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Sample records for agricultural mechanics laboratory

  1. Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory Management Professional Development Needs of Wyoming Secondary Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Billy R.; Saucier, P. Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Accidents happen; however, the likelihood of accidents occurring in the agricultural mechanics laboratory is greatly reduced when agricultural mechanics laboratory facilities are managed by secondary agriculture teachers who are competent and knowledgeable. This study investigated the agricultural mechanics laboratory management in-service needs…

  2. Student Arc Welding Noise Exposures in Agricultural Mechanics Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Glen M.

    1989-01-01

    A study surveyed noise levels in an agricultural mechanics educational laboratory while students completed common arc welds. It found that the time a student spent in the welding booth posed no threat to hearing. Maximum noise measured was well below the 140 dB(A) impulse level set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. (JOW)

  3. An Analysis of Agricultural Mechanics Safety Practices in Agricultural Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Michael K.

    North Dakota secondary agricultural mechanics instructors were surveyed regarding instructional methods and materials, safety practices, and equipment used in the agricultural mechanics laboratory. Usable responses were received from 69 of 89 instructors via self-administered mailed questionnaires. Findings were consistent with results of similar…

  4. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume II. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the second volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the eight lessons included in this volume are cold metal work, soldering, agricultural safety programs, farm shops, farm structures, farm and ranch electrification, soil and water…

  5. Assessing the Learning Needs of Student Teachers in Texas regarding Management of the Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory: Implications for the Professional Development of Early Career Teachers in Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saucier, P. Ryan; McKim, Billy R.

    2011-01-01

    Skills needed to manage a laboratory are essential knowledge for all school-based, agriculture teachers who instruct agricultural mechanics curriculum (Saucier, Terry, & Schumacher, 2009). This research investigated the professional development needs of Texas agricultural education student teachers regarding agricultural mechanics laboratory…

  6. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume I. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the first volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the 12 lessons included in this volume are selecting tractors and engines, diagnosing engine conditions, servicing electrical systems, servicing cooling systems, servicing fuel and…

  7. A Multi-State Factor-Analytic and Psychometric Meta-Analysis of Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory Management Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Billy R.; Saucier, P. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the 50 agricultural mechanics laboratory management competencies identified by Johnson and Schumacher in 1989 have served as the basis for numerous needs assessments of secondary agriculture teachers. This study reevaluated Johnson and Schumacher's instrument, as modified by Saucier, Schumacher, Funkenbusch, Terry, and…

  8. AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS INSTRUCTION IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN MISSISSIPPI, THE LABORATORY-WORK AREA APPROACH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POWELL, G.G., JR.; WALKER, G.M.

    TO MEET THE NEEDS RESULTING FROM INCREASED FARM MECHANIZATION, AN INTENSIFIED AND EXPANDED CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS HAS BEEN PROPOSED COVERING--(1) FARM MACHINERY, (2) FARM BUILDINGS, (3) ELECTRICITY, (4) WELDING, (5) CONCRETE AND MASONRY, (6) PLUMBING, (7) METAL WORKING, AND (8) TOOL FITTING. DISCUSSION OF EACH OF THESE AREAS INCLUDES…

  9. Goryachkin's agricultural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinenova, Vera

    2016-03-01

    The paper contributes to the development of applied mechanics by establishing a new discipline, namely, agricultural mechanics by academician Vasilii Prohorovich Goryachkin (1868-1935) who was an apprentice of Nikolay Yegorovich Zhukovsky and a graduate of the Moscow University (current known as Moscow State University) and the Imperial Higher Technical School.

  10. Teachers' Use of Agricultural Laboratories in Secondary Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoulders, Catherine W.; Myers, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    Trends in the agriculture industry require students to have the ability to solve problems associated with scientific content. Agricultural laboratories are considered a main component of secondary agricultural education, and are well suited to provide students with opportunities to develop problem-solving skills through experiential learning. This…

  11. Modules in Agricultural Education for Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    Each of the 38 curriculum modules in this packet for agricultural mechanics instruction contains a brief description of the module content, a list of the major divisions or units, the overall objectives, objectives by unit, content outline and suggested teaching methods, student application activities, and evaluation procedures. A listing of…

  12. Skill Sheets for Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This set of 33 skill sheets for agricultural mechanics was developed for use in high school and vocational school agricultural mechanics programs. Some sheets teach operational procedures while others are for simple projects. Each skill sheet covers a single topic and includes: (1) a diagram, (2) a step-by-step construction or operational…

  13. Policing Mechanisms in Agricultural Contracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Steven; Hueth, Brent; Ligon, Ethan

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we focus on mechanisms of coordination in agricultural contracts. Our approach is intended to advance understanding of social relations of production and distribution of power in agrofood systems. Through an analysis of contracts between farmers and intermediaries (e.g., processors, shippers, consignment agents) for California fruits…

  14. Single Sheet Agricultural Mechanics Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Leon, Ed.

    This packet contains 25 single-page plans for agricultural mechanics projects. Each plan consists of a one-page set of drawings of the object to be made with a list of needed materials, a cut list, and step-by-step construction procedures on the back of the page. Plans for the following wood projects are included: bluebird house, lawn seat, dog…

  15. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Agricultural Laboratory and Field Technician Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These Illinois skill standards for the agricultural laboratory and field technician cluster are intended to serve as a guide to workforce preparation program providers as they define content for their programs and to employers as they establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. They could also serve as a mechanism for…

  16. Agricultural Mechanics: Program Planning Guide: Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristol, Benton K.

    The program planning guide for agricultural mechanics was written to assist Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations (ABAO) teachers in enriching existing programs and/or to provide the basis for expansion of offerings to include additional materials for the cluster areas of agricultural power and machinery, structural and conveniences,…

  17. Science Laboratory Exercises for Vocational Agriculture Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Dale E.

    This manual provides learning activities for use in two vocational agriculture courses--ornamental horticulture I and agricultural technology I. These activities are intended as aids in the teaching of application of science principles. An introductory chart gives a summary of how vocational agriculture objectives match objectives of specific…

  18. Classical Mechanics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosing, Juliet W.

    2006-12-01

    At Pacific University we have included a lab with our upper division Classical Mechanics class. We do a combination of physical labs (air resistance, harmonic motion, amusement park physics), Maple labs (software), and projects. Presentation of some of the labs, results and challenges with this course will be included.

  19. TEACHING AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS IN HIGH SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILL, C.W.

    A LIST OF 12 CONCEPTS DEVELOPED FOR NEW YORK STATE IN 1958 SERVED AS GUIDES IN PLANNING AND DEVELOPING A COURSE OF STUDY AND TEACHING METHODS IN AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS FOR USE IN THE DAIRYING AREAS OF THE STATE. FORTY PERCENT OF THE TIME IS ALLOTTED TO THE SUBJECT IN AGRICULTURE 1 AND 2 AND 50 PERCENT IN DOUBLE-PERIOD AGRICULTURE 3 AND 4 SUBJECTS.…

  20. Analyses of Noise in Selected Agricultural Mechanics Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Lon R.

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the different noise levels found in four agricultural mechanics facilities selected as being representative of the concrete and brick veneer type and the predominately steel type. The type of instructional programs considered were the laboratory skill oriented and the project construction oriented. A…

  1. Ventilation of Welding Fumes in Vocational Agriculture Laboratories in Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Brenda; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This study was intended to measure the effectiveness of ventilation systems in removing airborne contaminants produced by arc welding in vocational agriculture laboratories in Missouri. It was found that most schools did not meet the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards. (SK)

  2. Farm Laboratory Aids Post-Secondary Instruction in Agricultural Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statler, Larry L.; Juhl, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Reports a farm laboratory of 1500 swine, 40 beef cattle, 52 sheep, a 300-crop acres, and a full line of leased new farm machinery for post-secondary agricultural production students. A student board of directors manages the demonstration farm. (DM)

  3. Site Description for the University of Nebraska's Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, B. R.; Blad, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory is operated by the University of Nebraska. The laboratory is located in the south-central part of the Nebraska Sandhills near Tryon, Nebraska (41 deg. 37' N; 100 deg. 50' W). The laboratory is surrounded on the west and south by native rangeland vegetation, on the south by a large field of corn irrigated by a center pivot, and on the east by wheat stubble. This site is appropriate for moisture stress studies since rainfall is almost always inadequate to meet evaporative demands of agricultural crops during most of the growing season and the sandy soils (Valentine fine sand) at the site do not store large quantities of water. Various levels of water stress are achieved through irrigation from solid set sprinklers.

  4. Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual. Laboratory Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avakian, Harry; And Others

    This publication is a laboratory study guide designed for mechanical engineering students. All of the experiments (with the exception of experiment No. 1) contained in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual have been included in this guide. Brief theoretical backgrounds, examples and their solutions, charts, graphs, illustrations, and…

  5. Selected References and Aids for Teaching Agricultural Mechanics to Students of Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzucco, April

    The booklet lists references and materials intended for both the student and the teacher of agricultural mechanics. The materials are grouped under nine topics: agricultural shop; metalwork and welding; agricultural machinery; agricultural power; drawing, construction, and maintenance; electricity; water management, soil and water conservation;…

  6. A Guide for Developing the Instructional Program in Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    This bulletin contains materials suggested for use by agricultural teachers in the improvement of their agricultural mechanics programs. In its function as a guide to planning a teaching program in agricultural mechanics the document outlines the principles and procedures in course planning, 12 guiding concepts in the teaching of agricultural…

  7. A Mechanical Resonance Apparatus for Undergraduate Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Christopher C.

    1995-01-01

    Reports the use of a heavy duty hacksaw blade and a 1000 turn pick-up coil to form the basis of a mechanical oscillator for a laboratory exercise in mechanical resonance designed for either the elementary undergraduate course or in association with an upper level mechanics course. (LZ)

  8. Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avakian, Harry; And Others

    This publication is a Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual designed to be used by technical institute students in Mechanical Engineering Technology Programs. The experiments are introductory in nature and embrace the fields of applied thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, refrigeration, heat transfer and basic instrumentation. There are 20…

  9. Agricultural Science and Mechanics I and II. An Instructional Guide for Agricultural Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Agricultural Education Program.

    This instructional guide contains guidelines and course outlines for a two- and three-year course in agricultural science and mechanics for students in grades 8, 9, and 10. Provided in the first 4 sections are course outlines for Agricultural Science and Mechanics I and II and references for use in each course. Each course outline contains an…

  10. Biology: An Important Agricultural Engineering Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the field of bioengineering with particular emphasis on agricultural engineering, and presents the results of a survey of schools that combine biology and engineering in their curricula. (JR)

  11. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  12. Soil moisture: Some fundamentals. [agriculture - soil mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milstead, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    A brief tutorial on soil moisture, as it applies to agriculture, is presented. Information was taken from books and papers considered freshman college level material, and is an attempt to briefly present the basic concept of soil moisture and a minimal understanding of how water interacts with soil.

  13. Agriculture--Agricultural Mechanics, Electric Motors. Kit No. 56. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bomar, William

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on agricultural mechanics (electric motors) are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of agriculture. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings:…

  14. A mechanical resonance apparatus for undergraduate laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christopher C.

    1995-03-01

    A heavy duty hacksaw blade and a 1000 turn pick-up coil form the basis of a mechanical oscillator for a laboratory exercise in mechanical resonance designed for either the elementary course or in association with an upper level mechanics course. Damped harmonic motion, amplitude, and phase resonance curves, and the transient motion of the system can be studied. Since the resonant frequencies are in the 10 to 20 Hz range, a digital multimeter can be used to record accurate amplitude resonance curves with minimal tedium.

  15. National assessment of capacity in public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratories--United States, 2011.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    In 2011, the University of Michigan's Center of Excellence in Public Health Workforce Studies and the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) assessed the workforce and program capacity in U.S. public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratories. During April-August 2011, APHL sent a web-based questionnaire to 105 public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratory directors comprising all 50 state public health laboratories, 41 local public health laboratories, eight environmental laboratories, and six agricultural laboratories. This report summarizes the results of the assessment, which inquired about laboratory capacity, including total number of laboratorians by occupational classification and self-assessed ability to carry out functions in 19 different laboratory program areas. The majority of laboratorians (74%) possessed a bachelor's degree, associate's degree, or a high school education or equivalency; 59% of all laboratorians were classified as laboratory scientists. The greatest percentage of laboratories reported no, minimal, or partial program capacity in toxicology (45%), agricultural microbiology (54%), agricultural chemistry (50%), and education and training for their employees (51%). Nearly 50% of laboratories anticipated that more than 15% of their workforce would retire, resign, or be released within 5 years, lower than the anticipated retirement eligibility rate of 27% projected for state public health workers. However, APHL and partners in local, state, and federal public health should collaborate to address gaps in laboratory capacity and rebuild the workforce pipeline to ensure an adequate future supply of public health laboratorians.

  16. AmeriFlux US-IB1 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory- Batavia (Agricultural site)

    SciTech Connect

    Matamala, Roser

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-IB1 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory- Batavia (Agricultural site). Site Description - Two eddy correlation systems are installed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory: one on a restored prairie (established October 2004) and one on a corn/soybean rotation agricultural field (established in July 2005). The prairie site had been farmed for more than 100 years, but was converted to prairie in 1989. The agricultural site has likely been farmed for more than 100 years, but the first documented instance of agricultural activity dates back to a picture taken in 1952.

  17. Laboratory rock mechanics testing manual. Public draft

    SciTech Connect

    Shuri, F S; Cooper, J D; Hamill, M L

    1981-10-01

    Standardized laboratory rock mechanics testing procedures have been prepared for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. These procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state-of-the-art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design has been incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements.

  18. Revising and Updating the Agricultural Mechanics Components of the Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This curriculum guide contains 28 competency-based units of study for use in high school agricultural mechanics courses, especially in Connecticut. The 10 exploratory units, suitable for grades 9-10, cover the following topics: beginning welding; cold metal and soldering; electricity; plumbing; power tools; shop safety, mathematics, painting and…

  19. The Use of Hand Tools in Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Univ., Bozeman. Dept. of Agricultural and Industrial Education.

    This document contains a unit for teaching the use of hand tools in agricultural mechanics in Montana. It consists of an outline of the unit and seven lesson plans. The unit outline contains the following components: situation, aims and goals, list of lessons, student activities, teacher activities, special equipment needed, and references. The…

  20. Agricultural/Industrial Mechanical Technician. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for agricultural/industrial mechanical technician occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits),…

  1. [Theme: Using Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Jack; Braker, Clifton

    1982-01-01

    Pritchard discusses the opportunities for applied learning afforded by laboratories. Braker describes the evaluation of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills in the agricultural mechanics laboratory. (SK)

  2. Skill Standards for Agriculture: John Deere Agricultural Equipment Technician, Agricultural & Diesel Equipment Mechanic, Irrigation Technologist, Turf Management Technician, Turf Equipment Service Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, Olympia.

    This document presents agriculture skill standards for programs to prepare Washington students for employment in the following occupations: John Deere agricultural equipment technician; agricultural and diesel equipment mechanic; irrigation technologist; turf management technician; and turf equipment service technician. The introduction explains…

  3. Summer Institute in Agricultural Mechanics Education, Southern Region, Proceedings (Blacksburg, Virginia, August 3-7, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg.

    This summer institute emphasizes the establishment of minimum measurable standards of attainment in agricultural engineering phases of teacher education in agriculture. Speeches presented are: (1) "Where We Are in Agricultural Mechanics Education," by Alfred H. Krebs, (2) "Research Offerings for More Effective Teaching in Agricultural Mechanics,"…

  4. Agricultural Education. Proceedings of the Central Region Annual Research Conference (44th, Chicago, Illinois, February 24-25, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan.

    The following papers are included: "Focusing Agricultural Education Research" (Williams); "A Time Series Analysis of Agricultural Education Student Teachers' Perceptions of Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory Management Competencies" (Schumacher, Johnson); "Determination of the Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory Management Inservice Needs of Missouri…

  5. Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Briassoulis, D. Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. • Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. • Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. • Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. • Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project “LabelAgriWaste” revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (“Quality I”) and another one for plastic profile production process (“Quality II”). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities

  6. Agricultural Mechanics. V-A-1 to V-E-1. Basic V.A.I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This packet contains five units of informational materials and transparency masters with accompanying scripts, skill sheets, and safety tests for teacher and student use in an agricultural mechanics course in vocational agriculture. The first unit introduces the agricultural mechanics shop, covering the following topics: importance of agricultural…

  7. Laboratory investigation of visible shuttle glow mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, A.; Swenson, G. R.; Caledonia, G. E.; Holtzclaw, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments designed to uncover mechanistic information about the spectral and spatial characteristics of shuttle glow were conducted. The luminescence was created when a pulse of O atoms traveling at orbital velocities was directed toward NO molecules previously adsorbed to aluminum, nickel, and Z306 Chemglaz (a common baffle black) coated surfaces held at various temperatures. Spectral and spatial measurements were made using a CCD imaging spectrometer. Corroborative spectral information was recorded in separate measurements using a scanning monochromator and gated photomultiplier arrangement. The e-folding distance at several temperatures was calculated from images of the surface glow using the photometrics image processing capability of the imaging spectrometer. The e-folding distance was not altered as a function of incoming O beam velocity. The results are presented and the observations provide direct evidence that the visible shuttle glow results from recombination of oxygen atoms and surface bound NO.

  8. The National Agricultural Laboratories of Brazil and the control of residues and contaminants in food.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz Mauricio, A; Lins, E S

    2012-01-01

    The laboratory activity of the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply in Brazil has a history that is richer than most people are aware of. The institutions that today are known as National Agricultural Laboratory - Lanagros - were once a smaller initiative that suffered ups and downs throughout the decades. The recognition that the Lanagros have today - as reference centres with open communication channels with some of the world's greater laboratories in residue and contaminants in food analyses - is the fruit of several years of hard work, good ideas and a strong will never to let down society. Today the Lanagros act not only by performing analyses for the monitoring and investigation programmes, but also in the research and development of analytical methods, providing technical advice on the elaboration of guidelines and normatives, international negotiation and the evaluation of other laboratories. The Lanagros work in an ISO 17025 environment, and they are now being directed and prepared to be able to respond to outbreaks and crises related to the presence of residues and contaminants in food, with the readiness, quickness and reliability that an emergency requires. Investments are allocated strategically and have been giving concrete results, all to the benefit of consumers. PMID:22087508

  9. Perceptions of Vocational Agriculture Instructors Regarding Knowledge and Importance of Including Selected Agricultural Mechanics Units in the Vocational Agriculture Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimgartner, Dale C.; Foster, Richard M.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of teachers in five northwestern states revealed that respondents in all states rated the units of arc welding and oxyacetylene welding as the most important units to be included in secondary vocational agriculture programs. (LRA)

  10. Population array and agricultural data arrays for the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.W.; Duffy, S.; Kowalewsky, K.

    1998-07-01

    To quantify or estimate the environmental and radiological impacts from man-made sources of radioactive effluents, certain dose assessment procedures were developed by various government and regulatory agencies. Some of these procedures encourage the use of computer simulations (models) to calculate air dispersion, environmental transport, and subsequent human exposure to radioactivity. Such assessment procedures are frequently used to demonstrate compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) and US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulations. Knowledge of the density and distribution of the population surrounding a source is an essential component in assessing the impacts from radioactive effluents. Also, as an aid to calculating the dose to a given population, agricultural data relevant to the dose assessment procedure (or computer model) are often required. This report provides such population and agricultural data for the area surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  11. A STUDY OF FARM MECHANICS JOBS TAUGHT BY TEACHERS OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IN MISSOURI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GEORGE, WILLIAM C.

    IN ORDER TO DETERMINE WHAT FARM MECHANICS JOBS WERE BEING TAUGHT IN MISSOURI HIGH SCHOOL VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE DAY CLASSES, 175 VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS DURING THE 1962-63 SCHOOL YEAR RESPONDED TO A QUESTIONNAIRE WHICH INCLUDED 73 FARM MECHANICS JOBS IN 16 SUBJECT MATTER AREAS BASED ON A MISSOURI STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LIST. THE…

  12. Mobile laboratory measurements of atmospheric emissions from agriculture, oil, and natural gas activities in northeastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilerman, S. J.; Peischl, J.; Neuman, J. A.; Ryerson, T. B.; Wild, R. J.; Perring, A. E.; Brown, S. S.; Aikin, K. C.; Holloway, M.; Roberts, O.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions from agriculture are important to air quality and climate, yet their representation in inventories is incomplete. Increased fertilizer use has lead to increased emissions of nitrogen compounds, which can adversely affect ecosystems and contribute to the formation of fine particulates. Furthermore, extraction and processing of oil and natural gas continues to expand throughout northeastern Colorado; emissions from these operations require ongoing measurement and characterization. This presentation summarizes initial data and analysis from a summer 2014 campaign to study emissions of nitrogen compounds, methane, and other species in northeastern Colorado using a new mobile laboratory. A van was instrumented to measure NH3, N2O, NOx, NOy, CH4, CO, CO2, O3, and bioaerosols with high time resolution. By sampling in close proximity to a variety of emissions sources, the mobile laboratory facilitated accurate source identification and quantification of emissions ratios. Measurements were obtained near agricultural sites, natural gas and oil operations, and other point sources. Additionally, extensive measurements were obtained downwind from urban areas and along roadways. The relationship between ammonia and other trace gases is used to characterize sources and constrain emissions inventories.

  13. Precision agriculture in large-scale mechanized farming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture involves a great deal of technologies and requires additional investments of money and time, but it can be practiced at different levels depending on the specific field and crop conditions and the resources and technology services available to the farmer. If practiced properly,...

  14. Farm and Ranch Mechanical Repair and VEH Farm and Ranch Maintenance. Curriculum Guide for Agribusiness 121. Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for teachers to use in developing a 1- or 2-year course in agricultural mechanics for at-risk and special education students. It is one of 28 semester courses in agricultural science and technology for Texas high schools. The program prepares low-achieving students with employability skills that are…

  15. Agricultural (nonbiomedical) animal research outside the laboratory: a review of guidelines for institutional animal care and use committees.

    PubMed

    Granstrom, David E

    2003-01-01

    Challenges and published guidelines associated with appropriate care and use of farm animals in agricultural research conducted outside the laboratory are briefly reviewed. The Animal Welfare Act (Title 9 of the 2000 Code of Federal Regulations), which regulates the care and use of agricultural animals in biomedical research, does not include livestock and poultry used in agricultural research. Farm animal research funded (and thereby regulated) by the US Public Health Service is further discussed in the National Research Council's 1996 Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. However, neither of these guidelines adequately addresses the unique attributes of research and teaching designed to improve production agriculture. That information is contained in the Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals in Agricultural Research and Teaching (the Ag Guide), published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies in 1999. The Ag Guide provides excellent general recommendations for agricultural animal research. It serves as an invaluable resource for institutional animal care and use committees, which attempt to balance the welfare of farm animals and the needs of those working to improve animal agriculture.

  16. Evaluation of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) behaviour in agricultural soil through laboratory continuous studies.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-07-01

    The behaviour of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) in agricultural soil is investigated in the laboratory using continuous-flow soil column studies in order to simultaneously analyze the three main underlying phenomena (adsorption/desorption, degradation and transport). The continuous-flow soil column experiments generated the breakthrough curves for each LAS homologue, C10, C11, C12 and C13, and by adding them up, for total LAS, from which the relevant retention, degradation and transport parameters could be estimated, after proposing adequate models. Several transport equations were considered, including the degradation of the sorbate in solution and its retention by soil, under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions between the sorbent and the sorbate. In general, the results obtained for the estimates of those parameters that were common to the various models studied (such as the isotherm slope, first order degradation rate coefficient and the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient) were rather consistent, meaning that mass transfer limitations are not playing a major role in the experiments. These three parameters increase with the length of the LAS homologue chain. The study will provide the underlying conceptual framework and fundamental parameters to understand, simulate and predict the environmental behaviour of LAS compounds in agricultural soils. PMID:25765258

  17. Evaluation of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) behaviour in agricultural soil through laboratory continuous studies.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-07-01

    The behaviour of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) in agricultural soil is investigated in the laboratory using continuous-flow soil column studies in order to simultaneously analyze the three main underlying phenomena (adsorption/desorption, degradation and transport). The continuous-flow soil column experiments generated the breakthrough curves for each LAS homologue, C10, C11, C12 and C13, and by adding them up, for total LAS, from which the relevant retention, degradation and transport parameters could be estimated, after proposing adequate models. Several transport equations were considered, including the degradation of the sorbate in solution and its retention by soil, under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions between the sorbent and the sorbate. In general, the results obtained for the estimates of those parameters that were common to the various models studied (such as the isotherm slope, first order degradation rate coefficient and the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient) were rather consistent, meaning that mass transfer limitations are not playing a major role in the experiments. These three parameters increase with the length of the LAS homologue chain. The study will provide the underlying conceptual framework and fundamental parameters to understand, simulate and predict the environmental behaviour of LAS compounds in agricultural soils.

  18. An Analysis of the Skills Required of Agricultural Mechanics at Retail Farm Machinery Dealerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Clinton O.; Mulcahy, John V.

    In order to determine needs for teaching various competencies in agricultural mechanics courses, a study was conducted to determine the types and frequencies of service/repair operations performed by an Arizona agricultural machinery company from January 1 to June 30, 1981. Data were obtained from 1,232 service orders at the Arizona Machinery…

  19. Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, D; Hiskakis, M; Babou, E

    2013-06-01

    Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project "LabelAgriWaste" revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process ("Quality I") and another one for plastic profile production process ("Quality II"). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

  20. Artificial sweeteners and metabolic dysregulation: Lessons learned from agriculture and the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Jane; Swithers, Susan E

    2016-06-01

    Escalating rates of obesity and public health messages to reduce excessive sugar intake have fuelled the consumption of artificial sweeteners in a wide range of products from breakfast cereals to snack foods and beverages. Artificial sweeteners impart a sweet taste without the associated energy and have been widely recommended by medical professionals since they are considered safe. However, associations observed in long-term prospective studies raise the concern that regular consumption of artificial sweeteners might actually contribute to development of metabolic derangements that lead to obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Obtaining mechanistic data on artificial sweetener use in humans in relation to metabolic dysfunction is difficult due to the long time frames over which dietary factors might exert their effects on health and the large number of confounding variables that need to be considered. Thus, mechanistic data from animal models can be highly useful because they permit greater experimental control. Results from animal studies in both the agricultural sector and the laboratory indicate that artificial sweeteners may not only promote food intake and weight gain but can also induce metabolic alterations in a wide range of animal species. As a result, simple substitution of artificial sweeteners for sugars in humans may not produce the intended consequences. Instead consumption of artificial sweeteners might contribute to increases in risks for obesity or its attendant negative health outcomes. As a result, it is critical that the impacts of artificial sweeteners on health and disease continue to be more thoroughly evaluated in humans. PMID:27387506

  1. Artificial sweeteners and metabolic dysregulation: Lessons learned from agriculture and the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Jane; Swithers, Susan E

    2016-06-01

    Escalating rates of obesity and public health messages to reduce excessive sugar intake have fuelled the consumption of artificial sweeteners in a wide range of products from breakfast cereals to snack foods and beverages. Artificial sweeteners impart a sweet taste without the associated energy and have been widely recommended by medical professionals since they are considered safe. However, associations observed in long-term prospective studies raise the concern that regular consumption of artificial sweeteners might actually contribute to development of metabolic derangements that lead to obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Obtaining mechanistic data on artificial sweetener use in humans in relation to metabolic dysfunction is difficult due to the long time frames over which dietary factors might exert their effects on health and the large number of confounding variables that need to be considered. Thus, mechanistic data from animal models can be highly useful because they permit greater experimental control. Results from animal studies in both the agricultural sector and the laboratory indicate that artificial sweeteners may not only promote food intake and weight gain but can also induce metabolic alterations in a wide range of animal species. As a result, simple substitution of artificial sweeteners for sugars in humans may not produce the intended consequences. Instead consumption of artificial sweeteners might contribute to increases in risks for obesity or its attendant negative health outcomes. As a result, it is critical that the impacts of artificial sweeteners on health and disease continue to be more thoroughly evaluated in humans.

  2. Mapping Large-Scale Mechanized Agriculture Across the Brazilian Cerrado Between 2001-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, S. A.; Mustard, J. F.; VanWey, L.

    2014-12-01

    Brazil is a global commodities powerhouse. Over the last decade, dynamic changes in agricultural development and land transformations occurred within Brazil's tropical savanna region, the cerrado. This interdisciplinary study uses remote sensing tools to map land cover across more than 3.6 million km2 of cerrado and statistical methods to characterize drivers of this land-cover change. We use the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index 16-day data product and a decision-tree algorithm, proven highly accurate in Mato Grosso (Spera et al. 2014) and here modified for the broader cerrado region, to characterize crop type, cropping frequency, expansion, and abandonment of large-scale mechanized agriculture during the 2001-2013 period. The algorithm exploits phenological differences between forest, pasture and cerrado, and mechanized agriculture. It is parameterized to distinguish between crop rotations in Mato Grosso, Goias, and the new agricultural frontier spanning Maranhao, Tocantins, Piaui, and Bahia (MaToPiBa). Training and validation data were collected using Google's Earth Engine. We map single-cropped soy, corn, and cotton; double-cropped soy/corn and soy/cotton rotations; and irrigated agriculture across these six Brazilian cerrado states. We find that while double cropping dominates in Mato Grosso and Goias, single cropping is still the dominant form of mechanized agriculture in the burgeoning MaToPiBa region. In western Bahia alone, preliminary results show agriculture has expanded by almost 350,000 ha and double cropping has increased by almost 40,000 ha. With MaToPiBa touted as Brazil's latest and last agricultural frontier, we predict that the region will experience a transition similar to that of Mato Grosso during the 2000s—an expansion and intensification of agriculture—which may beget unprecedented ramifications on regional climate processes that can then affect ecosystem health and the economic feasibility of cultivating rain-fed export crops.

  3. Integrating Cost-effective Rollover Protective Structure Installation in High School Agricultural Mechanics: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Joan; Vincent, Stacy; Watson, Jennifer; Westneat, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This study with three Appalachian county agricultural education programs examined the feasibility, effectiveness, and impact of integrating a cost-effective rollover protective structure (CROPS) project into high school agricultural mechanics classes. The project aimed to (1) reduce the exposure to tractor overturn hazards in three rural counties through the installation of CROPS on seven tractors within the Cumberland Plateau in the east region; (2) increase awareness in the targeted rural communities of cost-effective ROPS designs developed by the National Institution for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to encourage ROPS installations that decrease the costs of a retrofit; (3) test the feasibility of integration of CROPS construction and installations procedures into the required agricultural mechanics classes in these agricultural education programs; and (4) explore barriers to the implementation of this project in high school agricultural education programs. Eighty-two rural students and three agricultural educators participated in assembly and installation instruction. Data included hazard exposure demographic data, knowledge and awareness of CROPS plans, and pre-post knowledge of construction and assessment of final CROPS installation. Findings demonstrated the feasibility and utility of a CROPS education program in a professionally supervised secondary educational setting. The project promoted farm safety and awareness of availability and interest in the NIOSH Cost-effective ROPS plans. Seven CROPS were constructed and installed. New curriculum and knowledge measures also resulted from the work. Lessons learned and recommendations for a phase 2 implementation and further research are included. PMID:25906273

  4. Integrating Cost-effective Rollover Protective Structure Installation in High School Agricultural Mechanics: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Joan; Vincent, Stacy; Watson, Jennifer; Westneat, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This study with three Appalachian county agricultural education programs examined the feasibility, effectiveness, and impact of integrating a cost-effective rollover protective structure (CROPS) project into high school agricultural mechanics classes. The project aimed to (1) reduce the exposure to tractor overturn hazards in three rural counties through the installation of CROPS on seven tractors within the Cumberland Plateau in the east region; (2) increase awareness in the targeted rural communities of cost-effective ROPS designs developed by the National Institution for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to encourage ROPS installations that decrease the costs of a retrofit; (3) test the feasibility of integration of CROPS construction and installations procedures into the required agricultural mechanics classes in these agricultural education programs; and (4) explore barriers to the implementation of this project in high school agricultural education programs. Eighty-two rural students and three agricultural educators participated in assembly and installation instruction. Data included hazard exposure demographic data, knowledge and awareness of CROPS plans, and pre-post knowledge of construction and assessment of final CROPS installation. Findings demonstrated the feasibility and utility of a CROPS education program in a professionally supervised secondary educational setting. The project promoted farm safety and awareness of availability and interest in the NIOSH Cost-effective ROPS plans. Seven CROPS were constructed and installed. New curriculum and knowledge measures also resulted from the work. Lessons learned and recommendations for a phase 2 implementation and further research are included.

  5. Resistance to antiplatelet drugs: molecular mechanisms and laboratory detection.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, M

    2007-07-01

    The definition 'resistance to antiplatelet drugs' should be limited to situations in which failure of the drug to hit its pharmacological target has been documented by specific laboratory tests. Aspirin resistance, as determined by specific tests (e.g. serum thromboxane B(2)), appears to be rare (1-2%) and, in most instances, is caused by poor compliance. In contrast to aspirin, studies that used specific tests to measure the pharmacological effect of thienopyridines [e.g. vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP)] showed a wide variability of responses to these drugs, with significant proportions of subjects (15-30%) who are very poor responders. Inter-individual differences in the extent of metabolism of thienopyridines to their active metabolites is the most plausible mechanism for the observed inter-individual variability in platelet inhibition. The demonstration that some patients may be 'resistant' or 'poor responders' to the pharmacological effect of antiplatelet drugs, has prompted the need of laboratory monitoring of antiplatelet therapy. However, many published studies have been performed using unspecific tests of platelet function, which identify patients on antiplatelet treatment with high residual platelet reactivity, which is not necessarily because of resistance to antiplatelet drugs. Despite this drawback, identification of patients with high residual platelet reactivity may be useful to predict their risk of atherothrombotic events. However, many studies still need to be carried out to identify the ideal laboratory test and to answer basic questions on its clinical utility and cost-effectiveness, before monitoring antiplatelet therapy can be recommended in the clinical practise. Until then, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy should be considered for investigational purposes only. PMID:17635731

  6. A universal method for measuring functional activity of complement in humans, laboratory, domestic, and agricultural animals, amphibians, and birds.

    PubMed

    Kuleshina, O N; Kozlov, L V; Cheremnykh, E G

    2014-06-01

    A new universal method for measuring activity of the serum complement system in humans, laboratory, domestic, agricultural animals, birds and amphibians is based on automated evaluation of the mortality of ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis under the effect of the complement system. In contrast to the hemolytic method, measured activity of the complement shows no erroneously high results caused by reactive lysis in febrile patients. The method can be used for studies of the complement system in humans and animals without species-specific adaptation.

  7. Current and Projected Modes of Delivery of Veterinary Medical Services to Animal Agriculture: Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaton, Vaughn A.

    1980-01-01

    The veterinary diagnostic laboratory's prime role has been diagnosis and/or laboratory findings to assist a diagnosis. Interpretation and evaluation and more involvement with decision-making in monitoring groups of animals and their health status are seen as future roles for diagnostic laboratories. (MLW)

  8. Agricultural Mechanics Unit for Plant Science Core Curriculum. Volume 15, Number 4. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhardt, Richard E.; Hunter, Bill

    This instructor's guide is intended for use in teaching the agricultural mechanics unit of a plant science core curriculum. Covered in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: arc welding (following safety procedures, controlling distortion, selecting and caring for electrodes, identifying the material to be welded, and welding…

  9. Statistics of Agricultural and Mechanical Colleges for 1919 and 1920. Bulletin, 1922, No. 27

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Walton C

    1922-01-01

    Included in this bulletin are the statistical reports on student enrollments, the increase in teaching staff, military educational enrollments, and income of land grant colleges. The reports of the agricultural and mechanical colleges for the years 1918-19 and 1919-20 are indicative of marked material progress. (Contains 13 tables.) [Best copy…

  10. Mechanical Advantage. 7th and 8th Grade Agriculture Science Curriculum. Teacher Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This curriculum guide, the fourth in a set of six, contains teacher and student materials for a unit on mechanical engineering prepared as part of a seventh- and eighth-grade agricultural science curriculum that is integrated with science instruction. The guide contains the state goals and sample learning objectives for each goal for students in…

  11. Nebraska Vocational Agribusiness Curriculum for City Schools. Horticulture. Agricultural Mechanics. A Curriculum Guide. 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    Designed for use with high school juniors, this agribusiness curriculum for city schools contains thirty-two units of instruction in the areas of horticulture and agricultural mechanics. Among the units included in the curriculum are (1) Planting Media, (2) Fertilizer, (3) Plant Classification, (4) Turf Grass Management, (5) Landscape Design, (6)…

  12. Origin and Development of Industrial Education at Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jay T.

    This study covering the last 100 years in the development of industrial education at Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College was prompted by the need to determine the role of the college in the development of industrial education in the state of Mississippi. Sources of data included college catalogs, reports of the college administration and…

  13. Multifractal spectrum analysis of nonlinear dynamical mechanisms in China’s agricultural futures markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Peng; He, Ling-Yun

    2010-04-01

    Based on Partition Function and Multifractal Spectrum Analysis, we investigated the nonlinear dynamical mechanisms in China’s agricultural futures markets, namely, Dalian Commodity Exchange (DCE for short) and Zhengzhou Commodity Exchange (ZCE for short), where nearly all agricultural futures contracts are traded in the two markets. Firstly, we found nontrivial multifractal spectra, which are the empirical evidence of the existence of multifractal features, in 4 representative futures markets in China, that is, Hard Winter wheat (HW for short) and Strong Gluten wheat (SG for short) futures markets from ZCE and Soy Meal (SM for short) futures and Soy Bean No.1 (SB for short) futures markets from DCE. Secondly, by shuffling the original time series, we destroyed the underlying nonlinear temporal correlation; thus, we identified that long-range correlation mechanism constitutes major contributions in the formation in the multifractals of the markets. Thirdly, by tracking the evolution of left- and right-half spectra, we found that there exist critical points, between which there are different behaviors, in the left-half spectra for large price fluctuations; but for the right-hand spectra for small price fluctuations, the width of those increases slowly as the delay t increases in the long run. Finally, the dynamics of large fluctuations is significantly different from that of the small ones, which implies that there exist different underlying mechanisms in the formation of multifractality in the markets. Our main contributions focus on that we not only provided empirical evidence of the existence of multifractal features in China agricultural commodity futures markets; but also we pioneered in investigating the sources of the multifractality in China’s agricultural futures markets in current literature; furthermore, we investigated the nonlinear dynamical mechanisms based on spectrum analysis, which offers us insights into the underlying dynamical mechanisms in

  14. Laboratory Investigations into Micromechanical Mechanisms Controlling Earthquake Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Glaser, S. D.; Kiwan, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    Improving our understanding of factors controlling spontaneous shear rupture nucleation on a frictional fault would help better define the important physical processes contributing to earthquake rupture and faulting. Our current laboratory investigations quantify the local stress states on a laboratory fault, which control the transition of sliding from stable (quasi-static) to unstable (dynamic), commonly referred to as earthquake nucleation. A fault is experimentally modeled using two Poly(methyl methacrylate) samples in a direct shear configuration. During nucleation, we observed sudden, elastodynamic stress changes using an array of 16 acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Measurements of absolute displacement from these sensors allowed us to characterize general source mechanics using moment tensor inversion. This technique is widely used in seismology and we observe double-couple (DC) focal mechanisms; a source commonly used to characterize in situ earthquakes. During nucleation, we sometimes observe swarms of smaller, ';foreshock' earthquakes (Mw ~ -7), localized in time and space, prior to the incipient mainshock (Mw ~ -3.25). In general, the local perturbations in the stress field induced by the stress drop (Δσ) from a single foreshock was insufficient to cause the subsequent foreshock at the spatial distances recorded experimentally. This implied that the underlying process driving the foreshock sequence (and eventual mainshock) was aseismic slip over the nucleation zone recorded using non-contact sensors. Spatio-temporal distributions of the foreshocks and the near-fault aseismic motions were shown to be directly related to: i) the rate at which the average bulk stress accumulates across the fault (dτf /dt) and ii) the heterogeneity of normal stress caused by the irregular distribution of asperities, respectively. (A) Locations of the foreshocks (FS1-FS9) determined using p-wave travel times from multiple AE sensors. The locations were superimposed on

  15. Biochar: from laboratory mechanisms through the greenhouse to field trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, C. A.; Gao, X.; Dugan, B.; Silberg, J. J.; Zygourakis, K.; Alvarez, P. J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The biochar community is excellent at pointing to individual cases where biochar amendment has changed soil properties, with some studies showing significant improvements in crop yields, reduction in nutrient export, and remediation of pollutants. However, many studies exist which do not show improvements, and in some cases, studies clearly show detrimental outcomes. The next, crucial step in biochar science and engineering research will be to develop a process-based understanding of how biochar acts to improve soil properties. In particular, we need a better mechanistic understanding of how biochar sorbs and desorbs contaminants, how it interacts with soil water, and how it interacts with the soil microbial community. These mechanistic studies need to encompass processes that range from the nanometer to the kilometer scale. At the nanometer scale, we need a predictive model of how biochar will sorb and desorb hydrocarbons, nutrients, and toxic metals. At the micrometer scale we need models that explain biochar's effects on soil water, especially the plant-available fraction of soil water. The micrometer scale is also where mechanistic information is neeed about microbial processes. At the macroscale we need physical models to describe the landscape mobility of biochar, because biochar that washes away from fields can no longer provide crop benefits. To be most informative, biochar research should occur along a lab-greenhouse-field trial trajectory. Laboratory experiments should aim determine what mechanisms may act to control biochar-soil processes, and then greenhouse experiments can be used to test the significance of lab-derived mechanisms in short, highly replicated, controlled experiments. Once evidence of effect is determined from greenhouse experiments, field trials are merited. Field trials are the gold standard needed prior to full deployment, but results from field trials cannot be extrapolated to other field sites without the mechanistic backup provided

  16. Internal Gravity Waves: Generation and Breaking Mechanisms by Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    la Forgia, Giovanni; Adduce, Claudia; Falcini, Federico

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves (IGWs), occurring within estuaries and the coastal oceans, are manifest as large amplitude undulations of the pycnocline. IGWs propagating horizontally in a two layer stratified fluid are studied. The breaking of an IGW of depression shoaling upon a uniformly sloping boundary is investigated experimentally. Breaking dynamics beneath the shoaling waves causes both mixing and wave-induced near-bottom vortices suspending and redistributing the bed material. Laboratory experiments are conducted in a Perspex tank through the standard lock-release method, following the technique described in Sutherland et al. (2013). Each experiment is analysed and the instantaneous pycnocline position is measured, in order to obtain both geometric and kinematic features of the IGW: amplitude, wavelength and celerity. IGWs main features depend on the geometrical parameters that define the initial experimental setting: the density difference between the layers, the total depth, the layers depth ratio, the aspect ratio, and the displacement between the pycnoclines. Relations between IGWs geometric and kinematic features and the initial setting parameters are analysed. The approach of the IGWs toward a uniform slope is investigated in the present experiments. Depending on wave and slope characteristics, different breaking and mixing processes are observed. Sediments are sprinkled on the slope to visualize boundary layer separation in order to analyze the suspension e redistribution mechanisms due to the wave breaking.

  17. Parallel solid mechanics codes at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, M.

    1994-08-01

    Computational physicists at Sandia National Laboratories have moved their production codes to distributed memory parallel computers. The codes include the multi-material CTH Eulerian code, structural mechanics code. This presentation discusses our experiences moving the codes to parallel computers and experiences running the codes. Moving large production codes onto parallel computers require developing parallel algorithms, parallel data bases and parallel support tools. We rewrote the Eulerian CTH code for parallel computers. We were able to move both ALEGRA and PRONTO to parallel computers with only a modest number of modifications. We restructured the restart and graphics data bases to make them parallel and minimize the I/O to the parallel computer. We developed mesh decomposition tools to divide a rectangular or arbitrary connectivity mesh into sub-meshes. The sub-meshes map to processors and minimize the communication between processors. We developed new visualization tools to process the very large, parallel data bases. This presentation also discusses our experiences running these codes on Sandia`s 1840 compute node Intel Paragon, 1024 processor nCUBE and networked workstations. The parallel version of CTH uses the Paragon and nCUBE for production calculations. The ALEGRA and PRONTO codes are moving off networked workstations onto the Paragon and nCUBE massively parallel computers.

  18. Event triggered data acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, R.D.

    1993-03-01

    Increasing complexity of experiments coupled with limitations of the previously used computers required improvements in both hardware and software in the Rock Mechanics Laboratories. Increasing numbers of input channels and the need for better graphics could no longer be supplied by DATAVG, an existing software package for data acquisition and display written by D. J. Holcomb in 1983. After researching the market and trying several alternatives, no commercial program was found which met our needs. The previous version of DATAVG had the basic features needed but was tied to obsolete hardware. Memory limitations on the previously used PDP-11 made it impractical to upgrade the software further. With the advances in IBM compatible computers it is now desirable to use them as data recording platforms. With this information in mind, it was decided to write a new version of DATAVG which would take advantage of newer hardware. The new version had to support multiple graphic display windows and increased channel counts. It also had to be easier to use.

