6 × 10 8  s -1  M -1 for the same reaction with SO 4 - radicals. The absorption spectra of organic intermediates detected by laser flash photolysis of S 2 O 8 2- with flusilazole, were identified as α-aminoalkyl and siloxyl radicals and agree very well with those estimated employing the time-dependent density functional theory with explicit account for bulk solvent effects. In the continuous photolysis experiments, performed by photo-Fenton reaction of the fungicide, the main degradation products were: (bis(4-fluorophenyl)-hydroxy-methylsilane) and the non-toxic silicic acid, diethyl bis(trimethylsilyl) ester, in ten and twenty minutes of reaction, respectively. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Comparative assessment of the effect of synthetic and natural fungicides on soil respiration.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Angelo; Felício, Joanna D'Arc; de Andréa, Mara M

    2012-01-01

    As toxic pesticide residues may persist in agricultural soils and cause environmental pollution, research on natural fungicides to replace the synthetic compounds is currently increasing. The effect of the synthetic fungicide chlorothalonil and a natural potential fungicide on the soil microbial activity was evaluated here by the substrate-induced respiration by addition of glucose (SIR), as bioindicator in two soils (Eutrophic Humic Gley-GHE and Typic Eutroferric Chernosol-AVEC). The induced soil respiration parameter was followed during 28 days after soil treatment either with chlorathalonil (11 μg·g(-1)), or the methanolic fraction from Polymnia sonchifolia extraction (300 μg·g(-1)), and (14)C-glucose (4.0 mg and 5.18 Bq of (14)C-glucose g(-1)). The (14)C-CO(2) produced by the microbial respiration was trapped in NaOH (0.1 M) which was changed each two hours during the first 10 h, and 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 28 days after the treatments. The methanolic fraction of the plant extract inhibited (2.2%) and stimulated (1.8%) the respiration of GHE and AVEC, respectively, but the synthetic chlorothalonil caused 16.4% and 2.6% inhibition of the respiration, respectively of the GHE and AVEC soils. As the effects of the natural product were statistically small, this bioindicator indicates that the methanolic fraction of the Polymnia sonchifolia extract, which has fungicide properties, has no environmental effects.

  5. Insecticidal and fungicidal compounds from Isatis tinctoria.

    PubMed

    Seifert, K; Unger, W

    1994-01-01

    Tryptanthrin (1), indole-3-acetonitrile (2) and p-coumaric acid methylester (3) were isolated from the aerial parts of Isatis tinctoria L. The compounds show insecticidal and anti-feedant activity against termites (Reticulitermis santonensis), insect preventive and control activity against larvae of the house longhorn beetle (Hylotrupes bajulus) and fungicidal activity against the brown-rot fungus (Coniophora puteana).

  6. The 1975 Insecticide, Herbicide, Fungicide Quick Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Bill G.; Thomson, W. T.

    This is a quick guide for choosing a chemical to use to control a certain pest on a specific crop. Information in the book was obtained from manufacturers' labels and from the USDA and FDA pesticide summary. The book is divided into four parts: (1) insecticides, (2) herbicides, (3) fungicides, and (4) conversion tables. Each of the first three…

  7. Microscopy reveals disease control through novel effects on fungal development: a case study with an early-generation benzophenone fungicide.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Mark R; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Cotter, H Van T; O'Connell, Richard; Hollomon, Derek

    2006-05-01

    The benzophenones are a new class of agricultural fungicides that demonstrate protectant, curative and eradicative/antisporulant activity against powdery mildews. The chemistry is represented in the marketplace by the fungicide metrafenone, recently introduced by BASF and discussed in the following paper. The benzophenones show no evidence of acting by previously identified biochemical mechanisms, nor do they show cross-resistance with existing fungicides. The value of microscopy in elucidating fungicide mode of action is demonstrated through identification of the effects of an early benzophenone, eBZO, on mildew development. eBZO caused profound alterations in the morphology of powdery mildews of both monocotyledons and dicotyledons, affecting multiple stages of fungal development, including spore germination, appressorial formation, penetration, surface hyphal morphology and sporogenesis. Identification of analogous effects of eBZO on sporulation in the model organism Aspergillus nidulans (Eidam) Winter provides a unique opportunity to elucidate important morphogenetic regulatory sites in the economically important obligate pathogens, the powdery mildews. Benzophenones provide a further example of the benefits of whole-organism testing in the search for novel fungicide modes of action. Copyright 2006 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Effects of Fungicides on Rat's Neurosteroid Synthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiuwei; Chen, Fan; Chen, Lanlan; Su, Ying; Huang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors may interfere with nervous system's activity. Fungicides such as tebuconazole, triadimefon, and vinclozolin have antifungal activities and are used to prevent fungal infections in agricultural plants. In the present study, we studied effects of tebuconazole, triadimefon, and vinclozolin on rat's neurosteroidogenic 5α-reductase 1 (5α-Red1), 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), and retinol dehydrogenase 2 (RDH2). Rat's 5α-Red1, 3α-HSD, and RDH2 were cloned and expressed in COS-1 cells, and effects of these fungicides on them were measured. Tebuconazole and triadimefon competitively inhibited 5α-Red1, with IC50 values of 8.670 ± 0.771 × 10−6 M and 17.390 ± 0.079 × 10−6 M, respectively, while vinclozolin did not inhibit the enzyme at 100 × 10−6 M. Triadimefon competitively inhibited 3α-HSD, with IC50 value of 26.493 ± 0.076 × 10−6 M. Tebuconazole and vinclozolin weakly inhibited 3α-HSD, with IC50 values about 100 × 10−6 M, while vinclozolin did not inhibit the enzyme even at 100 × 10−6 M. Tebuconazole and triadimefon weakly inhibited RDH2 with IC50 values over 100 × 10−6 M and vinclozolin did not inhibit this enzyme at 100 × 10−6 M. Docking study showed that tebuconazole, triadimefon, and vinclozolin bound to the steroid-binding pocket of 3α-HSD. In conclusion, triadimefon potently inhibited rat's neurosteroidogenic enzymes, 5α-Red1 and 3α-HSD. PMID:28812018

  9. The effect of stereochemistry on the biological activity of natural phytotoxins, fungicides, insecticides and herbicides.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Antonio; Cimmino, Alessio; Andolfi, Anna

    2013-02-01

    Phytotoxins are secondary microbial metabolites that play an essential role in the development of disease symptoms induced by fungi on host plants. Although phytotoxins can cause extensive-and in some cases devastating-damage to agricultural crops, they can also represent an important tool to develop natural herbicides when produced by fungi and plants to inhibit the growth and spread of weeds. An alternative strategy to biologically control parasitic plants is based on the use of plant and fungal metabolites, which stimulate seed germination in the absence of the host plant. Nontoxigenic fungi also produce bioactive metabolites with potential fungicide and insecticide activity, and could be applied for crop protection. All these metabolites represent important tools to develop eco-friendly pesticides. This review deals with the relationships between the biological activity of some phytotoxins, seed germination stimulants, fungicides and insecticides, and their stereochemistry. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Rust Inhibitor And Fungicide For Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.; Greer, D. Clay

    1988-01-01

    Mixture of benzotriazole, benzoic acid, and fungicide prevents growth of rust and fungus. Water-based cooling mixture made from readily available materials prevents formation of metallic oxides and growth of fungi in metallic pipes. Coolant remains clear and does not develop thick sludge tending to collect in low points in cooling systems with many commercial rust inhibitors. Coolant compatible with iron, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Cannot be used with cadmium or cadmium-plated pipes.

  11. Azole fungicides: occurrence and fate in wastewater and surface waters.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Maren; Buerge, Ignaz J; Hauser, Andrea; Müller, Markus D; Poiger, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The mode of action of azole compounds implies a potential to affect endocrine systems of different organisms and is reason for environmental concern. The occurrence and fate of nine agricultural azole fungicides, some of them also used as biocides, and four azole pharmaceuticals were studied in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and lakes in Switzerland. Two pharmaceuticals (fluconazole, clotrimazole, 10-110 ng L(-1)) and two biocides (propiconazole, tebuconazole, 1-30 ng L(-1)) were consistently observed in WWTP influents. Loads determined in untreated and treated wastewater indicated thatfluconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole were largely unaffected by wastewater treatment, but clotrimazole was effectively eliminated (> 80%). Incubation studies with activated sludge showed no degradation for fluconazole and clotrimazole within 24 h, but strong sorption of clotrimazole to activated sludge. Slow degradation and some sorption were observed for tebuconazole and propiconazole (degradation half-lives, 2-3 d). In lakes, fluconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole were detected at low nanogram-per-liter levels. Concentrations of the pharmaceutical fluconazole correlated with the expected contamination by domestic wastewater, but not those of the biocides. Per capita loads of propiconazole and tebuconazole in lakes suggested additional inputs; for example, from agricultural use or urban runoff rainwater.

  12. ASSESSING THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF FUNGICIDES ON NONTARGET GUT FUNGI (TRICHOMYCETES) AND THEIR ASSOCIATED LARVAL BLACK FLY HOSTS

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Emma R.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Gray, Elmer; Bond, Laura; Steele, Lance; Kandel, Prasanna; Chamberlin, Alison; Gause, Justin; Reynolds, Nicole; Robertson, Ian; Novak, Stephen; Feris, Kevin; White, Merlin M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungicides are moderately hydrophobic and have been detected in water and sediment, particularly in agricultural watersheds, but typically are not included in routine water quality monitoring efforts. This is despite their widespread use and frequent application to combat fungal pathogens. Whereas the efficacy of these compounds on fungal pathogens is well documented, little is known about their effects on nontarget fungi. This pilot study, a field survey in southwestern Idaho from April to December 2010 on four streams with varying pesticide inputs (two agricultural and two reference sites), was conducted to assess nontarget impact of fungicides on gut fungi, or trichomycetes. Tissues of larval black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae), hosts of gut fungi, were analyzed for pesticide accumulation. Fungicides were detected in hosts from streams within agricultural watersheds but were not detected in hosts from reference streams. Gut fungi from agricultural sites exhibited decreased percent infestation, density within the gut, and sporulation, and black fly tissues had elevated pesticide concentrations. Differences observed between the sites demonstrate a potential effect on this symbiotic system. Future research is needed to parse out the details of the complex biotic and abiotic relationships; however, these preliminary results indicate that impacts to nontarget organisms could have far-reaching consequences within aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26380545

  13. Assessing the potential effects of fungicides on nontarget gut fungi (trichomycetes) and their associated larval black fly hosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Emma R.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Gray, Elmer; Bond, Laura; Steele, Lance; Kandel, Prasanna; Chamberlin, Alison; Gause, Justin; Reynolds, Nicole; Robertson, Ian; Novak, Stephen; Feris, Kevin; White, Merlin M.

    2014-01-01

    Fungicides are moderately hydrophobic and have been detected in water and sediment, particularly in agricultural watersheds, but typically are not included in routine water quality monitoring efforts. This is despite their widespread use and frequent application to combat fungal pathogens. Although the efficacy of these compounds on fungal pathogens is well documented, little is known about their effects on nontarget fungi. This pilot study, a field survey in southwestern Idaho from April to December 2010 on four streams with varying pesticide inputs (two agricultural and two reference sites), was conducted to assess nontarget impact of fungicides on gut fungi, or trichomycetes. Tissues of larval black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae), hosts of gut fungi, were analyzed for pesticide accumulation. Fungicides were detected in hosts from streams within agricultural watersheds but were not detected in hosts from reference streams. Gut fungi from agricultural sites exhibited decreased percent infestation, density and sporulation within the gut, and black fly tissues had elevated pesticide concentrations. Differences observed between the sites demonstrate a potential effect on this symbiotic system. Future research is needed to parse out the details of the complex biotic and abiotic relationships; however, these preliminary results indicate that impacts to nontarget organisms could have far-reaching consequences within aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Implication of Fusarium graminearum primary metabolism in its resistance to benzimidazole fungicides as revealed by 1H NMR metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Sevastos, A; Kalampokis, I F; Panagiotopoulou, A; Pelecanou, M; Aliferis, K A

    2018-06-01

    Fungal metabolomics is a field of high potential but yet largely unexploited. Focusing on plant-pathogenic fungi, no metabolomics studies exist on their resistance to fungicides, which represents a major issue that the agrochemical and agricultural sectors are facing. Fungal infections cause quantitative, but also qualitative yield losses, especially in the case of mycotoxin-producing species. The aim of the study was to correlate metabolic changes in Fusarium graminearum strains' metabolomes with their carbendazim-resistant level and discover corresponding metabolites-biomarkers, with primary focus on its primary metabolism. For this purpose, comparative 1 H NMR metabolomics was applied to a wild-type and four carbendazim-resistant Fusarium graminearum strains following or not exposure to the fungicide. Results showed an excellent discrimination between the strains based on their carbendazim-resistance following exposure to low concentration of the fungicide (2 mg L -1 ). Both genotype and fungicide treatments had a major impact on fungal metabolism. Among the signatory metabolites, a positive correlation was discovered between the content of F. graminearum strains in amino acids of the aromatic and pyruvate families, l-glutamate, l-proline, l-serine, pyroglutamate, and succinate and their carbendazim-resistance level. In contrary, their content in l-glutamine and l-threonine, had a negative correlation. Many of these metabolites play important roles in fungal physiology and responses to stresses. This work represents a proof-of-concept of the applicability of 1 H NMR metabolomics for high-throughput screening of fungal mutations leading to fungicide resistance, and the study of its biochemical basis, focusing on the involvement of primary metabolism. Results could be further exploited in programs of resistance monitoring, genetic engineering, and crop protection for combating fungal resistance to fungicides. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling fungicides mobility in undisturbed vineyard soil cores unamended and amended with spent mushroom substrates.

    PubMed

    Marín-Benito, Jesús María; Rodríguez-Cruz, María Sonia; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Mamy, Laure

    2015-09-01

    The performance of the pesticide fate model PRZM to predict the fate of two fungicides, penconazole and metalaxyl, and the major metabolite of metalaxyl (CGA-62826), in amended and unamended vineyard soils was tested from undisturbed soils columns experiments. Three different treatments were tested in two soils: control soil (unamended), and soil amended with fresh or composted spent mushroom substrates, which correspond to common agricultural practices in Spain. Leaching experiments were performed under non-saturated flow conditions. The model was parameterized with laboratory and literature data, and using pedotransfer functions. It was first calibrated for water flow against chloride breakthrough curves. The key parameter was the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (DISP). No leaching of penconazole, the most hydrophobic fungicide, was observed. It remained in the top 0-8 cm of the column. In any case, simulations were highly correlated to the experimental results. On the contrary, metalaxyl and its metabolite were consistently found in the leachates. A calibration step of the Kd of metalaxyl and CGA-62826 and of DISP for CGA-62826 was necessary to obtain good prediction of the leaching of both compounds. PRZM generally simulated acceptable metalaxyl vertical distribution in the soil profiles although results were overestimated for its metabolite. Nevertheless, PRZM can be reasonably used to assess the leaching (through breakthrough curves) and vertical distribution of fungicides in amended soils, knowing their DISP values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential use of cuminic acid as a botanical fungicide against Valsa mali.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Sun, Yang; Han, LiRong; Zhang, Xing; Feng, Juntao

    2017-05-01

    Valsa canker caused by Valsa mali is commonly present in eastern Asia and cause large economic losses. Because of limited agricultural measures and chemical residues of commonly used fungicides there is an urgent need of alternative plant protecting agents. On this background the activity of cuminic acid, a plant extract from the seed of Cuminum cyminum L, was assessed. The median effective concentration (EC 50 ) values for inhibition of mycelial growth of seven V. mali strains ranged from 3.046 to 8.342 μg/mL, with an average EC 50 value of 4.956 ± 0.281 μg/mL. The antifungal activity was the direct activity of cuminic acid instead of the influence on the pH of media by cuminic acid. After treated with cuminic acid, mycelia dissolved with decreased branches and swelling; cell membrane permeability increased while pectinases activity decreased significantly. Moreover, peroxidase (POD) activity of the apple leaves increased after treated with cuminic acid. Importantly, on detached branches of apple tree, cuminic acid exhibited both protective and curative activity. These results indicated that cuminic acid not only showed the antifungal activity, but also could improve the defense capacity of the plants. Taken together, cuminic acid showed the potential as a natural alternative to commercial fungicides or a lead compound to develop new fungicides for the control of Valsa canker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of fungicide on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because fungal infection may complicate both the logistics and the interpretation of germination tests, seeds are sometimes treated with chemical fungicides. Fungicides may reduce the germination rate and/or germination percentage, and should be avoided unless fungal contamination is severe enough ...

  18. Evaluation of fungicides for hop downy mildew, Hubbard, Oregon, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This research was conducted to quantify the degree of control of the disease with a phosphorous acid-based fungicide, the present industry-standard for management of downy mildew on hop in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. No suppression of the disease was observed with the industry standard fungicide,...

  19. Fungicide residue remediation on table grapes using ozone fumigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ozone fumigation was explored as a means for degrading contemporary organic fungicides related to table grape production. Separate fumigations were conducted in a flow-through chamber on fungicides sorbed to model abiotic glass surfaces or to table grapes. Gaseous ozone at constant ozone concentrati...

  20. Fungicide-induced transposon movement in Monilinia fructicola.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fengping; Everhart, Sydney E; Bryson, P Karen; Luo, Chaoxi; Song, Xi; Liu, Xili; Schnabel, Guido

    2015-12-01

    Repeated applications of fungicides with a single mode of action are believed to select for pre-existing resistant strains in a pathogen population, while the impact of sub-lethal doses of such fungicides on sensitive members of the population is unknown. In this study, in vitro evidence is presented that continuous exposure of Monilinia fructicola mycelium to some fungicides can induce genetic change in form of transposon transposition. Three fungicide-sensitive M. fructicola isolates were exposed in 12 weekly transfers of mycelia to a dose gradient of demethylation inhibitor fungicide (DMI) SYP-Z048 and quinone outside inhibitor fungicide (QoI) azoxystrobin in solo or mixture treatments. Evidence of mutagenesis was assessed by monitoring Mftc1, a multicopy transposable element of M. fructicola, by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Movement of Mftc1 was observed following azoxystrobin and azoxystrobin plus SYP-Z048 treatments in two of the three isolates, but not in the non-fungicide-treated controls. Interestingly, the upstream promoter region of MfCYP51 was a prime target for Mftc1 transposition in these isolates. Transposition of Mftc1 was verified by Southern blot in two of three isolates from another, similar experiment following prolonged, sublethal azoxystrobin exposure, although in these isolates movement of Mftc1 in the upstream MfCYP51 promoter region was not observed. More research is warranted to determine whether fungicide-induced mutagenesis may also happen under field conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of fungicides for control of Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    S. Wagner; K. Kaminski; S. Werres

    2008-01-01

    As part of the project European Phytophthora ramorum Pest Risk Analysis (RAPRA) a wide range of fungicides was tested for in vitro activity against mycelial growth and zoospore germination of P. ramorum. A preliminary set of experiments was performed to study the effect of nine common fungicides specific for

  2. Sensitivity of Texas strains of Ceratocystis fagacearum to triazole fungicides

    Treesearch

    A. Dan Wilson; L.B. Forse

    1997-01-01

    Ten geographically diverse Texas strains of the oak wilt fungus Ceratocystis fagacearum were tested in vitro for their sensitivity to five triazole fungicides based on accumulated linear growth, linear growth rates, and dry weight accumulation in response to fungicide concentrations of 0.1 to 600 parts per billion (ppb). None of the triazoles inhibited growth at 0.1...

  3. Evaluating variable rate fungicide applications for control of Sclerotinia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oklahoma peanut growers continue to try to increase yields and reduce input costs. Perhaps the largest input in a peanut crop is fungicide applications. This is especially true for areas in the state that have high disease pressure from Sclerotinia. On average, a single fungicide application cost...

  4. SOT 2008- TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES IN THYROID TISSUES FROM RATS TREATED WITH A TUMORIGENIC AND A NON-TUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are triazole- or imidazole-containing fungicides that are used in agriculture and medicine. Conazoles can induce follicular cell adenomas of the thyroid in rats after chronic bioassay. The goal of this study was to identify pathways and networks of genes that were assoc...

  5. Misuse of organomercury fungicides in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, W. F.; Pregnolatto, W.; Pigati, P.

    1976-01-01

    A methoxyethyl mercuric compound, licensed in Brazil as a fungicide for seed dressing, was widely used for spraying tomato and other vegetable crops in 1966 and 1967. Mercury residues ranging from 0.05 to 0.30 mg/kg were detected in 14% of the tomatoes, 13% of other vegetable samples, and 57% of the tomato paste batches. A wide campaign through newspapers, radio, and television was quickly established to educate farmers and the population in general on the hazards of ingestion of mercury-contaminated food. All samples of tomatoes and other vegetables positive for mercury (residues above 0.05 mg/kg) were destroyed. Inspection posts on the main roads and highways prevented the delivery of contaminated food to cities and food processing plants. The sale of organomercury fungicides is now controlled in Brazil; however, treated seeds which are not planted may be diverted to human or animal consumption. There is no official record of accidents, but occasional cases of poisoning are known. The mercury residue level in Brazilian fish is low, indicating that environmental pollution by mercury is not a big problem in the country. However, some fresh-water and estuarine fish may contain mercury residues ranging from 0.01 to 0.66 mg/kg. PMID:1086162

  6. Chlorogenic acid is a fungicide active against phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Guadalupe; Regente, Mariana; Jacobi, Santiago; Del Rio, Marianela; Pinedo, Marcela; de la Canal, Laura

    2017-08-01

    Plants synthesize diverse types of secondary metabolites and some of them participate in plant protection against pathogen attack. These compounds are biodegradable and renewable alternatives, which may be envisaged for the control of plant pests and diseases. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a phenolic secondary metabolite which accumulates in diverse plant tissues and can be found in several agro-industrial by-products and waste. The aim of this work was to determine whether CGA could control the growth of various plant pathogenic fungi, gaining insight into its mechanism of action. Microscopic analysis showed the complete inhibition of spore germination or reduction of mycelial growth for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Fusarium solani, Verticillium dahliae, Botrytis cinerea and Cercospora sojina. CGA concentrations that did not completely abolish spore germination were able to produce a partial inhibition of mycelial growth. Viability tests and vital dye staining demonstrate that CGA induces fungal cell lysis. Its fungicidal activity involves an early membrane permeabilization of the spores. These results show the antifungal activity of CGA against phytopathogenic fungi relevant in horticulture and agriculture highlighting the potential of CGA-enriched wastes and by-products to be used as biofungicides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo mutagenicity of conazole fungicides correlates with tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey A; Moore, Tanya; Leavitt, Sharon A

    2009-03-01

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity tests. We studied the in vivo mutagenicity of these three conazoles using the Big Blue mouse assay system. Groups of mice were fed either control diet or diet containing 1800 p.p.m. triadimefon, 2500 p.p.m. propiconazole or 2000 p.p.m. myclobutanil. After 4 days of feeding, mice were immediately euthanized, livers were removed, DNA isolated and lacI genes recovered into infectious bacteriophage lambda particles by in vitro packaging. Bacteriophage with mutations in the lacI gene was detected by infecting into Escherichia coli, and mutant frequencies were determined using a colorimetric plaque assay. Propiconazole induced a 1.97-fold increase in mutant frequency compared to concurrent controls (P = 0.018) and triadimefon induced a 1.94-fold increase compared to concurrent controls (P = 0.009). Myclobutanil did not induce any change in mutant frequency (P = 0.548). These results provide the first evidence that the hepatotumorigenic conazoles are capable of inducing mutations in liver in vivo while the non-tumorigen myclobutanil is not, suggesting that mutagenicity may represent a key event in conazoles tumorigenic mode of action.

  8. Effects of disease control by fungicides on greenhouse gas emissions by U.K. arable crop production.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David J; West, Jonathan S; Atkins, Simon D; Gladders, Peter; Jeger, Michael J; Fitt, Bruce Dl

    2011-09-01

    The U.K. government has published plans to reduce U.K. agriculture's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. At the same time, the goal of global food security requires an increase in arable crop yields. Foliar disease control measures such as fungicides have an important role in meeting both objectives. It is estimated that U.K. winter barley production is associated with GHG emissions of 2770 kg CO2 eq. ha(-1) of crop and 355 kg CO2 eq. t(-1) of grain. Foliar disease control by fungicides is associated with decreases in GHG emissions of 42-60 kg CO2 eq. t(-1) in U.K. winter barley and 29-39 kg CO2 eq. t(-1) in U.K. spring barley. The sensitivity of these results to the impact of disease control on yield and to variant GHG emissions assumptions is presented. Fungicide treatment of the major U.K. arable crops is estimated to have directly decreased U.K. GHG emissions by over 1.5 Mt CO2 eq. in 2009. Crop disease control measures such as fungicide treatment reduce the GHG emissions associated with producing a tonne of grain. As national demand for food increases, greater yields as a result of disease control also decrease the need to convert land from non-arable to arable use, which further mitigates GHG emissions. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Differential sensitivity of developmental stages of the South American toad to a fungicide based on fludioxonil and metalaxyl-M.

    PubMed

    Svartz, Gabriela; Acquaroni, Mercedes; Pérez Coll, Cristina

    2018-06-07

    Agricultural fungicide application in Argentina has increased twice since 2008, with Maxim® XL (2.5% fludioxonil +1% metalaxyl-M) as one of the most used fungicide formulation. The toxicity of this pesticide on Rhinella arenarum was assessed by means of continuous (from embryo and larval development) and 24-h pulse exposure standardized bioassays. Lethality was concentration- and exposure time-dependent. Maxim® XL caused a progressive lethal effect along the bioassays with higher toxicity on embryos than larvae, obtaining 50% lethal concentrations at 96, 336, and 504 h of 10.85, 2.89, and 1.71 mg/L for embryos, and 43.94, 11.79, and 5.76 mg/L for larvae respectively. Lethal 504-h no observed effect concentration values for embryos and larvae were 1 and 2.5 mg/L respectively. A stage-dependent toxicity of Maxim® XL was also demonstrated within the embryo development, with early stages more sensitive than the later ones, and blastula as the most sensitive developmental stage. The risk quotients obtained for chronic risk assessment determined a potential threat for the survival and continuity of R. arenarum populations under these conditions. The results indicate that the levels of the fungicide reaching amphibian habitats could be risky for the early development of this amphibian species. This study also emphasizes the necessity to evaluate the chronic effects of fungicides in pesticide risk assessment.

  10. Design, synthesis, and fungicidal activities of imino diacid analogs of valine amide fungicides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Man; Yang, Hui-Hui; Tian, Lei; Li, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Wei-Guang

    2015-12-15

    The novel imino diacid analogs of valine amides were synthesized via several steps, including the protection, amidation, deprotection, and amino alkylation of valine, with the resulting structures confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR and HRMS. Bioassays showed that some of these compounds exhibited good fungicidal activity. Notably, isopropyl 2-((1-((1-(3-fluorophenyl)ethyl)amino)-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)amino)propanoate 5i displayed significant levels of control, at 50%, against Erysiphe graminis at 3.9μM as well as a level of potency very similar to the reference azoxystrobin, which gave 60% activity at this concentration. The present work demonstrates that imino diacid analogs of valine amides could be potentially useful key compounds for the development of novel fungicides against wheat powdery mildew. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Agricultural Pesticides. An Instructional Unit for Teachers of Adult Vocational Education in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Kenneth M.; Iverson, Maynard J.

    The proper use of agricultural pesticides is the major emphasis on the unit of instruction developed as a guide for use by teachers in planning and conducting young farmer and adult farmer classes. Seven lessons are included in the unit covering topical areas related to the utilization of pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and the…

  12. In vitro fungicide sensitivity of Rhizoctonia isolates collected from turfgrasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Different Rhizoctonia species and anastomosis groups (AGs) have been reported to show variable sensitivity to various commercial fungicides. Thirty–six isolates of Rhizoctonia collected from turfgrasses were tested in vitro for sensitivity to commercial formulations of iprodione, triticonazole, and ...

  13. Effects of Conazole Fungicides on Spontaneous Activity in Neural Networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexaconazole (HEX), Tetraconazole (TET), Fluconazole (FLU), and Triadimefon (TRI) are conazole fungicides, used to control powdery mildews on crops, and as veterinary and clinical treatments. TRI, a demethylation inhibitor, is neurotoxic in vivo, and previous in vitro experiments...

  14. CHARACTERIZING THE CONFORMATIONAL AND ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazole fungicides have important environmental and human health considerations including chemical reactivity and transformation pathways. The electronic and conformational properties of an organic molecule determines in conjunction with solvent properties, its chemical reacti...

  15. Effects of Fungicides on Aquatic Fungi and Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conners, D. E.; Rosemond, A. D.; Black, M. C.

    2005-05-01

    Aquatic microorganisms play an important role in conditioning leaf litter that enters streams and serves as an important base of production for consumers. Contamination of streams by fungicides may adversely affect microorganisms and alter leaf litter processing rates. Unfortunately, microorganisms are rarely used in acute toxicity tests for fungicide evaluation and registration. We adapted the resazurin reduction assay, which is used in medical microbiology, to assess the acute toxicity of four fungicides (azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl and chlorothalonil) to aquatic fungi (Articulospora tetracladia) and bacteria (Cytophaga spp.), and investigated the ability of the toxicants to inhibit leaf breakdown in microcosms. Fungi were more sensitive to fungicides than many standard test organisms (cladocerans, green algae, trout), while bacteria were often the least sensitive. All of the fungicides except kresoxim-methyl, when added to microcosms at concentrations that inhibited the fungi by 90 percent in acute tests, reduced leaf breakdown rates by an average of 14.7 percent. Thus, aquatic fungi and their associated functions in streams may be relatively sensitive to fungicides applied terrestrially that enter streams through non-point sources. These data highlight the importance of including aquatic fungi in safety assessments of pesticides for protection of microbial function.

  16. Inhibition of Efflux Transporter-Mediated Fungicide Resistance in Pyrenophora tritici-repentis by a Derivative of 4′-Hydroxyflavone and Enhancement of Fungicide Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Sven; Deising, Holger B.

    2005-01-01

    Populations of the causal agent of wheat tan spot, Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, that are collected from fields frequently treated with reduced fungicide concentrations have reduced sensitivity to strobilurin fungicides and azole fungicides (C14-demethylase inhibitors). Energy-dependent efflux transporter activity can be induced under field conditions and after in vitro application of sublethal amounts of fungicides. Efflux transporters can mediate cross-resistance to a number of fungicides that belong to different chemical classes and have different modes of action. Resistant isolates can grow on substrata amended with fungicides and can infect plants treated with fungicides at levels above recommended field concentrations. We identified the hydroxyflavone derivative 2-(4-ethoxy-phenyl)-chromen-4-one as a potent inhibitor of energy-dependent fungicide efflux transporters in P. tritici-repentis. Application of this compound in combination with fungicides shifted fungicide-resistant P. tritici-repentis isolates back to normal sensitivity levels and prevented infection of wheat leaves. These results highlight the role of energy-dependent efflux transporters in fungicide resistance and could enable a novel disease management strategy based on the inhibition of fungicide efflux to be developed. PMID:15933029

  17. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of three fungicides: elemental sulfur (S 0 ) (known to result in increased H 2 S in wine); fenbuconazole (used in orchards but not vineyards); and fludioxonil (used in post-harvest storage of apples). Only S 0 led to increased H 2 S production. Fenbuconazole (≥0.2 mg L -1 ) resulted in a decreased fermentation rate and increased residual sugar. An interactive effect of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and fenbuconazole was observed such that increasing the YAN concentration alleviated the negative effects of fenbuconazole on fermentation kinetics. Cidermakers should be aware that residual fenbuconazole (as low as 0.2 mg L -1 ) in apple juice may lead to stuck fermentation, especially when the YAN concentration is below 250 mg L -1 . These results indicate that fermentation problems attributed to low YAN may be caused or exacerbated by additional factors such as fungicide residues, which have a greater impact on fermentation performance under low YAN conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Disruption of quercetin metabolism by fungicide affects energy production in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Mao, Wenfu; Schuler, Mary A; Berenbaum, May R

    2017-03-07

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450) in the honey bee, Apis mellifera , detoxify phytochemicals in honey and pollen. The flavonol quercetin is found ubiquitously and abundantly in pollen and frequently at lower concentrations in honey. Worker jelly consumed during the first 3 d of larval development typically contains flavonols at very low levels, however. RNA-Seq analysis of gene expression in neonates reared for three days on diets with and without quercetin revealed that, in addition to up-regulating multiple detoxifying P450 genes, quercetin is a negative transcriptional regulator of mitochondrion-related nuclear genes and genes encoding subunits of complexes I, III, IV, and V in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Thus, a consequence of inefficient metabolism of this phytochemical may be compromised energy production. Several P450s metabolize quercetin in adult workers. Docking in silico of 121 pesticide contaminants of American hives into the active pocket of CYP9Q1, a broadly substrate-specific P450 with high quercetin-metabolizing activity, identified six triazole fungicides, all fungal P450 inhibitors, that dock in the catalytic site. In adults fed combinations of quercetin and the triazole myclobutanil, the expression of five of six mitochondrion-related nuclear genes was down-regulated. Midgut metabolism assays verified that adult bees consuming quercetin with myclobutanil metabolized less quercetin and produced less thoracic ATP, the energy source for flight muscles. Although fungicides lack acute toxicity, they may influence bee health by interfering with quercetin detoxification, thereby compromising mitochondrial regeneration and ATP production. Thus, agricultural use of triazole fungicides may put bees at risk of being unable to extract sufficient energy from their natural food.

  19. Disruption of quercetin metabolism by fungicide affects energy production in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wenfu; Schuler, Mary A.; Berenbaum, May R.

    2017-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450) in the honey bee, Apis mellifera, detoxify phytochemicals in honey and pollen. The flavonol quercetin is found ubiquitously and abundantly in pollen and frequently at lower concentrations in honey. Worker jelly consumed during the first 3 d of larval development typically contains flavonols at very low levels, however. RNA-Seq analysis of gene expression in neonates reared for three days on diets with and without quercetin revealed that, in addition to up-regulating multiple detoxifying P450 genes, quercetin is a negative transcriptional regulator of mitochondrion-related nuclear genes and genes encoding subunits of complexes I, III, IV, and V in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Thus, a consequence of inefficient metabolism of this phytochemical may be compromised energy production. Several P450s metabolize quercetin in adult workers. Docking in silico of 121 pesticide contaminants of American hives into the active pocket of CYP9Q1, a broadly substrate-specific P450 with high quercetin-metabolizing activity, identified six triazole fungicides, all fungal P450 inhibitors, that dock in the catalytic site. In adults fed combinations of quercetin and the triazole myclobutanil, the expression of five of six mitochondrion-related nuclear genes was down-regulated. Midgut metabolism assays verified that adult bees consuming quercetin with myclobutanil metabolized less quercetin and produced less thoracic ATP, the energy source for flight muscles. Although fungicides lack acute toxicity, they may influence bee health by interfering with quercetin detoxification, thereby compromising mitochondrial regeneration and ATP production. Thus, agricultural use of triazole fungicides may put bees at risk of being unable to extract sufficient energy from their natural food. PMID:28193870

  20. Fungicides transport in runoff from vineyard plot and catchment: contribution of non-target areas.

    PubMed

    Lefrancq, Marie; Payraudeau, Sylvain; García Verdú, Antonio Joaquín; Maillard, Elodie; Millet, Maurice; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2014-04-01

    Surface runoff and erosion during the course of rainfall events are major processes of pesticides transport from agricultural land to aquatic ecosystem. These processes are generally evaluated either at the plot or the catchment scale. Here, we compared at both scales the transport and partitioning in runoff water of two widely used fungicides, i.e., kresoxim-methyl (KM) and cyazofamid (CY). The objective was to evaluate the relationship between fungicides runoff from the plot and from the vineyard catchment. The results show that seasonal exports for KM and CY at the catchment were larger than those obtained at the plot. This underlines that non-target areas within the catchment largely contribute to the overall load of runoff-associated fungicides. Estimations show that 85 and 62 % of the loads observed for KM and CY at the catchment outlet cannot be explained by the vineyard plots. However, the partitioning of KM and CY between three fractions, i.e., the suspended solids (>0.7 μm) and two dissolved fractions (i.e., between 0.22 and 0.7 µm and <0.22 µm) in runoff water was similar at both scales. KM was predominantly detected below 0.22 μm, whereas CY was mainly detected in the fraction between 0.22 and 0.7 μm. Although KM and CY have similar physicochemical properties and are expected to behave similarly, our results show that their partitioning between two fractions of the dissolved phase differs largely. It is concluded that combined observations of pesticide runoff at both the catchment and the plot scales enable to evaluate the sources areas of pesticide off-site transport.

  1. Degradation of conazole fungicides in water by electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, J; González-Vargas, C; Sepúlveda, F; Ureta-Zañartu, M S; Salazar, R

    2013-11-01

    The electrochemical oxidation (EO) treatment in water of three conazole fungicides, myclobutanil, triadimefon and propiconazole, has been carried out at constant current using a BDD/SS system. First, solutions of each fungicide were electrolyzed to assess the effect of the experimental parameters such as current, pH and fungicide concentration on the decay of each compound and total organic carbon abatement. Then a careful analysis of the degradation by-products was made by high performance liquid chromatography, ion chromatography and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry in order to provide a detailed discussion on the original reaction pathways. Thus, during the degradation of conazole fungicides by the electrochemical oxidation process, aromatic intermediates, aliphatic carboxylic acids and Cl(-) were detected prior to their complete mineralization to CO2 while NO3(-) anions remained in the treated solution. This is an essential preliminary step towards the applicability of the EO processes for the treatment of wastewater containing conazole fungicides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of a fungicide (imazalil) and an insecticide (diazinon) on stream fungi and invertebrates associated with litter breakdown.

    PubMed

    Flores, L; Banjac, Z; Farré, M; Larrañaga, A; Mas-Martí, E; Muñoz, I; Barceló, D; Elosegi, A

    2014-04-01

    The intensification of agriculture has promoted the use of pesticides such as fungicides and insecticides. Many pesticides readily leach into natural water bodies and affect both organisms and ecosystem processes such as leaf breakdown, a crucial process in headwater streams. As leaf breakdown in streams involves sequential steps by different groups of organisms (first microbial conditioning, then invertebrate shredding), pesticides targeting different organisms are likely to affect one or the other step, and a mixture of contaminants might have interactive effects. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of a fungicide (imazalil) and an insecticide (diazinon) on stream fungal and invertebrate activities, and their effects on leaf consumption. After an initial assay to define 'effective concentration' of both pesticides in a laboratory experiment, we manipulated pesticide presence/absence during the conditioning and shredding phases. Both pesticides affected fungal community and reduced the performance of the shredding amphipod Echinogammarus berilloni, and leaf consumption. The impact of pesticides on fungal sporulation depended on the length of the exposure period. In addition, pesticides seemed to cause an energetic imbalance in the amphipod, affecting body condition and mortality. The combined effect of both pesticides was similar to those of the fungicide. Overall, our results show that the effects of pesticide mixtures on leaf breakdown are hard to predict from those observed in either fungi or macroinvertebrate performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of new metabolic pathways in the enantioselective fungicide tebuconazole biodegradation by Bacillus sp. 3B6.

    PubMed

    Youness, Mohamed; Sancelme, Martine; Combourieu, Bruno; Besse-Hoggan, Pascale

    2018-06-05

    The use of triazole fungicides in various fields ranging from agriculture to therapy, can cause long-term undesirable effects on different organisms from various environmental compartments and lead to resistance phenomena (even in humans) due to their extensive use and persistence. Their occurrence in various water bodies has increased and tebuconazole, in particular, is often detected, sometimes in high concentration. Only a few bacterial and fungal strains have been isolated and found to biotransform this fungicide, described as not easily biodegradable. Nevertheless, the knowledge of efficient degrading-strains and metabolites potentially formed could improve bioremediation process and global overview of risk assessment. Therefore, a broad screening of microorganisms, isolated from various environmental compartments or from commercially-available strain collections, allowed us to find six bacterial strains able to biotransform tebuconazole. The most efficient one was studied further: this environmental strain Bacillus sp. 3B6 biotransforms the fungicide enantioselectively (ee = 18%) into two hydroxylated metabolites, one of them being transformed in its turn to alkene by a biotic dehydration reaction. This original enantioselective pathway shows that racemic pesticides should be treated by the environmental risk assessment authorities as a mixture of two compounds because persistence, biodegradation, bioaccumulation and toxicity often show chiral dependence. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative analyses of fungicide sensitivity and SSR marker variations indicate a low risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chun-Fang; He, Meng-Han; Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhu, Wen; Yang, Li-Na; Wu, E-Jiao; Guo, Zheng-Liang; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the evolution of fungicide resistance is important in securing sustainable disease management in agricultural systems. In this study, we analyzed and compared the spatial distribution of genetic variation in azoxystrobin sensitivity and SSR markers in 140 Phytophthora infestans isolates sampled from seven geographic locations in China. Sensitivity to azoxystrobin and its genetic variation in the pathogen populations was measured by the relative growth rate (RGR) at four fungicide concentrations and determination of the effective concentration for 50% inhibition (EC50). We found that all isolates in the current study were sensitive to azoxystrobin and their EC50 was similar to that detected from a European population about 20 years ago, suggesting the risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in P. infestans populations is low. Further analyses indicate that reduced genetic variation and high fitness cost in resistant mutations are the likely causes for the low evolutionary likelihood of developing azoxystrobin resistance in the pathogen. We also found a negative correlation between azoxystrobin tolerance in P. infestans populations and the mean annual temperature of collection sites, suggesting that global warming may increase the efficiency of using the fungicide to control the late blight. PMID:26853908

  5. Comparative analyses of fungicide sensitivity and SSR marker variations indicate a low risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chun-Fang; He, Meng-Han; Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhu, Wen; Yang, Li-Na; Wu, E-Jiao; Guo, Zheng-Liang; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-02-08

    Knowledge of the evolution of fungicide resistance is important in securing sustainable disease management in agricultural systems. In this study, we analyzed and compared the spatial distribution of genetic variation in azoxystrobin sensitivity and SSR markers in 140 Phytophthora infestans isolates sampled from seven geographic locations in China. Sensitivity to azoxystrobin and its genetic variation in the pathogen populations was measured by the relative growth rate (RGR) at four fungicide concentrations and determination of the effective concentration for 50% inhibition (EC50). We found that all isolates in the current study were sensitive to azoxystrobin and their EC50 was similar to that detected from a European population about 20 years ago, suggesting the risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in P. infestans populations is low. Further analyses indicate that reduced genetic variation and high fitness cost in resistant mutations are the likely causes for the low evolutionary likelihood of developing azoxystrobin resistance in the pathogen. We also found a negative correlation between azoxystrobin tolerance in P. infestans populations and the mean annual temperature of collection sites, suggesting that global warming may increase the efficiency of using the fungicide to control the late blight.

  6. Elimination of fungicides in biopurification systems: Effect of fungal bioaugmentation on removal performance and microbial community structure.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Zamora, Sergio; Castro-Gutiérrez, Víctor; Masís-Mora, Mario; Lizano-Fallas, Verónica; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E

    2017-11-01

    Bioaugmentation with ligninolytic fungi represents a potential way to improve the performance of biomixtures used in biopurification systems for the treatment of pesticide-containing agricultural wastewater. The fungus Trametes versicolor was employed in the bioaugmentation of a biomixture to be used in the simultaneous removal of seven fungicides. Liquid cultures of the fungus were able to remove tebuconazole, while no evidence of carbendazim, metalaxyl and triadimenol depletion was found. When applied in the biomixture, the bioaugmented matrix failed to remove all the triazole fungicides (including tebuconazole) under the assayed conditions, but was efficient to eliminate carbendazim, edifenphos and metalaxyl (the latter only after a second pesticide application). The re-addition of pesticides markedly increased the elimination of carbendazim and metalaxyl; nonetheless, no clear enhancement of the biomixture performance could be ascribed to fungal bioaugmentation, not even after the re-inoculation of fungal biomass. Detoxification efficiently took place in the biomixture (9 d after pesticide applications) according to acute tests on Daphnia magna. DGGE-analysis revealed only moderate time-divergence in bacterial and fungal communities, and a weak establishment of T. versicolor in the matrix. Data suggest that the non-bioaugmented biomixture is useful for the treatment of fungicides other than triazoles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acaricide, Fungicide and Drug Interactions in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Reed M.; Dahlgren, Lizette; Siegfried, Blair D.; Ellis, Marion D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemical analysis shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera) and hive products contain many pesticides derived from various sources. The most abundant pesticides are acaricides applied by beekeepers to control Varroa destructor. Beekeepers also apply antimicrobial drugs to control bacterial and microsporidial diseases. Fungicides may enter the hive when applied to nearby flowering crops. Acaricides, antimicrobial drugs and fungicides are not highly toxic to bees alone, but in combination there is potential for heightened toxicity due to interactive effects. Methodology/Principal Findings Laboratory bioassays based on mortality rates in adult worker bees demonstrated interactive effects among acaricides, as well as between acaricides and antimicrobial drugs and between acaricides and fungicides. Toxicity of the acaricide tau-fluvalinate increased in combination with other acaricides and most other compounds tested (15 of 17) while amitraz toxicity was mostly unchanged (1 of 15). The sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicide prochloraz elevated the toxicity of the acaricides tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos and fenpyroximate, likely through inhibition of detoxicative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Four other SBI fungicides increased the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate in a dose-dependent manner, although possible evidence of P450 induction was observed at the lowest fungicide doses. Non-transitive interactions between some acaricides were observed. Sublethal amitraz pre-treatment increased the toxicity of the three P450-detoxified acaricides, but amitraz toxicity was not changed by sublethal treatment with the same three acaricides. A two-fold change in the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate was observed between years, suggesting a possible change in the genetic composition of the bees tested. Conclusions/Significance Interactions with acaricides in honey bees are similar to drug interactions in other animals in that P450-mediated detoxication appears to play an

  8. The influence of fungicides on the growth of Trichoderma asperellum.

    PubMed

    De Schutter, B; Aerts, R; Rombouts, L

    2002-01-01

    Numbers of strains of Trichoderma asperellum are known as biological control agents of certain root pathogens of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). The restricted use of fungicides is sometimes useful in combination with these biological control agents. Therefore some experiments were conducted to evaluate the growth of T. asperellum in the presence of fungicides as Previcur (active substance propamocarb) and Sumico (with the active substance carbendazim and diethofencarb). The influence of these fungicides was first examined in laboratory conditions. The fungus was brought on a potato dextrose agar where the fungicides Previcur, Sumico and carbendazim were added in a concentration of 0.1x, 1x and 10x the recommended dose. The growth of T. asperellum was totally inhibited by the three Sumico and carbendazim concentrations. T. asperellum knew a small but significant decrease of growth when the 10x dose of Previcur was added. Afterwards the influence of these fungicides on the fungus was tested in field conditions in the greenhouse. The fungus was applied to the roots of the tomato plant, which was grown on a rockwool medium. Previcur and Sumico were submitted to the plants using the normal procedure. The results of the tests showed that in field conditions there was no effect of the fungicide treatment on the presence of the fungus, although the laboratory tests showed the opposite for Sumico. To explain this contradiction two other experiments were conducted to follow the migration of the Sumico after treatment. A residue analysis showed that the highest concentration of Sumico was detected in the rockwool medium, and some residues were found in the drain water and the stems. Even with a 100x recommended dose of Sumico the fungus was still present the day after the treatment.

