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Sample records for agricultural practices continue

  1. Ancient lipids reveal continuity in culinary practices across the transition to agriculture in Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Oliver E.; Steele, Val J.; Fischer, Anders; Hartz, Sönke; Andersen, Søren H.; Donohoe, Paul; Glykou, Aikaterini; Saul, Hayley; Jones, D. Martin; Koch, Eva; Heron, Carl P.

    2011-01-01

    Farming transformed societies globally. Yet, despite more than a century of research, there is little consensus on the speed or completeness of this fundamental change and, consequently, on its principal drivers. For Northern Europe, the debate has often centered on the rich archaeological record of the Western Baltic, but even here it is unclear how quickly or completely people abandoned wild terrestrial and marine resources after the introduction of domesticated plants and animals at ∼4000 calibrated years B.C. Ceramic containers are found ubiquitously on these sites and contain remarkably well-preserved lipids derived from the original use of the vessel. Reconstructing culinary practices from this ceramic record can contribute to longstanding debates concerning the origins of farming. Here we present data on the molecular and isotopic characteristics of lipids extracted from 133 ceramic vessels and 100 carbonized surface residues dating to immediately before and after the first evidence of domesticated animals and plants in the Western Baltic. The presence of specific lipid biomarkers, notably ω-(o-alkylphenyl)alkanoic acids, and the isotopic composition of individual n-alkanoic acids clearly show that a significant proportion (∼20%) of ceramic vessels with lipids preserved continued to be used for processing marine and freshwater resources across the transition to agriculture in this region. Although changes in pottery use are immediately evident, our data challenge the popular notions that economies were completely transformed with the arrival of farming and that Neolithic pottery was exclusively associated with produce from domesticated animals and plants. PMID:22025697

  2. Ancient lipids reveal continuity in culinary practices across the transition to agriculture in Northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Craig, Oliver E; Steele, Val J; Fischer, Anders; Hartz, Sönke; Andersen, Søren H; Donohoe, Paul; Glykou, Aikaterini; Saul, Hayley; Jones, D Martin; Koch, Eva; Heron, Carl P

    2011-11-01

    Farming transformed societies globally. Yet, despite more than a century of research, there is little consensus on the speed or completeness of this fundamental change and, consequently, on its principal drivers. For Northern Europe, the debate has often centered on the rich archaeological record of the Western Baltic, but even here it is unclear how quickly or completely people abandoned wild terrestrial and marine resources after the introduction of domesticated plants and animals at ∼4000 calibrated years B.C. Ceramic containers are found ubiquitously on these sites and contain remarkably well-preserved lipids derived from the original use of the vessel. Reconstructing culinary practices from this ceramic record can contribute to longstanding debates concerning the origins of farming. Here we present data on the molecular and isotopic characteristics of lipids extracted from 133 ceramic vessels and 100 carbonized surface residues dating to immediately before and after the first evidence of domesticated animals and plants in the Western Baltic. The presence of specific lipid biomarkers, notably ω-(o-alkylphenyl)alkanoic acids, and the isotopic composition of individual n-alkanoic acids clearly show that a significant proportion (∼20%) of ceramic vessels with lipids preserved continued to be used for processing marine and freshwater resources across the transition to agriculture in this region. Although changes in pottery use are immediately evident, our data challenge the popular notions that economies were completely transformed with the arrival of farming and that Neolithic pottery was exclusively associated with produce from domesticated animals and plants.

  3. Agricultural Energy Practices. Agriculture Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with agricultural energy practices. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss energy use and conservation of resources in the production of agricultural products. Some topics covered are basic uses of direct energy in…

  4. Adoption of Improved Agricultural Practices in Uruguay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucks, Carlos Alberto

    Conducted in Uruguay during 1965-68, this study compared adoption rates for selected agricultural practices between one area which received an extension program and one which did not; and sought relationships between selected characteristics of individual farmers and the adoption of new practices. Data came from interviews with 69 experimental and…

  5. Continuing professional development: best practices.

    PubMed

    Filipe, Helena P; Silva, Eduardo D; Stulting, Andries A; Golnik, Karl C

    2014-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) involves not only educational activities to enhance medical competence in medical knowledge and skills, but also in management, team building, professionalism, interpersonal communication, technology, teaching, and accountability. This paper aims at reviewing best practices to promote effective CPD. Principles and guidelines, as already defined by some professional societies and world organizations, are emphasized as core actions to best enhance an effective lifelong learning after residency. The personal learning plan (PLP) is discussed as the core of a well-structured CPD and we describe how it should be created. Fundamental CPD principles and how they are integrated in the framework of every physician's professional life will be described. The value of systematic and comprehensive CPD documentation and assessment is emphasized. Accreditation requirements and professional relationships with commercial sponsors are discussed.

  6. Measures of the Effects of Agricultural Practices on Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Virginia H; Polasky, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Agriculture produces more than just crops. Agricultural practices have environmental impacts that affect a wide range of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity. Understanding the contribution of various agricultural practices to the range of ecosystem services would help inform choices about the most beneficial agricultural practices. To accomplish this, however, we must overcome a big challenge in measuring the impact of alternative agricultural practices on ecosystem services and of ecosystem services on agricultural production.

  7. Hyperspectral image classification for mapping agricultural tillage practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An efficient classification framework for mapping agricultural tillage practice using hyperspectral remote sensing imagery is proposed, which has the potential to be implemented practically to provide rapid, accurate, and objective surveying data for precision agricultural management and appraisal f...

  8. Practical application of remote sensing in agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Remote sensing program imagery from several types of platforms, from light aircraft to the LANDSAT (ERTS) satellites, have been utilized during the past few years, with preference for inexpensive imagery over expensive magnetic tapes. Emphasis has been on practical application of remote sensing data to increase crop yield by decreasing plant stress, disease, weeds and undesirable insects and by improving irrigation. Imagery obtained from low altitudes via aircraft provides the necessary resolution and complements but does not replace data from high altitude aircraft, Gemini and Apollo spacecraft, Skylab space station and LANDSAT satellites. Federal government centers are now able to supply imagery within about thirty days from data of order. Nevertheless, if the full potential of space imagery in practical agricultural operations is to be realized, the time span from date of imaging to user application needs to be shortened from the current several months to not more than two weeks.

  9. Grassland birds associated with agricultural riparian practices in southwestern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renfrew, R.B.; Ribic, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Rotational grazing has been proposed as a Best Management Practice (BMP) for minimizing runoff in Wisconsin agricultural riparian areas. The influence of this land management practice on grassland birds has not been evaluated in relation to more traditional agricultural land management systems in Midwestern riparian areas. This study compared the grassland bird community in riparian areas in Wisconsin that were rotationally grazed to 2 common land use practices along streams in Wisconsin: continuously grazed pastures and rowcrop fields with 10-m-wide ungrazed buffer strips located along the stream. We calculated total number of birds, the Berger-Parker Index of Dominance, and number of birds ha-1 for each site. Vegetation variables used were height-density, litter depth, and percent bare ground. Bird species richness, species dominance, and density did not differ among land use types. In contrast, grassland bird species of management concern [Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis Gmelin), Eastern Meadowlark (Sturnella magna L.), and Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus L.)] were found on continuous and rotational pastures but very rarely or never occurred on buffer strips. Contrary to previous research, however, rotationally grazed pastures did not support more of these species than continuously grazed pastures. Bird density was related to vegetation structure, with higher densities found on sites with deeper litter. Within the pasture land use types, there were no consistent differences between species richness and density near the stream (10 m).

  10. Continuing education in physical rehabilitation and health issues of agricultural workers.

    PubMed

    Wilhite, Carla S; Jaco, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Limited attention has been devoted to the cultural and practice competencies needed by occupational therapy and physical therapy professionals who provide services to farming families impacted by chronic health or disability issues. Agricultural occupational safety and health should represent a continuum of services responsive to individuals, families, and agricultural communities across a life span and range of health status changes. Physical rehabilitation professionals have a key role in impacting an agricultural producer's sense of self-efficacy and capacities for returning to agricultural living and work. However, demonstration of competency is essential in providing person-centered rehabilitation services of assessment, evaluation, treatment planning, interventions, referrals, and discharge issues. The paper highlights methods utilized by a state AgrAbility program and a former National AgrAbility Project to develop a model of continuing education programming for occupational and physical therapists that evaluate and treat agricultural workers after acute injury or exacerbation of chronic health conditions.

  11. Cost of areal reduction of gulf hypoxia through agricultural practice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major share of the area of hypoxic growth in the Northern Gulf of Mexico has been attributed to nutrient run-off from agricultural fields, but no estimate is available for the cost of reducing Gulf hypoxic area using agricultural conservation practices. We apply the Soil and Water Assessment Tool ...

  12. Continuing professional development and ICT: target practice.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Reynolds, P A

    2008-07-26

    Ever-increasing needs and demands by dentists and all other members of the dental team for education and training at all levels - undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing - are straining the resources of existing providers of such education. At the same time, there are ever-increasing opportunities to develop online delivery and the use of a range of information and communication technology (ICT) systems and services further, in all aspects of dental education. This paper reviews recent developments that have led to an increased demand for dental postgraduate programmes and continuing professional development (CPD) courses in the United Kingdom and then discusses how ICT has and will impact on teaching practice. Examples include the use of teaching and learning resources in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and the increasing use of blended learning. The paper then explores the need for both teachers and students to adapt to the new environment to ensure they can benefit to the maximum and that teaching and learning practices are changed accordingly.

  13. Water quality monitoring of an agricultural watershed lake: the effectiveness of agricultural best management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beasley Lake is an oxbow lake located in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Plain (the Delta), a region of intensive agricultural activity. Due to intensive row-crop agricultural practices, the 915 ha watershed was sediment impaired when monitoring began in 1995 and was a candidate to assess the effect...

  14. Agricultural sustainability and intensive production practices.

    PubMed

    Tilman, David; Cassman, Kenneth G; Matson, Pamela A; Naylor, Rosamond; Polasky, Stephen

    2002-08-08

    A doubling in global food demand projected for the next 50 years poses huge challenges for the sustainability both of food production and of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and the services they provide to society. Agriculturalists are the principal managers of global usable lands and will shape, perhaps irreversibly, the surface of the Earth in the coming decades. New incentives and policies for ensuring the sustainability of agriculture and ecosystem services will be crucial if we are to meet the demands of improving yields without compromising environmental integrity or public health.

  15. Continuous Passive Sampling of Solutes from Agricultural Subsurface Drainage Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblad Vendelboe, Anders; de Jonge, Hubert; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Wollesen de Jonge, Lis

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural subsurface tube drain systems play an important role in water and solute transport. One study, focusing on lowland agricultural catchments, showed that subsurface tube drainage contributed up to 80% of the annual discharge and 90% of the annual NO3 load from agricultural fields to the receiving water bodies. Knowledge of e.g. nutrient loads and drainage volumes, based on measurements and modelling, are important for adequate water quality management. Despite the importance of tube drain transport of solutes, monitoring data are scarce. This scarcity is a result of the existing monitoring techniques for flow and contaminant load from tube drains being expensive and labor-extensive. The study presented here aimed at developing a cheap, simple, and robust method to monitor solute loads from tube drains. The method is based on the newly developed Flowcap, which can be attached to existing tube drain outlets and can measure total flow, contaminant load and flow-averaged concentrations of solutes in the drainage. The Flowcap builds on the existing Sorbicell principle, a passive sampling system that measures average concentrations over longer periods of time (days to months) for various compounds. The Sorbicell consists of two compartments permeable to water. One compartment contains an adsorbent and one contains a tracer. When water passes through the Sorbicell the compound of interest is absorbed while a tracer is released. Using the tracer loss to calculate the volume of water that has passed the Sorbicell it is possible to calculate the average concentration of the compound. When mounting Sorbicells in the Flowcap, a flow-proportional part of the drainage is sampled from the main stream. To accommodate the wide range of drainage flow rates two Flowcaps with different capacities were tested in the laboratory: one with a capacity of 25 L min-1 (Q25) and one with a capacity of 256 L min-1 (Q256). In addition, Sorbicells with two different hydraulic

  16. Effects of conservation practices on fishes within agricultural watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation practices have been regularly implemented within agricultural watersheds in the United States without documentation of their impacts. The goal of the ARS Conservation Effects Assessment Project Watershed Assessment Study is to quantify the effect of conservation practices within 14 agri...

  17. [Ecological agriculture: future of Good Agriculture Practice of Chinese materia medica].

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan-ping; Zhou, Liang-yun; Mo, Ge; Wang, Sheng; Huang, Lu-qi

    2015-09-01

    Based on the ecological and economic problems in Good Agriculture Practice (GAP) of Chinese material medica, we introduced the origin, concept, features and operative technology of eco-agriculture worldwide, emphasizing its modes on different biological levels of landscape, ecosystem, community, population, individual and gene in China. And on this basis, we analyzed the background and current situation of eco-agriculture of Chinese materia medica, and proposed its development ideas and key tasks, including: (1) Analysis and planning of the production pattern of Chinese material medica national wide. (2) Typical features extraction of regional agriculture of Chinese materia medica. (3) Investigation of the interaction and its mechanism between typical Chinese materia medica in each region and the micro-ecology of rhizosphere soil. (4) Study on technology of eco-agriculture of Chinese materia medica. (5) Extraction and solidification of eco-agriculture modes of Chinese materia medica. (6) Study on the theory of eco-agriculture of Chinese materia medica. Also we pointed out that GAP and eco-agriculture of Chinese material medica are both different and relative, but they are not contradictory with their own features. It is an irresistible trend to promote eco-agriculture in the GAP of Chinese material medica and coordinate ecological and economic development.

  18. The Influence of Time Management Practices on Job Stress Level among Beginning Secondary Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Misty D.; Torres, Robert M.; Tummons, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring the stress of teachers continues to be important--particularly stress levels of beginning agriculture teachers. The study sought to describe the relationship between beginning teachers' perceived ability to manage their time and their level of stress. The Time Management Practices Inventory and the Job Stress Survey were used to measure…

  19. Protecting ground water: pesticides and agricultural practices. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The booklet presents the results of a project conducted by EPA's Office of Ground-Water Protection to evaluate the potential impacts of various agronomic, irrigation, and pesticide application practices on ground water. The report provides State and local water quality and agricultural officials with technical information to help in the development of programs to protect ground water from pesticide contamination. The report explains the principles involved in reducing the risk of pesticide contamination and describes what is known about the impact of various agricultural practices on pesticide leaching. It is hoped that the information will be helpful to water-quality officials in developing and implementing ground-water protection programs.

  20. Effects of conservation practices on fishes, amphibians, and reptiles within agricultural streams and wetlands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation practices have been traditionally used to manage soil and water resources to improve agricultural production, and now include methods to reduce the environmental impacts of agriculture on streams and wetlands. These practices have been regularly implemented within agricultural watershed...

  1. Watershed scale influence of pesticide reduction practices on pesticides and fishes within channelized agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of pesticide reduction practices to reduce pesticide usage within agricultural watersheds has the potential to reduce pesticide concentrations within agricultural streams. The watershed scale influence of pesticide reduction practices on pesticides and the biota within agricultural he...