  19. Evaluation of AIS Data for Agronomic and Rangeland Vegetation: Preliminary Results for August 1984 Flight over Nebraska Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, B. L.; Starks, P. J.; Hays, C.; Gardner, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1978 scientists from the Center for Agricultural Meteorology and Climatology at the University of Nebraska have been conducting research at the Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory on the effects of water stress on crop growth, development and yield using remote sensing techniques. We have been working to develop techniques, both remote and ground-based, to monitor water stress, phenological development, leaf area, phytomass production and grain yields of corn, soybeans and sorghum. Because of the sandy soils and relatively low rainfall at the site it is an excellent location to study water stress without the necessity of installing expensive rainout shelters. The primary objectives of research with the airborne imaging spectrometer (AIS) data collected during an August 1984 flight over the Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory are to evaluate the potential of using AIS to: (1) discriminate crop type; (2) to detect subtle architectural differences that exist among different cultivars or hybrids of agronomic crops; (3) to detect and quantify, if possible, the level of water stress imposed on the crops; and (4) to evaluate leaf area and biomass differences for different crops.

  20. The Boulby Geoscience Project Underground Research Laboratory: Initial Results of a Rock Mechanics Laboratory Testing Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, M. J.; Petley, D. N.; Rosser, N.; Lim, M.; Sapsford, M.; Barlow, J.; Norman, E.; Williams, A.; Pybus, D.

    2009-12-01

    The Boulby Mine, which is situated on the northeast coast of England, is a major source of potash, primarily for use as a fertiliser, with a secondary product of rock salt (halite), used in highway deicing. The deposits are part of the Zechstein formation and are found at depths of between c.1100 and 1135 m below sea level. The evaporite sequence also contains a range of further lithologies, including anhydrite, dolomite and a mixed evaporate deposit. From a scientific perspective the dry, uncontaminated nature of the deposits, the range of lithologies present and the high stress conditions at the mine provide a unique opportunity to observe rock deformation in situ in varying geological and stress environments. To this end the Boulby Geoscience Project was established to examine the feasibility of developing an underground research laboratory at the mine. Information regarding the mechanical properties of the strata at the Boulby Mine is required to develop our understanding of the strength and deformation behaviour of the rock over differing timescales in response to variations in the magnitude and duration of applied stresses. As such data are currently limited, we have developed a laboratory testing programme that examines the behaviour of the deposits during the application of differential compressive stresses. We present the initial results of this testing programme here. Experiments have been carried out using a high pressure Virtual Infinite Strain (VIS) triaxial apparatus (250 kN maximum axial load; 64 MPa maximum cell pressure) manufactured by GDS Instruments. Conventional compression tests under uniaxial and triaxial conditions have been undertaken to determine the effects of axial stress application rate, axial strain rate and confining pressure on behaviour and failure mechanisms. The experimental programme also includes advanced testing into time-dependent creep behaviour under constant deviatoric stress; the effects of variations in temperature and

  1. Mechanical and Acoustic Signature of Slow Earthquakes on Laboratory Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Marco Maria; Marone, Chris; Tinti, Elisa; Scognamiglio, Laura; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Collettini, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    Recent seismic and geodetic observations show that fault slip occurs via a spectrum of behaviors that range from seismic (fast dynamic) to aseismic (creep). Indeed faults can slip via a variety of quasi-dynamic processes such as Slow-Slip, Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFE), and Tremor. These transient modes of slip represent slow, but self-propagating acceleration of slip along fault zones. These phenomena have been observed worldwide in a variety of active tectonic environments, however the physics of quasi-dynamic rupture and the underlying fault zone processes are still poorly understood. Rate- and State- frictional constitutive equations predict that fast dynamic slip will occur when the stiffness of the loading system (k) is less than a critical stiffness (kc) characterizing the fault gouge. In order to investigate quasi-dynamic transients, we performed laboratory experiments on simulated fault gouge (silica powders) in the double direct shear configuration with a compliant central block allowing boundary conditions where k≈kc. In addition, PZTs were used to measure acoustical properties of the gouge layers during shear. We document an evolution of the fault mechanical properties as the σn is increased. For σn < 10 MPa we observe a steady state frictional type of shear. When σn ≥ 15 MPa we observe emergent slow-slip events from steady state shear with accumulated shear displacement of about 10 mm. The typical values of stress drop (Δτ) vary between 0.2 and 0.8 MPa, and have typical duration from 0.5 up to 3 seconds giving the characteristics of slow stick-slip. As σn is varied we observe different characteristics of slow slip. For σn = 15MPa a repetitive double period oscillation is observed with slow slip growing until a maximum stress drop and then self attenuating. When σn is increased to 20 and 25 MPa slow slip are characterized by larger Δτ with constant τmax and τmin, however still showing a co-seismic duration of ~2 seconds. Our results

  2. Effect of Previous Agricultural Mechanics Training on Achievement in a Basic Metals and Welding Course at Iowa State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Benjamin Arthur

    The purposes of this study were to determine the effects of previous training in agricultural mechanics upon achievement of students enrolled in a college level agricultural mechanics course and to determine factors that affect performance in this course of basic metals and welding. Students enrolled in the course during the fall and winter…

  3. Laboratory tests to assess optimal agricultural residue traits for an abrasive weed control system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the biggest challenges to organic agricultural production and herbicide resistant crops in industrialized countries today is the non-chemical control of weed plants. Studies of new tools and methods for weed control have been motivated by an increased consumer demand for organic produce and c...

  4. Spectral properties of agricultural crops and soils measured from space, aerial, field, and laboratory sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Vanderbilt, V. C.; Robinson, B. F.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1981-01-01

    Investigations of the multispectral reflectance characteristics of crops and soils as measured from laboratory, field, aerial, and satellite sensor systems are reviewed. The relationships of important biological and physical characteristics to the spectral properties of crops and soils are addressed.

  5. Agricultural Intensification as a Mechanism of Adaptation to Climate Change Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, P.; Calvin, K. V.; le Page, Y.; Patel, P.; West, T. O.; Wise, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The research, policy, and NGO communities have devoted significant attention to the potential for agricultural intensification, or closure of "yield gaps," to alleviate future global hunger, poverty, climate change impacts, and other threats. However, because the research to this point has focused on biophysically attainable yields—assuming optimal choices under ideal conditions—the presently available work has not yet addressed the likely responses of the agricultural sector to real-world conditions in the future. This study investigates endogenous agricultural intensification in response to global climate change impacts—that is, intensification independent of policies or other exogenous interventions to promote yield gap closure. The framework for the analysis is a set of scenarios to 2100 in the GCAM global integrated assessment model, enhanced to include endogenous irrigation, fertilizer application, and yields, in each of 283 land use regions, with maximum yields based on the 95th percentile of attainable yields in a recent global assessment. We assess three levels of agricultural climate impacts, using recent global gridded crop model datasets: none, low (LPJmL), and high (Pegasus). Applying formulations for decomposition of climate change impacts response developed in prior AgMIP work, we find that at the global level, availability of high-yielding technologies mitigates price shocks and shifts the agricultural sector's climate response modestly towards intensification, away from cropland expansion and reduced production. At the regional level, the behavior is more complex; nevertheless, availability of high-yielding production technologies enhances the inter-regional shifts in agricultural production that are induced by climate change, complemented by commensurate changes in trade patterns. The results highlight the importance of policies to facilitate yield gap closure and inter-regional trade as mechanisms for adapting to climate change

  6. Exploring Agricultural Livelihood Transitions with an Agent-Based Virtual Laboratory: Global Forces to Local Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Magliocca, Nicholas R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Ellis, Erle C.

    2013-01-01

    Rural populations are undergoing rapid changes in both their livelihoods and land uses, with associated impacts on ecosystems, global biogeochemistry, and climate change. A primary challenge is, thus, to explain these shifts in terms of the actors and processes operating within a variety of land systems in order to understand how land users might respond locally to future changes in broader-scale environmental and economic conditions. Using ‘induced intensification’ theory as a benchmark, we develop a generalized agent-based model to investigate mechanistic explanations of relationships between agricultural intensity and population density, environmental suitability, and market influence. Land-use and livelihood decisions modeled from basic micro-economic theories generated spatial and temporal patterns of agricultural intensification consistent with predictions of induced intensification theory. Further, agent actions in response to conditions beyond those described by induced intensification theory were explored, revealing that interactions among environmental constraints, population pressure, and market influence may produce transitions to multiple livelihood regimes of varying market integration. The result is new hypotheses that could modify and enrich understanding of the classic relationship between agricultural intensity and population density. The strength of this agent-based model and the experimental results is the generalized form of the decision-making processes underlying land-use and livelihood transitions, creating the prospect of a virtual laboratory for systematically generating hypotheses of how agent decisions and interactions relate to observed land-use and livelihood patterns across diverse land systems. PMID:24039892

  7. Exploring agricultural livelihood transitions with an agent-based virtual laboratory: global forces to local decision-making.

    PubMed

    Magliocca, Nicholas R; Brown, Daniel G; Ellis, Erle C

    2013-01-01

    Rural populations are undergoing rapid changes in both their livelihoods and land uses, with associated impacts on ecosystems, global biogeochemistry, and climate change. A primary challenge is, thus, to explain these shifts in terms of the actors and processes operating within a variety of land systems in order to understand how land users might respond locally to future changes in broader-scale environmental and economic conditions. Using 'induced intensification' theory as a benchmark, we develop a generalized agent-based model to investigate mechanistic explanations of relationships between agricultural intensity and population density, environmental suitability, and market influence. Land-use and livelihood decisions modeled from basic micro-economic theories generated spatial and temporal patterns of agricultural intensification consistent with predictions of induced intensification theory. Further, agent actions in response to conditions beyond those described by induced intensification theory were explored, revealing that interactions among environmental constraints, population pressure, and market influence may produce transitions to multiple livelihood regimes of varying market integration. The result is new hypotheses that could modify and enrich understanding of the classic relationship between agricultural intensity and population density. The strength of this agent-based model and the experimental results is the generalized form of the decision-making processes underlying land-use and livelihood transitions, creating the prospect of a virtual laboratory for systematically generating hypotheses of how agent decisions and interactions relate to observed land-use and livelihood patterns across diverse land systems.

  8. A laboratory study of agricultural crop residue combustion in China: Emission factors and emission inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hefeng; Ye, Xingnan; Cheng, Tiantao; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Renyi

    The burning of agricultural crop residue represents a major source of trace gases (CO, CO 2, NO, NO 2, and NO x) and particulate matter on a regional and global scale. This study investigates the gaseous and particulate emissions from the burning of rice, wheat and corn straws, which are three major agricultural crop residues in China, using a self-built burning stove and an aerosol chamber. Emission factors of CO 2, CO, NO, NO 2 and NO x were measured to be 791.3, 64.2, 1.02, 0.79 and 1.81 g kg -1 for rice straw, 1557.9, 141.2, 0.79, 0.32 and 1.12 g kg -1 for wheat straw, and 1261.5, 114.7, 0.85, 0.43 and 1.28 g kg -1 for corn straw, respectively. The corresponding emission factors of particle number are 1.8 × 10 13, 1.0 × 10 13, and 1.7 × 10 13 particles kg -1, respectively. The total emissions of CO, CO 2, and NO x from rice, wheat and corn straw burnings in China for the year 2004 were estimated to be 22.59, 252.92, and 0.28 Tg, respectively. The percentages of CO, CO 2, and NO x to the total emissions were 13.9%, 15.3%, and 31.4% for rice straw, 32.9%, 32.5%, and 20.9% for wheat straw, and 53.2%, 52.2%, and 47.6% for corn straw, respectively. In addition, the emission allocations of agricultural crop residue burning were also plotted in different regions of China using a simple geographic information system (GIS).

  9. FORT KEOGH LIVESTOCK & RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-AGRICULTRAL RESEARCH SERVICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Article describes Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory to an audience of scientific researchers (i.e. ecologists) interested in the interactions among organisms and their environment. Article outlines the facilities, environment, history, and ongoing types of research. Emphasis is on...

  10. The fate and transport of the Cry1Ab protein in an agricultural field and laboratory aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Strain, Katherine E; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Genetically engineered crops expressing insecticidal crystalline proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), were commercialized almost two decades ago as a means to manage agricultural pests. The Bt proteins are highly specific and only lethal upon ingestion, limiting the scope of toxicity to target insects. However, concern of exposure to non-target organisms and negative public perceptions regarding Bt crops has caused controversy surrounding their use. The objective of this research was to monitor the fate and transport of a Bt protein, Cry1Ab, in a large-scale agricultural field containing maize expressing the Cry1Ab protein and a non-Bt near isoline, and in aquatic microcosms. The highest environmental concentrations of the Cry1Ab protein were found in runoff water and sediment, up to 130ngL(-1) and 143ngg(-1) dry weight, respectively, with the Cry1Ab protein detected in both Bt and non-Bt maize fields. As surface runoff and residual crop debris can transport Bt proteins to waterways adjacent to agricultural fields, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the potential fate of the Cry1Ab protein under different conditions. The results showed that sediment type and temperature can influence the degradation of the Cry1Ab protein in an aquatic system and that the Cry1Ab protein can persist for up to two months. Although Cry1Ab protein concentrations measured in the field soil indicate little exposure to terrestrial organisms, the consistent input of Bt-contaminated runoff and crop debris into agricultural waterways is relevant to understanding potential consequences to aquatic species. PMID:25828252

  11. Azole fungicides - understanding resistance mechanisms in agricultural fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Price, Claire L; Parker, Josie E; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2015-08-01

    Plant fungal pathogens can have devastating effects on a wide range of crops, including cereals and fruit (such as wheat and grapes), causing losses in crop yield, which are costly to the agricultural economy and threaten food security. Azole antifungals are the treatment of choice; however, resistance has arisen against these compounds, which could lead to devastating consequences. Therefore, it is important to understand how these fungicides are used and how the resistance arises in order to tackle the problem fully. Here, we give an overview of the problem and discuss the mechanisms that mediate azole resistance in agriculture (point mutations in the CYP51 amino acid sequence, overexpression of the CYP51 enzyme and overexpression of genes encoding efflux pump proteins). © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Event triggered data acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory upgrades and revisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes updates and revisions to the data acquisition computer program DATAVG which has served as the basic data collection system for the Sandia National Laboratories Geomechanics Department, Rock Mechanics Laboratory since late 1992. DATAVG was first described in Event Triggered Data Acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory, [Hardy, 1993]. DATAVG has been modified to incorporate numerous user-requested enhancements and a few bug fixes. In this paper these changes to DATAVG are described.

  13. Co-pyrolysis of swine manure with agricultural plastic waste: laboratory-scale study.

    PubMed

    Ro, Kyoung S; Hunt, Patrick G; Jackson, Michael A; Compton, David L; Yates, Scott R; Cantrell, Keri; Chang, SeChin

    2014-08-01

    Manure-derived biochar is the solid product resulting from pyrolysis of animal manures. It has considerable potential both to improve soil quality with high levels of nutrients and to reduce contaminants in water and soil. However, the combustible gas produced from manure pyrolysis generally does not provide enough energy to sustain the pyrolysis process. Supplementing this process may be achieved with spent agricultural plastic films; these feedstocks have large amounts of available energy. Plastic films are often used in soil fumigation. They are usually disposed in landfills, which is wasteful, expensive, and environmentally unsustainable. The objective of this work was to investigate both the energetics of co-pyrolyzing swine solids with spent plastic mulch films (SPM) and the characteristics of its gas, liquid, and solid byproducts. The heating value of the product gas from co-pyrolysis was found to be much higher than that of natural gas; furthermore, the gas had no detectable toxic fumigants. Energetically, sustaining pyrolysis of the swine solids through the energy of the product gas could be achieved by co-pyrolyzing dewatered swine solids (25%m/m) with just 10% SPM. If more than 10% SPM is used, the co-pyrolysis would generate surplus energy which could be used for power generation. Biochars produced from co-pyrolyzing SPM and swine solid were similar to swine solid alone based on the surface area and the (1)H NMR spectra. The results of this study demonstrated the potential of using pyrolysis technology to manage two prominent agricultural waste streams (SPM and swine solids) while producing value-added biochar and a power source that could be used for local farm operations.

  14. Transforming Agricultural Mechanics Curriculum through Expert Opinion to Model Technologies in Food, Environmental, and Natural Resource Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinn, Glen C.

    A study was conducted to develop a consensus document that would provide an external perspective of the curriculum in agricultural education that includes agricultural mechanics as a course of study. Data were collected in four phases: solicitation of expert opinion from 53 experts in the field (34 respondents); rating of the opinions; development…

  15. Draft standards and guidelines for the land application of mechanical pulp mill sludge to agricultural land

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Mechanical pulp mill sludge consists primarily of water, wood fiber, biomass, and residual chemicals. Research has shown that application of sludge to land improves the nutrient status and physical properties of soil, resulting in enhanced plant growth. This report presents guidelines for operations involving the application of mechanical pulp mill sludge on agricultural land in Alberta. It lists the regulatory requirements for sludge generators, restrictions on land application, and record-keeping and reporting requirements; provides general information on sludge properties and parameters of interest, suitability of receiving soils and areas, and sludge application rates and frequencies. Research studies conducted in Alberta on the benefits of land application of mechanical pulp mill sludge are also summarized.

  16. Laboratory Testing of Foundry Sands as Bulking Agents for Porous Media Filters Used to Treat Agricultural Drainage Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Foundry sands are industrial byproducts that may have potential application as bulking agents that when mixed with small amounts of more chemically reactive materials (i.e. sulfur modified iron, fly ash, etc.) can be used to produce porous media filters capable of removing contaminants from agricultural drainage waters. Foundry sand bulking agents are attractive primarily as a low cost means to maintain the hydraulic efficiency of a filter. Secondarily, the foundry sands themselves may have some capacity for removal of agricultural nutrients and pesticides from water. Consequently, a laboratory study was initiated to quantify hydraulic efficiency and agricultural contaminant removal abilities of six foundry sands. Of the six foundry sands tested, all were obtained in central Ohio, three from iron casting foundries, two from steel casting foundries, and one from an aluminum casting foundry. Hydraulic efficiencies of the foundry sands were assessed by measuring hydraulic conductivity with twice replicated falling-head permeability tests. Batch tests were employed to evaluate foundry sand potential to treat water containing nitrate and phosphate nutrients, along with the pesticide, atrazine. Five of the six foundry sand samples had measured hydraulic conductivity values from 7.6 x 10-3 cm/s to 3.8 x 10-2 cm/s, which is in the range of hydraulic conductivity values found for clean sand. The one foundry sand that was an exception had much lower measured hydraulic conductivity values of 2.75 x 10-5 cm/s and 5.76 x 10-5 cm/s. For the batch tests conducted, none of the nitrate was removed by any of the six foundry sands; however, conversely, almost all of the phosphate was removed by each foundry sand. Batch test atrazine removal results were much more varied. Compared with baseline batch tests, one foundry sand removed two thirds of the atrazine, one foundry sand removed about one half of the atrazine, three foundry sands removed about a third of the atrazine, and one

  17. Laboratory Feasibility Evaluation of a New Modified Iron Product for Use as a Filter Material to Treat Agricultural Drainage Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    The removal of excess soil water with a subsurface drainage pipe system is a common agricultural practice employed to improve crop yields, especially in the Midwest U.S. However, fertilizer nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) and pesticides applied on farm fields will frequently leach downwards through the soil profile to be intercepted by the buried drainage pipes and then discharged with drainage water into neighboring streams and lakes, oftentimes producing adverse environmental impacts on local, regional, and national scales. On-site drainage water filter treatment systems can potentially be employed to prevent the release of agricultural nutrients/pesticides into adjacent waterways. A recently developed modified iron product may have promise as a filter material used within this type of drainage water treatment system. Therefore, a laboratory study was initiated to directly evaluate the feasibility of employing this new modified iron product as a filter material to treat drainage waters. Laboratory research included saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests, contaminant (nutrient/pesticide) removal batch tests, and saturated solute transport column experiments. The saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests indicate that the unaltered modified iron product by itself has a high enough hydraulic conductivity (> 1.0 x 10-3 cm/s) to normally allow sufficient water flow rates that are needed to make this material hydraulically practical for use in drainage water filter treatment systems. Modified iron hydraulic conductivity can be improved substantially (> 1 x 10-2 cm/s) by using only the portion of this material that is retained on a 100 mesh sieve (particle size > 0.15 mm). Batch test results carried out with spiked drainage water and either unaltered or 100 mesh sieved modified iron showed nitrate reductions of greater than 30% and 100% removal of the pesticide, atrazine. Saturated solute transport columns tests with spiked drainage water

  18. Laboratory Evaluation of Sulfur Modified Iron for Use as a Filter Material to Treat Agricultural Drainage Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Where subsurface drainage practices are employed, fertilizer nutrients and pesticides applied on farm fields and municipal locations are commonly intercepted by the buried drainage pipes and then discharged into local streams and lakes, oftentimes producing adverse environmental impacts on these surface water bodies. On-site water filter treatment systems can be employed to prevent the release of agricultural nutrients/pesticides into adjacent waterways. Sulfur modified iron is a relatively unknown industrial product that may have promise for use as a filter material to remove contaminants from subsurface drainage waters. Sulfur modified iron (SMI) is a high surface area iron powder (zero valent iron) that has been altered via chemical reaction with pure sulfur to produce a sulfur/iron surface coating on the iron particles. A laboratory investigation was conducted with contaminant removal batch tests, saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests, and saturated solute transport column experiments to evaluate the feasibility for using SMI to treat subsurface drainage waters. Contaminant removal batch tests showed that three SMI samples were much more effective removing nitrate (> 94% nitrate removed) than three zero valent iron samples (< 10% nitrate removed). Batch test results additionally showed that SMI removed greater that 94% of dissolved phosphate, but was not particularly effective removing the pesticide, atrazine (< 37% atrazine removed). Hydraulic conductivity tests indicated that all three SMI samples that were evaluated had sufficient hydraulic conductivity, much greater than the 1 x 10-3 cm/s standard used for stormwater sand filters. The saturated solute transport tests confirmed that SMI can be effective removing nitrate and phosphate from drainage waters. Analysis of column effluent also showed that the large majority of nitrate removed by SMI was converted to ammonium. Consequently, these laboratory findings support the use of SMI in

  19. History of Sandia National Laboratories` auxiliary closure mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Weydert, J.C.; Ponder, G.M.

    1993-12-01

    An essential component of a horizontal, underground nuclear test setup at the Nevada Test Site is the auxiliary closure system. The massive gates that slam shut immediately after a device has been detonated allow the prompt radiation to pass, but block debris and hot gases from continuing down the tunnel. Thus, the gates protect experiments located in the horizontal line-of-sight steel pipe. Sandia National Laboratories has been the major designer and developer of these closure systems. This report records the history of SNL`s participation in and contributions to the technology of auxiliary closure systems used in horizontal tunnel tests in the underground test program.

  20. Seasonal fluctuations of bacterial community diversity in agricultural soil and experimental validation by laboratory disturbance experiments.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph; Wehrli, Bernhard; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2008-08-01

    Natural fluctuations in soil microbial communities are poorly documented because of the inherent difficulty to perform a simultaneous analysis of the relative abundances of multiple populations over a long time period. Yet, it is important to understand the magnitudes of community composition variability as a function of natural influences (e.g., temperature, plant growth, or rainfall) because this forms the reference or baseline against which external disturbances (e.g., anthropogenic emissions) can be judged. Second, definition of baseline fluctuations in complex microbial communities may help to understand at which point the systems become unbalanced and cannot return to their original composition. In this paper, we examined the seasonal fluctuations in the bacterial community of an agricultural soil used for regular plant crop production by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling (T-RFLP) of the amplified 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene diversity. Cluster and statistical analysis of T-RFLP data showed that soil bacterial communities fluctuated very little during the seasons (similarity indices between 0.835 and 0.997) with insignificant variations in 16S rRNA gene richness and diversity indices. Despite overall insignificant fluctuations, between 8 and 30% of all terminal restriction fragments changed their relative intensity in a significant manner among consecutive time samples. To determine the magnitude of community variations induced by external factors, soil samples were subjected to either inoculation with a pure bacterial culture, addition of the herbicide mecoprop, or addition of nutrients. All treatments resulted in statistically measurable changes of T-RFLP profiles of the communities. Addition of nutrients or bacteria plus mecoprop resulted in bacteria composition, which did not return to the original profile within 14 days. We propose that at less than 70% similarity in T-RFLP, the bacterial communities risk to

  1. Mechanisms of basin-scale nitrogen load reductions under intensified irrigated agriculture.

    PubMed

    Törnqvist, Rebecka; Jarsjö, Jerker; Thorslund, Josefin; Rao, P Suresh C; Basu, Nandita B; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture can modify the cycling and transport of nitrogen (N), due to associated water diversions, water losses, and changes in transport flow-paths. We investigate dominant processes behind observed long-term changes in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations and loads of the extensive (465,000 km2) semi-arid Amu Darya River basin (ADRB) in Central Asia. We specifically considered a 40-year period (1960-2000) of large irrigation expansion, reduced river water flows, increased fertilizer application and net increase of N input into the soil-water system. Results showed that observed decreases in riverine DIN concentration near the Aral Sea outlet of ADRB primarily were due to increased recirculation of irrigation water, which extends the flow-path lengths and enhances N attenuation. The observed DIN concentrations matched a developed analytical relation between concentration attenuation and recirculation ratio, showing that a fourfold increase in basin-scale recirculation can increase DIN attenuation from 85 to 99%. Such effects have previously only been observed at small scales, in laboratory experiments and at individual agricultural plots. These results imply that increased recirculation can have contributed to observed increases in N attenuation in agriculturally dominated drainage basins in different parts of the world. Additionally, it can be important for basin scale attenuation of other pollutants, including phosphorous, metals and organic matter. A six-fold lower DIN export from ADRB during the period 1981-2000, compared to the period 1960-1980, was due to the combined result of drastic river flow reduction of almost 70%, and decreased DIN concentrations at the basin outlet. Several arid and semi-arid regions around the world are projected to undergo similar reductions in discharge as the ADRB due to climate change and agricultural intensification, and may therefore undergo comparable shifts in DIN export as shown here for the ADRB

  2. Mechanisms of basin-scale nitrogen load reductions under intensified irrigated agriculture.

    PubMed

    Törnqvist, Rebecka; Jarsjö, Jerker; Thorslund, Josefin; Rao, P Suresh C; Basu, Nandita B; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture can modify the cycling and transport of nitrogen (N), due to associated water diversions, water losses, and changes in transport flow-paths. We investigate dominant processes behind observed long-term changes in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations and loads of the extensive (465,000 km2) semi-arid Amu Darya River basin (ADRB) in Central Asia. We specifically considered a 40-year period (1960-2000) of large irrigation expansion, reduced river water flows, increased fertilizer application and net increase of N input into the soil-water system. Results showed that observed decreases in riverine DIN concentration near the Aral Sea outlet of ADRB primarily were due to increased recirculation of irrigation water, which extends the flow-path lengths and enhances N attenuation. The observed DIN concentrations matched a developed analytical relation between concentration attenuation and recirculation ratio, showing that a fourfold increase in basin-scale recirculation can increase DIN attenuation from 85 to 99%. Such effects have previously only been observed at small scales, in laboratory experiments and at individual agricultural plots. These results imply that increased recirculation can have contributed to observed increases in N attenuation in agriculturally dominated drainage basins in different parts of the world. Additionally, it can be important for basin scale attenuation of other pollutants, including phosphorous, metals and organic matter. A six-fold lower DIN export from ADRB during the period 1981-2000, compared to the period 1960-1980, was due to the combined result of drastic river flow reduction of almost 70%, and decreased DIN concentrations at the basin outlet. Several arid and semi-arid regions around the world are projected to undergo similar reductions in discharge as the ADRB due to climate change and agricultural intensification, and may therefore undergo comparable shifts in DIN export as shown here for the ADRB

  3. Mechanisms of Basin-Scale Nitrogen Load Reductions under Intensified Irrigated Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Törnqvist, Rebecka; Jarsjö, Jerker; Thorslund, Josefin; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Basu, Nandita B.; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture can modify the cycling and transport of nitrogen (N), due to associated water diversions, water losses, and changes in transport flow-paths. We investigate dominant processes behind observed long-term changes in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations and loads of the extensive (465,000 km2) semi-arid Amu Darya River basin (ADRB) in Central Asia. We specifically considered a 40-year period (1960–2000) of large irrigation expansion, reduced river water flows, increased fertilizer application and net increase of N input into the soil-water system. Results showed that observed decreases in riverine DIN concentration near the Aral Sea outlet of ADRB primarily were due to increased recirculation of irrigation water, which extends the flow-path lengths and enhances N attenuation. The observed DIN concentrations matched a developed analytical relation between concentration attenuation and recirculation ratio, showing that a fourfold increase in basin-scale recirculation can increase DIN attenuation from 85 to 99%. Such effects have previously only been observed at small scales, in laboratory experiments and at individual agricultural plots. These results imply that increased recirculation can have contributed to observed increases in N attenuation in agriculturally dominated drainage basins in different parts of the world. Additionally, it can be important for basin scale attenuation of other pollutants, including phosphorous, metals and organic matter. A six-fold lower DIN export from ADRB during the period 1981–2000, compared to the period 1960–1980, was due to the combined result of drastic river flow reduction of almost 70%, and decreased DIN concentrations at the basin outlet. Several arid and semi-arid regions around the world are projected to undergo similar reductions in discharge as the ADRB due to climate change and agricultural intensification, and may therefore undergo comparable shifts in DIN export as shown here for the

  4. Computer simulation and laboratory work in the teaching of mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, L.; DeAmbrosis, A.; Mascheretti, P.; Massara, C. I.

    1987-03-01

    By analysing the measures of student success in learning the fundamentals of physics in conjunction with the research reported in the literature one can conclude that it is difficult or undergraduates as well as high-school students to gain a reasonable understanding of elementary mechanics. Considerable effort has been devoted to identifying those factors which might prevent mechanics being successfully learnt and also to developing instructional methods which could improve its teaching (Champagne et al. 1984, Hewson 1985, McDermott 1983, Saltiel and Malgrange 1980, Whitaker 1983, White 1983). Starting from these research results and drawing from their own experience (Borghi et al. 1984, 1985), they arrived at the following conclusions. A strategy based on experimental activity, performed by the students themselves, together with a proper use of computer simulations, could well improve the learning of mechanics and enhance the interest in, and understanding of, topics which are difficult to treat in a traditional way. The authors describe the strategy they have designed to help high school students to learn mechanics and report how they have applied this strategy to their particular topic of projectile motion.

  5. Weakening mechanism and energy budget of laboratory earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelegue, Francois; Brantut, Nicolas; Marty, Samson; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of earthquake ruptures in subduction zone are expected to be partially governed by the dehydration of minerals during shear heating. In this study, we conducted and compared results coming from stick-slip experiments on Westerly granite, serpentinized peridotite, and serpentinite. Experiments were conducted under triaxial loading (σ1>σ2=σ3) at confining pressures (σ3) of 50 and 100 MPa. The angle between the fault plane and the maximum stress (σ1) was imposed to be equal to 30°. Usual a dual gain system, a high frequency acoustic monitoring array recorded particles acceleration during macroscopic stick-slip events and premonitory background microseismicity. In addition, we used an amplified strain gage located at 3 mm to fault plane to record the dynamic stress change during laboratory earthquakes. In all rocks, we show that increasing the stress acting on the fault leads to an increase of the seismic slip, which in turns leads to a decrease in the dynamic friction coefficient. However, for a same initial stress, displacements are larger in serpentinized peridotite and in serpentinite than in Westerly granite. While the partial melting of the fault surface is observed in each rock tested, the dynamic friction drop is larger in peridotite and serpentinite. This larger friction drop is explained by the dehydration of antigorite, which leaves a partially amorphised material and leads to the production of a low viscosity melt. Finally, using theroretical assumptions, we show that the radiation efficiency of laboratory earthquakes is larger in peridotite and serpentinite than in granite. This calculation is supported by larger elastic wave radiation, and by microstructural analysis.

  6. Earthquake mechanism and predictability shown by a laboratory fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.

    1994-01-01

    Slip events generated in a laboratory fault model consisting of a circulinear chain of eight spring-connected blocks of approximately equal weight elastically driven to slide on a frictional surface are studied. It is found that most of the input strain energy is released by a relatively few large events, which are approximately time predictable. A large event tends to roughen stress distribution along the fault, whereas the subsequent smaller events tend to smooth the stress distribution and prepare a condition of simultaneous criticality for the occurrence of the next large event. The frequency-size distribution resembles the Gutenberg-Richter relation for earthquakes, except for a falloff for the largest events due to the finite energy-storage capacity of the fault system. Slip distributions, in different events are commonly dissimilar. Stress drop, slip velocity, and rupture velocity all tend to increase with event size. Rupture-initiation locations are usually not close to the maximum-slip locations. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  7. Chemical Fume Hoods in Higher Education Science Laboratories: Electrical, Mechanical and Human Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, John M.

    This paper is predicated on the realization that a chemical hood is only one element of laboratory safety which encompasses a variety of other elements starting with the architectural design and layout of laboratories; through the installation, operation and maintenance of integrated electrical and mechanical systems; to the safety-mindedness of…

  8. Importance of non CO2 fluxes for agricultural ecosystems - understanding the mechanisms and drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Katja

    2014-05-01

    In agriculture, a large proportion (about 89%) of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission saving potential may be achieved by means of soil C sequestration. Not surprising that exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been a main research objective during last decades. In spite of this, in agricultural ecosytems (i.e. grassland and croplands) a large proportion of total emissions (about 18% in CO2e worldwide) are linked to non CO2 fluxes (about 50% N2O, 40% CH4 in contraste to 10%CO2). Those emissions are however, diffuse, for example N2O, is emitted on almost all cultivated land, and all humid grasslands emit CH4 related to watertable. However, those emissions can vary largely from one site to another or from one farming system to another, while some studies even report a fixation of CH4 and N2O by grass- and croplands, not to mention the impacts of climate change on fluxes. Finally, given the large number of findings, along with their significant diversity, complicates both estimation of these emissions and the mechanism that the public authorities could implement to encourage their reduction. To determine effective mitigation options, a better knowledge on the drivers of CH4/N2O as well as their temporal and spatial variability are of particular interest. At present, more information is needed on i) the impact of agricultural practices and the contribution of CH4 and N2O to the GHG budgets within contrasting systems, ii) differences among climate regions and climate impacts, and iii) impact of managing soil microbial functioning (through plant diverstiy, litter inputs, etc). This presentation will review recent studies to highlight some new findings on the mentioned topics.

  9. Volatile organic compound emissions from straw-amended agricultural soils and their relations to bacterial communities: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Zhe; Wu, Ting; Wang, Xinming; Dai, Wanhong; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Ran; Zhang, Yonggan; Shi, Chengfei

    2016-07-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from agricultural soil amended with wheat straw and their associations with bacterial communities for a period of 66days under non-flooded and flooded conditions. The results indicated that ethene, propene, ethanol, i-propanol, 2-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone and acetophenone were the 10 most abundant VOCs, making up over 90% of the total VOCs released under the two water conditions. The mean emission of total VOCs from the amended soils under the non-flooded condition (5924ng C/(kg·hr)) was significantly higher than that under the flooded condition (2211ng C/(kg·hr)). One "peak emission window" appeared at days 0-44 or 4-44, and over 95% of the VOC emissions occurred during the first month under the two water conditions. Bacterial community analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that a relative increase of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and γ-Proteobacteria but a relative decrease of Acidobacteria with time were observed after straw amendments under the two water conditions. Cluster analysis revealed that the soil bacterial communities changed greatly with incubation time, which was in line with the variation of the VOC emissions over the experimental period. Most of the above top 10 VOCs correlated positively with the predominant bacterial species of Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Verrucomicrobia but correlated negatively with the dominant bacterial species of Actinobacteria under the two water conditions. These results suggested that bacterial communities might play an important role in VOC emissions from straw-amended agricultural soils. PMID:27372141

  10. Nitrate and phosphate removal from agricultural subsurface drainage using laboratory woodchip bioreactors and recycled steel byproduct filters.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guanghui; Salo, Morgan W; Schmit, Christopher G; Hay, Christopher H

    2016-10-01

    Woodchip bioreactors have been increasingly used as an edge-of-field treatment technology to reduce the nitrate loadings to surface waters from agricultural subsurface drainage. Recent studies have shown that subsurface drainage can also contribute substantially to the loss of phosphate from agricultural soils. The objective of this study was to investigate nitrate and phosphate removal in subsurface drainage using laboratory woodchip bioreactors and recycled steel byproduct filters. The woodchip bioreactor demonstrated average nitrate removal efficiencies of 53.5-100% and removal rates of 10.1-21.6 g N/m(3)/d for an influent concentration of 20 mg N/L and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 6-24 h. When the influent nitrate concentration increased to 50 mg N/L, the bioreactor nitrate removal efficiency and rate averaged 75% and 18.9 g N/m(3)/d at an HRT of 24 h. Nitrate removal by the woodchips followed zero-order kinetics with rate constants of 1.42-1.80 mg N/L/h when nitrate was non-limiting. The steel byproduct filter effectively removed phosphate in the bioreactor effluent and the total phosphate adsorption capacity was 3.70 mg P/g under continuous flow conditions. Nitrite accumulation occurred in the woodchip bioreactor and the effluent nitrite concentrations increased with decreasing HRTs and increasing influent nitrate concentrations. The steel byproduct filter efficiently reduced the level of nitrite in the bioreactor effluent. Overall, the results of this study suggest that woodchip denitrification followed by steel byproduct filtration is an effective treatment technology for nitrate and phosphate removal in subsurface drainage. PMID:27344249

  11. Nitrate and phosphate removal from agricultural subsurface drainage using laboratory woodchip bioreactors and recycled steel byproduct filters.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guanghui; Salo, Morgan W; Schmit, Christopher G; Hay, Christopher H

    2016-10-01

    Woodchip bioreactors have been increasingly used as an edge-of-field treatment technology to reduce the nitrate loadings to surface waters from agricultural subsurface drainage. Recent studies have shown that subsurface drainage can also contribute substantially to the loss of phosphate from agricultural soils. The objective of this study was to investigate nitrate and phosphate removal in subsurface drainage using laboratory woodchip bioreactors and recycled steel byproduct filters. The woodchip bioreactor demonstrated average nitrate removal efficiencies of 53.5-100% and removal rates of 10.1-21.6 g N/m(3)/d for an influent concentration of 20 mg N/L and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 6-24 h. When the influent nitrate concentration increased to 50 mg N/L, the bioreactor nitrate removal efficiency and rate averaged 75% and 18.9 g N/m(3)/d at an HRT of 24 h. Nitrate removal by the woodchips followed zero-order kinetics with rate constants of 1.42-1.80 mg N/L/h when nitrate was non-limiting. The steel byproduct filter effectively removed phosphate in the bioreactor effluent and the total phosphate adsorption capacity was 3.70 mg P/g under continuous flow conditions. Nitrite accumulation occurred in the woodchip bioreactor and the effluent nitrite concentrations increased with decreasing HRTs and increasing influent nitrate concentrations. The steel byproduct filter efficiently reduced the level of nitrite in the bioreactor effluent. Overall, the results of this study suggest that woodchip denitrification followed by steel byproduct filtration is an effective treatment technology for nitrate and phosphate removal in subsurface drainage.

  12. Exposure to a heat wave under food limitation makes an agricultural insecticide lethal: a mechanistic laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Khuong V; Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2016-10-01

    Extreme temperatures and exposure to agricultural pesticides are becoming more frequent and intense under global change. Their combination may be especially problematic when animals suffer food limitation. We exposed Coenagrion puella damselfly larvae to a simulated heat wave combined with food limitation and subsequently to a widespread agricultural pesticide (chlorpyrifos) in an indoor laboratory experiment designed to obtain mechanistic insights in the direct effects of these stressors in isolation and when combined. The heat wave reduced immune function (activity of phenoloxidase, PO) and metabolic rate (activity of the electron transport system, ETS). Starvation had both immediate and delayed negative sublethal effects on growth rate and physiology (reductions in Hsp70 levels, total fat content, and activity levels of PO and ETS). Exposure to chlorpyrifos negatively affected all response variables. While the immediate effects of the heat wave were subtle, our results indicate the importance of delayed effects in shaping the total fitness impact of a heat wave when followed by pesticide exposure. Firstly, the combination of delayed negative effects of the heat wave and starvation, and the immediate negative effect of chlorpyrifos considerably (71%) reduced larval growth rate. Secondly and more strikingly, chlorpyrifos only caused considerable (ca. 48%) mortality in larvae that were previously exposed to the combination of the heat wave and starvation. This strong delayed synergism for mortality could be explained by the cumulative metabolic depression caused by each of these stressors. Further studies with increased realism are needed to evaluate the consequences of the here-identified delayed synergisms at the level of populations and communities. This is especially important as this synergism provides a novel explanation for the poorly understood potential of heat waves and of sublethal pesticide concentrations to cause mass mortality.

  13. Exposure to a heat wave under food limitation makes an agricultural insecticide lethal: a mechanistic laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Khuong V; Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2016-10-01

    Extreme temperatures and exposure to agricultural pesticides are becoming more frequent and intense under global change. Their combination may be especially problematic when animals suffer food limitation. We exposed Coenagrion puella damselfly larvae to a simulated heat wave combined with food limitation and subsequently to a widespread agricultural pesticide (chlorpyrifos) in an indoor laboratory experiment designed to obtain mechanistic insights in the direct effects of these stressors in isolation and when combined. The heat wave reduced immune function (activity of phenoloxidase, PO) and metabolic rate (activity of the electron transport system, ETS). Starvation had both immediate and delayed negative sublethal effects on growth rate and physiology (reductions in Hsp70 levels, total fat content, and activity levels of PO and ETS). Exposure to chlorpyrifos negatively affected all response variables. While the immediate effects of the heat wave were subtle, our results indicate the importance of delayed effects in shaping the total fitness impact of a heat wave when followed by pesticide exposure. Firstly, the combination of delayed negative effects of the heat wave and starvation, and the immediate negative effect of chlorpyrifos considerably (71%) reduced larval growth rate. Secondly and more strikingly, chlorpyrifos only caused considerable (ca. 48%) mortality in larvae that were previously exposed to the combination of the heat wave and starvation. This strong delayed synergism for mortality could be explained by the cumulative metabolic depression caused by each of these stressors. Further studies with increased realism are needed to evaluate the consequences of the here-identified delayed synergisms at the level of populations and communities. This is especially important as this synergism provides a novel explanation for the poorly understood potential of heat waves and of sublethal pesticide concentrations to cause mass mortality. PMID:27390895

  14. Mechanical Design of Hybrid Densitometer for Laboratory Applications

    SciTech Connect

    G. Walton; P. J. Polk; S. -T. Hsue

    1999-01-01

    The hybrid K-edge densitometry (KED) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) densitometer is a unique nondestructive assay (NDA) technique to determine the concentrations of nuclear material (SNM) in solutions. The technique is ideally suited to assay the dissolver solutions as well as the uranium and plutonium product solutions from reprocessing It is an important instrument for safeguarding reprocessing; it is also a useful tool in analytical laboratories because of its capability of analyzing mixed solutions of SNM without chemical separation. Figure 1 shows the hardware of an hybrid system developed at Los Alamos. The hybrid densitometer employs a combination of two complimentary techniques: absorption KED and XRF. The KED technique measures the transmission of a tightly collimated photon beam through the sample; it is therefore quite insensitive to the radiation emitted by the sample material. Fission product level of {approximately}1 Ci/mL can be tolerated. The technique is insensitive to matrix variation. XRF measures the fluorescent x-rays from the same sample and can be used to determine the ratios of SNM. The technique can be applied to thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium concentration determination. The technique can also be applied to mixed solutions found in nuclear fuel cycle without separation: thorium-uranium, uranium-plutoniun neptunium-plutonium-americium. The design of the hybrid densitometer is shown schematically in Figs. 1 and 2; Fig. 1 shows the top view; Fig. 2 shows the side view. The heart of the design is the changer. The sample changer can accommodate a sample tray, which holds up to six samples. The samples can be a 2-cm path length cell, 4-cm path length cell, or a mixture of both sizes. The sample tray is controlled by a "Compumotor" which in turn is controlled by a computer. The absolute position of the sample cell can be reproduced to a standard deviation of 0.02 mm. The sample changer is housed inside square stainless steel

  15. Explaining Strengthening Mechanisms, Institutional Orientations and Problematic Challenges of University Agricultural Research in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharifzadeh, Aboulghasem; Abdollahzadeh, Gholamhossein

    2009-01-01

    According to empirical evidence and noted implications of sustainable agricultural development as a systemic and multi-actor process, integration of the research function of higher agricultural education in Iranian agricultural research systems seems to be an ongoing and considerable necessity. With the aim of identification and analysis of…

  16. Agricultural Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This brochure describes the philosophy and scope of a secondary-level course in agricultural production. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: careers in agriculture and agribusiness, animal science and livestock production, agronomy, agricultural mechanics, supervised occupational experience programs, and the…

  17. Tetracycline and Phenicol Resistance Genes and Mechanisms: Importance for Agriculture, the Environment, and Humans.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Marilyn C; Schwarz, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Recent reports have speculated on the future impact that antibiotic-resistant bacteria will have on food production, human health, and global economics. This review examines microbial resistance to tetracyclines and phenicols, antibiotics that are widely used in global food production. The mechanisms of resistance, mode of spread between agriculturally and human-impacted environments and ecosystems, distribution among bacteria, and the genes most likely to be associated with agricultural and environmental settings are included. Forty-six different tetracycline resistance () genes have been identified in 126 genera, with (M) having the broadest taxonomic distribution among all bacteria and (B) having the broadest coverage among the Gram-negative genera. Phenicol resistance genes are organized into 37 groups and have been identified in 70 bacterial genera. The review provides the latest information on tetracycline and phenicol resistance genes, including their association with mobile genetic elements in bacteria of environmental, medical, and veterinary relevance. Knowing what specific antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) are found in specific bacterial species and/or genera is critical when using a selective suite of ARGs for detection or surveillance studies. As detection methods move to molecular techniques, our knowledge about which type of bacteria carry which resistance gene(s) will become more important to ensure that the whole spectrum of bacteria are included in future surveillance studies. This review provides information needed to integrate the biology, taxonomy, and ecology of tetracycline- and phenicol-resistant bacteria and their resistance genes so that informative surveillance strategies can be developed and the correct genes selected.