  9. Agriculture Education. Agriculture Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary agricultural education students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agriculture structures. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) shop safety, (2) identification and general use of hand tools, (3) power tools, (4) carpentry, (5) blueprint…

  10. Widespread contamination of wildflower and bee-collected pollen with complex mixtures of neonicotinoids and fungicides commonly applied to crops.

    PubMed

    David, Arthur; Botías, Cristina; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Rotheray, Ellen L; Hill, Elizabeth M; Goulson, Dave

    2016-03-01

    There is considerable and ongoing debate as to the harm inflicted on bees by exposure to agricultural pesticides. In part, the lack of consensus reflects a shortage of information on field-realistic levels of exposure. Here, we quantify concentrations of neonicotinoid insecticides and fungicides in the pollen of oilseed rape, and in pollen of wildflowers growing near arable fields. We then compare this to concentrations of these pesticides found in pollen collected by honey bees and in pollen and adult bees sampled from bumble bee colonies placed on arable farms. We also compared this with levels found in bumble bee colonies placed in urban areas. Pollen of oilseed rape was heavily contaminated with a broad range of pesticides, as was the pollen of wildflowers growing nearby. Consequently, pollen collected by both bee species also contained a wide range of pesticides, notably including the fungicides carbendazim, boscalid, flusilazole, metconazole, tebuconazole and trifloxystrobin and the neonicotinoids thiamethoxam, thiacloprid and imidacloprid. In bumble bees, the fungicides carbendazim, boscalid, tebuconazole, flusilazole and metconazole were present at concentrations up to 73nanogram/gram (ng/g). It is notable that pollen collected by bumble bees in rural areas contained high levels of the neonicotinoids thiamethoxam (mean 18ng/g) and thiacloprid (mean 2.9ng/g), along with a range of fungicides, some of which are known to act synergistically with neonicotinoids. Pesticide exposure of bumble bee colonies in urban areas was much lower than in rural areas. Understanding the effects of simultaneous exposure of bees to complex mixtures of pesticides remains a major challenge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Empirical, metagenomic, and computational techniques illuminate the mechanisms by which fungicides compromise bee health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because disease can be devastating to crops, growers often spray fungicides as preventative measures. Unfortunately, many sprays are applied to in-bloom crops, which expose bees to fungicide residues. Generally considered “bee-safe,” fungicides are applied globally on flowering crops. However, there...

  12. Fungicide residue identification and discrimination using a conducting polymer electronic-nose

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2013-01-01

    The identification of fungicide residues on crop foliage is necessary to make periodic pest management decisions. The determination of fungicide residue identities currently is difficult and time consuming using conventional chemical analysis methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Different fungicide types produce unique electronic aroma signature...

  13. Environmental fate of fungicides in surface waters of a horticultural-production catchment in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Wightwick, Adam M; Bui, Anh Duyen; Zhang, Pei; Rose, Gavin; Allinson, Mayumi; Myers, Jackie H; Reichman, Suzanne M; Menzies, Neal W; Pettigrove, Vincent; Allinson, Graeme

    2012-04-01

    Fungicides are regularly applied in horticultural production systems and may migrate off-site, potentially posing an ecological risk to surface waterways. However, few studies have investigated the fate of fungicides in horticultural catchments. This study investigated the presence of 24 fungicides at 18 sites during a 5-month period within a horticultural catchment in southeastern Australia. Seventeen of the 24 fungicides were detected in the waterways, with fungicides detected in 63% of spot water samples, 44% of surface sediment samples, and 44% of the passive sampler systems deployed. One third of the water samples contained residues of two or more fungicides. Myclobutanil, trifloxystrobin, pyrimethanil, difenoconazole, and metalaxyl were the fungicides most frequently detected, being present in 16-38% of the spot water samples. Iprodione, myclobutanil, pyrimethanil, cyproconazole, trifloxystrobin, and fenarimol were found at the highest concentrations in the water samples (> 0.2 μg/l). Relatively high concentrations of myclobutanil and pyrimethanil (≥ 120 μg/kg dry weight) were detected in the sediment samples. Generally the concentrations of the fungicides detected were several orders of magnitude lower than reported ecotoxicological effect values, suggesting that concentrations of individual fungicides in the catchment were unlikely to pose an ecological risk. However, there is little information on the effects of fungicides, especially fungi and microbes, on aquatic ecosystems. There is also little known about the combined effects of simultaneous low-level exposure of multiple fungicides to aquatic organisms. Further research is required to adequately assess the risk of fungicides in aquatic environments.

  14. Effect of Fungicides and Plant Extracts on the Conidial Germination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Causing Mango Anthracnose

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaj, Ahmed; Rahman, Syed Ajijur; Alam, Shahidul; Parvin, Rehana; Farhana, Khandaker Mursheda; Kim, Sang-Beom

    2005-01-01

    In Northern Bangladesh, generally mango trees are planted as agroforest that gives higher Net Present Value (NPV) than traditional agriculture. Mango anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz. is seen as a very destructive and widely distributed disease, which results in poor market value. Five fungicides such as Cupravit, Bavistin, Dithane M-45, Thiovit and Redomil were tested against conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides. Dithane M-45 and Redomil were the most effective when the conidia were immersed for 10~20 minutes at 500~1000 ppm concentrations. Antifungal activities of 13 plant extracts were tested against conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides. Conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides was completely inhibited in Curcuma longa (leaf and rhizome), Tagetes erecta (leaf) and Zingiber officinales (rhizome) after 15 minutes of incubation respectively. PMID:24049501

  15. Integration of chemical and toxicological tools to assess the bioavailability of copper derived from different copper-based fungicides in soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan-Ying; Sun, Jing-Yue; Xu, Xing-Jian; Yu, Hong-Wen

    2018-06-20

    Because the extensive use of Cu-based fungicides, the accumulation of Cu in agricultural soil has been widely reported. However, little information is known about the bioavailability of Cu deriving from different fungicides in soil. This paper investigated both the distribution behaviors of Cu from two commonly used fungicides (Bordeaux mixture and copper oxychloride) during the aging process and the toxicological effects of Cu on earthworms. Copper nitrate was selected as a comparison during the aging process. The distribution process of exogenous Cu into different soil fractions involved an initial rapid retention (the first 8 weeks) and a following slow continuous retention. Moreover, Cu mainly moved from exchangeable and carbonate fractions to Fe-Mn oxides-combined fraction during the aging process. The Elovich model fit well with the available Cu aging process, and the transformation rate was in the order of Cu(NO 3 ) 2 > Bordeaux mixture > copper oxychloride. On the other hand, the biological responses of earthworms showed that catalase activities and malondialdehyde contents of the copper oxychloride treated earthworms were significantly higher than those of Bordeaux mixture treated earthworms. Also, body Cu loads of earthworms from different Cu compounds spiked soils were in the following order: copper oxychloride > Bordeaux mixture. Thus, the bioavailability of Cu from copper oxychloride in soil was significantly higher than that of Bordeaux mixture, and different Cu compounds should be taken into consideration when studying the bioavailability of Cu-based fungicides in the soil. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Occurrence of azoxystrobin, propiconazole, and selected other fungicides in US streams, 2005-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Kolpin, Dana W.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Fungicides are used to prevent foliar diseases on a wide range of vegetable, field, fruit, and ornamental crops. They are generally more effective as protective rather than curative treatments, and hence tend to be applied before infections take place. Less than 1% of US soybeans were treated with a fungicide in 2002 but by 2006, 4% were treated. Like other pesticides, fungicides can move-off of fields after application and subsequently contaminate surface water, groundwater, and associated sediments. Due to the constant pressure from fungal diseases such as the recent Asian soybean rust outbreak, and the always-present desire to increase crop yields, there is the potential for a significant increase in the amount of fungicides used on US farms. Increased fungicide use could lead to increased environmental concentrations of these compounds. This study documents the occurrence of fungicides in select US streams soon after the first documentation of soybean rust in the US and prior to the corresponding increase in fungicide use to treat this problem. Water samples were collected from 29 streams in 13 states in 2005 and/or 2006, and analyzed for 12 target fungicides. Nine of the 12 fungicides were detected in at least one stream sample and at least one fungicide was detected in 20 of 29 streams. At least one fungicide was detected in 56% of the 103 samples, as many as five fungicides were detected in an individual sample, and mixtures of fungicides were common. Azoxystrobin was detected most frequently (45% of 103 samples) followed by metalaxyl (27%), propiconazole (17%), myclobutanil (9%), and tebuconazole (6%). Fungicide detections ranged from 0.002 to 1.15 μ/L. There was indication of a seasonal pattern to fungicide occurrence, with detections more common and concentrations higher in late summer and early fall than in spring. At a few sites, fungicides were detected in all samples collected suggesting the potential for season-long occurrence in some streams

  17. Testing the efficacy of bicarbonates as fungicides against Cercospora beticola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS), caused by the fungal pathogen Cercospora beticola, is an economically important pathogen of sugar beets in many production areas throughout the world. The application of fungicides has been one of the most effective management tools for CLS, but their effectiveness has di...

  18. Analysis of the mutations inducedd by conazole fungicides in vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazo1e fungicides triadimefon and propiconazo1e have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazo1e myc1obutani1 ...

  19. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-...

  20. Timing fungicide application intervals based on airborne Erysiphe necator concentrations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management of grape powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator) and other polycyclic diseases relies on numerous fungicide applications that follow a calendar or model-based application intervals, both of which assume that inoculum is always present. Quantitative molecular assays have been previously develope...

  1. Influence of fungicides on gas exchange of pecan foliage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are several fungicide chemistries used for disease control on pecan (Carya illinoinensis), but there is little or no knowledge of subtle short- or long-term side-effects of these chemistries on host physiological processes, including photosynthesis (Pn). This study quantifies the impact of se...

  2. Fungicides for organic cantaloupe production in Oklahoma: An initial assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungicides that are potentially useful in organic production were evaluated for foliar disease control in cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulates ’Israeli’) during 2009 at Lane, Oklahoma. Milstop (85% potassium bicarbonate), Neem oil, Bonide liquid copper (10% copper octanoate), Serenade (QST ...

  3. Fungicide Injection to Control Dutch Elm Disease: Understanding the Options

    Treesearch

    Linda Haugen; Mark Stennes

    1999-01-01

    In some situations, injecting trees with fungicides is an effective treatment for the management of Dutch elm disease (DED). Several injection products are on the market, and various means of application are recommended. Each product and method has pros and cons. The "best" product depends on the individual tree? its current condition, the objectives of the...

  4. Systemic fungicidal activity of 1,4-oxathiin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Schmeling, B V; Kulka, M

    1966-04-29

    Treatment of pinto bean and barley seed with 1,4-oxathiin derivatives gave disease control by systemic fungicidal action of such pathogenic fungi as Uromyces phaseoli and Ustilago nuda. The two chemicals, D735 and F461, were highly specific and selective against the pathogens without injury of the hosts.

  5. Evaluation of fungicides for hop downy mildew, Woodburn, Oregon, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This research was conducted to quantify the degree of control of the disease downy mildew with a phosphorous acid-based fungicide, the present industry-standard for management of downy mildew on hop in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. No suppression of the disease was observed with the industry standa...

  6. Gene and protein expression biomarkers in fungicide exposed zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the impact of prochloraz (PCZ) on reproductively mature male and female zebrafish was examined following up to 96 h continuous exposure to a flow-through system to control (water only), low (100 ug/l) and high (500 ug/l) PCZ dose. An imidazole fungicide used to rpo...

  7. Fungicide sensitivity in the wild rice pathogen Bipolaris oryzae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years the occurrence of fungal brown spot, caused by Bipolaris oryzae has increased in cultivated wild rice (Zizania palustris) paddies in spite of the use of fungicides. To implement an efficient integrated disease management system, we are exploring whether field isolates have developed ...

  8. Empirical, Metagenomic, and Computational Techniques Illuminate the Mechanisms by which Fungicides Compromise Bee Health.

    PubMed

    Steffan, Shawn A; Dharampal, Prarthana S; Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Currie, Cameron R; Zalapa, Juan; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2017-10-09

    Growers often use fungicide sprays during bloom to protect crops against disease, which exposes bees to fungicide residues. Although considered "bee-safe," there is mounting evidence that fungicide residues in pollen are associated with bee declines (for both honey and bumble bee species). While the mechanisms remain relatively unknown, researchers have speculated that bee-microbe symbioses are involved. Microbes play a pivotal role in the preservation and/or processing of pollen, which serves as nutrition for larval bees. By altering the microbial community, it is likely that fungicides disrupt these microbe-mediated services, and thereby compromise bee health. This manuscript describes the protocols used to investigate the indirect mechanism(s) by which fungicides may be causing colony decline. Cage experiments exposing bees to fungicide-treated flowers have already provided the first evidence that fungicides cause profound colony losses in a native bumble bee (Bombus impatiens). Using field-relevant doses of fungicides, a series of experiments have been developed to provide a finer description of microbial community dynamics of fungicide-exposed pollen. Shifts in the structural composition of fungal and bacterial assemblages within the pollen microbiome are investigated by next-generation sequencing and metagenomic analysis. Experiments developed herein have been designed to provide a mechanistic understanding of how fungicides affect the microbiome of pollen-provisions. Ultimately, these findings should shed light on the indirect pathway through which fungicides may be causing colony declines.

  9. Environmental behavior of benalaxyl and furalaxyl enantiomers in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fang; Gao, Yong X; Guo, Bao Y; Xu, Peng; Li, Jian Z; Wang, Hui L

    2014-01-01

    The enantioselective environmental behavior of the chiral fungicides benalaxy and furalaxyl in agricultural soils in China was studied. Although sorption onto soils was non-enantioselective, the leaching of benalaxy and furalaxyl was enantioselective in soil columns. The concentrations of the S-enantiomers of both fungicides in the leachates were higher than the R-enantiomers. This can be attributed to enantioselective degradation of the two fungicides in the soil column. Enantioselective degradation of the two fungicides was verified by soil dissipation experiments, and the R-enantiomers degraded faster than the S-enantiomers in partial soils. The half-life was 27.7-57.8 days for S-benalaxyl, 20.4-53.3 days for R-benalaxyl, 19.3-49.5 days for S-furalaxyl and 11.4-34.7 days for R-furalaxyl. The degradation process of the two fungicide enantiomers followed the first-order kinetics (R(2) > 0.96). Compared to furalaxyl, benalaxyl degraded more slowly and degradation was less enantioselective. These results are attributed to the influence of soil physicochemical properties, soil microorganisms, and environmental factors.

  10. Leaching of two fungicides in spent mushroom substrate amended soil: Influence of amendment rate, fungicide ageing and flow condition.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Martín, Alba; Sánchez-Martín, María J; Ordax, José M; Marín-Benito, Jesús M; Sonia Rodríguez-Cruz, M

    2017-04-15

    A study has been conducted on the leaching of two fungicides, tebuconazole and cymoxanil, in a soil amended with spent mushroom substrate (SMS), with an evaluation of how different factors influence this process. The objective was based on the potential use of SMS as a biosorbent for immobilizing pesticides in vulnerable soils, and the need to know how it could affect the subsequent transport of these retained compounds. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) for 14 C-fungicides, non-incubated and incubated over 30days, were obtained in columns packed with an unamended soil (S), and this soil amended with SMS at rates of 5% (S+SMS5) and 50% (S+SMS50) under saturated and saturated-unsaturated flows. The highest leaching of tebuconazole (>50% of the total 14 C added) was found in S when a saturated water flow was applied to the column, but the percentage of leached fungicide decreased when a saturated-unsaturated flow was applied in both SMS-amended soils. Also a significant decrease in leaching was observed for tebuconazole after incubation in the column, especially in S+SMS50 when both flows were applied. Furthermore, cymoxanil leaching was complete in S and S+SMS when a saturated flow was applied, and maximum peak concentrations were reached at 1pore volume (PV), although BTCs showed peaks with lower concentrations in S+SMS. The amounts of cymoxanil retained only increased in S+SMS when a saturated-unsaturated flow was applied. A more relevant effect of SMS for reducing the leaching of fungicide was observed when cymoxanil was previously incubated in the column, although mineralization was enhanced in this case. These results are of interest for extending SMS application on the control of the leaching of fungicides with different physicochemical characteristics after different ageing times in the soil and water flow conditions applied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nucleic adaptability of heterokaryons to fungicides in a multinucleate fungus, Sclerotinia homoeocarpa.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Dylan; Sang, Hyunkyu; Bousquet, Amanda; Hulvey, Jonathan P; Garcia, Dawlyn; Rhee, Siyeon; Hoshino, Yoichiro; Yamada, Toshihiko; Jung, Geunhwa

    2018-06-01

    Sclerotinia homoeocarpa is the causal organism of dollar spot in turfgrasses and is a multinucleate fungus with a history of resistance to multiple fungicide classes. Heterokaryosis gives rise to the coexistence of genetically distinct nuclei within a cell, which contributes to genotypic and phenotypic plasticity in multinucleate fungi. We demonstrate that field isolates, resistant to either a demethylation inhibitor or methyl benzimidazole carbamate fungicide, can form heterokaryons with resistance to each fungicide and adaptability to serial combinations of different fungicide concentrations. Field isolates and putative heterokaryons were assayed on fungicide-amended media for in vitro sensitivity. Shifts in fungicide sensitivity and microsatellite genotypes indicated that heterokaryons could adapt to changes in fungicide pressure. Presence of both nuclei in heterokaryons was confirmed by detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the β-tubulin gene, the presence of microsatellite alleles of both field isolates, and the live-cell imaging of two different fluorescently tagged nuclei using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Nucleic adaptability of heterokaryons to fungicides was strongly supported by the visualization of changes in fluorescently labeled nuclei to fungicide pressure. Results from this study suggest that heterokaryosis is a mechanism by which the pathogen adapts to multiple fungicide pressures in the field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sensitivity of Phakopsora pachyrhizi (soybean rust) isolates to fungicides and the reduction of fungal sporulation based on fungicide and timing of application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust is a damaging foliar fungal disease of soybean in many soybean-growing areas throughout the world. Strategies to manage soybean rust include the use of foliar fungicides. Fungicides types, the rate of product application, and the number and timing of applications are critical components...

  13. Leaching and sorption of neonicotinoid insecticides and fungicides from seed coatings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly; Hladik, Michelle; Sanders, Corey; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2018-01-01

    Seed coatings are a treatment used on a variety of crops to improve production and offer protection against pests and fungal outbreaks. The leaching of the active ingredients associated with the seed coatings and the sorption to soil was evaluated under laboratory conditions using commercially available corn and soybean seeds to study the fate and transport of these pesticides under controlled conditions. The active ingredients (AI) included one neonicotinoid insecticide (thiamethoxam) and five fungicides (azoxystrobin, fludioxonil, metalaxyl, sedaxane thiabendazole). An aqueous leaching experiment was conducted with treated corn and soybean seeds. Leaching potential was a function of solubility and seed type. The leaching of fludioxonil, was dependent on seed type with a shorter time to equilibrium on the corn compared to the soybean seeds. Sorption experiments with the treated seeds and a solution of the AIs were conducted using three different soil types. Sorption behavior was a function of soil organic matter as well as seed type. For most AIs, a negative relationship was observed between the aqueous concentration and the log Koc. Sorption to all soils tested was limited for the hydrophilic pesticides thiamethoxam and metalaxyl. However, partitioning for the more hydrophobic fungicides was dependent on both seed type and soil properties. The mobility of fludioxonil in the sorption experiment varied by seed type indicating that the adjuvants associated with the seed coating could potentially play a role in the environmental fate of fludioxonil. This is the first study to assess, under laboratory conditions, the fate of pesticides associated with seed coatings using commercially available treated seeds. This information can be used to understand how alterations in agricultural practices (e.g., increasing use of seed treatments) can impact the exposure (concentration and duration) and potential effects of these chemicals to aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

  14. Direct and indirect effects of the fungicide azoxystrobin in outdoor brackish water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Kerstin; Blidberg, Eva; Elfgren, Irene Karlsson; Hellström, Anna; Kylin, Henrik; Gorokhova, Elena

    2010-02-01

    The effects of the strobilurin fungicide azoxystrobin were studied in brackish water microcosms, with natural plankton communities and sediment. Two experiments were conducted: Experiment 1 (nominal conc. 0, 15 and 60 microg/L, 24-L outdoor microcosms for 21 days) and a second, follow-up, Experiment 2 (nominal conc. 0, 3, 7.5, 15 microg/L, 4-L indoor microcosms for 12 days). The microcosms represent a simplified brackish water community found in shallow semi-enclosed coastal areas in agricultural districts in the Baltic Sea region. Measured water concentrations of the fungicide (Experiment 1) were, on average, 83 and 62% of nominal concentrations directly after application, and 25 and 30% after 21 days, for the low and high dose treatments, respectively, corresponding to mean DT50-values of 15.1 and 25.8 days, for low and high dose treatments, respectively. In Experiment 1, direct toxic effects on calanoid copepods at both test concentrations were observed. Similarly, in Experiment 2, the copepod abundance was significantly reduced at all tested concentrations. There were also significant secondary effects on zooplankton and phytoplankton community structure, standing stocks and primary production. Very few ecotoxicological studies have investigated effects of plant protection products on Baltic organisms in general and effects on community structure and function specifically. Our results show that azoxystrobin is toxic to brackish water copepods at considerably lower concentrations than previously reported from single species tests on freshwater crustaceans, and that direct toxic effects on this ecologically important group may lead to cascade effects altering lower food webs and ecosystem functioning.

  15. Conazole fungicides inhibit Leydig cell testosterone secretion and androgen receptor activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Maarke J E; Temming, A Roberto; Piersma, Aldert H; van den Berg, Martin; van Duursen, Majorie B M

    2014-01-01

    Conazole fungicides are widely used in agriculture despite their suspected endocrine disrupting properties. In this study, the potential (anti-)androgenic effects of ten conazoles were assessed and mutually compared with existing data. Effects of cyproconazole (CYPRO), fluconazole (FLUC), flusilazole (FLUS), hexaconazole (HEXA), myconazole (MYC), penconazole (PEN), prochloraz (PRO), tebuconazole (TEBU), triadimefon (TRIA), and triticonazole (TRIT) were examined using murine Leydig (MA-10) cells and human T47D-ARE cells stably transfected with an androgen responsive element and a firefly luciferase reporter gene. Six conazoles caused a decrease in basal testosterone (T) secretion by MA-10 cells varying from 61% up to 12% compared to vehicle-treated control. T secretion was concentration-dependently inhibited after exposure of MA-10 cells to several concentrations of FLUS (IC 50 = 12.4 μM) or TEBU (IC 50 = 2.4 μM) in combination with LH. The expression of steroidogenic and cholesterol biosynthesis genes was not changed by conazole exposure. Also, there were no changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation that could explain the altered T secretion after exposure to conazoles. Nine conazoles decreased T-induced AR activation (IC 50 s ranging from 10.7 to 71.5 μM) and effect potencies (REPs) were calculated relative to the known AR antagonist flutamide (FLUT). FLUC had no effect on AR activation by T. FLUS was the most potent (REP = 3.61) and MYC the least potent (REP = 0.03) AR antagonist. All other conazoles had a comparable REP from 0.12 to 0.38. Our results show distinct in vitro anti-androgenic effects of several conazole fungicides arising from two mechanisms: inhibition of T secretion and AR antagonism, suggesting potential testicular toxic effects. These effects warrant further mechanistic investigation and clearly show the need for accurate exposure data in order to perform proper (human) risk assessment of this class of compounds.

  16. Peptides of the Constant Region of Antibodies Display Fungicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C.; Pinto, Marcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  17. Toxicological effects of fungicide mixtures on the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hung T; Keough, Michael J; Long, Sara M; Pettigrove, Vincent J

    2017-10-01

    Approaches to assess the toxicity of mixtures often use predictive models with acute mortality as an endpoint at relatively high concentrations. However, these approaches do not reflect realistic situations where organisms could be exposed to chemical mixtures over long periods at low concentrations at which no significant mortalities occur. The present study investigated chronic effects of 2 common fungicides, Filan® (active ingredient [a.i]) boscalid) and Systhane™ (a.i. myclobutanil), on the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis at environmentally relevant concentrations under laboratory conditions. Sexually mature amphipods were exposed singly and in combination to Filan (1, 10, and 40 μg a.i./L) and Systhane (3 μg a.i./L) over 28 d. Survival, growth, a wide range of reproduction endpoints, and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity were measured at the end of the experiment. Both fungicides had significant independent effects on male growth, sex ratio, and juvenile size. Filan mainly affected female growth and the number of embryos per gravid female, whereas Systhane mainly affected the time for females to become gravid. The combined effects of these fungicides on numbers of gravid females and juveniles were antagonistic, causing a 61% reduction in the number of gravid females and a 77% reduction in the number of juveniles produced at the highest concentrations (40 μg a.i./L of boscalid and 3 μg a.i./L of myclobutanil) compared with the controls. There were no significant effects on survival or GST activity. The present study demonstrated that the effects of mixtures were endpoint dependent and that using a variety of endpoints should be considered for a comprehensive understanding of mixture effects. Also, chronic studies are more informative than acute studies for environmentally relevant fungicide concentrations. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2651-2659. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  18. Insecticidal, Repellent and Fungicidal Properties of Novel Trifluoromethylphenyl Amides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    strawberry at relative high rates, in the range of 1.64 kg (ai/ha), and azoxystrobin, a QoI (quinone outside inhib- itor) is applied at 0.131 oz (ai/ha...1980, pp. 172–194. [23] D.E. Wedge, B.J. Smith, J.P. Quebedeaux, R.J. Constain, Fungicide management strategies for control of strawberry fruit rot

  19. Fate of a novel strobilurin fungicide pyraoxystrobin in flooded soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tilong; Xu, Chao; Liu, Xunyue; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Jianbo; Ding, Xingcheng

    2014-05-01

    Pyraoxystrobin, ((E)-2-(2-((3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yloxy) methyl) phenyl)-3-methoxyacrylate) is a novel strobilurin fungicide with excellent and broad spectrum antifungal efficiency. Environmental behaviors of the new fungicide must be assessed to understand its potential risks to the environment. In this study, the extractable residues, bound residues and mineralization, as well as the dissipation rates of pyraoxystrobin were investigated in three flooded soils using a (14)C tracing technique. Results showed that pyraoxystrobin didn't undergo appreciable dissipation during the 100 day incubation period in some tested soils, with 70.01%, 28.58% and 83.85% of the parent compound remaining in the solonchak, cambisol and acrisol soils at the end of the experiment, respectively. Almost no (14)C-pyraoxystrobin was mineralized to (14)CO2 (<0.5%) over the experimental period. Organic matter had a dominating influence on the bound residues formation and the fractions of bound residues increased as the soil organic matter content increased. Less than 9% of the radioactivity was found in the aqueous phase, while the majority of extractable residues (>65.39%) were recovered in the organic extracts. This study aims to give a deep insight into the environmental behaviors of pyraoxystrobin and may be beneficial for the risk assessment of other analogous fungicides.

  20. Fungicides degradation in an organic biomixture: impact on microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Casucci, Cristiano; Milanovic, Vesna; Monaci, Elga; Marinozzi, Maria; Taccari, Manuela; Ciani, Maurizio; Vischetti, Costantino

    2011-12-15

    Biological systems are being developed all over EU countries to protect water-bodies from pesticide contamination at farm level. A laboratory experiment was carried out to test the efficiency of a mixture of compost and straw in bio-degrading different mixtures of fungicides usually applied in vineyards. At the same time the effects of fungicide applications on microbial community of biomixture were also evaluated. Results showed that the biomixture had a good capability of degrading pesticides. Indeed, at the end of the experiment (112 days), the concentration of most of the pesticides was close to complete degradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed an evident modification of microbial diversity after the addition of fungicides. However, at the end of degradation process, no significant changes in the composition of microbial community were seen. In this specific substrate used in the biomixture, yeast flora and ascomycete filamentous fungi seemed to be involved in the degradation activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Method for in vitro screening of aquatic fungicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Methods were developed for in vitro screening of candidate aquatic fungicides for efficacy against Achlya fiagellata, A. racemosa, Saprolegnia hypogyna and S. megasperma. Agar plugs containing fungal hyphae, removed from the edge of actively growing colonies, were placed in the depressions of spot plates containing 1a??0, 10a??0 and 100 mg/I of the candidate compounds for 15 or 60 min. After exposure, the plugs were transferred on to filter papers (0a??45-A?m pore) in a holder, rinsed, and then placed on cornmeal agar medium in tri-petri dishes. The plates were checked for mycelial growth after 48, 96 and 168 h of incubation in a lighted (400-800 A?m) environmental control chamber at 20A?2A?C. Criteria for the acceptance or rejection of candidate aquatic fungicides for further study were based on the antifungal spectrum index (ASI) comparisons between respective compounds and malachite green after 48 h and the concentration level producing complete growth inhibition. Candidate compounds whose ASI was less than 50% that of malachite green after 48 h or did not inhibit growth at levels less than 100 mg/l were rejected. This method provides a base from which in vivo and definitive test regimens can be developed. Preliminary in vitro screening of candidate fungicides reduces the need for costly in vivo tests on compounds that have low antifungal activity.

  2. Agriculture: Agriculture and Air Quality

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on air emissions from agricultural practices, types of agricultural burning, air programs that may apply to agriculture, reporting requirements, and links to state and other federal air-quality information.

  3. Antibiotics do not affect the degradation of fungicides and enhance the mineralization of chlorpyrifos in biomixtures.

    PubMed

    Castillo-González, Humberto; Pérez-Villanueva, Marta; Masís-Mora, Mario; Castro-Gutiérrez, Víctor; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E

    2017-05-01

    The use of antibiotics in agriculture produces residues in wastewaters. The disposal of such wastewaters in biopurification systems (BPS) employed for the treatment of pesticides could result in the inhibition of the degrading capacity of the biomixtures used in the BPS. We assayed the effect of two commercial formulations of antibiotics used in agriculture, one containing kasugamycin (KSG) and the other oxytetracycline plus gentamicin (OTC+GTM), on the biomixture performance. Doses from 0.1mgkg -1 to 1000mgkg -1 of KSG increased the respiration of the biomixture, and low doses enhanced the mineralization rate of the insecticide 14 C-chlorpyrifos. On the contrary, OTC+GTM depressed the respiration of the biomixture and the initial mineralization rate of 14 C-chlorpyrifos; nonetheless, the antibiotics did not decrease overall mineralization values. The application of both formulations in the biomixture at a relevant concentration did not harm the removal of the fungicides carbendazim and metalaxyl, or their enhanced degradation; on the other hand, the biomixture was unable to dissipate tebuconazol or triadimenol, a result that was unchanged during the addition of the antibiotic formulations. These findings reveal that wastewater containing these antibiotics do not affect the performance of BPS. However, such a response may vary depending on the type of pesticide and microbial consortium in the biomixture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ag doped hollow TiO2 nanoparticles as an effective green fungicide against Fusarium solani and Venturia inaequalis phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Boxi, Siddhartha Sankar; Mukherjee, Khushi; Paria, Santanu

    2016-02-26

    Chemical-based pesticides are widely used in agriculture to protect crops from insect infestation and diseases. However, the excessive use of highly toxic pesticides causes several human health (neurological, tumor, cancer) and environmental problems. Therefore nanoparticle-based green pesticides have become of special importance in recent years. The antifungal activities of pure and Ag doped (solid and hollow) TiO2 nanoparticles are studied against two potent phytopathogens, Fusarium solani (which causes Fusarium wilt disease in potato, tomato, etc) and Venturia inaequalis (which causes apple scab disease) and it is found that hollow nanoparticles are more effective than the other two. The antifungal activities of the nanoparticles were further enhanced against these two phytopathogens under visible light exposure. The fungicidal effect of the nanoparticles depends on different parameters, such as particle concentration and the intensity of visible light. The minimum inhibitory dose of the nanoparticles for V. inaequalis and F. solani are 0.75 and 0.43 mg/plate. The presence of Ag as a dopant helps in the formation of stable Ag-S and disulfide bonds (R-S-S-R) in cellular protein, which leads to cell damage. During photocatalysis generated (•)OH radicals loosen the cell wall structure and this finally leads to cell death. The mechanisms of the fungicidal effect of nanoparticles against these two phytopathogens are supported by biuret and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride analyses and field emission electron microscopy. Apart from the fungicidal effect, at a very low dose (0.015 mg/plate) the nanoparticles are successful in arresting production of toxic napthoquinone pigment for F. solani which is related to the fungal pathogenecity. The nanoparticles are found to be effective in protecting potatoes affected by F. solani or other fungi from spoiling.

  5. Ag doped hollow TiO2 nanoparticles as an effective green fungicide against Fusarium solani and Venturia inaequalis phytopathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Boxi, Siddhartha; Mukherjee, Khushi; Paria, Santanu

    2016-02-01

    Chemical-based pesticides are widely used in agriculture to protect crops from insect infestation and diseases. However, the excessive use of highly toxic pesticides causes several human health (neurological, tumor, cancer) and environmental problems. Therefore nanoparticle-based green pesticides have become of special importance in recent years. The antifungal activities of pure and Ag doped (solid and hollow) TiO2 nanoparticles are studied against two potent phytopathogens, Fusarium solani (which causes Fusarium wilt disease in potato, tomato, etc) and Venturia inaequalis (which causes apple scab disease) and it is found that hollow nanoparticles are more effective than the other two. The antifungal activities of the nanoparticles were further enhanced against these two phytopathogens under visible light exposure. The fungicidal effect of the nanoparticles depends on different parameters, such as particle concentration and the intensity of visible light. The minimum inhibitory dose of the nanoparticles for V. inaequalis and F. solani are 0.75 and 0.43 mg/plate. The presence of Ag as a dopant helps in the formation of stable Ag-S and disulfide bonds (R-S-S-R) in cellular protein, which leads to cell damage. During photocatalysis generated •OH radicals loosen the cell wall structure and this finally leads to cell death. The mechanisms of the fungicidal effect of nanoparticles against these two phytopathogens are supported by biuret and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride analyses and field emission electron microscopy. Apart from the fungicidal effect, at a very low dose (0.015 mg/plate) the nanoparticles are successful in arresting production of toxic napthoquinone pigment for F. solani which is related to the fungal pathogenecity. The nanoparticles are found to be effective in protecting potatoes affected by F. solani or other fungi from spoiling.

  6. Agricultural Products | National Agricultural Library

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to main content Home National Agricultural Library United States Department of Agriculture Ag News Contact Us Search  Log inRegister Home Home Agricultural Products NEWT: National Extension Web , tables, graphs), Agricultural Products html National Animal Nutrition Program (NANP) Feed Composition

  7. Metabolic and Dynamic Profiling for Risk Assessment of Fluopyram, a Typical Phenylamide Fungicide Widely Applied in Vegetable Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Peng; Liu, Yanan; Li, Wenzhuo; Qian, Yuan; Nie, Yanxia; Kim, Dongyeop; Wang, Mengcen

    2016-01-01

    Fluopyram, a typical phenylamide fungicide, was widely applied to protect fruit vegetables from fungal pathogens-responsible yield loss. Highly linked to the ecological and dietary risks, its residual and metabolic profiles in the fruit vegetable ecosystem still remained obscure. Here, an approach using modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) extraction combined with GC-MS/MS analysis was developed to investigate fluopyram fate in the typical fruit vegetables including tomato, cucumber, pepper under the greenhouse environment. Fluopyram dissipated in accordance with the first-order rate dynamics equation with the maximum half-life of 5.7 d. Cleveage of fluopyram into 2-trifluoromethyl benzamide and subsequent formation of 3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl) pyridine-2-acetic acid and 3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl) picolinic acid was elucidated to be its ubiquitous metabolic pathway. Moreover, the incurrence of fluopyram at the pre-harvest interval (PHI) of 7–21 d was between 0.0108 and 0.1603 mg/kg, and the Hazard Quotients (HQs) were calculated to be less than 1, indicating temporary safety on consumption of the fruit vegetables incurred with fluopyram, irrespective of the uncertain toxicity of the metabolites. Taken together, our findings reveal the residual essential of fluopyram in the typical agricultural ecosystem, and would advance the further insight into ecological risk posed by this fungicide associated with its metabolites. PMID:27654708

  8. Metabolic and Dynamic Profiling for Risk Assessment of Fluopyram, a Typical Phenylamide Fungicide Widely Applied in Vegetable Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Liu, Yanan; Li, Wenzhuo; Qian, Yuan; Nie, Yanxia; Kim, Dongyeop; Wang, Mengcen

    2016-09-01

    Fluopyram, a typical phenylamide fungicide, was widely applied to protect fruit vegetables from fungal pathogens-responsible yield loss. Highly linked to the ecological and dietary risks, its residual and metabolic profiles in the fruit vegetable ecosystem still remained obscure. Here, an approach using modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) extraction combined with GC-MS/MS analysis was developed to investigate fluopyram fate in the typical fruit vegetables including tomato, cucumber, pepper under the greenhouse environment. Fluopyram dissipated in accordance with the first-order rate dynamics equation with the maximum half-life of 5.7 d. Cleveage of fluopyram into 2-trifluoromethyl benzamide and subsequent formation of 3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl) pyridine-2-acetic acid and 3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl) picolinic acid was elucidated to be its ubiquitous metabolic pathway. Moreover, the incurrence of fluopyram at the pre-harvest interval (PHI) of 7-21 d was between 0.0108 and 0.1603 mg/kg, and the Hazard Quotients (HQs) were calculated to be less than 1, indicating temporary safety on consumption of the fruit vegetables incurred with fluopyram, irrespective of the uncertain toxicity of the metabolites. Taken together, our findings reveal the residual essential of fluopyram in the typical agricultural ecosystem, and would advance the further insight into ecological risk posed by this fungicide associated with its metabolites.

  9. Environmental behavior and analysis of agricultural sulfur.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Corey M; Woodrow, James E; Seiber, James N

    2015-11-01

    Sulfur has been widely used for centuries as a staple for pest and disease management in agriculture. Presently, it is the largest-volume pesticide in use worldwide. This review describes the sources and recovery methods for sulfur, its allotropic forms and properties and its agricultural uses, including development and potential advantages of nanosulfur as a fungicide. Chemical and microbial reactivity, interactions in soil and water and analytical methods for determination in environmental samples and foodstuffs, including inexpensive analytical methods for sulfur residues in wine, beer and other food/beverage substrates, will be reviewed. The toxicology of sulfur towards humans and agriculturally important fungi is included, with some restrictions on use to promote safety. The review concludes with areas for which more research is warranted. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Agriculture: Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Climate change affects agricultural producers because agriculture and fisheries depend on specific climate conditions. Temperature changes can cause crop planting dates to shift. Droughts and floods due to climate change may hinder farming practices.

  11. Grassland agriculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agriculture in grassland environments is facing multiple stresses from: shifting demographics, declining and fragmented agricultural landscapes, declining environmental quality, variable and changing climate, volatile and increasing energy costs, marginal economic returns, and globalization. Degrad...

  12. Honey bee gut microbial communities are robust to the fungicide Pristine® consumed in pollen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Honeybees that consume pollen with sublethal levels of the fungicide Pristine® can have reduced pollen digestion, lower ATP synthesis and in many ways resemble malnourished bees. Reduced nutrient acquisition in bees exposed to Pristine® might be because this fungicide affects the composition of gut ...

  13. Fungicide resistance profiles for 13 Botrytis cinerea isolated from strawberry in southeastern Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: Fungicidal sprays have been widely used for disease control of gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. In recent years strawberry growers in southeastern Louisiana reported a failure of their fungicide spray programs to control Botrytis fruit rot. Botrytis cinerea has become resistant ...

  14. Activity of two strobilurin fungicides against three species of decay fungi in agar plate tests

    Treesearch

    Juliet D. Tang; Tina Ciaramitaro; Maria Tomaso-Peterson; Susan V. Diehl

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity of strobilurin fungicides against wood decay fungi in order to assess their potential to act as a co-biocide for copper-based wood protection. Two strobilurin fungicides, Heritage (50% azoxystrobin active ingredient) and Insignia (20% pyraclostrobin active ingredients), and copper sulfate pentahydrate were tested...

  15. Cercospora leaf spot: monitoring and managing fungicide resistance in populations of Cercospora beticola in Michigan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS, Cercospora beticola) is the most serious foliar disease of sugarbeet in Michigan and Ontario.Management of CLS depends on timely fungicide applications, disease forecasting prediction models and the use of CLS resistant sugar beet varieties. Fungicides have a dominant role...

  16. Effectiveness of fungicides in protecting Douglas-fir shoots from infection by Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    G.A. Chastagner; E.M. Hansen; K.L. Riley; W. Sutton

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of 20 systemic and contact fungicides in protecting Douglas-fir seedlings from infection by Phytophthora ramorum was determined. Some systemic products were applied about a week prior to bud break, while most treatments were applied just after bud break. In addition to the fungicides, two surfactants were included in the post-bud...

  17. Chemical control of blister rust on sugar pine...two fungicides show promise in California tests

    Treesearch

    Clarence R. Quick

    1967-01-01

    Among several fungicides tested, Phytoactin L-340 and Dowicide 1 (o-phenylphenol) showed the most promise for systemic chemical control of blister rust on sugar pine in northern California. The trials included 22 tests on 224 sugar pines: five with Acti-dione BR (cycloheximide), one each with five common chemical fungicides,and 12 with phytoactin. Apparent...

  18. Evaluating Headline fungicide on alfalfa production and sensitivity of pathogens to pyraclostrobin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Headline fungicide was recently registered for management of foliar diseases on alfalfa. The effect of disease control on yield, forage quality, and potential return on investment for fungicide application was determined for field experiments conducted at five locations in 2012, three in Wisconsin a...

  19. trans-Cinnamic acid and Xenorhabdus szentirmaii metabolites synergize the potency of some commercial fungicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we explored the efficacy of commercial fungicide interactions when combined with either TCA or X. szentirmaii. Fungicides (active ingredient) included Abound® (Azoxystrobin), Serenade® (Bacillus subtilis), Elast® (dodine), Regalia® (extract of Reynoutria sachalinensis), Prophyt® (potas...

  20. The effect of the residues of vineyard fungicides on postharvest decay, 2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose for this experiment was to quantify the effect of residues of vineyard fungicides on control of postharvest decay of table grapes. Mature (22% soluble solids content), freshly harvested ‘Princess Seedless’ grape clusters were arranged on metal racks. Fungicides were applied with an air b...

  1. [Effect of five fungicides on growth of Glycyrrhiza uralensis and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-ying; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Xiu-teng; Zhou, Liane-yun; Shao, Ai-juan; Chen, Mei-lan

    2015-12-01

    In order to obtain the fungicides with minimal impact on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, the effect of five fungicides including polyoxins, jinggangmycins, thiophanate methylate, chlorothalonil and carbendazim on the growth of medicinal plant and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis were studied. Pot cultured Glycyrrhiza uralensis was treated with different fungicides with the concentration that commonly used in the field. 60 d after treated with fungicides, infection rate, infection density, biomass indexes, photosyn- thetic index and the content of active component were measured. Experimental results showed that carbendazim had the strongest inhibition on mycorrhizal symbiosis effect. Carbendazim significantly inhibited the mycorrhizal infection rate, significantly suppressed the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. Polyoxins showed the lowest inhibiting affection. Polyoxins had no significant effect on mycorrhizal infection rate, the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. The other three fungicides also had an inhibitory effect on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, and the inhibition degrees were all between polyoxins's and carbendazim's. The author considered that fungicide's inhibition degree on mycorrhizal effect might be related with the species of fungicides, so the author suggested that the farmer should try to choose bio-fungicides like polyoxins.