  2. Impact of agricultural management practices on soil organic carbon: simulation of Australian wheat systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Bryan, Brett A; King, Darran; Luo, Zhongkui; Wang, Enli; Song, Xiaodong; Yu, Qiang

    2013-05-01

    Quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics at a high spatial and temporal resolution in response to different agricultural management practices and environmental conditions can help identify practices that both sequester carbon in the soil and sustain agricultural productivity. Using an agricultural systems model (the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator), we conducted a high spatial resolution and long-term (122 years) simulation study to identify the key management practices and environmental variables influencing SOC dynamics in a continuous wheat cropping system in Australia's 96 million ha cereal-growing regions. Agricultural practices included five nitrogen application rates (0-200 kg N ha(-1) in 50 kg N ha(-1) increments), five residue removal rates (0-100% in 25% increments), and five residue incorporation rates (0-100% in 25% increments). We found that the change in SOC during the 122-year simulation was influenced by the management practices of residue removal (linearly negative) and fertilization (nonlinearly positive) - and the environmental variables of initial SOC content (linearly negative) and temperature (nonlinearly negative). The effects of fertilization were strongest at rates up to 50 kg N ha(-1) , and the effects of temperature were strongest where mean annual temperatures exceeded 19 °C. Reducing residue removal and increasing fertilization increased SOC in most areas except Queensland where high rates of SOC decomposition caused by high temperature and soil moisture negated these benefits. Management practices were particularly effective in increasing SOC in south-west Western Australia - an area with low initial SOC. The results can help target agricultural management practices for increasing SOC in the context of local environmental conditions, enabling farmers to contribute to climate change mitigation and sustaining agricultural production.

  3. 7 CFR 58.315 - Continuous churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND...

  4. Knowledge Gained from Good Agricultural Practices Courses for Iowa Growers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Angela; Strohbehn, Catherine; Naeve, Linda; Domoto, Paul; Wilson, Lester

    2015-01-01

    Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) educational courses provide produce growers with the fundamental information for producing and processing safe produce. To determine the effectiveness of the current 7-hour GAP course provided in Iowa, growers were surveyed before and 7-14 days after the course to determine changes in knowledge and opinions.…

  5. Factors Influencing Practical Training Quality in Iranian Agricultural Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mojarradi, Gholamreza; Karamidehkordi, Esmail

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the factors influencing the practical training quality of agricultural higher education programmes from the senior students' perspective. The study was conducted in two public universities located in the north-west of Iran using a cross-sectional survey and structured interviews with a randomised sample of 254…

  6. 78 FR 35258 - Solid Agricultural Grade Ammonium Nitrate from Ukraine: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... International Trade Administration Solid Agricultural Grade Ammonium Nitrate from Ukraine: Continuation of... revocation of the antidumping duty order \\1\\ on solid agricultural grade ammonium nitrate from Ukraine would... of the Order. \\1\\ See Antidumping Duty Order: Solid Agricultural Grade Ammonium Nitrate from...

  7. Effects of agricultural practices on organic matter degradation in ditches

    PubMed Central

    Hunting, Ellard R.; Vonk, J. Arie; Musters, C.J.M.; Kraak, Michiel H.S.; Vijver, Martina G.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural practices can result in differences in organic matter (OM) and agricultural chemical inputs in adjacent ditches, but its indirect effects on OM composition and its inherent consequences for ecosystem functioning remain uncertain. This study determined the effect of agricultural practices (dairy farm grasslands and hyacinth bulb fields) on OM degradation by microorganisms and invertebrates with a consumption and food preference experiment in the field and in the laboratory using natural OM collected from the field. Freshly cut grass and hyacinths were also offered to control for OM composition and large- and small mesh-sizes were used to distinguish microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption. Results show that OM decomposition by microorganisms and consumption by invertebrates was similar throughout the study area, but that OM collected from ditches adjacent grasslands and freshly cut grass and hyacinths were preferred over OM collected from ditches adjacent to a hyacinth bulb field. In the case of OM collected from ditches adjacent hyacinth bulb fields, both microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption were strongly retarded, likely resulting from sorption and accumulation of pesticides. This outcome illustrates that differences in agricultural practices can, in addition to direct detrimental effects on aquatic organisms, indirectly alter the functioning of adjacent aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26892243

  8. Effects of agricultural practices on organic matter degradation in ditches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunting, Ellard R.; Vonk, J. Arie; Musters, C. J. M.; Kraak, Michiel H. S.; Vijver, Martina G.

    2016-02-01

    Agricultural practices can result in differences in organic matter (OM) and agricultural chemical inputs in adjacent ditches, but its indirect effects on OM composition and its inherent consequences for ecosystem functioning remain uncertain. This study determined the effect of agricultural practices (dairy farm grasslands and hyacinth bulb fields) on OM degradation by microorganisms and invertebrates with a consumption and food preference experiment in the field and in the laboratory using natural OM collected from the field. Freshly cut grass and hyacinths were also offered to control for OM composition and large- and small mesh-sizes were used to distinguish microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption. Results show that OM decomposition by microorganisms and consumption by invertebrates was similar throughout the study area, but that OM collected from ditches adjacent grasslands and freshly cut grass and hyacinths were preferred over OM collected from ditches adjacent to a hyacinth bulb field. In the case of OM collected from ditches adjacent hyacinth bulb fields, both microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption were strongly retarded, likely resulting from sorption and accumulation of pesticides. This outcome illustrates that differences in agricultural practices can, in addition to direct detrimental effects on aquatic organisms, indirectly alter the functioning of adjacent aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Sustainability of current agriculture practices, community perception, and implications for ecosystem health: an Indian study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Atanu; Patil, Shantagouda; Hugar, Lingappa B; vanLoon, Gary

    2011-12-01

    In order to support agribusiness and to attain food security for ever-increasing populations, most countries in the world have embraced modern agricultural technologies. Ecological consequences of the technocentric approaches, and their sustainability and impacts on human health have, however, not received adequate attention particularly in developing countries. India is one country that has undergone a rapid transformation in the field of agriculture by adopting strategies of the Green Revolution. This article provides a comparative analysis of the effects of older and newer paradigms of agricultural practices on ecosystem and human health within the larger context of sustainability. The study was conducted in three closely situated areas where different agricultural practices were followed: (a) the head-end of a modern canal-irrigated area, (b) an adjacent dryland, and (c) an area (the ancient area) that has been provided with irrigation for some 800 years. Data were collected by in-depth interviews of individual farmers, focus-group discussions, participatory observations, and from secondary sources. The dryland, receiving limited rainfall, continues to practice diverse cropping centered to a large extent on traditional coarse cereals and uses only small amounts of chemical inputs. On the other hand, modern agriculture in the head-end emphasizes continuous cropping of rice supported by extensive and indiscriminate use of agrochemicals. Market forces have, to a significant degree, influenced the ancient area to abandon much of its early practices of organic farming and to take up aspects of modern agricultural practice. Rice cultivation in the irrigated parts has changed the local landscape and vegetation and has augmented the mosquito population, which is a potential vector for malaria, Japanese encephalitis and other diseases. Nevertheless, despite these problems, perceptions of adverse environmental effects are lowest in the heavily irrigated area.

  10. Carbon and Phosphorus in soil particulate fraction: effect of continuous agriculture, tillage and fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyngaard, N.; Echeverrıa, H. E.; Vidaurreta, A.; Picone, L. I.; Divito, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    In Argentinean Pampas region, the practice of intensive agriculture has diminished total organic carbon (TOC) content in soil. This degradation process can impact over phosphorus (P) organic fractions associated to it, and therefore limit soil capacity to provide P through mineralization. Along this line, P content in soil particulate fraction (PF) has been proposed as an index to estimate this capacity. The aims of this work were to evaluate (1) the effect of continuous agriculture, tillage and P fertilization over TOC and P fractions content in soil and PF, and (2) the stability of P-PF as a mineralization index. To this end, a long term experiment initiated in 2001 in Balcarce, Argentina, under continuous agriculture, was analyzed. There, two tillage systems - conventional till (CT) and no till (NT) - and two fertilization treatments - nitrogen (N) and N + P (NP) - were evaluated. Phosphorus rate was 30 kg ha-1 year-1. In each plot, the following parameters were determined in 2002, 2005, 2008 and 2011: TOC, P Bray, total P (Pt), inorganic P (Pi), and organic P (Po) content in the whole soil and in the PF. Also, C supply by residues and P soil balance during the experiment were calculated, and the P sorption capacity was determined in samples from 2011. C supply was greater in CT (7% relative to NT) and in NP (14% relative to N). However, TOC in soil was not modified neither by tillage or fertilization. Even though, C in the PF decreased (3% annually) by the use of continuous agriculture. This reduction was positively associated to the one observed in other soil properties as Pt, Pi and Po in the PF. P fertilization lessened this reduction in Pt (18,9 mg kg-1 in N and 23,1 mg kg-1 in NP in 2011) and Pi (4,2 mg kg-1 in N and 6,2 mg kg-1 in NP in 2011), but not in Po. This indicates that, Po is affected by management practices and, contrary to Pt, is stable to fertilization. Therefore Po can be studied as a potential P mineralization index. The difference among P

  11. Continuing the Legacy: Democracy and Education Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Sara; Schwartz, Joni

    2012-01-01

    The American adult education and literacy movement in the early twentieth century had its roots deep in the study and practice of democracy (Ramdeholl, Giordani, Heaney, Yanow, 2010). From Lindeman, Dewey, Laubach, Horton, to Heaney and Brookfield, a persistent theme is the indispensable relationship between democracy and adult education. For…

  12. Knowledge needs, available practices, and future challenges in agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Georgina; Whitfield, Mike G.; Cooper, Julia; De Vries, Franciska T.; Collison, Martin; Dedousis, Thanasis; Heathcote, Richard; Roth, Brendan; Mohammed, Shamal; Molyneux, Andrew; Van der Putten, Wim H.; Dicks, Lynn V.; Sutherland, William J.; Bardgett, Richard D.

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study is to clarify research needs and identify effective practices for enhancing soil health. This was done by a synopsis of soil literature that specifically tests practices designed to maintain or enhance elements of soil health. Using an expert panel of soil scientists and practitioners, we then assessed the evidence in the soil synopsis to highlight practices beneficial to soil health, practices considered detrimental, and practices that need further investigation. A partial Spearman's correlation was used to analyse the panel's responses. We found that increased certainty in scientific evidence led to practices being considered to be more effective due to them being empirically justified. This suggests that for practices to be considered effective and put into practice, a substantial body of research is needed to support the effectiveness of the practice. This is further supported by the high proportion of practices (33 %), such as changing the timing of ploughing or amending the soil with crops grown as green manures, that experts felt had unknown effectiveness, usually due to insufficiently robust evidence. Only 7 of the 27 reviewed practices were considered to be beneficial, or likely to be beneficial in enhancing soil health. These included the use of (1) integrated nutrient management (organic and inorganic amendments); (2) cover crops; (3) crop rotations; (4) intercropping between crop rows or underneath the main crop; (5) formulated chemical compounds (such as nitrification inhibitors); (6) control of traffic and traffic timing; and (7) reducing grazing intensity. Our assessment, which uses the Delphi technique, is increasingly used to improve decision-making in conservation and agricultural policy, identified practices that can be put into practice to benefit soil health. Moreover, it has enabled us to identify practices that need further research and a need for increased communication between researchers, policy-makers, and

  13. Bodily-Visual Practices and Turn Continuation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Cecilia E.; Thompson, Sandra A.; Drake, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This article considers points in turn construction where conversation researchers have shown that talk routinely continues beyond possible turn completion, but where bodily-visual behavior doing such turn extension work is found. The bodily-visual behaviors examined share many features with verbal turn extensions, but it is argued that embodied…

  14. Agricultural Marketing. Farmers' Marketing Practices and Programs To Teach Alternative Practices. Briefing Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report describes a General Accounting Office study of farmers' marketing practices. The report specifically discusses farmers' use of the three advanced marketing techniques--cash forward contracting, hedging in the futures market, and trading in agricultural options--as disclosed in nine studies of farmers' marketing practices made from 1976…

  15. Teacher Perspectives on the Practice of Continuity of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreth, Sascha; Garrity, Sarah; Ritblatt, Shulamit N.; Olson, Kelsey; Virgilio, Ashley; Dinh, Hilary; Padamada, Shane

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to address gaps in the literature on continuity of care through focus group interviews with teachers at public early care and education programs in San Diego County, California, USA. To better understand various perspectives on continuity of care, focus groups were conducted at programs that currently practice continuity of care,…

  16. Cost of areal reduction of gulf hypoxia through agricultural practice.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Gerald; Barnhart, Bradley L; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Arnold, Jeffrey G

    2015-02-01

    A major share of the area of hypoxic growth in the Northern Gulf of Mexico has been attributed to nutrient run-off from agricultural fields, but no estimate is available for the cost of reducing Gulf hypoxic area using agricultural conservation practices. We apply the Soil and Water Assessment Tool using observed daily weather to simulate the reduction in nitrogen loading in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) that would result from enrolling all row crop acreage in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Nitrogen loadings at the outlet of the UMRB are used to predict Gulf hypoxic area, and net cash farm rent is used as the price for participation in the CRP. Over the course of the 42 year simulation, direct CRP costs total more than $388 billion, and the Inter-Governmental Task Force goal of hypoxic area less than 5000 square kilometers is met in only two years.

  17. Theme: Innovative Curriculum Ideas and Practices in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen theme articles discuss the following: curriculum ideas and innovations in agricultural education, agricultural literacy, Supervised Agricultural Experience, active learning, locating agricultural education resources, distance and web-based instruction, principles of forest management, professional development, and service learning. (JOW)

  18. Agricultural practices in grasslands detected by spatial remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Dusseux, Pauline; Vertès, Françoise; Corpetti, Thomas; Corgne, Samuel; Hubert-Moy, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    The major decrease in grassland surfaces associated with changes in their management that has been observed in many regions of the earth during the last half century has major impacts on environmental and socio-economic systems. This study focuses on the identification of grassland management practices in an intensive agricultural watershed located in Brittany, France, by analyzing the intra-annual dynamics of the surface condition of vegetation using remotely sensed and field data. We studied the relationship between one vegetation index (NDVI) and two biophysical variables (LAI and fCOVER) derived from a series of three SPOT images on one hand and measurements collected during field campaigns achieved on 120 grasslands on the other. The results show that the LAI appears as the best predictor for monitoring grassland mowing and grazing. Indeed, because of its ability to characterize vegetation status, LAI estimated from remote sensing data is a relevant variable to identify these practices. LAI values derived from the SPOT images were then classified based on the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) supervised algorithm. The results points out that the distribution of grassland management practices such as grazing and mowing can be mapped very accurately (Kappa index = 0.82) at a field scale over large agricultural areas using a series of satellite images.