  18. Site study plan for routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan for Routine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes routine laboratory testing to be conducted on rock samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study plan describes the early laboratory testing. Additional testing may be required and the type and scope of testing will be dependent upon the results of the early testing. This study provides for measurements of index, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical properties with tests which are standardized and used widely in geotechnical investigations. Another Site Study Plan for Nonroutine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes laboratory testing of samples from the site to determine mechanical, thermomechanical, and thermal properties by less widely used methods, many of which have been developed specifically for characterization of the site. Data from laboratory tests will be used for characterization of rock strata, design of shafts and underground facilities, and modeling of repository behavior in support of resolution of both preclosure and postclosure issues. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Coping mechanisms of some blind trainees engaging in agricultural rehabilitation in a Nigerian training centre for the blind.

    PubMed

    Olujide, Mukaila G; Ademokoya, Julius A

    2006-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess the coping mechanisms of some blind trainees engaged in agricultural activities at the Nigeria Training Centre for the Blind, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria. The participants in this study were blind trainees and agricultural inspectors. Focus group discussions were used to elicit their feelings concerning their coping mechanisms with agricultural activities at the centre. In addition, a practical session, and participatory observation, was carried out to examine the trainees and their reactions to the agricultural training programmes. Findings revealed that the blind trainees could effectively undertake farming activities despite their disability. It was, however, noted that the facilities for agricultural training programme in the centre are not inadequate. Moreover, the study further discovered that the number of blind persons seeking agricultural training was far less than the expected intake for the centre. There were also more male than female trainees in the centre. Based on the findings, recommendations were made to improve the farming training programme for blind trainees at the centre. More facilities should be provided and efforts made to encourage more blind persons to use the centre. This will discourage begging and dependence, activities often engaged in by blind persons who have not been rehabilitated.

  20. Antibiotics Resistance in Rhizobium: Type, Process, Mechanism and Benefit for Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Naamala, Judith; Jaiswal, Sanjay K; Dakora, Felix D

    2016-06-01

    The use of high-quality rhizobial inoculants on agricultural legumes has contributed substantially to the N economy of farming systems through inputs from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Large populations of symbiotically effective rhizobia should be available in the rhizosphere for symbiotic BNF with host plants. The rhizobial populations should also be able to compete and infect host plants. However, the rhizosphere comprises large populations of different microorganisms. Some of these microorganisms naturally produce antibiotics which are lethal to susceptible rhizobial populations in the soil. Therefore, intrinsic resistance to antibiotics is a desirable trait for the rhizobial population. It increases the rhizobia's chances of growth, multiplication and persistence in the soil. With a large population of rhizobia in the soil, infectivity of host plants and the subsequent BNF efficiency can be guaranteed. This review, therefore, puts together findings by various researchers on antibiotic resistance in bacteria with the main emphasis on rhizobia. It describes the different modes of action of different antibiotics, the types of antibiotic resistance exhibited by rhizobia, the mechanisms of acquisition of antibiotic resistance in rhizobia and the levels of tolerance of different rhizobial species to different antibiotics. PMID:26897128

  1. Evaluating the Mathematics Achievement Levels of Students Participating in the Texas FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edney, Kirk Clowe

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a mathematics enrichment activity used to improve the mathematics performance of students relative to participation in the State Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event (CDE) and in mandated assessments. The treatment group (13 schools, 43 students) participated in a…

  2. Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics describes the laboratory testing to be conducted on soil samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermal, hydrologic, chemical, and mineral properties of soils from boring throughout the site. Samples will be taken from Playa Borings/Trenching, Transportation/Utilities Foundation Borings, Repository Surface Facilities Design Foundation Borings, and Exploratory Shaft Facilities Design Foundation Borings. Data from the laboratory tests will be used for soil strata characterization, design of foundations for surface structures, design of transportation facilities and utility structures, design of impoundments, design of shaft lining, design of the shaft freeze wall, shaft permitting, performance assessment calculations, and other program requirements. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Virtual Laboratories to Achieve Higher-Order Learning in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. S.; Gooseff, M. N.; Toto, R.

    2009-12-01

    Bloom’s higher-order cognitive skills (analysis, evaluation, and synthesis) are recognized as necessary in engineering education, yet these are difficult to achieve in traditional lecture formats. Laboratory components supplement traditional lectures in an effort to emphasize active learning and provide higher-order challenges, but these laboratories are often subject to the constraints of (a) increasing student enrollment, (b) limited funding for operational, maintenance, and instructional expenses and (c) increasing demands on undergraduate student credit requirements. Here, we present results from a pilot project implementing virtual (or online) laboratory experiences as an alternative to a traditional laboratory experience in Fluid Mechanics, a required third year course. Students and faculty were surveyed to identify the topics that were most difficult, and virtual laboratory and design components developed to supplement lecture material. Each laboratory includes a traditional lab component, requiring student analysis and evaluation. The lab concludes with a design exercise, which imposes additional problem constraints and allows students to apply their laboratory observations to a real-world situation.

  4. Testing Plastic Deformations of Materials in the Introductory Undergraduate Mechanics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romo-Kroger, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for…

  5. A Delphi Approach to the Preparation of Early-Career Agricultural Educators in the Curriculum Area of Agricultural Mechanics: Fully Qualified and Highly Motivated or Status Quo?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saucier, P. Ryan; McKim, Billy R.; Tummons, John D.

    2012-01-01

    According to the National Research Agenda for Agricultural Education and Communication, preservice agriculture teacher education programs should "prepare and provide an abundance of fully qualified and highly motivated agricultural educators at all levels" (Osborne, 2007, 8). The lack of preparation of entry career agricultural educators is no…

  6. Phototransformation rates and mechanisms for synthetic hormone growth promoters used in animal agriculture.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shen; Kolodziej, Edward P; Cwiertny, David M

    2012-12-18

    Trenbolone acetate, melengestrol acetate, and zeranol are synthetic hormones extensively used as growth promoters in animal agriculture, yet despite occurrence in water and soil little is known about their environmental fate. Here, we establish the time scales and mechanisms by which these synthetic growth promoters and their metabolites (SGPMs) undergo phototransformation in sunlit surface waters. The families of trenbolone acetate (including 17β-trenbolone, 17α-trenbolone, and trendione) and melengestrol acetate (including melengestrol) readily undergo direct photolysis, exhibiting half-lives between ∼0.25 and 1 h in both natural and simulated sunlight that were largely insensitive to solution variables (e.g., pH, temperature, and cosolutes). Direct photolysis yielded products that not only are more photostable but also maintain their steroidal ring structure and therefore may retain some biological activity. In contrast, zeranol, β-zearalanol, and zearalanone only exhibited reactivity in irradiated solutions of model humic and fulvic acids, and rates of indirect photolysis increased steadily from pH 7 to 9. Use of selective probe and quencher compounds suggest hydroxyl radical and triplet state dissolved organic matter are responsible for zeranol family decay at neutral pH, although singlet oxygen contributes modestly in more alkaline waters. This observed pH-dependence appears to result from photooxidants reacting primarily with the monodeprotonated form of zeranol (pK(a) values of 8.44 and 11.42). This investigation provides the first characterization of the fate of this emerging pollutant class in sunlit surface waters and prioritizes future efforts on the identity, fate, and biological impact of their more persistent phototransformation products.

  7. Intraoral laser welding: ultrastructural and mechanical analysis to compare laboratory laser and dental laser.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Nammour, Samir

    2011-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses. Recently in several clinical cases, we have suggested that the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilized in the dental office could be used to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly in the mouth. The aim of this work was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the quality of the weld and its mechanical strength, comparing a device normally used in dental laboratory and a device normally used in the dental office for oral surgery, the same as that described for intraoral welding. Metal plates of a Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy and steel orthodontic wires were subjected to four welding procedures: welding without filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding with filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding without filler metal using the office laser, and welding with filler metal using the office laser. The welded materials were then analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA. SEM analysis did not show significant differences between the samples although the plates welded using the office laser without filler metal showed a greater number of fissures than the other samples. EDS microanalysis of the welding zone showed a homogeneous composition of the metals. Mechanical tests showed similar elastic behaviours of the samples, with minimal differences between the samples welded with the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum force applied by the analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welds produced using the office Nd:YAG laser device and the laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, as analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and nonsignificant differences, although these findings need to be confirmed using a greater number of samples.

  8. Adaptation of an industrial application for an instructional laboratory in mechanical vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, W.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Extensive theoretical treatment is given to damping as the process of energy dissipation during mechanical vibration. The challenge in the classroom is to adequately convey this concept and extend it by teaching students practical applications in engineering analysis and design. Students are motivated by real-world problems; applying these types of problems with strong instructional classroom content significantly enhances the learning environment. This paper proposes the adaptation of an actual research project to a simple, yet innovative, mechanical vibrations laboratory. The adapted project involves an ongoing effort at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to investigate damping factors of various alloys used in military tank munitions. The kinetic-energy penetrators used in these tank rounds are cylindrical in shape and are a major class of weapons designed to defeat heavy armor. Unwanted transverse oscillations of these penetrators degrade the accuracy of the rounds and may lead to glancing blows off the target. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Environmental Fate of the Herbicide Fluazifop-P-butyl and Its Degradation Products in Two Loamy Agricultural Soils: A Combined Laboratory and Field Study.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Nora; Rosenbom, Annette E; Olsen, Preben; Sørensen, Sebastian R

    2015-08-01

    The herbicide fluazifop-P-butyl (FPB) is used against grasses in agricultural crops such as potato, oilseed rape, and sugar beet. Limited information is available in scientific literature on its environmental fate, therefore extensive monitoring at two agricultural test fields was combined with laboratory studies to determine leaching and the underlying degradation and sorption processes. Water samples from drains, suction cups, and groundwater wells showed leaching of the degradation products fluazifop-P (FP) and 2-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin (TFMP) following FPB treatment. Laboratory experiments with soil from each field revealed a rapid degradation of FPB to FP. The degradation was almost exclusively microbial, and further biodegradation to TFMP occurred at a slower rate. Both degradation products were sorbed to the two soils to a small extent and were fairly persistent to degradation during the two-month incubation period. Together, the field and laboratory results from this study showed that the biodegradation of FPB in loamy soils gave rise to the production of two major degradation products that sorbed to a small extent. In this study, both degradation products leached to drainage and groundwater during precipitation. It is therefore recommended that these degradation products be included in programs monitoring water quality in areas with FPB use.

  10. Research Progress on the use of Plant Allelopathy in Agriculture and the Physiological and Ecological Mechanisms of Allelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Allelopathy is a common biological phenomenon by which one organism produces biochemicals that influence the growth, survival, development, and reproduction of other organisms. These biochemicals are known as allelochemicals and have beneficial or detrimental effects on target organisms. Plant allelopathy is one of the modes of interaction between receptor and donor plants and may exert either positive effects (e.g., for agricultural management, such as weed control, crop protection, or crop re-establishment) or negative effects (e.g., autotoxicity, soil sickness, or biological invasion). To ensure sustainable agricultural development, it is important to exploit cultivation systems that take advantage of the stimulatory/inhibitory influence of allelopathic plants to regulate plant growth and development and to avoid allelopathic autotoxicity. Allelochemicals can potentially be used as growth regulators, herbicides, insecticides, and antimicrobial crop protection products. Here, we reviewed the plant allelopathy management practices applied in agriculture and the underlying allelopathic mechanisms described in the literature. The major points addressed are as follows: (1) Description of management practices related to allelopathy and allelochemicals in agriculture. (2) Discussion of the progress regarding the mode of action of allelochemicals and the physiological mechanisms of allelopathy, consisting of the influence on cell micro- and ultra-structure, cell division and elongation, membrane permeability, oxidative and antioxidant systems, growth regulation systems, respiration, enzyme synthesis and metabolism, photosynthesis, mineral ion uptake, protein and nucleic acid synthesis. (3) Evaluation of the effect of ecological mechanisms exerted by allelopathy on microorganisms and the ecological environment. (4) Discussion of existing problems and proposal for future research directions in this field to provide a useful reference for future studies on plant

  11. Research Progress on the use of Plant Allelopathy in Agriculture and the Physiological and Ecological Mechanisms of Allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Allelopathy is a common biological phenomenon by which one organism produces biochemicals that influence the growth, survival, development, and reproduction of other organisms. These biochemicals are known as allelochemicals and have beneficial or detrimental effects on target organisms. Plant allelopathy is one of the modes of interaction between receptor and donor plants and may exert either positive effects (e.g., for agricultural management, such as weed control, crop protection, or crop re-establishment) or negative effects (e.g., autotoxicity, soil sickness, or biological invasion). To ensure sustainable agricultural development, it is important to exploit cultivation systems that take advantage of the stimulatory/inhibitory influence of allelopathic plants to regulate plant growth and development and to avoid allelopathic autotoxicity. Allelochemicals can potentially be used as growth regulators, herbicides, insecticides, and antimicrobial crop protection products. Here, we reviewed the plant allelopathy management practices applied in agriculture and the underlying allelopathic mechanisms described in the literature. The major points addressed are as follows: (1) Description of management practices related to allelopathy and allelochemicals in agriculture. (2) Discussion of the progress regarding the mode of action of allelochemicals and the physiological mechanisms of allelopathy, consisting of the influence on cell micro- and ultra-structure, cell division and elongation, membrane permeability, oxidative and antioxidant systems, growth regulation systems, respiration, enzyme synthesis and metabolism, photosynthesis, mineral ion uptake, protein and nucleic acid synthesis. (3) Evaluation of the effect of ecological mechanisms exerted by allelopathy on microorganisms and the ecological environment. (4) Discussion of existing problems and proposal for future research directions in this field to provide a useful reference for future studies on plant

  12. Research Progress on the use of Plant Allelopathy in Agriculture and the Physiological and Ecological Mechanisms of Allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Allelopathy is a common biological phenomenon by which one organism produces biochemicals that influence the growth, survival, development, and reproduction of other organisms. These biochemicals are known as allelochemicals and have beneficial or detrimental effects on target organisms. Plant allelopathy is one of the modes of interaction between receptor and donor plants and may exert either positive effects (e.g., for agricultural management, such as weed control, crop protection, or crop re-establishment) or negative effects (e.g., autotoxicity, soil sickness, or biological invasion). To ensure sustainable agricultural development, it is important to exploit cultivation systems that take advantage of the stimulatory/inhibitory influence of allelopathic plants to regulate plant growth and development and to avoid allelopathic autotoxicity. Allelochemicals can potentially be used as growth regulators, herbicides, insecticides, and antimicrobial crop protection products. Here, we reviewed the plant allelopathy management practices applied in agriculture and the underlying allelopathic mechanisms described in the literature. The major points addressed are as follows: (1) Description of management practices related to allelopathy and allelochemicals in agriculture. (2) Discussion of the progress regarding the mode of action of allelochemicals and the physiological mechanisms of allelopathy, consisting of the influence on cell micro- and ultra-structure, cell division and elongation, membrane permeability, oxidative and antioxidant systems, growth regulation systems, respiration, enzyme synthesis and metabolism, photosynthesis, mineral ion uptake, protein and nucleic acid synthesis. (3) Evaluation of the effect of ecological mechanisms exerted by allelopathy on microorganisms and the ecological environment. (4) Discussion of existing problems and proposal for future research directions in this field to provide a useful reference for future studies on plant

  13. Urban Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbellini, Margaret

    1991-01-01

    John Bourne High School in Queens, New York, offers an agricultural program enrolling more than 400 students. The curriculum includes agricultural career exploration, plant and animal science, summer land laboratories, and a special education component. (SK)

  14. Mechanisms for Enhancing Teachers' Effectiveness in the Implementation of Agricultural Science Programme in Secondary Schools in Afikpo Education Zone of Ebonyi State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndem, Joseph Ukah

    2016-01-01

    Poor performance of students in agricultural science at the internal and external examinations has been attributed to ineffectiveness of the agricultural science teachers at the secondary schools in Afikpo education zone of Ebonyi State, therefore, this research determined the mechanisms for enhancing the teachers' effectiveness in the…

  15. Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance: possible mechanisms and clinical relevance. Part II: Potential causes and laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Vadász, Dávid; Sztriha, László K; Sas, Katalin; Vécsei, László

    2013-01-30

    Recent meta-analyses have indicated that patients with vascular disease demonstrated by laboratory tests to be aspirin or clopidogrel-resistant are at an increased risk of major vascular events. The suggested mechanisms of aspirin resistance include genetic polymorphism, alternative pathways of platelet activation, aspirin-insensitive thromboxane biosynthesis, drug interactions, or a low aspirin dose. Clopidogrel resistance is likely to develop as a result of a decreased bioavailability of the active metabolite, due to genetic variation or concomitant drug treatment. Additional work is required to improve and validate laboratory tests of platelet function, so that they may become useful tools for selection of the most appropriate antiplatelet therapy for an individual patient. Improvements in antiplatelet treatment strategies in the future should lead to a reduction in premature vascular events. PMID:23607225

  16. Virus in Groundwater: Characterization of transport mechanisms and impacts on an agricultural area in Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamazo, P. A.; Colina, R.; Victoria, M.; Alvareda, E.; Burutaran, L.; Ramos, J.; Lopez, F.; Soler, J.

    2014-12-01

    In many areas of Uruguay groundwater is the only source of water for human consumption and for industrial-agricultural economic activities. Traditionally considered as a safe source, due to the "natural filter" that occurs in porous media, groundwater is commonly used without any treatment. The Uruguayan law requires bacteriological analysis for most water uses, but virological analyses are not mentioned in the legislation. In the Salto district, where groundwater is used for human consumption and for agricultural activities, bacterial contamination has been detected in several wells but no viruses analysis have been performed. The Republic University (UDELAR), with the support of the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), is studying the incidence of virus in groundwater on an intensive agriculture area of the Salto district. In this area water is pumped from the "Salto Aquifer", a free sedimentary aquifer. Below this sedimentary deposit is the "Arapey" basaltic formation, which is also exploited for water productions on its fractured zones. A screening campaign has been performed searching for bacterial and viral contamination. Total and fecal coliforms have been found on several wells and Rotavirus and Adenovirus have been detected. A subgroup of the screening wells has been selected for an annual survey. On this subgroup, besides bacteria and viruses analysis, a standard physical and chemical characterization was performed. Results show a significant seasonal variation on microbiological contamination. In addition to field studies, rotavirus circulation experiments on columns are being performed. The objective of this experiments is to determinate the parameters that control virus transport in porous media. The results of the study are expected to provide an insight into the impacts of groundwater on Salto's viral gastroenterocolitis outbreaks.

  17. Micro-electro-mechanical systems projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J.A.

    1995-08-04

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) MicroTechnology Center has developed a wide variety of special capabilities used to design, build, and test MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). Our customers are both the LLNL Programs and a variety of external customers. Typical applications include: custom microstructures for scientific experiments; physical sensors; photonics; miniature tools for catheter-based surgery; and microinstruments for chemical analysis for biomedicine, environments and treaty verification. The majority of our prototype MEMS devices are fabricated with bulk silicon micromachining, but we also utilize surface micromachining capabilities.

  18. A mechanism for preseismic steady rupture fronts observed in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Y.; Ampuero, J.-P.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown that the onset of frictional instability is characterized by a transition from stable, quasi-static rupture growth to unstable, inertially-controlled high-speed rupture. In particular, slow rupture fronts propagating at a steady speed Vslow of the order of 5% of the S-wave speed have been observed prior to the onset of dynamic rupture in recent fault-friction laboratory experiments. However, the precise mechanism governing this Vslow stage is unknown. Here we reproduce this phenomenon in numerical simulations of earthquake sequences that incorporate laboratory-derived rate-and-state friction laws. Our simulations show that the Vslow stage originates from a stress concentration inherited from the coalescence of interseismic slow creep fronts. Its occurrence is limited to a narrow range of the parameter space but is found in simulations with two commonly-used state-variable evolution laws in the rate-and-state formulation. The sensitivity of the speed Vslow to the model parameters suggests that the propagation speed Vslow reported in laboratory experiments may also be sensitive to parameters of friction and stress conditions. Our results imply that time and space dimensions associated with the propagation of Vslow on natural faults can be as much as a few seconds and several hundred meters, respectively. Hence the detection of such preseismic signals may be possible with near-field high-resolution observations.

  19. A mechanism for preseismic steady rupture fronts observed in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    It has been shown that the onset of frictional instability is characterized by a transition from stable, quasi-static rupture growth to unstable, inertially-controlled high-speed rupture. In particular, slow `steady' fronts (which we call "V_slow") systematically propagating at ~5% of the S-wave speed prior to the onset of unstable rupture have been observed in recent fault-friction laboratory experiments (Nielsen et al., 2010). However, the precise mechanism of the occurrence of V_slow is unknown. Here we reproduce the occurrence of V_slow in numerical simulations of earthquake sequences that incorporate laboratory-derived rate-and-state friction laws. Our simulations show that the propagation of V_slow originates from a stress concentration inherited from the coalescence of interseismic slow creep fronts. The occurrence of V_slow is limited in a narrow range of the parameter space but is found in simulations with two commonly-used state-variable evolution laws in the rate-and-state formulation. Sensitivity of the speed of V_slow to the model parameters suggests that the previous laboratory experiments may have been carried out under special conditions. Our results imply that time and space dimensions associated with the propagation of V_slow on natural faults can be as much as a few seconds and several hundred meters, respectively. Hence the detection of such preseismic signals may be possible with near-field high-sampling GPS stations.

  20. Recent Results from a Laboratory Study of Charging Mechanisms in a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venturini, Catherine C.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Comfort, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    A laboratory investigation has been developed to experimentally study the interaction of micron sized particles with plasmas and electromagnetic radiation. The intent is to investigate under what conditions particles of various compositions and sizes become charged, or discharged, while exposed to an electron beam and UV radiation. This investigation uses a unique laboratory technique known as electrodynamic suspension of particles. Here, a single charged micron size particle is suspended in a quadrupole trap and then subjected to a controlled environment. In this paper, we will discuss recent results from this experiment in which different materials including polystyrene and aluminum oxide, and sizes ranging from 10 microns to 1 micron have been used to determine charge to mass ratios and then subjected to an electron beam and /or UV radiation. In each instance, the particle's charge as well as beam current flux and radiation intensity flux is measured. These results will be compared with initial results using salt crystals. It was found that a negatively charged salt crystal exposed for 30 minutes to a 500 eV electron beam with primary electron beam current of -3.06 x 10(exp -5) picoamps yielded a secondary electron current of 3.23 x 10(exp -5) picoamps. Additionally, the particle was observed to be steadily losing charge over this time interval. By studying the microphysics of one particle, a better understanding of theoretical models and other laboratory results associated with particle charging mechanisms can be achieved.

  1. Mechanisms of strontium uptake by laboratory and brewing strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S.V.; Tobin, J.M. )

    1992-12-01

    Concern over transfer of toxic metals from microorgansims to higher organisms and interest in the biotechnological potential of microorganisms for metal removal and/or recovery has increased interest in the processes involved in heavy metal uptake. Strontium is a trace element with no know essential biological role, but a long half-live and discharge as a constituent of radioactive wastewaters from nuclear reactors and in fall-out make its fate in the environment a concern. In this study, strontium uptake in biomass obtained from laboratory and industrial sources was examined. The mechanisms of Sr[sup 2+] uptake were examined and uptake capacities for Sr[sup 2+] were compared in both live and denatured forms of laboratory and brewery-derived strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Release of cellular Ca[sup 2+], Mg[sup 2+], and H[sup +] in response to metabolism-independent and -dependent Sr[sup 2+] uptake processes, was determined for all biomass types. The results indicate clear differences in the mechanisms of both Sr[sup 2+] adsorption and intracellular Sr[sup 2+] accumulation between the yeasts examined. They point out the strong influence that the differential ecophysiology of strains from a single genus may exert on metal uptake characteristics and on external binding and intracellular distribution of essential ions.

  2. The Mechanical Potential of the Language Laboratory. ERIC Focus Reports on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Edward M.

    The basic mechanical functions of the foreign language laboratory described in this report enable utilization of authentic target language, linguistically effective learning devices, visuals, and facilities for monitoring and testing. Brief descriptions of 11 laboratory functions include: (1) isolation (physical, acoustical, and psychological),…

  3. 14. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,311(463AM3)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory FacilityMechanical' Mare ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,311(463A-M-3)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory Facility-Mechanical' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Battery Test Office & Storage Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  4. Mechanical instability induced by water weakening in laboratory fluid injection tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C.; Dautriat, J.; Sarout, J.; Delle Piane, C.; Menéndez, B.; Macault, R.; Bertauld, D.

    2015-06-01

    To assess water-weakening effects in reservoir rocks, previous experimental studies have focused on changes in the failure envelopes derived from mechanical tests conducted on rocks fully saturated either with water or with inert fluids. So far, little attention has been paid to the mechanical behavior during fluid injection under conditions similar to enhanced oil recovery operations. We studied the effect of fluid injection on the mechanical behavior of the weakly consolidated Sherwood sandstone in laboratory experiments. Our specimens were instrumented with 16 ultrasonic P wave transducers for both passive and active acoustic monitoring during loading and fluid injection to record the acoustic signature of fluid migration in the pore space and the development of damage. Calibration triaxial tests were conducted on three samples saturated with air, water, or oil. In a second series of experiments, water and inert oil were injected into samples critically loaded up to 80% or 70% of the dry or oil-saturated compressive strength, respectively, to assess the impact of fluid migration on mechanical strength and elastic properties. The fluids were injected with a low back pressure to minimize effective stress variations during injection. Our observations show that creep takes place with a much higher strain rate for water injection compared to oil injection. The most remarkable difference is that water injection in both dry and oil-saturated samples triggers mechanical instability (macroscopic failure) within half an hour whereas oil injection does not after several hours. The analysis of X-ray computed tomography images of postmortem samples revealed that the mechanical instability was probably linked to loss of cohesion in the water-invaded region.

  5. Transcriptional profiling induced by pesticides employed in organic agriculture in a wild population of Chironomus riparius under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Valeria; Grazioli, Valentina; Rossaro, Bruno; Bernabò, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Copper (Cu) and azadirachtin (AZA-A+B) are pesticides allowed in organic agriculture whose environmental risk and toxicity for aquatic wildlife is only partially known. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to assess the molecular effect of acute and short-term exposure (3, 24h) of Cu (0.01, 0.05, 1, 10, 25mgl(-1)) and AZA-A+B (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 1mgl(-1)) on the expression of five candidate genes (hsp70, hsc70, hsp40, hsp10 and cyP450) in a non-target species, Chironomus riparius. Fourth-instar larvae were collected from a mountain stream polluted by agricultural land run-off. All genes were responsive to both pesticides but each gene had a specific response to the different experimental concentrations and exposure times. A few similarities in transcriptional profiling were observed, such as a linear concentration-dependent response of hsp70 after 24h of exposure (at ≥1mgl(-1) of Cu and ≥0.2mgl(-1) of AZA-A+B) and an up-regulation regardless of the concentration of hsc70 after 24h of exposure (at ≥0mgl(-1) of Cu and ≥0.2mgl(-1) of AZA-A+B and the up-regulation of hsp70 after 3h of exposure at ~LC50 (Cu-LC50=26.1±2.5mgl(-1), AZA-A+B-LC50=1.1±0.2mgl(-1)). According to the results, hsp40, hsp10 and cyP450 may be defined as pesticide-dependent (i.e., hsp40 and hsp10 seemed to responded mainly to AZA-A+B and cyP450 to Cu), while hsc70 as time-dependent regardless of the pesticide (i.e., hsc70 responded only after 24h of treatment with Cu and AZA-A+B). This study gives new insights on the potential role of the C. riparius's hsps and cyP450 genes as sensitive biomarkers for freshwater monitoring. PMID:26994805

  6. Transcriptional profiling induced by pesticides employed in organic agriculture in a wild population of Chironomus riparius under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Valeria; Grazioli, Valentina; Rossaro, Bruno; Bernabò, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Copper (Cu) and azadirachtin (AZA-A+B) are pesticides allowed in organic agriculture whose environmental risk and toxicity for aquatic wildlife is only partially known. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to assess the molecular effect of acute and short-term exposure (3, 24h) of Cu (0.01, 0.05, 1, 10, 25mgl(-1)) and AZA-A+B (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 1mgl(-1)) on the expression of five candidate genes (hsp70, hsc70, hsp40, hsp10 and cyP450) in a non-target species, Chironomus riparius. Fourth-instar larvae were collected from a mountain stream polluted by agricultural land run-off. All genes were responsive to both pesticides but each gene had a specific response to the different experimental concentrations and exposure times. A few similarities in transcriptional profiling were observed, such as a linear concentration-dependent response of hsp70 after 24h of exposure (at ≥1mgl(-1) of Cu and ≥0.2mgl(-1) of AZA-A+B) and an up-regulation regardless of the concentration of hsc70 after 24h of exposure (at ≥0mgl(-1) of Cu and ≥0.2mgl(-1) of AZA-A+B and the up-regulation of hsp70 after 3h of exposure at ~LC50 (Cu-LC50=26.1±2.5mgl(-1), AZA-A+B-LC50=1.1±0.2mgl(-1)). According to the results, hsp40, hsp10 and cyP450 may be defined as pesticide-dependent (i.e., hsp40 and hsp10 seemed to responded mainly to AZA-A+B and cyP450 to Cu), while hsc70 as time-dependent regardless of the pesticide (i.e., hsc70 responded only after 24h of treatment with Cu and AZA-A+B). This study gives new insights on the potential role of the C. riparius's hsps and cyP450 genes as sensitive biomarkers for freshwater monitoring.

  7. [Ethological basis for the evaluation of animal welfare in housing systems for agricultural animals and laboratory animals].

    PubMed

    Stauffacher, M

    1992-01-01

    The Swiss Federal Act on Animal Protection (1978) requires the sale of mass-produced housing systems for farm animals to be authorized by the Federal Veterinary Office. Authorization is only granted for housing systems that safeguard the animals' welfare. A concept for the assessment of Animal Welfare has to provide a high forensic value. The capacity of farm animals to adapt to an intensive housing system can be directly examined, whereas the existence and extent of subjective feelings can only be assumed. In our concept the examination focuses on the interaction of individuals with their artificial environment. The main question is whether or not the individuals are able to cope with given nonspecific (e.g. temperature, humidity) and specific (e.g. drinking troughs, behaviour of conspecifics) stimuli in order to reach the immediate (e.g. drinking, make way for) and ultimate (survival, reproduction success) goals. Animals of the same breed are observed in a highly diverse environment in order to determine normal behaviour. Whether behavioural expressions which differ significantly from normal behaviour are adaptive to the restrictive housing conditions is judged by the behaviours' consequences for both, the individuals and the environment. Many studies prove the concept's high forensic value and the authorities prefer conclusions based on this concept to others referring to the animals' motivational and emotional state. However more research has to be done with respect to animal welfare in farm and laboratory animal breeding as well as in the use of laboratory animals for experimental studies.

  8. Biorational agents--mechanism and importance in IPM and IRM programs for controlling agricultural pests.

    PubMed

    Ishaaya, I; Kontsedalov, S; Mazirov, D; Horowitz, A R

    2001-01-01

    Among the new approaches for controlling agricultural pests is the development of novel compounds affecting specific processes in insects such as chitin synthesis inhibitors, juvenile hormone mimics and ecdysone agonists. In addition, efforts have been made to develop compounds acting selectively on groups of insects by inhibiting or enhancing biochemical sites such as respiration (diafenthiuron), the nicotinyl acetylcholine receptors (imidacloprid and acetamiprid), the GABA receptors (avermectins), the salivary glands of sucking pests (pymetrozine) and others. Among the most recent novel insecticides with selective properties are novaluron, thiamethoxam, emamectin and spinosad. Novaluron (Rimon) is a novel chitin synthesis inhibitor that acts by both ingestion and contact. It is a powerful suppressor of lepidopteran larvae such as Spodoptera littoralis and Helicoverpa armigera (by ingestion) and of whiteflies such as Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes vaporariorum (by contact). Thiamethoxam (Actarn), a novel neonicotinoid acts specifically on aphids and whiteflies. Emamectin (Proclaim), an avermectin derivative acts on GABA receptor affecting diversity of insects such as mites, lepidopterans and thrips. Spinosad (Tracer) seems to act on both acetylcholine and GABA receptors affecting diversity of insect species and is considered an important agent for controlling the western flower thrips.

  9. E. coli RS2GFP Retention Mechanisms in Laboratory-Scale Fractured Rocks: A Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. N.; Qu, J.; Dickson, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    With billions of gallons of groundwater being withdrawn every day in the US and Canada, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms which jeopardize this resource and the health of those who rely on it. Porous media aquifers have typically been considered to provide significant filtration of particulate matter (e.g. microorganisms), while the fractures in fractured rock aquifers and aquitards are considered to act as contaminant highways allowing a large fraction of pathogens to travel deep into an aquifer relatively quickly. Recent research results indicate that fractured rocks filter out more particulates than typically believed. The goal of the research presented here is to quantify the number of E. coli RS2GFP retained in a single, saturated, laboratory-scale fracture, and to relate the retention of E. coli RS2GFP to the aperture field characteristics and groundwater flow rate. To achieve this goal, physical experiments were conducted at the laboratory-scale to quantify the retention of E. coli RS2GFP through several single, saturated, dolomitic limestone fractures under a range of flow rates. These fractures were also cast with a transparent epoxy in order to visualize the transport mechanisms in the various different aperture fields. The E. coli RS2GFP is tagged with a green-fluorescent protein (GFP) that is used to obtain visualization data when excited by ultraviolet light. A series of experiments was conducted, each of which involved the release of a known number of E. coli RS2GFP at the upstream end of the fracture and measuring the effluent concentration profile. These experiments were conducted using both the natural rock and transparent cast of several different aperture fields, under a range of flow rates. The effects of different aperture field characteristics and flow rates on the retention of E. coli RS2GFP will be determined by conducting a statistical analysis of the retention data under different experimental conditions. The images captured

  10. Reduction in in vivo testing at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories of the United States Department of Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Hyde, R L

    1986-01-01

    Efforts are being made at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories to reduce in vivo testing of USDA licensed veterinary vaccines. A hemagglutination test for determining potency of killed parvovirus vaccine is currently being used for canine and swine adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted products; a serum neutralization inhibition test (SNIT) is being developed for potency testing of killed adjuvanted infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) and parainfluenza (PI3) vaccines: and a tissue culture titration method for live avian encephalomyelitis virus vaccine is being pursued as a replacement for the old hatch-out chick embryo titration method. Difficulties in separating the antigen from oil emulsion products are preventing significant advances in developing in vitro testing procedures for poultry killed-virus vaccines.

  11. Correlating laboratory observations of fracture mechanical properties to hydraulically-induced microseismicity in geothermal reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

    2006-02-01

    To date, microseismicity has provided an invaluable tool for delineating the fracture network produced by hydraulic stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. While the locations of microseismic events are of fundamental importance, there is a wealth of information that can be gleaned from the induced seismicity (e.g. fault plane solutions, seismic moment tensors, source characteristics). Closer scrutiny of the spatial and temporal evolution of seismic moment tensors can shed light on systematic characteristics of fractures in the geothermal reservoir. When related to observations from laboratory experiments, these systematic trends can be interpreted in terms of mechanical processes that most likely operate in the fracture network. This paper reports on mechanical properties that can be inferred from observations of microseismicity in geothermal systems. These properties lead to interpretations about fracture initiation, seismicity induced after hydraulic shut-in, spatial evolution of linked fractures, and temporal evolution of fracture strength. The correlations highlight the fact that a combination of temperature, stressing rate, time, and fluid-rock interactions can alter the mechanical and fluid transport properties of fractures in geothermal systems.

  12. Agricultural Structures, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhardt, Richard E.; Burhoe, Steve

    This guide to a curriculum unit in agricultural structures is designed to expand the curriculum materials available in vocational agriculture in Missouri. It and Agricultural Structures I (see note) provide reference materials to systematize the curriculum. The six units cover working with concrete (19 lessons, 2 laboratory exercises), drawing and…

  13. Laboratory implementation of quantum-control-mechanism identification through Hamiltonian encoding and observable decoding

    SciTech Connect

    Rey-de-Castro, R.; Rabitz, H.

    2010-06-15

    We report on the laboratory implementation of quantum-control-mechanism identification through Hamiltonian encoding and observable decoding (HE-OD). Over a sequence of experiments, HE-OD introduces a special encoded signature into the components of a previously determined control field expressed in a chosen representation. The outcome appears as a modulated signal in the controlled system observable. Decoding the modulated signal identifies the hierarchy of correlations between components of the control field in a particular representation. In cases where the initial quantum state and observable operator are fully known, then HE-OD can also identify the transition amplitudes of the various Dyson expansion orders contributing to the controlled dynamics. The basic principles of HE-OD are illustrated for second harmonic generation when the components of the field representation are simply taken as the pixels in the pulse shaper. The outcome of HE-OD agrees well with simulations, verifying the concept.

  14. Failure mechanisms of polyester fiber anterior cruciate ligament implants: A human retrieval and laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Amis, A A; Kempson, S A

    1999-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that ACL implant failure is often caused by bone impingement in knee extension following malplacement of the tibial tunnel. This study examined polyethylene terephtalate fiber ACL implants retrieved from a clinical study, and, to confirm the hypothesis, also set up a laboratory study intended to duplicate the failure mechanism. SEM and TEM examination of 25 ruptured implants gave details of fiber failure morphology, with shearing into longitudinal fibrils, followed by rupture, when the fibrils burst apart. Cadaver joints were run in a knee simulator, with deliberately impinging ACL implants. SEM examination of implants abraded in the knee in vitro showed identical fiber damage patterns, thus confirming the impingement hypothesis. PMID:10421698

  15. What is needed to understand feedback mechanisms from agricultural and climate changes that can alter the hydrological system and the transport of sediments and agricultural chemicals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupe, Richard; Payraudeau, Sylvain; Babcsányi, Izabella; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2015-04-01

    Modern agriculture activities are constantly changing as producers try to produce a crop, keep their soils fertile, control pests, and prevent contamination of air and water resources. Because most of the world's arable land is already in production we must become more efficient if we are to feed and clothe the world's growing population as well as do this in a sustainable manner; leaving a legacy of fertile soil and clean water resources for our descendants. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of historical datasets and of developing new strategies to understand the effects of changing agricultural systems on the environment. Scientists who study agriculture and its effects on water must constantly adapt their strategies and evaluate how changing agricultural activities impact the environment. As well as understand from historical datasets on hydrology and agriculture how a changing climate or agricultural activity such as a change in tillage method might impact the processes that determine the movement of agricultural chemicals off of the target site. The 42.7 ha Hohrain (Rouffach, Alsace, France) vineyard experimental catchment offers several examples of how scientists have used historical data from this catchment to understand how the transport of agricultural chemicals may change due to a changing climate as well as how new strategies are developed for understanding the transport of agricultural chemicals. Runoff is a major process of pesticide transport from agricultural land to downstream aquatic ecosystems. The impact of rainfall characteristics on the transport of runoff-related pesticides is crucial to understanding how to prevent or minimize their movement now, but also in understanding how climate change might affect runoff. If we understand how rainfall characteristics affect the transport of pesticides, we can use climate change models to predict how those characteristics might change in the future and be better prepared for

  16. Agricultural Occupations Programs Planning Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt, Thomas R.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A set of program planning guides that include seven areas (1) Agricultural Production, (2) Agricultural Supplies and Services, (3) Agricultural Mechanics, (4) Agricultural Products, (5) Ornamental Horticulture, (6) Agricultural Resources, and (7) Forestry, were developed and introduced to high school applied biological and agricultural occupations…

  17. Field tracer investigation of unsaturated zone flow paths and mechanisms in agricultural soils of northwestern Mississippi, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Kim S.; Nimmo, John R.; Rose, Claire E.; Coupe, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    SummaryIn many farmed areas, intensive application of agricultural chemicals and withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation have led to water quality and supply issues. Unsaturated-zone processes, including preferential flow, play a major role in these effects but are not well understood. In the Bogue Phalia basin, an intensely agricultural area in the Delta region of northwestern Mississippi, the fine-textured soils often exhibit surface ponding and runoff after irrigation and rainfall as well as extensive surface cracking during prolonged dry periods. Fields are typically land-formed to promote surface flow into drainage ditches and streams that feed into larger river ecosystems. Downward flow of water below the root zone is considered minimal; regional groundwater models predict only 5% or less of precipitation recharges the heavily used alluvial aquifer. In this study transport mechanisms within and below the root zone of a fallow soybean field were assessed by performing a 2-m ring infiltration test with tracers and subsurface monitoring instruments. Seven months after tracer application, 48 continuous cores were collected for tracer extraction to define the extent of water movement and quantify preferential flow using a mass-balance approach. Vertical water movement was rapid below the pond indicating the importance of vertical preferential flow paths in the shallow unsaturated zone, especially to depths where agricultural disturbance occurs. Lateral flow of water at shallow depths was extensive and spatially non-uniform, reaching up to 10 m from the pond within 2 months. Within 1 month, the wetting front reached a textural boundary at 4-5 m between the fine-textured soil and sandy alluvium, now a potential capillary barrier which, prior to extensive irrigation withdrawals, was below the water table. Within 10 weeks, tracer was detectable at the water table which is presently about 12 m below land surface. Results indicate that 43% of percolation may be through

  18. Field tracer investigation of unsaturated zone flow paths and mechanisms in agricultural soils of northwestern Mississippi, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, K.S.; Nimmo, J.R.; Rose, C.E.; Coupe, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    In many farmed areas, intensive application of agricultural chemicals and withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation have led to water quality and supply issues. Unsaturated-zone processes, including preferential flow, play a major role in these effects but are not well understood. In the Bogue Phalia basin, an intensely agricultural area in the Delta region of northwestern Mississippi, the fine-textured soils often exhibit surface ponding and runoff after irrigation and rainfall as well as extensive surface cracking during prolonged dry periods. Fields are typically land-formed to promote surface flow into drainage ditches and streams that feed into larger river ecosystems. Downward flow of water below the root zone is considered minimal; regional groundwater models predict only 5% or less of precipitation recharges the heavily used alluvial aquifer. In this study transport mechanisms within and below the root zone of a fallow soybean field were assessed by performing a 2-m ring infiltration test with tracers and subsurface monitoring instruments. Seven months after tracer application, 48 continuous cores were collected for tracer extraction to define the extent of water movement and quantify preferential flow using a mass-balance approach. Vertical water movement was rapid below the pond indicating the importance of vertical preferential flow paths in the shallow unsaturated zone, especially to depths where agricultural disturbance occurs. Lateral flow of water at shallow depths was extensive and spatially non-uniform, reaching up to 10. m from the pond within 2. months. Within 1. month, the wetting front reached a textural boundary at 4-5. m between the fine-textured soil and sandy alluvium, now a potential capillary barrier which, prior to extensive irrigation withdrawals, was below the water table. Within 10. weeks, tracer was detectable at the water table which is presently about 12. m below land surface. Results indicate that 43% of percolation may be through

  19. Laboratory evidence for particle mobilization as a mechanism for permeability enhancement via dynamic stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Thibault; Brodsky, Emily E.; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that seismic waves can increase the permeability in natural systems, yet the mechanism remains poorly understood. We investigate the underlying mechanics by generating well-controlled, repeatable permeability enhancement in laboratory experiments. Pore pressure oscillations, simulating dynamic stresses, were applied to intact and fractured Berea sandstone samples under confining stresses of tens of MPa. Dynamic stressing produces an immediate permeability enhancement ranging from 1 to 60%, which scales with the amplitude of the dynamic strain (7×10-7 to 7×10-6) followed by a gradual permeability recovery. We investigated the mechanism by: (1) recording deformation of samples both before and after fracturing during the experiment, (2) varying the chemistry of the water and therefore particle mobility, (3) evaluating the dependence of permeability enhancement and recovery on dynamic stress amplitude, and (4) examining micro-scale pore textures of the rock samples before and after experiments. We find that dynamic stressing does not produce permanent deformation in our samples. Water chemistry has a pronounced effect on the sensitivity to dynamic stressing, with the magnitude of permeability enhancement and the rate of permeability recovery varying with ionic strength of the pore fluid. Permeability recovery rates generally correlate with the permeability enhancement sensitivity. Microstructural observations of our samples show clearing of clay particulates from fracture surfaces during the experiment. From these four lines of evidence, we conclude that a flow-dependent mechanism associated with mobilization of fines controls both the magnitude of the permeability enhancement and the recovery rate in our experiments. We also find that permeability sensitivity to dynamic stressing increases after fracturing, which is a process that generates abundant particulate matter in situ. Our results suggest that fluid permeability in many areas of the

  20. Retention efficiency of Cd, Pb and Zn from agricultural by-products activated carbon and biochar under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscione, Aline; Ramos, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    The immobilization of inorganic contaminants by using biochar in soils has played an increasingly important role and it is seen as an attractive alternative for the remediation of heavy metals. Although, the production of activated carbon (CA) from agricultural by-products has received special attention, the activation of the the organic source has been studied in order to increase its porposity, surface area and chemical polarity, resulting in higher adsorption of metals. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of BC and CA samples, obtained from a eucalyptus husks and cane sugar bagasse after activation with 20% phosphoric acid and pyrolyzed at 450oC in the retention of Zn, Cd and Pb using contaminated individual solutions. The experiment was performed using samples of activated carbon of eucalyptus husk (CCA), eucalyptus husk biochar (BC), activated carbon of sugar cane bagasse (CBA) and sugar cane bagasse biochar (BB) previously treated with Zn, Cd (range of tested solution from 0.1 up to 12 mmol L-1) and Pb (from 0.1 up 50 mmol L-1) which were submitted to stirring with ammonium acetate solution at pH 4.9 for 48 h. The results obtained were adjusted with Langmuir desorptiom isotherms. The pH of the resulting solution, were the meatls were analyse, was measure and remained in the range 4.9 - 5.0. The lower pH found in activated samples (range 2.4-2.5) resulted in larger desorption of metals than the biochar samples (pH of 9.7 for BC and 7.0 for BB). This result is surprising since for the biochar samples it was expected that any precipated metals were dissolved by the desorption solution in addition to metals released by ion exchange. Although the desorption results of activated samoels is still unclear, hich we belive may be explaibed by some adicitonal insterumental analysis, biochar samples showed better potential for application in contaminated soils than the previous.