  2. Experimental fungicidal control of blister rust on sugar pine in California

    Treesearch

    Clarence R. Quick

    1964-01-01

    Parallel series of exploratory experiments with antifungal antibiotics and conventional chemical fungicides for control of blister rust on sugar pine were started in northern California in 1959. Several fungicides, both antibiotic and conventional, appear slightly systemic, but all tested materials are more effective when sprayed directly on infected tissues....

  3. Seed Treatment with Systemic Fungicides for the Control of Fusiform Rust in Loblolly Pine

    Treesearch

    John G. Mexal; Glenn A. Snow

    1978-01-01

    A new systemic fungicide, Bayleton, may economically control fusiform rust in southern pine nurseries. Stratified seeds of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) were imbibed with Bayleton and two other systemic fungicides, and the seedlings were inoculated at three stages of emergence with spores of Cronartium quercuum (Berk.) Miyabe ex...

  4. Effects of Oral Exposure to Fungicides on Honey Bee Nutrition and Virus Levels.

    PubMed

    Degrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Chen, Yanping; Watkins Dejong, Emily; Chambers, Mona L; Hidalgo, Geoffrey

    2015-12-01

    Sublethal exposure to fungicides can affect honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in ways that resemble malnutrition. These include reduced brood rearing, queen loss, and increased pathogen levels. We examined the effects of oral exposure to the fungicides boscalid and pyraclostrobin on factors affecting colony nutrition and immune function including pollen consumption, protein digestion, hemolymph protein titers, and changes in virus levels. Because the fungicides are respiratory inhibitors, we also measured ATP concentrations in flight muscle. The effects were evaluated in 3- and 7-d-old worker bees at high fungicide concentrations in cage studies, and at field-relevant concentrations in colony studies. Though fungicide levels differed greatly between the cage and colony studies, similar effects were observed. Hemolymph protein concentrations were comparable between bees feeding on pollen with and without added fungicides. However, in both cage and colony studies, bees consumed less pollen containing fungicides and digested less of the protein. Bees fed fungicide-treated pollen also had lower ATP concentrations and higher virus titers. The combination of effects we detected could produce symptoms that are similar to those from poor nutrition and weaken colonies making them more vulnerable to loss from additional stressors such as parasites and pathogens. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. Agricultural Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This brochure describes the philosophy and scope of a secondary-level course in agricultural production. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: careers in agriculture and agribusiness, animal science and livestock production, agronomy, agricultural mechanics, supervised occupational experience programs, and the…

  6. Assessment of silicone as support to investigate the transformation routes of organic chemicals under environmental conditions and UV exposure. Application to selected fungicides.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, T; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Cela, R

    2013-05-01

    The suitability of bulk silicone as support to follow the degradation of chemical compounds under environmental conditions and UV radiation is illustrated selecting three fungicides (fenhexamid, FEN; triadimenol, TRI and difenoconazole, DIF) as model compounds. These precursor species were first absorbed in silicone supports (10 mm length × 2 mm i.d. and 0.5 mm thickness) and then kept outdoors for several days (up to 2 months) or exposed to UV radiation (254 nm), from a low pressure mercury lamp, in the laboratory. Degradation of precursor fungicides and by-products formation was followed by liquid chromatography (LC) quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS), after desorption of silicone supports using 0.5 mL of acetonitrile. Half-lives (t(1/2)) measured under UV exposure varied from 5 to 100 min. As regards environmental conditions, the most stable fungicide was DIF, degraded by just 15 % after 2 months; whereas, t(1/2) values of 30 and 83 h were calculated for FEN during summer and autumn, respectively. Supports contained by-products arising from precursor species through de-chlorination, cleavage, hydroxylation, intra-molecular cyclation and oligomerization reactions. Most of them have been previously identified in soil surface, vegetable leaves and water after application of fungicides in agriculture fields. The low cost of silicone tubes (ca. 0.4 Euros), added to their excellent chemical stability and capability to retain precursor species and their by-products, make them ideal supports to follow the transformation routes of organic compounds under environmental and simulated conditions, even for relatively stable species with t(1/2) in the range of weeks or months.

  7. Metabolite profiles of striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peronii) larvae exposed to the anti-androgenic fungicides vinclozolin and propiconazole are consistent with altered steroidogenesis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Steven D; Leusch, Frederic D L; Carroll, Anthony R

    2018-06-01

    Amphibians use wetlands in urban and agricultural landscapes for breeding, growth and development. Fungicides and other pesticides used in these areas have therefore been identified as potential threats that could contribute towards amphibian population declines. However, relatively little is known about how such chemicals influence sensitive early life-stages or how short episodic exposures influence sub-lethal physiological and metabolic pathways. The present study applied untargeted metabolomics to evaluate effects in early post-hatch amphibian larvae exposed to the anti-androgenic fungicides vinclozolin and propiconazole. Recently hatched (Gosner developmental stage 25) striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peronii) larvae were exposed for 96 h to vinclozolin at 17.5, 174.8 and 1748.6 nM and propiconazole at 5.8, 58.4 and 584.4 nM. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was performed on polar metabolites obtained from whole-body extracts. Both fungicides altered metabolite profiles compared to control animals at all concentrations tested, and there were notable differences between the two chemicals. Overall responses were consistent with altered steroidogenesis and/or cholesterol metabolism, with inconsistent responses between the two fungicides likely reflecting minor differences in the mechanisms of action of these chemicals. Broad down-regulation of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was also observed and is indicative of oxidative stress. Interestingly, formic acid was significantly increased in larvae exposed to vinclozolin but not propiconazole, suggesting this metabolite may serve as a useful biomarker of exposure to androgen-receptor binding anti-androgenic contaminants. This study demonstrates the power of untargeted metabolomics for distinguishing between similarly acting, but distinct, pollutants and for unraveling non-endocrine responses resulting from exposure to known endocrine active contaminants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All

  8. Activity of a novel strobilurin fungicide benzothiostrobin against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Congying; Hou, Yiping; Wang, Jianxin; Yang, Guangfu; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Mingguo

    2014-10-01

    Benzothiostrobin is a novel strobilurin fungicide. In this study, baseline sensitivity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary to benzothiostrobin was determined using 100 strains collected during 2012 and 2013 from different geographical regions in Jiangsu Province of China, and the average EC50 value was 0.0218 (± 0.0111)μg/mL for mycelial growth. After benzothiostrobin treatment, hyphae were contorted with offshoot of top increasing and cell membrane permeability increased markedly, while sclerotial production and oxalic acid content significantly decreased. Benzothiostrobin strongly inhibited mycelial respiration within 12h and the oxygen consumption of the mycelia could not be inhibited after 24h. On detached rapeseed leaves, the protective and curative activity test of benzothiostrobin suggested that benzothiostrobin had good control efficiency against S. sclerotiorum, and protective activity was better than curative activity. These results will contribute to us evaluating the potential of the new strobilurin fungicide benzothiostrobin for management of diseases caused by S. sclerotiorum and understanding the mode of action of benzothiostrobin against S. sclerotiorum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective effects of two systemic fungicides on soil fungi.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, H M; Abdel-Kader, M I; Hamida, S

    1982-08-20

    BAS 317 00F was not toxic to the total count of fungi after 2 days but was regularly significantly toxic at the three doses after 5, 20 and 40 days and toxic at the low and the high doses after 80 days. In the agar medium, it was toxic to the counts of total fungi. Aspergillus, A. terreus, Rhizopus oryzae and Mucor racemosus at the high dose. Only the mycelial growth of Trichoderma viride which was significantly inhibited by the three doses when this fungicide was added to the liquid medium. Polyram-Combi induced two effects on the total population of soil fungi. One inhibitory and this was demonstrated almost regularly after 2, 10 and 40 days and the other stimulatory after 80 days of treatment with the low and the high doses. In the agar medium, this fungicide was very toxic to total fungi and to almost all fungal genera and species at the three doses. Several fungi could survive the high dose. In liquid medium, the test fungi showed variable degree of sensitivity and the most sensitive was Gliocladium roseum which was completely eradicated by the three doses.

  10. Assessment of spent mushroom substrate as sorbent of fungicides: influence of sorbent and sorbate properties.

    PubMed

    Marín-Benito, Jesús M; Rodríguez-Cruz, M Sonia; Andrades, M Soledad; Sánchez-Martín, María J

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) as a sorbent of fungicides was evaluated for its possible use in regulating pesticide mobility in the environment. The sorption studies involved four different SMS types in terms of nature and treatment and eight fungicides selected as representative compounds from different chemical groups. Nonlinear sorption isotherms were observed for all SMS-fungicide combinations. The highest sorption was obtained by composted SMS from Agaricus bisporus cultivation. A significant negative and positive correlation was obtained between the K(OC) sorption constants and the polarity index values of sorbents and the K(OW) of fungicides, respectively. The statistic revealed that more than 77% of the variability in the K(OW) could be explained considering these properties jointly. The other properties of both the sorbent (total carbon, dissolved organic carbon, or pH) and the sorbate (water solubility) were nonsignificant. The hysteresis values for cyprodinil (log K(OW)= 4) were for all the sorbents much higher (>3) than for other fungicides. This was consistent with the remaining sorption after desorption considered as an indicator of the sorption efficiency of SMS for fungicides. Changes in the absorption bands of fungicides sorbed by SMS observed by FTIR permitted establishing the interaction mechanism of fungicides with SMS. The findings of this work provide evidence for the potential capacity of SMS as a sorbent of fungicides and the low desorption observed especially for some fungicides, although they suggest that more stabilized or humified organic substrates should be produced to enhance their efficiency in environmental applications. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  11. Genotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by the fungicide azoxystrobin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) livers.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingnan; Liu, Tong; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Lusheng

    2016-10-01

    Azoxystrobin is a frequently used fungicide in agriculture. Its toxicological effects on non-target organisms have aroused attention. In the present work, the toxic effects of azoxystrobin on zebrafish (Danio rerio) were investigated. Male and female zebrafish were separately exposed to a control solution and three azoxystrobin treatments (1, 10, and 100μg/L) and were sampled on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were accumulated in excess in the zebrafish livers. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly inhibited in the male zebrafish. Moreover, a notable decrease was also observed after day 21 in the female zebrafish. Catalase (CAT) activity was induced by the azoxystrobin treatments with the exception of the 1μg/L treatment. A significant increase in glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity was observed after day 21. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) was generated, and DNA damage was enhanced in a concentration-dependent manner. In conclusion, azoxystrobin induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in zebrafish livers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vocational Agriculture Education. Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Eddie; And Others

    To assist teachers in agricultural mechanics in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the mechanical skills and knowlege necessary for this specialized area. Six sections are included, as follow: orientation and safety; agricultural mechanics skills; agricultural power and machinery; agricultural…

  13. United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service research on natural products for pest management.

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O; Baerson, Scott R; Dayan, Franck E; Rimando, Agnes M; Scheffler, Brian E; Tellez, Mario R; Wedge, David E; Schrader, Kevin K; Akey, David H; Arthur, Frank H; De Lucca, Anthony J; Gibson, Donna M; Harrison, Howard F; Peterson, Joseph K; Gealy, David R; Tworkoski, Thomas; Wilson, Charles L; Morris, J Brad

    2003-01-01

    Recent research of the Agricultural Research Service of USDA on the use of natural products to manage pests is summarized. Studies of the use of both phytochemicals and diatomaceous earth to manage insect pests are discussed. Chemically characterized compounds, such as a saponin from pepper (Capsicum frutescens L), benzaldehyde, chitosan and 2-deoxy-D-glucose are being studied as natural fungicides. Resin glycosides for pathogen resistance in sweet potato and residues of semi-tropical leguminous plants for nematode control are also under investigation. Bioassay-guided isolation of compounds with potential use as herbicides or herbicide leads is underway at several locations. New natural phytotoxin molecular target sites (asparagine synthetase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase) have been discovered. Weed control in sweet potato and rice by allelopathy is under investigation. Molecular approaches to enhance allelopathy in sorghum are also being undertaken. The genes for polyketide synthases involved in production of pesticidal polyketide compounds in fungi are found to provide clues for pesticide discovery. Gene expression profiles in response to fungicides and herbicides are being generated as tools to understand more fully the mode of action and to rapidly determine the molecular target site of new, natural fungicides and herbicides.

  14. Influence of biochar on the enantioselective behavior of the chiral fungicide metalaxyl in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gámiz, Beatriz; Pignatello, Joseph J.; Hermosín, María Carmen; Cox, Lucía; Celis, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Chiral pesticides comprise an emerging and important class of organic pollutants currently, accounting for more than a quarter of used pesticides. Consequently, the contamination problems caused by chiral pesticides are concern matter and factors affecting enantioselective processes of chiral pesticides in soil need to be understood. For example, certain soil management practices, such as the use of organic amendments, can affect the enantioselective behavior of chiral pesticides in soils. Recently, biochar (BC), i.e. organic matter subjected to pyrolysis, has been proposed as organic amendment due to beneficial properties such as its high stability against decay in soil environments and its apparent ability to influence the availability of nutrients. BC is considered to be more biologically inert as compared to otherforms of organic carbon. However, its side-effects on the enantioselectivity of processes affecting the fate of chiral pesticides is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of biochar (BC) on the enantioselectivity of sorption, degradation, and leaching of the chiral fungicide metalaxyl in an agricultural soil. Amending the soil with BC (2% w/w) resulted in 3 times higher sorption of metalaxyl enantiomers compared to unamended soil, but no enantioselectivity in the process was observed. Moreover, both enantiomers showed some resistance to be desorbed in BC-amended soil compared to unamended soil. Dissipation studies revealed that the degradation of metalaxylwas more enantioselective in the unamended soil than in BC-amended soil. In unamended soil, R-metalaxyl(biologically active) and S- metalaxyl had half-lives (t1/2) of 3 and 34 days, respectively. BC enhanced the persistence of both enantiomers in the soil, with R-metalaxyl being degraded faster (t1/2=43 days) than S-metalaxyl (t1/2= 100 days). The leaching of both S-and R-metalaxyl was almost suppressed after amending the soil with BC; less than 10% of the fungicide applied to soil

  15. Soil microbial toxicity assessment of a copper-based fungicide in two contrasting soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dober, Melanie; Deltedesco, Evi; Jöchlinger, Lisa; Schneider, Martin; Gorfer, Markus; Bruckner, Alexander; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Soja, Gerhard; Zehetner, Franz; Keiblinger, Katharina Maria

    2016-04-01

    The infestation with the fungus downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola) causes dramatic losses in wine production. Copper (Cu) based fungicides have been used in viticulture since the end of the 19th century, and until today both conventional and organic viticulture strongly rely on Cu to prevent and reduce fungal diseases. Consequently, Cu has built up in many vineyard soils and it is still unclear how this affects soil functioning. The aim of the present study is the evaluation of the soil microbial toxicity of Cu contamination. Two contrasting agricultural soils, an acidic sandy soil and a calcareous loamy soil, were sampled to conduct an eco-toxicological greenhouse pot experiment. The soils were spiked with a commonly used fungicide based on copper hydroxid in seven concentrations (0, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1500 and 5000 mg Cu kg-1 soil) and Lucerne (Medicago sativa L. cultivar. Plato) was grown in the pots for 3 months. Sampling was conducted at the beginning and at the end of the study period to test copper's soil microbial toxicity in total microbial biomass and basal respiration, as well as enzyme activities, such as exoglucanase, β-glucosidase, exochitinase, phosphatase, protease, phenol-, peroxidase and urease. Additionally, DOC, TN, Cmic, Nmic, NO3 and NH4 were determined to provide further insight into the carbon and nitrogen cycle. Microbial community structure was analysed by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), and ergosterol as a fungal biomarker. In addition, molecular tools were applied by extracting soil DNA and performing real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and a metagenomic approach using 16S and ITS amplification and sequencing with MiSeq platform for the second sampling. Hydrolytic extracellular enzymes were not clearly affected by rising Cu concentrations, while a trend of increasing activity of oxidative enzymes (phenol- and peroxidase) was observed. Microbial respiration rate as well as the amount of Cmic and Nmic decreased with

  16. Clonal variation in physiological responses of Daphnia magna to the strobilurin fungicide azoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    Warming, Trine Perlt; Mulderij, Gabi; Christoffersen, Kirsten Seestern

    2009-02-01

    Because of its high grazing potential, Daphnia magna is an ecologically important species in aquatic food webs. This is especially true in small, shallow ponds lacking fish, where grazing by D. magna may have a relatively higher impact on water clarity as compared to larger lakes. Thus, a reduction in daphnid abundance may have dramatic ecological consequences for shallow ponds. At the same time, shallow ponds in close proximity to agricultural areas likely experience higher concentrations of pesticides because of runoff, spray drift, and drain flow. In the present study, the acute and chronic physiological effects of the strobilurin fungicide azoxystrobin on three clones of D. magna originating from different Danish lakes were evaluated. Significant clonal variation in the sensitivity of D. magna toward azoxystrobin was demonstrated. One clone had a 48-h median lethal concentration (LC50) of 0.277 mg/L (95% confidence limits [CL], 0.145 and 0.427 mg/L), which is comparable to the value widely used in risk assessments (0.259 mg/L). The two remaining clones were far more sensitive, however, and had LC50s of 0.071 mg/L (95% CL, 0.034 and 0.126 mg/L) and 0.098 mg/L (95% CL, 0.066 and 0.139 mg/L), respectively. Furthermore, through respiration measurements and life-table experiments, sublethal stress was shown to exist at exposure to an ecologically relevant concentration (0.026 microg/L). Based on these results, we may expect changes in daphnid populations at azoxystrobin concentrations much lower than previously thought. Thus, ponds in the agricultural areas may experience changes in food-web structure even at very low concentrations of azoxystrobin.

  17. Spread of Botrytis cinerea Strains with Multiple Fungicide Resistance in German Horticulture

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Sabrina; Weber, Roland W. S.; Rieger, Daniel; Detzel, Peter; Hahn, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a major plant pathogen, causing gray mold rot in a variety of cultures. Repeated fungicide applications are common but have resulted in the development of fungal populations with resistance to one or more fungicides. In this study, we have monitored fungicide resistance frequencies and the occurrence of multiple resistance in Botrytis isolates from raspberries, strawberries, grapes, stone fruits and ornamental flowers in Germany in 2010 to 2015. High frequencies of resistance to all classes of botryticides was common in all cultures, and isolates with multiple fungicide resistance represented a major part of the populations. A monitoring in a raspberry field over six seasons revealed a continuous increase in resistance frequencies and the emergence of multiresistant Botrytis strains. In a cherry orchard and a vineyard, evidence of the immigration of multiresistant strains from the outside was obtained. Inoculation experiments with fungicide-treated leaves in the laboratory and with strawberry plants cultivated in the greenhouse or outdoors revealed a nearly complete loss of fungicide efficacy against multiresistant strains. B. cinerea field strains carrying multiple resistance mutations against all classes of site-specific fungicides were found to show similar fitness as sensitive field strains under laboratory conditions, based on their vegetative growth, reproduction, stress resistance, virulence and competitiveness in mixed infection experiments. Our data indicate an alarming increase in the occurrence of multiresistance in B. cinerea populations from different cultures, which presents a major threat to the chemical control of gray mold. PMID:28096799

  18. Consequences of co-applying insecticides and fungicides for managing Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on onion.

    PubMed

    Nault, Brian A; Hsu, Cynthia L; Hoepting, Christine A

    2013-07-01

    Insecticides and fungicides are commonly co-applied in a tank mix to protect onions from onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman, and foliar pathogens. Co-applications reduce production costs, but past research shows that an insecticide's performance can be reduced when co-applied with a fungicide. An evaluation was made of the effects of co-applying spinetoram, abamectin and spirotetramat with commonly used fungicides, with and without the addition of a penetrating surfactant, on onion thrips control in onion fields. Co-applications of insecticides with chlorothalonil fungicides reduced thrips control by 25-48% compared with control levels provided by the insecticides alone in three of five trials. Inclusion of a penetrating surfactant at recommended rates with the insecticide and chlorothalonil fungicide did not consistently overcome this problem. Co-applications of insecticides with other fungicides did not interfere with thrips control. Co-applications of pesticides targeting multiple organisms should be examined closely to ensure that control of each organism is not compromised. To manage onion thrips in onion most effectively, insecticides should be applied with a penetrating surfactant, and should be applied separately from chlorothalonil fungicides. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Spread of Botrytis cinerea Strains with Multiple Fungicide Resistance in German Horticulture.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Sabrina; Weber, Roland W S; Rieger, Daniel; Detzel, Peter; Hahn, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a major plant pathogen, causing gray mold rot in a variety of cultures. Repeated fungicide applications are common but have resulted in the development of fungal populations with resistance to one or more fungicides. In this study, we have monitored fungicide resistance frequencies and the occurrence of multiple resistance in Botrytis isolates from raspberries, strawberries, grapes, stone fruits and ornamental flowers in Germany in 2010 to 2015. High frequencies of resistance to all classes of botryticides was common in all cultures, and isolates with multiple fungicide resistance represented a major part of the populations. A monitoring in a raspberry field over six seasons revealed a continuous increase in resistance frequencies and the emergence of multiresistant Botrytis strains. In a cherry orchard and a vineyard, evidence of the immigration of multiresistant strains from the outside was obtained. Inoculation experiments with fungicide-treated leaves in the laboratory and with strawberry plants cultivated in the greenhouse or outdoors revealed a nearly complete loss of fungicide efficacy against multiresistant strains. B. cinerea field strains carrying multiple resistance mutations against all classes of site-specific fungicides were found to show similar fitness as sensitive field strains under laboratory conditions, based on their vegetative growth, reproduction, stress resistance, virulence and competitiveness in mixed infection experiments. Our data indicate an alarming increase in the occurrence of multiresistance in B. cinerea populations from different cultures, which presents a major threat to the chemical control of gray mold.

  20. Agriculture, summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, R.

    1975-01-01

    Applications of remotely sensed data in agriculture are enumerated. These include: predictions of forage for range animal consumption, forest management, soil mapping, and crop inventory and management.

  1. Fungicide application method’ and the interpretation of mycorrhizal fungus insect indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Robert A.; Addicott, John F.

    2008-09-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi, by altering their host plant's physiology, can have indirect effects on insect herbivores. The 'fungicide application method' is a common approach used to investigate the indirect effects of mycorrhizal fungi on insects. This approach works by using initially mycorrhizal plants, and then generating a subset of these plants that are free of mycorrhizal fungi by applying fungicide to their roots. When insect feeding-bioassays are conducted using the resulting mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants, differences in insect performance are typically attributed to differences in mycorrhizal colonization per se, rather than the application of the fungicide. Thus, the fungicide application method relies on the assumption that there is no direct toxicity of the fungicide on the focal insect species, and no indirect effects on the focal insect resulting from effects of the fungicide on the host plant or on non-target soil micro-organisms. We tested this critical assumption by feeding Zygogramma exclamationis (Chrysomelidae) larvae on non-mycorrhizal Helianthus annuus (Asteraceae) plants whose roots were treated with a solution of the fungicide benomyl or with a distilled water control. Larvae fed on benomyl-treated plants had reduced survival, lower relative growth rate, and lower food conversion efficiency, compared to larvae fed on control plants. Hence, fungicides applied to roots can affect herbivorous insect performance even in the absence of the possibility of mycorrhizal fungi-mediated effects. We recommend caution when using fungicide application and suggest that selective inoculation is a preferable method of generating mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants when studying mycorrhizal fungi-insect indirect effects.

  2. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch

    Objective: Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. Methods: The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose–response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach.more » Results: The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50}. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Conclusion: Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Practice: Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Implications: Our evaluation provides an appropriate “proof of concept”, but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. - Highlights: • Humans are exposed to pesticide mixtures such as pyrethroids and azole fungicides. • We assessed the antiandrogenicity of

  3. Genetic progress in oat associated with fungicide use in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Follmann, D N; Cargnelutti Filho, A; Lúcio, A D; de Souza, V Q; Caraffa, M; Wartha, C A

    2016-12-19

    The State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) is the largest producer of oat in Brazil with the aid of consolidated breeding programs, which are constantly releasing new cultivars. The main objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate the annual genetic progress in grain yield and hectoliter weight of the oat cultivars in RS, with and without fungicide use on aerial parts of plants; and 2) evaluate the efficiency of oat breeding programs in introducing disease-resistant genes in the released cultivars through network yield trials conducted with and without fungicide use on aerial plant parts. The data on grain yield and hectoliter weight were obtained from 89 competition field trials of oat cultivars carried out from 2007 to 2014 in nine municipalities of RS. Of the total 89 trials, 44 were carried out with fungicide application on aerial plant parts and 45 were carried out without fungicide application. The annual genetic progress in oat cultivars was studied using the methodology proposed by Vencovsky (1988). The annual genetic progress in oat grain yield was 1.02% with fungicide use and 4.02% without fungicide use during the eight-year study period in RS. The annual genetic progress with respect to the hectoliter weight was 0.08% for trials with fungicide use and 0.71% for trials without fungicide use. Performing network yield trials with and without fungicide use on the aerial plants parts is a feasible method to evaluate the efficiency of oat breeding programs in introducing disease-resistant genes in the released cultivars.

  4. Mercurial fungicidal seed protectant toxic for sheep and chickens

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, J.S.

    1963-01-01

    An experiment was performed to determine the amount of a mercurial fungicidal seed protectant that would produce toxicosis in sheep and chickens. Varying daily doses were used in the tolerance study. All experimental subjects died from toxicosis after varying treatment periods. Signs of toxicosis were loss of weight associated with anorexia, diarrhea, stilted gait, lameness in 1 or more limbs, and clear mucous nasal discharge in treated sheep; in chickens, there were bleached combs, depression, and partial and complete paralysis. Necropsy findings were typical of metallic weight losses in all sheep on treatment, varying in direct proportion to daily intake.more » In the chickens, weight gains were observed in all but 1 of the treated birds as well as in the controls; however, the treated chickens had lower gains. 2 tables.« less

  5. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Since its introduction in 1983 imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest, such as tubers and citrus fruits. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal enzyme, lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, imazalil can inhibit a range of cytochrome p450 enzymes, including one or more involved in steroid biosynthesis. Previous in vitro and high throughput screening assays showed that imazalil can cause aromatase inhibition and reduce 17â-estradiol (E2) production by H295R cells. In the present study, we tested imazalil in a number of in vitro and in vivo bioassays with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to evaluate whether it would elicit effects consistent with an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) linking inhibition of aromatase to reduced fecundity. Ex vivo ovarian E2 and testosterone (T) production by ovary tissue from reproductively mature female P. promelas exposed to imazalil for 24 h at concentrations of 100, 500 and 1580 µg/L were significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls. Plasma E2 concentrations of females exposed for 24 h were significantly lower at imazalil concentrations of 80 and 250 µg/L, but not 2.5, 8, and 25 µg/L. In a separate 60 h exposure, plasma E2 concentrations were significantly lower than controls in mature P. promelas exposed to 200 ìg imazalil/L, but not at 0.2, 2, or 20 ug/L. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses measuring relative abundance of mRNA transcripts for v

  6. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Since its introduction in 1983, imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal cytochrome P450 (cyp), lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, imazalil can inhibit a range of cyp enzymes, including one or more involved in steroid biosynthesis in vertebrates. Previous in vitro assays showed that imazalil can cause aromatase inhibition and reduce 17â-estradiol (E2) production by H295R cells. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of imazalil in a 21 d Fish Short-Term Reproduction Assay (FSTRA) with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to evaluate whether the chemical would elicit effects consistent with an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) linking inhibition of aromatase to reduced fecundity. Fish were sampled at two time points (10, 21 d) and several endpoints (including key events [KE]s) associated with the AOP were measured. Fecundity also was determined daily. These data, combined with results of two previous exposures of 24 h and 60 h, produce a full time-course of effects. Ex vivo ovarian E2 production in females exposed to imazalil was significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls after 24 h at concentrations of 100, 500, and 1580 µg/L and remained significantly lower at 60 h, 10 d, and 21 d in fish exposed to 200 µg/L. Plasma E2 concentrations from females exposed for 24 h were significantly lower at imazalil concentrations of 80 and 250 µg/

  7. Aggregative stability of fungicidal nanomodifier based on zinc hydrosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishina, Anna; Korolev, Evgeniy

    2018-03-01

    Currently, there is a strong need of high performance multi functional materials in high-rise construction. Obviously, such materials should be characterized by high strength; but for interior rooms biosafety is important as well. The promising direction to obtain both high strength and maintain biosafety in buildings and structures is to manage the structure of mineral binders by means of fungicidal nanomodifier based on zinc hydrosilicates. In the present work the aggregative stability of colloidal solutions of zinc hydrosilicates after one year of storage was studied. It has been established that the concentration of iron (III) hydroxide used to prepare the precursor of zinc hydrosilicates has a significant effect on the long-term aggregative stability: as the concentration of iron (III) hydroxide increases, the resistance of the fungicidal nanomodifier increases. It was found that, despite the minimal concentration of nano-sized zinc hydrosilicates (0.028%), the colloidal solution possesses a low long-term aggregative stability; while in the initial period (not less than 14 days) the colloidal solution of the nanomodifier is aggregatively stable. It is shown that when the ratio in the colloidal solution of the amount of the substance CH3COOH / SiO2 = 0.43 is reached, an increase in the polymerization rate is observed, which is the main cause of low aggregative stability. Colloidal solutions containing zinc hydrosilicates synthesized at a concentration of iron (III) hydroxide used to produce a precursor equal to 0.7% have a long-term aggregative stability and do not significantly change the reduced particle. Such compositions are to be expediently used for the nanomodifying of building composites in order to control their structure formation and to create conditions that impede the development of various mycelial fungi.

  8. Pesticide Use and Cutaneous Melanoma in Pesticide Applicators in the Agricultural Heath Study

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Leslie K.; Lynch, Charles F.; Sandler, Dale P.; Alavanja, Michael C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Melanoma rates continue to increase; however, few risk factors other than sun sensitivity and ultraviolet radiation (including sun exposure) have been identified. Although studies of farmers have shown an excess risk of melanoma and other skin cancers, it is unclear how much of this is related to sun exposure compared with other agricultural exposures. Methods We examined dose–response relationships for 50 agricultural pesticides and cutaneous melanoma incidence in the Agricultural Health Study cohort of licensed pesticide applicators, along with ever use of older pesticides that contain arsenic. Logistic regression was used to examine odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with pesticide exposure adjusted for age, sex, and other potential confounders. Results We found significant associations between cutaneous melanoma and maneb/mancozeb (63 exposure days: OR = 2.4; 95% CI, 1.2–4.9; trend p = 0.006), parathion (≥ 56 exposure days: OR = 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3–4.4; trend p = 0.003), and carbaryl (≥ 56 exposure days: OR = 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1–2.5; trend p = 0.013). Other associations with benomyl and ever use of arsenical pesticides were also suggested. Conclusions Most previous melanoma literature has focused on host factors and sun exposure. Our research shows an association between several pesticides and melanoma, providing support for the hypotheses that agricultural chemicals may be another important source of melanoma risk. PMID:20164001

  9. Agricultural Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, W. J.; Switzenbaum, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of agricultural wastes, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) water characteristics and impacts; (2) waste treatment; (3) reuse of agricultural wastes; and (4) nonpoint pollution sources. A list of 150 references is also presented. (HM)

  10. Lead Agency Responsibilities to Keep Informed of Personnel Needs in the Food and Agricultural Sciences are not being Fully Met.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-28

    products De Kalb Agresearch, Inc. - operations include seed development and animal breeding research Doane-Western, Inc.’.- agricultural marketing ... research service E.I. Du Pont de Nemours and Co. - operations include producing fungicides, herbicides, seed protectants, and animal feed supplements

  11. Agricultural Energy Practices. Agriculture Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with agricultural energy practices. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss energy use and conservation of resources in the production of agricultural products. Some topics covered are basic uses of direct energy in…

  12. TRIADIMEFON, A TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDE, INDUCES STEREOTYPED BEHAVIOR AND ALTERS MONOAMINE METABOLISM IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, a triazole fungicide, has been observed to increase locomotion and induce stereotyped behavior in rodents. he present experiments characterized the stereotyped behavior induced by triadimefon using a computer-supported observational method, and tested the hypothesis ...

  13. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY-BASED METABOLOMICS FOR DIFFERENTIATING EXPOSURES TO TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES USING RAT URINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated as a metabolomic tool for assessing the impacts of exposure to environmental contaminants, using rat urine collected during the course of a toxicological study. Specifically, one of three triazole fungicides, myclobutanil, propiconazole or ...

  14. Gene Expression Profiling in Liver and Testis of Rats to Characterize the Toxicity of Triazole Fungicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected ...

  15. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING IN LIVER AND TESTIS OF RATS TO CHARACTERIZE THE TOXICITY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected ...

  16. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (Biolog(TM)) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  17. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Amaradasa, B. Sajeewa

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor), iprodione (unclear mode of action), thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis) and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors). Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50–100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR) loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each). Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed) generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001). Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the experiment

  18. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (BiologTM) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  19. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Amaradasa, B Sajeewa; Everhart, Sydney E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor), iprodione (unclear mode of action), thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis) and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors). Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50-100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR) loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each). Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed) generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001). Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the experiment, and

  20. Fungi and bacteria. [fungicide and bactericide measures for spacecraft in tropical regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    Spacecraft equipment is usually protected from fungi and bacteria by incorporating a fungicide-bactericide in the material, by a fungicide-bactericide spray, or by reducing the relative humidity to a degree where growth will not take place. A unique method to protect delicate, expensive bearings in equipment was to maintain a pressure (with dry air or nitrogen) slightly above the outside atmosphere (few millibars) within the working parts of the equipment, thus preventing fungi from entering equipment.

  1. Agriculture Sectors

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Agriculture sectors comprise establishments primarily engaged in growing crops, raising animals, and harvesting fish and other animals. Find information on compliance, enforcement and guidance on EPA laws and regulations on the NAICS 111 & 112 sectors.

  2. Agricultural Geophysics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The four geophysical methods predominantly used for agricultural purposes are resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and time domain reflectometry (TDR). Resistivity and electromagnetic induction methods are typically employed to map lateral variations of apparent so...

  3. Toxicity profiles in mice treated with hepatotumorigenic and non-hepatotumorigenic triazole conazole fungicides: Propiconazole, triadimefon, and myclobutanil.

    PubMed

    Allen, James W; Wolf, Douglas C; George, Michael H; Hester, Susan D; Sun, Guobin; Thai, Sheau-Fung; Delker, Don A; Moore, Tanya; Jones, Carlton; Nelson, Gail; Roop, Barbara C; Leavitt, Sharon; Winkfield, Ernest; Ward, William O; Nesnow, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Conazoles comprise a class of fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. The fungicidal properties of conazoles are due to their inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Certain conazoles are tumorigenic in rodents; both propiconazole and triadimefon are hepatotoxic and hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not a mouse liver tumorigen. As a component of a large-scale study aimed at determining the mode(s) of action for tumorigenic conazoles, we report the results from comparative evaluations of liver and body weights, liver histopathology, cell proliferation, cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity, and serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels after exposure to propiconazole, triadimefon, and myclobutanil. Male CD-1 mice were treated in the feed for 4, 30, or 90 days with triadimefon (0, 100, 500, or 1800 ppm), propiconazole (0, 100, 500, or 2500 ppm) or myclobutanil (0, 100, 500, or 2000 ppm). Alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (AROD) assays indicated that all 3 chemicals induced similar patterns of dose-related increases in metabolizing enzyme activity. PROD activities exceeded those of MROD, and EROD with propiconazole inducing the highest activities of PROD. Mice had similar patterns of dose-dependent increases in hepatocyte hypertrophy after exposure to the 3 conazoles. High-dose exposures to propiconazole and myclobutanil, but not triadimefon, were associated with early (4 days) increases in cell proliferation. All the chemicals at high doses reduced serum cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels at 30 days of treatment, while only triadimefon had this effect at 4 days of treatment and only myclobutanil and propiconazole at 90 days of treatment. Overall, the tumorigenic and nontumorigenic conazoles induced similar effects on mouse liver CYP enzyme activities and pathology. There was no specific pattern of tissue responses that could consistently be used to differentiate the tumorigenic conazoles

  4. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin.

    PubMed

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Fent, Karl

    2014-09-15

    Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose-response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC25 and EC50. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Our evaluation provides an appropriate "proof of concept", but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessing the impact of fungicide enostroburin application on bacterial community in wheat phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Gu, Likun; Bai, Zhihui; Jin, Bo; Hu, Qing; Wang, Huili; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Hongxun

    2010-01-01

    Fungicides have been used extensively for controlling fungal pathogens of plants. However, little is known regarding the effects that fungicides upon the indigenous bacterial communities within the plant phyllosphere. The aims of this study were to assess the impact of fungicide enostroburin upon bacterial communities in wheat phyllosphere. Culture-independent methodologies of 16S rDNA clone library and 16S rDNA directed polymerase chain reaction with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) were used for monitoring the change of bacterial community. The 16S rDNA clone library and PCR-DGGE analysis both confirmed the microbial community of wheat plant phyllosphere were predominantly of the gamma-Proteobacteria phyla. Results from PCR-DGGE analysis indicated a significant change in bacterial community structure within the phyllosphere following fungicide enostroburin application. Bands sequenced within control cultures were predominantly of Pseudomonas genus, but those bands sequenced in the treated samples were predominantly strains of Pantoea genus and Pseudomonas genus. Of interest was the appearance of two DGGE bands following fungicide treatment, one of which had sequence similarities (98%) to Pantoea sp. which might be a competitor of plant pathogens. This study revealed the wheat phyllosphere bacterial community composition and a shift in the bacterial community following fungicide enostroburin application.

  6. Agriculture: About EPA's National Agriculture Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's National Agriculture Center (Ag Center), with the support of the United States Department of Agriculture, serves growers, livestock producers, other agribusinesses, and agricultural information/education providers.

  7. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides.

    PubMed

    Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Coy, Monique R; Chalaire, Katelyn C; Becnel, James J; Agramonte, Natasha M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Clark, Gary G; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Swale, Daniel R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (1c) was most active (24 h LD50 19.182 nM, 0.5 μL/insect). However, the 24 h LC50 and LD50 values of fipronil against Ae. aegypti larvae and adults were significantly lower: 13.55 nM and 0.787 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Compound 1c was also active against Drosophila melanogaster adults with 24 h LC50 values of 5.6 and 4.9 μg/cm(2) for the Oregon-R and 1675 strains, respectively. Fipronil had LC50 values of 0.004 and 0.017 μg/cm(2) against the two strains of D. melanogaster, respectively. In repellency bioassays against female Ae. aegypti, 2,2,2-trifluoro-N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (4c) had the highest repellent potency with a minimum effective dosage (MED) of 0.039 μmol/cm(2) compared to DEET (MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2)). Compound N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)hexanamide (4a) had an MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2) which was comparable to DEET. Compound 4c was the most potent fungicide against Phomopsis obscurans. Several trends were discerned between the structural configuration of these molecules and the effect of structural changes on toxicity and repellency. Para- or meta- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with an aromatic ring attached to the carbonyl carbon showed higher toxicity against Ae. aegypti larvae, than ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. Ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with trifluoromethyl or alkyl group attached to the carbonyl carbon produced higher repellent activity against female Ae. aegypti and Anopheles albimanus than meta- or para- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. The presence of 2,6-dichloro- substitution on the phenyl ring of the amide had an influence on larvicidal and repellent

  8. In vitro metabolism of the anti-androgenic fungicide vinclozolin by rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Santoyo, Adolfo; Angeles-Soto, Esperanza; de Lourdes López-González, Ma; Harrison, Randy A; Hughes, Michael F

    2012-03-01

    Vinclozolin (V) is a fungicide used in agricultural settings. V administered to rats is hydrolyzed to 2-[[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy]-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1) and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2). V, M1 and M2 have antiandrogenic properties by interacting with the androgen receptor. Data on V, M1 and M2 biotransformation are limited. Our objective was to characterize V metabolism by rat liver microsomes. V was incubated with non-treated adult male Long-Evans rat liver microsomes and NADPH. Several metabolites were detected following the extraction of incubate with acetonitrile and analysis by HPLC/DAD/MSD. One metabolite was identified as [3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-5-(1,2-dihydroxyethyl)-1,3-oxazolidine-2,4-dione] (M4), which was gradually converted to 3',5'-dichloro-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutylanilide (M5). Both co-eluted in the same HPLC peak. Another metabolite ([M7]) was detected by UV but was unstable for mass spectral analysis. The K(M app) for co-eluted M4/M5 and [M7] was 53.7 and 135.4 μM, the V(max app) was 0.812 and 0.669 nmoles/min/mg protein, and CL(int) was 15.1 and 4.9 ml/min/g protein, respectively. Pilocarpine, orphenadrine and proadifen and anti-rat cytochrome P450 (CYP)2A, 2B and 3A antibodies inhibited M4/M5 and [M7] formation. These results indicate that V is efficiently metabolized by CYP. Determination of the metabolites of V will provide further insight into the relationship between toxicity and tissue dose of V and its metabolites.

  9. Genomic damage induced by the widely used fungicide chlorothalonil in peripheral human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Santovito, Alfredo; Gendusa, Claudio; Ferraro, Francesca; Musso, Irene; Costanzo, Maria; Ruberto, Stefano; Cervella, Piero

    2018-06-18

    Chlorothalonil is an important broad spectrum fungicide widely used in agriculture, silviculture, and urban settings. As a result of its massive use, chlorothalonil was found in all environmental matrices, with consequent risks to the health of terrestrial and aquatic organisms, as well as for humans. We analyzed the effects of chlorothalonil on human lymphocytes using in vitro chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and micronuclei (MNi) assays. Lymphocytes were exposed to five concentrations of chlorothalonil: 0.600 µg/mL, 0.060 µg/mL, 0.030 µg/mL, 0.020 µg/mL, and 0.015 µg/mL, where 0.020 and 0.600 µg/mL represent the ADI and the ARfD concentration values, respectively, established by FAO/WHO for this compound; 0.030 and 0.060 μg/mL represent intermediate values of these concentrations and 0.015 μg/mL represents the ADI value established by the Canadian health and welfare agency. We observed cytogenetic effects of chlorothalonil on cultured human lymphocytes in terms of increased CAs and MNi frequencies at all tested concentrations, including the FAO/WHO ADI and ARfD values of 0.020 and 0.600 μg/mL, respectively, but with exception of the Canadian ADI value of 0.015 μg/mL. Finally, no sexes differences were found in the levels of CAs and MNi induced by different chlorothalonil concentrations. Similarly, the mitotic index and the cytokinesis-block proliferation index did not show any significant effect on the proliferative capacity of the cells, although at the chlorothalonil concentration of 0.600 μg/mL the P-values of both indices were borderline. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of leaf growth on the disappearance of fungicides used on tea under south Indian agroclimatic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Chinnachamy; Muraleedharan, Narayanan Nair

    2009-01-01

    The sprayed chemicals on tea leaves disappear over a period of time by the influence of rainfall elution, evaporation, growth dilution, and photodegradation. Influence of plant growth on the four fungicides (hexaconazole, propiconazole, tridemorph, and c) was studied to know the constructive loss of fungicides. The study shows that residues of fungicides sprayed on tea shoots got diluted by the growing process. The expansion of a leaf took 8 to 11 d and more than 50% of the fungicide residues were cleaned out during this leaf expansion period. Under south Indian agroclimatic condition, the fungicides are sprayed at an interval of 10 d, so it is safe that the tea is harvested on the 10th day of the application of fungicides. PMID:19489107

  11. Contribution of leaf growth on the disappearance of fungicides used on tea under South Indian agroclimatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Chinnachamy; Muraleedharan, Narayanan Nair

    2009-06-01

    The sprayed chemicals on tea leaves disappear over a period of time by the influence of rainfall elution, evaporation, growth dilution, and photodegradation. Influence of plant growth on the four fungicides (hexaconazole, propiconazole, tridemorph, and c) was studied to know the constructive loss of fungicides. The study shows that residues of fungicides sprayed on tea shoots got diluted by the growing process. The expansion of a leaf took 8 to 11 d and more than 50% of the fungicide residues were cleaned out during this leaf expansion period. Under south Indian agroclimatic condition, the fungicides are sprayed at an interval of 10 d, so it is safe that the tea is harvested on the 10th day of the application of fungicides.

  12. Synergistic mortality between a neonicotinoid insecticide and an ergosterol-biosynthesis-inhibiting fungicide in three bee species.