  19. Effect of Continuing Medical Education on Practice Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Robert C.

    1978-01-01

    Data are reported suggesting that a change in practice patterns did occur subsequent to a continuing medical education program. Twenty-eight physicians took a course in pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and followup surveys indicate its objectives were met. (LBH)

  20. Hyperspectral image classification for mapping agricultural tillage practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Qiong; Li, Wei; Du, Qian; Yang, Chenghai

    2015-01-01

    An efficient classification framework for mapping agricultural tillage practice using hyperspectral remote sensing imagery is proposed, which has the potential to be implemented practically to provide rapid, accurate, and objective surveying data for precision agricultural management and appraisal from large-scale remote sensing images. It includes a local region filter [i.e., Gaussian low-pass filter (GLF)] to extract spatial-spectral features, a dimensionality reduction process [i.e., local fisher's discriminate analysis (LFDA)], and the traditional k-nearest neighbor (KNN) classifier, and is denoted as GLF-LFDA-KNN. Compared to our previously used local average filter and adaptive weighted filter, the GLF also considers spatial features in a small neighborhood, but it emphasizes the central pixel itself and is data-independent; therefore, it can achieve the balance between classification accuracy and computational complexity. The KNN classifier has a lower computational complexity compared to the traditional support vector machine (SVM). After classification separability is enhanced by the GLF and LFDA, the less powerful KNN can outperform SVM and the overall computational cost remains lower. The proposed framework can also outperform the SVM with composite kernel (SVM-CK) that uses spatial-spectral features.

  1. Grounding Continuous Professional Development (CPD) in Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Tracy; Clarke, Jane

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that developing a team-based approach to teaching and learning provides the basis for building commitment and continuous professional development in teaching practice among staff in higher education. A team approach that is grounded in practice leads to open communication and opportunities for formal and informal professional…

  2. Faculty Development for Continuing Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Ivan L.; Leslie, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a framework for faculty development in continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) and collaborative practice. The framework is built on best practices in faculty development and CIPE. It was informed by local experience in the development, delivery, and evaluation of a faculty development program to promote capacity for…

  3. Adult & Continuing Education. Theory and Practice. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Peter

    This textbook examines the theory and practice of adult and continuing education. The following topics are among those discussed in 11 chapters: rationale for provision of education for adults (nature of contemporary society and the individual); conceptual framework for adult and continuing education (changing concept of education; teaching,…

  4. Evaluation of Continuous Assessment Practice by University Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osadebe, Patrick U.

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the extent to which Continuous Assessment (CA) was practiced by university lecturers in Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria. The evaluation of continuous assessment focused on the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains of students' behaviour. That is teaching and learning should focus on these areas. Two research…

  5. Ethical Practice Contributes to Professionalization in Adult and Continuing Education: The Debate Continues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Michael K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Instead of developing a code of ethics, the field of adult/continuing education might consider principles of good practice that provide the needed ethical framework without the limitations of formal codes. (SK)

  6. General practitioners' continuing medical education within and outside their practice.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, P. A.; Allery, L. A.; Harding, K. G.; Hayes, T. M.

    1989-01-01

    To study continuing medical education 96 out of 101 general practitioners chosen at random from the list held by a family practitioner committee were interviewed. The results provided little evidence of regular attendance at local postgraduate centre meetings, though practice based educational meetings were common. Thirty one of the general practitioners worked in practices that held one or more practice based educational meetings each month at which the doctors provided the main educational content. Performance review was undertaken in the practices of 51 of the general practitioners, and 80 of the doctors recognised its value. The general practitioners considered that the most valuable educational activities occurred within the practice, the most valued being contact with partners. They asked for increased contact with hospital doctors. The development of general practitioners' continuing medical education should be based on the content of the individual general practitioner's day to day work and entail contact with his or her professional colleagues. PMID:2504381

  7. Changing agricultural practices: Potential consequences to aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, Peter J.; Urich, Matthew L.; Hassan, Sayed M.; Jacobs, Whitney N.; Bringolf, Robert B.; Owens, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural practices pose threats to biotic diversity in freshwater systems with increasing use of glyphosate-based herbicides for weed control and animal waste for soil amendment becoming common in many regions. Over the past two decades, these particular agricultural trends have corresponded with marked declines in populations of fish and mussel species in the Upper Conasauga River watershed in Georgia/Tennessee, USA. To investigate the potential role of agriculture in the population declines, surface waters and sediments throughout the basin were tested for toxicity and analyzed for glyphosate, metals, nutrients, and steroid hormones. Assessments of chronic toxicity with Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca indicated that few water or sediment samples were harmful and metal concentrations were generally below impairment levels. Glyphosate was not observed in surface waters, although its primary degradation product, aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA), was detected in 77% of the samples (mean = 509 μg/L, n = 99) and one or both compounds were measured in most sediment samples. Waterborne AMPA concentrations supported an inference that surfactants associated with glyphosate may be present at levels sufficient to affect early life stages of mussels. Nutrient enrichment of surface waters was widespread with nitrate (mean = 0.7 mg NO3-N/L, n = 179) and phosphorus (mean = 275 μg/L, n = 179) exceeding levels associated with eutrophication. Hormone concentrations in sediments were often above those shown to cause endocrine disruption in fish and appear to reflect the widespread application of poultry litter and manure. Observed species declines may be at least partially due to hormones, although excess nutrients and herbicide surfactants may also be implicated.

  8. Changing agricultural practices: potential consequences to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Lasier, Peter J; Urich, Matthew L; Hassan, Sayed M; Jacobs, Whitney N; Bringolf, Robert B; Owens, Kathleen M

    2016-12-01

    Agricultural practices pose threats to biotic diversity in freshwater systems with increasing use of glyphosate-based herbicides for weed control and animal waste for soil amendment becoming common in many regions. Over the past two decades, these particular agricultural trends have corresponded with marked declines in populations of fish and mussel species in the Upper Conasauga River watershed in Georgia/Tennessee, USA. To investigate the potential role of agriculture in the population declines, surface waters and sediments throughout the basin were tested for toxicity and analyzed for glyphosate, metals, nutrients, and steroid hormones. Assessments of chronic toxicity with Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca indicated that few water or sediment samples were harmful and metal concentrations were generally below impairment levels. Glyphosate was not observed in surface waters, although its primary degradation product, aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA), was detected in 77% of the samples (mean = 509 μg/L, n = 99) and one or both compounds were measured in most sediment samples. Waterborne AMPA concentrations supported an inference that surfactants associated with glyphosate may be present at levels sufficient to affect early life stages of mussels. Nutrient enrichment of surface waters was widespread with nitrate (mean = 0.7 mg NO3-N/L, n = 179) and phosphorus (mean = 275 μg/L, n = 179) exceeding levels associated with eutrophication. Hormone concentrations in sediments were often above those shown to cause endocrine disruption in fish and appear to reflect the widespread application of poultry litter and manure. Observed species declines may be at least partially due to hormones, although excess nutrients and herbicide surfactants may also be implicated.

  9. Continuing education: a national imperative for school nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K; Havice, Pamela A; Pruitt, Rosanne H

    2006-02-01

    Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theory of novice to expert provides a framework for the development of roles and competencies in the practice of school nursing. This manuscript synthesizes research reviewed in 15 articles. Common themes found in the articles include the importance of continuing education and identified barriers to attainment. In response, methods to access continuing education and financial resources are presented.

  10. An Evaluation of Best Practices in Online Continuing Theological Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raybon, Stephen Paul

    2012-01-01

    The principle purpose of this mixed methods case study was to evaluate the extent to which a wholly online continuing theological education program operated by an Association of Theological Schools accredited seminary modeled best practices of online education, as exemplified by the findings of the "Quality On the Line" study and the…

  11. School Psychologists' Continuing Professional Development Preferences and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armistead, Leigh D.; Castillo, Jose M.; Curtis, Michael J.; Chappel, Ashley; Cunningham, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated school psychologists' continuing professional development (CPD) activities, topics, needs, motivations, financial expenditures, and opinions, as well as relationships between select demographic characteristics and certain CPD practices and preferences. A survey was mailed to 1,000 randomly selected Regular Members of…

  12. Promoting Reflective Practice in Continuing Education in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Educationalist Fred Korthagen elaborated a model in the 1980s for the relationship between the teacher educator and the teacher which embraces reflective practice as its guiding principle. In the present study, research was carried out into teacher development among a small group of language teachers working in continuing education in France.…

  13. The Influence of Perceptions of Practice Characteristics: An Examination of Agricultural Best Management Practice Adoption in Two Indiana Watersheds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Adam P.; Weinkauf, Denise Klotthor; Prokopy, Linda Stalker

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural best management practices (BMPs), or conservation practices, can help reduce nonpoint source pollution from agricultural lands, as well as provide valuable wildlife habitat. There is a large literature exploring factors that lead to a producer's voluntary adoption of BMPs, but there have been inconsistent findings. Generally, this…

  14. Modelling the effect of agricultural management practices on soil organic carbon stocks: does soil erosion matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeu, Elisabet; Van Wesemael, Bas; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decades, an increasing number of studies have been conducted to assess the effect of soil management practices on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. At regional scales, biogeochemical models such as CENTURY or Roth-C have been commonly applied. These models simulate SOC dynamics at the profile level (point basis) over long temporal scales but do not consider the continuous lateral transfer of sediment that takes place along geomorphic toposequences. As a consequence, the impact of soil redistribution on carbon fluxes is very seldom taken into account when evaluating changes in SOC stocks due to agricultural management practices on the short and long-term. To address this gap, we assessed the role of soil erosion by water and tillage on SOC stocks under different agricultural management practices in the Walloon region of Belgium. The SPEROS-C model was run for a 100-year period combining three typical crop rotations (using winter wheat, winter barley, sugar beet and maize) with three tillage scenarios (conventional tillage, reduced tillage and reduced tillage in combination with additional crop residues). The results showed that including soil erosion by water in the simulations led to a general decrease in SOC stocks relative to a baseline scenario (where no erosion took place). The SOC lost from these arable soils was mainly exported to adjacent sites and to the river system by lateral fluxes, with magnitudes differing between crop rotations and in all cases lower under conservation tillage practices than under conventional tillage. Although tillage erosion plays an important role in carbon redistribution within fields, lateral fluxes induced by water erosion led to a higher spatial and in-depth heterogeneity of SOC stocks with potential effects on the soil water holding capacity and crop yields. This indicates that studies assessing the effect of agricultural management practices on SOC stocks and other soil properties over the landscape should

  15. Discrete and continuous water-quality data and hydrologic parameters from seven agricultural watersheds in the United States, 2002-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Lampe, David C.; Capel, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Field and analytical methods; discrete organic and non-organic water-quality data and associated quality-control data; and continuous hydrologic and water-quality parameters are reported for sites in California, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, and Washington. The sites were sampled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program?s Agricultural Chemicals Team study to better understand how environmental processes and agricultural practices interact to determine the transport and fate of agricultural chemicals in the environment.

  16. Promoting Sustainable Agricultural Practices Through Remote Sensing Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driese, K. L.; Sivanpillai, R.

    2007-12-01

    Ever increasing demand for food and fiber calls for farm management strategies such as effective use of chemicals and efficient water use that will maximize productivity while reducing adverse impacts on the environment. Remotely sensed data collected by satellites are a valuable resource for farmers and ranchers for gaining insights about farm and ranch productivity. While researchers in universities and agencies have made tremendous advances, technology transfer to end-users has lagged, preventing the farmers from taking advantage of this valuable resource. To overcome this barrier, the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC), a NASA funded program headed by the University of North Dakota, has been working with end-users to promote the use of remote sensing technology for sustainable agricultural practices. We will highlight the UMAC activities in Wyoming aimed at promoting this technology to sugar-beet farmers in the Big Horn Basin. To assist farmers who might not have a computer at home, we provide them to local county Cooperative Extension Offices pre-loaded with relevant imagery. Our targeted outreach activities have resulted in farmers requesting and using new and old Landsat images to identify growth anomalies and trends which have enabled them to develop management zones within their croplands.

  17. Continuing medical education for general practitioners: a practice format

    PubMed Central

    VanNieuwenborg, Lena; Goossens, Martine; De Lepeleire, Jan; Schoenmakers, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our current knowledge-based society and the many actualisations within the medical profession require a great responsibility of physicians to continuously develop and refine their skills. In this article, we reflect on some recent findings in the field of continuing education for professional doctors (continuing medical education, CME). Second, we describe the development of a CME from the Academic Center for General Practice (ACHG) of the KU Leuven. Methods First, we performed a literature study and we used unpublished data of a need assessment performed (2013) in a selected group of general practitioners. Second, we describe the development of a proposal to establish a CME programme for general practitioners. Results CME should go beyond the sheer acquisition of knowledge, and also seek changes in practice, attitudes and behaviours of physicians. The continuing education offerings are subject to the goals of the organising institution, but even more to the needs and desires of the end user. Conclusions Integrated education is crucial to meet the conditions for efficient and effective continuing education. The ACHG KU Leuven decided to offer a postgraduate programme consisting of a combination of teaching methods: online courses (self-study), contact courses (traditional method) and a materials database. PMID:26850504

  18. College Students' View of Biotechnology Products and Practices in Sustainable Agriculture Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture implies the use of products and practices that sustain production, protect the environment, ensure economic viability, and maintain rural community viability. Disagreement exists as to whether or not the products and practices of modern biotechnological support agricultural sustainability. The purpose of this study was to…

  19. From Agricultural Extension to Capacity Development: Exploring the Foundations of an Emergent Form of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauzon, Al

    2013-01-01

    This essay argues that capacity development is a response to changes in the organization and practice of agricultural extension as these changes have excluded small resource farmers. In this essay I trace the changes in the organization of agricultural extension through to the emergence of the concept and practice of capacity development. The idea…

  20. ASSESSING EFFECTS OF ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES ON WILDLIFE HABITAT IN IOWA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A habitat-change model was used to compare past, present, and future land cover and management practices to assess potential impacts of alternative agricultural practices on wildlife in two agricultural watersheds, Walnut Creek and Buck Creek, in central Iowa, USA. This approach ...

  1. Combining agricultural practices key to elevating soil microbial activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of soil health is an emerging topic in applied ecology, specifically as it pertains to the agriculture, which utilizes approximately 40% of earth’s land. However, rigorous quantification of soil health and the services provided by soil organisms to support agriculture production (e.g., n...

  2. Changing nursing practice through continuing education: a tool for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fleck, E; Fyffe, T

    1997-01-01

    In light of the current cost-orientated, rapidly changing health service, continuing education providers are challenged to achieve the greatest benefits for the service. Given this culture it is argued that it is essential for nurses to acquire the skills to continually learn, and that for managers there is seen to be a measurable change in a recommended practice or behaviour. To meet these challenges it is essential that continuing educators plan, implement and evaluate programmes in partnership with clinicians and managers. A literature review revealed that most evaluations did not address whether continuing education has resulted in a change in practice. This paper describes a study on the use of goal attainment scaling as an evaluation tool to measure changes in learner behaviour and as a means of promoting self-determination among the participants. It is proposed that goal attainment scaling can be used to measure changes in participant behaviour following an educational programme. In addition, this analysis of participant interviews indicates the tool's usefulness as a self-reporting instrument and this appears to foster the skills of self-assessment and appraisal of performance.