  1. Activated carbon and biochar from agricultural by-products in the adorption of Cd, Pb and Zn under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscione, Aline; Zini, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    The immobilization of inorganic contaminants by using biochar in soils has played an increasingly important role and it is seen as an attractive alternative for the remediation of heavy metals. Although, the production of activated carbon (CA) from agricultural by-products has received special attention, the activation of the the organic source has been studied in order to increase its porposity, surface area and chemical polarity, resulting in higher adsorption of metals. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of BC and CA samples, obtained from a eucalyptus husks and cane sugar bagasse after activation with 20% phosphoric acid and pyrolyzed at 450oC in the retention of Zn, Cd and Pb using contaminated individual solutions. The experiment was performed using samples of activated carbon of eucalyptus husk (CCA), eucalyptus husk biochar (BC), activated carbon of sugar cane bagasse (CBA) and sugar cane bagasse biochar (BB), treated with Zn, Cd (range of tested solution from 0.1 up to 12 mmol L-1) and Pb (from 0.1 up 50 mmol L-1) and the adjustemento of Langmuir adsorption isotherms. Samples obtained from bagasse presented higher adsoprtion of the metals tested then eucalyptus. Also the activation process had not the expected effect on either eucalyptus and bagasse samples The maxmum adsorption capacyty of samples were as follws, in mmol g-1: for Cd - 0.36 for BC; 0.32 for CCA; 0.40 for BB; 0.31 for CBA. For Zn- 0.14 for BC; no adsorbed by CCA; 0.35 5 for BB; 0.06 for CBA. For Pb - 1.24 for BC; 0.40 for CCA; 0,45 for BB; 0,03 for CBA. However, it was also observed that due to the activation with phosphoric acid, the pH of the activated carbon (CCA and CBA) were 2.4 and 2.5 in comparison with the biochars not activated (BC and BB) 9.7 and 7.0 respectively. Thus, it is yet not possible to state if the calculate capacity is due exclusively to the complexation of chemical groups in the surface of samples or to which extent there is a contribution of

  2. The variation of the mechanical properties of rock on spatial scales from the laboratory to outcrop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, J.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Maclaughlin, M.; Turner, A. L.; GEOX^TM

    2011-12-01

    We have installed a dense array of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) strain and temperature sensors on the 4100'-level (1250 m) at the site of the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD. The sensor installation site is composed of the Precambrian Poorman formation that contains deformed and metamorphosed Precambrian sediments that is anisotropic including a well-developed foliation, quartz veins, and several joint sets. We have installed nine Micron Optics Inc. OS3600 tube gages. Four of these gages are mounted on the surface of the rock mass and attached to rock bolts that extend 2 m into the rock mass. The other five OS3600 sensors are embedded in drill holes into the rock mass. Additionally, we have developed a new method for measuring in situ strain and temperature in intact rock masses. Fiber optically instrumented rock strain and temperature strips (FROSTS) are 2 m-long strips of 304 stainless steel specially designed to measure temperature and both shortening and elongation in an intact rock mass. FROSTS have FBG strain and temperature sensors mounted on them at 30 cm interval and are grouted into a drill hole in a rock mass. In May 2011, we performed an active loading experiment that consisted of using two hydraulic rams to apply over 200 kN of force to the rock mass. Elastic strain was measured with the fiber optic sensor array. A one-dimensional Boussinesq solution calculates a Young's Modulus of 6.25 GPa for the rock mass. The laboratory-determined values for Young's Modulus in the Poorman formation vary between 49.6 and 94.5 GPa. The difference between the laboratory and field values can be attributed to the closing of fractures and microcracks in the rock mass making the rock mass more compliant than the smaller specimens used for the laboratory experiments. The results of the active loading experiment have implications for the up-scaling of rock mechanical properties between the laboratory and field scales.

  3. Laboratory investigation of spray generation mechanism in wind-wave interaction under strong wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the reduction of sea surface aerodynamic drag coefficient at hurricane conditions [1]. In this paper the mechanism of generation of spray in the near-surface layer of the atmosphere in a strong wind through the mechanism of «bag-breakup instability» was investigated in laboratory conditions with the help of high-speed video shooting. The laboratory experiments were performed on the Thermostratified Wind-Wave Channel of the IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) [2]. Experiments were carried out for the wind speeds from 14 to 22 m/s. In this range spray generation characteristics change dramatically from almost no spray generation to so called catastrophic regime with multiple cascade breakups on each crest. Shooting was performed with High-speed digital camera NAC Memrecam HX-3 in two different setups to obtain both statistical data and detailed spray generation mechanism overview. In first setup bright LED spotlight with mate screen the side of a channel was used for horizontal shadow-method shooting. Camera was placed in semi-submerged box on the opposite side of the channel. Shooting was performed at the distance of 7.5 m from the beginning of the working section. Series of short records of the surface evolution were made at 10 000 fps with 55 to 119 µm/px scale revealed the dominant mechanism of spray generation - bag-breakup instability. Sequences of high resolution images allowed investigating the details of this "bags" evolution. Shadow method provided better image quality for such conditions than side illumination and fluorescence methods. To obtain statistical data on "bags" sizes and densities vertical shadow method was used. Submerged light box was created with two 300 W underwater lamps and mate screen places at the fetch of 6.5 m. Long records (up to 8 seconds) were made with 4500 fps at 124-256 µm/px scales. Specially developed software

  4. [Mechanism of stomatal regulation by root sourced signaling and its agricultural signficance].

    PubMed

    Guo, Anhong; Li, Zhaoxiang; Liu, Gengshan; Yang, Yuanyan; An, Shunqing

    2004-06-01

    Under soil drought condition, root sourced signal abcisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in the long distance signaling process, and can be a measurement of soil water availability. ABA is also an effective stomatal closing agent, and acts to reduce transpiration and canopy water loss. This paper briefly introduced the physiological mechanism and theoretical model about the stomatal regulation by root sourced signaling, and indicated that the combination of this model with root water absorption model and stomatal conductance model could be more effective in depicting the response of plant to soil drying and atmospheric drought. In addition, some effective irrigation approaches, such as regulated deficit irrigation (RDI), partial root-zone drying (PRD) and controlled alternative irrigation (CAI) were profited from the mechanism of plant water use regulation by the root sourced signaling. These irrigation measures favored to reasonably distribute available soil water in root-zone. Root signaling system also played important role in regulating root growth and its development, retarding shoot growth to adjusting root shoot ratio, and optimizing assimilation allocation to favor to improve reproductive development. These processes hold substantial promise for enhancing crop water use efficiency. PMID:15362642

  5. Ammonia recovery from agricultural wastes by membrane distillation: fouling characterization and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zarebska, A; Nieto, D Romero; Christensen, K V; Norddahl, B

    2014-06-01

    One of the main obstacles impeding implementation of membrane distillation for the recovery and concentration of ammonia from swine manure is wetting caused by fouling. Due to the different types of fouling which can occur in a membrane system, foulants characterization is a complex problem. To elucidate the fouling mechanism, deposit morphology and composition of foulants have been determined using Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry, Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared Spectrometry, Ion chromatography and Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. Based on the analysis of fouled membranes, it is concluded that membrane fouling is dominated by organic fouling in combination with deposits of inorganic elements and microorganisms. After a week of running the membrane process without cleaning, the average fouling layer thickness was estimated to 10-15 μm. The fouling layer further results in a loss of membrane hydrophobicity. This indicates that fouling could be a severe problem for membrane distillation performance. PMID:24631940

  6. Ammonia recovery from agricultural wastes by membrane distillation: fouling characterization and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zarebska, A; Nieto, D Romero; Christensen, K V; Norddahl, B

    2014-06-01

    One of the main obstacles impeding implementation of membrane distillation for the recovery and concentration of ammonia from swine manure is wetting caused by fouling. Due to the different types of fouling which can occur in a membrane system, foulants characterization is a complex problem. To elucidate the fouling mechanism, deposit morphology and composition of foulants have been determined using Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry, Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared Spectrometry, Ion chromatography and Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. Based on the analysis of fouled membranes, it is concluded that membrane fouling is dominated by organic fouling in combination with deposits of inorganic elements and microorganisms. After a week of running the membrane process without cleaning, the average fouling layer thickness was estimated to 10-15 μm. The fouling layer further results in a loss of membrane hydrophobicity. This indicates that fouling could be a severe problem for membrane distillation performance.

  7. Physical Quality Indicators and Mechanical Behavior of Agricultural Soils of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Silvia; da Silva, Alvaro Pires; Ghiberto, Pablo J; Tormena, Cássio A; Pilatti, Miguel A; Libardi, Paulo L

    2016-01-01

    Mollisols of Santa Fe have different tilth and load support capacity. Despite the importance of these attributes to achieve a sustainable crop production, few information is available. The objectives of this study are i) to assess soil physical indicators related to plant growth and to soil mechanical behavior; and ii) to establish relationships to estimate the impact of soil loading on the soil quality to plant growth. The study was carried out on Argiudolls and Hapludolls of Santa Fe. Soil samples were collected to determine texture, organic matter content, bulk density, water retention curve, soil resistance to penetration, least limiting water range, critical bulk density for plant growth, compression index, pre-consolidation pressure and soil compressibility. Water retention curve and soil resistance to penetration were linearly and significantly related to clay and organic matter (R2 = 0.91 and R2 = 0.84). The pedotransfer functions of water retention curve and soil resistance to penetration allowed the estimation of the least limiting water range and critical bulk density for plant growth. A significant nonlinear relationship was found between critical bulk density for plant growth and clay content (R2 = 0.98). Compression index was significantly related to bulk density, water content, organic matter and clay plus silt content (R2 = 0.77). Pre-consolidation pressure was significantly related to organic matter, clay and water content (R2 = 0.77). Soil compressibility was significantly related to initial soil bulk density, clay and water content. A nonlinear and significantly pedotransfer function (R2 = 0.88) was developed to predict the maximum acceptable pressure to be applied during tillage operations by introducing critical bulk density for plant growth in the compression model. The developed pedotransfer function provides a useful tool to link the mechanical behavior and tilth of the soils studied.

  8. Physical Quality Indicators and Mechanical Behavior of Agricultural Soils of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pires da Silva, Alvaro; Ghiberto, Pablo J.; Tormena, Cássio A.; Pilatti, Miguel A.; Libardi, Paulo L.

    2016-01-01

    Mollisols of Santa Fe have different tilth and load support capacity. Despite the importance of these attributes to achieve a sustainable crop production, few information is available. The objectives of this study are i) to assess soil physical indicators related to plant growth and to soil mechanical behavior; and ii) to establish relationships to estimate the impact of soil loading on the soil quality to plant growth. The study was carried out on Argiudolls and Hapludolls of Santa Fe. Soil samples were collected to determine texture, organic matter content, bulk density, water retention curve, soil resistance to penetration, least limiting water range, critical bulk density for plant growth, compression index, pre-consolidation pressure and soil compressibility. Water retention curve and soil resistance to penetration were linearly and significantly related to clay and organic matter (R2 = 0.91 and R2 = 0.84). The pedotransfer functions of water retention curve and soil resistance to penetration allowed the estimation of the least limiting water range and critical bulk density for plant growth. A significant nonlinear relationship was found between critical bulk density for plant growth and clay content (R2 = 0.98). Compression index was significantly related to bulk density, water content, organic matter and clay plus silt content (R2 = 0.77). Pre-consolidation pressure was significantly related to organic matter, clay and water content (R2 = 0.77). Soil compressibility was significantly related to initial soil bulk density, clay and water content. A nonlinear and significantly pedotransfer function (R2 = 0.88) was developed to predict the maximum acceptable pressure to be applied during tillage operations by introducing critical bulk density for plant growth in the compression model. The developed pedotransfer function provides a useful tool to link the mechanical behavior and tilth of the soils studied. PMID:27099925

  9. Laboratory and 3-D-distinct element analysis of failure mechanism of slope under external surcharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Cheng, Y. M.

    2014-09-01

    Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient details. There are however increasing interest on the consequences after the initiation of failure which includes the development and propagation of the failure surfaces, the amount of failed mass and runoff and the affected region. To assess the development of slope failure in more details and to consider the potential danger of slopes after failure has initiated, the slope stability problem under external surcharge is analyzed by the distinct element method (DEM) and laboratory model test in the present research. A more refined study about the development of failure, microcosmic failure mechanism and the post-failure mechanism of slope will be carried out. The numerical modeling method and the various findings from the present work can provide an alternate method of analysis of slope failure which can give additional information not available from the classical methods of analysis.

  10. A laboratory study on the MSW mechanical behavior in triaxial apparatus.

    PubMed

    Karimpour-Fard, Mehran; Machado, Sandro Lemos; Shariatmadari, Nader; Noorzad, Ali

    2011-08-01

    Shear strength characterization of MSW materials is a mandatory task when performing analyses related to landfill design and landfill geometry improvements. Despite the considerable amount of research focusing on MSW mechanical behavior there remain certain aspects which are not completely understood and deserve attention in particular the case of the undrained behavior of MSW. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive laboratory testing program using a large-scale triaxial apparatus at the Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil. The effect of factors such as confining pressure, unit weight, fiber content, rate of loading and over-consolidation on the MSW mechanical response were investigated. Tested samples presented typical MSW shear/strain curves (concave upward) in all the tests, despite the pore water pressure reaching levels almost equal to the confining pressure. The obtained results show that increasing confining stress, unit weight, loading rate, fiber content and over-consolidation lead to an increase in the MSW shear strength. The importance of the fibrous components in the waste behavior is highlighted and graphs showing the variation of the MSW shear strength with fiber content in different drainage conditions are shown. The authors believe these results could be of interest to many companies, especially considering the new trend of plastic material recycling (prior landfilling) for energy recovery purposes. PMID:21478006

  11. Creating Linkages between the Labour Market and Agricultural Higher Education in Iran: Strategies and Mechanisms for Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movahedi, Reza; Saadi, Heshmatollah; Farani, Ahmad Yaghoubi

    2011-01-01

    Employment of agriculture graduates in Iran is a major problem that needs to be addressed. There are three main issues: lack of robust strategies for linking agricultural higher education and the labour market, the lack of relevance of agricultural curricula to the real needs of the labour market, and diminishing levels of government services for…

  12. Joint laboratory investigations of the physical and mechanical properties of the COSC-1 drill core, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Lebedev, Maxim; Ask, Maria; Wenning, Quinn; Zappone, Alba; Berthet, Théo; Malehmir, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The Caledonian orogen is an early to middle Paleozoic mountain chain with size dimension similar to the Alpine-Himalayan orogen. Parts of the Caledonian orogen have been deeply eroded and provide excellent exposure of rocks that were emplaced into the middle and lower crust during orogenesis. These exposed rock units therefore provide the possibility to study processes of mountain building that are often inaccessible in more modern orogens, and represent the targets for the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides deep drilling project (COSC-1). The main target of COSC-1 was the high grade Seve nappe complex. Temperature estimates indicate granulite facies conditions at the top of this nappe, grading to lower amphibolitic conditions downwards through the nappe. Discovery of micro-diamond included in garnets from the nearby Åreskutan mountain hints at an ultra-high pressure origin in parts of the Seve nappe complex. The COSC-1 deep drilling project presents a unique opportunity to study the laboratory physical properties of a 2.5 km drill core, which can be correlated to downhole logging measurements and for the interpretation of surface geophysical experiments. In a joint effort that comprises five laboratories, the physical properties the COSC drill core are investigated. Measurement schemes and preliminary results from this cooperative effort are presented. The physical properties suite of measurements on the core includes (i) density, (ii) porosity, (iii) ultrasonic wave velocity and anisotropy at elevated confining pressure, (iv) seismic attenuation and (v) permeability (and anisotropy of permeability). Mechanical properties include uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength at different confining pressures, and subsequent calculation of internal and residual friction angles. The joint investigations will also serve to cross-validate and calibrate different laboratory techniques that are used to measure physical properties. The rock units

  13. Studies on the Mechanism of Telavancin Decreased Susceptibility in a Laboratory-Derived Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Lunde, Christopher S.; Benton, Bret M.

    2013-01-01

    Telavancin is a novel semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide derivative of vancomycin with a dual mode of action. This study sought to understand the mechanisms of decreased telavancin susceptibility in a laboratory-derived Staphlococcus aureus mutant TlvDSMED1952. There were extensive changes in the transcriptome of TlvDSMED1952 compared to the susceptible parent strain MED1951. Genes upregulated included cofactor biosynthesis genes, cell wall-related genes, fatty acid biosynthesis genes, and stress genes. Downregulated genes included lysine operon biosynthesis genes and lrgB, which are induced by telavancin in susceptible strains, agr and kdpDE genes, various cell surface protein genes, phenol-soluble modulin genes, several protease genes, and genes involved in anaerobic metabolism. The decreased susceptibility mutant had somewhat thicker cell walls and a decreased autolytic activity that may be related to decreased proteolytic peptidoglycan hydrolase processing. Membrane fatty acid changes correlated with increased membrane fluidity were observed. It seems likely that there are multiple genetic changes associated with the development of decreased telavancin susceptibility. The TlvDS mutant showed some similar features to vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus and decreased daptomycin susceptibility strains, but also exhibited its own unique features. PMID:23551248

  14. Studies on the mechanism of telavancin decreased susceptibility in a laboratory-derived mutant.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Lunde, Christopher S; Benton, Bret M; Wilkinson, Brian J

    2013-08-01

    Telavancin is a novel semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide derivative of vancomycin with a dual mode of action. This study sought to understand the mechanisms of decreased telavancin susceptibility in a laboratory-derived Staphlococcus aureus mutant Tlv(DS)MED1952. There were extensive changes in the transcriptome of Tlv(DS)MED1952 compared to the susceptible parent strain MED1951. Genes upregulated included cofactor biosynthesis genes, cell wall-related genes, fatty acid biosynthesis genes, and stress genes. Downregulated genes included lysine operon biosynthesis genes and lrgB, which are induced by telavancin in susceptible strains, agr and kdpDE genes, various cell surface protein genes, phenol-soluble modulin genes, several protease genes, and genes involved in anaerobic metabolism. The decreased susceptibility mutant had somewhat thicker cell walls and a decreased autolytic activity that may be related to decreased proteolytic peptidoglycan hydrolase processing. Membrane fatty acid changes correlated with increased membrane fluidity were observed. It seems likely that there are multiple genetic changes associated with the development of decreased telavancin susceptibility. The Tlv(DS) mutant showed some similar features to vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus and decreased daptomycin susceptibility strains, but also exhibited its own unique features.

  15. Laboratory studies of potential mechanisms of renoxification of tropospheric nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Figueroa, A M; Sumner, A L; Finlayson-Pitts, B J

    2003-02-01

    Laboratory studies of the heterogeneous reactions between HNO3 in thin water films on silica surfaces and gaseous NO, CO, CH4, and SO2, proposed as potential "renoxification" mechanisms in the atmosphere, are reported. Transmission FTIR was used to monitor reactants and products on the silica surface and in the gas phase as a function of time. No reaction of CO, CH4, or SO2 was observed; upper limits to the reaction probabilities (gamma(rxn)) are < or = 10(-10) for CO and SO2 and < or = 10(-12) for CH4. However, the reaction of HNO3 with NO does occur with a lower limit for the reaction probability of gammaNO > or = (6 +/- 2) x 10(-9) (2s). The experimental evidence shows that the chemistry is insensitive to whether the substrate is pure silica or borosilicate glass. Nitric acid in its molecular form, and not the nitrate anion form, was shown to be the reactive species, and NH4NO3 was shown not to react with NO. The HNO3-NO reaction could be a significant means of renoxification of nitric acid on the surfaces of buildings and soils in the boundary layer of polluted urban atmospheres. This chemistry may help to resolve some discrepancies between model-predicted ozone and field observations in polluted urban atmospheres.

  16. An in-depth analysis of the physico-mechanical properties imparted by agricultural fibers and food processing residues in polypropylene biocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Murdy, Rachel Campbell; Mak, Michelle; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar K.

    2015-05-22

    The use of agricultural and food processing residues as potential reinforcements in plastics has been extensively studied. However, there is a large variation in the mechanical performance of agricultural fiber-based biocomposites due to different processing materials and parameters. An in-depth comparison of the resulting effect of the agricultural filler on the matrix is often not possible given the discrepancy in processing conditions. This study seeks to determine the intrinsic properties of agricultural fibers and food processing residues for their use in polypropylene biocomposites based on a standardization of experimental design. The effect of 25wt% loading of miscanthus, fall-and spring-harvest switchgrass, wheat straw, oat hull, soy hull, soy stalk, hemp and flax on the physico-mechanical properties of polypropylene biocomposites was investigated. The addition of fiber led to an improvement in flexural strength, flexural modulus, and tensile modulus, and a general decrease in tensile strength at yield, elongation at break and Izod impact strength. Scanning electron microscopy highlighted the interfacial adhesion, orientation and distribution of the fibers within the matrix, confirming that fiber length and dispersion within the matrix are positively correlated with mechanical properties. The crystallization of the polypropylene phase and a compositional analysis of the agricultural fibers and processing residues were also compared to offer insight into the effect of the filler’s intrinsic properties on the resulting material performance.

  17. An in-depth analysis of the physico-mechanical properties imparted by agricultural fibers and food processing residues in polypropylene biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdy, Rachel Campbell; Mak, Michelle; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar K.

    2015-05-01

    The use of agricultural and food processing residues as potential reinforcements in plastics has been extensively studied. However, there is a large variation in the mechanical performance of agricultural fiber-based biocomposites due to different processing materials and parameters. An in-depth comparison of the resulting effect of the agricultural filler on the matrix is often not possible given the discrepancy in processing conditions. This study seeks to determine the intrinsic properties of agricultural fibers and food processing residues for their use in polypropylene biocomposites based on a standardization of experimental design. The effect of 25wt% loading of miscanthus, fall-and spring-harvest switchgrass, wheat straw, oat hull, soy hull, soy stalk, hemp and flax on the physico-mechanical properties of polypropylene biocomposites was investigated. The addition of fiber led to an improvement in flexural strength, flexural modulus, and tensile modulus, and a general decrease in tensile strength at yield, elongation at break and Izod impact strength. Scanning electron microscopy highlighted the interfacial adhesion, orientation and distribution of the fibers within the matrix, confirming that fiber length and dispersion within the matrix are positively correlated with mechanical properties. The crystallization of the polypropylene phase and a compositional analysis of the agricultural fibers and processing residues were also compared to offer insight into the effect of the filler's intrinsic properties on the resulting material performance.

  18. Effects of NO3 (-) and PO4 (3-) on the release of geogenic arsenic and antimony in agricultural wetland soil: a field and laboratory approach.

    PubMed

    Rouwane, Asmaa; Rabiet, Marion; Grybos, Malgorzata; Bernard, Guillaume; Guibaud, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) in wetland soil periodically submitted to agricultural pressure as well as the impact of soil enrichment with NO3 (-) (50 mg L(-1)) and PO4 (3-) (20 mg L(-1)) on As and Sb release were evaluated at both field and laboratory scales. The results showed that As and Sb exhibited different temporal behaviors, depending on the study scale. At field scale, As release (up to 93 μg L(-1)) occurred under Fe-reducing conditions, whereas Sb release was favored under oxidizing conditions (up to 5 μg L(-1)) and particularity when dissolved organic carbon (DOC) increased in soil pore water (up to 92.8 mg L(-1)). At laboratory scale, As and Sb release was much higher under reducing conditions (up to 138 and 1 μg L(-1), respectively) compared to oxic conditions (up to 6 and 0.5 μg L(-1), respectively) and was enhanced by NO3 (-) and PO4 (3-) addition (increased by a factor of 2.3 for As and 1.6 for Sb). The higher release of As and Sb in the enriched reduced soil compared to the non-enriched soil was probably induced by the combined effect of PO4 (3-) and HCO3 (-) which compete for the same binding sites of soil surfaces. Modeling results using Visual Minteq were in accordance with experimental results regarding As but failed in simulating the effects of PO4 (3-) and HCO3 (-) on Sb release. PMID:26531710

  19. Effects of NO3 (-) and PO4 (3-) on the release of geogenic arsenic and antimony in agricultural wetland soil: a field and laboratory approach.

    PubMed

    Rouwane, Asmaa; Rabiet, Marion; Grybos, Malgorzata; Bernard, Guillaume; Guibaud, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) in wetland soil periodically submitted to agricultural pressure as well as the impact of soil enrichment with NO3 (-) (50 mg L(-1)) and PO4 (3-) (20 mg L(-1)) on As and Sb release were evaluated at both field and laboratory scales. The results showed that As and Sb exhibited different temporal behaviors, depending on the study scale. At field scale, As release (up to 93 μg L(-1)) occurred under Fe-reducing conditions, whereas Sb release was favored under oxidizing conditions (up to 5 μg L(-1)) and particularity when dissolved organic carbon (DOC) increased in soil pore water (up to 92.8 mg L(-1)). At laboratory scale, As and Sb release was much higher under reducing conditions (up to 138 and 1 μg L(-1), respectively) compared to oxic conditions (up to 6 and 0.5 μg L(-1), respectively) and was enhanced by NO3 (-) and PO4 (3-) addition (increased by a factor of 2.3 for As and 1.6 for Sb). The higher release of As and Sb in the enriched reduced soil compared to the non-enriched soil was probably induced by the combined effect of PO4 (3-) and HCO3 (-) which compete for the same binding sites of soil surfaces. Modeling results using Visual Minteq were in accordance with experimental results regarding As but failed in simulating the effects of PO4 (3-) and HCO3 (-) on Sb release.

  20. Mechanisms affecting the transport and retention of bacteria, bacteriophage and microspheres in laboratory-scale saturated fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seggewiss, G.; Dickson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater is becoming an increasingly important water source due to the ever-increasing demands from agricultural, residential and industrial consumers. In search of more secure sources, wells are routinely finished over large vertical depths in bedrock aquifers, creating new hydraulic pathways and thus increasing the risk of cross contamination. Moreover, hydraulic pathways are also being altered and created by increasing water withdrawal rates from these wells. Currently, it is not well understood how biological contaminants are transported through, and retained in, fractured media thereby making risk assessment and land use decisions difficult. Colloid transport within fractured rock is a complex process with several mechanisms affecting transport and retention, including: advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, diffusion, size exclusion, adsorption, and decay. Several researchers have investigated the transport of bacteria, bacteriophage, and microspheres (both carboxylated and plain) to evaluate the effects of surface properties and size on transport and retention. These studies have suggested that transport is highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the particle, the fracture, and the carrying fluid. However, these studies contain little detail regarding the specific mechanisms responsible for transport beyond speculating about their existence. Further, little work has been done to compare the transport of these particulate materials through the same fracture, allowing for direct observations based on particulate size and surface properties. This research examines the similarities and differences in transport and retention between four different particles through two different laboratory-scale, saturated fractures. This work is designed to explore the effects of particle size, surface properties, ionic strength of the carrying solution, and aperture field characteristics on transport and retention in single, saturated fractures. The particulates

  1. Science of Agricultural Mechanization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Ashleigh Barbee, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  2. The Mechanization of Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Wayne D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses technological innovations affecting the economic and social basis of farm life, focusing on trends, farm equipment (plows, reaping tools, tractors, and harvesters), productivity, and influence of computers in all phases of agribusiness. (JN)

  3. Groundwater dynamics in wetland soils control the production and transfer mechanisms of dissolved reactive phosphorus in an agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas, Rémi; Gu, Sen; Gruau, Gérard; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2015-04-01

    Because of its high sorption affinity on soils solid phase, mitigation options to reduce diffuse P transfer usually focus on trapping particulate P forms delivered via surface flowpaths. Therefore, vegetated buffer zones placed between croplands and watercourses have been promoted worldwide, sometimes in wetland areas. To investigate the risk of such P trapping riparian wetlands (RWs) releasing dissolved P to rivers, we monitored molybdate reactive P (MRP) in the free soil solution of two RWs in an intensively farmed catchment. Two main mechanisms causing MRP release were identified in light of the geochemical and hydrological conditions in the RWs, controlled by groundwater dynamics. First, soil rewetting after the dry summer was associated with the presence of a pool of mobile P, limited in size. Its mobilization started under conditions of water saturation caused by groundwater uprise in RW organo-mineral soil horizons. Second, the establishment of anoxic conditions in the end of the winter caused reductive solubilization of Fe oxide-hydroxide, along with release of P. Comparison between sites revealed that the first MRP release occurred only in a RW with P enriched soils, whereas the second was recorded even in a RW with a low soil P status. Seasonal variations in MRP concentrations in the stream were synchronized with those in RW soils. Hence, enriched and/or periodically anoxic RWs can act as a key component of the P transfer continuum in agricultural landscapes by converting particulate P from croplands into MRP released to rivers.

  4. A finite element model for simulating runoff and soil erosion from mechanically treated agricultural lands: 2. Field validation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharda, V. N.; Singh, Sita Ram; Sastry, G.; Dhruvanarayana, V. V.

    1994-07-01

    The finite element model for simulation of runoff and soil erosion as developed by Sharda and Singh (this issue) is evaluated using data collected from agricultural land treated with major mechanical soil and water conservation measures, namely, contour bunding, graded bunding, bench terracing, and conservation bench terracing. The simulated and experimentally realized hydrographs and soil loss values are in reasonably good agreement for various measures. Probable reasons for discrepancies between the predicted and observed values are discussed. The model has the potential of being used on a single storm or a continuous basis provided the soil, crop, and climatic parameters are precisely known or estimated for a given location and for the period under consideration. The model logically simulates the effects of flow, topographic, soil, and crop parameters such as antecedent moisture level, roughness coefficient, saturated hydraulic conductivity, slope, depth of impoundment, size of outlet, longitudinal slope of the channel, vertical interval, and cropping management factor. The model is found to be quite sensitive to changes in roughness coefficient, rainfall excess rate, and cover management factor, and hence these parameters need to be assessed carefully in the field. The general applicability of the model as a planning tool for soil conservation measures and the scope for future development are also discussed.

  5. Mechanisms for flowering plants to benefit arthropod natural enemies of insect pests: prospects for enhanced use in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhong-Xian; Zhu, Ping-Yang; Gurr, Geoff M; Zheng, Xu-Song; Read, Donna M Y; Heong, Kong-Luen; Yang, Ya-Jun; Xu, Hong-Xing

    2014-02-01

    Reduction of noncrop habitats, intensive use of pesticides and high levels of disturbance associated with intensive crop production simplify the farming landscape and bring about a sharp decline of biodiversity. This, in turn, weakens the biological control ecosystem service provided by arthropod natural enemies. Strategic use of flowering plants to enhance plant biodiversity in a well-targeted manner can provide natural enemies with food sources and shelter to improve biological control and reduce dependence on chemical pesticides. This article reviews the nutritional value of various types of plant-derived food for natural enemies, possible adverse effects on pest management, and the practical application of flowering plants in orchards, vegetables and field crops, agricultural systems where most research has taken place. Prospects for more effective use of flowering plants to maximize biological control of insect pests in agroecosystem are good but depend up on selection of optimal plant species based on information on the ecological mechanisms by which natural enemies are selectively favored over pest species.

  6. An Internal Evaluation of the National FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event through Analysis of Individual and Team Scores from 1996-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Edward A.; Armbruster, James

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an internal evaluation of the National FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event (CDE) through analysis of individual and team scores from 1996-2006. Data were analyzed by overall and sub-event areas scores for individual contestants and team event. To facilitate the analysis process scores were…

  7. Integrating Statistical Mechanics with Experimental Data from the Rotational-Vibrational Spectrum of HCl into the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Bret R.; Mylon, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a computer exercise that bridges spectroscopy and thermodynamics using statistical mechanics and the experimental data taken from the commonly used laboratory exercise involving the rotational-vibrational spectrum of HCl. Based on the results from the analysis of their HCl spectrum, students calculate bulk thermodynamic properties…

  8. Course Outline for Lesson Plans for Pre-Employment Laboratory Training in CVAE-VEH Farm and Ranch Mechanical Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This packet contains 88 lesson plans for a laboratory course in farm and ranch mechanical repair. The lesson plans are organized into six units covering the following topics: occupational information, construction and maintenance (safety, farm carpentry, farm water supply and sanitation, farm electricity, concrete), hot metal work (oxyacetylene…

  9. Innovative Programs in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Developmental programs resulting from the increased emphasis on off-farm agricultural occupations and considered innovative by state wupervisors of agricultural education are described: (1) 17 high school vocational agriculture programs in horticulture, agricultural mechanics, forestry and conservation, agriculture and distribution, cooperative…

  10. Mechanical stratigraphy of deep-water sandstones: insights from a multisciplinary field and laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Corradetti, Amerigo; Cantalamessa, Gino

    2010-05-01

    Turbidite sandstones found in deep-water fold-and-thrust belts are increasingly exploited as hydrocarbon reservoirs. Within these rocks, the fluid flow is profoundly affected by the complex interaction between primary sedimentological and stratigraphic attributes (i.e, facies, layering, reservoir quality, stacking patterns, bed connectivity and lateral extent) and fracture characteristics (i.e., length, spacing, distribution, orientation, connectivity). Unfortunately, most of these features are at, or below, the resolution of conventional seismic datasets and, for this reason, their identification and localization represent one of the fundamental challenges facing exploration, appraisal and production of the sandstone reservoirs. In this respect, whereas considerable effort has been afforded to a characterization of the sedimentological and stratigraphic aspects of sandstones, detailed analysis of fractures in this type of successions has received significantly less attention. In this work, we combine field and laboratory analyses to assess the possible mechanical control exerted by the rock properties (grain size, intergranualr porosity, and Young modulus), as well as the influence of bed thickness, on joint density in turbidite sandstones. Joints are mode-I fractures occurring parallel to the greatest principle stress axis, which solve opening displacement and do not show evidence of shearing and enhance the values of total porosity forming preferential hydraulic conduits for fluid flow. Within layered rocks, commonly, joints form perpendicular to bedding due to overburden or exhumation. The empirical relation between joint spacing and bed thickness, documented in the field by many authors, has been mechanically related to the stress perturbation taking place around joints during their formation. Furthermore, close correlations between joint density and rock properties have been already established. In this present contribution, we focus on the bed

  11. The Technology Information Environment with Industry (TIE-In): A mechanism for accessing laboratory solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.; Machin, G.D.; Marek, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Technology Information Environment with Industry (TIE-In) is a system that helps users obtain laboratory-developed technical solutions without requiring that they duplicate the technical resources (in people, hardware and software) at the national laboratories. TIE-In is based on providing users with controlled access to distributed laboratory resources that are packaged in intelligent user interfaces. These interfaces help users obtain technical solutions without requiring that the user have specialized technical and computer expertise. As a designated DOE Technology Deployment Center/User Facility, industry users can access a broad range of laboratory-developed technologies on a cost-recovery basis. TIE-In will also be used to share laboratory resources with partners in US industry that help the DOE meet future manufacturing needs for the stewardship of our nation`s nuclear weapons stockpile.

  12. Mechanism and rate of denitrification in an agricultural watershed: Electron and mass balance along groundwater flow paths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Liebscher, H.; Cox, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    The rate and mechanism of nitrate removal along and between groundwater flow paths were investigated using a series of well nests screened in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer. Intensive agricultural activity in this area has resulted in nitrate concentrations in groundwater often exceeding drinking water standards. Both the extent and rate of denitrification varied depending on the groundwater flow path. While little or no denitrification occurred in much of the upland portions of the aquifer, a gradual redox gradient is observed as aerobic upland groundwater moves deeper in the aquifer. In contrast, a sharp shallow redox gradient is observed adjacent to a third-order stream as aerobic groundwater enters reduced sediments. An essentially complete loss of nitrate concurrent with increases in excess N2 provide evidence that denitrification occurs as groundwater enters this zone. Electron and mass balance calculations suggest that iron sulfide (e.g., pyrite) oxidation is the primary source of electrons for denitrification. Denitrification rate estimates were based on mass balance calculations using nitrate and excess N2 coupled with groundwater travel times. Travel times were determined using a groundwater flow model and were constrained by chlorofluorocarbon-based age dates. Denitrification rates were found to vary considerably between the two areas where denitrification occurs. Denitrification rates in the deep, upland portions of the aquifer were found to range from < 0.01 to 0.14 mM of N per year; rates at the redoxcline along the shallow flow path range from 1.0 to 2.7 mM of N per year. Potential denitrification rates in groundwater adjacent to the stream may be much faster, with rates up to 140 mM per year based on an in situ experiment conducted in this zone.The rate and mechanism of nitrate removal along and between groundwater flow paths were investigated using a series of well nests screened in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer. Intensive

  13. SOEP: Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Clinton O.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A series of articles examines aspects of supervised occupational experience programs (SOEP) in agricultural mechanics, including production agriculture, horticulture, technical institute programs, mechanized agriculture, safety education, point guide system for developing competencies, and teacher education's responsibility. (SK)

  14. Propagation and deposition mechanisms of dense pyroclastic density currents: insights from analogue laboratory experiments. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, O.; Montserrat, S.; Niño, Y.; Tamburrino, A.

    2010-12-01

    Analogue laboratory experiments on air-particle flows represent a useful tool to investigate the mechanisms of propagation and deposition of dense (or the dense part of) pyroclastic density currents. In this context, we carried out experiments in the dam-break configuration and studied the emplacement processes of analogue biphasic currents generated from the quasi-instantaneous release of fluidized columns of fine (80 µm) particles. The low permeability of the granular material permitted relatively slow diffusion of the initial pore pressure within the flows until they came to halt. Analysis of the flow kinematics and comparison with flows of water in the same apparatus revealed that the air-particle currents propagated in two distinct stages. They behaved as their inertial water counterparts for most their emplacement, as both types of flows had the same morphology and propagated at constant front velocity U~√(2gh), h being the initial height of the granular column. This occurred as long as the height of the collapsing fluidized columns was higher than the that of the resultant flows, thus generating a driving pressure gradient. This fluid-inertial behavior suggested that the pore fluid pressure was high during propagation of the mixture. In order to check this hypothesis, we carried out non invasive measurements of the pore fluid pressure at the base of the air-particle flows and made correlation of the pressure signal with the flow structure from analyses of high speed videos. The flow structure consisted of a sliding head that caused underpressure relative to ambient conditions and whose magnitude correlated with the flow velocity. The flow head was followed by a body that generated overpressure and at the base of which a deposit aggraded at a nearly constant rate. Both the flow head and body were sheared pervasively as the internal velocity increased upwards. The combination of pressure advection from the source and relatively slow pressure diffusion

  15. An Inquiry-Infused Introductory Biology Laboratory That Integrates Mendel's Pea Phenotypes with Molecular Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudish, Philip; Schlag, Erin; Kaplinsky, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multi-week laboratory in which college-level introductory biology students investigate Mendel's stem length phenotype in peas. Students collect, analyze and interpret convergent evidence from molecular and physiological techniques. In weeks 1 and 2, students treat control and experimental plants with Gibberellic Acid (GA) to…

  16. Laboratory Activities to Support Student Understanding of the Molecular Mechanisms of Mutation & Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubler, Tina; Adams, Patti; Scammell, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of evolution is an important and challenging concept for students to understand. In a previous article, we provided some of the scientific background necessary to teach this topic. This article features a series of laboratory activities demonstrating that molecular events can alter the genomes of organisms. These activities are…

  17. Laboratory Characterization of Mechanical and Permeability Properties of Dynamically Compacted Crushed Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F.D.; Mellegard, K.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

    1999-02-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy plans to dispose of transuranic wastes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geologic repository located at a depth of about 655 meters. The WIPP underground facility is located in the bedded salt of the Salado Formation. Access to the facility is provided through vertical shafts, which will be sealed after decommissioning to limit the release of hazardous waste from the repository and to limit flow into the facility. Because limited data are available to characterize the properties of dynamically compacted crushed salt, Sandia National Laboratories authorized RE/SPEC to perform additional tests on specimens of dynamically compacted crushed salt. These included shear consolidation creep, permeability, and constant strain-rate triaxial compression tests. A limited number of samples obtained from the large compacted mass were available for use in the testing program. Thus, additional tests were performed on samples that were prepared on a smaller scale device in the RE/SPEC laboratory using a dynamic-compaction procedure based on the full-scale construction technique. The laboratory results were expected to (1) illuminate the phenomenology of crushed-salt deformation behavior and (2) add test results to a small preexisting database for purposes of estimating parameters in a crushed-salt constitutive model. The candidate constitutive model for dynamically compacted crushed salt was refined in parallel with this laboratory testing.

  18. Laboratory Investigations of the Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Coupling Behaviour of Sandstone in CO2 Storage in Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui; Hu, Dawei; Zhang, Fan; Shao, Jianfu; Feng, Xiating

    2016-02-01

    This paper is devoted to experimental investigations of the hydro-mechanical-chemical coupling behaviour of sandstone in the context of CO2 storage in aquifers. We focused on the evolution of creep strain, the transport properties and the elastic modulus of sandstone under the effect of CO2-brine or CO2 alone. A summary of previous laboratory results is first presented, including mechanical, poromechanical and hydro-mechanical-chemical coupling properties. Tests were then performed to investigate the evolution of the creep strain and permeability during the injection of CO2-brine or CO2 alone. After the injection of CO2-brine or CO2 alone, an instantaneous volumetric dilatancy was observed due to the decrease in the effective confining stress. However, CO2 alone had a significant influence on the creep strain and permeability compared to the small influence of CO2-brine. This phenomenon can be attributed to the acceleration of the CO2-brine-rock reaction by the generation of carbonic acid induced by the dissolution of CO2 into the brine. The original indentation tests on samples after the CO2-brine-rock reaction were also performed and indicated that the elastic modulus decreased with an increasing reaction time. The present laboratory results can advance our knowledge of the hydro-mechanical-chemical coupling behaviour of sandstone in CO2 storage in aquifers.