    PubMed

    Sgolastra, Fabio; Medrzycki, Piotr; Bortolotti, Laura; Renzi, Maria Teresa; Tosi, Simone; Bogo, Gherardo; Teper, Dariusz; Porrini, Claudio; Molowny-Horas, Roberto; Bosch, Jordi

    2017-06-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides have been identified as an important factor contributing to bee diversity declines. Nonetheless, uncertainties remain about their impact under field conditions. Most studies have been conducted on Apis mellifera and tested single compounds. However, in agricultural environments, bees are often exposed to multiple pesticides. We explore the synergistic mortality between a neonicotinoid (clothianidin) and an ergosterol-biosynthesis-inhibiting fungicide (propiconazole) in three bee species (A. mellifera, Bombus terrestris, Osmia bicornis) following oral exposure in the laboratory. We developed a new approach based on the binomial proportion test to analyse synergistic interactions. We estimated uptake of clothianidin per foraging bout in honey bees foraging on seed-coated rapeseed fields. We found significant synergistic mortality in all three bee species exposed to non-lethal doses of propiconazole and their respective LD 10 of clothianidin. Significant synergism was only found at the first assessment times in A. mellifera (4 and 24 h) and B. terrestris (4 h), but persisted throughout the experiment (96 h) in O. bicornis. O. bicornis was also the most sensitive species to clothianidin. Our results underscore the importance to test pesticide combinations likely to occur in agricultural environments, and to include several bee species in environmental risk assessment schemes. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Sertaconazole Nitrate Shows Fungicidal and Fungistatic Activities against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Epidermophyton floccosum, Causative Agents of Tinea Pedis▿

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso J.; Tur-Tur, Cristina; Cárdenes, Delia C.; Estivill, Dolors; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The fungistatic and fungicidal activities of sertaconazole against dermatophytes were evaluated by testing 150 clinical isolates of causative agents of tinea pedis, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Epidermophyton floccosum. The overall geometric means for fungistatic and fungicidal activities of sertaconazole against these isolates were 0.26 and 2.26 μg/ml, respectively, although values were higher for T. mentagrophytes than for the others. This is the first comprehensive demonstration of the fungicidal activity of sertaconazole against dermatophytes. PMID:21746955

  14. Dissipation of the fungicide hexaconazole in oil palm plantation.

    PubMed

    Maznah, Zainol; Halimah, Muhamad; Ismail, Sahid; Idris, Abu Seman

    2015-12-01

    Hexaconazole is a potential fungicide to be used in the oil palm plantation for controlling the basal stem root (BSR) disease caused by Ganoderma boninense. Therefore, the dissipation rate of hexaconazole in an oil palm agroecosystem under field conditions was studied. Two experimental plots were treated with hexaconazole at the recommended dosage of 4.5 g a.i. palm(-1) (active ingredient) and at double the recommended dosage (9.0 g a.i. palm(-1)), whilst one plot was untreated as control. The residue of hexaconazole was detected in soil samples in the range of 2.74 to 0.78 and 7.13 to 1.66 mg kg(-1) at the recommended and double recommended dosage plots, respectively. An initial relatively rapid dissipation rate of hexaconazole residues occurred but reduced with time. The dissipation of hexaconazole in soil was described using first-order kinetics with the value of coefficient regression (r (2) > 0.8). The results indicated that hexaconazole has moderate persistence in the soil and the half-life was found to be 69.3 and 86.6 days in the recommended and double recommended dosage plot, respectively. The results obtained highlight that downward movement of hexaconazole was led by preferential flow as shown in image analysis. It can be concluded that varying soil conditions, environmental factors, and pesticide chemical properties of hexaconazole has a significant impact on dissipation of hexaconazole in soil under humid conditions.

  15. Phototransformation of azoxystrobin fungicide in organic solvents. Photoisomerization vs. photodegradation.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Jeoffrey; ter Halle, Alexandra; de Sainte Claire, Pascal; Voyard, Guillaume; Traikïa, Mounir; Richard, Claire

    2013-12-01

    Azoxystrobin is a systemic fungicide that has a tendency to accumulate at the surface of crop leaves or inside their cuticle where it undergoes photodegradation. Its photochemistry was investigated in n-heptane and isopropanol to mimic the polarity of wax leaves. Using analytical and kinetic data, we demonstrate that azoxystrobin (isomer E) undergoes efficient photoisomerization into the isomer Z with a quantum yield of 0.75 ± 0.08. This value is 30-fold higher than that reported in aqueous solution. The photoisomerization of isomer Z into azoxystrobin is more efficient with a chemical yield of 0.95 ± 0.1. In addition, a pseudo photostationary equilibrium is reached when the ratio [azoxystrobin]/[isomer Z] is 2.0 ± 0.1. Photodegradation also takes place from azoxystrobin (quantum yield = 0.073 ± 0.008). Photoproducts mainly arise from bond cleavage between rings and from demethylation of the ether with or without saturation of the acrylate double bond. Theoretical calculations were undertaken to investigate the photoisomerization mechanism and the solvent effect. These data show that the photochemical reactivity of azoxystrobin is enhanced when the solvent polarity decreases and thus should be significant in leaf waxes.

  16. Stereoselective degradation of chiral fungicide myclobutanil in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinru; Wang, Yao; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Myclobutanil, (RS)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(1H-1, 2, 4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)hexanenitrile is a broad-spectrum systemic triazole fungicide which consists of a pair of enantiomers. The stereoselective degradation of myclobutanil was investigated in rat liver microsomes. The concentrations of myclobutanil enantiomers were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a cellulose-tris-(3,5-dimethyl-phenylcarbamate)-based chiral stationary phase (CDMPC-CSP) under reversed phase condition. The t(1/2) of (+)-myclobutanil is 8.49 min, while the t(1/2) of (-)-myclobutanil is 96.27 min. Such consequences clearly indicated that the degradation of myclobutanil in rat liver microsomes was stereoselective and the degradation rate of (+)-myclobutanil was much faster than (-)-myclobutanil. In addition, significant differences between two enantiomers were also observed in enzyme kinetic parameters. The V(max) of (+)-myclobutanil was about 4-fold of (-)-myclobutanil and the CL(int) of (+)-myclobutanil was three times as much as (-)-myclobutanil after incubation in rat liver microsomes. Corresponding consequences may shed light on the environmental and ecological risk assessment for myclobutanil and may improve human health. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Analysis of the mutations induced by conazole fungicides in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey A; Leavitt, Sharon A

    2010-05-01

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the non-tumorigenic conazole myclobutanil was not mutagenic. DNA sequencing of the mutants recovered from each treatment group as well as from animals receiving control diet was conducted to gain additional insight into the mode of action by which tumorigenic conazoles induce mutations. Relative dinucleotide mutabilities (RDMs) were calculated for each possible dinucleotide in each treatment group and then examined by multivariate statistical analysis techniques. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of RDM values segregated two independent control groups together, along with the non-tumorigen myclobutanil. The two tumorigenic conazoles clustered together in a distinct grouping. Partitioning around mediods of RDM values into two clusters also groups the triadimefon and propiconazole together in one cluster and the two control groups and myclobutanil together in a second cluster. Principal component analysis of these results identifies two components that account for 88.3% of the variability in the points. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that propiconazole- and triadimefon-induced mutations do not represent clonal expansion of background mutations and support the hypothesis that they arise from the accumulation of reactive electrophilic metabolic intermediates within the liver in vivo.

  18. Herbicidal and Fungicidal Activities of Lactones in Kava (Piper methysticum).

    PubMed

    Xuan, T D; Elzaawely, A A; Fukuta, M; Tawata, S

    2006-02-08

    This is the first report showing that kava lactones are plant and plant fungus growth inhibitors. Aqueous extract of kava roots showed high allelopathic potential and strongly suppressed germination and growth of lettuce, radish, barnyardgrass, and monochoria. Nine kava lactones were detected using GC-MS including desmethoxyyagonin, kavain, 7,8-dihydrokavain, hydroxykavain, yagonin, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroxyyagonin, methysticin, dihydromethysticin, and 11-hydroxy-12-methoxydihydrokavain. Quantities of desmethoxyyagonin, kavain, 7,8-dihydrokavain, yagonin, methysticin, and dihydromethysticin detected were 4.3, 6.9, 18.6, 5.7, 1.4, and 5.4 mg/g of dry weight, respectively. These six major lactones in kava roots showed great herbicidal and antifungal activities. Growth of lettuce and barnyardgrass were significantly inhibited at 1-10 ppm, and four plant fungi including Colletotrichum gloeosporides, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum, and Trichoderma viride were significantly inhibited at 10-50 ppm. The biological activities of kava lactones were characterized by different double-bond linkage patterns in positions 5,6 and 7,8. The findings of this study suggest that kava lactones may be useful for the development of bioactive herbicides and fungicides.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Rach, J.J.; Schreier, Theresa M.

    1994-01-01

    Antifungal agents are needed to maintain healthy stocks of fish in the intensive culture systems currently employed in fish hatcheries. Malachite green has been the most widely used antifungal agent; however, its potential for producing teratology in animals and fish precludes further use in fish culture. Preliminary studies at the National Fisheries Research Center, La Crosse, WI, USA (La Crosse Center) indicate that hydrogen peroxide is effective for control of Saprolegnia sp. fungus on incubating eggs of rainbow trout. It is also effective against a wide variety of other organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, viruses, and spores, and has been proposed as a treatment for sea lice on salmon. Hydrogen peroxide and its primary decomposition products, oxygen and water, are not systemic poisons and are considered environmentally compatible. In response to a petition from the La Crosse Center, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently classified hydrogen peroxide as a 'low regulatory priority' when used for control of fungus on fish and fish eggs. Preliminary tests conducted at the La Crosse Center suggest that prophylactic treatments of 250 to 500 ppm (based on 100% active ingredient) for 15 minutes every other day will inhibit fungal infections on healthy rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) eggs. This treatment regime also seems to inhibit fungal development and increase hatching success among infected eggs. Efficacy and safety of hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish are currently being evaluated.

  20. Acylamino acid chiral fungicides on toxiciepigenetics in lambda DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jing; Zhu, Feilong; Hao, Weiyu; Xu, Qi; Chang, Jin; Wang, Huili; Guo, Baoyuan

    2017-11-01

    Acylamino acid chiral fungicides (AACFs) are low-toxicity pesticides and considered as non-carcinogenic chemicals to laboratory animals. Though AACFs have potential toxicological effects on mammals by non-genotoxic mechanisms, the toxicoepigenomics of AACFs has not been documented. In this article, we explored toxiciepigenetics of metalaxyl, benalaxyl and furalaxyl through epigenetics research on lambda DNA under different concentration exposure. The toxicoepigenomic difference of stereoisomers was examined also. Our results showed that AACFs would affect methyltransferase activity resulting in modulating DNA methylation levels and pattern. The LOAEL of R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl were 30 mM and 0.3 mM, respectively. The LOAEL of (R, S)-benalaxyl and (R, S)-furalaxyl were 0.3 Mm and 30 mM, respectively. A significant dose-response effect between (R, S)-benalaxyl and global methylation level was observed. Global methylation level was more susceptible to S-enantiomer compared to R-enantiomer, which indicated enantiomers of AACFs have the enantioselectivity in toxiciepigenetics. Moreover, the dependence of the methylation inhibition on the chiral center of metalaxyl may suggest a considerable specificity of the compound of AACFs for DNA methyltransferases. The inhibition effect between R-enantiomer and S-enantiomer of AACFs on DNA methylation levels generated in this study is important for low-toxicity pesticides toxicoepigenomics evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of Chemical and Biological Fungicides Applied to Grapevine on Grape Biofilm, Must, and Wine Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Escribano-Viana, Rocío; López-Alfaro, Isabel; López, Rosa; Santamaría, Pilar; Gutiérrez, Ana R.; González-Arenzana, Lucía

    2018-01-01

    This study was aimed to measure the impact of the application of a bio-fungicide against Botrytis cinerea on the microbiota involved in the alcoholic fermentation (AF) of Tempranillo Rioja wines. For this purpose, a bio-fungicide composed of the biological control bacterium Bacillus subtilis QST713 was applied to the vineyard. The microbial diversity was analyzed from grape biofilm to wine. Impact on microbial diversity was measured employing indexes assessed with the software PAST 3.10 P.D. Results were compared to non-treated samples and to samples treated with a chemical fungicide mainly composed by fenhexamid. Overall, the impact of the biological-fungicide (bio-fungicide) on the microbial diversity assessed for grape biofilm and for musts was not remarkable. Neither of the tested fungicides enhanced the growth of any species or acted against the development of any microbial groups. The bio-fungicide had no significant impact on the wine microbiota whereas the chemical fungicide caused a reduction of microbial community richness and diversity. Although environmental threats might generate a detriment of the microbial species richness, in this study the tested bio-fungicide did not modify the structure of the microbial community. Indeed, some of the Bacillus applied at the grape surface, were detected at the end of the AF showing its resilience to the harsh environment of the winemaking; in contrast, its impact on wine quality during aging is yet unknown. PMID:29467723

  2. Impact of Chemical and Biological Fungicides Applied to Grapevine on Grape Biofilm, Must, and Wine Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Escribano-Viana, Rocío; López-Alfaro, Isabel; López, Rosa; Santamaría, Pilar; Gutiérrez, Ana R; González-Arenzana, Lucía

    2018-01-01

    This study was aimed to measure the impact of the application of a bio-fungicide against Botrytis cinerea on the microbiota involved in the alcoholic fermentation (AF) of Tempranillo Rioja wines. For this purpose, a bio-fungicide composed of the biological control bacterium Bacillus subtilis QST713 was applied to the vineyard. The microbial diversity was analyzed from grape biofilm to wine. Impact on microbial diversity was measured employing indexes assessed with the software PAST 3.10 P.D. Results were compared to non-treated samples and to samples treated with a chemical fungicide mainly composed by fenhexamid. Overall, the impact of the biological-fungicide (bio-fungicide) on the microbial diversity assessed for grape biofilm and for musts was not remarkable. Neither of the tested fungicides enhanced the growth of any species or acted against the development of any microbial groups. The bio-fungicide had no significant impact on the wine microbiota whereas the chemical fungicide caused a reduction of microbial community richness and diversity. Although environmental threats might generate a detriment of the microbial species richness, in this study the tested bio-fungicide did not modify the structure of the microbial community. Indeed, some of the Bacillus applied at the grape surface, were detected at the end of the AF showing its resilience to the harsh environment of the winemaking; in contrast, its impact on wine quality during aging is yet unknown.

  3. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARQUHAR, R.N.

    AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION HAS LONG EMPHASIZED TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE AT THE EXPENSE OF THE SOCIOECONOMIC ASPECTS OF FARM PRODUCTION AND FARM LIFE. ONLY IN TASMANIA HAS FARM MANAGEMENT BEEN STRESSED. DEMANDS FOR THE WHOLE-FARM APPROACH HAVE PRODUCED A TREND TOWARD GENERALISM FOR DISTRICT OFFICERS IN MOST STATES. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT,…

  4. Agricultural Biodiversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postance, Jim

    1998-01-01

    The extinction of farm animals and crops is rarely brought up during discussions of endangered species and biodiversity; however, the loss of diversity in crops and livestock threatens the sustainability of agriculture. Presents three activities: (1) "The Colors of Diversity"; (2) "Biodiversity among Animals"; and (3) "Heirloom Plants." Discusses…

  5. Effect of fungicide on Fusarium verticillioides mycelial morphology and fumonisin B 1 production

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Tatiana de Á.; Bordini, Jaqueline G.; Saito, Gervásio H.; Andrade, Célia G.T. de J.; Ono, Mario A.; Hirooka, Elisa Y.; Vizoni, Édio; Ono, Elisabete Y.S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M on the mycelial morphology, sporulation and fumonisin B 1 production by Fusarium verticillioides 103 F was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the fungicide caused inhibition of hyphal growth and defects on hyphae morphology such as cell wall disruption, withered hyphae, and excessive septation. In addition, extracellular material around the hyphae was rarely observed in the presence of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M. While promoting the reduction of mycelial growth, the fungicide increased sporulation of F. verticillioides compared to the control, and the highest production occurred on the 14 th day in the treatments and on the 10 th day in the control cultures. Fumonisin B 1 production in the culture media containing the fungicide (treatment) was detected from the 7 th day incubation, whereas in cultures without fungicide (control) it was detected on the 10 th day. The highest fumonisin B 1 production occurred on the 14 th day, both for the control and for the treatment. Fludioxonil + metalaxyl - M can interfere in F. verticillioides mycelial morphology and sporulation and increase fumonisin B 1 levels. These data indicate the importance of understanding the effects of fungicide to minimize the occurrence of toxigenic fungi and fumonisins. PMID:26221120

  6. Effect of fungicide on Fusarium verticillioides mycelial morphology and fumonisin B₁ production.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Tatiana de Á; Bordini, Jaqueline G; Saito, Gervásio H; Andrade, Célia G T de J; Ono, Mario A; Hirooka, Elisa Y; Vizoni, Édio; Ono, Elisabete Y S

    2015-03-01

    The effect of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M on the mycelial morphology, sporulation and fumonisin B 1 production by Fusarium verticillioides 103 F was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the fungicide caused inhibition of hyphal growth and defects on hyphae morphology such as cell wall disruption, withered hyphae, and excessive septation. In addition, extracellular material around the hyphae was rarely observed in the presence of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M. While promoting the reduction of mycelial growth, the fungicide increased sporulation of F. verticillioides compared to the control, and the highest production occurred on the 14 (th) day in the treatments and on the 10 (th) day in the control cultures. Fumonisin B 1 production in the culture media containing the fungicide (treatment) was detected from the 7 (th) day incubation, whereas in cultures without fungicide (control) it was detected on the 10 (th) day. The highest fumonisin B 1 production occurred on the 14 (th) day, both for the control and for the treatment. Fludioxonil + metalaxyl - M can interfere in F. verticillioides mycelial morphology and sporulation and increase fumonisin B 1 levels. These data indicate the importance of understanding the effects of fungicide to minimize the occurrence of toxigenic fungi and fumonisins.

  7. Resistance Mechanisms and Molecular Docking Studies of Four Novel QoI Fungicides in Peronophythora litchii

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuxin; Chen, Lei; Hu, Jian; Duan, Hongxia; Lin, Dong; Liu, Pengfei; Meng, Qingxiao; Li, Bin; Si, Naiguo; Liu, Changling; Liu, Xili

    2015-01-01

    Peronophythora litchii is the causal agent of litchi downy blight. Enestroburin, SYP-1620, SYP-2815 and ZJ0712 are four novel QoI fungicides developed by China. Eight mutants of P. litchii resistant to these QoI fungicides and azoxystrobin (as a known QoI fungicide) were obtained in our preliminary work. In this study, the full length of the cytochrome b gene in P. litchii, which has a full length of 382 amino acids, was cloned from both sensitive isolates and resistant mutants, and single-site mutations G142A, G142S, Y131C, or F128S were found in resistant mutants. Molecular docking was used to predict how the mutations alter the binding of the five QoI fungicides to the Qo-binding pockets. The results have increased our understanding of QoI fungicide-resistance mechanisms and may help in the development of more potent inhibitors against plant diseases in the fields. PMID:26657349

  8. Fungicides affect Japanese beetle Popillia japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) egg hatch, larval survival and detoxification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Obear, Glen R; Adesanya, Adekunle W; Liesch, Patrick J; Williamson, R Chris; Held, David W

    2016-05-01

    Larvae of the Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), have a patchy distribution in soils, which complicates detection and management of this insect pest. Managed turf systems are frequently under pest pressure from fungal pathogens, necessitating frequent fungicide applications. It is possible that certain turfgrass fungicides may have lethal or sublethal adverse effects on eggs and larvae of P. japonica that inhabit managed turf systems. In this study, eggs and first-, second- and third-instar larvae were treated with the fungicides chlorothalonil and propiconazole, and survival was compared with that of untreated controls as well as positive controls treated with the insecticide trichlorfon. Chlorothalonil reduced survival of first-instar larvae treated directly and hatched from treated eggs. Propiconazole delayed egg hatch, reduced the proportion of eggs that successfully hatched and reduced survival of first-instar larvae treated directly and hatched from treated eggs. Sublethal doses of the fungicides lowered the activities of certain detoxification enzymes in third-instar grubs. Fungicide applications to turfgrass that coincide with oviposition and egg hatch of white grubs may have sublethal effects. This work is applicable both to high-maintenance turfgrass such as golf courses, where applications of pesticides are more frequent, and to home lawn services, where mixtures of multiple pesticides are commonly used. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Sensitivity of some nitrogen fixers and the target pest Fusarium oxysporum to fungicide thiram.

    PubMed

    Osman, Awad G; Sherif, Ashraf M; Elhussein, Adil A; Mohamed, Afrah T

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the toxic effects of the fungicide thiram (TMTD) against five nitrogen fixers and the thiram target pest Fusarium oxysporum under laboratory conditions. Nitrogen fixing bacteria Falvobacterium showed the highest values of LD(50) and proved to be the most resistant to the fungicide followed by Fusarium oxysporum, while Pseudomonas aurentiaca was the most affected microorganism. LD(50) values for these microorganisms were in 2-5 orders of magnitude lower in comparison with LD(50) value for Fusarium oxysporum. Thiram was most toxic to Pseudomonas aurentiaca followed by Azospirillum. The lowest toxicity index was recorded for Fusarium oxysporum and Flavobacterium. The slope of the curve for Azomonas, Fusarium oxysporum and Flavobacterium is more steep than that of the other curves, suggesting that even a slight increase of the dose of the fungicide can cause a very strong negative effect. Thiram was more selective to Pseudomonas aurentiaca followed by Azospirillum, Rhizobium meliloti and Azomonas. The lowest selectivity index of the fungicide was recorded for Falvobacterium followed by Fusarium oxysporum. The highest safety coefficient of the fungicide was assigned for Flavobacterium, while Pseudomonas aurentiaca showed the lowest value.

  10. Effects of 2 fungicide formulations on microbial and macroinvertebrate leaf decomposition under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elskus, Adria; Smalling, Kelly L.; Hladik, Michelle; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic fungi contribute significantly to the decomposition of leaves in streams, a key ecosystem service. However, little is known about the effects of fungicides on aquatic fungi and macroinvertebrates involved with leaf decomposition. Red maple (Acer rubrum) leaves were conditioned in a stream to acquire microbes (bacteria and fungi), or leached in tap water (unconditioned) to simulate potential reduction of microbial biomass by fungicides. Conditioned leaves were exposed to fungicide formulations QUILT (azoxystrobin + propiconazole) or PRISTINE (boscalid + pyraclostrobin), in the presence and absence of the leaf shredder, Hyalella azteca (amphipods; 7-d old at start of exposures) for 14 d at 23 °C. QUILT formulation (~ 0.3 μg/L, 1.8 μg/L, 8 μg/L) tended to increase leaf decomposition by amphipods (not significant) without a concomitant increase in amphipod biomass, indicating potential increased consumption of leaves with reduced nutritional value. PRISTINE formulation (~ 33 μg/L) significantly reduced amphipod growth and biomass (p<0.05), effects similar to those observed with unconditioned controls. The significant suppressive effects of PRISTINE on amphipod growth, and the trend towards increased leaf decomposition with increasing QUILT concentration, indicate the potential for altered leaf decay in streams exposed to fungicides. Further work is needed to evaluate fungicide effects on leaf decomposition under conditions relevant to stream ecosystems, including temperature shifts and pulsed exposures to pesticide mixtures.

  11. Sensitivity of Podosphaera xanthii populations to anti-powdery-mildew fungicides in Spain.

    PubMed

    Bellón-Gómez, Davinia; Vela-Corcía, David; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Torés, Juan A

    2015-10-01

    Cucurbit powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera xanthii limits crop production in Spain, where disease control is largely dependent on fungicides. In previous studies, high levels of resistance to QoI and DMI fungicides were documented in south-central Spain. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of P. xanthii populations to other fungicides and to provide tools for improved disease management. Using a leaf-disc assay, sensitivity to thiophanate-methyl, bupirimate and quinoxyfen of 50 isolates of P. xanthii was analysed to determine discriminatory concentrations between sensitive and resistant isolates. With the exception of thiophanate-methyl, no clearly different groups of isolates could be identified, and as a result, discriminatory concentrations were established on the basis of the maximum fungicide field application rate. Subsequently, a survey of P. xanthii resistance to these fungicides was carried out by testing a collection of 237 isolates obtained during the 2002-2011 cucurbit growing seasons. This analysis revealed very high levels of resistance to thiophanate-methyl (95%). By contrast, no resistance to bupirimate and quinoxyfen was found. Results suggest that thiophanate-methyl has become completely ineffective for controlling cucurbit powdery mildew in Spain. By contrast, bupirimate and quinoxyfen remain as very effective tools for cucurbit powdery mildew management. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Chronic aquatic effect assessment for the fungicide azoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Rene P A; Belgers, Dick J M; Zafar, Mazhar I; Matser, Arrienne M; Boerwinkel, Marie-Claire; Arts, Gertie H P

    2014-12-01

    The present study examined the ecological effects of a range of chronic exposure concentrations of the fungicide azoxystrobin in freshwater experimental systems (1270-L outdoor microcosms). Intended and environmentally relevant test concentrations of azoxystrobin were 0 µg active ingredient (a.i.)/L, 0.33 µg a.i./L, 1 µg a.i./L, 3.3 µg a.i./L, 10 µg a.i./L, and 33 µg a.i./L, kept at constant values. Responses of freshwater populations and community parameters were studied. During the 42-d experimental period, the time-weighted average concentrations of azoxystrobin ranged from 93.5% to 99.3% of intended values. Zooplankton, especially copepods and the Daphnia longispina group, were the most sensitive groups. At the population level, a consistent no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) of 1 µg a.i./L was calculated for Copepoda. The NOEC at the zooplankton community level was 10 µg azoxystrobin/L. The principle of the European Union pesticide directive is that lower-tier regulatory acceptable concentrations (RACs) are protective of higher-tier RACs. This was tested for chronic risks from azoxystrobin. With the exception of the microcosm community chronic RAC (highest tier), all other chronic RAC values were similar to each other (0.5-1 µg a.i./L). The new and stricter first-tier species requirements of the European Union pesticide regulation (1107/2009/EC) are not protective for the most sensitive populations in the microcosm study, when based on the higher tier population RAC. In comparison, the Water Framework Directive generates environmental quality standards that are 5 to 10 times lower than the derived chronic RACs. © 2014 SETAC.

  13. Time-to-death approach to reveal chronic and cumulative toxicity of a fungicide for honeybees not revealed with the standard ten-day test.

    PubMed

    Simon-Delso, Noa; San Martin, Gilles; Bruneau, Etienne; Hautier, Louis

    2018-05-08

    Synthetic fungicides are pesticides widely used in agriculture to control phytopathogenic fungi. The systemicity, persistency and intense application of some of these fungicides, such as boscalid, leads to long periods of exposure for honeybees via contaminated water, pollen and nectar. We exposed adult honeybees in the lab to food contaminated with boscalid for 33 days instead of the standard 10-day test. Most of the toxic effects were observed after 10 days. The median time to death (LT 50 ) ranged from 24.9 days (lowest concentration) to 7.1 days (highest concentration) and was significantly shorter in all cases than with the control (32.0 days). The concentration and dietary doses of boscalid inducing 50% mortality (LC 50 and LDD 50 , respectively) decreased strongly with the time of exposure: LC 50  = 14,729 and 1,174 mg/l and LDD 50  = 0.318 and 0.0301 mg bee -1 day -1 at days 8 and 25, respectively. We found evidence of reinforced toxicity when exposure is prolonged, but with an unusual pattern: no cumulative toxicity is observed until 17-18 days, when a point of inflexion appears that suggests a reduced capacity of bees to deal with the toxicant. Our results show the importance of time-to-death experiments rather than fixed-duration studies for evaluating chronic toxicity.

  14. Solid-phase microextraction of benzimidazole fungicides in environmental liquid samples and HPLC-fluorescence determination.

    PubMed

    López Monzón, A; Vega Moreno, D; Torres Padrón, M E; Sosa Ferrera, Z; Santana Rodríguez, J J

    2007-03-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection was optimized for extraction and determination of four benzimidazole fungicides (benomyl, carbendazim, thiabendazole, and fuberidazole) in water. We studied extraction and desorption conditions, for example fiber type, extraction time, ionic strength, extraction temperature, and desorption time to achieve the maximum efficiency in the extraction. Results indicate that SPME using a Carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane 75 microm (CAR-PDMS) fiber is suitable for extraction of these types of compound. Final analysis of benzimidazole fungicides was performed by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Recoveries ranged from 80.6 to 119.6 with RSDs below 9% and limits of detection between 0.03 and 1.30 ng mL-1 for the different analytes. The optimized procedure was applied successfully to the determination of benzimidazole fungicides mixtures in environmental water samples (sea, sewage, and ground water).

  15. Fungicidal effect of 15 disinfectants against 25 fungal contaminants commonly found in bread and cheese manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, K; Nielsen, P V

    1996-03-01

    Resistance of 19 mold and 6 yeast species to 15 commercial disinfectants was investigated by using a suspension method in which the fungicidal effect and germination time were determined at 20 degrees C. Disinfectants containing 0.5% dodecyldiethylentriaminacetic acid, 10 g of chloramine-T per 1, 2.0% formaldehyde, 0.1% potassium hydroxide, 3.0% hydrogen peroxide, or 0.3% peracetic acid were ineffective as fungicides. The fungicidal effect of quaternary ammonium compounds and chlorine compounds showed great variability between species and among the six isolates of Penicillium roqueforti var. roqueforti tested. The isolates of P roqueforti var. carneum, P. discolor, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium repens examined were resistant to different quaternary ammonium compounds. Conidia and vegetative cells were killed by alcohols, whereas ascospores were resistant. Resistance of ascospores to 70% ethanol increased with age. Both P. roqueforti var. roqueforti and E. repens showed great variability of resistance within isolates of each species.

  16. The fungicide Pristine® inhibits mitochondrial function in vitro but not flight metabolic rates in honey bees

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Honey bees and other pollinators are exposed to fungicides that act by inhibiting mitochondrial function. Here we test whether a common fungicide (Pristine®) inhibits the function of mitochondria of honeybees, and whether consumption of ecologically-realistic concentrations can cause negative eff...

  17. Effects of fungicide and adjuvant sprays on nesting behavior in two managed solitary bees, Osmia lignaria and Megachile rotundata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The lethal and sublethal effects of two widely used fungicides and one adjuvant spreader were assessed in cage studies in California on blue orchard bees, Osmia lignaria, and in cage studies in Utah on alfalfa leafcutting bees, Megachile rotundata. The fungicides tested were Rovral® 4F (iprodione) ...

  18. Effect of fungicides and biocontrol agents on inoculum production and persistence of Phytophthora ramorum on nursery hosts

    Treesearch

    Steve Tjosvold; David Chambers; Gary Chastagner; Marianne Elliott

    2013-01-01

    Once Phytophthora ramorum is introduced into a nursery on a host, its local spread and establishment is primarily dependent on sporangia and zoospore production. Nursery operators commonly use fungicides to prevent the establishment of Phytophthora –caused diseases, although current research only supports the use of fungicides...

  19. Combinations of fungicide and cultural practices influence the incidence and impact of fusiform rust in slash pine plantations

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; Allan E. Tiarks

    1994-01-01

    Slash pine was grown in central Louisiana under four levels of culture with or without repeated sprayings of the systematic fungicide triadimefon for protection against fusiform rust. The eight treatment combinations were: (1)no fungicide, weed control, or fertilizer; (2)weeded; (3)weeded, applied inorganic fertilizer, and bedded before planting; (4)weeded, bedded,...

  20. 48 CFR 1552.235-73 - Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-73 Section... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in... Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996) In order to perform duties under the contract, the...

  1. Using Epidemiological Principles to Explain Fungicide Resistance Management Tactics: Why do Mixtures Outperform Alternations?

    PubMed

    Elderfield, James A D; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco J; van den Bosch, Frank; Cunniffe, Nik J

    2018-07-01

    Whether fungicide resistance management is optimized by spraying chemicals with different modes of action as a mixture (i.e., simultaneously) or in alternation (i.e., sequentially) has been studied by experimenters and modelers for decades. However, results have been inconclusive. We use previously parameterized and validated mathematical models of wheat Septoria leaf blotch and grapevine powdery mildew to test which tactic provides better resistance management, using the total yield before resistance causes disease control to become economically ineffective ("lifetime yield") to measure effectiveness. We focus on tactics involving the combination of a low-risk and a high-risk fungicide, and the case in which resistance to the high-risk chemical is complete (i.e., in which there is no partial resistance). Lifetime yield is then optimized by spraying as much low-risk fungicide as is permitted, combined with slightly more high-risk fungicide than needed for acceptable initial disease control, applying these fungicides as a mixture. That mixture rather than alternation gives better performance is invariant to model parameterization and structure, as well as the pathosystem in question. However, if comparison focuses on other metrics, e.g., lifetime yield at full label dose, either mixture or alternation can be optimal. Our work shows how epidemiological principles can explain the evolution of fungicide resistance, and also highlights a theoretical framework to address the question of whether mixture or alternation provides better resistance management. It also demonstrates that precisely how spray tactics are compared must be given careful consideration. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY 4.0 International license .

  2. Fungicide Sprays Can Injure the Stigmatic Surface During Receptivity in Almond Flowers

    PubMed Central

    YI, WEIGUANG; LAW, S. EDWARD; WETZSTEIN, HAZEL Y.

    2003-01-01

    Fungicides can be detrimental to flower development, pollen function and fruit set in a number of crops. Almond is a self‐incompatible nut crop that has a fruit set of only approx. 30 % of the total number of flowers. Thus, interference of pollination and fertilization by fungicide sprays is of concern, and identification of chemicals having the least detrimental effects would be desirable. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of fungicide sprays on stigma morphology in almond using a laboratory spray apparatus that simulated field applications. Four fungicides (azoxystrobin, myclobutanil, iprodione and cyprodinil) were applied, and fresh, unfixed stigmatic surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscope at 4 and 24 h after spraying. Increased exudate accumulation was induced by azoxystrobin at both time periods, and localized damage and collapse of stigmatic cells were observed after 24 h. Damaged stigmatic papillae exhibited wrinkling, surface distortion or collapse. Likewise, myclobutanil caused significant damage to and collapse of papillae; these were more extensive at later observations. Iprodione had no effect on exudate accumulation but caused marked and severe collapse of stigmatic papillae which was pronounced at 24 h. Cyprodinil promoted a copious increase in exudate secretion and caused the most severe collapse of stigmatic cells of all the fungicides evaluated. Damage was somewhat localized at 4 h but more global at 24 h. This study has verified that certain fungicide sprays have direct detrimental effects on stigma morphology and enhance exudate production in almond flowers. PMID:12547686

  3. Polymeric and Solid Lipid Nanoparticles for Sustained Release of Carbendazim and Tebuconazole in Agricultural Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Estefânia Vangelie Ramos; Oliveira, Jhones Luiz De; da Silva, Camila Morais Gonçalves; Pascoli, Mônica; Pasquoto, Tatiane; Lima, Renata; Abhilash, P. C.; Fernandes Fraceto, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Carbendazim (MBC) (methyl-2-benzimidazole carbamate) and tebuconazole (TBZ) ((RS)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)pentan-3-ol) are widely used in agriculture for the prevention and control of fungal diseases. Solid lipid nanoparticles and polymeric nanocapsules are carrier systems that offer advantages including changes in the release profiles of bioactive compounds and their transfer to the site of action, reduced losses due to leaching or degradation, and decreased toxicity in the environment and humans. The objective of this study was to prepare these two types of nanoparticle as carrier systems for a combination of TBZ and MBC, and then investigate the release profiles of the fungicides as well as the stabilities and cytotoxicities of the formulations. Both nanoparticle systems presented high association efficiency (>99%), indicating good interaction between the fungicides and the nanoparticles. The release profiles of MBC and TBZ were modified when the compounds were loaded in the nanoparticles, and cytotoxicity assays showed that encapsulation of the fungicides decreased their toxicity. These fungicide systems offer new options for the treatment and prevention of fungal diseases in plants.

  4. Field evaluation of an expertise-based formal decision system for fungicide management of grapevine downy and powdery mildews.

    PubMed

    Delière, Laurent; Cartolaro, Philippe; Léger, Bertrand; Naud, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    In France, viticulture accounts for 20% of the phytochemicals sprayed in agriculture, and 80% of grapevine pesticides target powdery and downy mildews. European policies promote pesticide use reduction, and new methods for low-input disease management are needed for viticulture. Here, we present the assessment, in France, of Mildium, a new decision support system for the management of grapevine mildews. A 4 year assessment trial of Mildium has been conducted in a network of 83 plots distributed across the French vineyards. In most vineyards, Mildium has proved to be successful at protecting the crop while reducing by 30-50% the number of treatments required when compared with grower practices. The design of Mildium results from the formalisation of a common management of both powdery and downy mildews and eventually leads to a significant fungicide reduction at the plot scale. It could encourage stakeholders to design customised farm-scale and low-chemical-input decision support methods. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Absence of effects on the rat sperm quality after subacute exposure to low doses of fungicide prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Marciana; Pessin, Alessandra; Zanutto, Mirella Rossitto; Perobelli, Juliana Elaine; Guerra, Marina Trevizan; Banzato, Thais Petrochelli; Borges, Cibele dos Santos; Kempinas, Wilma De Grava

    2015-01-01

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is a fungicide and androgen-receptor antagonist used worldwide in horticulture and agriculture. Pre- and perinatal exposure to this pesticide during sexual differentiation is deleterious for male offspring. Since data on the effects of PCZ on epididymal functions are scarce, and because sperm maturation occurs in this organ, the present investigation aimed to determine whether low PCZ doses administered to rats during the phase of sperm transit through the epididymis might affect the morphophysiology of this organ and sperm quality. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned to 4 different groups: 0 (control, vehicle) or 10, 15, or 30 mg/kg bw/d PCZ diluted in corn oil administered orally for 4 consecutive days. Morphofunctional parameters of the male reproductive tract, hormone concentrations, sperm evaluations, and fertility and histopathologic analysis of testis and epididymis were assessed. There were no statistically significant differences between treated and control groups in relation to all evaluated parameters. Data demonstrated show that PCZ exposure for a brief 4-d exposure and low doses did not produce reproductive toxicity or compromise sperm quality in adult rats.

  6. Toxicity profiles in rats treated with tumorigenic and nontumorigenic triazole conazole fungicides: Propiconazole, triadimefon, and myclobutanil.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Douglas C; Allen, James W; George, Michael H; Hester, Susan D; Sun, Guobin; Moore, Tanya; Thai, Sheau-Fung; Delker, Don; Winkfield, Ernest; Leavitt, Sharon; Nelson, Gail; Roop, Barbara C; Jones, Carlton; Thibodeaux, Julie; Nesnow, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Conazoles are a class of azole based fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. They have a common mode of antifungal action through inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Some members of this class have been shown to be hepatotoxic and will induce mouse hepatocellular tumors and/or rat thyroid follicular cell tumors. The particular mode of toxic and tumorigenic action for these compounds is not known, however it has been proposed that triadimefon-induced rat thyroid tumors arise through the specific mechanism of increased TSH. The present study was designed to identify commonalities of effects across the different conazoles and to determine unique features of the tissue responses that suggest a toxicity pathway and a mode of action for the observed thyroid response for triadimefon. Male Wistar/Han rats were treated with triadimefon (100, 500, 1800 ppm), propiconazole (100, 500, 2500 ppm), or myclobutanil (100, 500, 2000 ppm) in feed for 4, 30, or 90 days. The rats were evaluated for clinical signs, body and liver weight, histopathology of thyroid and liver, hepatic metabolizing enzyme activity, and serum T3, T4, TSH, and cholesterol levels. There was a dose-dependent increase in liver weight but not body weight for all treatments. The indication of cytochrome induction, pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (PROD) activity, had a dose-related increase at all time points for all conazoles. Uridine diphopho-glucuronosyl transferase (UDPGT), the T4 metabolizing enzyme measured as glucuronidation of 1-naphthol, was induced to the same extent after 30 and 90 days for all three conazoles. Livers from all high dose treated rats had centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy after 4 days, while only triadimefon and propiconazole treated rats had hepatocyte hypertrophy after 30 days, and only triadimefon treated rats had hepatocyte hypertrophy after 90 days. Thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy, increased follicular cell proliferation, and colloid depletion were

  7. Relations Among the Use, Occurrence, and Flux of Azoxystrobin, Propiconazole, and Other Fungicides in US Streams, 2005-06

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglin, W. A.; Sandstrom, M. W.

    2007-05-01

    Fungicides account for 10 percent of global pesticide use (0.25 million metric tons per year), and 6 percent of US use (33 thousand metric tons per year). Some fungicides such as chlorothalonil have been in use for decades (first US registration in 1966), while others such as azoxystrobin were introduced in the last decade (first US sales in 1996). Fungicide fate and transport is not well understood, but recent investigations have detected fungicides in precipitation, groundwater, streams, and streambed sediment. The occurrence of Asian soybean rust in the Southern US is of concern because of the increase in fungicide use that would result if it spreads to the Central US during the growing season. In the Central US many growers have never used fungicides to protect soybeans. The purpose of this study is to collect baseline data on fungicide occurrence in streams prior to the spread of Asian rust to soybeans in the Central US and the anticipated increase in fungicide use to control the rust. These data are then used to investigate relations among the occurrence and flux of fungicides in US streams, and the use of those products within the associated drainage basins. Water samples from streams in the Southern and Central US were collected in 2005 (26 sites, 40 samples) and 2006 (16 sites, 41 samples), and analyzed for up to 11 fungicides. This is the first study to monitor for several of these fungicides in environmental samples from locations in this region of the US. Chlorothalonil was used in all study basins but only detected in one sample from 2006. Azoxystrobin was detected in one or more samples from 12 of 26 sites in 2005 and 10 of 16 sites in 2006. Estimated daily fluxes of azoxystrobin ranged from zero to 440 grams/day but were not significantly correlated (p value = 0.3) with estimated azoxystrobin use in the upstream watershed. Estimated daily fluxes of propiconizole ranged from zero to 360 grams/day and were correlated (p value = <0.0001) with estimated

  8. Agricultural Health and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics View more Rural Agricultural Health and Safety Agriculture is one of the most hazardous industries in ... 088,000 full-time workers employed in production agriculture. Each day, agricultural workers experience 100 non-fatal ...

  9. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-07-30

    Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish populations in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of oral exposure to fungicides on honey bee nutrition and immunity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Worker bees fed pollen containing fungicides (boscalid and pyraclostrobin) that are respiratory inhibitors had lower ATP concentrations in thoracic muscle tissue than those fed untreated pollen in both cage and colony studies. Midgut protease activity, used an indicator of consumption, was higher in...

  11. A fungicide-responsive kinase as a tool for synthetic cell fate regulation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kentaro; Hohmann, Stefan

    2015-08-18

    Engineered biological systems that precisely execute defined tasks have major potential for medicine and biotechnology. For instance, gene- or cell-based therapies targeting pathogenic cells may replace time- and resource-intensive drug development. Engineering signal transduction systems is a promising, yet presently underexplored approach. Here, we exploit a fungicide-responsive heterologous histidine kinase for pathway engineering and synthetic cell fate regulation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rewiring the osmoregulatory Hog1 MAPK signalling system generates yeast cells programmed to execute three different tasks. First, a synthetic negative feedback loop implemented by employing the fungicide-responsive kinase and a fungicide-resistant derivative reshapes the Hog1 activation profile, demonstrating how signalling dynamics can be engineered. Second, combinatorial integration of different genetic parts including the histidine kinases, a pathway activator and chemically regulated promoters enables control of yeast growth and/or gene expression in a two-input Boolean logic manner. Finally, we implemented a genetic 'suicide attack' system, in which engineered cells eliminate target cells and themselves in a specific and controllable manner. Taken together, fungicide-responsive kinases can be applied in different constellations to engineer signalling behaviour. Sensitizing engineered cells to existing chemicals may be generally useful for future medical and biotechnological applications. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Interaction of basal foliage removal and late season fungicide applications in management of Hop powdery mildew

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Experiments were conducted over three years to evaluate whether fungicide applications could be ceased after the most susceptible stages of cone development (late July) without unduly affecting crop yield and quality when disease pressure was moderated with varying levels of basal foliage removal. I...

  13. Fungicide spray coverage from ground-based sprayers in mature pecan trees

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Air-blast sprayers are widely used to control pecan scab (Fusicladium effusum) on pecan trees. Good spray coverage is critical to ensure disease control and to minimize risk of fungicide resistance. Spray coverage from an air-blast sprayer, typical of the sprayer used by commercial producers, was me...

  14. Effects of fungicide application on control of stripe rust on winter wheat cultivars in 2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine the effects of fungicide application on control of stripe rust on individual winter wheat cultivars with various levels of resistance grown in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, this study was conducted in a field near Pullman, WA. Fertilizer (100N-20K-25S) was applied at 80 lb/A at the time o...

  15. Inhibition of fungal plant pathogens by synergistic action of chito-oligosaccharides and commercially available fungicides.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Hafizur; Shovan, Latifur Rahman; Hjeljord, Linda Gordon; Aam, Berit Bjugan; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Sørlie, Morten; Tronsmo, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan is a linear heteropolymer consisting of β 1,4-linked N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and D-glucosamine (GlcN). We have compared the antifungal activity of chitosan with DPn (average degree of polymerization) 206 and FA (fraction of acetylation) 0.15 and of enzymatically produced chito-oligosaccharides (CHOS) of different DPn alone and in combination with commercially available synthetic fungicides, against Botrytis cinerea, the causative agent of gray mold in numerous fruit and vegetable crops. CHOS with DPn in the range of 15-40 had the greatest anti-fungal activity. The combination of CHOS and low dosages of synthetic fungicides showed synergistic effects on antifungal activity in both in vitro and in vivo assays. Our study shows that CHOS enhance the activity of commercially available fungicides. Thus, addition of CHOS, available as a nontoxic byproduct of the shellfish industry, may reduce the amounts of fungicides that are needed to control plant diseases.