  3. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon for Agricultural Land Use Under Various Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Drewniak, B.; Song, J.; Prell, J.; Jacob, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Bioenergy is generating tremendous interest as an alternative energy source that is both environmentally friendly and economically competitive. The amount of land designated for agriculture is expected to expand, including changes in the current distribution of crops, as demand for biofuels increases as a carbon neutral alternative fuel source. However, the influence of agriculture on the carbon cycle is complex, and varies depending on land use change and management practices. The purpose of this research is to integrate agriculture in the carbon-nitrogen based Community Land Model (CLM) to evaluate the above and below ground carbon storage for corn, soybean, and wheat crop lands. The new model, CLM-Crop simulates carbon allocation during four growth stages, a soybean nitrogen fixation scheme, fertilizer, and harvest practices. We present results from this model simulation, which includes the impact of a new dynamic roots module to simulate the changing root structure and depth with growing season based on the availability of water and nitrogen in the root zone and a retranslocation scheme to simulate redistribution of nitrogen from leaves, roots, and stems to grain during organ development for crop yields, leaf area index (LAI), carbon allocation, and changes in soil carbon budgets under various practices such as fertilizer and residue management. Simulated crop yields for corn, soybean and wheat are in general agreement with measurements. Initial model results indicate a loss of soil organic carbon over cultivated lands after removal of natural vegetation which continues in the following years. Soil carbon in crop lands is a strong function of the residue management and has the potential to impact crop yields significantly.

  4. [Good agricultural practice (GAP) of Chinese materia medica (CMM) for ten years: achievements, problems and proposals].

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Shou-Dong; Wang, Gui-Hua; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Mei-Lan; He, Ya-Li; Han, Bang-Xing; Chen, Nai-Fu; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-04-01

    This paper aims to summarize the achievements during the implementation process of good agricultural practice (GAP) in Chinese Materia Medica (CMM), and on basis of analyzing the existing problems of GAP, to propose further implementation of GAP in TCM growing. Since the launch of GAP in CMM growing ten years ago, it has acquired great achievements, including: (1) The promulgation of a series of measures for the administration of the GAP approval in the CMM growing; (2) The expanded planting area of CMM; (3) The increased awareness of standardized CMM growing among farmers and enterprises; (4) The establishment of GAP implementation bases for CMM growing; (5) The improvement of theory and methodology for CMM growing; (6) The development of a large group of experts and scholars in GAP approval for CMM production. The problems existing in the production include: (1) A deep understanding of GAP and its certification is still needed; (2) The distribution of the certification base is not reasonable; (3) The geo-economics effect and the backward farming practices are thought to be the bottlenecks in the standardization of CMM growing and the scale production of CMM; (4) Low comparative effectiveness limits the development of the GAP; (5) The base of breeding improved variety is blank; (6) The immature of the cultivation technique lead to the risk of production process; (7) The degradation of soil microbial and the continuous cropping obstacle restrict the sustainable development of the GAP base. To further promote the health and orderly GAP in the CMM growing, the authors propose: (1) To change the mode of production; (2) To establish a sound standard system so as to ensure quality products for fair prices; (3) To fully consider the geo-economic culture and vigorously promote the definite cultivating of traditional Chinese medicinal materials; (4) To strengthen the transformation and generalization of basic researches and achievements, in order to provide technical

  5. Evaluating sustainable water quality management in the U.S.: Urban, Agricultural, and Environmental Protection Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oel, P. R.; Alfredo, K. A.; Russo, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable water management typically emphasizes water resource quantity, with focus directed at availability and use practices. When attention is placed on sustainable water quality management, the holistic, cross-sector perspective inherent to sustainability is often lost. Proper water quality management is a critical component of sustainable development practices. However, sustainable development definitions and metrics related to water quality resilience and management are often not well defined; water quality is often buried in large indicator sets used for analysis, and the policy regulating management practices create sector specific burdens for ensuring adequate water quality. In this research, we investigated the methods by which water quality is evaluated through internationally applied indicators and incorporated into the larger idea of "sustainability." We also dissect policy's role in the distribution of responsibility with regard to water quality management in the United States through evaluation of three broad sectors: urban, agriculture, and environmental water quality. Our research concludes that despite a growing intention to use a single system approach for urban, agricultural, and environmental water quality management, one does not yet exist and is even hindered by our current policies and regulations. As policy continues to lead in determining water quality and defining contamination limits, new regulation must reconcile the disparity in requirements for the contaminators and those performing end-of-pipe treatment. Just as the sustainable development indicators we researched tried to integrate environmental, economic, and social aspects without skewing focus to one of these three categories, policy cannot continue to regulate a single sector of society without considering impacts to the entire watershed and/or region. Unequal distribution of the water pollution burden creates disjointed economic growth, infrastructure development, and policy

  6. Best Management Practices for sediment control in a Mediterranean agricultural watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahab, Ossama M. M.; Bingner, Ronald L.; Milillo, Fabio; Gentile, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion can lead to severe destruction of agricultural sustainability that affects not only productivity, but the entire ecosystem in the neighboring areas. Sediments transported together with the associated nutrients and chemicals can significantly impact downstream water bodies. Various conservation and management practices implemented individually or integrated together as a system can be used to reduce the negative impacts on agricultural watersheds from soil erosion. Hydrological models are useful tools for decision makers when selecting the most effective combination of management practices to reduce pollutant loads within a watershed system. The Annualized Agricultural Non-point Source (AnnAGNPS) pollutant loading management model can be used to analyze the effectiveness of diverse management and conservation practices that can control or reduce the impact of soil erosion processes and subsequent sediment loads in agricultural watersheds. A 506 km2 Mediterranean medium-size watershed (Carapelle) located in Apulia, Southern Italy was used as a case study to evaluate the model and best management practices (BMPs) for sediment load control. A monitoring station located at the Ordona bridge has been instrumented to continuously monitor stream flow and suspended sediment loads. The station has been equipped with an ultrasound stage meter and a stage recorder to monitor stream flow. An infrared optic probe was used to measure suspended sediment concentrations (Gentile et al., 2010 ). The model was calibrated and validated in the Carapelle watershed on an event basis (Bisantino et al., 2013), and the validated model was used to evaluate the effectiveness of BMPs on sediment reduction. Various management practices were investigated including evaluating the impact on sediment load of: (1) converting all cropland areas into forest and grass covered conditions; (2) converting the highest eroding cropland areas to forest or grass covered conditions; and (3

  7. The potential of agricultural practices to increase C storage in cropped soils: an assessment for France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenu, Claire; Angers, Denis; Métay, Aurélie; Colnenne, Caroline; Klumpp, Katja; Bamière, Laure; Pardon, Lenaic; Pellerin, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    Though large progress has been achieved in the last decades, net GHG emissions from the agricultural sector are still more poorly quantified than in other sectors. In this study, we examined i) technical mitigation options likely to store carbon in agricultural soils, ii) their potential of additional C storage per unit surface area and iii) applicable areas in mainland France. We considered only agricultural practices being technically feasible by farmers and involving no major change in either production systems or production levels. Moreover, only currently available techniques with validated efficiencies and presenting no major negative environmental impacts were taken into account. Four measures were expected to store additional C in agricultural soils: - Reducing tillage: either a switch to continuous direct seeding, direct seeding with occasional tillage once every five years, or continuous superficial (<15 cm) tillage. - Introducing cover crops in cropping systems: sown between two cash crops on arable farms, in orchards and vineyards (permanent or temporary cover cropping) . - Expanding agroforestry systems; planting of tree lines in cultivated fields and grasslands, and hedges around the field edges. - Increasing the life time of temporary sown grasslands: increase of life time to 5 years. The recent literature was reviewed in order to determine long term (>20yrs) C storage rates (MgC ha-1 y-1,) of cropping systems with and without the proposed practice. Then we analysed the conditions for potential application, in terms of feasibility, acceptance, limitation of yield losses and of other GHG emissions. According to the literature, additional C storage rates were 0.15 (0-0.3) MgC ha-1 y-1 for continuous direct seeding, 0.10 (0-0.2) MgC ha-1 y-1for occasional tillage one year in five, and 0.0 MgC ha-1 y-1 for superficial tillage. Cover crops were estimated to store 0.24 (0.13-0.37) MgC ha-1 y-1 between cash crops and 0.49 (0.23-0.72) MgC ha-1 y-1 when

  8. Comparison of soil bacterial communities under diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tiehang; Chellemi, Dan O; Graham, Jim H; Martin, Kendall J; Rosskopf, Erin N

    2008-02-01

    The composition and structure of bacterial communities were examined in soil subjected to a range of diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices. Length heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) of bacterial DNA extracted from soil was used to generate amplicon profiles that were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistical methods. Five land management programs were initiated in July 2000: conventional, organic, continuous removal of vegetation (disk fallow), undisturbed (weed fallow), and bahiagrass pasture (Paspalum notatum var Argentine). Similar levels in the diversity of bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons were detected in soil samples collected from organically and conventionally managed plots 3 and 4 years after initiation of land management programs, whereas significantly lower levels of diversity were observed in samples collected from bahiagrass pasture. Differences in diversity were attributed to effects on how the relative abundance of individual amplicons were distributed (evenness) and not on the total numbers of bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons detected (richness). Similar levels of diversity were detected among all land management programs in soil samples collected after successive years of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cultivation. A different trend was observed after a multivariate examination of the similarities in genetic composition among soil bacterial communities. After 3 years of land management, similarities in genetic composition of soil bacterial communities were observed in plots where disturbance was minimized (bahiagrass and weed fallow). The genetic compositions in plots managed organically were similar to each other and distinct from bacterial communities in other land management programs. After successive years of tomato cultivation and damage from two major hurricanes, only the composition of soil bacterial communities within organically managed plots continued to maintain a high degree of similarity

  9. Mentoring Functions Practiced by Undergraduate Faculty in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Ashley J.; Retallick, Michael S.; Martin, Robert; Steiner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The literature has indicated that faculty and administrators are often uncertain about how to foster effective mentoring relationships with undergraduate students. This study analyzed the mentoring functions of faculty in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University regarding the undergraduate mentoring process. Six…

  10. Private Agricultural Extension System in Kenya: Practice and Policy Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muyanga, Milu; Jayne, T. S.

    2008-01-01

    Private extension system has been at the centre of a debate triggered by inefficient public agricultural extension. The debate is anchored on the premise that the private sector is more efficient in extension service delivery. This study evaluates the private extension system in Kenya. It employs qualitative and quantitative methods. The results…

  11. Certified Organic Agriculture in Mexico: Market Connections and Certification Practices in Large and Small Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovar, Laura Gomez; Martin, Lauren; Cruz, Manuel Angel Gomez; Mutersbaugh, Tad

    2005-01-01

    Certification within organic agriculture exhibits flexibility with respect to practices used to demonstrate that a product meets published quality standards. This case study of Mexican certified-organic agriculture finds two forms. Indigenous smallholders of southern Mexico undertake a low-input, process-oriented organic farming in which…

  12. Effects of agricultural conservation practices on oxbow lake watersheds in the Mississippi River alluvial plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Globally, agricultural lands are considered to major sources of nonpoint source pollutants such as sediment, pesticides and nutrients in the United States. While conservation practices have been tested for their effectiveness in reducing agricultural related pollutants on test plot scales, they typ...

  13. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadhira, Vebi; Kurniadi, Deddy; Juliastuti, E.; Sutiswan, Adeline

    2014-03-01

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  14. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    SciTech Connect

    Nadhira, Vebi Kurniadi, Deddy Juliastuti, E. Sutiswan, Adeline

    2014-03-24

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  15. Agricultural Diversification and Marketing. Instructional Materials Developed for Secondary, Postsecondary, and Continuing Education Agriculture Programs in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Agriculture, Des Moines.

    These instructional materials on agricultural diversification and marketing were developed for use by Iowa's vocational and technical agricultural instructors and extension personnel. This document is one of three manuals making up a single package. (The other two are Christmas Tree Production and Marketing and Sod Production and Marketing). The…

  16. Agriculture

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA Agriculture Resource Directory offers comprehensive, easy-to-understand information about environmental stewardship on farms and ranches; commonsense, flexible approaches that are both environmentally protective and agriculturally sound.

  17. Agricultural practices and personal hygiene among agricultural workers in a rural area of Howrah district, West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Das, D K; Dey, T K

    2005-01-01

    The study attempted to assess agricultural practices and personal hygiene among 100 agricultural workers in a rural area of West Bengal in 1999. 69% of the study population was marginal farmer with less than 2 acres of land. Organophosphorus group of pesticides were most commonly used pesticides (68%); spraying was irregular in nature (98%), through semiautomatic sprayer (99%) and only 5% used any special dress while spraying pesticides. 40% of workers used to store pesticides either in living room or in food storage area. 88% of them did not take any food during work with pesticides, only 37% used to take regular bath after working with pesticides but regular hand washing was practiced by all of them.

  18. Evaluation of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) behaviour in agricultural soil through laboratory continuous studies.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-07-01

    The behaviour of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) in agricultural soil is investigated in the laboratory using continuous-flow soil column studies in order to simultaneously analyze the three main underlying phenomena (adsorption/desorption, degradation and transport). The continuous-flow soil column experiments generated the breakthrough curves for each LAS homologue, C10, C11, C12 and C13, and by adding them up, for total LAS, from which the relevant retention, degradation and transport parameters could be estimated, after proposing adequate models. Several transport equations were considered, including the degradation of the sorbate in solution and its retention by soil, under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions between the sorbent and the sorbate. In general, the results obtained for the estimates of those parameters that were common to the various models studied (such as the isotherm slope, first order degradation rate coefficient and the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient) were rather consistent, meaning that mass transfer limitations are not playing a major role in the experiments. These three parameters increase with the length of the LAS homologue chain. The study will provide the underlying conceptual framework and fundamental parameters to understand, simulate and predict the environmental behaviour of LAS compounds in agricultural soils.

  19. Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses.

    PubMed

    Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

    2014-01-01

    Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses' (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements.

  20. Integrating seasonal climate prediction and agricultural models for insights into agricultural practice

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James W

    2005-01-01

    Interest in integrating crop simulation models with dynamic seasonal climate forecast models is expanding in response to a perceived opportunity to add value to seasonal climate forecasts for agriculture. Integrated modelling may help to address some obstacles to effective agricultural use of climate information. First, modelling can address the mismatch between farmers' needs and available operational forecasts. Probabilistic crop yield forecasts are directly relevant to farmers' livelihood decisions and, at a different scale, to early warning and market applications. Second, credible ex ante evidence of livelihood benefits, using integrated climate–crop–economic modelling in a value-of-information framework, may assist in the challenge of obtaining institutional, financial and political support; and inform targeting for greatest benefit. Third, integrated modelling can reduce the risk and learning time associated with adaptation and adoption, and related uncertainty on the part of advisors and advocates. It can provide insights to advisors, and enhance site-specific interpretation of recommendations when driven by spatial data. Model-based ‘discussion support systems’ contribute to learning and farmer–researcher dialogue. Integrated climate–crop modelling may play a genuine, but limited role in efforts to support climate risk management in agriculture, but only if they are used appropriately, with understanding of their capabilities and limitations, and with cautious evaluation of model predictions and of the insights that arises from model-based decision analysis. PMID:16433092

  1. Agricultural environmental management; case studies from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Frost, A; Stewart, S; Kerr, D; MacDonald, J; D'Arcy, B

    2004-01-01

    Six farms were examined, each from a different sector of Scottish agriculture. Surveys were carried out to identify both diffuse pollution risks and options for habitat conservation and enhancement. Financial data were also gathered to determine the current sources of farm income, both from sale of produce and from grants. Whole farm plans were produced aimed at bringing about reductions in diffuse pollution to water, soil and air and also habitat improvements. The assembled information was used to devise a possible agri-environment grant scheme to aid the implementation of the whole farm plans.