  19. The mechanisms of plant stress mitigation by kaolin-based particle films and its applications in horticultural and agricultural crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kaolin-based particle films have utility in reducing insect, heat, light, and uv stress in plants due to the reflective nature of the particles. Particle films with a residue density of 1 to 3 g/ square meter have been evaluated in a range of crops and agricultural environments. The particle film ...

  20. Is mudflow in Sidoarjo, East Java due to the pumping mechanism of hot air bubbles? : Laboratory simulations and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.

    2015-09-01

    Extraordinary mudflow has happened in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia since 2006. This mud comes from the giant crater that is located close to the BJP - 01. Thousands of homes have been submerged due to mudflow. Till today this giant mud crater is still has great strength despite the mud flowing over 8 years. This is a very rare phenomenon in the world. This mud flow mechanism raises big questions, because it has been going on for years, naturally the mudflow will stop by itself because the pressure should be reduced. This research evaluates all aspects of integrated observations, laboratory tests and field observations since the beginning of this ongoing mudflow. Laboratory tests were done by providing hot air bubbles into the fluid inside the inverted funnel showed that the fluid can flow with a high altitude. It is due to the mechanism of buoyant force from air bubbles to the water where the contrast density of the water and the air is quite large. Quantity of air bubbles provides direct effect to the debit of fluid flow. Direct observation in the field, in 2006 and 2007, with TIMNAS and LPPM ITB showed the large number of air bubbles on the surface of the mud craters. Temperature observation on the surface of mud crater is around 98 degree C whereas at greater depth shows the temperature is increasingly rising. This strengthens the hypothesis or proves that the mud pumping mechanism comes from buoyant force of hot air bubbles. Inversion gravity images show that the deep subsurface of main crater is close to volcanic layers or root of Arjuna mountain. Based on the simulation laboratory and field observation data, it can be concluded that the geothermal factor plays a key role in the mudflow mechanism.

  1. Resolving the mesospheric nighttime 4.3 µm emission puzzle: Laboratory demonstration of new mechanism for OH(υ) relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogerakis, Konstantinos S.; Matsiev, Daniel; Sharma, Ramesh D.; Wintersteiner, Peter P.

    2016-09-01

    We report laboratory results that support a recently proposed mechanism for relaxation of highly vibrationally excited hydroxyl radical by ground-state oxygen atoms (Sharma et al., GRL 42, 4639-4647 (2015)). According to this mechanism, which eventually leads to an enhancement of nocturnal 4.3 µm CO2 emissions in the mesosphere, the deactivation of OH(high υ) by O(3P) involves a fast, spin-allowed, multiquantum vibration-to-electronic (V-E) energy transfer process generating O(1D). We present laser-based experiments that demonstrate these energy transfer processes in action and discuss some implications of the new mechanism for mesospheric OH. These developments represent a breakthrough addressing the long-standing problem of unacceptably large discrepancies between models and observations of the nocturnal mesospheric 4.3 µm emission.

  2. A comparative study of seismicity statistics in laboratory stick-slip experiments and nature: Implications for fault mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Thomas; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Becker, Thorsten; Sammis, Charles; Dresen, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Fault properties can rarely be monitored under in-situ conditions at seismogenic depth. At these depths seismicity records are possibly the only high-resolution data that can provide insight into state of stress and mechanics of faulting. We analyze series of laboratory experiments on faults that developed during stick-slip on saw-cut and fractured surfaces under upper crustal stress conditions. Stick-slip experiments were performed on surfaces with varying roughness and fracture surfaces that evolved into fault zones with pronounced damage zones. We monitor and analyze acoustic emission events that exhibit many striking similarities to natural seismicity across all examined scales. These similarities include pronounced Gutenberg-Richter-type magnitude distributions, Omori-type aftershock decay, and off-fault seismicity distributions that decay as a power law with distance. In the laboratory, fault roughness and heterogeneity are critical in concentrating stresses that lead to local AE clustering, and differences in off-fault activities and lower b-values. Similar observations of earthquake clustering and b-value variations were made for natural faults such as the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas fault. In addition to seismicity statistics, we conducted a detailed analysis of moment tensors, focusing on relative contributions from isotropic and deviatoric components to laboratory seismicity. In contrast to natural seismicity, our results revealed a larger contribution from isotropic components. These contributions are a result of ongoing fracture processes within the evolving fault which are most pronounced after stick-slip events. Our study shows, that seismicity analyses in laboratory experiments can significantly advance our understanding of fault mechanics from the scale of single asperities to large fault zones.

  3. Agricultural Machinery - Equipment. Agricultural Cooperative Training. Vocational Agricluture. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandlin, David, Comp.; And Others

    Designed for students enrolled in the Agricultural Cooperative Part-Time Training Program, this course of study contains 12 units on agricultural machinery mechanics. Units include (examples of unit topics in parentheses): introduction (agricultural mechanics as an occupation; safety--shop and equipment; use of holding devices, jacks, lifts, and…

  4. Thigmomorphogenesis: field and laboratory studies of Abies fraseri in response to wind or mechanical perturbation.

    PubMed

    Telewski, F W; Jaffe, M J

    1986-01-01

    Field- and greenhouse-grown Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. (Fraser fir) were analyzed for wind- or mechanically-induced flexure changes. These changes included inhibition of stem and needle elongation, reinforcement of branch bases around the stem, and increased radial growth in the direction of the mechanical perturbation (MP). Mature trees exposed to high wind conditions were severely flag-formed. These modified tree crowns had a lower drag than crowns of non-flag formed trees in wind-tunnel tests. In both field-grown and greenhouse-grown A. fraseri, MP induced a decrease in flexibility and increased elasticity of the stems. The increased radial growth of the stems overrode the increase in elasticity, resulting in the overall decrease in flexibility. The increase in radial growth caused by wind or mechanical flexure was due to greater cell divisions of the vascular cambium, resulting in increased numbers of tracheids. The decrease in stem elongation in these trees was due, at least in part, to a decrease in tracheid length. The potential biological and mechanical significance of these induced growth changes in trees are addressed. The data support the thigmomorphogenetic theory, which states that plants respond to wind and other mechanical perturbations in a way that is favorable to the plant for continued survival in windy environments.

  5. Thigmomorphogenesis: field and laboratory studies of Abies fraseri in response to wind or mechanical perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telewski, F. W.; Jaffe, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Field- and greenhouse-grown Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. (Fraser fir) were analyzed for wind- or mechanically-induced flexure changes. These changes included inhibition of stem and needle elongation, reinforcement of branch bases around the stem, and increased radial growth in the direction of the mechanical perturbation (MP). Mature trees exposed to high wind conditions were severely flag-formed. These modified tree crowns had a lower drag than crowns of non-flag formed trees in wind-tunnel tests. In both field-grown and greenhouse-grown A. fraseri, MP induced a decrease in flexibility and increased elasticity of the stems. The increased radial growth of the stems overrode the increase in elasticity, resulting in the overall decrease in flexibility. The increase in radial growth caused by wind or mechanical flexure was due to greater cell divisions of the vascular cambium, resulting in increased numbers of tracheids. The decrease in stem elongation in these trees was due, at least in part, to a decrease in tracheid length. The potential biological and mechanical significance of these induced growth changes in trees are addressed. The data support the thigmomorphogenetic theory, which states that plants respond to wind and other mechanical perturbations in a way that is favorable to the plant for continued survival in windy environments.

  6. Working through Laboratory/Industry Linkages: Creating an Enabling Mechanism in CSIR India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh, Dr.

    India's research base rests on its more than 260 universities and about 2500 recognized research and development (r&d) laboratories. Most of them, representing diverse science disciplines have linkages, both formal and informal with academia and industry. These linkages, established primarily because of increasing global competition, burgeoning research costs and rapid technological changes, have helped in synergisation of intellectual efforts, sharing of r&d results, pooling of resources, and availability of trained manpower. This case study details institutionalization of one such cooperative effort in which a laboratory of India's Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in a multilateral linkage with industrial units and government agencies has embarked upon a programme which integrates the technology upgradation and management needs of a cluster of small enterprises. Initiated under the Government of India's Upgradation of Technology (UPTECH) scheme this cooperative effort involving four major agencies, with one of them being the nodal one, is to be implemented in three phases over a two year period. It has well set goals and agreed output norms. The programme, which started six months ago, has already given results which do generate hope for the success of this large multilateral linkage programme. It also heralds a promise for hundreds of small industrial enterprises, which need to modernize in terms of process upgradation, environmental friendliness and reaching out to global markets by following cluster and participative management approaches.

  7. An Evaluation of a Welding Fumes Exhaust System. Agricultural Experiment Station Research Report 284.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, C. O.

    A study evaluated the feasibility of introducing unheated outside air into the airstream of a cross-flow welding exhaust system to reduce heating energy costs of a school welding laboratory. The physical facility used was the agricultural mechanics laboratory at the University of Arizona, which is similar to facilities in which instruction in…

  8. Laboratory determination of mechanical properties of rocks from the Parcperdue geopressured/geothermal site

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, K.P.; Borschel, T.F.; Holland, M.T.; Schatz, J.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The deformational behavior and fluid flow characteristics of rock samples obtained from DOW/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 Test Well at the Parcperdue Geopressured/Geothermal Site have been investigated in the laboratory. Elastic moduli, compressibility, uniaxial compaction coefficient, strength, creep parameters, permeability, acoustic velocites (all at reservoir conditions) and changes in these quantities induced by simulated reservoir production have been obtained from tests on several sandstone and shale samples from different depths. Tests consisting of several hydrostatic and triaxial loading phases and pore pressure reduction were designed to provide measurements to be used for calculating several of the above mentioned parameters in a single test. Pore volume changes were measured during some phases of the tests.

  9. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as an Agricultural-Industrial Equipment Mechanic. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Edgar P.; McCracken, J. David

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the agricultural-industrial equipment mechanic is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are…

  10. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 3. Battelle Columbus Laboratories pilot plant preliminary design and Phase 2 definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary design for an engineering field test project of a solar controlled environment agriculture system with 0.37 hectare of growing area is presented. Specifications and requirements of system components are outlined as are the instrumentation and control systems. System support facilities are briefly discussed. The program management plan and an economic analysis are included. (BCS)

  11. Database of Mechanical and Hydrological Properties of WIPP Anhydrite Derived from Laboratory-Scale Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

    1998-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the purpose of demonstrating safe management, storage, and disposal of radioactive transuranic (TRU) waste generated by U.S. defense programs. The WIPP is located in southeastern New Mexico, and the underground facilities of the WIPP (i.e., experimental rooms, disposal rooms, etc.) are sited in the bedded salt of the Salado Formation at a depth of about 660 meters. The DOE has authorized the continuance of scientific research and engineering analysis related to the performance of the WIPP repository. One area of additional research relates to characterization of the mechanical and hydrological properties of anhydrite interbeds within the Salado Formation. These anhydrite interbeds have been penetrated by the shafts that provide access to the underground facilities and also lie in close proximity to the proposed radioactive waste disposal rooms at the repository horizon. Properties of particular interest are mechanical strength, deforrnational behavior, and fluid transport properties such as permeability. These properties will be used in calculationskmalyses of the mechanical and hydrological behavior of the anhydrite, in particular, and the shaft sealing system and disposal rooms, in general.

  12. Attenuation and Transport Mechanisms of Depleted Uranium in Groundwater at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danny, K. R.; Taffet, M. J.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Chorover, J.

    2015-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 was established in 1955 to support weapons research and development. Depleted uranium was used as a proxy for fissile uranium-235 (235U) in open-air explosives tests conducted at Building 812. As a result, oxidized depleted uranium was deposited on the ground, eventually migrating to the underlying sandstone aquifer. Uranium (U) groundwater concentrations exceed the California and Federal Maximum Contaminant Level of 20 pCi L-1 (30 ug L-1). However, the groundwater plume appears to attenuate within 60 m of the source, beyond which no depleted U is detected. This study will determine the relative contribution of physical (e.g. dilution), chemical (e.g. surface adsorption, mineral precipitation), and biological (e.g. biotransformation) processes that contribute to the apparent attenuation of U, which exists as uranyl (UO22+) complexes, at the site. Methods of investigation include evaluating 15 yr of hydrogeologic and chemical data, creating a site conceptual model, and applying equilibrium (e.g. aqueous species complexation, mineral saturation indices) and reactive transport models using Geochemist's WorkbenchTM. Reactive transport results are constrained by direct field observations, including U major ion, and dissolved O2 concentrations, pH, and others, under varying chemical and hydraulic conditions. Aqueous speciation calculations indicate that U primarily exists as anionic CaUO2(CO3)32- or neutral Ca2UO2(CO3)30 species. Additionally, nucleation and growth of Ca/Mg uranyl carbonate solids are predicted to affect attenuation. Initial reactive transport results suggest surface adsorption (e.g. ion exchange, surface complexation) to layer silicate clays is limited under the aqueous geochemical conditions of the site. Current and future work includes XRD analysis of aquifer solids to constrain iron and aluminum (oxy)hydroxides, and coupling advective-dispersive transport with the chemical and physical processes

  13. [Application of Tessier-AAS to the non-biological transformation mechanism of chemical speciation of lead in red soil in agricultural area of central China].

    PubMed

    Fan, Chun-hui; Zhang, Ying-chao; Wang, Jia-hong

    2015-02-01

    The soil contamination of heavy metals, from the areas of mine, highway, industrial area, agricultural land and so on, is nowadays a serious issue all over the world. The contamination of heavy metals in large agricultural area might lead to the decrease of products quality and economic value. Actually, the accumulation amount of heavy metals by crops is much more related to the activated speciation, which is exchangeable and able to transform to the forms of carbonates, Fe-Mn oxides, organic matter and residual. Thus, the investigation to reveal the transformation mechanism of heavy metals caused by soil conditions might be appropriate to reduce the contaminated risk to crops. The vermicular red soil from the agricultural area of central China was used as sample in the paper, and the Tessier Sequential Extraction Procedure-atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was applied to discuss the chemical speciation and non-biological transformation mechanism of Pb at different conditions. The results showed: the total amount of Pb is 32.56 mg x kg(-1), lower than the first level of the State Environmental Quality Standard for Soils. The Pb content of different speciation, with decreased concentration, is residual (54.55% of total Pb content), bound to Fe-Mn oxides, bound to organic matter, bound to carbonates and exchangeable. The pH value of red soil is related to the charge amount on surface of inorganic colloids and organic matter, and the water content of red soil would change the redox potential, effective for the variation of chemical speciation of Pb. The environmental factors of straw dosage and aging time could change Pb speciation, with Pb concentration of residual form the highest. The Muller index of Igeo is 0.3025, indicating the contribution of human activities. The Tessier Sequential Extraction Procedure-AAS is effective for the non-biological transformation mechanism identification of Pb speciation in red soil.

  14. Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Modeling for Accelerated Design of EV Batteries; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, Ahmad; Zhang, Chao; Kim, Gi-heon; Santhanagopalan, Shriram

    2015-06-10

    The physical and chemical phenomena occurring in a battery are many and complex and in many different scales. Without a better knowledge of the interplay among the multi-physics occurring across the varied scales, it is very challenging and time consuming to design long-lasting, high-performing, safe, affordable large battery systems, enabling electrification of the vehicles and modernization of the grid. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory, has been developing thermal and electrochemical models for cells and battery packs. Working with software producers, carmakers, and battery developers, computer-aided engineering tools have been developed that can accelerate the electrochemical and thermal design of batteries, reducing time to develop and optimize them and thus reducing the cost of the system. In the past couple of years, we initiated a project to model the mechanical response of batteries to stress, strain, fracture, deformation, puncture, and crush and then link them to electrochemical and thermal models to predict the response of a battery. This modeling is particularly important for understanding the physics and processes that happen in a battery during a crush-inducing vehicle crash. In this paper, we provide an overview of electrochemical-thermal-mechanical models for battery system understanding and designing.

  15. Hydro-mechanical constitutive model for unsaturated compacted bentonite-sand mixture (BSM): Laboratory tests, parameter calibrations, modifications, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyanto, D. G.; Man, A. G.; Blatz, J. A.; Dixon, D. A.

    A bentonite-sand mixture (BSM) is one of the clay-based sealing components proposed for use in a Canadian deep geological repository (DGR) for used nuclear fuel. Numerical modelling to assess the overall design of the proposed DGR requires characterisation of the hydraulic-mechanical (H-M) of each of the components of the sealing system, including the BSM. The BSM currently under consideration is a 50/50 mixture (by dry mass) of bentonite and well-graded silica sand, compacted to a dry density of at least 1.67 Mg/m 3. This paper presents the H-M constitutive model parameters, calibrated for BSM specimens under saturated and unsaturated conditions, based on various laboratory tests. A set of parameters for an elastoplastic model for unsaturated soil, Basic Barcelona Model (BBM), have been determined to simulate the mechanical behaviour of the BSM specimen. A set of parameters for van Genuchten’s Soil-Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC) and Kozeny’s hydraulic permeability model have been determined to simulate the hydraulic behaviour of the BSM specimen. Using a finite element computer code, CODE_BRIGHT, these sets of parameters have been used to simulate H-M processes in BSM specimens during water infiltration under constant volume (CV) and constant mean stress (CMS) boundary conditions. The key features of the selected constitutive models that are different from the laboratory tests of the BSM specimen have been summarised. The functions to improve the capability of the selected constitutive models to match the laboratory test results of the BSM specimen have been proposed.

  16. The behaviour of consolidated volcanic tuffs: weathering mechanisms under simulated laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stück, H.; Forgó, L. Z.; Rüdrich, J.; Siegesmund, S.; Török, Á.

    2008-12-01

    Five volcanic tuffs ranging from dacitic tuffs of Hungary to rhyolite, phonolite and basaltic tuffs of Germany were consolidated under laboratory conditions. Prior to consolidation an anti-hygro, a hydrous consolidant, which reduces the swelling ability of clay minerals, was applied. The three consolidants, a silicic acid ester (SAE), an elastic silicic acid ester (eSAE) and an acrylate resin (PMMA) were applied on test specimens under vacuum. Petrographic characterisation (polarizing microscopy, XRD, SEM) provided data for fabric analyses and the mineral composition of the tuffs. Changes in fabric, effective porosity, density, tensile strength, ultrasonic wave velocity were evaluated after the treatment. Weathering simulation tests such as hygric dilatation and thermal dilatation aimed to prove the effectiveness of consolidation and the durability of consolidated tuff samples. More than 500 samples were analysed. The tests showed that SAE caused the highest increase in indirect tensile strength. The water absorption and the pore size distribution of the tuffs were modified by consolidation. The PMMA reduced the water absorption the most, whereas SAE modified it the least. All the tested consolidants increased the thermal dilatation of the tuffs. The changes in hygric dilatation were not uniform: for most tuffs SAE increased and PMMA decreased the hygric dilatation, although the clay-rich Habichtswald tuff showed the opposite trend. The changes in hygric and thermal behaviour of consolidated tuff require special care when specific consolidants are chosen. These products modify the physical properties of consolidated tuffs and change the behaviour of weathering.

  17. 15. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,312(463AM4)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory FacilityHood VentilationMechanical' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,312(463A-M-4)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory Facility-Hood Ventilation-Mechanical' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Battery Test Office & Storage Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  18. Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia: incidence, clinical features, laboratory testing, and pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DIIT) is a relatively uncommon adverse reaction caused by drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) that react with platelet membrane glycoproteins only when the implicated drug is present. Although more than 100 drugs have been associated with causing DIIT, recent reviews of available data show that carbamazepine, eptifibatide, ibuprofen, quinidine, quinine, oxaliplatin, rifampin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and vancomycin are probably the most frequently implicated. Patients with DIIT typically present with petechiae, bruising, and epistaxis caused by an acute, severe drop in platelet count (often to <20,000 platelets/pL). Diagnosis of DIIT is complicated by its similarity to other non-drug-induced immune thrombocytopenias, including autoimmune thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness, and must be differentiated by temporal association of exposure to a candidate drug with an acute, severe drop in platelet count. Treatment consists of immediate withdrawal of the implicated drug. Criteria for strong evidence of DIIT include (1) exposure to candidate drug-preceded thrombocytopenia; (2) sustained normal platelet levels after discontinuing candidate drug; (3) candidate drug was only drug used before onset of thrombocytopenia or other drugs were continued or reintroduced after resolution of thrombocytopenia, and other causes for thrombocytopenia were excluded; and (4) reexposure to the candidate drug resulted in recurrent thrombocytopenia. Flow cytometry testing for DDAbs can be useful in confirmation of a clinical diagnosis, and monoclonal antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing can be used to determine the platelet glycoprotein target(s), usually GPIIb/IIIa or GPIb/IX/V, but testing is not widely available. Several pathogenic mechanisms for DIIT have been proposed, including hapten, autoantibody, neoepitope, drug-specific, and quinine-type drug mechanisms. A recent proposal

  19. 7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science and Technology Programs, Agricultural...

  20. 7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science and Technology Programs, Agricultural...

  1. 7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science and Technology Programs, Agricultural...

  2. 7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science and Technology Programs, Agricultural...

  3. 7 CFR 996.21 - USDA laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false USDA laboratory. 996.21 Section 996.21 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.21 USDA laboratory. USDA laboratory means laboratories of the Science and Technology Programs, Agricultural...

  4. The physiology and mechanics of undulatory swimming: a student laboratory exercise using medicinal leeches.

    PubMed

    Ellerby, David J

    2009-09-01

    The medicinal leech is a useful animal model for investigating undulatory swimming in the classroom. Unlike many swimming organisms, its swimming performance can be quantified without specialized equipment. A large blood meal alters swimming behavior in a way that can be used to generate a discussion of the hydrodynamics of swimming, muscle mechanics, hydrostatic skeletons, and the physiological features that allow leeches to deal with the volume increase and osmotic load imposed by the meal. Analyses can be carried out at a range of levels tailored to suit a particular class.

  5. The Slumgullion Natural Laboratory: Landsliding Mechanisms Inferred from Seismic and Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, W. H.; Kean, J. W.; Gomberg, J. S.; Bodin, P.; Wang, G.; Coe, J. A.; MacQueen, P.; Foster, K.; Creager, K.

    2009-12-01

    Effective mitigation of landslide hazards requires accurate characterization of landslide subsurface geometry and failure mode, both of which are difficult to obtain. To evaluate a new geophysical approach for landslide and faulting characterization in a natural setting, we recently deployed an array of 88 single-channel seismometers complemented by geodetic measurements made using GPS and a robotic total-station theodolite at the 3.9-km-long Slumgullion landslide in southwestern Colorado. This landslide was selected because of its size, nearly continuous movement, and the documentation of its failure modes from previous continuous monitoring and laboratory testing. Our previous studies identified that the landslide material (soil and weathered rock) dilates during shear and has very low permeability. These characteristics result in generation of excess negative pore-water pressures along shear surfaces that restrain movement by increasing effective normal stresses. We’ve also observed that lateral shear boundaries episodically relocate, forming new shear surfaces. Although we have only just completed the data-gathering phase, we’ve identified that landslide movement varies considerably, sometimes occurring aseismically and other times producing seismic tremor and localized slidequakes. Our working hypothesis is that steady aseismic slip occurs where shear-zone porosity is at critical state, tremor radiates from areas where increased effective stress from shear-zone dilation sporadically resists movement, and slidequakes are produced from similarly dilating areas, especially where and when new shear surfaces are formed. Complex rearrangements between individual kinematic units comprising the landslide may also affect its mode of failure and slip and consequent observables. Further analyses of geodetic, seismic, and environmental data will refine our hypotheses. Location estimates of the large number of observed seismic events may constrain the geometry of the

  6. Use of xylan, an agricultural by-product, in wheat gluten based biodegradable films: mechanical, solubility and water vapor transfer rate properties.

    PubMed

    Kayserilioğlu, Betül S; Bakir, Ufuk; Yilmaz, Levent; Akkaş, Nuri

    2003-05-01

    The possibility of using xylan, as an agricultural by-product, for production of composite films in combinations with wheat gluten was investigated. Different levels of xylan (0-40% w/w) were incorporated into wheat gluten to form biodegradable composite films. Films were prepared at pH 4 and 11, and dried at either uncontrolled or controlled conditions. The mechanical properties, solubilities and water vapour transfer rate (WVTR) of the composite films were studied. Films were obtained with added xylan without decreasing film-forming quality. Xylan can be used as an additive, as much as 40% (w/w), in wheat gluten films. Changing pH, wheat gluten/xylan ratio, xylan type and drying conditions affected mechanical and solubility properties, however, WVTR was not affected by xylan additions. Wheat gluten/xylan composite films having different characteristics can be produced depending on xylan type, composition and process conditions.

  7. Physical, mechanical and hydration kinetics of particleboards manufactured with woody biomass (Cupressus lusitanica, Gmelina arborea, Tectona grandis), agricultural resources, and Tetra Pak packages.

    PubMed

    Moya, Róger; Camacho, Diego; Oporto, Gloria S; Soto, Roy F; Mata, Julio S

    2014-02-01

    Lignocellulosic wastes resulting from agricultural activities as well as Tetra Pak residues from urban centres can cause significant levels of pollution. A possible action to minimize this problem is to use them in the production of particleboards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical, mechanical, and hydration properties of particleboards manufactured with the mixture of woody biomass (Cupressus lusitanica, Gmelina arborea, and Tectona grandis) and either agricultural wastes [pineapple leaves (Ananas comosus) and palm residues (Elaeis guineensis)] or Tetra Pak residues (TP). The results show that the particleboards prepared with TP and woody biomass can reduce the swelling and water absorption in up to 40% and 50% compared with particleboards without TP. Also, these particleboards had increased flexure resistance and shear stress (up to 100%) compared with those without TP. On the contrary, particleboards prepared with pineapple leaves in combination with woody biomass showed the lowest mechanical properties, particularly for tensile strength, hardness, glue-line shear, and nail and screw evaluation.

  8. Physical, mechanical and hydration kinetics of particleboards manufactured with woody biomass (Cupressus lusitanica, Gmelina arborea, Tectona grandis), agricultural resources, and Tetra Pak packages.

    PubMed

    Moya, Róger; Camacho, Diego; Oporto, Gloria S; Soto, Roy F; Mata, Julio S

    2014-02-01

    Lignocellulosic wastes resulting from agricultural activities as well as Tetra Pak residues from urban centres can cause significant levels of pollution. A possible action to minimize this problem is to use them in the production of particleboards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical, mechanical, and hydration properties of particleboards manufactured with the mixture of woody biomass (Cupressus lusitanica, Gmelina arborea, and Tectona grandis) and either agricultural wastes [pineapple leaves (Ananas comosus) and palm residues (Elaeis guineensis)] or Tetra Pak residues (TP). The results show that the particleboards prepared with TP and woody biomass can reduce the swelling and water absorption in up to 40% and 50% compared with particleboards without TP. Also, these particleboards had increased flexure resistance and shear stress (up to 100%) compared with those without TP. On the contrary, particleboards prepared with pineapple leaves in combination with woody biomass showed the lowest mechanical properties, particularly for tensile strength, hardness, glue-line shear, and nail and screw evaluation. PMID:24519224

  9. Effects of debris flow composition on runout, depositional mechanisms, and deposit morphology in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Leuven, Jasper R. F. W.; Lokhorst, Ivar R.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2015-09-01

    Predicting debris flow runout is of major importance for hazard mitigation. Apart from topography and volume, runout distance and area depends on debris flow composition and rheology, but how is poorly understood. We experimentally investigated effects of composition on debris flow runout, depositional mechanisms, and deposit geometry. The small-scale experimental debris flows were largely similar to natural debris flows in terms of flow behavior, deposit morphology, grain size sorting, channel width-depth ratio, and runout. Deposit geometry (lobe thickness and width) in our experimental debris flows is largely determined by composition, while the effects of initial conditions of topography (i.e., outflow plain slope and channel slope and width) and volume are negligible. We find a clear optimum in the relations of runout with coarse-material fraction and clay fraction. Increasing coarse-material concentration leads to larger runout. However, excess coarse material results in a large accumulation of coarse debris at the flow front and enhances diffusivity, increasing frontal friction and decreasing runout. Increasing clay content initially enhances runout, but too much clay leads to very viscous flows, reducing runout. Runout increases with channel slope and width, outflow plain slope, debris flow volume, and water fraction. These results imply that debris flow runout depends at least as much on composition as on topography. This study improves understanding of the effects of debris flow composition on runout and may aid future debris flow hazard assessments.

  10. Unravelling floods selection mechanisms for vegetation from laboratory experiments and implications for river restoration efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perucca, Eliana; Molnar, Peter; Francis, Robert; Perona, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The establishment and evolution of vegetation in organized patterns on river bar alluvial sediment are active morphodynamic processes governed by flow hydrology. Although this is well documented in literature, how do time scales between the arrival of flow disturbances and vegetation growth interact to determine the survival of certain vegetation characteristics is still unclear. We started to explore such dynamics within the research project RIVERINE (RIver - VEgetation interactions and Reproduction of Island Nuclei formation and Evolution), funded by the Hydralab III European Framework Programme. Laboratory experiments are important tools which allow comprehensive observations of the feedbacks between flow, channel morphology and vegetation, which are otherwise difficult to observe at the real scale. In this work we present the results of novel flume experiments that we carried out at the Total Environment Simulator (TES) of the University of Hull, United Kingdom. Starting from an initial levelled slope of 1%, the channel was seeded with Avena Sativa at a uniform density. A number of days after seeding, the flume was flooded daily for 4 days with a flood disturbance which lasted 15 minutes. Different flood magnitudes as well as times between seeding and the first disturbance and flume geometries (i.e., parallel and convergent walls) were investigated. After each disturbance the eroded material (sediment, seeds and plants) was collected at the channel bottom and corresponding statistics for main root length, number of roots and stem height were calculated. At the same time, random samples of non-eroded plants were sampled from the flume and the same statistics were computed for a control run. After every flood disturbance, the channel bed surface was measured with a laser scanner and photographed. Since flooding frequencies were comparable with the plant root germination and growth time scales, vegetation and flood disturbances were in direct competition. Results

  11. Plate deformation at the transition between collision and subduction: insights from 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D. A.; Cruden, A. R.; Oncken, O.

    2012-04-01

    3-D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments of arc-continent collision investigate plate deformation at the transition between collision and subduction. Deformation in the collision area propagates into the subduction-collision transition zone via along-strike coupling of the neighboring segments of the plate boundary. The largest along-strike gradient of trench-perpendicular compression produced by a passive margin turning by 90 degrees does not generate sufficiently localized shear strain in the transition zone to cause a strike-slip system. This is because of the fast propagation of lithosphere failure in the arc area. Deformation is thus continuous along-strike, but the deformation mechanism is three-dimensional and progressive structural variations arise because the coupling between neighboring segments induces either advanced or delayed failure of the arc lithosphere and passive margin. During the initial stage of collision, the accretionary wedge is partially subducted, the interplate zone is lubricated, and shear traction drops. Thus large convergence obliquity does not produce a migrating fore-arc sliver. Instead, the fore-arc motion is due to the pressure force generated by subduction of the buoyant continental crust. It follows that convergence obliquity does not yield trench-parallel deformation of the fore-arc and its influence on the collision process is limited. However, convergence obliquity may have shaped the active margin during the stage of oceanic subduction stage, prior to collision, and inherited structures may impact the propagation mechanism.

  12. Grassland agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture in grassland environments is facing multiple stresses from: shifting demographics, declining and fragmented agricultural landscapes, declining environmental quality, variable and changing climate, volatile and increasing energy costs, marginal economic returns, and globalization. Degrad...

  13. Olfactory regulation of the sexual behavior and reproductive physiology of the laboratory mouse: effects and neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, Kevin R; Wersinger, Scott R

    2009-01-01

    In many species, chemical compounds emitted by conspecifics exert profound effects on reproductive physiology and sexual behavior. This is particularly true in the mouse, where such cues advance and delay puberty, suppress and facilitate estrous cycles, and cause the early termination of pregnancy. They also facilitate sexual behavior and inform mate selection. The mouse has a rich and complex repertoire of social behaviors. The technologies of molecular genetics are well developed in the mouse. Gene expression can be experimentally manipulated in the mouse relatively easily and in a time- and tissue-specific manner. Thus, the mouse is an excellent model in which to investigate the genetic, neural, and hormonal bases by which chemical compounds released by other mice affect physiology and behavior. These chemical cues are detected and processed by the olfactory system and other specialized but less well characterized sensory organs. The sensory information reaches brain regions that regulate hormone levels as well as those that are involved in behavior and alters the function of these brain regions. The effects of these chemical compounds have important implications for the laboratory animal facility as well as for researchers. We begin with an overview of the basic structure and function of the olfactory system and of the connections among brain regions that receive olfactory stimuli. We discuss the effects of chemosensory cues on the behavior and physiology of the organism along with what is known about the neural and hormonal mechanisms underlying these effects. We also describe some of the implications for the laboratory animal facility.

  14. Fish on Prozac: a simple, noninvasive physiology laboratory investigating the mechanisms of aggressive behavior in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Sharon E; Egar, Joseph M; Walker, Brian G; Sperry, Todd S; Ramenofsky, Marilyn

    2007-12-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is an important regulator of aggressive behavior in vertebrates. Experimentally increasing synaptic levels of serotonin with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been shown to reliably decrease the expression of aggressive behavior. Here, we describe a method by which fluoxetine can be noninvasively administered to male Betta splendens (an attractive model for the study of aggressive behavior) and describe a simple laboratory exercise that allows students to experimentally investigate the physiological mechanisms of aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that relatively short-term exposure (3 h) of male bettas to as little as 3 microg/ml of fluoxetine-treated aquarium water is sufficient to reduce the expression of specific aggressive behaviors. We emphasize the physiological concepts that can be addressed with this exercise, including the role of the serotonergic system in regulating aggression, and the interplay of environmental contaminants and physiology in regulating the expression of behavior. We also highlight important aspects of experimental design. This exercise can be flexibly altered to accommodate one or several laboratory periods. It is also low cost, is low impact to the animals, and requires minimal preparation time for instructors.

  15. Fish on Prozac: a simple, noninvasive physiology laboratory investigating the mechanisms of aggressive behavior in Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Sharon E; Egar, Joseph M; Walker, Brian G; Sperry, Todd S; Ramenofsky, Marilyn

    2007-12-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is an important regulator of aggressive behavior in vertebrates. Experimentally increasing synaptic levels of serotonin with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been shown to reliably decrease the expression of aggressive behavior. Here, we describe a method by which fluoxetine can be noninvasively administered to male Betta splendens (an attractive model for the study of aggressive behavior) and describe a simple laboratory exercise that allows students to experimentally investigate the physiological mechanisms of aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that relatively short-term exposure (3 h) of male bettas to as little as 3 microg/ml of fluoxetine-treated aquarium water is sufficient to reduce the expression of specific aggressive behaviors. We emphasize the physiological concepts that can be addressed with this exercise, including the role of the serotonergic system in regulating aggression, and the interplay of environmental contaminants and physiology in regulating the expression of behavior. We also highlight important aspects of experimental design. This exercise can be flexibly altered to accommodate one or several laboratory periods. It is also low cost, is low impact to the animals, and requires minimal preparation time for instructors. PMID:18057410

  16. Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus in Denmark: a laboratory-based study on resistance mechanisms and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R H; Hagen, F; Astvad, K M T; Tyron, A; Meis, J F; Arendrup, M C

    2016-06-01

    Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus originating from the environment as well as induced during therapy are continuously emerging in Danish clinical settings. We performed a laboratory-based retrospective study (2010-2014) of azole resistance and genetic relationship of A. fumigatus at the national mycology reference laboratory of Denmark. A total of 1162 clinical and 133 environmental A. fumigatus isolates were identified by morphology, thermotolerance and/or β-tubulin sequencing. Screening for azole resistance was carried out using azole agar, and resistant isolates were susceptibility tested by the EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) E.Def 9.2 reference method and CYP51A sequenced. Genotyping was performed for outbreak investigation and, when appropriate, short tandem repeat Aspergillus fumigatus microsatellite assay. All 133 environmental A. fumigatus isolates were azole susceptible. However, from 2010 to 2014, there was an increasing prevalence of azole resistance (from 1.4 to 6% isolates (p <0.001) and 1.8 to 4% patients (p <0.05)) among the clinical isolates, with the well-known environmental CYP51A variant TR34/L98H responsible for >50% of the azole resistance mechanisms. Among 184 Danish A. fumigatus isolates, 120 unique genotypes were identified and compared to a collection of 1822 international genotypes. Seven (5.8%) Danish genotypes were shared between isolates within Denmark but with different origin, 19 (15.8%) were shared with foreign genotypes, and two (11.8%) of 17 genotypes of isolates carrying the TR34/L98H resistance mechanisms were identical to two Dutch TR34/L98H isolates. Our findings underlines the demand for correct identification and susceptibility testing of clinical mould isolates. Furthermore, although complex, genotyping supported the hypotheses regarding clonal expansion and the potential of a single origin for the TR34/L98H clone. PMID:27091095

  17. Commercial-scale evaluation of two agricultural waste products, cotton burr/stem and module wraps in thermoplastic composites and comparison with laboratory-scale results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-scale research had shown the potential of using cotton burr/stem (CBS) as a fiber filler in thermoplastic composites. This study evaluates the potential of using waste materials from cotton harvesting/ginning operations, CBS, and cotton module wraps (CMW) as a filler and substrate in ther...

  18. Vegetable fibres from agricultural residues as thermo-mechanical reinforcement in recycled polypropylene-based green foams.

    PubMed

    Ardanuy, Mònica; Antunes, Marcelo; Velasco, José Ignacio

    2012-02-01

    Novel lightweight composite foams based on recycled polypropylene reinforced with cellulosic fibres obtained from agricultural residues were prepared and characterized. These composites, initially prepared by melt-mixing recycled polypropylene with variable fibre concentrations (10-25 wt.%), were foamed by high-pressure CO(2) dissolution, a clean process which avoids the use of chemical blowing agents. With the aim of studying the influence of the fibre characteristics on the resultant foams, two chemical treatments were applied to the barley straw in order to increase the α-cellulose content of the fibres. The chemical composition, morphology and thermal stability of the fibres and composites were analyzed. Results indicate that fibre chemical treatment and later foaming of the composites resulted in foams with characteristic closed-cell microcellular structures, their specific storage modulus significantly increasing due to the higher stiffness of the fibres. The addition of the fibres also resulted in an increase in the glass transition temperature of PP in both the solid composites and more significantly in the foams.

  19. Batch vs continuous-feeding operational mode for the removal of pesticides from agricultural run-off by microalgae systems: A laboratory scale study.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Víctor; Rodríguez, Yolanda

    2016-05-15

    Microalgae-based water treatment technologies have been used in recent years to treat different water effluents, but their effectiveness for removing pesticides from agricultural run-off has not yet been addressed. This paper assesses the effect of microalgae in pesticide removal, as well as the influence of different operation strategies (continuous vs batch feeding). The following pesticides were studied: mecoprop, atrazine, simazine, diazinone, alachlor, chlorfenvinphos, lindane, malathion, pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos, endosulfan and clofibric acid (tracer). 2L batch reactors and 5L continuous reactors were spiked to 10 μg L(-1) of each pesticide. Additionally, three different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were assessed (2, 4 and 8 days) in the continuous feeding reactors. The batch-feeding experiments demonstrated that the presence of microalgae increased the efficiency of lindane, alachlor and chlorpyrifos by 50%. The continuous feeding reactors had higher removal efficiencies than the batch reactors for pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos and lindane. Whilst longer HRTs increased the technology's effectiveness, a low HRT of 2 days was capable of removing malathion, pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos, and endosulfan by up to 70%. This study suggests that microalgae-based treatment technologies can be an effective alternative for removing pesticides from agricultural run-off.

  20. Exploring the evolutionary ecology of fungal endophyte in agricultural systems: using functional traits to reveal mechanisms in community processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All plants, including crop species, harbor a community of fungal endophyte species, however, we know little about the biotic factors that are important in endophyte community assembly. We suggest that the most direct route to understanding the mechanisms underlying community assembly is through the...

  1. Agricultural Waste.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ling; Zhang, Panpan; Shu, Huajie; Chang, Chein-Chi; Wang, Renqing; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the quantity of agricultural waste has been rising rapidly all over the world. As a result, the environmental problems and negative impacts of agricultural waste are drawn more and more attention. Therefore, there is a need to adopt proper approaches to reduce and reuse agricultural waste. This review presented about 200 literatures published in 2015 relating to the topic of agricultural waste. The review examined research on agricultural waste in 2015 from the following four aspects: the characterization, reuse, treatment, and management. Researchers highlighted the importance to reuse agricultural waste and investigated the potential to utilize it as biofertilizers, cultivation material, soil amendments, adsorbent, material, energy recycling, enzyme and catalyst etc. The treatment of agricultural waste included carbonization, biodegradation, composting hydrolysis and pyrolysis. Moreover, this review analyzed the differences of the research progress in 2015 from 2014. It may help to reveal the new findings and new trends in this field in 2015 comparing to 2014. PMID:27620093

  2. Agricultural Waste.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ling; Zhang, Panpan; Shu, Huajie; Chang, Chein-Chi; Wang, Renqing; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the quantity of agricultural waste has been rising rapidly all over the world. As a result, the environmental problems and negative impacts of agricultural waste are drawn more and more attention. Therefore, there is a need to adopt proper approaches to reduce and reuse agricultural waste. This review presented about 200 literatures published in 2015 relating to the topic of agricultural waste. The review examined research on agricultural waste in 2015 from the following four aspects: the characterization, reuse, treatment, and management. Researchers highlighted the importance to reuse agricultural waste and investigated the potential to utilize it as biofertilizers, cultivation material, soil amendments, adsorbent, material, energy recycling, enzyme and catalyst etc. The treatment of agricultural waste included carbonization, biodegradation, composting hydrolysis and pyrolysis. Moreover, this review analyzed the differences of the research progress in 2015 from 2014. It may help to reveal the new findings and new trends in this field in 2015 comparing to 2014.

  3. Laboratory and 3-D distinct element analysis of the failure mechanism of a slope under external surcharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Cheng, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient detail. There is however increasing interest in the consequences after the initiation of failure that includes the development and propagation of the failure surfaces, the amount of failed mass and runoff and the affected region. To assess the development of slope failure in more detail and to consider the potential danger of slopes after failure has initiated, the slope stability problem under external surcharge is analyzed by the distinct element method (DEM) and a laboratory model test in the present research. A more refined study about the development of failure, microcosmic failure mechanisms and the post-failure mechanisms of slopes will be carried out. The numerical modeling method and the various findings from the present work can provide an alternate method of analysis of slope failure, which can give additional information not available from the classical methods of analysis.

  4. Site study plan for non-routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Site Study Plan describes the non-routine rock mechanics and thermal properties laboratory testing program planned for the characterization of site-specific geologic materials for the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The study design provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermomechanical, thermal and special properties for the host salt, and where appropriate, for nonhost lithologies. The types of tests which will be conducted are constant stress (creep) tests, constant strain (stress relaxation) tests, constant strain-rate tests, constant stress-rate tests, cyclic loading tests, hollow cylinder tests, uniaxial and triaxial compression tests, direct tension tests, indirect (triaxial) shear tests, thermal property determinations (conductivity, specific heat, expansivity, and diffusivity), fracture healing tests, thermal decrepitation tests, moisture content determinations, and petrographic and micromechanics analyses. Tests will be conducted at confining pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 300/degree/C. These data are used to construct mathematical models for the phenomenology of salt deformation. The models are then used in finite-element codes to predict repository response. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. The duration of the testing program is expected to be approximately 5 years. 44 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs.

  5. Human Y-chromosome short tandem repeats: a tale of acculturation and migrations as mechanisms for the diffusion of agriculture in the Balkan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Mirabal, Sheyla; Varljen, Tatjana; Gayden, Tenzin; Regueiro, Maria; Vujovic, Slavica; Popovic, Danica; Djuric, Marija; Stojkovic, Oliver; Herrera, Rene J

    2010-07-01

    Southeastern Europe and, particularly, the Balkan Peninsula are especially useful when studying the mechanisms responsible for generating the current distribution of Paleolithic and Neolithic genetic signals observed throughout Europe. In this study, 404 individuals from Montenegro and 179 individuals from Serbia were typed for 17 Y-STR loci and compared across 9 Y-STR loci to geographically targeted previously published collections to ascertain the phylogenetic relationships of populations within the Balkan Peninsula and beyond. We aim to provide information on whether groups in the region represent an amalgamation of Paleolithic and Neolithic genetic substrata, or whether acculturation has played a critical role in the spread of agriculture. We have found genetic markers of Middle Eastern, south Asian and European descent in the area, however, admixture analyses indicate that over 80% of the Balkan gene pool is of European descent. Altogether, our data support the view that the diffusion of agriculture into the Balkan region was mostly a cultural phenomenon although some genetic infiltration from Africa, the Levant, the Caucasus, and the Near East has occurred.