  16. Inhibition of Fungal Plant Pathogens by Synergistic Action of Chito-Oligosaccharides and Commercially Available Fungicides

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Hafizur; Shovan, Latifur Rahman; Hjeljord, Linda Gordon; Aam, Berit Bjugan; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Sørlie, Morten; Tronsmo, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan is a linear heteropolymer consisting of β 1,4-linked N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and D-glucosamine (GlcN). We have compared the antifungal activity of chitosan with DPn (average degree of polymerization) 206 and F A (fraction of acetylation) 0.15 and of enzymatically produced chito-oligosaccharides (CHOS) of different DPn alone and in combination with commercially available synthetic fungicides, against Botrytis cinerea, the causative agent of gray mold in numerous fruit and vegetable crops. CHOS with DPn in the range of 15–40 had the greatest anti-fungal activity. The combination of CHOS and low dosages of synthetic fungicides showed synergistic effects on antifungal activity in both in vitro and in vivo assays. Our study shows that CHOS enhance the activity of commercially available fungicides. Thus, addition of CHOS, available as a nontoxic byproduct of the shellfish industry, may reduce the amounts of fungicides that are needed to control plant diseases. PMID:24770723

  17. ENANTIOSELECTIVE IN VITRO METABOLISM OF THE TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES BROMUCONAZOLE AND TRIADIMEFON USING RAT HEPATIC MICROSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on the in vitro metabolism of the enantiomers of two triazole fungicides: triadimefon [two enantiomers; 1-(4-chlorophneoxy)-3,3-dimethyl-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butan-2-one] and bromuconazole {two diastereomers, each having two enantiomers; 1-[(2RS,4RS:2RS,4SR)-4-brom...

  18. Management of bull’s eye rot using preharvest and postharvest fungicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neofabraea perennans and N. kienholzii are major causal pathogens of bull’s eye rot in apple in Eastern WA. These fungi cause significant economic loss to the Washington State apple industry and have been listed as quarantine pathogens. Previous experiments indicate that fungicide treatments contain...

  19. Comparing protection afforded by different organic alternatives to conventional fungicides for reducing scab on pecan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pecan scab (Venturia effusa) is the major yield-limiting disease in the southeastern USA. Although conventional fungicides are available to manage the disease, there is no comparison of organic methods (organically produced nuts attract a higher price). In 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 and 2016 trees of cv...

  20. Using airborne imagery to monitor cotton root rot infection before and after fungicide treatment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton root rot is a severe soilborne disease that has affected cotton production for over a century. Recent research has shown that a commercial fungicide, flutriafol, has potential for the control of this disease. To effectively and economically control this disease, it is necessary to identify in...

  1. Defining Adverse Outcome Pathways for Effects of the Fungicide Propiconazole of Fish Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are used to describe the linkage of chemical interactions in terms of molecular initiating events to whole organism responses suitable for risk assessment. This study was conducted to develop AOPs for the model fungicide propiconazole relative to r...

  2. Determination of fungicide resistance in Botrytis cinerea from strawberry in the Central Coast Region of California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted in 2013 to investigate the occurrence of fungicide resistance in Botrytis cinerea populations in California’s northern strawberry growing region; specifically in Watsonville and Salinas. In mid-May, 59 samples consisting of a single diseased fruit or plant part with gray mold s...

  3. Efficacy of Fungicides for Control of Rosette and Post-harvest Fruit Diseases of Blackberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rosette disease (caused by the fungus Cercosporella rubi) is often severe on erect blackberries grown in the southeastern U.S. and, if not controlled, may limit fruit production. A series of trials were conducted in south Mississippi to determine fungicide efficacy and optimum timing of applications...

  4. Evaluation of fungicide and biological treatments for control of fungal storage rots in sugar beet, 2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Preventing sucrose losses in storage is important to the economic viability of the sugar beet industry. In an effort to establish additional measures for reducing sucrose losses in storage, ten fungicide and/or biological treatments were evaluated on sugar beet roots in a commercial sugar beet stor...

  5. METABOLOMIC EVALUATION OF RAT LIVER AND TESTIS TO CHARACTERIZE THE TOXICITY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of two triazole fungicides, myclobutanil and triadimefon, on endogenous rat metabolite profiles in blood serum, liver, and testis was assessed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for...

  6. Control of clavicipitaceous anamorphic endophytes with fungicides, aerated steam and supercritical fluid CO2-seed extraction

    Treesearch

    A. Dan Wilson; Donald G. Lester; Brian K. Luckenbill

    2008-01-01

    The effects of soil drenches with systemic fungicides on viability of clavicipitaceous anamorphic endophytes, non-choke inducing endosymbiotic fungi of the genus Neotyphodium that systemically infect grasses, were tested in endophyte-infected seedlings of Hordeum brevisubulatum subsp. violaceum, Lolium perenne...

  7. EFFECT OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES ON REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN THE FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three triazole fungicides were evaluated for effects on female rat reproductive development. Rats were exposed via feed to propiconazole (P) (100, 500, or 2500 ppm), myclobutanil (M) (100, 500, or 2000 ppm), or triadimefon (T) (100, 500, or 1800 ppm) from gestation day 6 to postn...

  8. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and fungicides on Botryosphaeria stem blight lesion development on detached stems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    : Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of blueberries that has not been well managed with fungicides. Field observations showed that stem blight is more severe on vigorously growing plants than on slower growing plants. Detached stem assays were used to compare the effect of fertil...

  9. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and fungicides on Botryosphaeria stem blight lesion development on detached blueberry stems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of blueberries. Field observations indicate stem blight is more severe on vigorous plants than on slower growing plants. Two studies compared the effect of two types of fertilizers applied at four rates and nine fungicides on lesion development fo...

  10. Effect of Fungicide Seed Treatments on Fusarium virguliforme and Sudden Death Syndrome of Soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is a yield reducing disease increasing in prevalence across soybean producing states. Recent research indicates the SDS pathogen, Fusarium virguliforme, can infect as early as initial radicle emergence. This suggests fungicide seed treatments could offer some protection a...

  11. POMICS: A Simulation Disease Model for Timing Fungicide Applications in Management of Powdery Mildew of Cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Sapak, Z; Salam, M U; Minchinton, E J; MacManus, G P V; Joyce, D C; Galea, V J

    2017-09-01

    A weather-based simulation model, called Powdery Mildew of Cucurbits Simulation (POMICS), was constructed to predict fungicide application scheduling to manage powdery mildew of cucurbits. The model was developed on the principle that conditions favorable for Podosphaera xanthii, a causal pathogen of this crop disease, generate a number of infection cycles in a single growing season. The model consists of two components that (i) simulate the disease progression of P. xanthii in secondary infection cycles under natural conditions and (ii) predict the disease severity with application of fungicides at any recurrent disease cycles. The underlying environmental factors associated with P. xanthii infection were quantified from laboratory and field studies, and also gathered from literature. The performance of the POMICS model when validated with two datasets of uncontrolled natural infection was good (the mean difference between simulated and observed disease severity on a scale of 0 to 5 was 0.02 and 0.05). In simulations, POMICS was able to predict high- and low-risk disease alerts. Furthermore, the predicted disease severity was responsive to the number of fungicide applications. Such responsiveness indicates that the model has the potential to be used as a tool to guide the scheduling of judicious fungicide applications.

  12. Phyto-fungicides: Structure activity relationships of the thymol derivatives against Rhizoctonia solani

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thymol, the key component of thyme oil and its derivatives were evaluated for their structure activity relationship as fungicide against Rhizoctonia solani. Since plant based chemicals are considered as “Generally Recognized as Safe” (GRAS) chemicals, there is a great potential to use phytochemicals...

  13. Evaluating fungicide sensitivity of regional Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici populations in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (Bgt), cause of wheat powdery mildew, has a high likelihood of developing fungicide resistance because of the large quantity of spores produced along with the mixed mode of reproduction. Additionally, once reduced sensitivity appears in a population it can influence n...

  14. THE IN VITRO PHASE I METABOLISM OF THE TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDE BROMUCONAZOLE AND ITS FOUR ENANTIOMERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The triazole fungicide bromuconazole contains two chiral centers and exists as two diastereomers, each with two enantiomers. It has been widely used as a mixture of its diastereomers on food products. Here we report on the in vitro metabolism of the individual and combined dias...

  15. Fungicidal efficiency of electrolyzed oxidizing water on Candida albicans and its biochemical mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xinping; Ye, Guoqing; Tang, Wenwei; Ouyang, Ting; Tian, Lin; Ni, Yaming; Li, Ping

    2011-07-01

    The fungicidal influencing factors of electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) on Candida albicans were investigated by suspension quantitative germicidal tests. Results showed that EOW possessed predominant fungicidal rate on C. albican, as high as consumately 100% after 0.5min duration of 65.5mg/L active available chlorine concentration (ACC). The fungicidal effect was promoted proportionally along with ACC but was inhibited by organic interferential bovine serum albumin (BSA). The fungicidal mechanism was also investigated at a biological molecular level by detecting series of biochemical indices. Fluorescent microscopy showed that almost all C. albicans cells were stained red in 1min, suggesting that cell membrane was one of EOW's action targets. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that EOW destroyed the cellular protective barriers and imposed some damage upon the nucleus area, which verified EOW's effects on microbial ultra-structures. EOW improved membrane permeabilities with the result that the leakages of cellular inclusions (K(+), proteins and DNA) and the conductivity increased rapidly. The dehydrogenase relative activities of C. albicans decreased by 44.0% after 10min, indicating that EOW also had a destructive effect on cellular dehydrogenase. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of fungicides in protecting conifers and rhododendrons from Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    Gary A. Chastagner; Annie DeBauw; Kathy Riley; Norm Dart

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of 19 fungicides in protecting noble fir, grand fir, and Rhododendron x ?Nova Zembla? foliage from P. ramorum was tested. The tops of conifer seedlings with newly emerging shoots and mature rhododendron leaves were collected from treated plants 7 days after drench applications or 1 day after foliar applications....

  17. Screening conventional fungicides...control of blister rust on sugar pine in California

    Treesearch

    Clarence R. Quick

    1967-01-01

    After 5 years, 4 of 14 fungicides tested showed varying pr of development into satisfactory direct control of blister rust. Little promise of systemic control was found. Trees treated were second-growth sugar pine in a mixed conifer forest in eastern Shasta County, California, where blister rust has been intensifying for many years. Most trees received basal-stem...

  18. A reassessment of the risk of rust fungi developing resistance to fungicides.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Richard P

    2014-11-01

    Rust fungi are major pathogens of many annual and perennial crops. Crop protection is largely based on genetic and chemical control. Fungicide resistance is a significant issue that has affected many crop pathogens. Some pathogens have rapidly developed resistance and hence are regarded as high-risk species. Rust fungi have been classified as being low risk, in spite of sharing many relevant features with high-risk pathogens. An examination of the evidence suggests that rust fungi may be wrongly classified as low risk. Of the nine classes of fungicide to which resistance has developed, six are inactive against rusts. The three remaining classes are quinone outside inhibitors (QoIs), demethylation inhibitors (DMIs) and succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors (SDHIs). QoIs have been protected by a recently discovered intron that renders resistant mutants unviable. Low levels of resistance have developed to DMIs, but with limited field significance. Older SDHI fungicides were inactive against rusts. Some of the SDHIs introduced since 2003 are active against rusts, so it may be that insufficient time has elapsed for resistance to develop, especially as SDHIs are generally sold in mixtures with other actives. It would therefore seem prudent to increase the level of vigilance for possible cases of resistance to established and new fungicides in rusts. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Application of Toxicogenomics to Develop a Mode of Action for a Carcinogenic Conazole Fungicide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a common class of fungicides used to control fungal growth in the environment and in humans. Some of these agents have adverse toxicological outcomes in mammals as carcinogens, reproductive toxins, and hepatotoxins. We coupled the results from genomic analyses with ...

  20. Evaluation of fungicides for the control of Phytophthora ramorum infecting Rhododendron, Camellia, Viburnum, and Pieris

    Treesearch

    S.A. Tjosvold; D.L. Chambers; S. Koike

    2006-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum has been detected infecting ornamental hosts in European nurseries and gardens beginning in 1993, and detected in North American nurseries beginning in 2000. Nursery operators need a comprehensive program to insure that nursery stock remain disease free. Fungicides could be part of an integrated pest management approach to meet...

  1. Evaluation of spring wheat cultivars to fungicide application for control of stripe rust in 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To evaluate spring wheat cultivars grown in the U.S. Pacific Northwest to fungicide application for control of stripe rust and assess their yield loss caused by the disease, this study was conducted in a field near Pullman, WA. Spring wheat genotype ‘Avocet S’ (AvS) was used as a susceptible check, ...

  2. Understanding the molecular basis of the resistance of Phytophthora infestans to fungicides by functional genomics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Development of resistance to fungicides is a major concern in managing potato late blight disease caused by Phytophthora infestans. The problem is P. infestans is capable of sexual recombination contributing to increased strain variability and high adaptability that hastens the development of resis...

  3. Biological characterization of fenpicoxamid, a new fungicide with utility in cereals and other crops

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chenglin; Myung, Kyung; Kemmitt, Greg; Leader, Andrew; Meyer, Kevin G; Bowling, Andrew J; Slanec, Thomas; Kramer, Vincent J

    2017-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND The development of novel highly efficacious fungicides that lack cross‐resistance is extremely desirable. Fenpicoxamid (Inatreq™ active) possesses these characteristics and is a member of a novel picolinamide class of fungicides derived from the antifungal natural product UK‐2A. RESULTS Fenpicoxamid strongly inhibited in vitro growth of several ascomycete fungi, including Zymoseptoria tritici (EC50, 0.051 mg L−1). Fenpicoxamid is converted by Z. tritici to UK‐2A, a 15‐fold stronger inhibitor of Z. tritici growth (EC50, 0.0033 mg L−1). Strong fungicidal activity of fenpicoxamid against driver cereal diseases was confirmed in greenhouse tests, where activity on Z. tritici and Puccinia triticina matched that of fluxapyroxad. Due to its novel target site (Qi site of the respiratory cyt bc1 complex) for the cereals market, fenpicoxamid is not cross‐resistant to Z. tritici isolates resistant to strobilurin and/or azole fungicides. Across multiple European field trials Z. tritici was strongly controlled (mean, 82%) by 100 g as ha−1 applications of fenpicoxamid, which demonstrated excellent residual activity. CONCLUSIONS The novel chemistry and biochemical target site of fenpicoxamid as well as its lack of cross‐resistance and strong efficacy against Z. tritici and other pathogens highlight the importance of fenpicoxamid as a new tool for controlling plant pathogenic fungi. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:28471527

  4. THE FUNGICIDE PROCHLORAZ: IN VITRO ANDROGEN ANTAGONISM, PARTURITION DELAYS, AND MALE REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fungicide Prochloraz: In vitro Androgen Antagonism, Parturition Delays, and Male Reproductive Malformations in Rats.
    Nigel C. Noriega, Joseph Ostby, Christy Lambright, Vickie S. Wilson, and L. Earl Gray Jr.,
    noriega.nigel@epa.gov
    US EPA
    Prochloraz (PZ) is an imid...

  5. Fungicidal seed coatings exert minor effects on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant nutrient content

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: Determine if contemporary, seed-applied fungicidal formulations inhibit colonization of plant roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, plant development, or plant nutrient content during early vegetative stages of several commodity crops. Methods: We evaluated seed-applied commercial fungic...

  6. Use of Adverse Outcome Pathways for Assessing Effects of the Fungicide Propiconazole on Fish Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOP) are used to describe the linkage of biological events from a molecular initiating point, to individual-level-endpoints relevant to risk assessment. This study was done to assess toxicity outcomes for the conazole fungicide propiconazole based on a p...

  7. Multilocation field trials for risk assessment of a combination fungicide Fluopicolide + Propamocarb in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K K; Shukla, V R; Patel, A R; Vaghela, K M; Patel, H K; Shah, Paresh G; Banerjee, Hemanta; Banerjee, Tirthankar; Hudait, Ram K; Sharma, Debi; Sahoo, S K; Singh, Balwinder; Tripathy, Vandana

    2016-11-01

    Dissipation kinetics of two systemic fungicides, namely fluopicolide and propamocarb used as a combination formulation (Infinito 68.75 SC), were studied on tomato at four different locations by the All India Network Project on Pesticide Residues to recommend their pre-harvest interval (PHI) and to propose the maximum residue limits (MRL) for the two fungicides based on chronic hazard exposure assessment. The combination fungicide was sprayed thrice at the recommended dosage of 93.75 g a.i./ha fluopicolide and 937.50 g a.i./ha propamocarb as well as at double the recommended dosage of 187.50 g a.i./ha fluopicolide and 1875.0 g a.i./ha propamocarb on tomato crops and the residues were monitored periodically by GC-MS. The fungicides dissipated to below the limit of quantification (LOQ) within 10 to 15 days, with a half-life of 2-4 days for fluopicolide and 1-2 days for propamocarb. Taking into consideration the MRLs of codex and calculations made using the method of MRL fixation of the Food Safety and Standard Authority of India (FSSAI) as well as the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) calculator, MRL of 5 mg/kg is proposed for fluopicolide and 15 mg/kg for propamocarb, following critical exposure of the commodity considering PHI of 1 day.

  8. Effects of triazole fungicides on androgenic disruption and CYP3A4 enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xuan; Pan, Liumeng; Wang, Jiaying; Lu, Liping; Yan, Weilin; Zhu, Yanye; Xu, Yiwen; Guo, Ming; Zhuang, Shulin

    2017-03-01

    Triazole fungicides are widely used as broad-spectrum fungicides, non-steroidal antiestrogens and for various industrial applications. Their residues have been frequently detected in multiple environmental and human matrices. The increasingly reported toxicity incidents have led triazole fungicides as emerging contaminants of environmental and public health concern. However, whether triazole fungicides behave as endocrine disruptors by directly mimicking environmental androgens/antiandrogens or exerting potential androgenic disruption indirectly through the inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme activity is yet an unresolved question. We herein evaluated five commonly used triazole fungicides including bitertanol, hexaconazole, penconazole, tebuconazole and uniconazole for the androgenic and anti-androgenic activity using two-hybrid recombinant human androgen receptor (AR) yeast bioassay and comparatively evaluated their effects on enzymatic activity of CYP3A4 by P450-Glo™ CYP3A4 bioassay. All five fungicides showed moderate anti-androgenic activity toward human AR with the IC 50 ranging from 9.34 μM to 79.85 μM. The anti-androgenic activity remained no significant change after the metabolism mediated by human liver microsomes. These fungicides significantly inhibited the activity of CYP3A4 at the environmental relevant concentrations and the potency ranks as tebuconazole > uniconazole > hexaconazole > penconazole > bitertanol with the corresponding IC 50 of 0.81 μM, 0.93 μM, 1.27 μM, 2.22 μM, and 2.74 μM, respectively. We found that their anti-androgenic activity and the inhibition potency toward CYP3A4 inhibition was significantly correlated (R 2 between 0.83 and 0.97, p < 0.001). Our results indicated that the risk assessment of triazole pesticides and structurally similar chemicals should fully consider potential androgenic disrupting effects and the influences on the activity of CYP450s. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  9. The evil within? Systemic fungicide application in trees enhances litter quality for an aquatic decomposer-detritivore system.

    PubMed

    Newton, Kymberly; Zubrod, Jochen P; Englert, Dominic; Lüderwald, Simon; Schell, Theresa; Baudy, Patrick; Konschak, Marco; Feckler, Alexander; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2018-06-05

    Waterborne exposure towards fungicides is known to trigger negative effects in aquatic leaf-associated microbial decomposers and leaf-shredding macroinvertebrates. We expected similar effects when these organisms use leaf material from terrestrial plants that were treated with systemic fungicides as a food source since the fungicides may remain within the leaves when entering aquatic systems. To test this hypothesis, we treated black alder (Alnus glutinosa) trees with a tap water control or a systemic fungicide mixture (azoxystrobin, cyprodinil, quinoxyfen, and tebuconazole) at two worst-case application rates. Leaves of these trees were used in an experiment targeting alterations in two functions provided by leaf-associated microorganisms, namely the decomposition and conditioning of leaf material. The latter was addressed via the food-choice response of the amphipod shredder Gammarus fossarum. During a second experiment, the potential impact of long-term consumption of leaves from trees treated with systemic fungicides on G. fossarum was assessed. Systemic fungicide treatment altered the resource quality of the leaf material resulting in trends of increased fungal spore production and an altered community composition of leaf-associated fungi. These changes in turn caused a significant preference of Gammarus for microbially conditioned leaves that had received the highest fungicide treatment over control leaves. This higher food quality ultimately resulted in a higher gammarid growth (up to 300% increase) during the long-term feeding assay. Although the underlying mechanisms still need to be addressed, the present study demonstrates a positive indirect response in aquatic organisms due to systemic pesticide application in a terrestrial system. As the effects from the introduction of plant material treated with systemic fungicides strongly differ from those mediated via other pathways (e.g., waterborne exposure), our study provides a novel perspective of fungicide

  10. Agricultural biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Waage, J K; Mumford, J D

    2008-02-27

    The prevention and control of new pest and disease introductions is an agricultural challenge which is attracting growing public interest. This interest is in part driven by an impression that the threat is increasing, but there has been little analysis of the changing rates of biosecurity threat, and existing evidence is equivocal. Traditional biosecurity systems for animals and plants differ substantially but are beginning to converge. Bio-economic modelling of risk will be a valuable tool in guiding the allocation of limited resources for biosecurity. The future of prevention and management systems will be strongly influenced by new technology and the growing role of the private sector. Overall, today's biosecurity systems are challenged by changing national priorities regarding trade, by new concerns about environmental effects of biological invasions and by the question 'who pays?'. Tomorrow's systems may need to be quite different to be effective. We suggest three changes: an integration of plant and animal biosecurity around a common, proactive, risk-based approach; a greater focus on international cooperation to deal with threats at source; and a commitment to refocus biosecurity on building resilience to invasion into agroecosystems rather than building walls around them.

  11. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Eric H.; Jaronski, Stefan T.; Hodgson, Erin W.; Gassmann, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought. PMID:26191815

  12. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Eric H; Jaronski, Stefan T; Hodgson, Erin W; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought.

  13. Fungicide dissipation and impact on metolachlor aerobic soil degradation and soil microbial dynamics.

    PubMed

    White, Paul M; Potter, Thomas L; Culbreath, Albert K

    2010-02-15

    Pesticides are typically applied as mixtures and or sequentially to soil and plants during crop production. A common scenario is herbicide application at planting followed by sequential fungicide applications post-emergence. Fungicides depending on their spectrum of activity may alter and impact soil microbial communities. Thus there is a potential to impact soil processes responsible for herbicide degradation. This may change herbicide efficacy and environmental fate characteristics. Our study objective was to determine the effects of 4 peanut fungicides, chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-1,3-benzenedicarbonitrile), tebuconazole (alpha-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-alpha-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol), flutriafol (alpha-(2-fluorophenyl)-alpha-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol), and cyproconazole (alpha-(4-chlorophenyl)-alpha-(1-cyclopropylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol) on the dissipation kinetics of the herbicide, metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(6-ethyl-o-tolyl)-N-[(1RS)-2-methoxy-1-methylethyl]acetamide), and on the soil microbial community. This was done through laboratory incubation of field treated soil. Chlorothalonil significantly reduced metolachlor soil dissipation as compared to the non-treated control or soil treated with the other fungicides. Metolachlor DT(50) was 99 days for chlorothalonil-treated soil and 56, 45, 53, and 46 days for control, tebuconazole, flutriafol, and cyproconazole-treated soils, respectively. Significant reductions in predominant metolachlor metabolites, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid (MOA), produced by oxidation of glutathione-metolachlor conjugates were also observed in chlorothalonil-treated soil. This suggested that the fungicide impacted soil glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity. Fungicide DT(50) was 27-80 days but impacts on the soil microbial community as indicated by lipid biomarker analysis were minimal. Overall study results indicated that

  14. EFFECTS OF THE FUNGICIDE TRIADMEFON ON FIXED-INTERVAL PERFORMANCE: COMPARISON WITH METHYLPHENIDATE, D-AMPHETAMINE AND CHLORPROMAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon is a fungicide that has recently been shown to increase motor activity and also to increase rates of schedule-controlled responding. hese findings indicate that triadimefon resembles psychomotor stimulants. he present experiment was designed to compare triadimefon to ...

  15. Programs in Animal Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Don R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Five topics relating to programs in animal agriculture are addressed: (1) the future of animal agriculture; (2) preparing teachers in animal agriculture; (3) how animal programs help young people; (4) a nontraditional animal agriculture program; and (5) developing competencies in animal agriculture. (LRA)

  16. Deprotonation and protonation of humic acids as a strategy for the technological development of pH-responsive nanoparticles with fungicidal potential.

    PubMed

    Motta, F L; Melo, B A G; Santana, M H A

    2016-12-25

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules of undefined compositions that vary with origin, the process by which they are obtained and functional groups present in their structure, such as quinones, phenols, and carboxylic acids. In addition to agriculture, there is an increased interest in HAs due to their important pharmacological effects. However, HAs are not readily soluble in water at physiological pH, which may limit their bioavailability. Although primary aggregation forms non-uniform pseudo-micelles, the presence of ionisable groups in the HA molecule makes pH an environmental stimulus for controlled aggregation and precipitation. The aim of this work was to induce HA deprotonation and protonation, without compromising their colloidal dispersion, by means of pH changes as a strategy to produce nanoparticles. Deprotonation and protonation were achieved by treating HAs with sodium hydroxide and acetic acid, respectively, at various concentrations. Non pH-treated HAs at the same concentrations were used as control. The evolution of the treatments was monitored by pH changes in bulk solutions as a function of time. At equilibrium, the conformation of the colloidal structures was characterised by the predominant mean diameter, polydispersity index and absorbance of the solutions. The zeta potential was also measured in protonation assays. Moreover, the fungicidal activity of the nanoparticles was evaluated on the mycelial growth of three fungal genera. The results showed the pH decrease or increment as a function of the balance between hydroxyl and carboxyl groups and of the diffusion rate inside the structures. Deprotonation followed by protonation produced nanosized (100-200nm), electrostatically stable (-30mV) and pH-responsive particles with a polydispersity index <0.5. The protonated nanoparticles significantly inhibited (P≤0.05) the mycelial growth of Candida albicans in vitro, when compared with control, and the fungicidal activity was dose-dependent. No

  17. Agricultural Spray Drift Concentrations in Rainwater, Stemflow ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In order to study spray drift contribution to non-targeted habitats, pesticide concentrations were measured in stemflow (water flowing down the trunk of a tree during a rain event), rainfall, and amphibians in an agriculturally impacted wetland area near Tifton, Georgia, USA. Agricultural fields and sampling locations were located on the University of Georgia's Gibbs research farm. Samples were analyzed for >150 pesticides and over 20 different pesticides were detected in these matrices. Data indicated that herbicides (metolachlor and atrazine) and fungicides (tebuconazole) were present with the highest concentrations in stemflow, followed by those in rainfall and amphibian tissue samples. Metolachlor had the highest frequency of detection and highest concentration in rainfall and stemflow samples. Higher concentrations of pesticides were observed in stemflow for a longer period than rainfall. Furthermore, rainfall and stemflow concentrations were compared against aquatic life benchmarks and environmental water screening values to determine if adverse effects would potentially occur for non-targeted organisms. Of the pesticides detected, several had concentrations that exceeded the aquatic life benchmark value. The majority of the time mixtures were present in the different matrices, making it difficult to determine the potential adverse effects that these compounds will have on non-target species, due to unknown potentiating effects. These data help assess the

  18. Tolerance of triazole-based fungicides by biocontrol agents used to control Fusarium head blight in wheat in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Palazzini, J M; Torres, A M; Chulze, S N

    2018-05-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium graminearum species complex is a devastating disease that causes extensive yield and quality losses to wheat around the world. Fungicide application and breeding for resistance are among the most important tools to counteract FHB. Biological control is an additional tool that can be used as part of an integrated management of FHB. Bacillus velezensisRC 218, Brevibacillus sp. RC 263 and Streptomyces sp. RC 87B were selected by their potential to control FHB and deoxynivalenol production. The aim of this work was to test the tolerance of these biocontrol agents to triazole-based fungicides such as prothioconazole, tebuconazole and metconazole. Bacterial growth was evaluated in Petri dishes using the spread plating technique containing the different fungicides. Bacillus velezensisRC 218 and Streptomyces sp. RC 87B showed better tolerance to fungicides than Brevibacillus sp. RC 263. Complete growth inhibition was observed at concentrations of 20 μg ml -1 for metconazole, 40 μg ml -1 for tebuconazole and 80 μg ml -1 for prothioconazole. The results obtained indicate the possibility of using these biocontrol agents in combination with fungicides as part of an integrated management to control FHB of wheat. This study evaluates the possibility to use biocontrol agents (Bacillus velezensisRC 218, Brevibacillus sp. RC 263 and Streptomyces sp. RC 87B) in combination with triazole-based fungicides to control Fusarium head blight in wheat. The evaluation of biocontrol agents' growth under in vitro conditions was carried out in Petri dishes containing either prothioconazole, tebuconazole or metconazole. Viability studies demonstrated that B. velezensisRC 218 and Streptomyces sp. RC 87B were more tolerant to the fungicides evaluated. Results obtained reflect the possibility to use fungicides at low doses combined with biocontrol agents. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Residue behavior and dietary intake risk assessment of three fungicides in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaodan; Jia, Chunhong; Duan, Lifang; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Pingzhong; He, Min; Chen, Li; Zhao, Ercheng

    2016-11-01

    The residue behavior and dietary intake risk of three fungicides (pyrimethanil, iprodione, kresoxim-methyl) in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) grown in greenhouse were investigated. A simple, rapid analytical method for the quantification of fungicide residues in tomatoes was developed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrum detection (GC-MSD). The fortified recoveries were ranged from 87% to 103% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) varied from 4.7% to 12.1%. The results indicated that the dissipation rate of the studied fungicides in tomatoes followed first order kinetics with half lives in the range of 8.6-11.5 days. The final residues of all the fungicides in tomatoes were varied from 0.241 to 0.944 mg/kg. The results of dietary intake assessment indicated that the dietary intake of the three fungicides from tomatoes consumption for Chinese consumers were acceptable. This study would provide more understanding of residue behavior and dietary intake risk by these fungicides used under greenhouse conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective effect of myclobutanil enantiomers on fungicidal activity and fumonisin production by Fusarium verticillioides under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Deng, Luqing; Li, Jianfang; Wang, Zhengbing; Han, Yiye; Liu, Chenglan

    2018-05-01

    Myclobutanil is a widely used triazole fungicide, comprising two enantiomers with different fungicidal activities, non-target toxicities, and environmental fates. The enantioselective effects of myclobutanil on fumonisin B (FB) production by Fusarium verticillioides, an important pathogen, have not yet been investigated. In the present study, the fungicidal activities of rac-myclobutanil and its enantiomers on F. verticillioides cultured on maize-based media were studied under different water activity and temperature conditions. The FB levels were measured to assess the enantioselective effects on FB production when F. verticillioides were cultured treated with EC 50 and EC 90 concentrations (concentrations inhibiting mycelial growth by 50.0% and 90.0%, respectively) of myclobutanil and enantiomers under different conditions. The fungicidal activities of rac-myclobutanil and its enantiomers decreased with increasing temperature and decreasing water activity. Little difference in fungicidal activity was observed between the enantiomers. FB production was significantly influenced by temperature, a w , and fungicides dose. At EC50 concentrations, rac-myclobutantil and its enantiomers were shown to enhance mycotoxin production and enantioselective effects of enantiomers on FB production were observed under certain conditions. This is the first report on the differential effects of myclobutanil enantiomers on the control of F. verticillioides growth and FB production in maize-based media under different conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Apyrase inhibitors enhance the ability of diverse fungicides to inhibit the growth of different plant-pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Kumar Tripathy, Manas; Weeraratne, Gayani; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J

    2017-09-01

    A previous study has demonstrated that the treatment of Arabidopsis plants with chemical inhibitors of apyrase enzymes increases their sensitivity to herbicides. In this study, we found that the addition of the same or related apyrase inhibitors could potentiate the ability of different fungicides to inhibit the growth of five different pathogenic fungi in plate growth assays. The growth of all five fungi was partially inhibited by three commonly used fungicides: copper octanoate, myclobutanil and propiconazole. However, when these fungicides were individually tested in combination with any one of four different apyrase inhibitors (AI.1, AI.10, AI.13 or AI.15), their potency to inhibit the growth of five fungal pathogens was increased significantly relative to their application alone. The apyrase inhibitors were most effective in potentiating the ability of copper octanoate to inhibit fungal growth, and least effective in combination with propiconazole. Among the five pathogens assayed, that most sensitive to the fungicide-potentiating effects of the inhibitors was Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Overall, among the 60 treatment combinations tested (five pathogens, four apyrase inhibitors, three fungicides), the addition of apyrase inhibitors increased significantly the sensitivity of fungi to the fungicide treatments in 53 of the combinations. Consistent with their predicted mode of action, inhibitors AI.1, AI.10 and AI.13 each increased the level of propiconazole retained in one of the fungi, suggesting that they could partially block the ability of efflux transporters to remove propiconazole from these fungi. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  2. Evaluating the combined efficacy of polymers with fungicides for protection of museum textiles against fungal deterioration in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Fungal deterioration is one of the highest risk factors for damage of historical textile objects in Egypt. This paper represents both a study case about the fungal microflora deteriorating historical textiles in the Egyptian Museum and the Coptic museum in Cairo, and evaluation of the efficacy of several combinations of polymers with fungicides for the reinforcement of textiles and their prevention against fungal deterioration. Both cotton swab technique and biodeteriorated textile part technique were used for isolation of fungi from historical textile objects. The plate method with the manual key was used for identification of fungi. The results show that the most dominant fungi isolated from the tested textile samples belong to Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Penicillium and Trichoderma species. Microbiological testing was used for evaluating the usefulness of the suggested conservation materials (polymers combined with fungicides) in prevention of the fungal deterioration of ancient Egyptian textiles. Textile samples were treated with 4 selected polymers combined with two selected fungicides. Untreated and treated textile samples were deteriorated by 3 selected active fungal strains isolated from ancient Egyptian textiles. This study reports that most of the tested polymers combined with the tested fungicides prevented the fungal deterioration of textiles. Treatment of ancient textiles by suggested polymers combined with the suggested fungicides not only reinforces these textiles, but also prevents fungal deterioration and increases the durability of these textiles. The tested polymers without fungicides reduce the fungal deterioration of textiles but do not prevent it completely.

  3. Complexation of carbendazim with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin to improve solubility and fungicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xia; Huang, Zheng; Tian, Shilong; Huang, Yulong; Zeng, Chaozhen

    2012-06-05

    The effect of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) on the improvement of the solubility and fungicidal activity of carbendazim (MBC) has been investigated. The inclusion complexation of HPβCD with MBC has been prepared and characterized by phase solubility diagram, fluorescence, (1)H NMR, ROESY and FT-IR spectra. The stoichiometric ratio and stability constant were determined by Job's plot and phase solubility studies, respectively. The inclusion complex MBC·HPβCD has exhibited different properties from MBC. The obtained inclusion complex was found to significantly improve the water solubility of MBC. In addition, the biological activity indicated that the complex displayed the better fungicidal activity than MBC. The present study provided useful information for a more rational application of MBC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of fungicide residues on the primary fermentation of young lager beer.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Simón; Pérez, Gabriel; Navarro, Ginés; Mena, Luis; Vela, Nuria

    2007-02-21

    The effect of four sterol biosynthesis-inhibiting fungicides added to the pitching wort on the evolution of several organoleptic parameters during the primary fermentation of young lager beer was assessed. Pyrimidine (nuarimol and fenarimol) and triazole (myclobutanil and propiconazole) fungicides were individually supplied to the pitching wort to obtain a concentration of 1 mg/L. A marked influence in the fermentation rate was observed for the samples with propiconazole residues. From the fourth day onward, the fermentation prematurely ceased (stuck fermentation), and therefore, statistical significant differences were found in fermented extract, alcohol content, fermentable carbohydrates, pH, color, and total polyphenol and flavonoid contents of beer. Myclobutanil residues are only influenced in the total polyphenol and flavonoid contents, while differences in the analyzed parameters were not noticeable for the samples containing nuarimol and fenarimol residues in comparison with the blank sample.

  5. Synthesis and fungicidal activity of 1,1-diaryl tertiary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuyun; Han, Xiaoqiang; He, Mengmeng; Xiao, Yumei; Qin, Zhaohai

    2016-12-15

    A series of 1,1-diaryl tertiary alcohols and some of their dehydration derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their antifungal activities. Some compounds exhibited moderate inhibitory activities against seven plant pathogens at 50μg/mL in vitro, compounds 5g and 7c displayed nearly the same or higher fungicidal activities against some certain plant pathogens compared with the lead compound pyrimorph. A qualitative structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis revealed that the Cl substituent and its position at the pyridine ring were crucial for the compounds' activities. Specially, several compounds displayed 100% protection effect against wheat powdery mildew or cucumber anthrax at 400mg/mL in vivo, which suggested that these compounds might be potential fungicidal candidates for certain plant diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Corn silage from corn treated with foliar fungicide and performance of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Haerr, K J; Lopes, N M; Pereira, M N; Fellows, G M; Cardoso, F C

    2015-12-01

    Foliar fungicide application to corn plants is used in corn aimed for corn silage in the dairy industry, but questions regarding frequency of application and its effect on corn silage quality and feed conversion when fed to dairy cows remain prevalent. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of various foliar fungicide applications to corn on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, and milk composition when fed to dairy cows. Sixty-four Holstein cows with parity 2.5±1.5, 653±80kg of body weight, and 161±51d in milk were blocked and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 corn silage treatments (total mixed ration with 35% of the dry matter as corn silage). Treatments were as follows: control (CON), corn silage with no applications of foliar fungicide; treatment 1 (1X), corn silage from corn that received 1 application of pyraclostrobin (PYR) foliar fungicide (Headline; BASF Corp.) at corn vegetative stage 5; treatment 2 (2X), corn silage from corn that received the same application as 1X plus another application of a mixture of PYR and metconazole (Headline AMP; BASF Corp.) at corn reproductive stage 1 ("silking"); and treatment 3 (3X), corn silage from corn that received the same applications as 2X as well as a third application of PYR and metconazole at reproductive stage 3 ("milky kernel"). Corn was harvested at about 32% dry matter and 3/4 milk line stage of kernel development and ensiled for 200d. Treatments were fed to cows for 5wk, with the last week being used for statistical inferences. Week -1 was used as a covariate in the statistical analysis. Dry matter intake tended to be lower for cows fed corn silage treated with fungicide than CON (23.8, 23.0, 19.5, and 21.3kg for CON, 1X, 2X, and 3X, respectively). A linear treatment effect for DMI was observed, with DMI decreasing as foliar fungicide applications increased. Treatments CON, 1X, 2X, and 3X did not differ for milk yield (34.5, 34.5, 34.2, and 34.4kg/d, respectively); however, a trend for

  7. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for residue analysis of the fungicide azoxystrobin in agricultural products.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Mika; Tsuzuki, Kazuyuki; Hamada, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi Murakami, Yukie; Uchigashima, Mikiko; Saka, Machiko; Watanabe, Eiki; Iwasa, Seiji; Narita, Hiroshi; Miyake, Shiro

    2012-02-01

    A direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dc-ELISA) was developed for residue analysis of azoxystrobin in garden crops, for which the maximum residue limits (MRLs) are 0.5-50 mg/kg in Japan. For hapten synthesis, an ethyl carboxyl group was introduced to the 4-position of the 2-cyanophenoxy group in azoxystrobin, and its cyano group was changed to a methyl group. An anti-azoxystrobin monoclonal antibody was prepared from mice immunized with hapten-keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate. The dc-ELISA using prepared antibody showed 50-250-fold higher sensitivity compared to the MRLs. The working range of the dc-ELISA was 10-200 ng/mL. The dc-ELISA showed high specificity to azoxystrobin. When methanol extracts from nine kinds of garden crops spiked with azoxystrobin ranging near the MRLs were analyzed, the determined results by the dc-ELISA agreed well with the results of their controls. In addition, azoxystrobin spiked in garden crops homogenates was satisfactorily extracted by methanol solution and easily analyzed. The recovery rate of dc-ELISA was 96-109% and correlated well with the results obtained by HPLC analysis.

  8. The presence of bromuconazole fungicide pollutant in organic waste anaerobic fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariyadi, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    The presence of bromuconazole fungicide pollutant in organic waste anaerobic fermentation was carried out as well as the influence phenol and benzoate, and biodegradation of bromuconazole. Bromuconazole is a fungicide effective against Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and fungi imperfecti in cereals, grapes, top fruits and vegetables. It is also effective against Alternaria and Fusarium sp. The remaining fungicide in leaves might contaminates landfill. One month of organic waste added with bromuconazole was anaerobically incubated in 500 mL bottles at 30°C without shaking in dark room. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with UV detector and a 100 RP 185μm Lichrosphere column was used to determine bromuconazole concentration. Methane content was determined by Gas Chromatography (GC) method equipped with a flame ionization detector and a metal column packed with 5% neopentyl glycol sebacate and 1% H3PO4 on Chromosorb W-AW (mesh 80-100). After incubation for 225 days, bromuconazole of 200 mg/L inhibited the production of methane (99.5 mM) significantly, but did not inhibit the production of volatile fatty acids. The addition of 100 mg/L phenol or 146 mg/L benzoate increased the production of methane, 143 mM and 135.2 mM, respectively compared with control (121.8 mM). In anaerobic conditions, the presence of toxic pollutants such as fungicide bromuconazole in landfills sites may cause further problems with the accumulation of volatile fatty acids in leachate. Further study to determine the threshold, the presence of bromconazole in low concentration (less than 200 mg/L) on the methane production is recommended.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induced by the fungicide prothioconazole triggers deoxynivalenol (DON) production by Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fusarium head blight is a very important disease of small grain cereals with F. graminearum as one of the most important causal agents. It not only causes reduction in yield and quality but from a human and animal healthcare point of view, it produces mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) which can accumulate to toxic levels. Little is known about external triggers influencing DON production. Results In the present work, a combined in vivo/in vitro approach was used to test the effect of sub lethal fungicide treatments on DON production. Using a dilution series of prothioconazole, azoxystrobin and prothioconazole + fluoxastrobin, we demonstrated that sub lethal doses of prothioconazole coincide with an increase in DON production 48 h after fungicide treatment. In an artificial infection trial using wheat plants, the in vitro results of increased DON levels upon sub lethal prothioconazole application were confirmed illustrating the significance of these results from a practical point of view. In addition, further in vitro experiments revealed a timely hyperinduction of H2O2 production as fast as 4 h after amending cultures with prothioconazole. When applying H2O2 directly to germinating conidia, a similar induction of DON-production by F. graminearum was observed. The effect of sub lethal prothioconazole concentrations on DON production completely disappeared when applying catalase together with the fungicide. Conclusions These cumulative results suggest that H2O2 induced by sub lethal doses of the triazole fungicide prothioconazole acts as a trigger of DON biosynthesis. In a broader framework, this work clearly shows that DON production by the plant pathogen F. graminearum is the result of the interaction of fungal genomics and external environmental triggers. PMID:20398299

  10. Sensitivities to DMI fungicides in populations of Podosphaera fusca in south central Spain.

    PubMed

    López-Ruiz, Francisco J; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Fernández-Ortuño, Dolores; Romero, Diego; García, Emilio; de Vicente, Antonio; Brown, James K M; Torés, Juan A

    2010-07-01

    Cucurbit powdery mildew elicited by Podosphaera fusca (Fr.) U Braun & N Shishkoff limits crop production in Spain. Disease control is largely dependent on fungicides such as sterol demethylation inhibitors (DMIs). Fungicide resistance is an increasing problem in this pathogen. To overcome such risk, it is necessary to design rational control programmes based upon knowledge of field resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the state of DMI sensitivity of Spanish P. fusca populations and provide tools for improved disease management. Using a leaf-disc assay, sensitivity to fenarimol, myclobutanil and triadimenol of 50 isolates of P. fusca was analysed to determine discriminatory concentrations between sensitive and resistant isolates. As no clearly different groups of isolates could be identified, discriminatory concentrations were established on the basis of maximum fungicide field application rate, 100 mg L(-1) for the three fungicides tested. Subsequently, a survey of DMI resistance was carried out in different provinces located in the south central area of Spain during the cucurbit growing seasons in 2002, 2003 and 2004. Examination of a collection of 250 isolates revealed that 23% were resistant to fenarimol and 7% to triadimenol, the provinces of Almería, Badajoz and Murcia being the locations with the highest frequencies of resistance. By contrast, no resistance to myclobutanil was found. Results show that fenarimol and, to a lesser extent, triadimenol have become less efficient for controlling cucurbit powdery mildew in Spain. These are important observations that should lead to reconsideration of the current disease management programmes. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Biological characterization of fenpicoxamid, a new fungicide with utility in cereals and other crops.