  2. Use of Continuous Specific Conductance to Differentiate the Sources of Water to an Agricultural Stream With Subsurface Drainage Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. A.; Thornburg, J.; Capel, P. D.

    2008-12-01

    The sources of water to natural streams include direct precipitation, overland flow, and ground-water inflow. In glaciated areas, the presence of artificial surface and subsurface drainage networks, a common practice for removing excess water from agricultural fields, provides additional pathways of water movement to the stream. The artificial drainage of agricultural fields allows rainfall to move quickly through the catchment to the stream transporting nutrients, pesticides and other agricultural-related constituents. A largely agricultural (about 90%), 31 km2 subcatchment of the South Fork of the Iowa River in north-central Iowa was studied for two years. Discharge and specific conductance (SC) were measured continuously and discreet water samples were obtained for analyses of nutrients and other constituents. SC is an electrical measurement of the total ion content in the water. The SC of the rain and ground-water is about 10 microS/cm and 800-1,200 microS/cm, respectively. The typical, base-flow SC of the stream is 700-800 microS/cm. Within minutes after a substantial rain event, the stream discharge increases and the SC decreases (often times below 200"nmicroS/cm). The rain water is processed through the catchment before it reaches the stream via direct overland flow, preferential flow to subsurface drains, vertical drains attached to subsurface drains in ponded areas, and/or soil infiltration to ground-water. Water moving through each of these pathways has different characteristic time scales and different degrees of interactions with the soil yielding different ionic content, thus different SC. Both the discharge and SC concurrently return to the typical base-flow values over the following days and weeks. This strong relation between rainfall, discharge and SC is used to calculate the relative importance and time scale of the various hydrologic pathways. In addition to the two-year stream record, complementary discharge and SC data were collected in two

  3. Influence of agricultural practices on fruit quality of bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zahra, T R

    2011-09-15

    An experiment was carried out under plastic house conditions to compare the effect of four fermented organic matter sources (cattle, poultry and sheep manure in addition to 1:1:1 mixture of the three organic matter sources) in which 4 kg organic matter m(-2) were used, with that of the conventional agriculture (chemical fertilizers) treatments on Marvello red pepper fruit quality, by using a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replicates. Pepper fruits characteristics cultivated in soil supplemented with manure were generally better than those from plants grown in soil only. Addition of animal manure increased bell pepper fruit content of soluble solids, ascorbic acid, total phenols, crude fibre and intensity of red color as compare with conventional agriculture that produced fruits with higher titratable acidity, water content, lycopene and bigger fruit size. In most cases of animal manure treatments, best results were obtained by the sheep manure treatment that produced the highest TSS, while the worst results were obtained by the poultry manure treatment that produced the smallest fruit and lowest fruit lycopene content.

  4. Smallholder farmers' behavioural intentions towards sustainable agricultural practices.

    PubMed

    Zeweld, Woldegebrial; Van Huylenbroeck, Guido; Tesfay, Girmay; Speelman, Stijn

    2017-02-01

    The introduction of sustainable practices is considered a win-win strategy for low-income countries because of its potential to simultaneously improve food security and address environmental issues. Despite the numerous studies that focus on the adoption of technological innovations, little work has been done on the socio-psychological behaviour of farmers with regard to sustainable practices. This study investigates smallholder farmers' intentions towards two practices: minimum tillage and row planting. The decomposed theory of planned behaviour is used as a theoretical framework to analyse the intentions. The findings reveal that attitudes and normative issues positively explain farmers' intentions to adopt both practices. Perceived control also has a positive significant effect on the intention to apply minimum tillage. When the intention is formed, farmers are expected to carry out their intention when opportunities arise. Moreover, perceived usefulness, social capital, and perceived ease of operation are also significant predictors of farmers' attitudes. Furthermore, social capital and training are factors that positively affect the normative issue, which in turn also positively mediates the relationship between training, social capital and intention. Finally, it is shown that neither the perceived resources nor information from the media significantly affect farmers' intentions. This paper thus confirms that social capital, personal efficacy, training and perceived usefulness play significant roles in the decision to adopt sustainable practices. In addition, willingness to adopt seems to be limited by negative attitudes and by weak normative issues. Therefore, to improve adoption of sustainable practices by smallholder farmers, attention should be given to socio-psychological issues. This could lead to improvements in farm productivity and enhance the livelihoods of smallholders.

  5. An Analysis of Selected Data Practices: A Case Study of the Purdue College of Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pouchard, Line; Bracke, Marianne Stowell

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of data practices given to the Purdue College of Agriculture. Data practices are a concern for many researchers with new governmental funding mandates that require data management plans, and for the institution providing resources to comply with these mandates. The survey attempted to answer these questions: What are…

  6. Agriculture Teachers' Perception and Practice for Teaching Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Justin Lee

    2011-01-01

    Federal legislation mandates that appropriate education be provided for all students in US public schools (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2004; No Child Left Behind, 2001). The use of evidence-based instructional practices for special education, such as Direct Instruction and Strategy Instruction, is one example of mandated…

  7. Environmental Effects of Agricultural Practices - Summary of Workshop Held on June 14-16, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    A meeting between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners was held June 14-16, 2005, in Denver, CO, to discuss science issues and needs related to agricultural practices. The goals of the meeting were to learn about the (1) effects of agricultural practices on the environment and (2) tools for identifying and quantifying those effects. Achieving these goals required defining the environmental concerns, developing scientific actions to address assessment of environmental effects, and creating collaborations to identify future research requirements and technical gaps. Five areas of concern were discussed-emerging compounds; water availability; genetically modified organisms; effects of conservation practices on ecosystems; and data, methods, and tools for assessing effects of agricultural practices.

  8. The eco-evolutionary impacts of domestication and agricultural practices on wild species.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Martin M; Araki, Hitoshi; Karp, Daniel S; Poveda, Katja; Whitehead, Susan R

    2017-01-19

    Agriculture is a dominant evolutionary force that drives the evolution of both domesticated and wild species. However, the various mechanisms of agriculture-induced evolution and their socio-ecological consequences are not often synthetically discussed. Here, we explore how agricultural practices and evolutionary changes in domesticated species cause evolution in wild species. We do so by examining three processes by which agriculture drives evolution. First, differences in the traits of domesticated species, compared with their wild ancestors, alter the selective environment and create opportunities for wild species to specialize. Second, selection caused by agricultural practices, including both those meant to maximize productivity and those meant to control pest species, can lead to pest adaptation. Third, agriculture can cause non-selective changes in patterns of gene flow in wild species. We review evidence for these processes and then discuss their ecological and sociological impacts. We finish by identifying important knowledge gaps and future directions related to the eco-evolutionary impacts of agriculture including their extent, how to prevent the detrimental evolution of wild species, and finally, how to use evolution to minimize the ecological impacts of agriculture.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences'.

  9. Using knowledge of agricultural practices to enhance through-the-season interpretation of Landsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Pestre, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    Landsat data contain features that can be interpreted to produce information about crops, in support of crop estimation procedures. This paper considers ways in which detailed knowledge of agricultural practices and events might increase and improve the utilization of Landsat data in both the predictive and observational or measurement components of such procedures. Landsat observables related to agricultural practices and events throughout the cropping season are listed. Agricultural fields are identified as the preferred observational units for incorporating refined agricultural understanding, such as crop rotation patterns, into machine procedures. Uses of Landsat data from both prior seasons and the current season are considered, as is use of predictive models of crop appearance. The investigation of knowledge engineering systems tailored to through-the-season estimation problems is recommended for long range development.

  10. Selection criteria for water disinfection techniques in agricultural practices.

    PubMed

    Haute, Sam van; Sampers, Imca; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This paper comprises a selection tool for water disinfection methods for fresh produce pre- and postharvest practices. A variety of water disinfection technologies is available on the market and no single technology is the best choice for all applications. It can be difficult for end users to choose the technology that is best fit for a specific application. Therefore, the different technologies were characterized in order to identify criteria that influence the suitability of a technology for pre- or postharvest applications. Introduced criteria were divided into three principal components: (i) criteria related to the technology and which relate to the disinfection efficiency, (ii) attention points for the management and proper operation, and (iii) necessities in order to sustain the operation with respect to the environment. The selection criteria may help the end user of the water disinfection technology to obtain a systematic insight into all relevant aspects to be considered for preliminary decision making on which technologies should be put to feasibility testing for water disinfection in pre- and postharvest practices of the fresh produce chain.

  11. Ergonomic risks and musculoskeletal disorders in production agriculture: recommendations for effective research to practice.

    PubMed

    Kirkhorn, Steven R; Earle-Richardson, Giulia; Banks, R J

    2010-07-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are increasingly recognized as a significant hazard of agricultural occupation. In agricultural jobs with significant physical labor, MSDs are typically the most frequently reported injury. Although not as lethal as tractor roll-overs, MSDs can result in disability, lost work time, and increased production costs. MSDs increase production costs as a result of worker absence, medical and insurance costs, decreased work capacity, and loss of employees to turnover and competition from other less physically demanding industries. This paper will provide an overview of what is currently known about MSDs in agriculture, including high-risk commodities, tasks and work practices, and the related regulatory factors and workers' compensation costs. As agricultural production practices evolve, the types of MSDs also change, as do ergonomic risk factors. One example is the previous higher rates of knee and hip arthritis identified in farmers in stanchion dairies evolving into upper extremity tendonitis, arthritis, and carpal tunnel syndrome now found in milking technicians in dairy milking parlors. This paper summarizes the presentation, "Musculoskeletal Disorders in Labor-Intensive Operations," at the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conference, "Be Safe, Be Profitable: Protecting Workers in Agriculture," January 27-28, 2010, Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The primary focus of the paper is to address current research on ergonomic solutions for MSDs in agriculture. These include improved tools, carts or equipment, as well as work practices. One of the key challenges in this area pertains to measurement, due to the fact that musculoskeletal strain is a chronic condition that can come and go, with self-reported pain as its only indicator. Alternative measurement methods will be discussed. Finally, the implementation of research into practice is reviewed, with an emphasis on best

  12. Using continuous monitoring of physical parameters to better estimate phosphorus fluxes in a small agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaudo, Camille; Dupas, Rémi; Moatar, Florentina; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus fluxes in streams are subjected to high temporal variations, questioning the relevance of the monitoring strategies (generally monthly sampling) chosen to assist EU Directives to capture phosphorus fluxes and their variations over time. The objective of this study was to estimate the annual and seasonal P flux uncertainties depending on several monitoring strategies, with varying sampling frequencies, but also taking into account simultaneous and continuous time-series of parameters such as turbidity, conductivity, groundwater level and precipitation. Total Phosphorus (TP), Soluble Reactive Phosphorus (SRP) and Total Suspended Solids (TSS) concentrations were surveyed at a fine temporal frequency between 2007 and 2015 at the outlet of a small agricultural catchment in Brittany (Naizin, 5 km2). Sampling occurred every 3 to 6 days between 2007 and 2012 and daily between 2013 and 2015. Additionally, 61 storms were intensively surveyed (1 sample every 30 minutes) since 2007. Besides, water discharge, turbidity, conductivity, groundwater level and precipitation were monitored on a sub-hourly basis. A strong temporal decoupling between SRP and particulate P (PP) was found (Dupas et al., 2015). The phosphorus-discharge relationships displayed two types of hysteretic patterns (clockwise and counterclockwise). For both cases, time-series of PP and SRP were estimated continuously for the whole period using an empirical model linking P concentrations with the hydrological and physic-chemical variables. The associated errors of the estimated P concentrations were also assessed. These « synthetic » PP and SRP time-series allowed us to discuss the most efficient monitoring strategies, first taking into account different sampling strategies based on Monte Carlo random simulations, and then adding the information from continuous data such as turbidity, conductivity and groundwater depth based on empirical modelling. Dupas et al., (2015, Distinct export dynamics for

  13. Practicing Conservation Agriculture to mitigate and adapt to Climate Change in Jordan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khresat, Saeb

    2016-04-01

    Climate change scenarios indicate that Jordan and the Middle East could suffer from reduced agricultural productivity and water availability among other negative impacts. Based on the projection models for the area, average temperature in Jordan is projected to increase between 1.2 and 1.6 °C by 2050. Projections for precipitation trends are projected to decrease by 16% by the year 2050. Evaporation is likely to increase due to higher temperatures. This is likely to increase the incidence of drought potential since precipitation is projected to decrease. The dominant form of agriculture system in Jordan is based on intensive tillage. This form of tillage has resulted in large losses of organic soil carbon, weaker soil structure, and cause compaction. It has negative effects on soil aeration, root development and water infiltration among other factors. There is a need to transform farming practices to conservation agriculture to sequester carbon so that climate change mitigation becomes an inherent property of future farming systems. Conservation Agriculture, a system avoiding or minimizing soil disturbance, combined with soil cover and crop diversification, is considered to be a sustainable production system that can also sequester carbon unlike tillage agriculture. Conservation agriculture promotes minimal disturbance of the soil by tillage (zero tillage), balanced application of chemical inputs and careful management of residues and wastes. This study was conducted to develop a clear understanding of the impacts and benefits of the two most common types of agriculture, traditional tillage agriculture and conservation agriculture with respect to their effects on land productivity and on soil carbon pools. The study results indicated that conservation agriculture contributed to the reduction of the farming systems' greenhouse gas emissions and enhance its role as carbon sinks. Also, it was found that by shifting to conservation agriculture labor cost needed for

  14. School Meal Programs: Sharing Information on Best Practices May Improve Programs' Operations. Report to the Secretary of Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    At the request of the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, this investigation identified state and local school food authorities' (SFA) management and operating practices recognized as best practice by the United State Department of Agriculture (USDA) or other officials. In addition, the study determined whether some of these practices could be…

  15. Implementation of Sentinel-2 Data in the M4Land System for the Generation of Continuous Information Products in Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, P.; Schlenz, F.; Hank, T.; Migdall, S.; Weiß, I.; Danner, M.; Bach, H.; Mauser, W.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis system developed in the frame of the M4Land project (Model based, Multi-temporal, Multi scale and Multi sensorial retrieval of continuous land management information) has proven its capabilities of classifying crop type and creating products on the intensity of agricultural production using optical remote sensing data from Landsat and RapidEye. In this study, Sentinel-2 data is used for the first time together with Landsat 7 ETM+ and 8 OLI data within the M4Land analysis system to derive continuously crop type and the agricultural intensity of fields in an area north of Munich, Germany and the year 2015.

  16. Continuing Education for Professionals: A Practice-Oriented Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toombs, William; Lindsay, Carl A.