  6. Laboratory Anion Chemistry: Implications for the DIBs, and a Potential Formation Mechanism for a Known Interstellar Molecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichelberger, B.; Barckholtz, C.; Stepanovic, M.; Bierbaum, V.; Snow, T.

    2002-01-01

    Due to recent interest in molecular anions as possible interstellar species, we have carried out several laboratory studies of anion chemistry. The reactions of the series C(sub n)(sup -); and C(sub n)H(sup -) with H and H2 were studied to address the viability of such species in the diffuse interstellar medium and to address their ability to be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). These same molecules were also reacted with N and O to show possible heteroatomic products. C(sub m)N(sup - was a particularly stable product from the reaction of C(sub n)(sup -) + N. C3N(sup -) was further reacted with H to study chemistry that could produce HC3N, a known interstellar species. The reactions were done in a flowing afterglow selected ion flow tube apparatus (FA-SIFT). The anions were generated in an electron impact or cold cathode discharge source and the anion of interest was then selected by a quadrupole mass filter. The selected ion was then reacted with the atomic or molecular species in the flow tube and products were detected by another quadrupole. While the C(sub n)(sup -) species do not appear to be viable DIB carriers, their possible presence could provide a mechanism for the formation of known heteroatomic neutral molecules detected in the interstellar medium (ISM).

  7. A laboratory study of particle ploughing and pore-pressure feedback: A velocity-weakening mechanism for soft glacier beds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomason, J.F.; Iverson, N.R.

    2008-01-01

    If basal-water discharge and pressure are sufficiently high, a soft-bedded glacier will slip over its bed by ploughing, the process in which particles that span the ice-bed interface are dragged across the bed surface. Results of laboratory experiments indicate that resistance to ploughing can decrease with increasing ploughing velocity (velocity weakening). During ploughing at various velocities (15-400 ma-1), till was compacted in front of idealized particles, causing pore pressures there that were orders of magnitude higher than the ambient value. This excess pore pressure locally weakened the till in shear, thereby decreasing ploughing resistance by a factor of 3.0-6.6 with a six-fold increase in ploughing velocity. Characteristic timescales of pore-pressure diffusion and compaction down-glacier from ploughing particles depend on till diffusivity, ploughing velocity and sizes of ploughing particles. These timescales accurately predict the ranges of these variables over which excess pore pressure and velocity weakening occurred. Existing ploughing models do not account for velocity weakening. A new ploughing model with no adjustable parameters predicts ploughing resistance to no worse than 38% but requires that excess pore pressures be measured. Velocity weakening by this mechanism may affect fast glacier flow, sediment transport by bed deformation and basal seismicity.

  8. 7 CFR 983.1 - Accredited laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accredited laboratory. 983.1 Section 983.1 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  9. 7 CFR 75.43 - Laboratory testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory testing. 75.43 Section 75.43 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... AND CERTIFICATION OF QUALITY OF AGRICULTURAL AND VEGETABLE SEEDS Fees and Charges § 75.43...

  10. 7 CFR 75.43 - Laboratory testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laboratory testing. 75.43 Section 75.43 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... AND CERTIFICATION OF QUALITY OF AGRICULTURAL AND VEGETABLE SEEDS Fees and Charges § 75.43...

  11. 7 CFR 75.43 - Laboratory testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laboratory testing. 75.43 Section 75.43 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... AND CERTIFICATION OF QUALITY OF AGRICULTURAL AND VEGETABLE SEEDS Fees and Charges § 75.43...

  12. 7 CFR 75.43 - Laboratory testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laboratory testing. 75.43 Section 75.43 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... AND CERTIFICATION OF QUALITY OF AGRICULTURAL AND VEGETABLE SEEDS Fees and Charges § 75.43...

  13. 7 CFR 75.43 - Laboratory testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laboratory testing. 75.43 Section 75.43 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... AND CERTIFICATION OF QUALITY OF AGRICULTURAL AND VEGETABLE SEEDS Fees and Charges § 75.43...

  14. Determination of low-level agricultural residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Paske, Nathan; Berry, Bryan; Schmitz, John; Sullivan, Darryl

    2007-01-01

    In this study, sponsored by PepsiCo Inc., a method was validated for measurement of 11 pesticide residues in soft drinks and sports drinks. The pesticide residues determined in this validation were alachlor, atrazine, butachlor, isoproturon, malaoxon, monocrotophos, paraoxon-methyl, phorate, phorate sulfone, phorate sulfoxide, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) when spiked at 0.100 microg/L (1.00 microg/L for phorate). Samples were filtered (if particulate matter was present), degassed (if carbonated), and analyzed using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Quantitation was performed with matrix-matched external standard calibration solutions. The standard curve range for this assay was 0.0750 to 10.0 microg/L. The calibration curves for all agricultural residues had coefficient of determination (r2) values greater than or equal to 0.9900 with the exception of 2 values that were 0.9285 and 0.8514. Fortification spikes at 0.100 microg/L (1.00 microg/L for phorate) over the course of 2 days (n=8 each day) for 3 matrixes (7UP, Gatorade, and Diet Pepsi) yielded average percent recoveries (and percent relative standard deviations) as follows (n=48): 94.4 (15.2) for alachlor, 98.2 (13.5) for atrazine, 83.1 (41.6) for butachlor, 89.6 (24.5) for isoproturon, 87.9 (24.4) for malaoxon, 96.1 (9.26) for monocrotophos, 101 (25.7) for paraoxon-methyl, 86.6 (20.4) for phorate, 101 (16.5) for phorate sulfone, 93.6 (25.5) for phorate sulfoxide, and 98.2 (6.02) for 2,4-D. PMID:17474522

  15. Agricultural Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, W. J.; Switzenbaum, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of agricultural wastes, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) water characteristics and impacts; (2) waste treatment; (3) reuse of agricultural wastes; and (4) nonpoint pollution sources. A list of 150 references is also presented. (HM)

  16. VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Research Coordinating Unit.

    TO ASSIST THOSE WHO MAKE DECISIONS RELATING TO EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURE, RECENT RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IS SUMMARIZED. A 1963 STUDY TREATS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORK EXPERIENCE AND STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS, PLANS, AND ASPIRATIONS. STUDIES ON POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION CONCERN GUIDELINES FOR TECHNICIAN PROGRAMS, JUSTIFICATION…

  17. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  18. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  19. Workload Distribution among Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Robert M.; Ulmer, Jonathan D.; Aschenbrener, Mollie S.

    2008-01-01

    Teachers distribute their time in many ways. The study sought to determine how agriculture teachers distribute their time among 11 selected teacher activities (i.e., preparation for instruction; classroom/laboratory teaching; laboratory preparation and/or maintenance; grading/scoring students' work; administrative duties-program management;…

  20. Agriculture Education. Agricultural Metal Working.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary agricultural education students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agricultural metal working. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) oxyacetylene welding, (2) arc welding, (3) sheet metal, (4) blueprint reading for welders and (5) job…

  1. Determination of low-level agricultural residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography with mass-selective detection: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Paske, Nathan; Berry, Bryan; Schmitz, John; Sullivan, Darryl

    2007-01-01

    In this study, sponsored by PepsiCo Inc., a method was validated for measurement of 19 pesticide residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with mass selective detection The pesticide residues determined in this validation were alpha-benzenehexachloride (BHC); beta-BHC; gamma-BHC; delta-BHC; methyl parathion; malathion; chlorpyrifos; aldrin; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE); alpha-endosulfan; 4,4-DDE; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD); dieldrin; ethion; 4,4-DDD; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene (DDT); beta-endosulfan; 4,4-DDT; and endosulfan sulfate when spiked into a 200 mL matrix sample at 0.50 microg/L. The samples were diluted with acetonitrile and water, then liquid-liquid phase extracted into petroleum ether. The resulting extract was concentrated to near dryness and diluted with hexane:dichloromethane (50:50). The concentrated samples were purified by gel permeation chromatography. The resulting solution was concentrated and separated on a Florisil substrate. The eluent was concentrated to near dryness, reconstituted to produce a 200-fold concentration, and analyzed using a GC/MS instrument operated in the selective ion monitoring mode. The GC/MS instrument was equipped with a large volume injector capable of injecting 25 microL. External standards prepared in dichloromethane were used for quantification without the need for matrix-matched calibration because the extraction step minimized the matrix effects. The calibration curves for all agricultural residues had coefficients of determination (r2) of greater than or equal to 0.9900, with the exception of one value that was 0.988. Fortification spikes at 0.50 microg/L in 3 matrixes (7UP, Gatorade, and Diet Pepsi) over the course of 2 days (4 days for Gatorade), where n=8 each day, yielded average percent recoveries (and percent relative standard deviations) as follows (n=64): 95.6 (24.8) for alpha-BHC; 91.9 (23.6) for beta-BHC; 89.1 (21

  2. Determination of low-level agricultural residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography with mass-selective detection: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Paske, Nathan; Berry, Bryan; Schmitz, John; Sullivan, Darryl

    2007-01-01

    In this study, sponsored by PepsiCo Inc., a method was validated for measurement of 19 pesticide residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with mass selective detection The pesticide residues determined in this validation were alpha-benzenehexachloride (BHC); beta-BHC; gamma-BHC; delta-BHC; methyl parathion; malathion; chlorpyrifos; aldrin; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE); alpha-endosulfan; 4,4-DDE; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD); dieldrin; ethion; 4,4-DDD; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene (DDT); beta-endosulfan; 4,4-DDT; and endosulfan sulfate when spiked into a 200 mL matrix sample at 0.50 microg/L. The samples were diluted with acetonitrile and water, then liquid-liquid phase extracted into petroleum ether. The resulting extract was concentrated to near dryness and diluted with hexane:dichloromethane (50:50). The concentrated samples were purified by gel permeation chromatography. The resulting solution was concentrated and separated on a Florisil substrate. The eluent was concentrated to near dryness, reconstituted to produce a 200-fold concentration, and analyzed using a GC/MS instrument operated in the selective ion monitoring mode. The GC/MS instrument was equipped with a large volume injector capable of injecting 25 microL. External standards prepared in dichloromethane were used for quantification without the need for matrix-matched calibration because the extraction step minimized the matrix effects. The calibration curves for all agricultural residues had coefficients of determination (r2) of greater than or equal to 0.9900, with the exception of one value that was 0.988. Fortification spikes at 0.50 microg/L in 3 matrixes (7UP, Gatorade, and Diet Pepsi) over the course of 2 days (4 days for Gatorade), where n=8 each day, yielded average percent recoveries (and percent relative standard deviations) as follows (n=64): 95.6 (24.8) for alpha-BHC; 91.9 (23.6) for beta-BHC; 89.1 (21

  3. 7 CFR 983.1 - Accredited laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.1 Accredited laboratory. An accredited laboratory is a laboratory that has been approved or accredited by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Accredited laboratory. 983.1 Section 983.1...

  4. 7 CFR 983.1 - Accredited laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.1 Accredited laboratory. An accredited laboratory is a laboratory that has been approved or accredited by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Accredited laboratory. 983.1 Section 983.1...

  5. 7 CFR 983.1 - Accredited laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.1 Accredited laboratory. An accredited laboratory is a laboratory that has been approved or accredited by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Accredited laboratory. 983.1 Section 983.1...

  6. 7 CFR 983.1 - Accredited laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.1 Accredited laboratory. An accredited laboratory is a laboratory that has been approved or accredited by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accredited laboratory. 983.1 Section 983.1...

  7. A Laboratory Study of the 2004-2008 Mount St Helens Lava Dome: Mechanical Behaviour, Rheology, and Earthquakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Sammonds, P. R.; Tuffen, H.; Meredith, P. G.

    2009-05-01

    Lava domes are often modelled as a fluid whose dynamics are controlled by the viscosity and pressurisation of the fluid. However, the behaviour of active domes such as the 2004-2008 Mount St Helens dome and spine complex reveals that most of the lava dome deformation occurs on shear fracture planes. Evidence from seismology and exposed magma conduits at other volcanoes also indicates that the final ascent of magma into these domes may be controlled by shear fracture zones at the conduit margins. These observations demonstrate that fracturing may exert a stronger control on lava dome dynamics than fluid mechanics does. It is therefore important to expand the limited existing data on the high temperature rock mechanics of dome lavas under eruptive conditions. Acoustic emissions (AE) recorded whilst producing such data can provide a link between laboratory experiments and seismicity recorded during lava dome eruptions. Here we present results of uniaxial and triaxial deformation of a dacite sample extruded at Mount St Helens lava dome in December 2005, which has unsurpassed age constraints. This provides the unique opportunity to compare experimental results to the geophysical signals recorded as the sample was extruded. A newly modified high temperature triaxial compression apparatus was used to deform 25 mm diameter cylindrical samples at temperatures up to 1000°C, effective pressures up to 10 MPa, and strain rates from 10-4 s-1 to 10-6 s-1. It was thus possible to deform samples at temperatures, strain rates, and effective pressures typical of the Mount St Helens lava dome system and of active andesitic and dacitic lava dome systems in general, whilst also recording AE. The experimental results show the effect of temperature, effective pressure, and strain rate on the compressive strength, failure mode, and rheology of dome lavas within the brittle ductile transition. They provide key parameters and constraints for developing numerical and analytical models of

  8. Role of folded anisotropic fabric in the failure mode of gneiss: new insights from mechanical, microseismic and microstructural laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Dobbs, Marcus R.; Zanchetta, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Fabric anisotropy is a key control of the mechanical behaviour of rocks in a variety of geological settings and on different timescales. However, the effects of inherited, tectonically folded anisotropic fabrics on the brittle strength and failure mode of foliated metamorphic rocks is yet to be fully understood. Data from laboratory uniaxial compression tests on folded gneiss (Agliardi et al., 2014, Tectonophysics) recently showed that the brittle failure mode of this rock type depends on the arrangement of two distinct anisotropies (i.e. foliation and fold axial plane anisotropy), and that rock strength correlates with failure mode. Here we investigate the effects of confining pressure on this behaviour by performing triaxial compression experiments with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, and analyse resulting fracture mechanisms and their microfabric controls using high resolution microanalysis techniques. We tested the Monte Canale Gneiss (Austroalpine Bernina nappe, Central Italian Alps), characterized by low phyllosilicate content, compositional layering folded at the cm-scale, and absence of a well-developed axial plane foliation. We used a servo-controlled hydraulic loading system to test 19 air-dry cylindrical specimens (diameter: 54 mm) that were characterized both in terms of fold geometry and orientation of foliation and fold axial planes to the axial load direction. We instrumented the specimens with direct contact axial and circumferential strain gauges. We performed tests at confining pressures of 40 MPa and constant axial strain rates of 5*10-6 s-1, measuring acoustic emissions and P- and S-wave velocities by three wideband (350-1000 kHz) piezoelectric transceivers with 40 dB preamps, mounted in the compression platens. We carried out post-failure microscale observation of fracture mechanisms, microcrack patterns and related fabric controls on resin-impregnated samples, using X-ray MicroCT (resolution: 9 μm), optical microscopy and SEM. Samples

  9. 7 CFR 91.15 - Basis of a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis of a laboratory service. 91.15 Section 91.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING...

  10. 7 CFR 91.36 - Appeal laboratory certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appeal laboratory certificate. 91.36 Section 91.36 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING...

  11. 7 CFR 91.16 - Order of a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Order of a laboratory service. 91.16 Section 91.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING...

  12. Agricultural Electronics. Curriculum Guide for Agriscience 324.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This guide outlines the topics of instruction and goals/objectives of a half-unit shop/laboratory course in agricultural electronics (Agriscience 324) that is part of Texas' secondary-level agricultural science and technology program. Presented first are lists of the essential elements common to all agricultural science and technology courses…

  13. Theme: Teaching Physical Science Applications in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Edward W.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "Preparing Teachers to Teach Agriscience" (Osborne); "Physical Sciences and Agriculture" (Buriak); "Using Experiments to Teach Agriculture" (Miller); "Oooh-Ahhh: So That's How It Works!" (Loschen); "Keeping Agriculture in Agriscience" (Moss); "Sharpening Twist Drills" (McHargue, Hood); and "Safety in the Agriscience Laboratory"…

  14. A Guide for Planning Programs in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichelberger, A. E.; And Others

    The general information necessary for planning a high school program in agricultural educated is provided, based on the following briefly described occupational areas: agricultural production, agricultural supplied/services, agricultural mechanics, agricultural products (processing, inspection, and marketing), agricultural resources (conversation,…

  15. Agricultural Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Winston J.

    1981-01-01

    Elucidates strategies for applying microbiological techniques to traditional agricultural practices. Discusses the manipulation of microorganisms that live with plants and also the problems involved in the introduction of new genes into crop plants by recombinant DNA methods. (CS)

  16. Agricultural Geophysics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The four geophysical methods predominantly used for agricultural purposes are resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and time domain reflectometry (TDR). Resistivity and electromagnetic induction methods are typically employed to map lateral variations of apparent so...

  17. [Transformation Mechanism and Sources of Secondary Inorganic Components in PM2.5 at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-yi; Zeng, Li-min; Dong, Hua-bin; Zhu, Tong

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneously on-line measurements of major water-soluble inorganic ions and gaseous pollutants were performed from June 9 to July 11, 2014 at Quzhou, an agriculture site in the North China Plain using a gas-aerosol collector (GAC) and ion chromatograph (IC), aiming to track the diurnal variation rule of secondary inorganic components and gas-phase precursors as well as their interactions. The transformation mechanism and sources of fine particles (PM2.5) were also discussed. The results showed that these water-soluble ions in PM2.5 and their gas-phase precursors varied regularly. As the dominant ionic components of PM2.5 (accounting for 76.23%), the average concentrations of SO4(2-), NH4(+), NO3(-) were 26.28 μg x m(-3), 18.08 μg x m(-3) and 16.36 μg m(-3) respectively. Among the precursor gases, the NH3, generated from the discharges of local agricultural activities, displayed a significantly higher concentration at an average value of 44.85 μg x m(-3). The average fine sulfate and nitrate oxidation ratios (SOR and NOR) were SOR = 0.60, NOR = 0.30, revealing the remarkable characteristics of secondary pollution. As could be found from the relevant analysis, the NH4(+) of Quzhou showed well relations with NO3(-) and SO4(2-), and the environment here was rich of ammonia. The NH4(+) existed in the form of (NH4)2SO4 and the generation of NO3(-) was limited by the HNO3. From the analysis for the equilibrium of NH4NO3, we observed that the atmospheric environment of Quzhou was adverse to the generation and maintenance of NH4NO3 during the daytime,in contrast with the night. Integrated with the study, the results displayed that the secondary transformation was the main source of fine particles in Quzhou, and the NH3 from field and compost was the significant factor leading to the high value of S-N-A. PMID:26841585

  18. [Transformation Mechanism and Sources of Secondary Inorganic Components in PM2.5 at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-yi; Zeng, Li-min; Dong, Hua-bin; Zhu, Tong

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneously on-line measurements of major water-soluble inorganic ions and gaseous pollutants were performed from June 9 to July 11, 2014 at Quzhou, an agriculture site in the North China Plain using a gas-aerosol collector (GAC) and ion chromatograph (IC), aiming to track the diurnal variation rule of secondary inorganic components and gas-phase precursors as well as their interactions. The transformation mechanism and sources of fine particles (PM2.5) were also discussed. The results showed that these water-soluble ions in PM2.5 and their gas-phase precursors varied regularly. As the dominant ionic components of PM2.5 (accounting for 76.23%), the average concentrations of SO4(2-), NH4(+), NO3(-) were 26.28 μg x m(-3), 18.08 μg x m(-3) and 16.36 μg m(-3) respectively. Among the precursor gases, the NH3, generated from the discharges of local agricultural activities, displayed a significantly higher concentration at an average value of 44.85 μg x m(-3). The average fine sulfate and nitrate oxidation ratios (SOR and NOR) were SOR = 0.60, NOR = 0.30, revealing the remarkable characteristics of secondary pollution. As could be found from the relevant analysis, the NH4(+) of Quzhou showed well relations with NO3(-) and SO4(2-), and the environment here was rich of ammonia. The NH4(+) existed in the form of (NH4)2SO4 and the generation of NO3(-) was limited by the HNO3. From the analysis for the equilibrium of NH4NO3, we observed that the atmospheric environment of Quzhou was adverse to the generation and maintenance of NH4NO3 during the daytime,in contrast with the night. Integrated with the study, the results displayed that the secondary transformation was the main source of fine particles in Quzhou, and the NH3 from field and compost was the significant factor leading to the high value of S-N-A.

  19. Effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on survival, development, growth and sex ratios of wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles. II: agriculturally relevant exposures to Roundup WeatherMax® and Vision® under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lanctôt, C; Navarro-Martín, L; Robertson, C; Park, B; Jackman, P; Pauli, B D; Trudeau, V L

    2014-09-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are currently the most commonly used herbicides in the world. They have been shown to affect survival, growth, development and sexual differentiation of tadpoles under chronic laboratory exposures but this has not been investigated under more environmentally realistic conditions. The purpose of this study is (1) to determine if an agriculturally relevant exposure to Roundup WeatherMax®, a relatively new and understudied formulation, influences the development of wood frog tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus) through effects on the mRNA levels of genes involved in the control of metamorphosis; (2) to compare results to the well-studied Vision® formulation (containing the isopropylamine salt of glyphosate [IPA] and polyethoxylated tallowamine [POEA] surfactant) and to determine which ingredient(s) in the formulations are responsible for potential effects on development; and (3) to compare results to recent field studies that used a similar experimental design. In the present laboratory study, wood frog tadpoles were exposed to an agriculturally relevant application (i.e., two pulses) of Roundup WeatherMax® and Vision® herbicides as well as the active ingredient (IPA) and the POEA surfactant of Vision®. Survival, development, growth, sex ratios and mRNA levels of genes involved in tadpole metamorphosis were measured. Results show that Roundup WeatherMax® (2.89 mg acid equivalent (a.e.)/L) caused 100% mortality after the first pulse. Tadpoles treated with a lower concentration of Roundup WeatherMax® (0.21 mg a.e./L) as well as Vision® (2.89 mg a.e./L), IPA and POEA had an increased condition factor (based on length and weight measures in the tadpoles) relative to controls at Gosner stage (Gs) 36/38. At Gs42, tadpoles treated with IPA and POEA had a decreased condition factor. Also at Gs42, the effect on condition factor was dependent on the sex of tadpoles and significant treatment effects were only detected in males. In most cases

  20. Does a Curriculum Integration Intervention to Improve the Mathematics Achievement of Students Diminish Their Acquisition of Technical Competence? An Experimental Study in Agricultural Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Brian A.; Edwards, M. Craig; Leising, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically test the hypothesis that students who participated in a contextualized, mathematics-enhanced high school agricultural power and technology curriculum and aligned instructional approach would not experience significant diminishment in acquisition of technical skills related to agricultural power and…

  1. Agricultural Biodiversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postance, Jim

    1998-01-01

    The extinction of farm animals and crops is rarely brought up during discussions of endangered species and biodiversity; however, the loss of diversity in crops and livestock threatens the sustainability of agriculture. Presents three activities: (1) "The Colors of Diversity"; (2) "Biodiversity among Animals"; and (3) "Heirloom Plants." Discusses…

  2. AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STEVENS, GLENN Z.

    FEDERAL LEGISLATION HAS PROVIDED FOR PUBLIC PROGRAMS OF OCCUPATIONAL AGRICULTURE EDUCATION IN LAND GRANT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS, AND MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES SHOULD BE TO DEVELOP KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS, PROVIDE OCCUPATIONAL GUIDANCE AND PLACEMENT, AND DEVELOP ABILITIES IN HUMAN RELATIONS AND…

  3. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARQUHAR, R.N.

    AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION HAS LONG EMPHASIZED TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE AT THE EXPENSE OF THE SOCIOECONOMIC ASPECTS OF FARM PRODUCTION AND FARM LIFE. ONLY IN TASMANIA HAS FARM MANAGEMENT BEEN STRESSED. DEMANDS FOR THE WHOLE-FARM APPROACH HAVE PRODUCED A TREND TOWARD GENERALISM FOR DISTRICT OFFICERS IN MOST STATES. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT,…

  4. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  5. Urban Agriculture Programs on the Rise: Agriculture Education Model Can Reach Students Other Classes Leave Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritsch, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural education begins with hands-on classroom and laboratory instruction. Because agriculture is such a broad topic, schools typically tailor agriculture class offerings to match the interests of the student population, needs of nearby businesses and industry, or topics relevant to their state's standard assessments. Within most…

  6. 7 CFR 160.17 - Laboratory analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory analysis. 160.17 Section 160.17 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Methods of Analysis, Inspection, Sampling and Grading § 160.17 Laboratory analysis. The analysis and laboratory testing of naval stores shall be conducted, so far as is...

  7. 7 CFR 160.17 - Laboratory analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laboratory analysis. 160.17 Section 160.17 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Methods of Analysis, Inspection, Sampling and Grading § 160.17 Laboratory analysis. The analysis and laboratory testing of naval stores shall be conducted, so far as is...

  8. 7 CFR 160.17 - Laboratory analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laboratory analysis. 160.17 Section 160.17 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Methods of Analysis, Inspection, Sampling and Grading § 160.17 Laboratory analysis. The analysis and laboratory testing of naval stores shall be conducted, so far as is...

  9. 7 CFR 160.17 - Laboratory analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laboratory analysis. 160.17 Section 160.17 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Methods of Analysis, Inspection, Sampling and Grading § 160.17 Laboratory analysis. The analysis and laboratory testing of naval stores shall be conducted, so far as is...

  10. 7 CFR 160.17 - Laboratory analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laboratory analysis. 160.17 Section 160.17 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Methods of Analysis, Inspection, Sampling and Grading § 160.17 Laboratory analysis. The analysis and laboratory testing of naval stores shall be conducted, so far as is...

  11. Thermo-mechanical laboratory modeling of lithospheric-scale processes: the example of deep continental subduction and exhumation of UHP/LT rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, David

    2010-05-01

    Purely mechanical (isothermal) laboratory experiments of continental subduction suggested existence of two principal regimes of this process, defined by the interplate pressure and inversely proportional to the pull-force. The pull-force itself depends on the difference between the average density of the subducting lithosphere and the surrounding mantle. In both high and low compression regimes, the continental crust reaches a critical depth proportional to its strength. Although these modeling results correspond quite well to geological data, it was purely mechanical and did not consider change in the mechanical properties during subduction. In nature, however, both pressure and temperature increase causing the strength of the subducting crust and mantle to be reduced by about one order of magnitude when reaching ~100 km-depth. Thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments revealed that such strong change deeply affect the subduction and exhumation processes. In the low compression regime, the crust can only subducts to ~120 km-depth in the asthenosphere. By then, it has become too hot and weak and undergoes large deformation, including upward ductile flow of the deeply subducted portions and a localized failure of the upper crust at depth of a few tens of kilometers. This deformation is accompanied by the delamination of the crustal and mantle layers. In the high compression regime, the deeply subducted continental crust reaches greater depth (~150 to 200 km) and maintains lower temperature when continental subduction triggers the subduction of the fore-arc block or the arc plate. 2-D thermo-mechanical laboratory modeling of continental subduction thus show that exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust is possible in the low compression regime (i.e. when the effective interplate pressure Pn is lower than the lithostatic pressure), while for the deeply subducted continental crust to be preserved at low temperature at great depth, the continental subduction

  12. 7 CFR 58.442 - Laboratory and quality control tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory and quality control tests. 58.442 Section 58.442 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.442 Laboratory and quality control tests. (a)...

  13. 7 CFR 58.442 - Laboratory and quality control tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laboratory and quality control tests. 58.442 Section 58.442 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.442 Laboratory and quality control tests. (a)...

  14. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sample immediately after receipt because standard materials, laboratory equipment and supplies need... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Postponing a laboratory service. 91.17 Section 91.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  15. The interrelationship of research in the laboratory and the field to assess hydration status and determine mechanisms involved in water regulation during physical activity.

    PubMed

    Stachenfeld, Nina S

    2014-05-01

    Changes in skin blood and sweating are the primary mechanisms for heat loss in humans. A hot, humid environment concomitant with dehydration limits the ability to increase skin blood flow for the purpose of transferring heat from the body core to skin surface and evaporate sweat to maintain core temperature within safe limits during exercise. Adequate hydration improves thermoregulation by maintaining blood volume to support skin blood flow and sweating. Humans rely on fluid intake to maintain total body water and blood volume, and have developed complex mechanisms to sense changes in the amount and composition of fluid in the body. This paper addresses the interrelationship of research in the laboratory and the field to assess hydration status involved in body water and temperature regulation during exercise. In the controlled setting of a research laboratory, investigators are able to investigate the contributions of volume and tonicity of fluid in the plasma to body water and temperature regulation during exercise and recovery. For example, laboratory studies have shown that tonicity in a rehydration beverage maintains the thirst mechanism (and stimulates drinking), and contributes to the ongoing stimulation of renal fluid retention hormones, ultimately leading to a more complete rehydration. Research in the field cannot control the environment precisely, but these studies provide a natural, 'real-life' setting to study fluid and temperature regulation during exercise. The conditions encountered in the field are closest to the environment during competition, and data collected in the field can have an immediate impact on performance and safety during exercise. There is an important synergy between these two methods of collecting data that support performance and protect athletes from harm during training and improve performance during competition. PMID:24791921

  16. Evaluation of thermal treatments to improve physical and mechanical properties of bio-composites made from cotton byproducts and other agricultural fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for wood products continues to grow at levels that challenge the available resources. Alternative materials are sought to sustainably supplement the wood fiber industry. Experiments were conducted on composite boards made from agricultural residues. The boards were subjected to thermal tre...

  17. Modeling Stretching Modes of Common Organic Molecules with the Quantum Mechanical Harmonic Oscillator: An Undergraduate Vibrational Spectroscopy Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnis, J. Mark; Thompson, Matthew G. K.

    2004-01-01

    An introductory undergraduate physical organic chemistry exercise that introduces the harmonic oscillator's use in vibrational spectroscopy is developed. The analysis and modeling exercise begins with the students calculating the stretching modes of common organic molecules with the help of the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator (QMHO) model.

  18. CHEMICAL OIL SPILL DISPERSANTS: UPDATE STATE-OF-THE- ART ON MECHANISM OF ACTION AND LABORATORY TESTING FOR PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical dispersants are formulations designed to facilitate dispersion of an oil slick into small droplets that disperse to non-problematic concentrations in an underlying water column. This project had two primary objectives: (1) update information on mechanisms of action of ...

  19. What the laboratory rat has taught us about social play behavior: role in behavioral development and neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    Social play behavior is the most vigorous and characteristic form of social interaction displayed by developing mammals. The laboratory rat is an ideal species to study this behavior, since it shows ample social play that can be easily recognized and quantified. In this chapter, we will first briefly describe the structure of social play behavior in rats. Next, we will discuss studies that used social isolation rearing during the period in life when social play is most abundant to investigate the developmental functions of social play behavior in rats, focusing on the consequences of play deprivation on social, cognitive, emotional, and sensorimotor development. Last, we will discuss the neural substrates of social play behavior in rats, with emphasis on the limbic corticostriatal circuits that underlie emotions and their influence on behavior. PMID:24338663

  20. Intermediate Scale Laboratory Testing to Understand Mechanisms of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during Injection and Post-Injection of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Illangasekare, Tissa; Trevisan, Luca; Agartan, Elif; Mori, Hiroko; Vargas-Johnson, Javier; Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana; Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin

    2015-03-31

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) represents a technology aimed to reduce atmospheric loading of CO2 from power plants and heavy industries by injecting it into deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers. A number of trapping mechanisms contribute to effective and secure storage of the injected CO2 in supercritical fluid phase (scCO2) in the formation over the long term. The primary trapping mechanisms are structural, residual, dissolution and mineralization. Knowledge gaps exist on how the heterogeneity of the formation manifested at all scales from the pore to the site scales affects trapping and parameterization of contributing mechanisms in models. An experimental and modeling study was conducted to fill these knowledge gaps. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes and mechanisms in field settings is not possible as it is not feasible to fully characterize the geologic heterogeneity at all relevant scales and gathering data on migration, trapping and dissolution of scCO2. Laboratory experiments using scCO2 under ambient conditions are also not feasible as it is technically challenging and cost prohibitive to develop large, two- or three-dimensional test systems with controlled high pressures to keep the scCO2 as a liquid. Hence, an innovative approach that used surrogate fluids in place of scCO2 and formation brine in multi-scale, synthetic aquifers test systems ranging in scales from centimeter to meter scale developed used. New modeling algorithms were developed to capture the processes controlled by the formation heterogeneity, and they were tested using the data from the laboratory test systems. The results and findings are expected to contribute toward better conceptual models, future improvements to DOE numerical codes, more accurate assessment of storage capacities, and optimized placement strategies. This report presents the experimental and modeling methods

  1. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time PCR method for detecting shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in beef and comparison to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology laboratory guidebook method.

    PubMed

    Fratamico, Pina M; Wasilenko, Jamie L; Garman, Bradley; Demarco, Daniel R; Varkey, Stephen; Jensen, Mark; Rhoden, Kyle; Tice, George

    2014-02-01

    The "top-six" non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) most frequently associated with outbreaks and cases of foodborne illnesses have been declared as adulterants in beef by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). Regulatory testing in beef began in June 2012. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the DuPont BAX System method for detecting these top six STEC strains and strains of E. coli O157:H7. For STEC, the BAX System real-time STEC suite was evaluated, including a screening assay for the stx and eae virulence genes and two panel assays to identify the target serogroups: panel 1 detects O26, O111, and O121, and panel 2 detects O45, O103, O145. For E. coli O157:H7, the BAX System real-time PCR assay for this specific serotype was used. Sensitivity of each assay for the PCR targets was ≥1.23 × 10(3) CFU/ml in pure culture. Each assay was 100% inclusive for the strains tested (20 to 50 per assay), and no cross-reactivity with closely related strains was observed in any of the assays. The performance of the BAX System methods was compared with that of the FSIS Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) methods for detection of the top six STEC and E. coli O157:H7 strains in ground beef and beef trim. Generally, results of the BAX System method were similar to those of the MLG methods for detecting non-O157 STEC and E. coli O157:H7. Reducing or eliminating novobiocin in modified tryptic soy broth (mTSB) may improve the detection of STEC O111 strains; one beef trim sample inoculated with STEC O111 produced a negative result when enriched in mTSB with 8 mg/liter novobiocin but was positive when enriched in mTSB without novobiocin. The results of this study indicate the feasibility of deploying a panel of real-time PCR assay configurations for the detection and monitoring of the top six STEC and E. coli O157:H7 strains in beef. The approach could easily be adapted

  2. Laboratory Equipment Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. Construction Fund, Albany, NY.

    Requirements for planning, designing, constructing and installing laboratory furniture are given in conjunction with establishing facility criteria for housing laboratory equipment. Furniture and equipment described include--(1) center tables, (2) reagent racks, (3) laboratory benches and their mechanical fixtures, (4) sink and work counters, (5)…

  3. Overview of Mosquito Research Programs at the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical, Agricultural & Veterinary Entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE), a U.S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research Service laboratory, was established in World War II to produce products to protect military personnel against insect vector of disease. Currently the mission of CMAVE is ...

  4. SLOPE FAILURE MECHANISMS IN COHESIVE SOILS: INSIGHTS FROM THEORETICAL AND NUMERICAL ANALYSES OF FIELD AND LABORATORY-TRIGGERED EVENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, J.; Spickermann, A.; van Asch, T.

    2009-12-01

    A landslide can show a variety of failure modes which depends on the given conditions of the slope such as geometry, material characteristics and presence of discontinuities. Besides the gravity as main loading factor, it is assumed that slope failures are often caused by hydrological processes. The identification and modelling of failure modes and triggering mechanisms are essential requirements in landslide forecasting and in the design of reliable early warning systems. This work is an attempt to get a better understanding of the mode of failure and possible failure mechanisms taking place in cohesive slopes. Theoretical analysis has been carried out on the basis of (1) field observations of two failure events of the clay-rich Super-Sauze mudslide (Southeast France) and (2) small-scale landslides triggered in a flume using clay from Zoelen (Netherlands) and reworked black marls from Super-Sauze. To investigate the failure behaviour numerically a simple analytical model, named 2LM (Landslide Liquefaction Model) (van Asch et al. 2006; van Asch & Malet, in press) is used. The model assumes that liquefaction is related to previous development of slip surfaces, i.e. deformation of the landslide body (sliding blocks, slumps) during motion leading to the generation of excess pore water pressure and thus to fluidization. The model is based on the theory of limiting equilibrium dividing the area above an estimated slip surface into slices of constant width. Immediately after failure, the difference in movement for each slice is calculated assuming a viscous shear band and using the Coulomb-viscous model. The differential movements conduct to differential strains which are transferred to excess pore water pressures. The potential fluidization is then evaluated for each slice in relation to the displacements. Results from an application of this model on the two slump-type failures that occurred in the Super-Sauze mudslide are presented. Then the model is applied to the

  5. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Postponing a laboratory service. 91.17 Section 91.17..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Laboratory Service § 91.17 Postponing a laboratory service. If...

  6. 7 CFR 91.36 - Appeal laboratory certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appeal laboratory certificate. 91.36 Section 91.36..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Appeal of Laboratory Services § 91.36 Appeal laboratory certificate....

  7. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Postponing a laboratory service. 91.17 Section 91.17..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Laboratory Service § 91.17 Postponing a laboratory service. If...

  8. 7 CFR 91.36 - Appeal laboratory certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appeal laboratory certificate. 91.36 Section 91.36..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Appeal of Laboratory Services § 91.36 Appeal laboratory certificate....

  9. 7 CFR 91.36 - Appeal laboratory certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appeal laboratory certificate. 91.36 Section 91.36..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Appeal of Laboratory Services § 91.36 Appeal laboratory certificate....

  10. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Postponing a laboratory service. 91.17 Section 91.17..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Laboratory Service § 91.17 Postponing a laboratory service. If...

  11. 7 CFR 91.15 - Basis of a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Basis of a laboratory service. 91.15 Section 91.15..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Laboratory Service § 91.15 Basis of a laboratory service....

  12. 7 CFR 91.36 - Appeal laboratory certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appeal laboratory certificate. 91.36 Section 91.36..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Appeal of Laboratory Services § 91.36 Appeal laboratory certificate....

  13. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Postponing a laboratory service. 91.17 Section 91.17..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Laboratory Service § 91.17 Postponing a laboratory service. If...

  14. Agricultural biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Waage, J K; Mumford, J D

    2008-02-27

    The prevention and control of new pest and disease introductions is an agricultural challenge which is attracting growing public interest. This interest is in part driven by an impression that the threat is increasing, but there has been little analysis of the changing rates of biosecurity threat, and existing evidence is equivocal. Traditional biosecurity systems for animals and plants differ substantially but are beginning to converge. Bio-economic modelling of risk will be a valuable tool in guiding the allocation of limited resources for biosecurity. The future of prevention and management systems will be strongly influenced by new technology and the growing role of the private sector. Overall, today's biosecurity systems are challenged by changing national priorities regarding trade, by new concerns about environmental effects of biological invasions and by the question 'who pays?'. Tomorrow's systems may need to be quite different to be effective. We suggest three changes: an integration of plant and animal biosecurity around a common, proactive, risk-based approach; a greater focus on international cooperation to deal with threats at source; and a commitment to refocus biosecurity on building resilience to invasion into agroecosystems rather than building walls around them.

  15. The erosion of the beaches on the coast of Alicante: Study of the mechanisms of weathering by accelerated laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    López, I; López, M; Aragonés, L; García-Barba, J; López, M P; Sánchez, I

    2016-10-01

    One of the main problems that coasts around the world present, is the regression and erosion of beaches. However, the factors involved in these processes are unclear. In this study, the influence of sediment erosion on beach regression has been analysed. In order to do that, a three-step investigation has been carried out. Firstly, coastline variations of four Spanish beaches have been analysed. Secondly, a study on sediment position along the beach profile has been developed. Finally, the process that beach sediments undergo along the surf zone when they are hit by the incident waves has been simulated by an accelerated particle weathering test. Samples of sand and shells were subjected to this accelerated particle weathering test. Results were supplemented with those from carbonate content test, XRD, SEM and granulometric analysis. Results shows a cross-shore classification of sediments along the beach profile in which finer particles move beyond offshore limit. Besides, it was observed that sediment erosion process is divided into three sages: i) particles wear due to crashes ii) dissolution of the carbonate fraction, and iii) breakage and separation of mineral and carbonate parts of particles. All these processes lead to a reduction of particle size. The mechanism responsible of beach erosion would consist of multiples and continuous particle location exchanges along the beach profile as a consequence of grain-size decrease due to erosion.

  16. The erosion of the beaches on the coast of Alicante: Study of the mechanisms of weathering by accelerated laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    López, I; López, M; Aragonés, L; García-Barba, J; López, M P; Sánchez, I

    2016-10-01

    One of the main problems that coasts around the world present, is the regression and erosion of beaches. However, the factors involved in these processes are unclear. In this study, the influence of sediment erosion on beach regression has been analysed. In order to do that, a three-step investigation has been carried out. Firstly, coastline variations of four Spanish beaches have been analysed. Secondly, a study on sediment position along the beach profile has been developed. Finally, the process that beach sediments undergo along the surf zone when they are hit by the incident waves has been simulated by an accelerated particle weathering test. Samples of sand and shells were subjected to this accelerated particle weathering test. Results were supplemented with those from carbonate content test, XRD, SEM and granulometric analysis. Results shows a cross-shore classification of sediments along the beach profile in which finer particles move beyond offshore limit. Besides, it was observed that sediment erosion process is divided into three sages: i) particles wear due to crashes ii) dissolution of the carbonate fraction, and iii) breakage and separation of mineral and carbonate parts of particles. All these processes lead to a reduction of particle size. The mechanism responsible of beach erosion would consist of multiples and continuous particle location exchanges along the beach profile as a consequence of grain-size decrease due to erosion. PMID:27220096

  17. Fore-arc deformation at the transition between collision and subduction: results from first 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D. A.; Oncken, O.; Ustaszewski, K. M.; Cruden, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    3-D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments of arc-continent collision investigate the deformation of the fore-arc at the transition between collision and subduction. The deformation of the plates in the collision area propagates into the subduction-collision transition zone via along-strike coupling of the neighboring segments of the plate boundary. The largest along-strike gradient of trench-perpendicular compression produced by a passive margin turning by 90 degrees does not generate sufficiently localized shear strain in the transition zone to cause a strike-slip system because of the fast propagation of arc lithosphere failure. Deformation is thus continuous along-strike, but the deformation mechanism is three-dimensional and progressive structural variations arise because the coupling between neighboring segment induces either advanced or delayed failure of the arc lithosphere and passive margin. During the initial stage of collision, the accretionary wedge is partially subducted, the interplate zone is lubricated, and shear traction drops. Thus large convergence obliquity does not produce a migrating fore-arc sliver. Instead, the fore-arc motion is due to the pressure force generated by subduction of the buoyant continental crust. It follows that convergence obliquity does not yield trench-parallel deformation of the fore-arc and its influence on the collision process is limited. However, convergence obliquity may have shaped the active margin during the stage of oceanic subduction stage, prior to collision, and inherited structures may impact the propagation mechanism.

  18. 7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE AND PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories....

  19. 7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE AND PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories....

  20. 7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE AND PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories....

  1. 7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE AND PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories....

  2. 7 CFR 802.1 - Qualified laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE AND PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN WEIGHING EQUIPMENT AND RELATED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS § 802.1 Qualified laboratories....