    PubMed

    Owen, W John; Yao, Chenglin; Myung, Kyung; Kemmitt, Greg; Leader, Andrew; Meyer, Kevin G; Bowling, Andrew J; Slanec, Thomas; Kramer, Vincent J

    2017-10-01

    The development of novel highly efficacious fungicides that lack cross-resistance is extremely desirable. Fenpicoxamid (Inatreq™ active) possesses these characteristics and is a member of a novel picolinamide class of fungicides derived from the antifungal natural product UK-2A. Fenpicoxamid strongly inhibited in vitro growth of several ascomycete fungi, including Zymoseptoria tritici (EC 50 , 0.051 mg L -1 ). Fenpicoxamid is converted by Z. tritici to UK-2A, a 15-fold stronger inhibitor of Z. tritici growth (EC 50 , 0.0033 mg L -1 ). Strong fungicidal activity of fenpicoxamid against driver cereal diseases was confirmed in greenhouse tests, where activity on Z. tritici and Puccinia triticina matched that of fluxapyroxad. Due to its novel target site (Q i site of the respiratory cyt bc1 complex) for the cereals market, fenpicoxamid is not cross-resistant to Z. tritici isolates resistant to strobilurin and/or azole fungicides. Across multiple European field trials Z. tritici was strongly controlled (mean, 82%) by 100 g as ha -1 applications of fenpicoxamid, which demonstrated excellent residual activity. The novel chemistry and biochemical target site of fenpicoxamid as well as its lack of cross-resistance and strong efficacy against Z. tritici and other pathogens highlight the importance of fenpicoxamid as a new tool for controlling plant pathogenic fungi. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Fitness and Competitive Ability of Botrytis cinerea Isolates with Resistance to Multiple Chemical Classes of Fungicides.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Luo, C X; Hu, M J; Schnabel, G

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to multiple chemical classes of fungicides in Botrytis cinerea isolates from eastern United States strawberry fields is common and strategies to control them are needed. In this study, we compared fitness and competitive ability of eight sensitive isolates (S), eight isolates resistant to five or six chemical classes of fungicides but not to phenylpyrroles (5CCR), and eight isolates resistant to six or seven chemical classes including phenylpyrroles (6CCR/MDR1h). The latter included the MDR1h phenotype due to overexpression of atrB based on Δ497V/L in mrr1. The 6CCR/MDR1h isolates grew more slowly at 4°C on potato dextrose agar, and both 5CCR and 6CCR/MDR1h isolates were hypersensitive to osmotic stress compared with S isolates. In contrast, no differences were found in oxidative sensitivity, aggressiveness, and spore production in vivo, and sclerotia production and viability in vitro. In competition experiments, the 5CCR and 6CCR/MDR1h isolates were both outcompeted by S isolates and 6CCR/MDR1h isolates were outcompeted by 5CCR isolates in the absence of fungicide pressure. Under selective pressure of a fludioxonil/pyraclostrobin rotation, the 6CCR/MDR1h isolates dominated after coinoculation with 5CCR and S isolates. The competitive disadvantage of 5CCR and especially 6CCR/MDR1h isolates suggest that, in the absence of fungicide selection pressure, S isolates may reduce inoculum potential of multifungicide-resistant isolates under field conditions.

  13. Signum, a new fungicide with interesting properties in resistance management of fungal diseases in strawberries.

    PubMed

    Hauke, K; Creemers, P; Brugmans, W; Van Laer, S

    2004-01-01

    Signum, a new fungicide developed by BASF, was applied during 6 successive years against fungal diseases in strawberries. The product is formulated as a water dispersible granule, containing 6.7 % pyraclostrobin and 26.7 % boscalid. Pyraclostrobin is similar in chemistry to other strobilurin fungicides like kresoxim-methyl and trifloxystrobin, registered for fruit disease control. Boscalid belongs to the class of carboxyanilides. Both components in the premix formulation combine two different biochemical modes of action in the fungal cell respiration. Therefore, this co-formulation gives a broad-spectrum activity and also a reduced resistance risk for different target pathogens. Botrytis cinerea is the most important disease on strawberry-fruits and thus the control of fruit rot is mainly focused on this fungus. In average over 6 years, Signum has not only given a very good control against Botrytis fruit rot, but it has also shown a high performance in the control of Colletotrichum. Besides, Signum provides good control of powdery mildew (Podosphaera aphanis) and limits the shift to other fruit rots like leather rot (Phytophthora cactorum and leak (Rhizopus, Mucor). The availability of several categories of fungicide families with a different mode of action gives opportunities in alternating different fungicides and is the best guarantee for a sustainable control of fruit rot in all kinds of strawberry production methods. Signum should be integrated in an overall disease management program. Trials, in which the applications of Signum were timed on disease forecasting, based on environmental factors favorable for Botrytis development, were very promising. This tool can also help in establishing the IPM-concept in the production of strawberries.

  14. Agricultural SWOT analysis and wisdom agriculture design of chengdu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Xiangyu; Du, Shaoming; Yin, Guowei; Yu, Feng; Liu, Guicai; Gong, Jin; Han, Fujun

    2017-08-01

    According to the status of agricultural information, this paper analyzed the advantages, opportunities and challenges of developing wisdom agriculture in Chengdu. By analyzed the local characteristics of Chengdu agriculture, the construction program of Chengdu wisdom agriculture was designed, which was based on the existing agricultural informatization. The positioning and development theme of Chengdu agriculture is leisure agriculture, urban agriculture and quality agriculture.

  15. Degradation and sorption of the fungicide tebuconazole in soils from golf greens.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Nora; Rosenbom, Annette E; Jensen, Anne M D; Sørensen, Sebastian R

    2016-12-01

    The fungicide tebuconazole (TBZ) is used to repress fungal growth in golf greens and ensure their playability. This study determined the degradation and sorption of TBZ applied as an analytical grade compound, a commercial fungicide formulation or in combination with a surfactant product in thatch and soils below two types of greens (USGA and push-up greens) in 12-cm vertical profiles covered by three different types of turf grass. Only minor TBZ degradation was observed and it was most pronounced in treatments with the commercial fungicide product or in combination with the surfactant compared to the analytical grade compound alone. A tendency for higher TBZ sorption when applied as the formulated product and lowest sorption when applied as a formulated product in combination with the surfactant was observed, with this effect being most distinct on USGA greens. No correlation between occurrence of degradation and soil depth, green type or grass type was observed. Sorption seemed to be the main process governing the leaching risk of TBZ from the greens and a positive correlation to the organic matter content was shown. In light of these findings, organic matter content should be taken into consideration during the construction of golf courses, especially when following USGA guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of Fungicides and Microalgal Phenolic Extracts for the Direct Control of Fumonisin Contamination in Maize.

    PubMed

    Scaglioni, Priscila Tessmer; Blandino, Massimo; Scarpino, Valentina; Giordano, Debora; Testa, Giulio; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2018-05-16

    Fungicides and, for the first time, microalgal phenolic extracts (MPE) from Spirulina sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. were applied on maize culture media under field conditions to evaluate their ability to minimize Fusarium species development and fumonisin production. An in vitro assay against F. verticillioides was carried out using maize grains as the culture medium. An open-field experiment was carried out in Northwest Italy under natural infection conditions. The compared treatments were factorial combinations of two insecticide treatments (an untreated control and pyrethroid, used against European Corn Borer), four antifungal treatments (an untreated control, MPE from Spirulina sp., MPE from Nannochloropsis sp., and a synthetic fungicide), and two timings of the application of the antifungal compounds (at maize flowering and at the milk stage). The MPE compounds were capable of inhibiting fumonisin production in vitro more efficiently than tebuconazole. Insecticide application reduced the infection by Fusarium species and subsequent fumonisin contamination. However, fumonisins in maize fields were not significantly controlled by either fungicide or MPE application.

  17. Sensitivity of Podosphaera aphanis isolates to DMI fungicides: distribution and reduced cross-sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sombardier, Audrey; Dufour, Marie-Cécile; Blancard, Dominique; Corio-Costet, Marie-France

    2010-01-01

    Management of strawberry powdery mildew, Podopshaera aphanis (Wallr.), requires numerous fungicide treatments. Limiting epidemics is heavily dependent on sterol demethylation inhibitors (DMIs) such as myclobutanil or penconazole. Recently, a noticeable reduction in the efficacy of these triazole fungicides was reported by strawberry growers in France. The goal of this study was to investigate the state of DMI sensitivity of French P. aphanis and provide tools for improved pest management. Using leaf disc sporulation assays, sensitivity to myclobutanil and penconazole of 23 isolates of P. aphanis was monitored. Myclobutanil EC(50) ranged from less than 0.1 to 14.67 mg L(-1) and for penconazole from 0.04 to 4.2 mg L(-1). A cross-analysis and a Venn diagram showed that there was reduced sensitivity and a positive correlation between the less sensitive myclobutanil and penconazole isolates; 73.9% of isolates were less sensitive to a DMI and 47.8% exhibited less sensitivity to both fungicides. The results show that sensitivity to myclobutanil and, to a lesser extent, penconazole has become less efficient in strawberry powdery mildew in France. Therefore, urgent action is required in order to document its appearance and optimise methods of control.

  18. Detachment of sprayed colloidal copper oxychloride-metalaxyl fungicides by a shallow water flow.

    PubMed

    Pose-Juan, Eva; Paradelo-Pérez, Marcos; Rial-Otero, Raquel; Simal-Gándara, Jesus; López-Periago, José E

    2009-06-01

    Flow shear stress induced by rainfall promotes the loss of the pesticides sprayed on crops. Some of the factors influencing the losses of colloidal-size particulate fungicides are quantified by using a rotating shear system model. With this device it was possible to analyse the flow shear influencing washoff of a commercial fungicide formulation based on a copper oxychloride-metalaxyl mixture that was sprayed on a polypropylene surface. A factor plan with four variables, i.e. water speed and volume (both variables determining flow boundary stress in the shear device), formulation dosage and drying temperature, was set up to monitor colloid detachment. This experimental design, together with sorption experiments of metalaxyl on copper oxychloride, and the study of the dynamics of metalaxyl and copper oxychloride washoff, made it possible to prove that metalaxyl washoff from a polypropylene surface is controlled by transport in solution, whereas that of copper oxychloride occurs by particle detachment and transport of particles. Average losses for metalaxyl and copper oxychloride were, respectively, 29 and 50% of the quantity applied at the usual recommended dosage for crops. The key factors affecting losses were flow shear and the applied dosage. Empirical models using these factors provided good estimates of the percentage of fungicide loss. From the factor analysis, the main mechanism for metalaxyl loss induced by a shallow water flow is solubilisation, whereas copper loss is controlled by erosion of copper oxychloride particles.

  19. Fungicide sensitivity of Trichoderma spp. from Agaricus bisporus farms in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Kosanović, Dejana; Potočnik, Ivana; Vukojević, Jelena; Stajić, Mirjana; Rekanović, Emil; Stepanović, Miloš; Todorović, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma species, the causal agents of green mould disease, induce great losses in Agaricus bisporus farms. Fungicides are widely used to control mushroom diseases although green mould control is encumbered with difficulties. The aims of this study were, therefore, to research in vitro toxicity of several commercial fungicides to Trichoderma isolates originating from Serbian and Bosnia-Herzegovina farms, and to evaluate the effects of pH and light on their growth. The majority of isolates demonstrated optimal growth at pH 5.0, and the rest at pH 6.0. A few isolates also grew well at pH 7. The weakest mycelial growth was noted at pH 8.0-9.0. Generally, light had an inhibitory effect on the growth of tested isolates. The isolates showed the highest susceptibility to chlorothalonil and carbendazim (ED50 less than 1 mg L(-1)), and were less sensitive to iprodione (ED50 ranged 0.84-6.72 mg L(-1)), weakly resistant to thiophanate-methyl (ED50 = 3.75-24.13 mg L(-1)), and resistant to trifloxystrobin (ED50 = 10.25-178.23 mg L(-1)). Considering the toxicity of fungicides to A. bisporus, carbendazim showed the best selective toxicity (0.02), iprodione and chlorothalonil moderate (0.16), and thiophanate-methyl the lowest (1.24), while trifloxystrobin toxicity to A. bisporus was not tested because of its inefficiency against Trichoderma isolates.

  20. Fungicide resistance and genetic variability in plant pathogenic strains of Guignardia citricarpa

    PubMed Central

    Possiede, Y.M.; Gabardo, J.; Kava-Cordeiro, V.; Galli-Terasawa, L.V.; Azevedo, J.L.; Glienke, C.

    2009-01-01

    Citrus black spot (CBS) is a plant disease of worldwide occurrence, affecting crops in Africa, Oceania, and South America. In Brazil, climate provides favorable conditions and CBS has spread to the Southeast and South regions. CBS is caused by the fungus Guignardia citricarpa (anamorph: Phyllosticta citricarpa) and its control is based on the use of fungicides, such as benzimidazoles. In South Africa, the disease was kept under control for 10 years with benomyl, until cases of resistance to high concentrations of this fungicide were reported from all citrus-producing areas. Azoxystrobin (a strobilurin) has been found effective in controlling phytopathogens, including CBS, in a wide range of economically important crops. The present study investigated in vitro the effects of the fungicides benomyl and azoxystrobin on 10 strains of G. citricarpa isolated from lesions in citrus plants from Brazil and South Africa. Benomyl at 0.5 μg/mL inhibited mycelial growth in all strains except PC3C, of African origin, which exhibited resistance to concentrations of up to 100.0 μg/mL. The spontaneous mutation frequency for resistance to benomyl was 1.25 × 10-7. Azoxystrobin, even at high concentrations, did not inhibit mycelial growth in any of the strains, but significantly reduced sporulation rates, by as much as 100%, at a concentration of 5.0 μg/mL. Variations in sensitivity across strains, particularly to the strobilurin azoxystrobin, are possibly related to genetic variability in G. citricarpa isolates. PMID:24031363

  1. Antifungal screening of endophytic fungi from Ginkgo biloba for discovery of potent anti-phytopathogenic fungicides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu; Li, Hong-Xia; Li, Cong; Wang, Jian-Xin; Li, Jun; Wang, Ming-Hua; Ye, Yong-Hao

    2013-02-01

    Many endophytic fungi have been found to synthesize bioactive compounds to defend host plants against pathogenic organisms. Here we performed anti-fungal bioassay of 80 endophytic fungi isolated from Ginkgo biloba. Fifteen endophytes were active against at least one of the selected fungi, Fusarium graminearum, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Phytophthora capsici, using the agar diffusion method. The most bioactive strain CDW7 was identified as Chaetomium globosum by microscopic examination and ITS rRNA gene sequence data. Culture broth of CDW7 diluted 3-fold completely inhibited the mycelial growth and conidia germination of F. graminearum in vitro. Therefore, Fusarium head blight, a common disease in wheat and barley associated with Fusarium spp., was used to test the anti-phytopathogenic activity in vivo. The fermentation broth of CDW7 resulted in a protective efficacy of 54.9% and curative efficacy of 48.8%. Followed by a bioassay-guided approach, 1,2-benzenedicarboxaldehyde-3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-methyl (flavipin) was isolated and demonstrated to significantly inhibit the growth of several plant-pathogenic fungi, especially F. graminearum with an EC(50) value of 0.73 μg mL(-1) comparable to the commonly used fungicide carbendazim, indicating that it could be used as a fungicide or as a lead compound of new fungicides. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Contamination of apple orchard soils and fruit trees with copper-based fungicides: sampling aspects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanying; Liu, Jingshuang; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Accumulations of copper in orchard soils and fruit trees due to the application of Cu-based fungicides have become research hotspots. However, information about the sampling strategies, which can affect the accuracy of the following research results, is lacking. This study aimed to determine some sampling considerations when Cu accumulations in the soils and fruit trees of apple orchards are studied. The study was conducted in three apple orchards from different sites. Each orchard included two different histories of Cu-based fungicides usage, varying from 3 to 28 years. Soil samples were collected from different locations varying with the distances from tree trunk to the canopy drip line. Fruits and leaves from the middle heights of tree canopy at two locations (outer canopy and inner canopy) were collected. The variation in total soil Cu concentrations between orchards was much greater than the variation within orchards. Total soil Cu concentrations had a tendency to increase with the increasing history of Cu-based fungicides usage. Moreover, total soil Cu concentrations had the lowest values at the canopy drip line, while the highest values were found at the half distances between the trunk and the canopy drip line. Additionally, Cu concentrations of leaves and fruits from the outer parts of the canopy were significantly higher than from the inner parts. Depending on the findings of this study, not only the between-orchard variation but also the within-orchard variation should be taken into consideration when conducting future soil and tree samplings in apple orchards.

  3. Determination of Tebuconazole and Penconazole Fungicides in Rat and Human Hair By Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Polledri, Elisa; Mercadante, Rosa; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2018-05-04

    Tebuconazole (TEB) and penconazole (PEN) are widely applied fungicides and environmental contaminants; their toxicological properties include possible effects to the unborn child, therefore the evaluation of human exposure is relevant to risk assessment. Hair is a non-invasive specimen that incorporates pollutants allowing an extended exposure window to be surveyed. Aim of this work was to develop and validate an assay for the determination of TEB and PEN in human hair. Under optimised conditions, analytes were extracted soaking hair in acetonitrile, in the presence of deuterated analogues, under heating and agitation. Chemical separation was achieved using a C18 reversed-phase chromatographic column and detection and quantification were performed, after a positive electrospray ionization, by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry operating in selected reaction monitoring mode. The assay validation showed a linear dynamic range up to 5 μg/L or 200 pg/mg hair, inter- and intra-run precisions <6%, and accuracies within 5% of spiked concentrations. Limits of quantification were 0.001 μg/L or 1 pg/mg hair for both TEB and PEN. Matrix effect experiments showed that the isotope dilution approach allowed for the control of bias sources. TEB and PEN were determined in hair of rats exposed to a low dose of TEB and in hair of agricultural workers exposed to TEB and/or PEN during the application season, indicating that both chemicals are incorporated into the hair upon exposure. The results of this study indicate that the developed assay is useful to evaluate the exposure to TEB and PEN in humans. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptional profiles in liver from rats treated with tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic triazole conazole fungicides: Propiconazole, triadimefon, and myclobutanil.

    PubMed

    Hester, Susan D; Wolf, Douglas C; Nesnow, Stephen; Thai, Sheau-Fung

    2006-01-01

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides used as pharmaceutical and agricultural agents. In chronic bioassays in rats, triadimefon was hepatotoxic and induced follicular cell adenomas in the thyroid gland, whereas, propiconazole and myclobutanil were hepatotoxic but had no effect on the thyroid gland. These conazoles administered in the feed to male Wistar/Han rats were found to induce hepatomegaly, induce high levels of pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, increase cell proliferation in the liver, increase serum cholesterol, decrease serum T3 and T4, and increase hepatic uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase activity. The goal of the present study was to define pathways that explain the biologic outcomes. Male Wistar/Han rats (3 per group), were exposed to the 3 conazoles in the feed for 4, 30, or 90 days of treatment at tumorigenic and nontumorigenic doses. Hepatic gene expression was determined using high-density Affymetrix GeneChips (Rat 230_2). Differential gene expression was assessed at the probe level using Robust Multichip Average analysis. Principal component analysis by treatment and time showed within group sample similarity and that the treatment groups were distinct from each other. The number of altered genes varied by treatment, dose, and time. The greatest number of altered genes was induced by triadimefon and propiconazole after 90 days of treatment, while myclobutanil had minimal effects at that time point. Pathway level analyses revealed that after 90 days of treatment the most significant numbers of altered pathways were related to cell signaling, growth, and metabolism. Pathway level analysis for triadimefon and propiconazole resulted in 71 altered pathways common to both chemicals. These pathways controlled cholesterol metabolism, activation of nuclear receptors, and N-ras and K-ras signaling. There were 37 pathways uniquely changed by propiconazole, and triadimefon uniquely altered 34 pathways. Pathway level analysis of altered gene expression

  5. Development of a multiplex allele-specific primer PCR assay for simultaneous detection of QoI and CAA fungicide resistance alleles in Plasmopara viticola populations.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshinao; Hada, Yosuke; Suzuki, Shunji

    2013-02-01

    DNA-based diagnosis has become a common tool for the evaluation of fungicide resistance in obligate phytopathogenic fungus Plasmopara viticola. A multiplex allele-specific primer PCR assay has been developed for the rapid detection of fungicide resistance in P. viticola populations. With this assay, a glycine-to-alanine substitution at codon 143 of the P. viticola cytochrome b gene, which conferred QoI fungicide resistance, and a glycine-to-serine substitution at codon 1105 of the P. viticola cellulose synthase gene PvCesA3, which conferred CAA fungicide resistance, were detected simultaneously. It is suggested that the present assay is a reliable tool for the rapid and simultaneous detection of QoI and CAA fungicide resistance alleles in P. viticola populations. The assay required only 2 h from the sampling of symptoms to the detection of resistance alleles to both fungicides. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Speciation of Cu and Zn in drainage water from agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, Annette P; Kistler, David; Sigg, Laura

    2002-11-15

    Inputs of copper and zinc from agricultural soils into the aquatic system were investigated in this study, because of their heavy agricultural usage as feed additives and components of fertilizers and fungicides. As the mobility and bioavailability of these metals are affected by their speciation, the lipophilic, colloidal and organic fractions were determined in drainage water from a loamy and a humic soil treated with fungicides or manure. This study therefore investigates the impact of agricultural activity on a natural environment and furthers our understanding of the mobility of metals in agricultural soils and aquatic pollution in rural areas. Marked increases in the total dissolved metal concentrations were observed in the drainage water during rain events with up to 0.3 microM Cu and 0.26 microM Zn depending on the intensity of the rainfall and soil type. The mobile metal fractions were of a small molecular size (<10 kD) and mainly hydrophilic. Lipophilic complexes originating from a dithiocarbamate (DTC) fungicide could not be observed in the drainage water; however, small amounts of lipophilic metal complexes may be of natural origin. Cu was organically complexed to > 99.9% by abundant organic ligands (log K 10.5-11.0). About 50% of dissolved Zn were electrochemically labile, and the other 50% were complexed by strong organic ligands (log K 8.2-8.6). Therefore very little free metal species were found suggesting a low bioavailability of these metals in the drainage water even at elevated metal concentrations.

  7. Vocational Agriculture Computer Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort.

    This document is a catalog of reviews of computer software suitable for use in vocational agriculture programs. The reviews were made by vocational agriculture teachers in Kentucky. The reviews cover software on the following topics: farm management, crop production, livestock production, horticulture, agricultural mechanics, general agriculture,…

  8. Home | National Agricultural Library

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to main content Home National Agricultural Library United States Department of Agriculture Ag /items/collectionKey.... 5/2/2018: Data Science and Agriculture Webinar Join us for our next webinar on Akshat Pant discuss applications and aspects of data science as it relates to agriculture. Read further

  9. Theme: Agricultural Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeds, Jacquelyn P.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six theme articles attempt to define and advocate agricultural literacy, review the status of K-8 agricultural literacy programs in states, discuss an Oklahoma study of agricultural literacy, clarify the meaning of sustainable agriculture, and describe the Future Farmers of America's Food for America program for elementary students. (SK)

  10. News | National Agricultural Library

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to main content Home National Agricultural Library United States Department of Agriculture Ag Instruction Series on the National Agricultural Library's YouTube channel. These video tutorials review much our Ag Data Commons User Instruction Series on the National Agricultural Library's YouTube channel

  11. Bioenergy | National Agricultural Library

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to main content Home National Agricultural Library United States Department of Agriculture Ag , graphs), Agricultural Products html Data from: Comparative farm-gate life cycle assessment of oilseed registered trademark of Dries Buytaert. NAL Home | USDA.gov | Agricultural Research Service | Plain Language

  12. Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Geophysical methods continue to show great promise for use in agriculture. The term “agricultural geophysics” denotes a subdiscipline of geophysics that is focused only on agricultural applications. The Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics was compiled to include a comprehensive overview of the geoph...

  13. Iodine nutritional status and thyroid effects of exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates

    SciTech Connect

    Medda, Emanuela

    Introduction: Italy is still characterized by a mild iodine deficiency and is among the most intensive users of chemical products for agriculture in Europe. The aim of this study was i) to evaluate thyroid effects of exposure to mancozeb, a fungicide widely used in agriculture, in a sample of Italian grapevine workers, and ii) to verify whether the iodine intake may modulate the risk of thyroid disruption due to the mancozeb metabolite ethylenthiourea (ETU). Methods: One hundred seventy-seven occupationally exposed male workers (29 from Chianti, a mild iodine deficient area, and 148 from Bolzano an iodine sufficient province) and 74more » non-occupationally exposed male controls (34 from Chianti and 40 from Bolzano) were enrolled in the study. Serum biomarkers of thyroid function, as well as urinary iodine and ETU concentrations were assessed. Moreover all the recruited subjects underwent clinical examination and thyroid ultrasound. Results: Multivariate comparisons showed lower mean serum levels of FT4 in Chianti-workers as compared to Bolzano-workers. Moreover, an increased urinary iodine excretion (>250 µg/L) was more frequently found among more exposed workers (ETU>20 µg/L) than among less exposed ones and this effect was more pronounced in Chianti- than in Bolzano-workers. Chianti-workers also showed a significantly higher frequency of very low thyroid volume (≤6.0 ml) as compared to controls. Conclusions: These findings showed a mild thyroid disrupting effect due to occupational exposure to mancozeb, more pronounced in workers residing in an area characterized by a mild to moderate iodine deficiency as compared to workers residing in an area covered by a long-lasting iodine prophylaxis program. - Highlights: • Thyroid is vulnerable to endocrine disrupting effects due to environmental exposures. • Mancozeb is a fungicide widely used in agriculture worldwide. • Mancozeb is broken down into ethylenthiourea (ETU) which has anti-thyroid activity.

  14. Within- and between-orchard variability in the sensitivity of Venturia inaequalis to myclobutanil, a DMI fungicide, in the UK.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liqiang; Berrie, Angela; Yang, Jiarong; Xu, Xiangming

    2009-11-01

    Myclobutanil, a demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicide, is an important fungicide for controlling apple scab and powdery mildew. Overuse of this fungicide has led to establishment of scab isolates with reduced sensitivity to this fungicide in several countries. Experiments were conducted to determine the sensitivity of the causal agent of apple scab, Venturia inaequalis (Cooke) Winter, to myclobutanil in the UK, in order to assess whether there is a relationship between fungal insensitivity and the number of DMI applications, and establishing whether fungal sensitivity varied greatly within an orchard. Reduced sensitivity of V. inaequalis to myclobutanil was positively related linearly to the number of DMI applications. ED(50) values ranged from 0.028 to 1.017 mg L(-1) (average = 0.292) for the baseline population, whereas isolates from two other orchards had much greater ED(50) values, ranging from 0.085 to 5.213 mg L(-1) (average = 1.852). There was significant variation in fungal sensitivity to myclobutanil among fungal isolates from different locations within a single orchard. Spatial spread of insensitive isolates of V. inaequalis to myclobutanil is likely to be limited in distance. Conidia may be an important source of primary inoculum. Myclobutanil should still be effective for most field isolates, but its use should be strategically integrated with other groups of fungicides. (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Effects of fungicides on the yeast-like symbiotes and their host, Nilaparvata lugens Stål (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Shentu, Xu-Ping; Li, Dan-Ting; Xu, Jian-Feng; She, Liang; Yu, Xiao-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Yeast-like symbiotes (YLS) are endosymbionts that are closely related to the growth, development and reproduction of their host, the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens Stål (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). In order to understand the relationship between the population of YLS in BPH cells and the survival rate of BPH, eight different fungicides were applied to rice plants infested by BPH, and the number of YLS and mortality of BPH were determined. Three of the fungicides, 27% toyocamycin & tetramycin P & tetrin B & tetramycin A, 0.01% trichodermin, and 75% trifloxystrobin & tebuconazole WG, were found to significantly reduce the number of YLS in BPH, subsequently causing a high mortality of BPH. The three fungicides were each mixed with a commonly used insecticide-imidacloprid, and the fungicide/insecticide mixtures could cause a marked reduction in YLS number in BPH, resulting in a significantly higher mortality of BPH than did the imidacloprid alone. The mixture of 27% toyocamycin & tetramycin P & tetrin B & tetramycin A with imidacloprid showed the best inhibitory effect on BPH population. Our study demonstrated a high dependence of the BPH survival rate on the number of YLS harbored in BPH fat-body cells. It implies that using specific fungicides as an additive to imidacloprid for controlling BPH could be a novel way to enhance the efficacy of insecticide, minimizing the use of imidacloprid in paddy fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Involvement of Penicillium digitatum PdSUT1 in fungicide sensitivity and virulence during citrus fruit infection.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Carbonell, Marta de; Sánchez-Torres, Paloma

    2017-10-01

    A putative sucrose transporter PdSUT1 included in the same clade that Sut1p from Schizosaccharomyces pombe was identified in Penicillium digitatum, the major citrus postharvest pathogen. PdSUT1 gene was characterized using target gene disruption and gene overexpression. The ΔPdSUT1 mutants generated by gene elimination showed reduction in fungal virulence during citrus fruit infection assayed in mature fruit at 20°C. However, the overexpression mutants did not increased disease severity neither in the mutants coming from a high virulent nor from a low virulent P. digitatum progenitor strains. Moreover, fungicide sensitivity was affected in the deletant mutants but not in the overexpression transformants. The expression analysis of several genes involved in fungicide resistance showed an intensification of MFS transporters and a decrease of sterol demethylases transcriptional abundance in the ΔPdSUT1 mutants compare to the parental wild type strain. PdSUT1 appear not to be directly involved in fungicide resistance although can affect the gene expression of fungicide related genes. These results indicate that PdSUT1 contribute to P. digitatum fungal virulence and influence fungicide sensitivity through carbohydrate uptake and MFS transporters gene activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Geospatial approaches to characterizing agriculture in the Chincoteague Bay subbasin.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Frederick W; Morgan, John M; Monn, Jeremy; Petrey, Chad P

    2012-01-01

    Most agricultural information is reported by government sources on a state or county basis. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate use of geospatial data, the 2002 Agricultural Cropland Data Layer (CDL) for the mid-Atlantic region, to characterize agricultural, environmental, and other scientific parameters for the Chincoteague Bay subbasin using geographic information systems. This study demonstrated that agriculture can be characterized accurately on subbasin and subwatershed bases, thus complimenting various assessment technologies. Approximately 28% of the dry land of the subbasin was cropland. Field corn was the largest crop. Soybeans, either singly or double-cropped with wheat, were the second most predominant crop. Although the subbasin is relatively small, cropping practices in the northern part were different from those in the southern portion. Other crops, such as fresh vegetables and vegetables grown for processing, were less than 10% of the total cropland. A conservative approximation of the total pesticide usage in the subbasin in 2002 was over 277,000 lbs of active ingredients. Herbicides represented the most frequently used pesticides in the subbasin, both in number (17) and in total active ingredients (over 261,000 lbs). Ten insecticides predominated in the watershed, while only small quantities of three fungicides were used. Total pesticide usage and intensity were estimated using the CDL. Nutrient inputs to cropland from animal manure, chemical fertilizer, and atmospheric deposition were modeled at over 30 million pounds of nitrogen and over 7 million pounds of phosphorous. Crops under conservation tillage had the largest input of both nutrients.

  18. Role of Fungicides, Application of Nozzle Types, and the Resistance Level of Wheat Varieties in the Control of Fusarium Head Blight and Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Mesterházy, Ákos; Tóth, Beáta; Varga, Monika; Bartók, Tibor; Szabó-Hevér, Ágnes; Farády, László; Lehoczki-Krsjak, Szabolcs

    2011-01-01

    Fungicide application is a key factor in the control of mycotoxin contamination in the harvested wheat grain. However, the practical results are often disappointing. In 2000-2004, 2006-2008 and 2007 and 2008, three experiments were made to test the efficacy of fungicide control on Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) in wheat and to find ways to improve control of the disease and toxin contamination. In a testing system we have used for 20 years, tebuconazole and tebuconazole + prothioconazole fungicides regularly reduced symptoms by about 80% with a correlating reduction in toxin contamination. Averages across the years normally show a correlation of r = 0.90 or higher. The stability differences (measured by the stability index) between the poorest and the best fungicides are about 10 or more times, differing slightly in mycotoxin accumulation, FHB index (severity) and Fusarium damaged kernels (FDK). The weak fungicides, like carbendazim, were effective only when no epidemic occurred or epidemic severity was at a very low level. Similar fungicide effects were seen on wheat cultivars which varied in FHB resistance. In this study, we found three fold differences in susceptibility to FHB between highly susceptible and moderately resistant cultivars when treated with fungicides. In the moderately resistant cultivars, about 50% of the fungicide treatments lowered the DON level below the regulatory limit. In the most susceptible cultivars, all fungicides failed to reduce mycotoxin levels low enough for grain acceptance, in spite of the fact that disease was significantly reduced. The results correlated well with the results of the large-scale field tests of fungicide application at the time of natural infection. The Turbo FloodJet nozzle reduced FHB incidence and DON contamination when compared to the TeeJet XR nozzle. Overall, the data suggest that significant decreases in FHB incidence and deoxynivalenol contamination in field situations are possible with proper fungicide

  19. Agricultural Export Transportation Handbook (Agricultural Handbook 700)

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-02-01

    This handbook looks at the transportation portion of the export process, that is, how to physically move agricultural products overseas with a focus on shipping high-value or value-added agricultural products, and provides a compilation of best indus...

  20. Agricultural Chartbook 1988. Agriculture Handbook No. 673.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    These charts present an overview of the current economic health of American agriculture. The charts move from the national and international arenas to farm economic health measures and crop and livestock trends. A small amount of descriptive narrative accompanies most of the charts. Charts depicting the economic picture of U.S. agriculture include…

  1. 1986 Agricultural Chartbook. Agriculture Handbook No. 663.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    This book contains 310 charts, tables, and graphs containing statistical information about agriculture-related commodities and services, primarily in the United States, in 1986. The book is organized in seven sections that cover the following topics: (1) the farm (farm income, farm population, farm workers, food and fiber system, agriculture and…

  2. Gene expression profiling in liver and testis of rats to characterize the toxicity of triazole fungicides.

    PubMed

    Tully, Douglas B; Bao, Wenjun; Goetz, Amber K; Blystone, Chad R; Ren, Hongzu; Schmid, Judith E; Strader, Lillian F; Wood, Carmen R; Best, Deborah S; Narotsky, Michael G; Wolf, Douglas C; Rockett, John C; Dix, David J

    2006-09-15

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected for hormone measurements, and liver and testes were collected for histology, enzyme biochemistry, or gene expression profiling. Body and testis weights were unaffected, but liver weights were significantly increased by all four triazoles, and hepatocytes exhibited centrilobular hypertrophy. Myclobutanil exposure increased serum testosterone and decreased sperm motility, but no treatment-related testis histopathology was observed. We hypothesized that gene expression profiles would identify potential mechanisms of toxicity and used DNA microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to generate profiles. Triazole fungicides are designed to inhibit fungal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 51 enzyme but can also modulate the expression and function of mammalian CYP genes and enzymes. Triazoles affected the expression of numerous CYP genes in rat liver and testis, including multiple Cyp2c and Cyp3a isoforms as well as other xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) and transporter genes. For some genes, such as Ces2 and Udpgtr2, all four triazoles had similar effects on expression, suggesting possible common mechanisms of action. Many of these CYP, XME and transporter genes are regulated by xeno-sensing nuclear receptors, and hierarchical clustering of CAR/PXR-regulated genes demonstrated the similarities of toxicogenomic responses in liver between all four triazoles and in testis between myclobutanil and triadimefon. Triazoles also affected expression of multiple genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism in the two tissues. Thus, gene expression profiles helped identify possible toxicological mechanisms of the triazole fungicides.

  3. Effect of fluconazole on fungicidal activity of flucytosine in murine cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, R A; Bauer, M; Weiner, J M; Diamond, D M; Leal, M E; Ding, J C; Rinaldi, M G; Graybill, J R

    1996-01-01

    Both animal and in vitro studies have demonstrated that combinations of flucytosine with amphotericin B and with fluconazole have significantly improved activity against cryptococcal meningitis compared with the activity of each drug used alone. However, very few dose levels of these agents have been tested in combination. This study evaluated the efficacy of fluconazole plus flucytosine in a murine model of cryptococcal meningitis over a broad range of dose combinations (fluconazole, 0 to 40 micrograms/g of body weight per day; flucytosine, 0 to 200 micrograms/g/day). Both drugs were dissolved in drinking water, with treatment on days 2 to 11. In this highly reproducible model, fluconazole had a dramatic effect on the fungicidal activity of flucytosine. Flucytosine at dose levels of as much as 200 micrograms/g/day alone or in combination with low doses of fluconazole had minimal fungicidal activity, whereas in combination with fluconazole at 24 to 40 micrograms/g/day, flucytosine showed fungicidal activity in the range of 45 to 65% of the animals treated at doses of 40 to 100 micrograms/g/day. This striking effect of fluconazole is consistent with the results of both in vitro and clinical studies. In the clinic, the use of flucytosine is often limited by severe toxicity, while toxicity is rarely observed with fluconazole. These results suggest that when flucytosine is given with higher doses of fluconazole, the maximum therapeutic effect of the former in the clinic may be observed at dose levels that are far less than the doses commonly employed (150 micrograms/g daily). PMID:8878602

  4. Triazole Fungicides Can Induce Cross-Resistance to Medical Triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Karawajczyk, Anna; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Kema, Gert H. J.; van der Lee, Henrich A.; Klaassen, Corné H.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Azoles play an important role in the management of Aspergillus diseases. Azole resistance is an emerging global problem in Aspergillus fumigatus, and may develop through patient therapy. In addition, an environmental route of resistance development has been suggested through exposure to 14α-demethylase inhibitors (DMIs). The main resistance mechanism associated with this putative fungicide-driven route is a combination of alterations in the Cyp51A-gene (TR34/L98H). We investigated if TR34/L98H could have developed through exposure to DMIs. Methods and Findings Thirty-one compounds that have been authorized for use as fungicides, herbicides, herbicide safeners and plant growth regulators in the Netherlands between 1970 and 2005, were investigated for cross-resistance to medical triazoles. Furthermore, CYP51-protein homology modeling and molecule alignment studies were performed to identify similarity in molecule structure and docking modes. Five triazole DMIs, propiconazole, bromuconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and difenoconazole, showed very similar molecule structures to the medical triazoles and adopted similar poses while docking the protein. These DMIs also showed the greatest cross-resistance and, importantly, were authorized for use between 1990 and 1996, directly preceding the recovery of the first clinical TR34/L98H isolate in 1998. Through microsatellite genotyping of TR34/L98H isolates we were able to calculate that the first isolate would have arisen in 1997, confirming the results of the abovementioned experiments. Finally, we performed induction experiments to investigate if TR34/L98H could be induced under laboratory conditions. One isolate evolved from two copies of the tandem repeat to three, indicating that fungicide pressure can indeed result in these genomic changes. Conclusions Our findings support a fungicide-driven route of TR34/L98H development in A. fumigatus. Similar molecule structure characteristics of five triazole DMIs

  5. Impact of TiO2 on the chemical and biological transformation of formulated chiral-metalaxyl in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junxing; Zhang, Xu; Liang, Chuanzhou; Hu, Jun

    2018-04-15

    The impacts of TiO 2 on the chemical and biological transformation of racemic metalaxyl wettable powder (rac-metalaxyl WP) in agricultural soils, and soil microorganisms were investigated. Under simulated solar irradiation, TiO 2 highly promoted the transformation of rac-metalaxyl WP without changing the enantiomer fraction, with the promotion amplitude (60-1280%) being dependent on TiO 2 characteristics. TiO 2 characteristics showed different influence on the transformation of rac-metalaxyl WP in soils and aqueous solutions because their characteristics changed differently in soils. The impact of the mancozeb and other co-constituents on the transformation of rac-metalaxyl WP was smaller in soil media than in aqueous solution. Autoclave sterilization changed soil properties and subsequently weakened the promotion effects of TiO 2 on the chemical transformations of rac-metalaxyl WP to 0-233%. Microorganism biomass and bacterial community were not statistically significant changed by TiO 2 exposure regardless of rac-metalaxyl WP, suggesting that the promotional effects occurred mainly through chemical processes. The results also showed TiO 2 -soil interactions may be strengthened with TiO 2 (Degussa P25) aging time in soils, which decreased its promotion amplitude from 1060% (without aging) to 880% (aging for 20 days). Intermediate formed in soil biological transformation process was different from that in TiO 2 photocatalysis process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Screening fungicides for use in fish culture: Evaluation of the agar plug transfer, cellophane transfer, and agar dilution methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Tom A.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability, reproducibility, and usefulness of three screening methods -- the cellophane transfer, the agar plug transfer, and the agar dilution -- to screen aquatic fungicides were evaluated. Achlya flagellata and Saprolegnia hypogyna were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of malachite green to test each method. The cellophane transfer and agar plug transfer techniques had similar reliability and reproducibility in rating fungicidal activity, and were both superior to the agar dilution technique. The agar plug transfer and agar dilution techniques adequately projected in vivo activity of malachite green, but the cellophane transfer technique overestimated its activity. Overall, the agar plug transfer technique most accurately rated the activity of malachite green and was the easiest test to perform. It therefore appears to be the method of choice for testing aquatic fungicides.

  7. Identification of the Fungal Pathogen that Causes Strawberry Anthracnose in Bangladesh and Evaluation of In Vitro Fungicide Activity

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Md. Shamim; Alam, Shahidul; Islam, Md. Shafiqul

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the Colletotrichum species causing anthracnose disease of strawberry in Balgladesh and to evaluate in vitro activity of commercial fungicides it. Based on morphological and cultural characteristics, all 22 isolates were identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. They developed white or glittery colonies with grey to dark grey reverse colony colors and they produced cylindrical conidia. The efficacy of five commercial fungicides, Bavistin DF, Dithane M-45, Sulcox 50 WP, Corzim 50 WP and Rovral 50 WP, were tested against the fungus. Bavistin inhibited radial growth completely and was followed in efficacy by Dithane M-45. In Bavistin DF treated media, the fungus did not produce conidia. The percent inhibition of radial growth of the fungus was increased with the increasing concentrations of fungicide. PMID:23983513

  8. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproductive axis a case study in 21st century toxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since its introduction in 1983, imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal cytochrome P450 (cyp), lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, imazalil can inhibit...

  9. Comparison of the Fungicide Sensitivity of Alberta and Prince Edward Island Isolates of Fusarium graminearum Producing Either 3- or 15-acetyl Deoxynivalenol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium graminearum Schwabe of the ‘3ADON’ chemotype is now displacing ‘15ADON’ isolates in Canada. One concern regarding this shift in chemotypes is related to potential differences in fungicide sensitivity. This could have significant implications as fungicide application is an important strate...

  10. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproductive axis a case study in 21st century toxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since its introduction in 1983 imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest, such as tubers and citrus fruits. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal enzyme, lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, im...

  11. Off-site transport of fungicides with runoff: A comparison of flutolanil and pentachloronitrobeneze applied to creeping bentgrass managed as a golf course fairway

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flutolanil and pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) are fungicides used to control or suppress foliar and soil borne diseases in turf and ornamental crops. On golf courses, sports fields, sod farms and commercial lawns these fungicides are used as preventive treatments to combat snow mold, brown patch an...

  12. Long-term effects of fungicides on leaf-associated microorganisms and shredder populations-an artificial stream study.

    PubMed

    Zubrod, Jochen P; Englert, Dominic; Wolfram, Jakob; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R; Feckler, Alexander; Bundschuh, Rebecca; Seitz, Frank; Konschak, Marco; Baudy, Patrick; Lüderwald, Simon; Fink, Patrick; Lorke, Andreas; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2017-08-01

    Leaf litter is a major source of carbon and energy for stream food webs, while both leaf-decomposing microorganisms and macroinvertebrate leaf shredders can be affected by fungicides. Despite the potential for season-long fungicide exposure for these organisms, however, such chronic exposures have not yet been considered. Using an artificial stream facility, effects of a chronic (lasting up to 8 wk) exposure to a mixture of 5 fungicides (sum concentration 20 μg/L) on leaf-associated microorganisms and the key leaf shredder Gammarus fossarum were therefore assessed. While bacterial density and microorganism-mediated leaf decomposition remained unaltered, fungicide exposure reduced fungal biomass (≤71%) on leaves from day 28 onward. Gammarids responded to the combined stress from consumption of fungicide-affected leaves and waterborne exposure with a reduced abundance (≤18%), which triggered reductions in final population biomass (18%) and in the number of precopula pairs (≤22%) but could not fully explain the decreased leaf consumption (19%), lipid content (≤43%; going along with an altered composition of fatty acids), and juvenile production (35%). In contrast, fine particulate organic matter production and stream respiration were unaffected. Our results imply that long-term exposure of leaf-associated fungi and shredders toward fungicides may result in detrimental implications in stream food webs and impairments of detrital material fluxes. These findings render it important to understand decomposer communities' long-term adaptational capabilities to ensure that functional integrity is safeguarded. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2178-2189. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  13. Vocational Agriculture in Ponape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayrit, Ruben S.

    1975-01-01

    The general objectives of agriculture education in both the elementary and secondary schools in Ponape District are to develop interest in agriculture among students and to provide practical and technical skills in growing crops and raising domestic animals. (Author)

  14. Traditional Agriculture and Permaculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dick

    1997-01-01

    Discusses benefits of combining traditional agricultural techniques with the concepts of "permaculture," a framework for revitalizing traditions, culture, and spirituality. Describes school, college, and community projects that have assisted American Indian communities in revitalizing sustainable agricultural practices that incorporate…

  15. Department of Agriculture

    MedlinePlus

    ... provide is transmitted securely. Menu U.S. Department of Agriculture Main navigation Home Topics Topics Animals Biotechnology Climate ... Agencies and Staff Offices New farmers, start here. Agriculture is full of exciting and rewarding opportunities. Farming ...

  16. Agriculture: Land Use

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Land Use and agriculture. Information about land use restrictions and incentive programs.Agricultural operations sometimes involve activities regulated by laws designed to protect water supplies, threatened or endangered plants and animals, or wetlands.