    The Continuing Professional Education Project at The Pennsylvania State University is described. Five professions were involved: architecture, accounting, clinical psychology, clinical dietetics, and nursing. The objectives were: (1) to bring the university and the professions into collaboration, (2) to focus continuing education activities as…

  17. Modeling the impacts of climate change and agricultural management practices on surface erosion in a dryland agricultural basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottenbreit, E.; Adam, J. C.; Barber, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of climate change and agricultural management practices on suspended sediment concentrations in the Potlach River basin in northwestern Idaho. Suspended sediment is a pollutant in many water systems and contributes to the impairment of streams. Conventional tillage practices and rain-on-snow events in the Palouse region of northern Idaho and eastern Washington can produce some of the highest sediment losses per acre in the United States. Climate change may lead to further problems as more frequent and intense winter storm events are predicted to occur. Many hydrological models have been developed which examine suspended sediment in river systems. The Potlatch River basin near Julietta, ID was examined using the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM), which has a sediment module that includes surface erosion and channel sediment transport. DHSVM was calibrated and evaluated over the historical period of streamflow observations and was used to predict soil erosion rates and suspended sediment concentrations using a range of downscaled Global Climate Models (GCMs) emissions scenarios for the year 2045. Furthermore, the sensitivity of suspended sediment concentrations to conventional versus convservative tillage practices was explored. The results show that as the projected climate-driven intensity of storms increase, more sediment is predicted in the Potlatch River. Suspended sediment and streamflow are predicted to increase during the late fall through the early spring. This increase occurs during times of heightened runoff when suspended sediment concentration in the river is highest. Three tillage scenarios were incorporated into DHSVM for winter wheat: conventional till, reduced till, and no till. Erosion and suspended sediment were higher during storm events under conventional agricultural tillage scenarios. In the long-term, this research can lead to examination of the effects of climate

  18. Nursing organizations call for phase-out of agricultural practices that promote antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Clouse, Rebecca

    2006-02-01

    The use of antibiotics in agriculture is considered a contributing factor to the problem of antibiotic resistance. A majority of antibiotics and related drugs produced in the United States are not used to treat the infirm, but rather are used as feed additives for agricultural animals to promote growth and compensate for stressful and crowded growing conditions. Significant efforts must be made to decrease inappropriate overuse in animals and agriculture. Several leading health and political organizations have begun to address the issue. The American Nurses Association has established policies that call on Congress, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and meat producers to promptly phase out the agricultural practices that promote antibiotic resistance.

  19. The Impact of the "Getting Practical: Improving Practical Work in Science" Continuing Professional Development Programme on Teachers' Ideas and Practice in Science Practical Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Ian; Reiss, Michael J.; Sharpe, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the widespread use of practical work in school it has been recognised that more needs to be done to improve its effectiveness in developing conceptual understanding. The "Getting Practical" CPD (Continuing Professional Development) programme was designed to contribute towards an improvement in the effectiveness of…

  20. Integrating Federal and State data records to report progress in establishing agricultural conservation practices on Chesapeake Bay farms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hively, W. Dean; Devereux, Olivia H.; Claggett, Peter

    2013-01-01

    methods that were used by the USGS in 2012 to collect and process USDA agricultural conservation data, and also documents methods that were used by the jurisdictions to integrate Federal and State data records, reduce double counting, and provide an accurate reporting of conservation practices to the CBP Partnership’s Annual Progress Review. A similar tracking, reporting, and assessment will occur in future years, as State and Federal governments and nongovernmental organizations continue to work with farmers and conservation districts to reduce the impacts of agriculture on water-quality.

  1. EFFECT OF MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON THE SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY IN AGRICULTURAL AND NATIVE SYSTEMS IN BRAZIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increase in agricultural practices in the Cerrado (tropical savannah) and Amazon regions in Brazil is causing drastic changes in the nutrient and carbon cycling of native areas. Because microorganisms play a key role in biogeochemical cycling, monitoring the shifts in the microb...

  2. Occupational Safety and Health: A View of Current Practices in Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threeton, Mark D.; Ewing, John C.; Evanoski, Danielle C.

    2015-01-01

    Providing safe and secure teaching and learning environments within schools is an ongoing process which requires a significant amount of attention. Therefore, this study sought to: 1) explore safety and health practices within secondary Agricultural Mechanics Education; and 2) identify the perceived obstacles which appear to hinder implementation…

  3. Responses of corn physiology and yield to six agricultural practices over three years in middle Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chih-Li; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Wang, Junming; Reddy, K. Chandra; Dennis, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Different agricultural practices may have substantial impacts on crop physiology and yield. However, it is still not entirely clear how multiple agricultural practices such as tillage, biochar and different nutrient applications could influence corn physiology and yield. We conducted a three-year field experiment to study the responses of corn physiology, yield, and soil respiration to six different agricultural practices. The six treatments included conventional tillage (CT) or no tillage (NT), in combination with nitrogen type (URAN or chicken litter) and application method, biochar, or denitrification inhibitor. A randomized complete block design was applied with six replications. Leaf photosynthetic rate, transpiration, plant height, leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and yield were measured. Results showed that different agricultural practices had significant effects on plant leaf photosynthesis, transpiration, soil respiration, height, and yield, but not on LAI and biomass. The average corn yield in the NT-URAN was 10.03 ton/ha, 28.9% more than in the CT-URAN. Compared to the NT-URAN, the NT-biochar had lower soil respiration and similar yield. All variables measured showed remarkable variations among the three years. Our results indicated that no tillage treatment substantially increased corn yield, probably due to the preservation of soil moisture during drought periods. PMID:27272142

  4. Innovative best management practices for improving nutrient reductions in agricultural landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the burgeoning human population increases pressures on agriculture for increasing yields, the concomitant strain on the aquatic environment downstream is elevated through non-point source pollution. Traditional management practices of conservation tillage, terracing, and cover crops are good prac...

  5. Responses of corn physiology and yield to six agricultural practices over three years in middle Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chih-Li; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Wang, Junming; Reddy, K Chandra; Dennis, Sam

    2016-06-07

    Different agricultural practices may have substantial impacts on crop physiology and yield. However, it is still not entirely clear how multiple agricultural practices such as tillage, biochar and different nutrient applications could influence corn physiology and yield. We conducted a three-year field experiment to study the responses of corn physiology, yield, and soil respiration to six different agricultural practices. The six treatments included conventional tillage (CT) or no tillage (NT), in combination with nitrogen type (URAN or chicken litter) and application method, biochar, or denitrification inhibitor. A randomized complete block design was applied with six replications. Leaf photosynthetic rate, transpiration, plant height, leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and yield were measured. Results showed that different agricultural practices had significant effects on plant leaf photosynthesis, transpiration, soil respiration, height, and yield, but not on LAI and biomass. The average corn yield in the NT-URAN was 10.03 ton/ha, 28.9% more than in the CT-URAN. Compared to the NT-URAN, the NT-biochar had lower soil respiration and similar yield. All variables measured showed remarkable variations among the three years. Our results indicated that no tillage treatment substantially increased corn yield, probably due to the preservation of soil moisture during drought periods.

  6. Of birds, carbon and water: integrating multiple ecosystem service impacts to identify locations for agricultural conservation practice adoption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human use of the landscape for crop production can degrade ecosystem services. A number of agricultural conservation practices are touted as mitigating these impacts. Many of these practices are encouraged by incentive programs such as the Conservation Reserve Program administere...

  7. Relating management practices and nutrient export in agricultural watersheds of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sprague, Lori A.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Relations between riverine export (load) of total nitrogen (N) and total phosphorus (P) from 133 large agricultural watersheds in the United States and factors affecting nutrient transport were evaluated using empirical regression models. After controlling for anthropogenic inputs and other landscape factors affecting nutrient transport-such as runoff, precipitation, slope, number of reservoirs, irrigated area, and area with subsurface tile drains-the relations between export and the area in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) (N) and conservation tillage (P) were positive. Additional interaction terms indicated that the relations between export and the area in conservation tillage (N) and the CRP (P) progressed from being clearly positive when soil erodibility was low or moderate, to being close to zero when soil erodibility was higher, to possibly being slightly negative only at the 90th to 95th percentile of soil erodibility values. Possible explanations for the increase in nutrient export with increased area in management practices include greater transport of soluble nutrients from areas in conservation tillage; lagged response of stream quality to implementation of management practices because of nitrogen transport in groundwater, time for vegetative cover to mature, and/or prior accumulation of P in soils; or limitations in the management practice and stream monitoring data sets. If lags are occurring, current nutrient export from agricultural watersheds may still be reflecting the influence of agricultural land-use practices that were in place before the implementation of these management practices.

  8. Analysis of the Continuing Decline in Use of Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Roger

    1997-01-01

    When responses from 135 of 222 New York secondary agriculture teachers were compared with a 1983 study, a 10% decrease in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) was found. Barriers were low level of summer employment, limited release time, less funding for transportation, and scheduling problems. A comprehensive overhaul of the concept and…

  9. Effective Practices in Continuing Professional Development: Lessons from Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter; Porritt, Vivienne

    2009-01-01

    This book presents case studies of schools' journeys towards effective CPD practice as part of a TDA national project. It tells the story of the goals set and achieved, and the challenges and successes along the way. Each case study makes specific reference to the nine factors or approaches to CPD identified in the book as underpinning effective…

  10. Continuous Professional Development of English Language Teachers: Perception and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Asmari, AbdulRahman

    2016-01-01

    Professional development is considered as an essential element in enhancing the teaching and learning process to ensure student learning. Professional development can also be deemed as a cornerstone of teacher professionalism and quality. The governments and educational institutions invest significantly in Continuous Professional Development (CPD)…

  11. Integrating Aesthetics: Transforming Continuing Education through Africentric Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Auburn E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Manuscript written for the Adult Education Research Conference based on dissertation research completed at National Louis University. Purpose: To increase knowledge base of art based learning as a mode of anti-racist pedagogy and the use of an Africentric framework for continuing and professional education. Setting: African Centered…

  12. The Continuing Evolution of Effective IT Security Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voloudakis, John

    2006-01-01

    In the past three years, higher education institutions have made a number of moves to secure their critical systems and protect their users, resulting in a marked change in the techniques used to combat security threats. Today, continued progress may depend on the development of an enterprise IT security program. (Contains 10 notes.)

  13. Namibia specific climate smart agricultural land use practices: Challenges and opportunities for enhancing ecosystem services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Talamondjila Naanda, Martha; Bloemertz, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture is a backbone for many African economies, with an estimated 70% of Africans active in agricultural production. The sector often does not only directly contribute to, but sustains food security and poverty reduction efforts. Sustaining this productivity poses many challenges, particularly to small scale subsistence farmers (SSF) in dry land areas and semi-arid countries like Namibia. SSF in northern central Namibia mix crop and livestock production on degraded semi-arid lands and nutrient-poor sandy soils. They are fully dependent on agricultural production with limited alternative sources of income. Mostly, their agricultural harvests and outputs are low, not meeting their livelihood needs. At the same time, the land use is often not sustainable, leading to degradation. The Namibia case reveals that addressing underlying economic, social and environmental challenges requires a combination of farm level-soil management practices with a shift towards integrated landscape management. This forms the basis for SSF to adopt sustainable land management practices while building institutional foundations, like establishing SSF cooperatives. One way in which this has been tested is through the concept of incentive-based motivation, i.e. payment for ecosystem services (PES), in which some of the beneficiaries pay, for instance for farmers or land users, who provide the services. The farmers provide these services by substituting their unsustainable land and soil management and adopting new (climate smart agricultural) land use practices. Climate Smart Agricultural land use practices (CSA-LUP) are one way of providing ecosystem services, which could be fundamental to long-term sustainable soil and land management solutions in Africa. There are few PES cases which have been systematically studied from an institutional development structure perspective. This study presents lessons evolving from the notion that direct participation and involvement of local people

  14. Practices to reduce nitrate leaching and increase nitrogen use efficiency in irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quemada, Miguel; Baranski, Marcin; Nobel de Lange, Majimcha; Vallejo, Antonio; Cooper, Julia

    2013-04-01

    Despite the large body of research in irrigated agriculture, it is still not clear which practices most effectively reduce nitrate leaching (NL) while maintaining crop yield. A meta-analysis (MA) of published experimental results from agricultural irrigated systems was conducted to identify those agricultural practices that have proven effective at reducing NL and to quantify the scale of reduction that can be achieved. Forty-four scientific articles were identified which investigated four main strategies (water and fertilizer management, use of cover crops and fertilizer technology) creating a database with 279 observations on NL and 166 on crop yield. Management practices that adjust water application to crop needs reduced NL by a mean of 80% without a reduction in crop yield. Improved fertilizer management reduced NL by 40%, and the best relationship between yield and NL was obtained when applying the recommended N fertilizer rate. Applications above the recommended rate increased leaching without enhancing yield. Replacing a fallow with a non-legume cover crop (CC) reduced NL by 50% while using a legume CC did not have any effect on NL. Legume CC increased yield and N use efficiency while yields following non-legume CC were not different from the fallow. Improved fertilizer technology also decreased NL but was the least effective of the selected strategies. The risk of nitrate leaching from irrigated systems is high, but optimum management practices may mitigate this risk and maintain crop yields while enhancing environmental sustainability.

  15. The Role of Networks of Practice and Webs of Influencers on Farmers' Engagement with and Learning about Agricultural Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oreszczyn, Sue; Lane, Andy; Carr, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the UK research project, "Farmers' understandings of GM crops within local communities", this paper considers the application of the concepts of communities of practice and networks of practice in the agricultural context. A brief review of theories about communities of practice and networks of practice is given and some of…

  16. Online Continuing Education for Health Professionals: Does Sticky Design Promote Practice-Relevance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaghab, Roxanne Ward; Maldonado, Carlos; Whitehead, Dongsook; Bartlett, Felicia; de Bittner, Magaly Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Online continuing education (CE) holds promise as an effective method for rapid dissemination of emerging evidence-based practices in health care. Yet, the field of CE continues to develop and delivery is predominately face-to-face programs. Practice-oriented online educational methods and e-learning platforms are not fully utilized. Educational…

  17. A Comparative Study on the Practice of Continuous Assessment between Addis Ababa and Unity Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeleke, Aytaged Sisay

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the practice of continuous assessment at Unity University College and Addis Ababa University. It has also investigated constraints instructors say they have been facing in implementing continuous assessment. Students' attitudes about the practice of this assessment mode towards their course achievements were explored.…

  18. Emerging health risks associated with modern agriculture practices: a comprehensive study in India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Atanu; Aronson, Kristan J; Patil, Shantagouda; Hugar, Lingappa B; vanLoon, Gary W

    2012-05-01

    In order to enhance food production, India has adopted modern agriculture practices and achieved noteworthy success. This achievement was essentially the result of a paradigm shift in agriculture that included high inputs of agrochemicals, water, and widespread practice of monoculture, as well as bureaucratic changes that promoted these changes. There are very few comprehensive analyses of potential adverse health outcomes that may be related to these changes. The objective of this study is to identify health risks associated with modern agricultural practices in the southern Indian state of Karnataka. This study aims to compare high-input and low-input agricultural practices and the consequences for health of people in these communities. The fieldwork was conducted from May to August, 2009 and included a survey carried out in six villages. Data were collected by in-depth personal interviews among 240 households and key informants, field observations, laboratory analyses, and data from secondary sources. The study identified four major visible impacts: occupational hazards, vector borne diseases, changing nutritional status, and inequity in development. In the high-input area, mechanization has resulted in more occurrences of serious accidents and injuries. Ecological changes due to rice cultivation in this area have further augmented mosquito breeding, and there has been a surge in the incidence of Japanese encephalitis and malaria. The traditional coarse cereals (complex carbohydrates, high protein) have been replaced by mill-polished rice (simple carbohydrate, low protein). The prevalence of overweight (BMI>25) has emerged as a new public health challenge, and this is most evident in large-landholding households, especially in the high-input agriculture areas. In all agro-ecological areas, it was observed that women faced a greater risk of both extremes of under-nutrition and being overweight. Output-driven and market-oriented modern agricultural practices have

  19. [Should we continue to use benzodiazepines in clinical practice?].