  3. Programs in Animal Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Don R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Five topics relating to programs in animal agriculture are addressed: (1) the future of animal agriculture; (2) preparing teachers in animal agriculture; (3) how animal programs help young people; (4) a nontraditional animal agriculture program; and (5) developing competencies in animal agriculture. (LRA)

  4. Litter size manipulation in laboratory mice: an example of how proteomic analysis can uncover new mechanisms underlying the cost of reproduction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Life history theories predict that investment in current reproduction comes at a cost for future reproduction and survival. Oxidative stress is one of the best documented mechanisms underlying costs of reproduction to date. However, other, yet to be described molecular mechanisms that play a short term role during reproduction may explain the negative relationships underlying the cost of reproduction. To identify such new mechanisms, we used a global proteomic determination of liver protein profiles in laboratory adult female mice whose litter size had been either reduced or enlarged after birth. This litter size manipulation was expected to affect females by either raising or decreasing their current reproductive effort. At the same time, global parameters and levels of oxidative stress were also measured in all females. Results Based on plasma analyses, females with enlarged litters exhibited increased levels of oxidative stress at the date of weaning compared to females with reduced litters, while no significant difference was found between both the latter groups and control females. None of the liver proteins related to oxidative balance were significantly affected by the experimental treatment. In contrast, the liver protein profiles of females with enlarged and reduced litters suggested that calcium metabolism and cell growth regulation were negatively affected by changes in the number of pup reared. Conclusions Plasma oxidative stress levels in reproductive mice revealed that the degree of investment in reproduction can actually incur a cost in terms of plasmatic oxidative stress, their initial investment in reproduction being close to maximum and remaining at a same level when the energy demand of lactation is reduced. Liver proteomic profiles in reproductive females show that hepatic oxidative stress is unlikely to be involved in the cost of reproduction. Reproductive females rather exhibited liver protein profiles similar to those previously

  5. Energy efficiency procedures for agricultural machinery used in onion cultivation (Allium fistulosum) as an alternative to reduce carbon emissions under the clean development mechanism at Aquitania (Colombia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, K.; Carrillo, S.; Gutierrez, L.

    2014-06-01

    Climate change has both causes and consequences over agriculture. This paper focuses on the first element and presents scenarios for ASOLAGO -an onion cropper's association in Colombia with 250 members- to reduce their carbon footprint. It evaluates a case study at "La Primavera" farm using a methodology approved by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Land preparation and crop irrigation were analyzed as stages in order to propose energy efficiency alternatives for both the farm and the association. They include field efficiency, fuel economy and energy efficiency from biofuels for the first stage as well as solar and wind energy supply for the second. A cost-benefit analysis to generate additional income selling additional power produced by the system to the National Grid was done.

  6. Agricultural Education at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Donald E.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses educational reform in the context of agricultural education. Covers a recent report on agricultural education reform by the National Academy of Sciences, state legislative initiatives, and several recommendations for the future of agricultural education. (CH)

  7. Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysical methods continue to show great promise for use in agriculture. The term “agricultural geophysics” denotes a subdiscipline of geophysics that is focused only on agricultural applications. The Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics was compiled to include a comprehensive overview of the geoph...

  8. 7 CFR 94.5 - Charges for laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Charges for laboratory service. 94.5 Section 94.5..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Mandatory Analyses of Egg Products § 94.5 Charges for laboratory service....

  9. 7 CFR 94.5 - Charges for laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Charges for laboratory service. 94.5 Section 94.5..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Mandatory Analyses of Egg Products § 94.5 Charges for laboratory service....

  10. 7 CFR 94.5 - Charges for laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Charges for laboratory service. 94.5 Section 94.5..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Mandatory Analyses of Egg Products § 94.5 Charges for laboratory service....

  11. Performance of the Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop Rover Heat Rejection System Used for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Bame, David; Mastropietro, A. J.; Miller, Jennifer; Karlmann, Paul; Liu, Yuanming; Anderson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The challenging range of landing sites for which the Mars Science Laboratory Rover was designed, required a rover thermal management system that is capable of keeping temperatures controlled across a wide variety of environmental conditions. On the Martian surface where temperatures can be as cold as -123 C and as warm as 38 C, the Rover relies upon a Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop (MPFL) Rover Heat Rejection System (RHRS) and external radiators to maintain the temperature of sensitive electronics and science instruments within a -40 C to +50 C range. The RHRS harnesses some of the waste heat generated from the Rover power source, known as the Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), for use as survival heat for the rover during cold conditions. The MMRTG produces 110 Watts of electrical power while generating waste heat equivalent to approximately 2000 Watts. Heat exchanger plates (hot plates) positioned close to the MMRTG pick up this survival heat from it by radiative heat transfer and supply it to the rover. This design is the first instance of use of a RHRS for thermal control of a rover or lander on the surface of a planet. After an extremely successful landing on Mars (August 5), the rover and the RHRS have performed flawlessly for close to an earth year (half the nominal mission life). This paper will share the performance of the RHRS on the Martian surface as well as compare it to its predictions.

  12. Agriculture Supplies & Services. Volume 3 of 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan.

    The third of three volumes included in a secondary agricultural supplies and services curriculum guide, this volume contains twenty-five units of instruction in the area of agricultural mechanics. Among the unit topics included are (1) Farm Safety, (2) Ignition Systems; (3) Servicing Wheel Bearings, (4) Oxyacetylene Cutting, (5) Servicing the…

  13. Agribusiness Management. The Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    These materials in agribusiness management for the Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum were designed for use in the following areas: Animal Science; Plant Science; Agricultural Mechanics; and Natural Resources and Aquaculture. Each unit of this competency-based guide contains title of unit, unit length, grade level, objectives, teacher…

  14. Beyond conservation agriculture.

    PubMed

    Giller, Ken E; Andersson, Jens A; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture.

  15. Beyond conservation agriculture.

    PubMed

    Giller, Ken E; Andersson, Jens A; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture. PMID:26579139

  16. Beyond conservation agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Giller, Ken E.; Andersson, Jens A.; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture. PMID:26579139

  17. 1986 Agricultural Chartbook. Agriculture Handbook No. 663.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    This book contains 310 charts, tables, and graphs containing statistical information about agriculture-related commodities and services, primarily in the United States, in 1986. The book is organized in seven sections that cover the following topics: (1) the farm (farm income, farm population, farm workers, food and fiber system, agriculture and…

  18. Agricultural Aircraft for Site-Specific Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a convenient platform to aid in precision agriculture, in which pesticide, fertilizer or other field inputs are applied only where they are needed. This saves on chemical and farm resources, and reduces environmental loading. Remote sensing is used to spot areas of the ...

  19. Agricultural Chartbook 1988. Agriculture Handbook No. 673.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    These charts present an overview of the current economic health of American agriculture. The charts move from the national and international arenas to farm economic health measures and crop and livestock trends. A small amount of descriptive narrative accompanies most of the charts. Charts depicting the economic picture of U.S. agriculture include…

  20. Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliom, Laura R.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

  1. Migrant labor in agriculture: an international comparison.

    PubMed

    Martin, P L

    1985-01-01

    The May 1984 Conference on Migrant Labor in Agriculture at the University of California-Davis discussed papers by 22 farm labor experts from 12 nations. Each industrial nation utilizes a different set of public and private policies to supply workers for labor-intensive agriculture, but none is entirely satisfactory. Labor-intensive agriculture is becoming more dependent on workers who are shut out of labor markets. Some countries have simply accepted foreign workers in agriculture, while others have adopted policies to integrate farm and nonfarm labor markets. Polices to reduce agriculture's reliance on workers-without-options include restructuring employment practices to employ fewer seasonal workers for longer periods, mechanizing production, and importing fruits and vegetables from nearby developing countries. This article explains the salient features of labor-intensive agriculture, the various polices for obtaining seasonal farmworkers, and options to reduce farming's dependence on migrant labor.

  2. Irradiation of Northwest agricultural products

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin, D.E.; Tingey, G.L.

    1985-02-01

    Irradiation of food for disinfestation and preservation is increasing in importance because of increasing restrictions on various chemical treatments. Irradiation treatment is of particular interest in the Northwest because of a growing supply of agricultural products and the need to develop new export markets. Several products have, or could potentially have, significant export markets if stringent insect control procedures are developed and followed. Due to the recognized potential benefits of irradiation, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting this program to evaluate the benefits of using irradiation on Northwest agricultural products under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Byproducts Production and Utilization Program. Commodities currently included in the program are cherries, apples, asparagus, spices, hay, and hides.

  3. Agricultural Libraries and Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Keith W., Ed.; Pisa, Maria G., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven articles address issues relating to agricultural libraries and information, including background on agricultural libraries and information, trend management, document delivery, reference services, user needs and library services, collection development, technologies for international information management, information sources,…

  4. Theme: Delivering Agricultural Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Warren D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Eight articles in this theme issue deal with the nationwide implementation of agricultural literacy programs--discovering how to do it. Discussed are experiences in planning and conducting agricultural literacy programs at state and local levels. (JOW)

  5. Traditional Agriculture and Permaculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dick

    1997-01-01

    Discusses benefits of combining traditional agricultural techniques with the concepts of "permaculture," a framework for revitalizing traditions, culture, and spirituality. Describes school, college, and community projects that have assisted American Indian communities in revitalizing sustainable agricultural practices that incorporate cultural…

  6. Vocational Agriculture in Ponape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayrit, Ruben S.

    1975-01-01

    The general objectives of agriculture education in both the elementary and secondary schools in Ponape District are to develop interest in agriculture among students and to provide practical and technical skills in growing crops and raising domestic animals. (Author)

  7. Strategies for Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosson, Pierre R.; Rosenberg, Norman J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the change of agricultural methods with human population growth. Describes the trends of world food production, changes in farmland, use of fertilizer, and 13 agricultural research institutions. Lists 5 references for further reading. (YP)

  8. [Effects of agricultural practices on community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in agricultural ecosystem: a review].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ping-Ping; Li, Min; Liu, Run-Jin

    2011-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are rich in diversity in agricultural ecosystem, playing a vital role based on their unique community structure. Host plants and environmental factors have important effects on AM fungal community structure, so do the agricultural practices which deserve to pay attention to. This paper summarized the research advances in the effects of agricultural practices such as irrigation, fertilization, crop rotation, intercropping, tillage, and pesticide application on AM fungal community structure, analyzed the related possible mechanisms, discussed the possible ways in improving AM fungal community structure in agricultural ecosystem, and put forward a set of countermeasures, i.e., improving fertilization system and related integrated techniques, increasing plant diversity in agricultural ecosystem, and inoculating AM fungi, to enhance the AM fungal diversity in agricultural ecosystem. The existing problems in current agricultural practices and further research directions were also proposed.

  9. Development paths of China's agricultural Pharmaceutical industry under Eco-agriculture background.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinkai; Gong, Liutang; Ji, Xi; Zhang, Jin; Miao, Pei

    2014-07-01

    Using pesticides has double effects. On one hand, it contributes to pests control and regulates the growth of crops; On the other hand, it does harm to the environment. To develop ecological agriculture should not only emphasize the output level of agriculture to pursuit of economic efficiency, but also need to keep the ecological environment protected and focus on the social benefits during the development of the industry. As a large agricultural country in the world, China is vigorously promoting the development of ecological agriculture, which is bound to put forward to developing the pesticide industry and green ecological development requirements to promote the transformation and upgrading of agricultural pharmaceutical industry. This paper discusses the mechanism of pesticide pollution on the ecological environment and analyzes China's agricultural problems in the pharmaceutical industry. Then study on the development of Chinese green pesticides and try to find the proper paths of agricultural pharmaceutical to achieve industrial upgrading.

  10. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  11. 7 CFR 94.3 - Analyses performed and locations of laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Analyses performed and locations of laboratories. 94.3 Section 94.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED)...

  12. Biotechnology and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Martin

    Even at this early date in the application of biotechnology to agriculture, it is clear that agriculture may provide the largest market for new or less expensive biotechnologically manufactured products. The chemical and pharmaceutical industries that hold important positions in agricultural inputs are consolidating their positions by purchasing…

  13. Agriculture Business and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seperich, George; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended for vocational agriculture teachers who deliver agricultural business and management programs at the secondary or postsecondary level. It is based on the Arizona validated occupational competencies and tasks for management and supervisory positions in agricultural business. The competency/skill and task list…

  14. Agricultural Education: Value Adding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenberg, Lou E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This issue develops the theme of "Agricultural Education--Value Adding." The concept value adding has been a staple in the world of agricultural business for describing adding value to a commodity that would profit the producer and the local community. Agricultural education should add value to individuals and society to justify agricultural…

  15. Information for Agricultural Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaungamno, E. E.

    This paper describes the major international agricultural information services, sources, and systems; outlines the existing information situation in Tanzania as it relates to problems of agricultural development; and reviews the improvements in information provision resources required to support the process of agricultural development in Tanzania.…

  16. Chapter 3: Cropland Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2013, cropland agriculture resulted in total emissions of approximately 209 MMT CO2 eq. of greenhouse gases (GHG). Cropland agriculture is responsible for almost half (46%) of all emissions from the agricultural sector. Nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) emissions from c...

  17. Dutch Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netherlands Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, The Hauge.

    Agricultural Education in the Netherlands is categorized as Scientific, Higher Secondary, Middle Secondary, and Lower Secondary. Scientific education is given at the agricultural university which has a 6- or 7-year curriculum. Higher secondary education is given at agricultural and horticultural colleges with a 3- to 4-year curriculum. Middle…

  18. Agriculture, Environmental Education Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project I-C-E, Green Bay, WI.

    This agriculture guide, for use at the secondary level, is one of a series of guides, K-12, which were developed by teachers to help introduce environmental education into the total curriculum. Environmental problems are present in every community where agriculture education is offered, and therefore many agriculture teachers have included some…

  19. SUMMARIES OF RESEARCH STUDIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION FOR THE PACIFIC REGION, 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCOMAS, J.D.

    TWENTY DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS, STAFF STUDIES, AND MASTERS' THESES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION ARE REPORTED IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS -- AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES, CIVIL DEFENSE, COMMUNITY COLLEGES, CURRICULUM, EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION, DROPOUTS, EXTENSION EDUCATION, EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES, JUNIOR COLLEGES, LAND LABORATORIES, OCCUPATIONAL…

  20. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  1. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  2. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  3. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  4. 7 CFR 58.417 - Mechanical agitators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mechanical agitators. 58.417 Section 58.417 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....417 Mechanical agitators. The mechanical agitators shall be of sanitary construction. The...

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Daily III, W D

    2010-02-24

    This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300 should be

  6. Developmental Research of Off-Farm Agricultural Businesses in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berks County Schools, Reading, PA.

    Student vocational interest and agricultural business surveys were conducted in Berks County, Pennsylvania to gauge career opportunities in off-farm agricultural occupations. The seven categories of businesses surveyed included agriculture supplies, agriculture mechanics, horticulture mechanics, floriculture, landscaping, turf, and garden center…

  7. Theme: Urban Mechanization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Glen; And Others, Eds.

    1991-01-01

    Six theme articles discuss agricultural mechanics and its image problem, its importance, and its relevance to urban mechanization. They stress the need for agricultural mechanics and science in the urban environment for preparation for a variety of careers including landscape technology, environmental technology, energy systems management, and…

  8. Agricultural Experiment Stations and Branch Stations in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Calvin H.; Atucha, Amaya

    2015-01-01

    In 1887, Congress passed the Hatch Act, which formally established and provided a funding mechanism for agricultural experiment stations in each state and territory in the United States. The main purpose of agricultural experiment stations is to conduct agricultural research to meet the needs of the citizens of the United States. The objective of…

  9. Two Year Core Curriculum for Agricultural Education in Montana. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Univ., Bozeman. Dept. of Agricultural and Industrial Education.

    This core curriculum consists of materials for use in conducting a two-year secondary level agricultural education course. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: leadership; agricultural career planning; supervised occupational experience programs (SOEPs); agricultural mechanics (shop management and safety,…

  10. The Discipline Called Agricultural Education. Professorial Inaugural Lecture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, R. Kirby

    A historical perspective of agricultural education is needed in order to understand its role in the future. Agriculture as a science did not exist prior to the 19th century. The Morrill Act contributed greatly to this development. With the realization that higher education could serve persons interested in the agricultural and mechanical arts came…

  11. Secondary aerosol production from agricultural gas precursors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of air quality indicate that agricultural emissions may impact particulate mass concentrations through both primary and secondary processes. Increasing evidence from both laboratory and field work suggests that not only does ammonia produce secondary particulate matter, but some volatile org...

  12. Agricultural Biology, Science (Experimental): 5314.09.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basnett, Fred D.

    This unit of instruction was designed as a laboratory study of soils, plants, crop improvements and pesticides, and gives consideration to fish farming, tropical fish, and careers in agriculture. The booklet lists the relevant state-adopted texts and states the performance objectives for the unit. It provides an outline of the course content and…

  13. Spanish for Agricultural Purposes: The Video Episodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainous, Bruce H.; And Others

    The transcripts of dialogues from videotape recordings were developed, along with accompanying language laboratory material, as part of a one-semester course in Spanish for North American agriculture specialists preparing to work in Latin America. Included are 48 episodes covering such topics as: working with a local Spanish-speaking counterpart,…

  14. Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Evolution of Transport Properties in Porous Media: From Laboratory to the Groß-Schönebeck Geothermal Reservoir.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Watanabe, Norihiro; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magadalena

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying variations of transport properties of porous material, which are porosity and permeability is of special interest for geothermal applications. Variations of these properties result from the coupling between rock deformation and thermal processes. Significant pore pressure and temperature changes can occur during injection and production of fluid. Such changes have a direct impact on the stress-field affecting the geothermal reservoir performance. Understanding the coupling between deformation of the porous material and variation of its properties for mass and energy transfer is therefore a major focus for any geothermal operations. Deformation of a porous material filled with fluid is based on variations of bulk and pore volumes and affects therefore the basic transport properties of the rock. Variations of the transport properties can be expressed by theoretical formulations based on experimental observations and then integrated into numerical models which can be used to predict reservoir performance at the field scale. The aim of this study is to develop a complete poro- and thermoelastic formulation capable of explaining and quantifying fluid-rock interactions in a context of geothermal applications. In a first step, formulations to quantify porosity variations are tested with the open-source finite element method based software OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al. 2012) and compared to laboratory experiments to constrain the parameters involved. Numerical description of the physical phenomena involved for such behavior requires to account for the coupling between deformation, thermal and hydraulic processes and the relations between different scales. Three different formulations with H-M coupling are studied which are based on the theories of poroelasticity and crack closure (Zimmerman 1991, Blöcher et al. 2013 and Chin et al. 2000). These three formulations are tested on two different kinds of sandstones (Flechtinger and Bentheimer sandstones) by comparing

  15. Low temperature nickel titanium iron shape memory alloys: Actuator engineering and investigation of deformation mechanisms using in situ neutron diffraction at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vinu B.

    Shape memory alloys are incorporated as actuator elements due to their inherent ability to sense a change in temperature and actuate against external loads by undergoing a shape change as a result of a temperature-induced phase transformation. The cubic so-called austenite to the trigonal so-called R-phase transformation in NiTiFe shape memory alloys offers a practical temperature range for actuator operation at low temperatures, as it exhibits a narrow temperature-hysteresis with a desirable fatigue response. Overall, this work is an investigation of selected science and engineering aspects of low temperature NiTiFe shape memory alloys. The scientific study was performed using in situ neutron diffraction measurements at the newly developed low temperature loading capability on the Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory and encompasses three aspects of the behavior of Ni46.8Ti50Fe3.2 at 92 K (the lowest steady state temperature attainable with the capability). First, in order to study deformation mechanisms in the R-phase in NiTiFe, measurements were performed at a constant temperature of 92 K under external loading. Second, with the objective of examining NiTiFe in one-time, high-stroke, actuator applications (such as in safety valves), a NiTiFe sample was strained to approximately 5% (the R-phase was transformed to B19' phase in the process) at 92 K and subsequently heated to full strain recovery under a load. Third, with the objective of examining NiTiFe in cyclic, low-stroke, actuator applications (such as in cryogenic thermal switches), a NiTiFe sample was strained to 1% at 92 K and subsequently heated to full strain recovery under load. Neutron diffraction spectra were recorded at selected time and stress intervals during these experiments. The spectra were subsequently used to obtain quantitative information related to the phase-specific strain, texture and phase fraction evolution using the

  16. Constructing Wood Agricultural Buildings. An Instructional Unit for High School Teachers of Vocational Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Paul; Carpenter, Bruce

    This 5-week unit on constructing wood agricultural buildings is designed for the junior or senior year of the regular agribusiness course of study or as part of the agricultural mechanics program. In outline form, the unit is divided into eight major performance objectives. Each objective is subdivided into the areas of content, suggested…

  17. Microcomputers in Agriculture. A Resource Guide for California Community College Faculty in Agriculture & Natural Resources. Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This resource guide contains descriptions of microcomputer programs that are suitable for use in community college courses in agriculture and natural resources. Product descriptions are organized according to the following subject areas: agricultural business, animal production, farm mechanics, farm management, forestry and natural resources,…

  18. Spanish for Agricultural Purposes: Another Use of Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainous, Bruce H.; And Others

    Spanish for Agricultural Purposes is a set of study materials designed to furnish experience in Spanish for North American agriculturalists preparing to work in Latin America. The materials were developed in the University of Illinois' Language Learning Laboratory (LLL). They consist of (1) a basic manual based on specimens of agricultural writing…

  19. Agricultural Biotechnology Technician. National Voluntary Occupational Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Future Farmers of America Foundation, Madison, WI.

    The skill standards in this document were developed as a result of meetings between representatives of the agricultural industry and educational institutions to determine the skills and educational preparation required of an agricultural biotechnology technician, verified by technicians working in laboratories, greenhouses, animal facilities, and…

  20. Adding Professional Ethics to an Introductory Course on Sustainable Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fick, Gary W.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the details and evaluation of a laboratory exercise that introduces professional and agricultural ethics into a course on sustainable agriculture. Concludes that including material on ethics in existing courses appears to be an effective way to increase the ethical content of a curriculum and emphasizes ethical decision making as an…

  1. Laboratory Building.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  2. Agricultural Occupations Program Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul E.; Mayer, Leon

    The major program objectives of agricultural occupations courses are (1) to develop agricultural competencies needed by individuals engaged in or preparing to engage in production agriculture, and in agricultural occupations other than production agriculture; (2) to develop an understanding of the career opportunities in agriculture; (3) to…

  3. 7 CFR 996.22 - USDA-approved laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false USDA-approved laboratory. 996.22 Section 996.22... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.22 USDA-approved laboratory. USDA-approved laboratory means laboratories approved by the Science and Technology...

  4. 7 CFR 996.22 - USDA-approved laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false USDA-approved laboratory. 996.22 Section 996.22... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.22 USDA-approved laboratory. USDA-approved laboratory means laboratories approved by the Science and Technology...

  5. 7 CFR 996.22 - USDA-approved laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false USDA-approved laboratory. 996.22 Section 996.22... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.22 USDA-approved laboratory. USDA-approved laboratory means laboratories approved by the Science and Technology...

  6. 7 CFR 996.22 - USDA-approved laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false USDA-approved laboratory. 996.22 Section 996.22... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.22 USDA-approved laboratory. USDA-approved laboratory means laboratories approved by the Science and Technology...

  7. 7 CFR 996.22 - USDA-approved laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false USDA-approved laboratory. 996.22 Section 996.22... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.22 USDA-approved laboratory. USDA-approved laboratory means laboratories approved by the Science and Technology...

  8. 9 CFR 391.4 - Laboratory services rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laboratory services rate. 391.4 Section 391.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... AND LABORATORY ACCREDITATION § 391.4 Laboratory services rate. The rate for laboratory...

  9. 9 CFR 391.4 - Laboratory services rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory services rate. 391.4 Section 391.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... AND LABORATORY ACCREDITATION § 391.4 Laboratory services rate. The rate for laboratory...

  10. Agriculture and water quality. Agriculture Information Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, B.M.; Ribaudo, M.O.; Young, C.E.

    1988-08-01

    Agriculture generates byproducts that may contribute to the contamination of the Nation's water supply. Any effective regulations to ban or restrict agricultural-chemical or land-use practices in order to improve water quality will affect the farm economy. Some farmers will benefit; some will not. Most agricultural pollutants reach surface waterways in runoff; some leach through soil into ground water. Because surface-water systems and ground water systems are interrelated, farm-management practices need to focus on water quality in both systems. Modifying farm-management practices may raise production costs in some areas. Farmers can reduce runoff losses by reducing input use, implementing soil-conservation practices, and changing land use. Also at issue is who should pay for improving water quality.

  11. Agricultural aviation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, H. L. (Compiler); Bouse, L. F. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    A compilation of papers, comments, and results is provided during a workshop session. The purpose of the workshop was to review and evaluate the current state of the art of agricultural aviation, to identify and rank potentially productive short and long range research and development areas, and to strengthen communications between research scientists and engineers involved in agricultural research. Approximately 71 individuals actively engaged in agricultural aviation research were invited to participate in the workshop. These were persons familiar with problems related to agricultural aviation and processing expertise which are of value for identifying and proposing beneficial research.

  12. Plant exposure laboratory and chambers. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, C.; Pfleeger, T.

    1986-01-01

    The research is to learn the factors that control plant uptake, translocation, and metabolism of anthropogenic organic chemicals. Understanding these processes is essential to predict food contamination and environmental damage from various agricultural and industrial pollutants. Contamination of plants is only one component, but since plants are the fulcrum upon which all nourishment systems depend, understanding the ways they become contaminated is critical to prudent production, transportation, and use of organic chemicals. These efforts to identify the controlling mechanisms of these phenomena require an understanding of the physiological parameters of the plants during uptake and translocation of the extraneous chemicals. Since the chemicals of interest are toxic and studies generally include /sup 14/C as a label for monitoring chemical kinetics, containment is an important criterion. The paper describes the laboratory and support system, the exposure chambers, the computer system, and the plant hydroponic nursery built to accomplish this research.

  13. LANGUAGE LABORATORIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRUBAKER, CHARLES WILLIAM

    THE USE OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY HAS GIVEN MANY THOUSANDS OF INDIVIDUALS GOOD LISTENING AND SPEAKING PRACTICE AND HAS BECOME AN EFFECTIVE LEARNING TOOL. THE BASIC PIECE OF EQUIPMENT OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY IS THE TAPE RECORDER-AND-PLAYBACK, DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH AUDIOPASSIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE-COMPARATIVE STUDY, AND…

  14. Learning Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Lyn; Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Considers the school library media center as an information learning laboratory. Topics include information literacy; Kuhlthau's Information Search Process model; inquiry theory and approach; discovery learning; process skills of laboratory science; the information scientist; attitudes of media specialists, teachers, and students; displays and Web…

  15. Modules in Agricultural Education for Agricultural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    Each of the 31 curriculum modules in this packet for agricultural resources instruction contains a brief description of the module content, a list of the major division or units, the overall objective, objectives by units, content outline and suggested teaching methods, student application activities, and evaluation procedures. A list of resource…

  16. VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE RECORD BOOK FOR PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1966

    FORMS ARE PROVIDED FOR RECORDING FINANCIAL INFORMATION ABOUT SUPERVISED FARM PROGRAM ENTERPRISES BY INDIVIDUAL VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE STUDENTS. THE BOOK IS DESIGNED ON AN ENTERPRISE BASIS AND PROVIDES SPACE FOR AGREEMENTS, INVENTORIES, EXPENSES, INCOME, SUMMARIES, AND ANALYSES. ASSISTANCE FOR TEACHERS USING THIS RECORD BOOK IS AVAILABLE IN "GUIDE…

  17. Agricultural Technology Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Board of Education, Raleigh. Agricultural Technology Education Section.

    Agricultural education programs available through North Carolina's newly created system of industrial education center, technical institutes, and community colleges are described. The information is for use by administrators, and teachers of adult agricultural courses and counselors of high school dropouts and graduates. It describes the need for…

  18. Vocational Agriculture I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Bob; Harp, Keith

    These course materials are designed to provide a foundation of basic knowledge in production agriculture as a prelude to further education in vocational agriculture. The guide contains 6 sections and 22 units of instruction. Each unit includes all or most of eight basic components: performance objectives, suggested activities for the teacher,…

  19. Theme: Urban Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellibee, Margaret; And Others

    1990-01-01

    On the theme of secondary agricultural education in urban areas, this issue includes articles on opportunities, future directions, and implications for the profession; creative supervised experiences for horticulture students; floral marketing, multicultural education; and cultural diversity in urban agricultural education. (JOW)

  20. Global Transformations and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Rex R.

    1990-01-01

    Examines worldwide political, economic, and social transformations and their impact on agriculture, focusing on biotechnology. Discusses rise of international corporations and accompanying constraints on government power. Sees trend toward increasing agribusiness role in world food and agricultural sectors. Calls for broader views and research in…

  1. Agriculture and Rural Viability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    Agriculture and the rural economic bases in mining, fisheries, forestry, and natural resource extraction are experiencing major social and economic changes. The farm and rural crises of the 1980s are not short-term aberrations, but symptoms of long-term trends that were partially hidden by the relatively good times for agriculture and rural areas…

  2. Agricultural Occupations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Floyd J.; Henderson, Billie

    This agricultural occupations handbook was developed from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) and the U.S. Departments of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Labor publication, Vocational Education and Occupations. It includes the U.S. Office of Education coding for the instructional area of agriculture and the cluster coding for the…

  3. Personal Achievement Reading: Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozeboom, Deborah A.

    Exercises are provided in a set of five workbooks designed to aid students in agricultural programs in building vocabulary and reading skills. Each workbook borrows from terminology of agriculture to provide explanations and exercises for a sequential series of instructional objectives. One workbook concentrates on the ability to determine word…

  4. Agriculture Power and Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Tom

    This guide is intended to assist vocational agriculture teachers who are teaching secondary- or postsecondary-level courses in agricultural power and machinery. The materials presented are based on the Arizona validated occupational competencies and tasks for the following occupations: service manager, shop foreman, service technician, and tractor…

  5. Revisiting Supervised Agricultural Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G.; Clarke, Ariane; Fallon, Maureen

    2000-01-01

    A Delphi panel of 40 agricultural educators unanimously agreed that supervised agricultural experience should remain an integral component of the curriculum; a name change is not currently warranted. Categories recommended were agribusiness entrepreneurship, placement, production, research, directed school lab, communications, exploration, and…

  6. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests Share Tweet Linkedin ... Approved Home and Lab Tests Find All In Vitro Diagnostic Products and Decision Summaries Since November 2003 ...

  7. 7 CFR 91.31 - When an appeal of a laboratory service may be requested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When an appeal of a laboratory service may be...) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Appeal of...

  8. Physics Laboratory in UEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Tohru; Nakamura, Jin; Suzuki, Masaru

    All the first-year students in the University of Electro-Communications (UEC) take "Basic Physics I", "Basic Physics II" and "Physics Laboratory" as required subjects; Basic Physics I and Basic Physics II are calculus-based physics of mechanics, wave and oscillation, thermal physics and electromagnetics. Physics Laboratory is designed mainly aiming at learning the skill of basic experimental technique and technical writing. Although 95% students have taken physics in the senior high school, they poorly understand it by connecting with experience, and it is difficult to learn Physics Laboratory in the university. For this reason, we introduced two ICT (Information and Communication Technology) systems of Physics Laboratory to support students'learning and staff's teaching. By using quantitative data obtained from the ICT systems, we can easily check understanding of physics contents in students, and can improve physics education.

  9. [Ecological agriculture: future of Good Agriculture Practice of Chinese materia medica].

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan-ping; Zhou, Liang-yun; Mo, Ge; Wang, Sheng; Huang, Lu-qi

    2015-09-01

    Based on the ecological and economic problems in Good Agriculture Practice (GAP) of Chinese material medica, we introduced the origin, concept, features and operative technology of eco-agriculture worldwide, emphasizing its modes on different biological levels of landscape, ecosystem, community, population, individual and gene in China. And on this basis, we analyzed the background and current situation of eco-agriculture of Chinese materia medica, and proposed its development ideas and key tasks, including: (1) Analysis and planning of the production pattern of Chinese material medica national wide. (2) Typical features extraction of regional agriculture of Chinese materia medica. (3) Investigation of the interaction and its mechanism between typical Chinese materia medica in each region and the micro-ecology of rhizosphere soil. (4) Study on technology of eco-agriculture of Chinese materia medica. (5) Extraction and solidification of eco-agriculture modes of Chinese materia medica. (6) Study on the theory of eco-agriculture of Chinese materia medica. Also we pointed out that GAP and eco-agriculture of Chinese material medica are both different and relative, but they are not contradictory with their own features. It is an irresistible trend to promote eco-agriculture in the GAP of Chinese material medica and coordinate ecological and economic development.

  10. Introductory Materials Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, John E., Jr.

    Described is an introductory materials science laboratory program which emphasizes crystal structure both on the atomistic and microscopic scale and the dependence of materials properties on structure. The content of this program is classified into four major areas: (1) materials science, (2) mechanical behavior of materials, (3) materials testing…

  11. Instrumental Analysis Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz de la Pena, Arsenio; Gonzalez-Gomez, David; Munoz de la Pena, David; Gomez-Estern, Fabio; Sequedo, Manuel Sanchez

    2013-01-01

    designed for automating the collection and assessment of laboratory exercises is presented. This Web-based system has been extensively used in engineering courses such as control systems, mechanics, and computer programming. Goodle GMS allows the students to submit their results to a…

  12. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Michigan No. 2 well, Otsego County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect

    1981-11-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Michigan No. 2 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data was obtained from the study of approximately 249 feet of core retrived from a well drilled in Otsego County of north-central Michigan (lower peninsula).

  13. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 3 well, Erie County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 3 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. This data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 422 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Erie County of north-western Pennsylvania.

  14. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 5 well, Lawrence County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 5 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technology University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 604 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Lawrence County of west-central Pennsylvania.

  15. Cliff Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 6 wells - Gallia County. Phase III report. Summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect

    1981-07-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Ohio No. 6 wells. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. This data presented were obtained from a study of approximately 1522 feet of core retrieved from five wells drilled in Gallia County in southeastern Ohio.

  16. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 1 well, McKean County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 1 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 741 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in MeKean County of north-central Pennsylvania.

  17. Eastern Gas Shales Project: West Virginia No. 7 well, Wetzel County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-West Virginia No. 7 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithiology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 533 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Wetzel county of north-central West Virginia.

  18. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 4 well, Indiana County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 4 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 891 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Indiana County of west-central Pennsylvania.

  19. Agricultural chemical utilization and human health.

    PubMed Central

    Mushak, E W; Piver, W T

    1992-01-01

    The public is justifiably concerned about the human health effects of agricultural chemicals. The many gaps in information about the mechanisms of toxic action, human exposures, and the nature and extent of human health effects are large. Very few older pesticides, in particular, have been tested for human health effects. Workers who produce, harvest, store, transport, process, and prepare food and fibers are exposed to many chemicals that are potentially hazardous and that are used in agriculture. The occupational health of these workers has not been adequately studied, and protective efforts have sometimes been minimal. Valid and accurate risk assessment is best based on sound information about how chemicals, in this case agricultural chemicals, are involved in toxic events--their mechanisms of action. These health effects include tumor promotion, chronic and acute neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and reproductive and developmental toxicity. Another key part of risk assessment is exposure assessment. Fundamental studies of the toxicology of target organisms and nontarget organisms exposed to agricultural chemicals are needed to discover and develop better solutions to the problems of agricultural pest control, including better formulations, optimal application rates and public education in safety and alternative agricultural practices. The large number of pesticides that have never been adequately tested for effects on human health is particularly worrisome in light of emerging information about delayed nervous system effects. PMID:1396466

  20. Mars Science Laboratory Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okon, Avi B.

    2010-01-01

    The Drill for the Mars Science Laboratory mission is a rotary-percussive sample acquisition device with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. The unique challenges associated with autonomous drilling from a mobile robot are addressed. A highly compressed development schedule dictated a modular design architecture that satisfies the functional and load requirements while allowing independent development and testing of the Drill subassemblies. The Drill consists of four actuated mechanisms: a spindle that rotates the bit, a chuck that releases and engages bits, a novel voice-coil-based percussion mechanism that hammers the bit, and a linear translation mechanism. The Drill has three passive mechanisms: a replaceable bit assembly that acquires and collects sample, a contact sensor / stabilizer mechanism, and, lastly a flex harness service loop. This paper describes the various mechanisms that makeup the Drill and discusses the solutions to their unique design and development challenges.

  1. Agricultural Research Service

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protection Crop Production and Protection Natural Resources and Sustainable Agricultural Systems Nutrition, Food Safety, and Quality Overseas ... LA, MS, NC, PR, SC) Footer Content ARS Home | USDA.gov | Site Map | Statements and Disclaimers | Plain ...

  2. Serving Agriculture's "Big Business"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schake, L. M.

    1970-01-01

    A new dimension and challenge in Extension activities is emerging as some phases of agriculture evolve from small operations to multimillion dollar agribusiness ventures; the beef cattle commercial feedlot industry in the Southwest is a good example. (EB)

  3. Toward a Sustainable Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Future trends in population growth, energy use, climate change, and globalization will challenge agriculturists to develop innovative production systems that are highly productive and environmentally sound. Furthermore, future agricultural production systems must possess an inherent capacity to adap...

  4. Collaboration in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Roland L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Theme articles discuss environment, food, agriculture, and renewal resources as they relate to science education, learning partnerships, collaboration in Kyrghyzstan, leadership development, opportunities for collaboration, networking, and the creation of a shared course between agribusiness and biology. (JOW)

  5. Agriculture increases individual fitness.

    PubMed

    Kovaka, Karen; Santana, Carlos; Patel, Raj; Akçay, Erol; Weisberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We question the need to explain the onset of agriculture by appealing to the second type of multilevel selection (MLS2). Unlike eusocial insect colonies, human societies do not exhibit key features of evolutionary individuals. If we avoid the mistake of equating Darwinian fitness with health and quality of life, the adoption of agriculture is almost certainly explicable in terms of individual-level selection and individual rationality. PMID:27561384

  6. Lunar agriculture in Mesoamerica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaniszewski, S.

    Through the moon' s role in choosing the proper time for planting, harvesting and woodcutting is widely attested in ethnographic reports, the cultural logic and structure of actions by which this celestial body is perceived and used has not been satisfactorily explained. The aim of this paper is to offer such an explanatory framework within which the role of the moon in the agricultural cycle may be explained. My examples of the beliefs about lunar agriculture derive from the Mesoamerican cultural tradition.

  7. Irrigated Agriculture, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, center-pivot, swing-arm irrigated agriculture complexes such as the one imaged at Jabal Tuwayq (20.5N, 45.0 E) extract deep fossil water reserves to achieve food crop production self sufficiency in this desert environment. The significance of the Saudi expanded irrigated agriculture is that the depletion of this finite water resource is a short term solution to a long term need that will still exist when the water has been extracted.

  8. Agricultural sustainability: concepts, principles and evidence.

    PubMed

    Pretty, Jules

    2008-02-12

    Concerns about sustainability in agricultural systems centre on the need to develop technologies and practices that do not have adverse effects on environmental goods and services, are accessible to and effective for farmers, and lead to improvements in food productivity. Despite great progress in agricultural productivity in the past half-century, with crop and livestock productivity strongly driven by increased use of fertilizers, irrigation water, agricultural machinery, pesticides and land, it would be over-optimistic to assume that these relationships will remain linear in the future. New approaches are needed that will integrate biological and ecological processes into food production, minimize the use of those non-renewable inputs that cause harm to the environment or to the health of farmers and consumers, make productive use of the knowledge and skills of farmers, so substituting human capital for costly external inputs, and make productive use of people's collective capacities to work together to solve common agricultural and natural resource problems, such as for pest, watershed, irrigation, forest and credit management. These principles help to build important capital assets for agricultural systems: natural; social; human; physical; and financial capital. Improving natural capital is a central aim, and dividends can come from making the best use of the genotypes of crops and animals and the ecological conditions under which they are grown or raised. Agricultural sustainability suggests a focus on both genotype improvements through the full range of modern biological approaches and improved understanding of the benefits of ecological and agronomic management, manipulation and redesign. The ecological management of agroecosystems that addresses energy flows, nutrient cycling, population-regulating mechanisms and system resilience can lead to the redesign of agriculture at a landscape scale. Sustainable agriculture outcomes can be positive for food

  9. Agricultural sustainability: concepts, principles and evidence.

    PubMed

    Pretty, Jules

    2008-02-12

    Concerns about sustainability in agricultural systems centre on the need to develop technologies and practices that do not have adverse effects on environmental goods and services, are accessible to and effective for farmers, and lead to improvements in food productivity. Despite great progress in agricultural productivity in the past half-century, with crop and livestock productivity strongly driven by increased use of fertilizers, irrigation water, agricultural machinery, pesticides and land, it would be over-optimistic to assume that these relationships will remain linear in the future. New approaches are needed that will integrate biological and ecological processes into food production, minimize the use of those non-renewable inputs that cause harm to the environment or to the health of farmers and consumers, make productive use of the knowledge and skills of farmers, so substituting human capital for costly external inputs, and make productive use of people's collective capacities to work together to solve common agricultural and natural resource problems, such as for pest, watershed, irrigation, forest and credit management. These principles help to build important capital assets for agricultural systems: natural; social; human; physical; and financial capital. Improving natural capital is a central aim, and dividends can come from making the best use of the genotypes of crops and animals and the ecological conditions under which they are grown or raised. Agricultural sustainability suggests a focus on both genotype improvements through the full range of modern biological approaches and improved understanding of the benefits of ecological and agronomic management, manipulation and redesign. The ecological management of agroecosystems that addresses energy flows, nutrient cycling, population-regulating mechanisms and system resilience can lead to the redesign of agriculture at a landscape scale. Sustainable agriculture outcomes can be positive for food

  10. Using LEDs and Phosphorescent Materials to Teach High School Students Quantum Mechanics: A Guided-Inquiry Laboratory for Introductory High School Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William P.; Trotochaud, Alan; Sherman, Julia; Kazerounian, Kazem; Faraclas, Elias W.

    2009-01-01

    The quantization of electronic energy levels in atoms is foundational to a mechanistic explanation of the periodicity of elemental properties and behavior. This paper presents a hands-on, guided inquiry approach to teaching this concept as part of a broader treatment of quantum mechanics, and as a foundation for an understanding of chemical…

  11. Coupling of Mechanical Behavior of Lithium Ion Cells to Electrochemical-Thermal Models for Battery Crush; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, Ahmad; Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Sahraei, Elham; Wierzbiki, Tom

    2015-06-15

    Propagation of failure in lithium-ion batteries during field events or under abuse is a strong function of the mechanical response of the different components in the battery. Whereas thermal and electrochemical models that capture the abuse response of batteries have been developed and matured over the years, the interaction between the mechanical behavior and the thermal response of these batteries is not very well understood. With support from the Department of Energy, NREL has made progress in coupling mechanical, thermal, and electrochemical lithium-ion models to predict the initiation and propagation of short circuits under external crush in a cell. The challenge with a cell crush simulation is to estimate the magnitude and location of the short. To address this, the model includes an explicit representation of each individual component such as the active material, current collector, separator, etc., and predicts their mechanical deformation under different crush scenarios. Initial results show reasonable agreement with experiments. In this presentation, the versatility of the approach for use with different design factors, cell formats and chemistries is explored using examples.

  12. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Dow Chemical wells No. 100, No. 103, and No. 205. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the Dow Chemical No. 100, No. 103, and No. 205 wells. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing on samples from the Dow Chemical No. 103 core at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealth with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 617 feet of core retrieved from several wells drilled in Sanilac County of east-central Michigan.

  13. 7 CFR 91.34 - When an appeal of a laboratory service may be refused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When an appeal of a laboratory service may be refused... MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Appeal of Laboratory Services §...

  14. 7 CFR 91.35 - Who shall perform an appealed laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Who shall perform an appealed laboratory service. 91... MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Appeal of Laboratory Services §...

  15. Biosurfactants in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Dhara P; Cameotra, Swaranjit S

    2013-02-01

    Agricultural productivity to meet growing demands of human population is a matter of great concern for all countries. Use of green compounds to achieve the sustainable agriculture is the present necessity. This review highlights the enormous use of harsh surfactants in agricultural soil and agrochemical industries. Biosurfactants which are reported to be produced by bacteria, yeasts, and fungi can serve as green surfactants. Biosurfactants are considered to be less toxic and eco-friendly and thus several types of biosurfactants have the potential to be commercially produced for extensive applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and food industries. The biosurfactants synthesized by environmental isolates also has promising role in the agricultural industry. Many rhizosphere and plant associated microbes produce biosurfactant; these biomolecules play vital role in motility, signaling, and biofilm formation, indicating that biosurfactant governs plant-microbe interaction. In agriculture, biosurfactants can be used for plant pathogen elimination and for increasing the bioavailability of nutrient for beneficial plant associated microbes. Biosurfactants can widely be applied for improving the agricultural soil quality by soil remediation. These biomolecules can replace the harsh surfactant presently being used in million dollar pesticide industries. Thus, exploring biosurfactants from environmental isolates for investigating their potential role in plant growth promotion and other related agricultural applications warrants details research. Conventional methods are followed for screening the microbial population for production of biosurfactant. However, molecular methods are fewer in reaching biosurfactants from diverse microbial population and there is need to explore novel biosurfactant from uncultured microbes in soil biosphere by using advanced methodologies like functional metagenomics.

  16. A Combustion Laboratory for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a combustion laboratory facility and experiments for a senior-level (undergraduate) course in mechanical engineering. The experiment reinforces basic thermodynamic concepts and provides many students with their first opportunity to work with a combustion system. (DH)

  17. Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas W.