  17. Strategies for Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosson, Pierre R.; Rosenberg, Norman J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the change of agricultural methods with human population growth. Describes the trends of world food production, changes in farmland, use of fertilizer, and 13 agricultural research institutions. Lists 5 references for further reading. (YP)

  18. Theme: Delivering Agricultural Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Warren D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Eight articles in this theme issue deal with the nationwide implementation of agricultural literacy programs--discovering how to do it. Discussed are experiences in planning and conducting agricultural literacy programs at state and local levels. (JOW)

  19. Orchard factors associated with resistance and cross resistance to sterol demethylation inhibitor fungicides in populations of Venturia inaequalis from Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Pfeufer, Emily E; Ngugi, Henry K

    2012-03-01

    Orchard management practices, such as destroying of overwintered inoculum and limiting the number of fungicide applications, are often recommended as tactics for slowing the development of resistance to sterol demethylation-inhibitor (DMI) fungicides in populations of Venturia inaequalis. However, there is little quantitative evidence relating the use of such practices to levels of resistance in orchards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of V. inaequalis isolates from Pennsylvania to DMI fungicides, and to identify orchard management factors related to the incidence of resistant isolates. In total, 644 single-spore V. inaequalis cultures obtained from 20 apple orchards in 2008 or 2009 were tested for sensitivity to myclobutanil, fenbuconazole, or difenoconazole. Growers provided management history of the sampled plots. Widespread shifts toward resistance to the three fungicides were noted, with mean effective concentration for 50% inhibition (EC(50)) values of 2.136, 0.786, and 0.187 μg/ml for myclobutanil, fenbuconazole, and difenoconazole, respectively. Cross resistance to the three fungicides was documented in high correlation (Spearman's r > 0.6) between mean EC(50) values for 14 orchards. Based on a 0.5-μg/ml threshold, 66 and 26% of isolates were resistant to myclobutanil and fenbuconazole, respectively, and 22% were cross resistant to the two fungicides. A significant between-year shift toward increased resistance was noted in two of three orchards surveyed in both years. Failure to use dormant copper sprays, older trees, larger orchards, orchards with ≤10 cultivars, and application of >4 DMI sprays were positively correlated (0.0001 < P < 0.05) with the incidence of resistant isolates. Isolates from orchards with >4 DMI sprays were four times as likely to be resistant to fenbuconazole (odds ratio = 4.57; P = 0.015). Isolates from orchards without dormant copper sprays were twice as likely to be cross-shifted toward resistance to all

  20. Integrated control of white rot disease on beans caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum using Contans® and reduced fungicides application.

    PubMed

    Elsheshtawi, Mohamed; Elkhaky, Maged T; Sayed, Shaban R; Bahkali, Ali H; Mohammed, Arif A; Gambhir, Dikshit; Mansour, Aref S; Elgorban, Abdallah M

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the compatibility of Contans® ( Coniothyrium minitans ) with fungicides against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum . Results showed that both Contans® and Topsin® significantly reduced the disease incidence caused by S. sclerotiorum by 90% and 95% survival plants, respectively when they were individually applied and compared to control. While, soil application of Contans® and Sumisclex mixture was the most effective in suppressing the white rot disease incidence that produced 100% survival plants, application of C. minitans combined with the reduced doses of fungicides would be advantageous in saving labor cost, thus increasing production efficiency of bean.

  1. Agriculture Business and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seperich, George; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended for vocational agriculture teachers who deliver agricultural business and management programs at the secondary or postsecondary level. It is based on the Arizona validated occupational competencies and tasks for management and supervisory positions in agricultural business. The competency/skill and task list…

  2. Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Bureau of Vocational Services.

    Designed for use in the Connecticut Regional Vocational Agriculture Centers, this curriculum provides exploratory and specialization units for four major areas of agriculture. These are Agriculture Mechanics, Animal Science, Natural Resources, and Plant Science. The exploratory units are required for grades 9 and 10, while the specialization units…

  3. Chapter 3: Cropland Agriculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2013, cropland agriculture resulted in total emissions of approximately 209 MMT CO2 eq. of greenhouse gases (GHG). Cropland agriculture is responsible for almost half (46%) of all emissions from the agricultural sector. Nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) emissions from c...

  4. Division of Agriculture

    Science.gov Websites

    Department of Natural Resources logo, color scheme Department of Natural Resources Division of Agriculture Search Search DNR's site DNR State of Alaska Toggle main menu visibility Agriculture Home Programs Asset Disposals Alaska Caps Progam Board of Agriculture & Conservation Farm To School Program Grants

  5. Agricultural Structures, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhardt, Richard E.; Burhoe, Steve

    This guide to a curriculum unit in agricultural structures is designed to expand the curriculum materials available in vocational agriculture in Missouri. It and Agricultural Structures I (see note) provide reference materials to systematize the curriculum. The six units cover working with concrete (19 lessons, 2 laboratory exercises), drawing and…

  6. Biotechnology and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Martin

    Even at this early date in the application of biotechnology to agriculture, it is clear that agriculture may provide the largest market for new or less expensive biotechnologically manufactured products. The chemical and pharmaceutical industries that hold important positions in agricultural inputs are consolidating their positions by purchasing…

  7. Information for Agricultural Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaungamno, E. E.

    This paper describes the major international agricultural information services, sources, and systems; outlines the existing information situation in Tanzania as it relates to problems of agricultural development; and reviews the improvements in information provision resources required to support the process of agricultural development in Tanzania.…

  8. Cytotoxicity of the dicarboximide fungicides, vinclozolin and iprodione, in rat hepatoma-derived Fa32 cells.

    PubMed

    Dierickx, Paul J

    2004-10-01

    Dicarboximide fungicides are widely used to control various fungal species. Their primary action is not known, due to a lack of knowledge concerning the mechanism of action of the dicarboximide group. The cytotoxicities of vinclozolin and iprodione in rat hepatoma-derived Fa32 cells were investigated. Cytotoxicity was measured by neutral red uptake inhibition after treatment for 24 hours. Iprodione was more toxic than vinclozolin. Vinclozolin was less toxic in glutathione-depleted cells than in control cells. This was also true for iprodione at lower concentrations, but iprodione became more toxic at higher concentrations. Both the fungicides increased the endogenous glutathione content by 20% after 1 hour. After 24 hours, the glutathione content was doubled by vinclozolin, but was not affected by iprodione. No effect on glutathione S-transferase activity or reactive oxygen species formation could be observed. Cytochrome P450-dependent ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase and pentoxyresorufin-O-depentylase activities were moderately activated by iprodione and strongly activated by vinclozolin. A glutathione-related cytochrome P450-dependent metabolic attack of vinclozolin and iprodione could be responsible for their cytotoxicity in Fa32 cells. Further research is needed to fully elucidate these (or other) mechanisms.

  9. Stemphylium Leaf Blight of Garlic (Allium sativum ) in Spain: Taxonomy and In Vitro Fungicide Response

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Laura; Gil-Serna, Jéssica; García, Marta; Iglesias, Concepción; Palmero, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The most serious aerial disease of garlic is leaf blight caused by Stemphylium spp. Geographical variation in the causal agent of this disease is indicated. Stemphylium vesicarium has been reported in Spain, whereas S. solani is the most prevalent species recorded in China. In this study, Stemphylium isolates were obtained from symptomatic garlic plants sampled from the main Spanish production areas. Sequence data for the ITS1–5.8S–ITS2 region enabled assignation of the isolates to the Pleospora herbarum complex and clearly distinguished the isolates from S. solani. Conidial morphology of the isolates corresponded to that of S. vesicarium and clearly discriminated them from S. alfalfae and S. herbarum on the basis of the size and septation pattern of mature conidia. Conidial morphology as well as conidial length, width and length:width ratio also allowed the Spanish isolates to be distinguished from S. botryosum and S. herbarum. Control of leaf blight of garlic is not well established. Few studies are available regarding the effectiveness of chemical treatments to reduce Stemphylium spp. incidence on garlic. The effectiveness of nine fungicides of different chemical groups to reduce Stemphylium mycelial growth in vitro was tested. Boscalid + pyraclostrobin (group name, succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors + quinone outside inhibitors), iprodione (dicar-boximide), and prochloraz (demethylation inhibitors) were highly effective at reducing mycelial growth in S. vesicarium with EC50 values less than 5 ppm. In general, the effectiveness of the fungicide was enhanced with increasing dosage. PMID:27721688

  10. Insights into the molecular mechanism of tolerance to carboxylic acid amide (CAA) fungicides in Pythium aphanidermatum.

    PubMed

    Blum, Mathias; Gisi, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    Tolerance to the oomycete-specific carboxylic acid amide (CAA) fungicides is a poorly understood mechanism in Pythium species. The root-rot and damping-off causative agent Pythium aphanidermatum and the CAA fungicide mandipropamid (MPD) were used to investigate the molecular basis of CAA tolerance. Five genes putatively involved in carbohydrate synthesis were identified and characterised: one chitin synthase gene, PaChs, and four cellulose synthase genes PaCesA1 to PaCesA4, of which PaCesA3 encodes the MPD target enzyme. These genes were differentially expressed throughout the life cycle of P. aphanidermatum. Mycelium treated with MPD concentrations slightly affecting mycelial growth did not cause a change in PaCesA3 expression nor a strong upregulation of PaCesA homologues. The high tolerance level of P. aphanidermatum and the lack of PaCesA upregulation imply that MPD tolerance is the result of a specific amino acid configuration in the cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) target enzyme. Indeed, P. aphanidermatum displays the amino acid L1109 which is also associated with MPD resistance in artificial mutants of Phytophthora species. It is concluded that MPD tolerance in P. aphanidermatum is not caused by compensatory mechanisms but most likely by an inherent target-site configuration in PaCesA3 that hinders MPD binding to the enzyme pocket. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Translocation and degradation of tebuconazole and prothioconazole in wheat following fungicide treatment at flowering.

    PubMed

    Lehoczki-Krsjak, Szabolcs; Varga, Mónika; Szabó-Hevér, Ágnes; Mesterházy, Ákos

    2013-11-01

    Prothioconazole and tebuconazole are among the most effective fungicides against Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The translocation between the ears and the flag leaves and the kinetics of degradation may influence field efficacy of these active ingredients (AIs). In greenhouse experiments, only traces (<1%) of the total AI content translocated from the flag leaves to the ears, and a maximum of 3.55% from the ears to the flag leaves. From the treated to the non-treated side of the ears, 3.2-15.9% of the AI translocated, depending on cultivar, AI and time. In field experiments, the degradation kinetics in the first 8 days after treatment revealed a higher velocity in the flag leaf blades than in the ears, although both were dependent on the type of cultivar. The fungicide treatment resulted in 42.6-100% decreases in FHB traits. There is no effective translocation of these AIs, only moderate redistribution in the ears, which can be decisive from the aspect of FHB management. The degradation of prothioconazole was faster than that of tebuconazole. Cultivar and environmental effects influenced the degradation kinetics of these AIs, but a high level of protection against FHB was maintained. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. The fungicide triadimefon affects beer flavor and composition by influencing Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Zhiqiang; Li, Minmin; An, Jingjing; Chen, Jieying; Bao, Yuming; Francis, Frédéric; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Despite the fact that beer is produced on a large scale, the effects of pesticide residues on beer have been rarely investigated. In this study, we used micro-brewing settings to determine the effect of triadimefon on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and beer flavor. The yeast growth in medium was significantly inhibited (45%) at concentrations higher than 5 mg L-1, reaching 80% and 100% inhibition at 10 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1, respectively. There were significant differences in sensory quality between beer samples fermented with and without triadimefon based on data obtained with an electronic tongue and nose. Such an effect was most likely underlain by changes in yeast fermentation activity, including decreased utilization of maltotriose and most amino acids, reduced production of isobutyl and isoamyl alcohols, and increased ethyl acetate content in the fungicide treated samples. Furthermore, yeast metabolic profiling by phenotype microarray and UPLC/TOF-MS showed that triadimefon caused significant changes in the metabolism of glutathione, phenylalanine and sphingolipids, and in sterol biosynthesis. Thus, triadimefon negatively affects beer sensory qualities by influencing the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae during fermentation, emphasizing the necessity of stricter control over fungicide residues in brewing by the food industry.

  13. Effects of the fungicide azoxystrobin on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) smolt.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Kroglund, Frode; Finstad, Bengt; Kristensen, Torstein

    2010-11-01

    Atlantic salmon smolts were exposed to three doses of the fungicide azoxystrobin for 4 days, and physiological blood parameters and transcriptional effects in liver and muscle were evaluated in search for potential negative effects. Azoxystrobin exposure mediated up-regulation of catalase, MAPK1 and IGFBP1 in liver tissue. Catalase, transferrin, IGFBP1 and TNFR were up-regulated and CYP1A down-regulated in muscle tissue. Blood parameters glucose, hematocrit, pCO(2), HCO(3) and pH grouped together with transcripts levels of MnSOD, MAPK1, IGFBP1, MAP3K7 and GPx4 in liver of fish exposed to the highest azoxystrobin concentration (352 μgL(-1)) using principal component analysis (PCA). In muscle, the blood parameters glucose, hematocrit, pCO(2), HCO(3) and pH grouped together with transcript levels of heme oxygenase, thioredoxin, MnSOD, TNFR and MMP9. These results suggest that the fungicide azoxystrobin affects mitochondrial respiration and mechanisms controlling cell growth and proliferation in fish and may have negative effects on juvenile Atlantic salmon. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus to azole farm fungicide.

    PubMed

    Kano, Rui; Sobukawa, Hideto; Murayama, Somay Yamagata; Hirose, Dai; Tanaka, Yoko; Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is mainly due to a point mutation in the 14α-sterol demethylase (CYP51A) gene, which encodes the target of azole fungicides. Moreover, overexpression of CYP51B or multidrug resistance (MDR) gene is supposedly related to the mechanism of azole resistance in A. fumigatus. In this study, we tried to induce resistance to tetraconazole, an azole fungicide, in strains of A. fumigatus from a farm and then investigated mutation and expression of their CYP51A, CYP51B, and multidrug resistance (MDR) genes. Three tetraconazole resistant strains were induced and their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for tetraconazole was 145 mg/L. However, the MICs of itraconazole (ITZ), posaconazole (POS), and voriconazole (VRZ) obtained by an E-test of the three tetraconazole resistant strains were 0.064-0.19 mg/L for ITZ, 0.023-0.32 mg/L for POS, and 0.047-0.064 mg/L for VRZ. No gene mutations were detected in the CYP 51A sequence amplified in these strains. RT-PCR of cyp51A and cyp51B indicated that the tetraconazole resistant strains more highly expressed these genes than the susceptible strain in tetraconazole containing medium. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Time-dependent sorption of two novel fungicides in soils within a regulatory framework.

    PubMed

    Gulkowska, Anna; Buerge, Ignaz J; Poiger, Thomas; Kasteel, Roy

    2016-12-01

    Convincing experimental evidence suggests increased sorption of pesticides on soil over time, which, so far, has not been considered in the regulatory assessment of leaching to groundwater. Recently, Beulke and van Beinum (2012) proposed a guidance on how to conduct, analyse and use time-dependent sorption studies in pesticide registration. The applicability of the recommended experimental set-up and fitting procedure was examined for two fungicides, penflufen and fluxapyroxad, in four soils during a 170 day incubation experiment. The apparent distribution coefficient increased by a factor of 2.5-4.5 for penflufen and by a factor of 2.5-2.8 for fluxapyroxad. The recommended two-site, one-rate sorption model adequately described measurements of total mass and liquid phase concentration in the calcium chloride suspension and the calculated apparent distribution coefficient, passing all prescribed quality criteria for model fit and parameter reliability. The guidance is technically mature regarding the experimental set-up and parameterisation of the sorption model for the two moderately mobile and relatively persistent fungicides under investigation. These parameters can be used for transport modelling in soil, thereby recognising the existence of the experimentally observed, but in the regulatory leaching assessment of pesticides not yet routinely considered phenomenon of time-dependent sorption. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Biological activity of sedaxane---a novel broad-spectrum fungicide for seed treatment.

    PubMed

    Zeun, Ronald; Scalliet, Gabriel; Oostendorp, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Sedaxane is a new broad-spectrum seed treatment fungicide developed by Syngenta Crop Protection for control of seed- and soil-borne diseases in a broad range of crops. Its physicochemical properties and activity spectrum have been optimised for use as a seed treatment providing both local and systemic protection of the seed and roots of target crops. Sedaxane inhibits respiration by binding to the succinate dehydrogenase complex in the fungal mitochondrium. Its activity spectrum covers seed-borne fungi such as Ustilago nuda, Tilletia caries, Monographella nivalis and Pyrenophora graminea, as well as the soil-borne fungi Rhizoctonia solani, R. cerealis and Typhula incarnata. Under greenhouse conditions, sedaxane showed high levels and consistent protection against U. nuda, P. graminea and Rhizoctonia spp. Under field conditions, efficacy against Rhizoctonia spp. resulted in increased yield compared with the untreated check. Efficacy against snow mould has been shown under very high disease pressure conditions. The combination of sedaxane plus fludioxonil against snow mould can provide resistance management for sustainable use. The broad spectrum and high level of activity in combination with excellent crop tolerance allow the use of sedaxane as a seed treatment in a wide variety of crops. It is a potential tool for precautionary resistance management when combined with other fungicides, especially against pathogens showing a potential for resistance development, such as M. nivalis. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Effectiveness of control strategies against Botrytis cinerea in vineyard and evaluation of the residual fungicide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gabriolotto, Chiara; Monchiero, Matteo; Negre, Michele; Spadaro, Davide; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2009-05-01

    This investigation was undertaken to test different control strategies against Botrytis cinerea vineyards. Two commercial vineyards, "Barbera" and "Moscato," located in Piedmont (Northern Italy) were divided into seven plots and treated with different combinations of fungicides including fenhexamid, pyrimethanil, fludioxonil + cyprodinil, iprodione, and boscalid, a new carboxamide compound. An integrated strategy including a chemical (pyrimethanil) and a biocontrol agent (Trichoderma spp. t2/4ph1) was also included. At harvest, the percentage of bunches and berries attacked by B. cinerea and the concentration of the chemical fungicides were determined. All the pesticide residues at harvest were below the maximum residue level (MRL), except when two applications of pyrimethanil per season were applied. Boscalid was the most effective active ingredient against B. cinerea among the tested chemicals. When boscalid application was followed by a treatment with pyrimethanil, its efficacy was similar to that shown by two treatments of pyrimethanil. However, this second strategy was not feasible due to the risks of resistance development in the pathogen and to the residue accumulation as indicated by the analysis.

  18. New hosts of Myrothecium SPP. In brazil and a preliminary In Vitro assay of fungicides

    PubMed Central

    Quezado Duval, A.M.; Henz, G.P.; Paz-Lima, M.L.; Medeiros, A.R.; Miranda, B.E.C.; Pfenning, L.H.; Reis, A.

    2010-01-01

    Myrothecium roridum and M. verrucaria are two plant pathogenic species causing foliar spots in a large number of cultivated plants. This paper aims to study the causal agents of foliar spots in vegetable crops (sweet pepper, tomato, cucumber), ornamental plants (Spathiphyllum, Solidago canadensis, Anthurium, Dieffenbachia) and a solanaceous weed plant (Nicandra physalodes). Most of the isolates were identified as M. roridum; only the isolate ‘Myr-02’ from S. canadensis was identified as M. verrucaria. All the isolates were pathogenic to their original plant hosts and also to some other plants. Some fungicides were tested in vitro against an isolate of M. roridum and the mycelial growth recorded after seven days. Fungicides with quartenary ammonium, Tebuconzole and copper were highly effective in inhibiting the mycelial growth of M. roridum. This paper confirms the first record of M. roridum causing leaf spots in sweet pepper, tomato, Spathiphyllum, Anthurium, Dieffenbachia and N. physalodes. We also report M. roridum as causal agent of cucumber fruit rot and also M. verrucaria in tango plants. PMID:24031487

  19. [Benzimidazole and its derivatives--from fungicides to designer drugs. A new occupational and environmental hazards].

    PubMed

    Lutz, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Benzimidazole and benzimidazole derivatives play an important role in controlling various fungal pathogens. The benzimidazoles are also used to treat nematode and trematode infections in humans and animals. It acts by binding to the microtubules and stopping hyphal growth. It also binds to the spindle microtubules and blocks nuclear division. The most popular fungicide is carbendazim. The fungicide is used to control plant diseases in cereals and fruits. Laboratory studies have shown that carbendazim cause infertility and destroy the testicles of laboratory animals. Other benzimidazole derivatives are used as a preservative in paint, textile, papermaking, leather industry, and warehousing practices, as well as a preservative of fruits. Occupational exposure to benzimidazole may occur through inhalation and dermal contact with those compounds at workplaces where benzimidazole is used or produced. Some of the benzimidazoles are common environmental pollutants. They are often found in food and fruit products. Some of the benzimidazoles, like a astemizole or esomeprazole have found applications in diverse therapeutical areas. Despite of the clear advantages afforded by the use of benzimidazole derivatives, they share a danger potential. The most hazardous, however, are new illegally synthesed psychoactive drugs known as designer drugs. Some of them, like nitazene, etonitazene or clonitazene belong to benzimidazole derivatives. Laboratory animal studies revealed that etonitazene produced very similar effects in central nervous system as those observed after morphine administration. Considering etonitazene's properties, it seems reasonable to expected that long-term exposure to other benzimidazole derivatives may result in drug abuse and development of drug dependence.

  20. The fungicide triadimefon affects beer flavor and composition by influencing Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Zhiqiang; Li, Minmin; An, Jingjing; Chen, Jieying; Bao, Yuming; Francis, Frédéric; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that beer is produced on a large scale, the effects of pesticide residues on beer have been rarely investigated. In this study, we used micro-brewing settings to determine the effect of triadimefon on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and beer flavor. The yeast growth in medium was significantly inhibited (45%) at concentrations higher than 5 mg L−1, reaching 80% and 100% inhibition at 10 mg L−1 and 50 mg L−1, respectively. There were significant differences in sensory quality between beer samples fermented with and without triadimefon based on data obtained with an electronic tongue and nose. Such an effect was most likely underlain by changes in yeast fermentation activity, including decreased utilization of maltotriose and most amino acids, reduced production of isobutyl and isoamyl alcohols, and increased ethyl acetate content in the fungicide treated samples. Furthermore, yeast metabolic profiling by phenotype microarray and UPLC/TOF-MS showed that triadimefon caused significant changes in the metabolism of glutathione, phenylalanine and sphingolipids, and in sterol biosynthesis. Thus, triadimefon negatively affects beer sensory qualities by influencing the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae during fermentation, emphasizing the necessity of stricter control over fungicide residues in brewing by the food industry. PMID:27629523

  1. The Phytophthora cactorum genome provides insights into the adaptation to host defense compounds and fungicides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Duan, Shengchang; Mei, Xinyue; Huang, Huichuan; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yixiang; Guo, Cunwu; Yang, Ting; Wei, Wei; Liu, Xili; He, Xiahong; Dong, Yang; Zhu, Shusheng

    2018-04-25

    Phytophthora cactorum is a homothallic oomycete pathogen, which has a wide host range and high capability to adapt to host defense compounds and fungicides. Here we report the 121.5 Mb genome assembly of the P. cactorum using the third-generation single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology. It is the second largest genome sequenced so far in the Phytophthora genera, which contains 27,981 protein-coding genes. Comparison with other Phytophthora genomes showed that P. cactorum had a closer relationship with P. parasitica, P. infestans and P. capsici. P. cactorum has similar gene families in the secondary metabolism and pathogenicity-related effector proteins compared with other oomycete species, but specific gene families associated with detoxification enzymes and carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) underwent expansion in P. cactorum. P. cactorum had a higher utilization and detoxification ability against ginsenosides-a group of defense compounds from Panax notoginseng-compared with the narrow host pathogen P. sojae. The elevated expression levels of detoxification enzymes and hydrolase activity-associated genes after exposure to ginsenosides further supported that the high detoxification and utilization ability of P. cactorum play a crucial role in the rapid adaptability of the pathogen to host plant defense compounds and fungicides.

  2. Optimal control issues in plant disease with host demographic factor and botanical fungicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Mardiyah, M.; Istifadah, N.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss a mathematical model of plant disease with the effect of fungicide. We assume that the fungicide is given as a preventive treatment to infectious plants. The model is constructed based on the development of the disease in which the monomolecular is monocyclic. We show the value of the Basic Reproduction Number (BRN) ℛ0 of the plant disease transmission. The BRN is computed from the largest eigenvalue of the next generation matrix of the model. The result shows that in the region where ℛ0 greater than one there is a single stable endemic equilibrium. However, in the region where ℛ0 less than one this endemic equilibrium becomes unstable. The dynamics of the model is highly sensitive to changes in contact rate and infectious period. We also discuss the optimal control of the infected plant host by considering a preventive treatment aimed at reducing the infected host plant. The obtaining optimal control shows that it can reduce the number of infected hosts compared to that without control. Some numerical simulations are also given to illustrate our analytical results.

  3. Miltefosine is fungicidal to Paracoccidioides spp. yeast cells but subinhibitory concentrations induce melanisation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Diego Conrado Pereira; Spadari, Cristina de Castro; Nosanchuk, Joshua Daniel; Taborda, Carlos Pelleschi; Ishida, Kelly

    2017-04-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungi Paracoccidioides spp. The duration of antifungal treatment ranges from months to years and relapses may nevertheless occur despite protracted therapy. Thus, there remains an urgent need for new therapeutic options. Miltefosine (MLT), an analogue of alkylphospholipids, has antifungal activity against species of yeast and filamentous fungi. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effects of MLT on the yeast forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii. MLT demonstrated inhibitory activity from 0.12 to 1 µg/mL, which was similar to amphotericin B or the combination trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole but was not more effective than itraconazole. The fungicidal activity of MLT occurred at concentrations ≥1 µg/mL. Ultrastructural alterations were observed following exposure of the fungus to a subinhibitory concentration of MLT, such as cytoplasmic membrane alteration, mitochondrial swelling, electron-lucent vacuole accumulation and increasing melanosome-like structures. Melanin production by yeasts following MLT exposure was confirmed by labelling with antibodies to melanin. In addition, the combination of a subinhibitory concentration of MLT and tricyclazole, an inhibitor of DHN-melanin biosynthesis, drastically reduced yeast viability. In conclusion, MLT had a fungicidal effect against both Paracoccidioides spp., and a subinhibitory concentration impacted melanogenesis. These findings suggest that additional investigations should be pursued to establish a role for MLT in the treatment of PCM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  4. China Report, Agriculture, Sichuan Agricultural Geography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-25

    changes have taken place in the far-flung rural villages of Sichuan Province since liberation, and achievements have been extremely remarkable. Since...in Production Patterns Among Various Crops Sichuan still does not produce an abundance of grain. In most villages , standards for commune members...198175 JPRS-CAG-86-026 25 JUNE 1986 China Report AGRICULTURE SICHUAN AGRICULTURAL GEOGRAPHY DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public

  5. Impacts of biochar on bioavailability of the fungicide azoxystrobin: a comparison of the effect on biodegradation rate and toxicity to the fungal community.

    PubMed

    Sopeña, Fatima; Bending, Gary D

    2013-06-01

    There is great interest in using biochar (BC) as a soil amendment to provide a long-term repository of carbon to mitigate climate change. BC can have major impacts on soil biogeochemical cycling processes, largely by the sorption and protection of organic matter from microbial turnover. Application of BC to agricultural soil could also affect the efficacy, fate and environmental impact of pesticides. In the current study we investigated the effect of BC on bioavailability of the fungicide azoxystrobin in soil. We found that application of BC had no effect on sorption or degradation of azoxystrobin, even at a rate of 2% w/w. While azoxystrobin reduced dehydrogenase activity, BC addition greatly increased dehydrogenase, although the inhibitory effect of azoxystrobin was still evident in BC amended soil. Using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism of fungal SSU rRNA gene ITS regions it was found that azoxystrobin altered the structure of the soil fungal community, although this effect was dampened by BC addition. BC application had minor effects on fungal community structure. We conclude that measurement of the effect of BC on pesticide bioavailability by analysis of biodegradation rate and non-target effects on fungal community structure gave contrasting conclusions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Occupational Health and Safety for Agricultural Workers in Thailand: Gaps and Recommendations, with a Focus on Pesticide Use

    PubMed Central

    Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Kongtip, Pornpimol; Woskie, Susan

    2018-01-01

    Over 16.7 million workers in Thailand (42 percent of the working population) are engaged in agriculture, disproportionately from the lower socioeconomic strata of Thai society. Most agricultural workers (over 93 percent) work in the informal sector without the protections of regulations or enforcement of labor or health and safety laws or enrollment in a social security system. Although Thailand’s use of herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides is growing, there is little regulation of the sale, use, or application of these potentially toxic chemicals. This paper summarizes the research to date on occupational health and safety for Thai agricultural workers, identifies gaps in pesticide regulations and the current systems for occupational health and safety and social support for Thai agricultural workers, and makes recommendations for future policy and research initiatives to fill the identified gaps. PMID:25815744

  7. Occupational health and safety for agricultural workers in Thailand: gaps and recommendations, with a focus on pesticide use.

    PubMed

    Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Kongtip, Pornpimol; Woskie, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Over 16.7 million workers in Thailand (42 percent of the working population) are engaged in agriculture, disproportionately from the lower socioeconomic strata of Thai society. Most agricultural workers (over 93 percent) work in the informal sector without the protections of regulations or enforcement of labor or health and safety laws or enrollment in a social security system. Although Thailand's use of herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides is growing, there is little regulation of the sale, use, or application of these potentially toxic chemicals. This paper summarizes the research to date on occupational health and safety for Thai agricultural workers, identifies gaps in pesticide regulations and the current systems for occupational health and safety and social support for Thai agricultural workers, and makes recommendations for future policy and research initiatives to fill the identified gaps. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Transcriptional responses in thyroid tissues from rats treated with a tumorigenic and a non-tumorigenic triazole conazole fungicide.

    PubMed

    Hester, Susan D; Nesnow, Stephen

    2008-03-15

    Conazoles are azole-containing fungicides that are used in agriculture and medicine. Conazoles can induce follicular cell adenomas of the thyroid in rats after chronic bioassay. The goal of this study was to identify pathways and networks of genes that were associated with thyroid tumorigenesis through transcriptional analyses. To this end, we compared transcriptional profiles from tissues of rats treated with a tumorigenic and a non-tumorigenic conazole. Triadimefon, a rat thyroid tumorigen, and myclobutanil, which was not tumorigenic in rats after a 2-year bioassay, were administered in the feed to male Wistar/Han rats for 30 or 90 days similar to the treatment conditions previously used in their chronic bioassays. Thyroid gene expression was determined using high density Affymetrix GeneChips (Rat 230_2). Gene expression was analyzed by the Gene Set Expression Analyses method which clearly separated the tumorigenic treatments (tumorigenic response group (TRG)) from the non-tumorigenic treatments (non-tumorigenic response group (NRG)). Core genes from these gene sets were mapped to canonical, metabolic, and GeneGo processes and these processes compared across group and treatment time. Extensive analyses were performed on the 30-day gene sets as they represented the major perturbations. Gene sets in the 30-day TRG group had over representation of fatty acid metabolism, oxidation, and degradation processes (including PPARgamma and CYP involvement), and of cell proliferation responses. Core genes from these gene sets were combined into networks and found to possess signaling interactions. In addition, the core genes in each gene set were compared with genes known to be associated with human thyroid cancer. Among the genes that appeared in both rat and human data sets were: Acaca, Asns, Cebpg, Crem, Ddit3, Gja1, Grn, Jun, Junb, and Vegf. These genes were major contributors in the previously developed network from triadimefon-treated rat thyroids. It is postulated that

  9. ENANTIOSELECTIVE FORMATION OF THE TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDE TRIADIMENOL FROM TRIADIMEFON IN MAMMAL AND FISH HEPATIC MICROSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triazole containing compounds are used extensively in both agriculture and medicine for the control of fungal infections. Recently, emphasis has been placed on the potential adverse effects of these compounds within mammalian systems. Triadimefon is a common agricultural fungici...

  10. Environmental fate of the fungicide metalaxyl in soil amended with composted olive-mill waste and its biochar: An enantioselective study.

    PubMed

    Gámiz, Beatriz; Pignatello, Joseph J; Cox, Lucía; Hermosín, María C; Celis, Rafael

    2016-01-15

    A large number of pesticides are chiral and reach the environment as mixtures of optical isomers or enantiomers. Agricultural practices can affect differently the environmental fate of the individual enantiomers. We investigated how amending an agricultural soil with composted olive-mill waste (OMWc) or its biochar (BC) at 2% (w:w) affected the sorption, degradation, and leaching of each of the two enantiomers of the chiral fungicide metalaxyl. Sorption of metalaxyl enantiomers was higher on BC (Kd ≈ 145 L kg(-1)) than on OMWc (Kd ≈ 22 L kg(-1)) and was not enantioselective in either case, and followed the order BC-amended>OMWc-amended>unamended soil. Both enantiomers showed greater resistance to desorption from BC-amended soil compared to unamended and OMWc-amended soil. Dissipation studies revealed that the degradation of metalaxyl was more enantioselective (R>S) in unamended and OMWc-amended soil than in BC-amended soil. The leaching of both S- and R-metalaxyl from soil columns was almost completely suppressed after amending the soil with BC and metalaxyl residues remaining in the soil columns were more racemic than those in soil column leachates. Our findings show that addition of BC affected the final enantioselective behavior of metalaxyl in soil indirectly by reducing its bioavailability through sorption, and to a greater extent than OMWc. BC showed high sorption capacity to remove metalaxyl enantiomers from water, immobilize metalaxyl enantiomers in soil, and mitigate the groundwater contamination problems particularly associated with the high leaching potential of the more persistent enantiomer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy of fungicide combinations, phosphoric acid, and plant extract from stinging nettle on potato late blight management and tuber yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans is a major constraint to potato production. Inadequate management of the disease has often resulted in heavy losses in various production regions. We assessed the efficacy of fungicides, phosphoric acid, and stinging nettle plant extract combinations for...

  12. Efficacy of fungicides for control of scab on a mid-ripening peach variety in middle Georgia, 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungicides were evaluated for control of scab in a mid-ripening experimental peach block (‘Flameprince’) located at the USDA-ARS Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory (Byron, GA). Chemical formulations were applied at each application date: 3 Apr (petal fall to 1% shuck split), 10 Apr (shuck split ...

  13. Efficacy of petal fall and shuck split fungicides for control of scab on peach in middle Georgia, 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungicides were evaluated for control of scab in a mid-ripening experimental peach block (‘Flameprince’) located at the USDA-ARS Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory (Byron, GA). Chemical formulations were applied at each application date: 3 Apr (petal fall to 1% shuck split), 10 Apr (shuck split ...

  14. Efficacy of fungicides for control of scab on a mid-ripening peach variety in middle Georgia, 2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungicides were evaluated for control of scab in a mid-ripening experimental peach block (‘Flameprince’) located at the USDA-ARS Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory (Byron, GA). Chemical formulations were applied at each application date: 17 Mar (petal fall to 1% shuck split), 1 Apr (shuck split ...

  15. LATE GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO THE FUNGICIDE PROCHLORAZ DELAYS THE ONSET OF PARTURITION AND CAUSES REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS IN MALE RAT OFFSPRING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Prochloraz (PZ) is an imidazole fungicide that displays multiple endocrine activities. It inhibits androgen and estrogen synthesis via CYP-19 P-450 modulation and also acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. Although PZ has been shown to display antiandrogenic e...

  16. Investigations of fungicide exposure and pollen type on bee health: Insights from in vitro-reared solitary bees

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although solitary bees provide crucial pollination services for wild and managed crops, this species-rich group has been largely overlooked in pesticide regulation studies. The risk of exposure to fungicide residues is likely to be especially high if the spray occurs on, or near host plants while th...

  17. Two fungicides alter reproduction of the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus by influencing gene and protein expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aside from their intended actions, fungicides can drive pest insect outbreaks and, due to virtually continuous use, evolution. Small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus, outbreaks occurred recently in many provinces in China, with devastating rice losses. Because exposure to the fungici...

  18. Effect of fungicide seed treatments on Fusarium virguliforme infection of soybean and development of sudden death syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS), caused by Fusarium virguliforme (Fv), is a major yield-limiting disease of soybean in North America. Infection of soybean seedling roots by Fv results in severe root damage; therefore, fungicide seed treatments could potentially reduce these early-season infections and r...

  19. Comparative study of the fungicide Benomyl toxicity on some plant growth promoting bacteria and some fungi in pure cultures.

    PubMed

    Elslahi, Randa H; Osman, Awad G; Sherif, Ashraf M; Elhussein, Adil A

    2014-03-01

    Six laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the fungicide Benomyl on pure cultures of some plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) and some fungi. The highest LD50 was recorded for Bacillus circulans and proved to be the most resistant to the fungicide, followed by Azospirillum braziliense, while Penicillium sp. was the most affected microorganism. LD50 values for the affected microorganisms were in 21-240 orders of magnitude lower in comparison with the LD50 value for Azospirillum braziliense. The results indicate a strong selectivity for Benomyl against Rhizobium meliloti and Penicillium sp. when compared to other microorganisms tested. The highest safety coefficient was recorded for Bacillus circulans followed by Azospirillum braziliense, while Rhizobium meliloti, showed the lowest safety coefficient value compared to other bacteria. The lowest toxicity index was recorded for Bacillus circulans and Azospirillum braziliense. The slope of the curves for Bacillus sp. and Rhizobium meliloti was steeper than that of the other curves, suggesting that even a slight increase of the dose of the fungicide can cause a very strong negative effect. In conclusion, Benomyl could be applied without restriction when using inocula based on growth promoting bacteria such as symbiotic nitrogen fixers (Rhizobium meliloti), non-symbiotic nitrogen fixers (Azospirillum braziliense) or potassium solibilizers (Bacillus circulans), given that the fungicide is applied within the range of the recommended field dose.

  20. Synthesis of ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer containing fungicides and evaluation of their effect for wood decay resistance

    Treesearch

    George C. Chen

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to combat wood decay based on the approach controlled-release biocides from polymers. The possibility of introducing polymer-bonded fungicides into the cell lumens was investigated. The synthesis of ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer containing pentachlorophenol (penta) and 8-hydroxy quinoline (8HQ) in N, N dimethyl formamide is...

  1. INFLUENCE OF MATRIX FORMULATION ON DERMAL PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES USING QSAR AND PBPK / PD MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work is to use the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to develop an assessment tool for human exposure assessment to triazole fungicides. A dermal exposure route is used for the physi...

  2. LATE GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO THE FUNGICIDE PROCHLORAZ DELAYS THE ONSET OF PARTURITION AND CAUSES REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS IN MALE RAT OFFSPRING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Late gestational exposure to the fungicide prochloraz delays the onset of parturition and causes reproductive malformations in male rat offspring.
    Nigel C. Noriega, Joseph Ostby, Christy Lambright, Vickie S. Wilson, and L. Earl Gray Jr.,

    Prochloraz (PZ) is an imidazol...

  3. Assessment of the Endocrine Toxicity of the Fungicide Prochloraz using the Larval Amphibian Growth and Development Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz is a broad spectrum fungicide that acts by inhibiting ergosterol biosynthesis in target species. Toxicity results in non-target vertebrate species suggest this toxicant acts as an endocrine disruptor that inhibits aromatase, the enzyme responsible for the conversion of...

  4. A long term field study of the effect of fungicides penconazole and sulfur on yeasts in the vineyard.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Arroyo, Teresa; Valero, Eva

    2014-10-17

    This research deals with how two fungicide treatments against powdery mildew, penconazole as a systematic fungicide and sulfur as an inorganic broad-spectrum fungicide, affect the diversity and density of wine yeasts associated with grape berry surfaces and subsequent spontaneous fermentations. Unlike other studies in this area, this work aims to evaluate this effect on the population dynamics in the environment, the conditions of which are not reproducible in the laboratory. A long term (three year) sampling plan was thus devised. A minimum inhibitory concentration assay was also carried out in the laboratory in order to prove the influence of these antifungals on yeast populations. While both antifungal treatments (penconazole and sulfur) were similarly effective against powdery mildew, each had a very different effect on yeast populations. Penconazole showed the most negative effect on biodiversity in the vineyard and was the fungicide to which the isolated yeasts showed the greatest sensitivity. This study therefore evidences the suitability of treatment with sulfur, in both conventional and organic viticulture, to preserve the yeast population associated with grape berries, in particular the Saccharomyces cerevisiae species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Involvement of alternative oxidase in the regulation of sensitivity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum to the fungicides azoxystrobin and procymidone.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Wang, Ya-Ting; Liang, Wu-Sheng; Yao, Fei; Li, Yong-Hong; Li, Dian-Rong; Wang, Hao; Wang, Zheng-Yi

    2013-06-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a filamentous fungal pathogen that can infect many economically important crops and vegetables. Alternative oxidase is the terminal oxidase of the alternative respiratory pathway in fungal mitochondria. The function of alternative oxidase was investigated in the regulation of sensitivity of S. sclerotiorum to two commercial fungicides, azoxystrobin and procymidone which have different fungitoxic mechanisms. Two isolates of S. sclerotiorum were sensitive to both fungicides. Application of salicylhydroxamic acid, a specific inhibitor of alternative oxidase, significantly increased the values of effective concentration causing 50% mycelial growth inhibition (EC50) of azoxystrobin to both S. sclerotiorum isolates, whereas notably decreased the EC50 values of procymidone. In mycelial respiration assay azoxystrobin displayed immediate inhibitory effect on cytochrome pathway capacity, but had no immediate effect on alternative pathway capacity. In contrast, procymidone showed no immediate impact on capacities of both cytochrome and alternative pathways in the mycelia. However, alternative oxidase encoding gene (aox) transcript and protein levels, alternative respiration pathway capacity of the mycelia were obviously increased by pre-treatment for 24 h with both azoxystrobin and procymidone. These results indicate that alternative oxidase was involved in the regulation of sensitivity of S. sclerotiorum to the fungicides azoxystrobin and procymidone, and that both fungicides could affect aox gene expression and the alternative respiration pathway capacity development in mycelia of this fungal pathogen.

  6. Lack of interaction between glyphosate and fungicide treatments on Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in glyphosate-resistant sugarbeet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field experiment was conducted in 2008 and 2009 in the Saginaw Valley region of Michigan to determine if there were potential interactions between applications of glyphosate and the fungicide azoxystrobin and to determine the effectiveness of foliar and in-furrow azoxystrobin applications when Rhi...

  7. Effects of fungicide seed treatments on germination, population, and yield of maize grown from seed infected with fungal pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seedborne fungi can reduce survival, growth, and yield of maize (Zea mays L.). Laboratory, field, and growth chamber experiments were conducted to determine the effects of the seed treatment fungicides fludioxonil, mefenoxam, and azoxystrobin on germination, plant population, and grain yield of maiz...

  8. TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES IN LIVER FROM MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are environmental and pharmaceutical fungicides. The present study relates the toxicological effects of conazoles to alterations of gene and pathway transcription and identifies potential modes of tumorigenic action. In a companion study (Allen et al. 2006) under...

  9. Effect of cultural practices and fungicide treatments on the severity of Phytophthora root rot of blueberries grown in Mississippi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytophthora root rot is an important disease of blueberries, especially those grown in areas with poor drainage. Reliable cultural and chemical management strategies are needed for control of this disease. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of cultural practices and fungicide treat...

  10. Characterization and Potential Environmental Implications of Select Cu-Based Fungicides and Bactericides Employed in U.S. Markets

    EPA Science Inventory

    This exploratory study aimed to examine the extent and mineral speciation of nanosized Cu in two fungicide products (A and B) available in the U.S. markets. Electron microcopy results demonstrated the presence of spherical and polydisperse <100 nm Cu particles in product B. Oth...

  11. Influence of Bravo fungicide applications on wood density and moisture content of Swiss needle cast affected Douglas-fir trees.

    Treesearch

    G.R. Johnson; Barbara L. Gartner; Doug Maguire; Alan Kanaskie

    2003-01-01

    Wood density, moisture content, tracheld width and cell wall size were examined in trees from plots that were sprayed for 5 years with chlorothalonil (Bravo ®) fungicide to reduce the impact of Swiss needle-cast (SNC) and from trees in adjacent unsprayed plots. The unsprayed (more heavily diseased) trees had significantly narrower sapwood, narrower growth tings, lower...

  12. Degradation of Linuron and Some Other Herbicides and Fungicides by a Linuron-Inducible Enzyme Obtained from Bacillus sphaericus

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, G.; Wallnöfer, P. R.; Plapp, R.

    1971-01-01

    Linuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-methoxy-1-methylurea] induces the formation of an enzyme (acylamidase) responsible for the degradation of a large variety of different herbicides and fungicides of the acylanilide and phenylurea type. The former type is degraded at a rate at least 10 times higher than the latter. PMID:5119200

  13. Glyphosate and fungicide effects on Cercospora leaf spot in four glyphosate-resistant sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) varieties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate has been shown to reduce foliar diseases in soybean and wheat. In fact, currently there is a patent application for a synergistic combination of glyphosate and a fungicide for disease management. Cercospora leaf spot (Cercospora beticola) is one of the most significant foliar disease prob...