    PubMed

    Sampogna, Gaia; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Luciano, Mario; De Rosa, Corrado; Albert, Umberto; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Fiorillo, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of benzodiazepines has represented a milestone in the history of pharmacological treatments and in relation to the management of anxiety, sleep and other psychiatric disorders. After several decades, these agents still represent one of the largest and most widely prescribed groups of medications, not only in the psychiatric clinical practice, but also in the whole medical field. Over the last decade, however, multiple concerns have been raised on the risks related to the prescription of benzodiazepines, for their addictive potential and for cognitive side-effects. Therefore, benzodiazepines are today considered as a double-edge sword, which should be carefully handled and preferentially prescribed by specialists (or at least under their supervision), after an adequate training. Unfortunately, this is not the case in many situations, and the need to improve training on benzodiazepines management has been recently emphasized.

  20. Predictors of relational continuity in primary care: patient, provider and practice factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuity is a fundamental tenet of primary care, and highly valued by patients; it may also improve patient outcomes and lower cost of health care. It is thus important to investigate factors that predict higher continuity. However, to date, little is known about the factors that contribute to continuity. The purpose of this study was to analyse practice, provider and patient predictors of continuity of care in a large sample of primary care practices in Ontario, Canada. Another goal was to assess whether there was a difference in the continuity of care provided by different models of primary care. Methods This study is part of the larger a cross-sectional study of 137 primary care practices, their providers and patients. Several performance measures were evaluated; this paper focuses on relational continuity. Four items from the Primary Care Assessment Tool were used to assess relational continuity from the patient’s perspective. Results Multilevel modeling revealed several patient factors that predicted continuity. Older patients and those with chronic disease reported higher continuity, while those who lived in rural areas, had higher education, poorer mental health status, no regular provider, and who were employed reported lower continuity. Providers with more years since graduation had higher patient-reported continuity. Several practice factors predicted lower continuity: number of MDs, nurses, opening on weekends, and having 24 hours a week or less on-call. Analyses that compared continuity across models showed that, in general, Health Service Organizations had better continuity than other models, even when adjusting for patient demographics. Conclusions Some patients with greater health needs experience greater continuity of care. However, the lower continuity reported by those with mental health issues and those who live in rural areas is concerning. Furthermore, our finding that smaller practices have higher continuity suggests that

  1. The impact of the `Getting Practical: Improving Practical Work in Science' continuing professional development programme on teachers' ideas and practice in science practical work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Ian; Reiss, Michael J.; Sharpe, Rachael