    1979-01-01

    This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

  18. Safety VI: Hazards in Physics Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, R. J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes advice from the Laboratory Safeguards Subcommittee of the Association for Science Education related to flames and heat, hazardous chemicals, electricity and dangerous voltages, and mechanical hazards. Knowledge is cited as the key to preventing accidents in physics laboratories. (DH)

  19. Advancing agricultural greenhouse gas quantification*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Eva; Tubiello, Francesco; Herold, Martin

    2013-03-01

    , multiple development goals can be reinforced by specific climate funding granted on the basis of multiple benefits and synergies, for instance through currently negotiated mechanisms such as Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) (REDD+, Kissinger et al 2012). 3. Challenges to quantifying GHG information for the agricultural sector The quantification of GHG emissions from agriculture is fundamental to identifying mitigation solutions that are consistent with the goals of achieving greater resilience in production systems, food security, and rural welfare. GHG emissions data are already needed for such varied purposes as guiding national planning for low-emissions development, generating and trading carbon credits, certifying sustainable agriculture practices, informing consumers' choices with regard to reducing their carbon footprints, assessing product supply chains, and supporting farmers in adopting less carbon-intensive farming practices. Demonstrating the robustness, feasibility, and cost effectiveness of agricultural GHG inventories and monitoring is a necessary technical foundation for including agriculture in the international negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and is needed to provide robust data and methodology platforms for global corporate supply-chain initiatives (e.g., SAFA, FAO 2012). Given such varied drivers for GHG reductions, there are a number of uses for agricultural GHG information, including (1) reporting and accounting at the national or company level, (2) land-use planning and management to achieve specific objectives, (3) monitoring and evaluating impact of management, (4) developing a credible and thus tradable offset credit, and (5) research and capacity development. The information needs for these uses is likely to differ in the required level of certainty, scale of analysis, and need for comparability across systems or repeatability over time, and they may depend on whether

  20. [Effects of agricultural activities and transgenic crops on agricultural biodiversity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Tao; Luo, Hong-Bing; Li, Jun-Sheng; Huang, Hai; Liu, Yong-Bo

    2014-09-01

    Agricultural biodiversity is a key part of the ecosystem biodiversity, but it receives little concern. The monoculture, environmental pollution and habitat fragmentation caused by agricultural activities have threatened agricultural biodiversity over the past 50 years. To optimize agricultural management measures for crop production and environmental protection, we reviewed the effects of agricultural activities, including cultivation patterns, plastic mulching, chemical additions and the cultivation of transgenic crops, on agricultural biodiversity. The results showed that chemical pesticides and fertilizers had the most serious influence and the effects of transgenic crops varied with other factors like the specific transgene inserted in crops. The environmental risk of transgenic crops should be assessed widely through case-by-case methods, particularly its potential impacts on agricultural biodiversity. It is important to consider the protection of agricultural biodiversity before taking certain agricultural practices, which could improve agricultural production and simultaneously reduce the environmental impacts.

  1. [Effects of agricultural activities and transgenic crops on agricultural biodiversity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Tao; Luo, Hong-Bing; Li, Jun-Sheng; Huang, Hai; Liu, Yong-Bo

    2014-09-01

    Agricultural biodiversity is a key part of the ecosystem biodiversity, but it receives little concern. The monoculture, environmental pollution and habitat fragmentation caused by agricultural activities have threatened agricultural biodiversity over the past 50 years. To optimize agricultural management measures for crop production and environmental protection, we reviewed the effects of agricultural activities, including cultivation patterns, plastic mulching, chemical additions and the cultivation of transgenic crops, on agricultural biodiversity. The results showed that chemical pesticides and fertilizers had the most serious influence and the effects of transgenic crops varied with other factors like the specific transgene inserted in crops. The environmental risk of transgenic crops should be assessed widely through case-by-case methods, particularly its potential impacts on agricultural biodiversity. It is important to consider the protection of agricultural biodiversity before taking certain agricultural practices, which could improve agricultural production and simultaneously reduce the environmental impacts. PMID:25757330

  2. Communication Technologies and Knowledge Building in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segrave, Robin

    2004-01-01

    The concept of knowledge building communities has not traditionally been associated with agricultural extension, but is one which has the potential to increase the rate of adoption of best management practices by the industry. A potentially important mechanism to facilitate knowledge building is information and communication technology (ICT);…

  3. Population, agriculture and food.

    PubMed

    1982-06-01

    Data published by the UN Statistical Office and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) indicates that food production in the world grew at an average annual rate of 2.5% during the period 1961-65 to 1980 whereas during the same period the population growth rate was 1.9% per annum, declining further to 1.8 toward the late 1970s. Yet, the food production growth trend has been most uneven. The situation in Asia has been more or less similar to the global trend. During 1962-72 the rate of population growth increased to 2.5% whereas the annual increase in food production dropped from 3.1 to 2.7%. Throughout the remainder of the 1970s, food production barely managed to keep pace with population growth. Closer analysis reveals that in about the mid 1960s food production fell behind population growth, and near famine situations developed in certain drought affected areas of India, Indonesia, and Pakistan. These countries had to import food to meet the situation at the cost of their economic development programs. According to the UN projections, the region's population will continue to grow at an average of 1.7% per annum up to 2000 despite the declining fertility trend. To cope with the population growth rate and the changing pattern of food consumption even at the present level of nutrition, Asian nations will have to increase food production annually at a 3% compound rate. An increase in food production basically means increasing the inputs of different factors of production such as land and water, labor, materials, and various types of capital and technological know how. The application of these factors in the developing countries largely depends on the infrastructure and services provided by the governments. 2 approaches are generally made in an effort to achieve the objective of increasing food production: horizontal expansion approach, used to bring new land under cultivation so as to produce more food; and the vertical expansion approach, used to increase the

  4. Investigation of the Degradation Mechanisms of a Variety of Organic Photovoltaic Devices by Combination of Imaging Techniques—the ISOS-3Inter-laboratory Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Germack D.; Rosch, R.; Tanenbaum, D.M.; Jorgensen, M.; Seeland, M.; Barenklau, M.; Hermenau, M.; Voroshazi, E.; Lloyd, M.T.; Galagan, Y.; Zimmermann, B.; Wurfel, U.; Hosel, M.; Dam, H.F.; Gevorgyan, S.A.; Kudret, S.; Maes, W.; Lutsen, L.; Vanderzande, D.; Andriessen, R.; Teran-Escobar, G.; Lira-Cantu, M.; Rivaton, A.; Uzunoglu, G.Y.; Andreasen, B.; Madsen, M.V.; Norrman, K.; Hoppe, H.; Krebs, F.C.

    2012-04-01

    The investigation of degradation of seven distinct sets (with a number of individual cells of n {ge} 12) of state of the art organic photovoltaic devices prepared by leading research laboratories with a combination of imaging methods is reported. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at Risoe DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance with established ISOS-3 protocols under defined illumination conditions. Imaging of device function at different stages of degradation was performed by laser-beam induced current (LBIC) scanning; luminescence imaging, specifically photoluminescence (PLI) and electroluminescence (ELI); as well as by lock-in thermography (LIT). Each of the imaging techniques exhibits its specific advantages with respect to sensing certain degradation features, which will be compared and discussed here in detail. As a consequence, a combination of several imaging techniques yields very conclusive information about the degradation processes controlling device function. The large variety of device architectures in turn enables valuable progress in the proper interpretation of imaging results - hence revealing the benefits of this large scale cooperation in making a step forward in the understanding of organic solar cell aging and its interpretation by state-of-the-art imaging methods.

  5. Lunar laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  6. Agriculture-related anaemias.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1994-12-01

    Man evolved as a hunter-gatherer, and the invention and spread of agriculture was followed by changes in diet, the environment and population densities which have resulted in globally high prevalences of anaemias due to nutritional deficiencies of iron, folate and (locally) vitamin B12, to infestations by hookworm and schistosomes, to malaria, and to the natural selection for the genes for sickle-cell diseases, beta-thalassaemias, alpha-thalassaemias, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, ovalocytosis and possibly (locally) elliptocytosis. The present explosion of population is driving an expansion of agriculture, especially the cultivation of rice, and this has led often to disastrous increases of transmission of malaria, schistosomiasis and other diseases, to widespread chemical pollution, and to degradation of the environment. Anaemia, as the commonest manifestation of human disease, is a frequent consequence. The urgent need for increased food production is matched by the urgent need for assessment and control of the health impact of agricultural development.

  7. Urban Agriculture Program Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul E.; Ethridge, Jim

    Urban agriculture may be defined as those areas of agriculture that are practiced in metropolitan settings, plus knowledge and skills in agricultural subject areas which lead to vocational proficiency and improved quality of life or effective citizenship. Agriculture areas that are especially significant in urban settings include ornamental…

  8. Theme: Changes in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Includes "Changes in Agricultural Education in Tennessee" (Byerley, Todd); "Evolving Focus for Agricultural Education Graduates?" (Schlink); "Researching Adult Organizations in Agricultural Education" (Seevers, Dormody); "Past 25 Years" (Klein, Luft); "Agricultural Education" (Sibiga, Mannebach); "Don't Look Back" (Butcher); "Changes in…

  9. 76 FR 49291 - Agricultural Swaps

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Commission recently promulgated a final rule defining the term ``agricultural commodity.'' See 76 FR 41048... Agricultural Swaps, 76 FR 6095, February 3, 2011. \\8\\ See Agricultural Swaps, 75 FR 59666, Sept. 28, 2010. C... specifically addressing the costs and benefits of the proposed agricultural swaps rules. \\10\\ See NPRM, 76...

  10. Laboratory accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1998-08-01

    Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

  11. Interagency study of Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Organization and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    This report is the result of a baseline study of technology transfer organizatin and operation in Federal laboratories, and is an analysis of responses to two information-gathering instruments: the Federal Laboratory ORTA Organizational and Operational Information survey, and the Technology Transfer Characterization, Technology Transfer Cases - ''Lessons Learned'' questionnaire. Response to these two instruments was adequate, with input provided by laboratory and agency representatives from nine agencies: the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, Interior, Transportation, Agriculture, Health and Human Services; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and the Environmental Protection Agency. The data provided have yielded several conclusions: The Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act has led to numerous changes in how technology transfer is perceived, and in how technology transfer activities are implemented in the Federal laboratories. American industry is increasingly interested in Federal innovations, and is going to the laboratories in pursuit of these innovations. Recognition of technology transfer as an integral function of laboratory management, and recognition of the importance of technology transfer in Federal laboratories, are increasing rapidly. Efforts to transfer technology are becoming more effective. Although the process is dynamic, specific methods and processes that accomplish successful transfer of inventions can be identified. Future refinements will bring further enhancements to these transfer processes and mechanisms. Seven groups of recommendations offered by the Working Group are given below. These recommendations result from the survey findings, and are provided to enhance transfer activities. A final recommendation of the Working Group is that technology transfer operation and organization be reassessed in a few years, primarily because of the rapid changes that are occurring in transfer activities.

  12. Proceedings: Agricultural Technology Alliance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report is a compilation of field trip overviews, presentations and committee reports from the EPRI-ATA meeting held in Boise, Idaho, May 28-30, 1997. The field trips consisted of an Agriculture and Aquaculture Tour, a tour of Idaho as America's Seed Supplier, and a Production of Milk, Cheese and Electricity tour. Presentations and committee reports include the following: (1) Idaho Seed Industry; (2) Controlled Environment Agriculture; (3) Irrigation in the North West: An Overview; (4) Drip Irrigation; (5) Sprinkler Irrigation; (6) Current Status of the ATA; (7) ATA Office Report; (8) Committee Reports; (9) Steering Committee Minutes.

  13. Bubble bursting as an aerosol generation mechanism during an oil spill in the deep-sea environment: laboratory experimental demonstration of the transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Ehrenhauser, Franz S; Avij, Paria; Shu, Xin; Dugas, Victoria; Woodson, Isaiah; Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga; Zhang, Zenghui; Hung, Francisco R; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills in the deep-sea environment such as the 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico release vast quantities of crude oil into the sea-surface environment. Various investigators have discussed the marine transport and fate of the oil into different environmental compartments (air, water, sediment, and biota). The transport of the oil into the atmosphere in these previous investigations has been limited to only evaporation, a volatility dependent pathway. In this work, we studied the aerosolization of oil spill matter via bursting bubbles as they occur during whitecaps in a laboratory aerosolization reactor. By evaluating the alkane content in oil mousse, crude oil, the gas phase, and particulate matter we clearly demonstrate that aerosolization via bursting bubbles is a solubility and volatility independent transport pathway for alkanes. The signature of alkane fractions in the native oil and aerosolized matter matched well especially for the less volatile alkanes (C20-C29). Scanning electron microscope interfaced with energy dispersive X-ray images identified the carbon fractions associated with salt particles of aerosols. Theoretical molecular dynamics simulations in the accompanying paper lend support to the observed propensity for alkanes at air-salt water interfaces of breaking bubbles and the produced droplets. The presence of a dispersant in the aqueous phase increased the oil ejection rate at the surface especially for the C20-C29 alkanes. The information presented here emphasizes the need to further study sea-spray aerosols as a possible transport vector for spilled oil in the sea surface environment. PMID:24296745

  14. Interaction between clinic and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Elina; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta; Lassila, Riitta

    2011-01-01

    Clinicians order laboratory tests to diagnose, monitor, and screen for diseases, to evaluate or confirm previously abnormal results and to develop prognoses. The rigorous quality assurance programs, large automated processes and economic constraints may induce direct challenges to tailored diagnosis. Clinicians will have to gain an understanding of the underlying principles of laboratory technologies without losing their ability to practice 'the art of medicine' at their primary focus - the patient. Specialized laboratory services and expertise play especially important roles in coagulation hematology. Assays are technically demanding and often based on functional properties of proteins, producing results that are far more than plain numbers. Interpretation of laboratory data poses many challenges, such as pre-analytical and patient-dependent factors, of which the laboratory is often not well informed, but which the clinicians are required to take into account. The laboratory scientist needs to understand the multiple clinical circumstances causing variance or interference in the laboratory results. Direct interaction between clinic and laboratory is needed. When laboratory-specific issues are uncertain to the clinician, the laboratory scientist should become the clinician's primary consultant. The better the education and knowledge of both directions, the better the outcome. Regular multidisciplinary rounds by the clinicians and the laboratory scientists are of great benefit. This interaction at its best fosters research and development by identifying new mechanisms and tools. PMID:21193109

  15. Monitoring arsenic contamination in agricultural soils with reflectance spectroscopy of rice plants.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tiezhu; Liu, Huizeng; Wang, Junjie; Chen, Yiyun; Fei, Teng; Wu, Guofeng

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility and to investigate the mechanism for rapidly monitoring arsenic (As) contamination in agricultural soils with the reflectance spectra of rice plants. Several data pretreatment methods were applied to improve the prediction accuracy. The prediction of soil As contents was achieved by partial least-squares regression (PLSR) using laboratory and field spectra of rice plants, as well as linear regression employing normalized difference spectral index (NDSI) calculated from fild spectra. For laboratory spectra, the optimal PLSR model for predicting soil As contents was achieved using Savitzky-Golay smoothing (SG), first derivative and mean center (MC) (root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP)=14.7 mg kg(-1); r=0.64; residual predictive deviation (RPD)=1.31). For field spectra, the optimal PLSR model was also achieved using SG, first derivative and MC (RMSEP=13.7 mg kg(-1); r=0.71; RPD=1.43). In addition, the NDSI with 812 and 782 nm obtained a prediction accuracy with r=0.68, RMSEP=13.7 mg kg(-1), and RPD=1.36. These results indicated that it was feasible to monitor the As contamination in agricultural soils using the reflectance spectra of rice plants. The prediction mechanism might be the relationship between the As contents in soils and the chlorophyll-a/-b contents and cell structure in leaves or canopies of rice plants. PMID:24804926

  16. Laboratory investigation of hypercoagulability.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L

    1998-01-01

    For many years, the laboratory investigation of patients with thrombophilia has lagged behind that of patients with bleeding diathesis. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control and regulate coagulation, and the resultant recognition of new defects, have greatly stimulated clinical laboratory interest in this area. Assays to detect resistance to activated protein C; deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, and protein S; and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies are widely available and should form part of the investigation of patients that present with idiopathic thrombosis. Such a work-up will likely provide an explanation for thrombosis in 40 to 60% of patients. Abnormalities of fibrinogen and fibrinolysis may explain still more, although such defects are currently considered rare. In addition, presently unrecognized defects almost certainly exist, and the identification of such individuals will undoubtedly improve our understanding of the hemostatic mechanism. Laboratory tests to define the hypercoagulable state are continually being developed. They include whole blood coagulation and platelet function tests and novel activation markers. However, acceptance of these approaches by clinical laboratories has been slow.

  17. Laboratory investigation of hypercoagulability.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L

    1998-01-01

    For many years, the laboratory investigation of patients with thrombophilia has lagged behind that of patients with bleeding diathesis. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control and regulate coagulation, and the resultant recognition of new defects, have greatly stimulated clinical laboratory interest in this area. Assays to detect resistance to activated protein C; deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, and protein S; and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies are widely available and should form part of the investigation of patients that present with idiopathic thrombosis. Such a work-up will likely provide an explanation for thrombosis in 40 to 60% of patients. Abnormalities of fibrinogen and fibrinolysis may explain still more, although such defects are currently considered rare. In addition, presently unrecognized defects almost certainly exist, and the identification of such individuals will undoubtedly improve our understanding of the hemostatic mechanism. Laboratory tests to define the hypercoagulable state are continually being developed. They include whole blood coagulation and platelet function tests and novel activation markers. However, acceptance of these approaches by clinical laboratories has been slow. PMID:9579632

  18. Vocational Agriculture III. A Curriculum Guide, 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Bob; Cox, Cecil

    Designed to provide a basic core of instruction for the third year of agriculture in Oklahoma, this guide is for use by teachers and their eleventh grade students. Instructional content is in five sections, each with four or more units: soil science, leadership, animal science, farm business management, and agricultural mechanics. Each unit…

  19. Vocational Agriculture II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harp, Keith; Steward, Jim

    This curriculum guide was developed for second-year courses in vocational agriculture in Oklahoma. The curriculum contains 5 sections organized in 16 instructional units. The units follow a standard format established in 1970 for development of instructional materials for all Oklahoma vocational teachers. This format includes eight basic…

  20. Agriculture: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in agriculture. The guide consists of a course description; general course objectives;…

  1. Nanotechnology in Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview is given of the application of nanotechnology to agriculture. This is an active field of R&D, where a large number of findings and innovations have been reported. For example, in soil management, applications reported include nanofertilizers, soil binders, water retention aids, and nut...

  2. Urban conservation agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetables are important sources of vitamins and nutrients for human nutrition. United States Department of Agriculture recommends filling half of the food plates with vegetables in every meal. While it is important in promoting good health, access to fresh vegetables is limited especially in urban ...

  3. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The necessary elements to perform global inventories of agriculture, forestry, and range resources are being brought together through the use of satellites, sensors, computers, mathematics, and phenomenology. Results of ERTS-1 applications in these areas, as well as soil mapping, are described.

  4. Agriculture. Poultry Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for poultry, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list.…

  5. Agriculture Education. Farm Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary agricultural education students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in farm machinery. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) small gas engines, (2) job opportunities, (3) tractors, (4) engines, (5) hydraulics, (6) electrical system, (7) combine…

  6. Agricultural lung diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkhorn, S R; Garry, V F

    2000-01-01

    Agriculture is considered one of the most hazardous occupations. Organic dusts and toxic gases constitute some of the most common and potentially disabling occupational and environmental hazards. The changing patterns of agriculture have paradoxically contributed to both improved working conditions and increased exposure to respiratory hazards. Animal confinement operations with increasing animal density, particularly swine confinement, have contributed significantly to increased intensity and duration of exposure to indoor air toxins. Ongoing research has implicated bacterial endotoxins, fungal spores, and the inherent toxicity of grain dusts as causes of upper and lower airway inflammation and as immunologic agents in both grain and animal production. Animal confinement gases, particularly ammonia and hydrogen sulfide, have been implicated as additional sources of respiratory irritants. It has become evident that a significant percentage of agricultural workers have clinical symptoms associated with long-term exposure to organic dusts and animal confinement gases. Respiratory diseases and syndromes, including hypersensitivity pneumonitis, organic dust toxic syndrome, chronic bronchitis, mucous membrane inflammation syndrome, and asthmalike syndrome, result from ongoing acute and chronic exposures. In this review we focus upon the emerging respiratory health issues in a changing agricultural economic and technologic environment. Environmental and occupational hazards and exposures will be emphasized rather than clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods of prevention, from both engineering controls and personal respiratory perspectives, are also addressed. PMID:10931789

  7. Agricultural Education in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, R. N.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a comprehensive survey of education and training for agriculture in Australia. The present facilities are described, and then set against estimates of present and future needs. Constructive proposals are made as to how these needs can best be met by agricultural…

  8. Teaching Traditional Tropical Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Maintains that the teaching of traditional tropical agriculture through the presentation of large numbers of categories or types tends to overemphasize superficial differences at the expense of comprehending the inner essence of life as it exists for the majority of the world's farmers. Offers an alternative approach which claims to foster greater…

  9. Microcomputer Applications in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenberg, Gene; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist persons teaching a course in microcomputer applications in agriculture. (These applications are designed to be used on Apple IIe or TRS-80 microcomputers.) Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: microcomputer operating procedures; procedures for evaluating and…

  10. Agriculture Sales and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlile, Robert

    Designed to assist teachers in improving instruction in agriculture and related areas, this curriculum guide is written in terms of student performance using measurable objectives, and is a suggested method of group instruction for students who are employed in an agribusiness program. The material is intended to cover those items which every…

  11. Agriculture. Sheep Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for sheep, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list. Each…

  12. Agriculture. Swine Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for swine, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task list. Each…

  13. Agriculture. Dairy Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for dairy livestock, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task…

  14. Agriculture. Beef Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for beef livestock, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task…

  15. Wet Fault or Dry Fault? A Laboratory Approach to Remotely Monitor the Hydro-Mechanical State of a Discontinuity Using Controlled-Source Seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Place, Joachim; Blake, Oshaine; Faulkner, Daniel; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Stress variation and fluid migration occur in deformation zones, which are expected to affect seismic waves reflected off or propagating across such structures. We developed a basic experimental approach to monitor the mechanical coupling with respect to seismic coupling across a single discontinuity between a granite sample in contact with a steel platen. Piezoceramics located on the platen were used to both generate and record the P and S wave fields reflected off the discontinuity at normal incidence. This way, normal ( B n) and tangential ( B t) compliances were calculated using Schoenberg's linear slip theory (Schoenberg, J Acoust Soc Am 68:1516-1521, 1980) when the roughness, the effective pressure ( P eff, up to 200 MPa), and the nature of the filling (gas or water) vary. We observe that increasing the effective pressure decreases B n and B t, which is interpreted as the effect of the closure of the voids at the interface, permitting more seismic energy to be transmitted across the interface. Values of B n are significantly higher than those of B t at low P eff (<60-80 MPa) in dry conditions, and significantly drop under water-saturated conditions. The water filling the voids therefore helps to transmit the seismic energy of compressional waves across the interface. These results show that the assumption B n ≈ B t commonly found in some theoretical approaches does not always stand. The ratio B n/ B t actually reflects the type of saturating fluids and the effective pressure, in agreement with other experimental studies. However, we illustrate that only the relative variations of this ratio seem to be relevant, not its absolute value as suggested in previous studies. Consequently, the use of B n against B t plots may allow effective pressure variation and the nature of the pore fluid to be inferred. In this respect, this experimental approach at sample scale helps to pave the way for remotely monitoring in the field the hydro-mechanical state of deformation

  16. The spectrum of agricultural trauma.

    PubMed

    Cogbill, T H; Busch, H M

    1985-01-01

    During the past 6 years, 375 patients were hospitalized with injuries resulting from farm accidents. The mechanism of injury was farm animal in 135 patients (36%), tractor in 89 (24%), corn picker or auger in 57 (15%), power take-off in 29 (8%), other farm machinery in 50 (13%), and miscellaneous in 15 (4%). Injury severity score (ISS) of 25 or greater was calculated for 29 individuals (8%). Eleven groups of surgical subspecialists performed 539 procedures. Eight patients (2.1%) died as a result of their injuries. All eight deaths occurred after tractor accidents secondary to pelvic fractures, head and spinal cord injury, or blunt chest trauma. Thirty-nine patients (10%) were left with serious permanent disability. Unnecessary morbidity and mortality in many cases were attributed to excessive prehospital care times within a largely rural area. Better prevention by farmer education and the initiation of mandatory safety devices on agricultural equipment may lower the incidence of farm accidents. Major agricultural trauma is frequent and diverse and is optimally managed in a regional trauma center. PMID:4093573

  17. Laboratory studies of carbon kinetic isotope effects on the production mechanism of particulate phenolic compounds formed by toluene photooxidation: a tool to constrain reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Irei, Satoshi; Rudolph, Jochen; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by photooxidation of isotope-label-free toluene. SOA generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 m(3) indoor smog chamber was collected on filters, which were extracted with acetonitrile for compound-specific analysis. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined using a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5-6‰ compared to the initial isotope ratio of toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4-nitrophenol remained identical to that of toluene. On the basis of the reaction mechanisms proposed in previous reports, stable carbon isotope ratios of these products were calculated. By comparing the observed isotope ratios with the predicted isotope ratios, we explored possible production pathways for the particulate phenolic compounds.

  18. Laboratory studies of carbon kinetic isotope effects on the production mechanism of particulate phenolic compounds formed by toluene photooxidation: a tool to constrain reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Irei, Satoshi; Rudolph, Jochen; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by photooxidation of isotope-label-free toluene. SOA generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 m(3) indoor smog chamber was collected on filters, which were extracted with acetonitrile for compound-specific analysis. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined using a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5-6‰ compared to the initial isotope ratio of toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4-nitrophenol remained identical to that of toluene. On the basis of the reaction mechanisms proposed in previous reports, stable carbon isotope ratios of these products were calculated. By comparing the observed isotope ratios with the predicted isotope ratios, we explored possible production pathways for the particulate phenolic compounds. PMID:25490235

  19. The Concept of Sustainable Agriculture: Challenges and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, M. S.; Attanda, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Agriculture has changed dramatically, especially since the end of World War II. Food and fibre productivity raised due to new technologies, mechanization, increased chemical use, specialization and government policies that favoured maximizing production. Sustainable agriculture is a subject of great interest and lively debate in many parts of the world. Most agriculturalists agree that the concept of sustainable agriculture is of paramount importance to the sustainability of our biosphere and its ever increasing human population. This paper is an effort to identify the ideas, practices and policies that constitute concept of sustainable agriculture.

  20. 7 CFR 91.33 - When an application for an appeal of a laboratory service may be withdrawn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When an application for an appeal of a laboratory... (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Appeal...

  1. 7 CFR 91.32 - Where to file for an appeal of a laboratory service and information required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Where to file for an appeal of a laboratory service... (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS SERVICES AND GENERAL INFORMATION Appeal...

  2. Flowing biofilms as a transport mechanism for biomass through porous media under laminar and turbulent conditions in a laboratory reactor system.

    PubMed

    Stoodley, P; Dodds, I; De Beer, D; Scott, H Lappin; Boyle, J D

    2005-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be important in influencing biofilm morphology and causing biofilms to flow over surfaces in flow cell experiments. However, it is not known whether similar effects may occur in porous media. Generally, it is assumed that the primary transport mechanism for biomass in porous media is through convection, as suspended particulates (cells and flocs) carried by fluid flowing through the interstices. However, the flow of biofilms over the surfaces of soils and sediment particles, may represent an important flux of biomass, and subsequently affect both biological activity and permeability. Mixed species bacterial biofilms were grown in glass flow cells packed with 1 mm diameter glass beads, under laminar or turbulent flow (porous media Reynolds number = 20 and 200 respectively). The morphology and dynamic behavior reflected those of biofilms grown in the open flow cells. The laminar biofilm was relatively uniform and after 23 d had inundated the majority of the pore spaces. Under turbulent flow the biofilm accumulated primarily in protected regions at contact points between the beads and formed streamers that trailed from the leeward face. Both biofilms caused a 2 to 3-fold increase in friction factor and in both cases there were sudden reductions in friction factor followed by rapid recovery, suggesting periodic sloughing and regrowth events. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that under both laminar and turbulent conditions biofilms flowed over the surface of the porous media. In some instances ripple structures formed. The velocity of biofilm flow was on the order of 10 mum h(-1) in the turbulent flow cell and 1.0 mum h(-1) in the laminar flow cell.

  3. Flowing biofilms as a transport mechanism for biomass through porous media under laminar and turbulent conditions in a laboratory reactor system.

    PubMed

    Stoodley, P; Dodds, I; De Beer, D; Scott, H Lappin; Boyle, J D

    2005-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be important in influencing biofilm morphology and causing biofilms to flow over surfaces in flow cell experiments. However, it is not known whether similar effects may occur in porous media. Generally, it is assumed that the primary transport mechanism for biomass in porous media is through convection, as suspended particulates (cells and flocs) carried by fluid flowing through the interstices. However, the flow of biofilms over the surfaces of soils and sediment particles, may represent an important flux of biomass, and subsequently affect both biological activity and permeability. Mixed species bacterial biofilms were grown in glass flow cells packed with 1 mm diameter glass beads, under laminar or turbulent flow (porous media Reynolds number = 20 and 200 respectively). The morphology and dynamic behavior reflected those of biofilms grown in the open flow cells. The laminar biofilm was relatively uniform and after 23 d had inundated the majority of the pore spaces. Under turbulent flow the biofilm accumulated primarily in protected regions at contact points between the beads and formed streamers that trailed from the leeward face. Both biofilms caused a 2 to 3-fold increase in friction factor and in both cases there were sudden reductions in friction factor followed by rapid recovery, suggesting periodic sloughing and regrowth events. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that under both laminar and turbulent conditions biofilms flowed over the surface of the porous media. In some instances ripple structures formed. The velocity of biofilm flow was on the order of 10 mum h(-1) in the turbulent flow cell and 1.0 mum h(-1) in the laminar flow cell. PMID:16371336

  4. Final Report of a CRADA Between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the General Motors Company (CRADA No. PNNL/271): “Degradation Mechanisms of Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology”

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Kim, Chang H.; Oh, Se H.; Schmieg, Steven J.; Wiebenga, Michelle H.

    2011-12-13

    Diesel engines can offer substantially higher fuel efficiency, good driving performance characteristics, and reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emission compared to stoichiometric gasoline engines. Despite the increasing public demand for higher fuel economy and reduced dependency on imported oil, however, meeting the stringent emission standards with affordable methods has been a major challenge for the wide application of these fuel-efficient engines in the US market. The selective catalytic reduction of NOx by urea (urea-SCR) is one of the most promising technologies for NOx emission control for diesel engine exhausts. To ensure successful NOx emission control in the urea-SCR technology, both a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a urea-SCR catalyst with high activity and durability are critical for the emission control system. Because the use of this technology for light-duty diesel vehicle applications is new, the relative lack of experience makes it especially challenging to satisfy the durability requirements. Of particular concern is being able to realistically simulate actual field aging of the catalyst systems under laboratory conditions, which is necessary both as a rapid assessment tool for verifying improved performance and certifiability of new catalyst formulations. In addition, it is imperative to develop a good understanding of deactivation mechanisms to help develop improved catalyst materials. In this CRADA program, General Motors Company and PNNL have investigated fresh, laboratory- and vehicle-aged DOC and SCR catalysts. The studies have led to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of catalysts used in the urea-SCR technology, and have improved the correlation between laboratory and vehicle aging for reduced development time and cost. This Final Report briefly highlights many of the technical accomplishments and documents the productivity of the program in terms of peer-reviewed scientific publications

  5. [Brazilian colonization in the Paraguayan agricultural frontier].

    PubMed

    Neupert, R F

    1991-04-01

    This work briefly describes Brazilian colonization of the Paraguayan agricultural frontier, analyzes factors responsible for expelling population from Brazil and for attracting Brazilians to Paraguay, and assesses the economic and social consequences of immigration to the area. Paraguay's vast and sparsely populated agricultural frontier in areas outside the Central subregion underwent a process of intense colonization from the early 1960s to the mid-1980s. The Paraguayan government initiated an ambitious colonization program in 1963 to increase production, relieve population pressure and subdivision of small parcels in the Central subregion, encourage agricultural modernization, and produce a more diversified agriculture. Paraguayan agriculture in the early 1960s suffered from excessive concentration of land in a few hands and resulting exclusion of around 3/4 of workers from ownership and from any possibility of obtaining credit to fund technological improvements. Results of studies 2 decades after implementation of the colonization plan suggest that it has failed in significant areas. Although a considerable population redistribution alleviated pressure in the Central subregion, it apparently resulted more from spontaneous movement of peasants outside the colonization areas than from the official program. Concentration of lands is now occurring in the colonization area. Assistance for agricultural modernization and diversification of production in the peasant sector has been minimal. On the other hand, production of soy, wheat, and cotton for export increased substantially, because of an entrepreneurial agriculture capitalized by foreign as well as national interests The unmet goals of the colonization program would have required structural reforms rather than simple spatial redistribution of the population. Many of the colonists in the 1970s were Brazilian families displaced by mechanized agriculture in the southern states of Parana, Santa Catarina, and Rio

  6. District, state or regional veterinary diagnostic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Gosser, H S; Morehouse, L G

    1998-08-01

    The district, regional or state laboratory is the local laboratory to which veterinarian practitioners usually submit samples, and consequently these laboratories are usually the first to observe a suspected disease problem. In most countries, these laboratories are under the jurisdiction of the State or region in which they are located. In the United States of America (USA), most veterinary diagnostic laboratories are State-associated and operate under the aegis of either the State Department of Agriculture or a university. The national laboratory provides reference assistance to the State laboratories. In the USA, the national Laboratory (the National Veterinary Services Laboratories) acts as a consultant to confirm difficult diagnoses and administer performance tests for State-associated laboratories. District, state or regional laboratories need to share information regarding technological advances in diagnostic procedures. This need was met in the USA by the formation of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) in the late 1950s. Another requirement of district, state or regional diagnostic laboratories is a method to confirm quality assurance, which was fulfilled in the USA by an accreditation programme established through the AAVLD. The Accreditation Committee evaluates laboratories (on request) in terms of organisation, personnel, physical facilities and equipment, records, finance and budget. Those laboratories which meet the standards as established in the 'Essential Requirements for Accreditation' are given accreditation status, which indicates that they have the expertise and facilities to perform tests on food-producing animals for shipment in national or international commerce and on companion, laboratory or zoo animals. While confidentiality of test records is most important, it is becoming necessary to release certain types of animal disease test information if a country is to participate in the exportation of animals

  7. Agricultural chemistry and bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Orts, William J; Holtman, Kevin M; Seiber, James N

    2008-06-11

    Renewed interest in converting biomass to biofuels such as ethanol, other forms of bioenergy, and bioenergy byproducts or coproducts of commercial value opens opportunities for chemists, including agricultural chemists and related disciplines. Applications include feedstock characterization and quantification of structural changes resulting from genetic modification and of the intermediates formed during enzymatic and chemical processing; development of improved processes for utilizing chemical coproducts such as lactic acid and glycerol; development of alternative biofuels such as methanol, butanol, and hydrogen; and ways to reduce greenhouse gas emission and/or use carbon dioxide beneficially. Chemists will also be heavily involved in detailing the phytochemical composition of alternative energy crops and genetically improved crops. A resurgence of demand for agricultural chemistry and related disciplines argues for increasing output through targeted programs and on-the-job training. PMID:18473470

  8. The Development Model Electronic Commerce of Regional Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jun; Cai, Lecai; Li, Hongchan

    With the developing of the agricultural information, it is inevitable trend of the development of agricultural electronic commercial affairs. On the basis of existing study on the development application model of e-commerce, combined with the character of the agricultural information, compared with the developing model from the theory and reality, a new development model electronic commerce of regional agriculture base on the government is put up, and such key issues as problems of the security applications, payment mode, sharing mechanisms, and legal protection are analyzed, etc. The among coordination mechanism of the region is discussed on, it is significance for regulating the development of agricultural e-commerce and promoting the regional economical development.

  9. Agricultural Awareness Days: Integrating Agricultural Partnerships and STEM Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Brian T.; Wilkinson, Carol A.; Shepherd, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States there is a need to educate young children in science, technology, and agriculture. Through collaboration with many agricultural groups, the Southern Piedmont Agricultural Research and Education Center has set up a program that works with 3rd grade students and teachers to reinforce the science that has been taught in the…

  10. Agricultural and urban pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehmer, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The degradation produced by the introduction of agricultural and urban wastes into estuarine systems, with emphasis on the Chesapeake Bay area, is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) effects of sediment loading and (2) organic and nutrient loading problems. The impact of high turbidity on the biological life of the bay is analyzed. The sources of nutrients which produce over-enrichment of the waters and the subsequent production of phytoplankton are examined.

  11. Agriculture and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, P.H.

    1992-07-03

    How will increases in levels of CO{sub 2} and changes in temperature affect food production A recently issued report analyzes prospects for US agriculture 1990 to 2030. The report, prepared by a distinguished Task Force, first projects the evolution of agriculture assuming increased levels of CO{sub 2} but no climate change. Then it deals with effects of climate change, followed by a discussion of how greenhouse emissions might be diminished by agriculture. Economic and policy matters are also covered. How the climate would respond to more greenhouse gases is uncertain. If temperatures were higher, there would be more evaporation and more precipitation. Where would the rain fall That is a good question. Weather in a particular locality is not determined by global averages. The Dust Bowl of the 1930s could be repeated at its former site or located in another region such as the present Corn Belt. But depending on the realities at a given place, farmers have demonstrated great flexibility in choosing what they may grow. Their flexibility has been increased by the numerous varieties of seeds of major crops that are now available, each having different characteristics such as drought resistance and temperature tolerance. In past, agriculture has contributed about 5% of US greenhouse gases. Two large components have involved emissions of CO{sub 2} from farm machinery and from oxidation of organic matter in soil due to tillage. Use of diesel fuel and more efficient machinery has reduced emissions from that source by 40%. In some areas changed tillage practices are now responsible for returning carbon to the soil. The report identifies an important potential for diminishing net US emissions of CO{sub 2} by growth and utilization of biomass. Large areas are already available that could be devoted to energy crops.

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Thanner, Sophie; Drissner, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this article, the current knowledge and knowledge gaps in the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in livestock and plants and importance in terms of animal and human health are discussed. Some recommendations are provided for generation of the data required in order to develop risk assessments for AMR within agriculture and for risks through the food chain to animals and humans. PMID:27094336

  13. Agricultural application of SWECS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, V.

    Principal applications of wind energy for agriculture are (1) farmstead power, mainly electrical, (2) building heating, (3) irrigation pumping, (4) product storage and processing, (5) hot water for residences and dairies, and (6) associated industries of agribusiness such as feedlots, fertilizer elevators, greenhouses, etc. Field experiments show that wind energy is a viable alternative, however, reliability and maintenance are still major problems. Test results of the various experiments are described.

  14. Aerosol emissions from biochar-amended agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, S.; Sharratt, B. S.; Li, J. J.; Olshvevski, S.; Meng, Z.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural production is a major contributor to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and associated global warming. In this regard, novel carbon sequestration strategies such as large-scale biochar application may provide sustainable pathways to increase the terrestrial storage of carbon in agricultural areas. Biochar has a long residence time in the soil and hence understanding the soil properties affected by biochar addition needs to be investigated to identify the tradeoffs and synergies of large-scale biochar application. Even though several studies have investigated the impacts of biochar application on a variety of soil properties, very few studies have investigated the impacts on soil erosion, in particular wind (aeolian) erosion and subsequent particulate emissions. Using a combination of wind tunnel studies and laboratory experiments, we investigated the dust emission potential of biochar-amended agricultural soils. We amended biochar (unsieved or sieved to appropriate particle size; application rates ranging from 1 - 5 % of the soil by weight) to three soil types (sand, sandy loam, and silt loam) and estimated the changes in threshold shear velocity for wind erosion and dust emission potential in comparison to control soils. Our experiments demonstrate that emissions of fine biochar particles may result from two mechanisms (a) very fine biochar particles (suspension size) that are entrained into the air stream when the wind velocity exceeds the threshold, and (b) production of fine biochar particles originating from the abrasion by quartz grains. The results indicate that biochar application significantly increased particulate emissions and more interestingly, the rate of increase was found to be higher in the intermediate range of biochar application. As fine biochar particles effectively adsorb/trap contaminants and pathogens from the soil, the preferential erosion of fine biochar particles by wind may lead to concentration of contaminants in the

  15. Entomophagy and space agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, N.; Ishikawa, Y.; Takaoki, M.; Yamashita, M.; Nakayama, S.; Kiguchi, K.; Kok, R.; Wada, H.; Mitsuhashi, J.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    Supplying food for human occupants remains one of the primary issues in engineering space habitation Evidently for long-term occupation on a distant planet it is necessary to start agriculture on site Historically humans have consumed a variety of animals and it is required to fill our nutritional need when they live in space Among many candidate group and species of animal to breed in space agriculture insects are of great interest since they have a number of advantages over mammals and other vertebrates or invertebrates About 70-75 of animal species is insects and they play an important role in materials recycle loop of terrestrial biosphere at their various niche For space agriculture we propose several insect species such as the silkworm Bombyx mori the drugstore beetle Stegobium paniceum and the termite Macrotermes subhyalinus Among many advantages these insects do not compete with human in terms of food resources but convert inedible biomass or waste into an edible food source for human The silkworm has been domesticated since 5 000 years ago in China Silk moth has lost capability of flying after its domestication history This feature is advantageous in control of their breeding Silkworm larvae eat specifically mulberry leaves and metamorphose in their cocoon Silk fiber obtained from cocoon can be used to manufacture textile Farming system of the drugstore beetle has been well established Both the drugstore beetle and the termite are capable to convert cellulose or other inedible biomass

  16. BASIC STEPS IN DESIGNING SCIENCE LABORATORIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WHITNEY, FRANK L.

    PLANNERS OF CURRENT UNIVERSITY LABORATORIES OFTEN MAKE THE SAME MISTAKES MADE BY INDUSTRIAL LABORATORIES 20 YEARS AGO. THIS CAN BE REMEDIED BY INCREASED COMMUNICATION BETWEEN SCIENTISTS AND DESIGNERS IN SEMINARS DEFINING THE BASIC NEEDS OF A PARTICULAR LABORATORY SITUATION. ELECTRONIC AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ACCOUNT FOR OVER 50 PER CENT OF TOTAL…

  17. Using the Computer as a Laboratory Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Peter J.; Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Reports experiences during a two-year period in introducing the computer to the laboratory and students to the computer as a laboratory instrument. Describes a working philosophy, data acquisition system, and experiments. Summarizes the laboratory procedures of nine experiments, covering mechanics, heat, electromagnetism, and optics. (YP)

  18. Theme: In-Agriculture Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Jack, Ed.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Seven theme articles review the history and philosophy of vocational agriculture, its relationship to the national goals for education, the place of sustainable agriculture and supervised experience in the curriculum, diversifying the curriculum, and fisheries education programs in Alaska. (SK)

  19. [Agriculture, ecology and development].

    PubMed

    Dufumier, M

    1993-01-01

    This work is based in part on the papers concerning agriculture, ecology, and development contained in this issue of the Revue Tiers-Monde. It provides an overview of changing international attitudes toward environmental damage, examines 3 specific types of damage affecting developing countries in particular, and discusses the shortcomings of existing environmental projects and the prerequisites for a lasting control over environmental damage. It has become increasingly evident that pollution and environmental damage cannot be the concern exclusively of developed countries. The 1992 UN Conference on the Environment and Development in rio de Janeiro focused most of its attention on problems evident at the planetary level such as the greenhouse effect and extinction of species. Problems resulting from the impact of harmful agricultural practices on developing country ecological environments were noted somewhat in passing. The examples of tropical deforestation, the degradation of savannahs and steppes, and cultivation of new fields on steep mountainsides demonstrate the complexity and gravity of environmental problems in developing countries. The poverty of peasants and their inability to obtain the inputs that would enable them to practice a more stable type of agriculture are important factors in the damage done. A common problem is that immediate production or consumption is favored with little regard for longterm consequences. Certain agricultural practices such as the use of cultivars selected for their high yields under optimal conditions contribute to the progressive disappearance of varieties with special properties such as resistance to disease or insects that may be needed in the future. Excessive use of herbicides, pesticides, or fertilizer may bring problems of pollution and toxicity. Numerous development projects sponsored by donors from the developed countries have been designed to pursue short term objectives with insufficient attention to longterm

  20. Institutional Discrimination in Agricultural Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, William C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Examines history of discrimination within U.S. agricultural programs, specifically in U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Compares USDA employment and grant allocations for Blacks and Whites since Civil Rights Act of 1964. Cites other examples of institutional discrimination in federal agriculture programs. Calls for development of policy…