  14. A turn-on supramolecular fluorescent probe for sensing benzimidazole fungicides and its application in living cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qing; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Tao; Wang, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Qingdi; Wei, Gang

    2018-02-01

    A cucurbit[8]uril-based turn-on supramolecular fluorescent probe between cucurbit[8]uril (Q[8]) and pyronine Y (PyY) (designated 2PyY@Q[8]) in acidic aqueous solution showed a remarkable fluorescence 'turn-on' response to benzimidazole fungicides such as thiabendazole, fuberidazole and carbendazim. The 2PyY@Q[8] fluorescent probe can be used to detect benzimidazole fungicides with high sensitivity and selectivity with a detection limit of 10- 8 mol/L. A good linear relationship of emission intensity at 580 nm for benzimidazole fungicides at concentrations of 0.4-5.0 μmol/L was observed. The proposed sensing mechanism was investigated using 1H NMR spectroscopy combined with density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The cell imaging study showed that the 2PyY@Q[8] complex could be used to image benzimidazole fungicide in prostate cancer (PC3) cells, which may help to elucidate relevant biological processes at the molecular level.

  15. Incidental contact with insecticides and fungicides on plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), movement and mortality: implications for pest management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exposure to Guthion and Imidan also led to high rates of mortality, though the impact on movement was less pronounced. Exposure to the neonicotinoid compounds, Calypso, Clutch, and Provado, to the insect growth regulator, Rimon, and to the fungicides, Nova and Penncozeb, had no impact on mobility a...

  16. A mini-bag technique for evaluation of fungicide effects on Trichoderma spp in mushroom compost.

    PubMed

    Abosriwil, Salem O; Clancy, Kevin J

    2004-04-01

    An in vivo technique was developed to observe colonisation of mushroom compost by Trichoderma spp. Isolates of T. harzianum (Th2), T. harzianum (Th1), T. koningii (Tk) and T. viride (Tv) were artificially introduced into compost using a mini-bag system. Wheat grains, colonised by Trichoderma spp, were placed centrally on a layer of compost at the bottom of 1-litre polythene bags which were then filled with 350 g of spawned or un-spawned compost, and partially sealed. After 14 and 21 days incubation at 27 degrees C, the bags were assessed for recovery of Trichoderma from middle and top zones using a needle stab re-isolation technique and a visual colonisation scoring system. Visible green mould contamination, similar to that observed in practice, developed within 21 days. The visual colonisation scoring was reliably related to the re-isolation success. In this evaluation, Trichoderma spp showed considerable differences in their relative abilities to colonise spawned and un-spawned compost, with Th2 isolates being consistently superior to the other isolates of Th1, Tk and Tv in colonising spawned compost. This technique was employed to evaluate the effects of fungicides on the colonisation of mushroom compost by three Trichoderma spp: Th2, Th1 and Tk, using 1-litre and 5-litre mini-bag systems. Aqueous suspensions of benomyl, carbendazim, thiabendazole, prochloraz and prochloraz+carbendazim incorporated into the compost at 50 mg litre(-1), or applied to spawn at 50 mg kg(-1), reduced the colonisation by Trichoderma spp. Prochloraz and prochloraz+carbendazim were superior to benomyl, carbendazim or thiabendazole in reducing compost colonisation by Th2, Th1 and Tk, with Th2 being the most persistent type, capable of colonising treated compost in the presence of all five fungicides. The prochloraz+carbendazim mixture, not normally used in mushroom production, was equal to or better than prochloraz alone. The incidence of green mould colonisation by Th2 was as extensive

  17. Development of sensitive determination method for fungicides from environmental water samples with Titanate nanotube array micro-solid phase extraction prior to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunrui; Zhou, Qingxiang; Xie, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Fungicides have been widely used throughout the world, and the resulted pollution has absorbed great attention in recent years. Present study described an effective measurement technique for fungicides including thiram, metalaxyl, diethofencarb, myclobutanil and tebuconazole in environmental water samples. A micro-solid phase extraction (μSPE) was developed utilizing ordered TiO(2) nanotube array for determination of target fungicides prior to a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The experimental results indicated that TiO(2) nanotube arrays demonstrated excellent merits on the preconcentration of fungicides, and excellent linear relationship between peak area and the concentration of fungicides was obtained in the range of 0.1-50 μg L(-1). The detection limits for the targeted fungicides were in the range of 0.016-0.086 μg L(-1) (S/N=3). Four real environmental water samples were used to validate the applicability of the proposed method, and good spiked recoveries in the range of 73.9-114% were achieved. A comparison of present method with conventional solid phase extraction was made and the results exhibited that proposed method resulted in better recoveries. The results demonstrated that this μ-SPE technique was a viable alternative for the analysis of fungicides in complex samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fungicide contamination reduces beneficial fungi in bee bread based on an area-wide field study in honey bee, Apis mellifera, colonies.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Jay A; Jajack, Andrew J; Rosselot, Andrew E; Smith, Terrance J; Yerke, Mary Clare; Sammataro, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Fermentation by fungi converts stored pollen into bee bread that is fed to honey bee larvae, Apis mellifera, so the diversity of fungi in bee bread may be related to its food value. To explore the relationship between fungicide exposure and bee bread fungi, samples of bee bread collected from bee colonies pollinating orchards from 7 locations over 2 years were analyzed for fungicide residues and fungus composition. There were detectable levels of fungicides from regions that were sprayed before bloom. An organic orchard had the highest quantity and variety of fungicides, likely due to the presence of treated orchards within bees' flight range. Aspergillus, Penicillium, Rhizopus, and Cladosporium (beneficial fungi) were the primary fungal isolates found, regardless of habitat differences. There was some variation in fungal components amongst colonies, even within the same apiary. The variable components were Absidia, Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Bipolaris, Fusarium, Geotrichum, Mucor, Nigrospora, Paecilomyces, Scopulariopsis, and Trichoderma. The number of fungal isolates was reduced as an effect of fungicide contamination. Aspergillus abundance was particularly affected by increased fungicide levels, as indicated by Simpson's diversity index. Bee bread showing fungicide contamination originated from colonies, many of which showed chalkbrood symptoms.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis in Agricultural Health Study Spouses: Associations with Pesticides and Other Farm Exposures.

    PubMed

    Parks, Christine G; Hoppin, Jane A; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Costenbader, Karen H; Alavanja, Michael C; Sandler, Dale P

    2016-11-01

    Farming has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the role of pesticides is not known. We examined associations between RA and pesticides or other agricultural exposures among female spouses of licensed pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. Women were enrolled between 1993 and 1997 and followed through 2010. Cases (n = 275 total, 132 incident), confirmed by a physician or by self-reported use of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, were compared with noncases (n = 24,018). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models adjusted for age, state, and smoking pack-years. Overall, women with RA were somewhat more likely to have reported lifetime use of any specific pesticide versus no pesticides (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.6). Of the 15 pesticides examined, maneb/mancozeb (OR = 3.3; 95% CI: 1.5, 7.1) and glyphosate (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.1) were associated with incident RA compared with no pesticide use. An elevated, but non-statistically significant association with incident RA was seen for DDT (OR = 1.9; 95% CI: 0.97, 3.6). Incident RA was also associated with the application of chemical fertilizers (OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.7) and cleaning with solvents (OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.4), but inversely associated with lifetime livestock exposure as a child and adult (OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.24, 0.97) compared with no livestock exposure. Our results suggest that specific agricultural pesticides, solvents, and chemical fertilizers may increase the risk of RA in women, while exposures involving animal contact may be protective. Citation: Parks CG, Hoppin JA, De Roos AJ, Costenbader KH, Alavanja MC, Sandler DP. 2016. Rheumatoid arthritis in Agricultural Health Study spouses: associations with pesticides and other farm exposures. Environ Health Perspect 124:1728-1734; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP129.

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis in Agricultural Health Study Spouses: Associations with Pesticides and Other Farm Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Christine G.; Hoppin, Jane A.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Costenbader, Karen H.; Alavanja, Michael C.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Farming has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the role of pesticides is not known. Objectives: We examined associations between RA and pesticides or other agricultural exposures among female spouses of licensed pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. Methods: Women were enrolled between 1993 and 1997 and followed through 2010. Cases (n = 275 total, 132 incident), confirmed by a physician or by self-reported use of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, were compared with noncases (n = 24,018). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models adjusted for age, state, and smoking pack-years. Results: Overall, women with RA were somewhat more likely to have reported lifetime use of any specific pesticide versus no pesticides (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.6). Of the 15 pesticides examined, maneb/mancozeb (OR = 3.3; 95% CI: 1.5, 7.1) and glyphosate (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.1) were associated with incident RA compared with no pesticide use. An elevated, but non-statistically significant association with incident RA was seen for DDT (OR = 1.9; 95% CI: 0.97, 3.6). Incident RA was also associated with the application of chemical fertilizers (OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.7) and cleaning with solvents (OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.4), but inversely associated with lifetime livestock exposure as a child and adult (OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.24, 0.97) compared with no livestock exposure. Conclusions: Our results suggest that specific agricultural pesticides, solvents, and chemical fertilizers may increase the risk of RA in women, while exposures involving animal contact may be protective. Citation: Parks CG, Hoppin JA, De Roos AJ, Costenbader KH, Alavanja MC, Sandler DP. 2016. Rheumatoid arthritis in Agricultural Health Study spouses: associations with pesticides and other farm exposures. Environ Health Perspect 124:1728–1734; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP129 PMID:27285288

  1. Nontarget effects of foliar fungicide application on the rhizosphere: diversity of nifH gene and nodulation in chickpea field

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C; Hamel, C; Vujanovic, V; Gan, Y

    2012-01-01

    Aims This study explores nontarget effects of fungicide application on field-grown chickpea. Methods and Results Molecular methods were used to test the effects of foliar application of fungicide on the diversity and distribution of nifH genes associated with two chickpea cultivars and their nodulation. Treatments were replicated four times in a split-plot design in the field, in 2008 and 2009. Chemical disease control did not change the richness of the nifH genes associated with chickpea, but selected different dominant nifH gene sequences in 2008, as revealed by correspondence analysis. Disease control strategies had no significant effect on disease severity or nifH gene distribution in 2009. Dry weather conditions rather than disease restricted plant growth that year, suggesting that reduced infection rather than the fungicide is the factor modifying the distribution of nifH gene in chickpea rhizosphere. Reduced nodule size and enhanced N2-fixation in protected plants indicate that disease control affects plant physiology, which may in turn influence rhizosphere bacteria. The genotypes of chickpea also affected the diversity of the nifH gene in the rhizosphere, illustrating the importance of plant selective effects on bacterial communities. Conclusions We conclude that the chemical disease control affects nodulation and the diversity of nifH gene in chickpea rhizosphere, by modifying host plant physiology. A direct effect of fungicide on the bacteria cannot be ruled out, however, as residual amounts of fungicide were found to accumulate in the rhizosphere soil of protected plants. Significance and Impact of the Study Systemic nontarget effect of phytoprotection on nifH gene diversity in chickpea rhizosphere is reported for the first time. This result suggests the possibility of manipulating associative biological nitrogen fixation in the field. PMID:22335393

  2. Chemosensitization of Fusarium graminearum to Chemical Fungicides Using Cyclic Lipopeptides Produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain JCK-12

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kihyun; Lee, Yoonji; Ha, Areum; Kim, Ji-In; Park, Ae Ran; Yu, Nan Hee; Son, Hokyoung; Choi, Gyung Ja; Park, Hae Woong; Lee, Chul Won; Lee, Theresa; Lee, Yin-Won; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by infection with Fusarium graminearum leads to enormous losses to crop growers, and may contaminate grains with a number of Fusarium mycotoxins that pose serious risks to human and animal health. Antagonistic bacteria that are used to prevent FHB offer attractive alternatives or supplements to synthetic fungicides for controlling FHB without the negative effects of chemical management. Out of 500 bacterial strains isolated from soil, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens JCK-12 showed strong antifungal activity and was considered a potential source for control strategies to reduce FHB. B. amyloliquefaciens JCK-12 produces several cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) including iturin A, fengycin, and surfactin. Iturin A inhibits spore germination of F. graminearum. Fengycin or surfactin alone did not display any inhibitory activity against spore germination at concentrations less than 30 μg/ml, but a mixture of iturin A, fengycin, and surfactin showed a remarkable synergistic inhibitory effect on F. graminearum spore germination. The fermentation broth and formulation of B. amyloliquefaciens JCK-12 strain reduced the disease incidence of FHB in wheat. Furthermore, co-application of B. amyloliquefaciens JCK-12 and chemical fungicides resulted in synergistic in vitro antifungal effects and significant disease control efficacy against FHB under greenhouse and field conditions, suggesting that B. amyloliquefaciens JCK-12 has a strong chemosensitizing effect. The synergistic antifungal effect of B. amyloliquefaciens JCK-12 and chemical fungicides in combination may result from the cell wall damage and altered cell membrane permeability in the phytopathogenic fungi caused by the CLP mixtures and subsequent increased sensitivity of F. graminearum to fungicides. In addition, B. amyloliquefaciens JCK-12 showed the potential to reduce trichothecenes mycotoxin production. The results of this study indicate that B. amyloliquefaciens JCK-12 could be used as an

  3. Effects of Fungicide and Adjuvant Sprays on Nesting Behavior in Two Managed Solitary Bees, Osmia lignaria and Megachile rotundata

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing body of empirical evidence showing that wild and managed bees are negatively impacted by various pesticides that are applied in agroecosystems around the world. The lethal and sublethal effects of two widely used fungicides and one adjuvant were assessed in cage studies in California on blue orchard bees, Osmia lignaria, and in cage studies in Utah on alfalfa leafcutting bees, Megachile rotundata. The fungicides tested were Rovral 4F (iprodione) and Pristine (mixture of pyraclostrobin + boscalid), and the adjuvant tested was N-90, a non-ionic wetting agent (90% polyethoxylated nonylphenol) added to certain tank mixtures of fungicides to improve the distribution and contact of sprays to plants. In separate trials, we erected screened cages and released 20 paint-marked females plus 30–50 males per cage to document the behavior of nesting bees under treated and control conditions. For all females in each cage, we recorded pollen-collecting trip times, nest substrate-collecting trip times (i.e., mud for O. lignaria and cut leaf pieces for M. rotundata), cell production rate, and the number of attempts each female made to enter her own or to enter other nest entrances upon returning from a foraging trip. No lethal effects of treatments were observed on adults, nor were there effects on time spent foraging for pollen and nest substrates and on cell production rate. However, Rovral 4F, Pristine, and N-90 disrupted the nest recognition abilities of O. lignaria females. Pristine, N-90, and Pristine + N-90 disrupted nest recognition ability of M. rotundata females. Electroantennogram responses of antennae of O. lignaria females maintained in the laboratory did not differ significantly between the fungicide-exposed and control bees. Our results provide the first empirical evidence that two commonly used fungicides and a non-ionic adjuvant can disrupt nest recognition in two managed solitary bee species. PMID:26274401

  4. Agricultural Occupations Program Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul E.; Mayer, Leon

    The major program objectives of agricultural occupations courses are (1) to develop agricultural competencies needed by individuals engaged in or preparing to engage in production agriculture, and in agricultural occupations other than production agriculture; (2) to develop an understanding of the career opportunities in agriculture; (3) to…

  5. Agricultural Occupations Programs Planning Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt, Thomas R.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A set of program planning guides that include seven areas (1) Agricultural Production, (2) Agricultural Supplies and Services, (3) Agricultural Mechanics, (4) Agricultural Products, (5) Ornamental Horticulture, (6) Agricultural Resources, and (7) Forestry, were developed and introduced to high school applied biological and agricultural occupations…

  6. Agricultural aviation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, H. L. (Compiler); Bouse, L. F. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    A compilation of papers, comments, and results is provided during a workshop session. The purpose of the workshop was to review and evaluate the current state of the art of agricultural aviation, to identify and rank potentially productive short and long range research and development areas, and to strengthen communications between research scientists and engineers involved in agricultural research. Approximately 71 individuals actively engaged in agricultural aviation research were invited to participate in the workshop. These were persons familiar with problems related to agricultural aviation and processing expertise which are of value for identifying and proposing beneficial research.

  7. Anethole, a potential antimicrobial synergist, converts a fungistatic dodecanol to a fungicidal agent.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Fujita, Tomoko; Kubo, Isao

    2007-01-01

    Anethole shows synergistic effects on the antifungal activities of phytochemicals including polygodial and (2E)-undecenal against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. It was found that a fungistatic dodecanol combined with a sublethal amount of anethole showed a fungicidal activity against S. cerevisiae. The MIC of dodecanol quickly reduced cell viability, but the cell viability recovered shortly after and then finally became no longer different from the control, indicating that the effect of dodecanol on this yeast was classified as sublethal damage. On the other hand, anethole completely restricted the recovery of cell viability. Therefore the expression of the synergistic effect was probably due to a blockade of the recovery process from dodecanol-induced stress.

  8. Physical-Chemical Properties of the Chiral Fungicide Fenamidone and Strategies for Enantioselective Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kort, Anne-Kathleen; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are of prime importance for designing crystallization processes. In this article, Preferential Crystallization, as a special approach to carry out enantioselective crystallization, is described to resolve the enantiomers of the chiral fungicide fenamidone. In preliminary investigations the melting behavior and solid-liquid equilibria in the presence of solvents were quantified. The analyses revealed a stable solid phase behavior of fenamidone in the applied solvents. Based on the results obtained, a two-step crystallization route was designed and realized capable of providing highly pure enantiomers. An initial Preferential Crystallization of the racemate was performed prior to crystallizing the target enantiomer preferentially out of the enriched mother liquor. Chirality 28:514-520, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Development of Proteomics-Based Fungicides: New Strategies for Environmentally Friendly Control of Fungal Plant Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Acero, Francisco Javier Fernández; Carbú, María; El-Akhal, Mohamed Rabie; Garrido, Carlos; González-Rodríguez, Victoria E.; Cantoral, Jesús M.

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics has become one of the most relevant high-throughput technologies. Several approaches have been used for studying, for example, tumor development, biomarker discovery, or microbiology. In this “post-genomic” era, the relevance of these studies has been highlighted as the phenotypes determined by the proteins and not by the genotypes encoding them that is responsible for the final phenotypes. One of the most interesting outcomes of these technologies is the design of new drugs, due to the discovery of new disease factors that may be candidates for new therapeutic targets. To our knowledge, no commercial fungicides have been developed from targeted molecular research, this review will shed some light on future prospects. We will summarize previous research efforts and discuss future innovations, focused on the fight against one of the main agents causing a devastating crops disease, fungal phytopathogens. PMID:21340014

  10. Prostate Cancer and Ambient Pesticide Exposure in Agriculturally Intensive Areas in California

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Myles; Mills, Paul; Zhang, Xinbo; Zadnick, John; Goldberg, Dan; Ritz, Beate

    2011-01-01

    In a population-based case-control study in California's intensely agricultural Central Valley (2005–2006), the authors investigated relations between environmental pesticide/fungicide exposure and prostate cancer. Cases (n = 173) were obtained from a population-based cancer registry, and controls (n = 162) were obtained from Medicare listings and tax assessor mailings. Past ambient exposures to pesticides/fungicides were derived from residential history and independently recorded pesticide and land-use data, using a novel geographic information systems approach. In comparison with unexposed persons, increased risks of prostate cancer were observed among persons exposed to compounds which may have prostate-specific biologic effects (methyl bromide (odds ratio = 1.62, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.59) and a group of organochlorines (odds ratio = 1.64, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.63)) but not among those exposed to other compounds that were included as controls (simazine, maneb, and paraquat dichloride). The authors assessed the possibility of selection bias due to less-than-100% enrollment of eligible cases and controls (a critical methodological concern in studies of this kind) and determined that there was little evidence of bias affecting the estimated effect size. This study provides evidence of an association between prostate cancer and ambient pesticide exposures in and around homes in intensely agricultural areas. The associations appear specific to compounds with a plausible biologic role in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:21447478

  11. Anethole potentiates dodecanol's fungicidal activity by reducing PDR5 expression in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Ishikura, Takayuki; Jono, Yui; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Ogita, Akira; Kubo, Isao; Tanaka, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    trans-Anethole (anethole), a major component of anise oil, has a broad antimicrobial spectrum and a weaker antimicrobial potency than other available antibiotics. When combined with polygodial, nagilactone E, and n-dodecanol, anethole has been shown to exhibit synergistic antifungal activity against a budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and a human opportunistic pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans. However, the mechanism underlying this synergistic effect of anethole has not been characterized. We studied this mechanism using dodecanol-treated S. cerevisiae cells and focusing on genes related to multidrug efflux. Although dodecanol transiently reduced the number of colony forming units, this recovered to levels similar to those of untreated cells with continued incubation beyond 24h. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed overexpression of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, PDR5, in addition to a slight increase in PDR11, PDR12, and PDR15 transcriptions in dodecanol-treated cells. In the presence of anethole, these effects were attenuated and the fungicidal activity of dodecanol was extended. Dodecanol showed longer lasting fungicidal activity against a Δpdr5. In addition, Δpdr3 and Δlge1, lack transcription factors of PDR5 and PDR3, were partly and completely susceptible to dodecanol, respectively. Furthermore, combination of anethole with fluconazole was also found to exhibit synergy on C. albicans. These results indicated that although anethole reduced the transcription of several transporters, PDR5 expression was particularly relevant to dodecanol efflux. Anethole is expected to be a promising candidate drug for the inhibition of efflux by reducing the transcription of several ABC transporters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. N-Chlorotaurine Exhibits Fungicidal Activity against Therapy-Refractory Scedosporium Species and Lomentospora prolificans.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Michaela; Binder, Ulrike; Reindl, Martin; Gönül, Beyhan; Fankhauser, Hannes; Mair, Christian; Nagl, Markus

    2015-10-01

    N-Chlorotaurine (NCT), a well-tolerated endogenous long-lived oxidant that can be applied topically as an antiseptic, was tested on its fungicidal activity against Scedosporium and Lomentospora, opportunistic fungi that cause severe infections with limited treatment options, mainly in immunocompromised patients. In quantitative killing assays, both hyphae and conidia of Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium boydii, and Lomentospora prolificans (formerly Scedosporium prolificans) were killed by 55 mM (1.0%) NCT at pH 7.1 and 37°C, with a 1- to 4-log10 reduction in CFU after 4 h and a 4- to >6-log10 reduction after 24 h. The addition of ammonium chloride to NCT markedly increased this activity. LIVE/DEAD staining of conidia treated with 1.0% NCT for 0.5 to 3 h increased the permeability of the cell wall and membrane. Preincubation of the test fungi in 1.0% NCT for 10 to 60 min delayed the time to germination of conidia by 2 h to >12 h and reduced their germination rate by 10.0 to 100.0%. Larvae of Galleria mellonella infected with 1.0 × 10(7) conidia of S. apiospermum and S. boydii died at a rate of 90.0 to 100% after 8 to 12 days. The mortality rate was reduced to 20 to 50.0% if conidia were preincubated in 1.0% NCT for 0.5 h or if heat-inactivated conidia were used. Our study demonstrates the fungicidal activity of NCT against different Scedosporium and Lomentospora species. A postantifungal effect connected with a loss of virulence occurs after sublethal incubation times. The augmenting effect of ammonium chloride can be explained by the formation of monochloramine. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. N-Chlorotaurine Exhibits Fungicidal Activity against Therapy-Refractory Scedosporium Species and Lomentospora prolificans

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Michaela; Binder, Ulrike; Reindl, Martin; Gönül, Beyhan; Fankhauser, Hannes; Mair, Christian

    2015-01-01

    N-Chlorotaurine (NCT), a well-tolerated endogenous long-lived oxidant that can be applied topically as an antiseptic, was tested on its fungicidal activity against Scedosporium and Lomentospora, opportunistic fungi that cause severe infections with limited treatment options, mainly in immunocompromised patients. In quantitative killing assays, both hyphae and conidia of Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium boydii, and Lomentospora prolificans (formerly Scedosporium prolificans) were killed by 55 mM (1.0%) NCT at pH 7.1 and 37°C, with a 1- to 4-log10 reduction in CFU after 4 h and a 4- to >6-log10 reduction after 24 h. The addition of ammonium chloride to NCT markedly increased this activity. LIVE/DEAD staining of conidia treated with 1.0% NCT for 0.5 to 3 h increased the permeability of the cell wall and membrane. Preincubation of the test fungi in 1.0% NCT for 10 to 60 min delayed the time to germination of conidia by 2 h to >12 h and reduced their germination rate by 10.0 to 100.0%. Larvae of Galleria mellonella infected with 1.0 × 107 conidia of S. apiospermum and S. boydii died at a rate of 90.0 to 100% after 8 to 12 days. The mortality rate was reduced to 20 to 50.0% if conidia were preincubated in 1.0% NCT for 0.5 h or if heat-inactivated conidia were used. Our study demonstrates the fungicidal activity of NCT against different Scedosporium and Lomentospora species. A postantifungal effect connected with a loss of virulence occurs after sublethal incubation times. The augmenting effect of ammonium chloride can be explained by the formation of monochloramine. PMID:26239996

  14. Analysis of antibiotic fungicide kasugamycin in irrigation water by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ceshing; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Lo, Chi-Chu

    2010-07-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis method with an ultraviolet (UV) detector and an Aqua C18 (250 x 4.6 mm, Phenomenex) column were applied to analyze the antibiotic fungicide kasugamycin in water. An aromatic sulfonic acid spe column (Backerbond, J. T. Backer) was used to remove the interfering materials from irrigation water. A good linear relation existed between the concentration of the fungicide and the peak area, and correlation coefficient of linearity from 0.1 to 10.2 microg/mL was 0.998. The accuracies expressed as the recoveries of kasugamycin from irrigation water ranged from 112.2 to 111.7 %. The precisions expressed as relative standard deviations (RSD) were found to be below 7.0 %. The quantitative detection limit (LOQ) of kasugamycin in irrigation water was set at 2.2 microg/mL which was 2-times higher than the method detection limit (MDL) 1.03 microg/mL. Electrospray ionization-mass (ESI-MS) and fast-atom bombardment-mass (FAB-MS) were applied to compare the ability of identifying the component of the eluent peak from HPLC, and the result indicated that electrospray ionization-mass (ESI-MS) was more sensitive than fast-atom bombardment-mass (FAB-MS) in the detection of kasugamycin. There was no kasugamycin residue detected in irrigation water samples collected from paddyfields at Wufong, indicated that the residues of kasugamycin in water were less than 2.2 microg/mL, and the risk of water contamination was very low.

  15. Evaluation of the aneugenic potential of the fungicide Ferbam in mice.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, R; Krishnamoorthy, M

    2002-01-01

    Ferbam, a potent dithiocarbamate fungicide is used as a protectant against a wide variety of fungal diseases in fruits, vegetables, and ornamental plants. The wide-spread use of this chemical is likely to pollute the environment. Hence, it was planned to test the possible genotoxicity of Ferbam through its aneugenic potential in the in vivo mouse (Mus musculus) test system. Four different doses of Ferbam, namely, 7.5, 15.0, 30.0, 60.0 mg/kg body weight were administered orally to mice Mus musculus suspended in gum tragacanth representing, respectively, 1/16, 1/8, 1/4;, 1/2 th of the LD50 value. They were sacrificed at 6-, 12-, 24-, and 48-h intervals along with a distilled water negative control at 2 mg/kg body weight. Colchicine treated animals were used as positive controls. Bone marrow preparations were made following the standard Hypotonic flame dry Giemsa staining technique to study the dose and time yield effect of Ferbam. The aneugenic potential was evaluated for C-mitotic effects by scoring the mitotic index, c-mitoses frequency, anaphase reduction, and hyper/hypodiploidy induction. Ferbam showed a significant increase in the mitotic index and C-mitoses effects and anaphase decreased at the highest doses of 30 and 60 mg/kg at 12- and 24-h intervals. Colchicine induced significant effects in all the aneugenic parameters observed at all the time intervals. There was no significant induction of either hyperdiploidy or hypodiploidy by Ferbam, unlike colchicine, indicating that the fungicide Ferbam is not aneugenic in the mouse test system. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Possibilities to use tank-mix adjuvants for better fungicide spreading on triticale ears.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, Bert; Spanoghe, Pieter; Heremans, Betty; Haesaert, Geert; Steurbaut, Walter

    2008-09-10

    Tank-mix adjuvants can increase the overall performance of plant protection products. Their most important ways of action are the improved retention, spreading, wetting, and penetration of the pesticide on the target and the reduction of fine droplets. In this paper, deposition and spreading of the systemic fungicide propiconazole on triticale ears were quantified. A better deposition and spreading of fungicide on the ear may be a possible help for the Fusarium problem in triticale, wheat, and other cereals. Triticale ears were applied with propiconazole in combination with 11 different tank-mix adjuvants. Vegetable oil, alcohol ethoxylates, lactate ester, trisiloxanes, and an amphoteric molecule were included in this experiment. When no tank-mix adjuvant was used, the lower part of the ear was reached five times less by the propiconazole spray than the upper part of the ear. When the tank-mix adjuvant was combined with the propiconazole formulation, an increase in residue on both the upper and the lower part of the ear was observed. A higher residue on the upper half of the ear means a better deposition, while a higher residue on the lower part of the ear is related to a better downward spreading over the grains and the needles of the ear. The combination of those two observations makes it interesting to use tank-mix adjuvants for the prevention of mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species. The advantages are emphasized even more when cost effectiveness was calculated. The use of a proper tank-mix adjuvant can result in 40% lower cost per application per hectare.

  17. Dynamics of biochemical properties associated with soil nitrogen mineralization following nitrification inhibitor and fungicide applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manyun; Wang, Weijin; Wang, Jun; Teng, Ying; Xu, Zhihong

    2017-04-01

    Agrochemical applications may have side effects on soil biochemical properties related to soil nitrogen (N) mineralization and thus affect N cycling. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) and fungicide iprodione on soil neutral protease (NPR), alkaline protease (APR), chitinase (CHI), and their functional genes (nprA, aprA, and chiA) related to soil N mineralization. The following four treatments were included: blank control (CK), single DMPP application (DAA), weekly iprodione applications (IPR), and the combined applications of DMPP and iprodione (DI). Compared with the CK treatment, DMPP application significantly inhibited the CHI activity in the first 14 days of incubation, and iprodione applications, particularly when applied alone, decreased the NPR, APR, and CHI activities. Relative to the IPR treatment, extra DMPP application had the potential to alleviate the inhibitory effects of iprodione on the activities of these enzymes. DMPP application significantly increased aprA gene abundances after 14 days of incubation. However, repeated iprodione applications, alone or with the DMPP, decreased nprA and chiA gene abundances. Relative to the CK treatment, DMPP application generated negligible effects on the positive/negative correlations between soil enzyme activities and the corresponding functional gene abundances. However, the positive correlation between the CHI activity and chiA gene abundance was changed to negative correlation by repeated iprodione applications, alone or together with the DMPP. Our results demonstrated that agrochemical applications, particularly repeated fungicide applications, can have inadvertent effects on enzyme activities and functional gene abundances associated with soil N mineralization.

  18. Effect of different rates of spent mushroom substrate on the dissipation and bioavailability of cymoxanil and tebuconazole in an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Martín, Alba; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Pose-Juan, Eva; Rodríguez-Cruz, María Sonia

    2016-04-15

    Physicochemical methods to immobilize pesticides in vulnerable soils are currently being developed to prevent water contamination. Some of these methods include the use of different organic residues to modify soils because they could limit the transport of pesticides and/or facilitate their dissipation. Spent mushroom substrate (SMS) may be used for these purposes. Accordingly a study was conducted under laboratory conditions to know the dissipation and bioavailability of the fungicides cymoxanil and tebuconazole over time in a vineyard soil amended with two rates of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) (5% and 50% (w/w)), selected to prevent the diffuse or point pollution of soil. The dissipation of cymoxanil was more rapid than that of tebuconazole in the different soils studied. The dissipation rate was higher in the amended soil than in the unamended one for both compounds, while no significant differences were observed between the amended soils in either case. An apparent dissipation occurred in the amended soil due to the formation of non-extractable residues. Bound residues increased with incubation time for tebuconazole, although a proportion of this fungicide was bioavailable after 303days. The major proportion of cymoxanil was tightly bound to the amended soil from the start, although an increasing fraction of bound fungicide was bioavailable for mineralization. Soil dehydrogenase activity was significantly affected by SMS application and incubation time; however, it was not significantly modified by fungicide application. The significance of this research suggests that SMS applied at a low or high rate to agricultural soil can be used to prevent both the diffuse or point pollution of soil through the formation of non-extractable residues, although more research is needed to discover the time that fungicides remain adsorbed into the soil decreasing either bioavailability (tebuconazole) or mineralization (cymoxanil) in SMS-amended soils. Copyright © 2016

  19. Modules in Agricultural Education for Agricultural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    Each of the 31 curriculum modules in this packet for agricultural resources instruction contains a brief description of the module content, a list of the major division or units, the overall objective, objectives by units, content outline and suggested teaching methods, student application activities, and evaluation procedures. A list of resource…

  20. Modules in Agricultural Education for Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    Each of the 38 curriculum modules in this packet for agricultural mechanics instruction contains a brief description of the module content, a list of the major divisions or units, the overall objectives, objectives by unit, content outline and suggested teaching methods, student application activities, and evaluation procedures. A listing of…

  1. Vocational Agriculture Education: Agricultural Livestock Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Greg

    Ten units of instruction are provided in this curriculum guide on agricultural livestock skills. Unit topics are as follow: (1) restraining, (2) vaccination, (3) livestock castration, (4) dehorning, (5) docking, (6) growth stimulants, (7) identification, (8) shearing, (9) hoof trimming, and (10) birth assistance. Each instructional unit generally…

  2. Vocational Agriculture I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Bob; Harp, Keith

    These course materials are designed to provide a foundation of basic knowledge in production agriculture as a prelude to further education in vocational agriculture. The guide contains 6 sections and 22 units of instruction. Each unit includes all or most of eight basic components: performance objectives, suggested activities for the teacher,…

  3. Agricultural Occupations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Floyd J.; Henderson, Billie

    This agricultural occupations handbook was developed from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) and the U.S. Departments of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Labor publication, Vocational Education and Occupations. It includes the U.S. Office of Education coding for the instructional area of agriculture and the cluster coding for the…

  4. Sustainable Agriculture: Cover Cropping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Megan

    2018-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture practices are increasingly being used by farmers to maintain soil quality, increase biodiversity, and promote production of food that is environmentally safe. There are several types of sustainable agriculture practices such as organic farming, crop rotation, and aquaculture. This lesson plan focuses on the sustainable…

  5. Theme: Urban Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellibee, Margaret; And Others

    1990-01-01

    On the theme of secondary agricultural education in urban areas, this issue includes articles on opportunities, future directions, and implications for the profession; creative supervised experiences for horticulture students; floral marketing, multicultural education; and cultural diversity in urban agricultural education. (JOW)

  6. Invasive species in agriculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agricultural production of food, feed, fiber or fuel is a local human activity with global ecological impacts, including the potential to foster invasions. Agriculture plays an unusual role in biological invasions, in that it is both a source of non-indigenous invasive species (NIS) and especially s...

  7. Agriculture and Rural Viability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    Agriculture and the rural economic bases in mining, fisheries, forestry, and natural resource extraction are experiencing major social and economic changes. The farm and rural crises of the 1980s are not short-term aberrations, but symptoms of long-term trends that were partially hidden by the relatively good times for agriculture and rural areas…

  8. Agricultural Technology Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Board of Education, Raleigh. Agricultural Technology Education Section.

    Agricultural education programs available through North Carolina's newly created system of industrial education center, technical institutes, and community colleges are described. The information is for use by administrators, and teachers of adult agricultural courses and counselors of high school dropouts and graduates. It describes the need for…

  9. Global Transformations and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Rex R.

    1990-01-01

    Examines worldwide political, economic, and social transformations and their impact on agriculture, focusing on biotechnology. Discusses rise of international corporations and accompanying constraints on government power. Sees trend toward increasing agribusiness role in world food and agricultural sectors. Calls for broader views and research in…

  10. AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. (TITLE SUPPLIED).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1966

    AGRICULTURE IS THE MOST BASIC INDUSTRY IN THE UNITED STATES AND, AS OUR SOURCE OF FOOD, FEED, AND FIBER, OCCUPIES A KEY ROLE IN THE ECONOMY OF THE COUNTRY. CHANGING DEMANDS AND SCIENTIFIC DEVELOPMENTS HAVE CREATED A NEED FOR INCREASED EMPHASIS ON TRAINING INDIVIDUALS FOR EMPLOYMENT IN THE TOTAL INDUSTRY OF AGRICULTURE. THESE CHANGES HAVE…

  11. Agriculture Power and Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Tom

    This guide is intended to assist vocational agriculture teachers who are teaching secondary- or postsecondary-level courses in agricultural power and machinery. The materials presented are based on the Arizona validated occupational competencies and tasks for the following occupations: service manager, shop foreman, service technician, and tractor…

  12. Plant protection and growth stimulation by microorganisms: biotechnological applications of Bacilli in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Alejandro; Romero, Diego; de Vicente, Antonio

    2011-04-01

    The increasing demand for a steady, healthy food supply requires an efficient control of the major pests and plant diseases. Current management practices are based largely on the application of synthetic pesticides. The excessive use of agrochemicals has caused serious environmental and health problems. Therefore, there is a growing demand for new and safer methods to replace or at least supplement the existing control strategies. Biological control, that is, the use of natural antagonists to combat pests or plant diseases has emerged as a promising alternative to chemical pesticides. The Bacilli offer a number of advantages for their application in agricultural biotechnology. Several Bacillus-based products have been marketed as microbial pesticides, fungicides or fertilisers. Bacillus-based biopesticides are widely used in conventional agriculture, by contrast, implementation of Bacillus-based biofungicides and biofertilizers is still a pending issue. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identifying International Agricultural Concepts for Secondary Agricultural Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Nathan W.; Gates, Hailey; Stripling, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    The globalization of the agriculture industry has created an emerging need for agricultural education in the United States to take a more globalized approach to prepare students for future careers in agriculture. The purpose of this study was to identify international agricultural concepts for secondary agricultural education curriculum. A Delphi…

  14. National Agricultural Library | United States Department of Agriculture

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to main content Home National Agricultural Library United States Department of Agriculture Ag is a data access system maintained by the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Agricultural websites. The Ag Data Commons provides access to a wide variety of open data relevant to agricultural

  15. Distributions of Sensitivities to Three Sterol Demethylation Inhibitor Fungicides Among Populations of Uncinula necator Sensitive and Resistant to Triadimefon.

    PubMed

    Erickson, E O; Wilcox, W F

    1997-08-01

    ABSTRACT Single-conidial isolates of Uncinula necator from (i) a population representing two vineyards with no previous exposure to sterol demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicides ("unexposed," n = 77) and (ii) a population representing two vineyards in which powdery mildew was poorly controlled by triadimefon after prolonged DMI use ("selected," n = 82) were assayed to determine distributions of sensitivities to the DMI fungicides triadimenol (the active form of triadimefon), myclobutanil, and fenarimol. Median 50% effective dose (ED(50)) values (micrograms per milliliter) in the selected versus unexposed populations were 0.06 versus 1.9 for triadimenol, 0.03 versus 0.23 for myclobutanil, and 0.03 versus 0.07 for fenarimol, respectively. Isolates were grouped into sensitivity classes according to their ED(50) values, and those from the selected population were categorized as resistant if the frequency of their sensitivity class had increased significantly relative to levels found in the unexposed population (ED(50) values exceeding 0.56, 0.18, and 0.18 mug/ml for triadimenol, myclobutanil, and fenarimol, respectively). Of the 76 isolates defined as resistant to triadimenol, 64% were classified as cross-resistant to myclobutanil, 18% were classified as cross-resistant to fenarimol, and 17% were classified as resistant to all three fungicides; 25% of the isolates classified as resistant to myclobutanil also were classified as resistant to fenarimol. Similar cross-resistance relationships were revealed when all isolates were examined by regressing log ED(50) values for each fungicide against those for the remaining two fungicides to determine the correlation coefficients (e.g., r = 0.85 for triadimenol versus myclobutanil and 0.56 for triadimenol versus fenarimol). The restricted levels of cross-resistance indicated by these data, particularly between fenarimol and the other two fungicides, is in sharp contrast to the high levels of cross-resistance among DMIs

  16. The influence of chosen fungicides on the activity of aminopeptidases in winter oilseed rape during pods development.

    PubMed

    Kania, Joanna; Mączyńska, Agnieszka; Głazek, Mariola; Krawczyk, Tomasz; Gillner, Danuta M

    2018-06-01

    Cultivation of oilseed rape requires application of specific fungicides. Besides their protective role, they can potentially influence the expression and activity of crucial enzymes in the plant. Among the large number of enzymes expressed in plants, aminopeptidases play a key role in all crucial physiological processes during the whole life cycle (e.g. storage protein mobilization and thus supplying plant with needed amino acids, as well as plant aging, protection and defense responses). In the present paper, we evaluate for the first time, the influence of the treatment of winter oilseed rape with commercially available fungicides (Pictor 400 SC, Propulse 250 SE and Symetra 325 SC), on the activity of aminopeptidases expressed in each plant organ (flowers, leaves, stems and pods separately). Fungicides were applied once, at one of the three stages of oilseed rape development (BBCH 59-61, BBCH 63-65 and BBCH 67-69). The aminopeptidase activity was determined using six different amino acid p-nitroanilides as substrates. The results have shown, that in control plants, at the beginning of intensive pods development and seeds production, hydrophobic amino acids with bulky side chains (Phe, Leu) were preferentially hydrolysed. In control plants, the activity was ~3.5 times higher in stems and pods, compared to leaves. The treatment with all pesticides caused significant increase in aminopeptidases hydrolytic activity toward small amino acids Gly, Ala as well as proline, mostly in flowers and leaves. These amino acids are proven to be crucial in the mechanisms of delaying of plant aging, development of better resistance to stress and plant defense. It can be suggested, that studied fungicides enhance such mechanisms, by activating the expression of genes coding for aminopeptidases, which are active in hydrolysis of N-terminal amino acids such as Gly, Ala, Pro from storage peptides and proteins. Depending on fungicide, the major increase of aminopeptidase activity was

  17. IN VITRO METABOLISM OF THE CHIRAL TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDE BROMUCONAZOLE 47 USING SUBSTRATE DEPLETION AND PRODUCT FORMATION KINETICS IN RAT HEPATIC MICROSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kinetic analysis of xenobiotic metabolism using in vitro hepatic microsomes are needed for predictive in vivo physiological modeling. Recently, much emphasis has been placed on the adverse effects of triazole fungicides in mammalian steroid metabolism. In vitro metabolism of the ...

  18. Fungicide resistance profiling in Botrytis cinerea populations from blueberries in California and Washington and their impact on control of gray mold

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a major postharvest disease of blueberries grown in the Central Valley of California (CA) and western Washington State (WA). Sensitivities to boscalid, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, fludioxonil, and pyraclostrobin, representing five different fungicide classes, were...

  19. Induction of numerical chromosomal aberrations during DNA synthesis using the fungicides nimrod and rubigan-4 in root tips of Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Shahin, S A; el-Amoodi, K H

    1991-11-01

    The 2 fungicides nimrod and rubigan-4 were tested for genotoxicity using Vicia faba root tips as the biological test system. Treating lateral roots with different concentrations of each fungicide for different periods showed that both fungicides were able to produce numerical but not structural chromosomal aberrations. The percentage of total aberrations in root tips exposed to nimrod reached 54.39% at 250 ppm for 4 h, and 64.69% in root tips exposed to rubigan-4 at 250 ppm for 6 h. The types of numerical chromosomal aberrations produced by both fungicides included: binucleate cells, c-metaphases, sticky chromosomes, polyploid cells, and laggards. Recovery experiments for 24, 48, and 96 h showed no significant differences between the percentage of total aberrations in treated and control groups.

  20. Vacuolar H(+)-Pyrophosphatase AVP1 is Involved in Amine Fungicide Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana and Provides Tridemorph Resistance in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Agustín; Herrera-Palau, Rosana; Madroñal, Juan M; Albi, Tomás; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Perez-Castiñeira, José R; Navas, Plácido; Valverde, Federico; Serrano, Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    Amine fungicides are widely used as crop protectants. Their success is believed to be related to their ability to inhibit postlanosterol sterol biosynthesis in fungi, in particular sterol-Δ(8),Δ(7)-isomerases and sterol-Δ(14)-reductases, with a concomitant accumulation of toxic abnormal sterols. However, their actual cellular effects and mechanisms of death induction are still poorly understood. Paradoxically, plants exhibit a natural resistance to amine fungicides although they have similar enzymes in postcicloartenol sterol biosynthesis that are also susceptible to fungicide inhibition. A major difference in vacuolar ion homeostasis between plants and fungi is the presence of a dual set of primary proton pumps in the former (V-ATPase and H(+)-pyrophosphatase), but only the V-ATPase in the latter. Abnormal sterols affect the proton-pumping capacity of V-ATPases in fungi and this has been proposed as a major determinant in fungicide action. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model fungus, we provide evidence that amine fungicide treatment induced cell death by apoptosis. Cell death was concomitant with impaired H(+)-pumping capacity in vacuole vesicles and dependent on vacuolar proteases. Also, the heterologous expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana main H(+)-pyrophosphatase (AVP1) at the fungal vacuolar membrane reduced apoptosis levels in yeast and increased resistance to amine fungicides. Consistently, A. thaliana avp1 mutant seedlings showed increased susceptibility to this amine fungicide, particularly at the level of root development. This is in agreement with AVP1 being nearly the sole H(+)-pyrophosphatase gene expressed at the root elongation zones. All in all, the present data suggest that H(+)-pyrophosphatases are major determinants of plant tolerance to amine fungicides.