    2014-09-01

    Background:Despite the widespread use of practical work in school it has been recognised that more needs to be done to improve its effectiveness in developing conceptual understanding. The 'Getting Practical' CPD (Continuing Professional Development) programme was designed to contribute towards an improvement in the effectiveness of practical work through initiating changes in teachers' predominantly 'hands-on' approach to practical work to one which manifests a more equitable balance between 'hands-on' and 'minds-on'. Purpose:To evaluate the impact of the Getting Practical: Improving Practical Work in Science CPD programme on teachers' ideas and practice in science practical work in primary and secondary schools in England. Programme description:The CPD programme was designed to improve the effectiveness of science practical work in developing conceptual understanding in primary and secondary schools in England. Sample:Ten teachers of primary science and 20 secondary science teachers. Design and methods:The study employed a condensed fieldwork strategy with data collected using interviews, observational field notes and pre- and post-CPD training observations in practical lessons within 30 schools. Results:Whilst the CPD programme was effective in getting teachers to reflect on the ideas associated with the Getting Practical programme, it was much less effective in bringing about changes in actual teaching practice. Conclusion:The findings suggest that if change, rather than only an enhanced awareness of the issues, is to be brought about in established teaching <span class="hlt">practice</span> then there is a need for ongoing support over an extended period of time. Furthermore, the impact of such CPD is more likely to be effective if it is undertaken by a senior member of a department or school with the full support of the SMT.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18..580S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18..580S"><span>Testing the Runoff Tool in Sicilian vineyards: adopting best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to prevent <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> surface runoff</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Singh, Manpriet; Dyson, Jeremy; Capri, Ettore</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Over the last decades rainfall has become more intense in Sicily, making large proportions of steeply sloping <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land more vulnerable to soil erosion, mainly orchards and vineyards (Diodato and Bellocchi 2010). The prevention of soil degradation is indirectly addressed in the European Union's Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) and Sustainable Use Directive (2009/128/EC). As a consequence, new EU compliance conditions for food producers requires them to have tools and solutions for on-farm implementation of sustainable <span class="hlt">practices</span> (Singh et al. 2014). The <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Runoff and Best Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Tool has been developed by Syngenta to help farm advisers and managers diagnose the runoff potential from fields with visible signs of soil erosion. The tool consists of 4 steps including the assessment of three key landscape factors (slope, topsoil permeability and depth to restrictive horizon) and 9 mainly soil and crop management factors influencing the runoff potential. Based on the runoff potential score (ranging from 0 to 10), which is linked to a runoff potential class, the Runoff Tool uses in-field and edge-of-the-field Best Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> (BMPs) to mitigate runoff (aligned with advice from ECPA's TOPPS-prowadis project). The Runoff tool needs testing in different regions and crops to create a number of use scenarios with regional/crop specific advice on BMPs. For this purpose the Tool has been tested in vineyards of the Tasca d'Almerita and Planeta wineries, which are large family-owned estates with long-standing tradition in viticulture in Sicily. In addition to runoff potential scores, Visual Soil Assessment (VSA) scores have been calculated to allow for a comparison between different diagnostic tools. VSA allows for immediate diagnosis of soil quality (a higher score means a better soil quality) including many indicators of runoff (Shepherd 2008). Runoff potentials were moderate to high in all tested fields. Slopes were classified as</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartDDDD-app8.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartDDDD-app8.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Dddd of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With the Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Requirements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With the Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Requirements 8 Table 8 to Subpart DDDD of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC23D0669X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC23D0669X"><span>Climate sensitivity of DSSAT under different <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios in China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xia, L.; Robock, A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Crop yields are sensitive to both <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> and climate changes. Under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios, crop yield may have different climate sensitivities. Since it is important to understand how future climate changes affect <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> productivity and what the potential adaptation strategies would be to compensate for possible negative impacts on crop production, we performed experiments to study climate sensitivity under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios for rice, maize and wheat in the top four production provinces in China using the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) crop model. The <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios include four categories: different amounts of nitrogen fertilizer or no nitrogen stress; irrigation turned on or off, or no water stress; all possible seeds in the DSSAT cultivar data base; and different planting dates. For the climate sensitivity test, the control climate is from 1998 to 2007, and we individually modify four climate variables: daily maximum and minimum temperature by +2 °C and -2 °C, daily precipitation by +20% and -20%, and daily solar radiation by + 20% and -20%. With more nitrogen fertilizer applied, crops are more sensitive to temperature changes as well as precipitation changes because of their release from nitrogen limitation. With irrigation turned on, crop yield sensitivity to temperature decreases in most of the regions depending on the amount of the local precipitation, since more water is available and soil temperature varies less with higher soil moisture. Those results indicate that there could be possible <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> adaptation strategies under certain future climate scenarios. For example, increasing nitrogen fertilizer usage by a certain amount might compensate for the negative impact on crop yield from climate changes. However, since crops are more sensitive to climate changes when there is more nitrogen fertilizer applied, if the climate changes are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/249771','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/249771"><span>An assessment of alternative <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practice</span> impacts on soil carbon in the corn belt</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barnwell, T.O. Jr.; Jackson, R.B.; Mulkey, L.A.</p> <p>1993-12-31</p> <p>This impact of alternative management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil C is estimated by a soil C mass balance modeling study that incorporates policy considerations in the analysis. A literature review of soil C modeling and impacts of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> has been completed. The models selected for use and/or modification to meet the needs of representing soil C cycles in agroecosystems and impacts of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> are CENTURY and DNDC. These models share a common ability to examine the impacts of alternative management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil organic C, and are readily accessible. An important aspect of this effort is the development of the modeling framework and methodology that define the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production systems and scenarios (i.e., crop-soil-climate combinations) to be assessed in terms of national policy, the integration of the model needs with available databases, and the operational mechanics of evaluating C sequestration potential with the integrated model/database system. We are working closely with EPA`s Office of Policy and Program Evaluation to define a reasonable set of policy alternatives for this assessment focusing on policy that might be affected through a revised Farm Bill, such as incentives to selectively promote conservation tillage, crop rotations, and/or good stewardship of the conservation reserve. Policy alternatives are translated into basic data for use in soil C models through economic models. These data, including such elements as <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, fertilization rates, and production levels are used in the soil C models to produce net carbon changes on a per unit area basis. The unit-area emissions are combined with areal-extent data in a GIS to produce an estimate of total carbon and nitrogen changes and thus estimate greenhouse benefits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11..656B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11..656B"><span>Effects of different management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on fungal biodiversity in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borriello, R.; Lumini, E.; Bonfante, P.; Bianciotto, V.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Symbiotic associations between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots are widespread in natural environments and provide a range of benefits to the host plant. These include improved nutrition, enhanced resistance to soil-borne pests, diseases, and drought, as well as tolerance to heavy metals. In addition, the presence of a well developed AMF hyphal network improve the soil structure. As obligate mutualistic symbionts these fungi colonize the roots of many <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> crops and it is often claimed that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (use of fertilizers and biocides, tillage, dominance of monocultures and the growing of non-mycorrhizal crops) are detrimental to AMF. As a result, agro ecosystems impoverished in AMF may not get the fully expected range of benefits from these fungi. Using molecular markers on DNA extracted directly from soil and roots we studied the effects of different management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (tillage and nitrogen fertilization) on the AMF populations colonizing an experimental agro ecosystem in Central Italy. Fungi in roots and soil were identified by cloning and sequencing a region of ~550bp of the 18S rDNA and ~600bp of the 28S rDNA. In symbiosis with the maize roots we detected only members of Glomeraceae group A that showed decrement in number under nitrogen fertilization. Instead in soil were mainly present members of two AMF groups, respectively Gigasporaceae and Glomeraceae group A. In addition only the low input management <span class="hlt">practices</span> preserve also members of Diversisporaceae and Glomeraceae group B. From our study we can conclude that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> can directly or indirectly influence AMF biodiversity. The result of this study highlight the importance and significant effects of the long term nitrogen fertilization and tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span> on specific groups of fungi playing a key role in arable soils. The research was founded by Biodiversity Project (IPP-CNR) and by SOILSINK (FISR-MIUR)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6873G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6873G"><span>Influence of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on microbial nitrogen cyclers in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> land management has great influences on soil properties, in particular on microbial communities, due to their sensitivity to the perturbations of the soils. This is even more relevant in Mediterranean <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas under semi-arid conditions. The Mediterranean belt is suffering from an intense degradation of its soils due to the millennia of intense land use and due to unsustainable management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. As a consequence this area is suffering from a depletion of N content. In this work we investigated the effect of several traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on specific functional groups related to the nitrogen cycle in the soil. A field experiment was performed with orchard orange trees (citrus sinesis) in Eastern Spain to assess the long-term effects of ploughing with inorganic fertilization (PI) and ecological <span class="hlt">practices</span> (EP) (chipped pruned branches and weeds as well as manure from sheep and goats) on microbes that can undertake nitrogen fixation and denitrification. Nine samples of soil were taken from every treatment, near the drip irrigation point and in a zone without the influence of drip irrigation (between trees row), and total DNA extracted. DNA samples were stored at minus-20°C to be analysed by qPCR. Microbial populations involved in the N biochemical cycle were analysed by targeted amplification of key functional biomarker genes: the abundance of nifH (nitrogen fixation), nirS, nirK and nosZ (denitrification) detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR) has shown significant differences between treatments with higher abundance of all four genes in soils from ecological <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> treatments. This may indicate that the ecological treatment created conditions that are more suitable for N cyclers in the soil and a better fertility and quality status of these soils.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5905L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5905L"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> of three crops on the soil communities under Mediterranean conditions: field evaluation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Leitão, Sara; José Cerejeira, Maria; Abreu, Manuela; Sousa, José Paulo</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production relies on soil communities as the main actors in key soil processes necessary to maintain sustainable soil functioning. Soil biodiversity influences soil physical and chemical characteristics and thus the sustainability of crop and agro-ecosystems functioning. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (e.g.: soil tillage, pesticides and fertilizer applications, irrigation) may affects negatively or positively soil biodiversity and abundances by modifying the relationships between organisms in the soil ecosystem. The present study aimed to study the influence of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> of three crops (potato, onion and maize) under Mediterranean climate conditions on soil macro- and mesofauna during their entire crop cycles. Effects on soil communities were assessed at a higher tier of environmental risk assessment comprising field testing of indigenous edaphic communities in a selected study-site located in a major <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> region of Central Portugal, Ribatejo e Oeste, neighbouring protected wetlands. A reference site near the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> field site was selected as a Control site to compare the terrestrial communities' composition and variation along the crop cycle. The field soil and Control site soil are sandy loam soils. Crops irrigation was performed by center-pivot (automated sprinkler that rotates in a half a circle area) and by sprinklers. Soil macro- and mesofauna were collected at both sites (field and Control) using two methodologies through pitfall trapping and soil sampling. The community of soil macro- and mesofauna of the three crops field varied versus control site along the crops cycles. Main differences were due to arachnids, coleopterans, ants and adult Diptera presence and abundance. The feeding activity of soil fauna between control site and crop areas varied only for potato and onion crops vs. control site but not among crops. Concentration of pesticides residues in soil did not cause apparent negative effects on the soil</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2016/3088/fs20163088.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2016/3088/fs20163088.pdf"><span>The 3D elevation program - Precision <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and other farm <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Sugarbaker, Larry J.; Carswell, Jr., William J.</p> <p>2016-12-27</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> industry, including farmers who rely on advanced technologies, increasingly use light detection and ranging (lidar) data for crop management to enhance <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity. Annually, the combination of greater yields and reduced crop losses is estimated to increase revenue by \\$2 billion for America's farmers when terrain data derived from lidar are available for croplands. Additionally, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) estimates that the value of improved services for farmers, through its farm assistance program, would be \\$79 million annually if lidar-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) are made available to the public.The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) of the U.S. Geological Survey provides the programmatic infrastructure to generate and supply superior, lidar-derived terrain data to the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> industry, which would allow farms to refine <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and produce crops more efficiently. By providing data to users, 3DEP reduces users’ costs and risks, allowing them to concentrate on mission objectives. 3DEP includes (1) data acquisition partnerships that leverage funding, (2) contracts with experienced private mapping firms, (3) technical expertise, lidar data standards and specifications, and (4) most importantly, public access to high-quality 3D elevation data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28380566','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28380566"><span>Lake Nutrient Responses to Integrated Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in an <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Watershed.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lizotte, Richard E; Yasarer, Lindsey M W; Locke, Martin A; Bingner, Ronald L; Knight, Scott S</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Watershed-scale management efforts to reduce nutrient loads and improve the conservation of lakes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds require effective integration of a variety of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs). This paper documents watershed-scale assessments of the influence of multiple integrated BMPs on oxbow lake nutrient concentrations in a 625-ha watershed of intensive row-crop <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> activity during a 14-yr monitoring period (1996-2009). A suite of BMPs within fields and at field edges throughout the watershed and enrollment of 87 ha into the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) were implemented from 1995 to 2006. Total phosphorus (TP), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), ammonium, and nitrate were measured approximately biweekly from 1996 to 2009, and total nitrogen (TN) was measured from 2001 to 2009. Decreases in several lake nutrient concentrations occurred after BMP implementation. Reductions in TP lake concentrations were associated with vegetative buffers and rainfall. No consistent patterns of changes in TN or SRP lake concentrations were observed. Reductions in ammonium lake concentrations were associated with conservation tillage and CRP. Reductions in nitrate lake concentrations were associated with vegetative buffers. Watershed simulations conducted with the AnnAGNPS (Annualized <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Non-Point Source) model with and without BMPs also show a clear reduction in TN and TP loads to the lake after the implementation of BMPs. These results provide direct evidence of how watershed-wide BMPs assist in reducing nutrient loading in aquatic ecosystems and promote a more viable and sustainable lake ecosystem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPRS..101..110T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPRS..101..110T"><span>Assessment of MODIS spectral indices for determining rice paddy <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and hydroperiod</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tornos, Lucia; Huesca, Margarita; Dominguez, Jose Antonio; Moyano, Maria Carmen; Cicuendez, Victor; Recuero, Laura; Palacios-Orueta, Alicia</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Rice <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and hydroperiod dates must be determined to obtain information on water management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and their environmental effects. Spectral indices derived from an 8-day MODIS composite allows to identify rice phenometrics at varying degrees of success. The aims of this study were (1) to assess the dynamics of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI(1) and NDWI(2)) and Shortwave Angle Slope Index (SASI) in relation to rice <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and hydroperiod, and (2) to assess the capability for these indices to detect phenometrics in rice under different flooding regimes. Two rice farming areas in Spain that are governed under different water management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, the Ebro Delta and Orellana, were studied over a 12-year period (2001-2012). The index time series autocorrelation function was calculated to determine index dynamics in both areas. Secondly, average indices were calculated to identify significant points close to key <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and flooding dates, and index behaviors and capacities to identify phenometrics were assessed on a pixel level. The index autocorrelation function produced a regular pattern in both zones, being remarkably homogeneous in the Ebro Delta. It was concluded that a combination of NDVI, NDWI(1), NDWI(2) and SASI may improve the results obtained through each index. NDVI was more effective at detecting the heading date and flooding trends in the Ebro Delta. NDWI(1), NDWI(2) and SASI identified the harvest and the end of environmental flooding in the Delta, and the flooding in Orellana, more effectively. These results may set strong foundations for the development of new strategies in rice monitoring systems, providing useful information to policy makers and environmental studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B43B0460M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B43B0460M"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Explain Variation in Global Yield Gaps of Major Crops</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mueller, N. D.; Gerber, J. S.; Ray, D. K.; Ramankutty, N.; Foley, J. A.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">continued</span> expansion and intensification of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> are key drivers of global environmental change. Meeting a doubling of food demand in the next half-century will further induce environmental change, requiring either large cropland expansion into carbon- and biodiversity-rich tropical forests or increasing yields on existing croplands. Closing the “yield gaps” between the most and least productive farmers on current <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands is a necessary and major step towards preserving natural ecosystems and meeting future food demand. Here we use global climate, soils, and cropland datasets to quantify yield gaps for major crops using equal-area climate analogs. Consistent with previous studies, we find large yield gaps for many crops in Eastern Europe, tropical Africa, and parts of Mexico. To analyze the drivers of yield gaps, we collected sub-national <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management data and built a global dataset of fertilizer application rates for over 160 crops. We constructed empirical crop yield models for each climate analog using the global management information for 17 major crops. We find that our climate-specific models explain a substantial amount of the global variation in yields. These models could be widely applied to identify management changes needed to close yield gaps, analyze the environmental impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> intensification, and identify climate change adaptation techniques.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/wri/1994/4176/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/wri/1994/4176/report.pdf"><span>Spatial data in geographic information system format on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemical use, land use, cropping <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the United States</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Battaglin, W.A.; Goolsby, D.A.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>The spatial data in geographic information system format described in this report consist of estimates for all counties in the conterminous United States of the annual use of 96 herbicides in 1989; annual sales of nitrogen fertilizer, in tons, for 1985-91; and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> expenses, land use, chemical use, livestock holdings, and cropping <span class="hlt">practices</span> in 1987. The source information, originally in tabular form, is summarized as digital polygon attribute data in the 18 geographic information system spatial data layers (coverages) provided. The information in these coverages can be used in estimating regional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span>-chemical use or <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and in producing visual displays and mapping relative rates of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span>-chemical use or <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> across broad regions of the United States.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=280013&keyword=week&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78754596&CFTOKEN=42176518','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=280013&keyword=week&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78754596&CFTOKEN=42176518"><span>Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams (Final Report)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This final report is a technical "best <span class="hlt">practices</span>" document describing sensor deployment for and collection of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> temperature and flow data at ungaged sites in wadeable streams. This document addresses questions related to equipment needs; configuration, placement, and ins...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=261911&keyword=retrieval&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=85863380&CFTOKEN=56860391','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=261911&keyword=retrieval&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=85863380&CFTOKEN=56860391"><span>Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams (External Review Draft)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This external review draft report is a technical "best <span class="hlt">practices</span>" document describing sensor deployment for and data collection of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> temperature and flow at ungaged sites in wadeable streams. This document addresses questions related to equipment needs; configuration, pl...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf"><span>7 CFR 201.18 - Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Seeds § 201.18 Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.A21A0029D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.A21A0029D"><span>Ammonia Emissions from the <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Sector of Argentina in a Context of Changing Technologies and <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dawidowski, L. E.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> is a key sector of the Argentinean economy, accounting for 6 to 8 5% of the GDP in the last ten years. Argentina switched in the 90´s from an articulated co-evolution between extensive livestock and crop farming, with annual rotation of crops and livestock, to intensive decoupled <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Under these new production schemes, ecosystems were supplied with more nutrients, generating increasing levels of wastes. Other changes have also occurred, associated with the shift of the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> frontier and the consequent reduction in the cattle stock. In addition, changes related to climate through the strong increase in rainfall in the 80s and 90s in the west Pampas, helped to boost <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> development. The <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> sector accounts for <span class="hlt">practically</span> all NH3 emissions in Argentina, however no inventory has been thus far available. To bridge this gap and particularly to have accurate input information to run coupled atmospheric chemistry models for secondary inorganic aerosols, we estimated 2000-2012 NH3 emissions, both at national and spatially disaggregated levels. Of particular interest for us was also temporal disaggregation as crops growing and temperature exhibit strong seasonal variability. As no NH3 inventory was available we also estimated related N2O emissions to verify our estimates with those of national GHG emission inventory (NEI). National NH3 emissions in 2012 amounted to 309.9 Gg, use of fertilizers accounted for 43.6%, manure management 18,9%, manure in pasture 36,0% and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> waste burning 1.5%. Our N2O estimates are in good agreement with the GHG-NEI. NH3 estimates in the EDGAR database for 2008 are 84.0% higher than ours for this year, and exhibit more significant differences per category, namely 113,6% higher for use of fertilizers and about 500% higher for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> waste burning. Urea dominates national NH3 emissions, accounting for 32,8% of the total and its use for wheat and corn crops dominates the trend.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23817957','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23817957"><span>Glucosinolates profile and antioxidant capacity of Romanian Brassica vegetables obtained by organic and conventional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vicas, Simona I; Teusdea, Alin C; Carbunar, Mihai; Socaci, Sonia A; Socaciu, Carmen</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>The profile of glucosinolates in relation to the antioxidant capacity of five Brassica vegetables (Broccoli, Cauliflower, Kohlrabi, White and Red Cabbage) grown by organic and conventional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Transylvania region-Romania, were determined and compared. The qualitative and quantitative compositions of glucosinolates were determined by HPLC-PDA technique. The antioxidant capacity was comparatively determined by ABTS, DPPH, FRAP and Folin-Ciocalteu assays. The highest glucosinolates levels were found in the Broccoli samples grown under conventional <span class="hlt">practices</span> (14.24 μmol/g dry weight), glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin and neo-glucobrassicin being the major components. The total glucosinolates content was similar in Kohlrabi and Cauliflower (4.89 and 4.84 μmol/g dry weight, respectively), the indolyl glucosinolates were predominant in Kohlrabi, while the aliphatic derivatives (sinigrin and glucoiberin) were major in Cauliflower. In Cabbage samples, the aliphatic glucosinolates were predominat against indolyl derivatives, glucoraphanin and glucoiberin being the main ones in Red Cabbage. The principal component analysis was applied to discriminate among conventional and organic samples and demonstrated non-overlaps between these two <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Meanwhile it was shown that glucosinolates may represent appropriate molecular markers of Brassica vegetables, their antioxidant capacity being higher in organic crops, without significant differences among different Brassica varieties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4945640','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4945640"><span>Conservation <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Rainfed Uplands of India Improve Maize-Based System Productivity and Profitability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pradhan, Aliza; Idol, Travis; Roul, Pravat K.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Traditional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> in rainfed uplands of India has been experiencing low <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity as the lands suffer from poor soil fertility, susceptibility to water erosion and other external pressures of development and climate change. A shift toward more sustainable cropping systems such as conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> production systems (CAPSs) may help in maintaining soil quality as well as improving crop production and farmer’s net economic benefit. This research assessed the effects over 3 years (2011–2014) of reduced tillage, intercropping, and cover cropping <span class="hlt">practices</span> customized for maize-based production systems in upland areas of Odisha, India. The study focused on crop yield, system productivity and profitability through maize equivalent yield and dominance analysis. Results showed that maize grain yield did not differ significantly over time or among CAPS treatments while cowpea yield was considered as an additional yield in intercropping systems. Mustard and horsegram grown in plots after maize cowpea intercropping recorded higher grain yields of 25 and 37%, respectively, as compared to those without intercropping. Overall, the full CAPS implementation, i.e., minimum tillage, maize–cowpea intercropping and mustard residue retention had significantly higher system productivity and net benefits than traditional farmer <span class="hlt">practices</span>, i.e., conventional tillage, sole maize cropping, and no mustard residue retention. The dominance analysis demonstrated increasing benefits of combining conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> that exceeded thresholds for farmer adoption. Given the use of familiar crops and technologies and the magnitude of yield and income improvements, these types of CAPS should be acceptable and attractive for smallholder farmers in the area. This in turn should support a move toward sustainable intensification of crop production to meet future household income and nutritional needs. PMID:27471508</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27471508','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27471508"><span>Conservation <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Rainfed Uplands of India Improve Maize-Based System Productivity and Profitability.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pradhan, Aliza; Idol, Travis; Roul, Pravat K</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Traditional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> in rainfed uplands of India has been experiencing low <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity as the lands suffer from poor soil fertility, susceptibility to water erosion and other external pressures of development and climate change. A shift toward more sustainable cropping systems such as conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> production systems (CAPSs) may help in maintaining soil quality as well as improving crop production and farmer's net economic benefit. This research assessed the effects over 3 years (2011-2014) of reduced tillage, intercropping, and cover cropping <span class="hlt">practices</span> customized for maize-based production systems in upland areas of Odisha, India. The study focused on crop yield, system productivity and profitability through maize equivalent yield and dominance analysis. Results showed that maize grain yield did not differ significantly over time or among CAPS treatments while cowpea yield was considered as an additional yield in intercropping systems. Mustard and horsegram grown in plots after maize cowpea intercropping recorded higher grain yields of 25 and 37%, respectively, as compared to those without intercropping. Overall, the full CAPS implementation, i.e., minimum tillage, maize-cowpea intercropping and mustard residue retention had significantly higher system productivity and net benefits than traditional farmer <span class="hlt">practices</span>, i.e., conventional tillage, sole maize cropping, and no mustard residue retention. The dominance analysis demonstrated increasing benefits of combining conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> that exceeded thresholds for farmer adoption. Given the use of familiar crops and technologies and the magnitude of yield and income improvements, these types of CAPS should be acceptable and attractive for smallholder farmers in the area. This in turn should support a move toward sustainable intensification of crop production to meet future household income and nutritional needs.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1814094C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1814094C"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> that store organic carbon in soils: is it only a matter of inputs ?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chenu, Claire; Cardinael, Rémi; Autret, Bénédicte; Chevallier, Tiphaine; Girardin, Cyril; Mary, Bruno</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Increasing the world soils carbon stocks by a factor of 4 per mil annually would compensate the annual net increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. This statement is the core of an initiative launched by the French government at the recent COP21, followed by many countries and international bodies, which attracts political attention to the storage potential of C in soils. Compared to forest and pasture soils, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils have a higher C storage potential, because they are often characterized by low C contents, and increasing their C content is associated with benefits in terms of soil properties and ecosystem services. Here we quantified, under temperate conditions, the additional C storage related to the implementation of two set of <span class="hlt">practices</span> that are recognized to be in the framework of agroecology: conservation tillage on the one hand and agroforestry on the other hand. These studies were based on long-term experiments, a 16-years comparison on cropping systems on luvisols in the Paris area and a 18-year-old silvoarable agroforestry trial, on fluvisols in southern France, the main crops being cereals in both cases. C stocks were measured on an equivalent soil mass basis. Both systems allowed for a net storage of C in soils, which are, for the equivalent of the 0-30 cm tilled layer, of 0.55 ± 0.16 t ha- 1 yr- 1 for conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (i.e. no tillage with permanent soil coverage with an associated plant, fescue or alfalfa) and of 0.25 ± 0.03 t ha-1 yr-1 for the agroforestry system. These results are in line with estimates proposed in a recent French national assessment concerning the potential of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Compared to recent literature, they further show that <span class="hlt">practices</span> that increase C inputs to soil through additional biomass production would be more effective to store C in soil (tree rows, cover crops in conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>) than <span class="hlt">practices</span>, such as no-tillage, that are assumed to reduce</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/443443','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/443443"><span>Metal uptake by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> plant species grown in sludge-amended soil following ecosystem restoration <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Peles, J.D.; Barrett, G.W.; Brewer, S.R.</p> <p>1996-12-01</p> <p>The disposal of municipal sewage sludge is an important environmental problem presently facing society. Because sludge is rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, land application as a fertilizer has been proposed as a cost-effective means of disposal. This method of disposal, however, is frequently the subject of public health concern since municipal sludge may contain heavy metals that potentially could be introduced into the human food chain. This study examined metal concentrations in two <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> species at a study site where ecosystem restoration <span class="hlt">practices</span> (liming and tilling) had been conducted for 5 years following 11 years of sludge enrichment. 11 refs., 2 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1712696M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1712696M"><span>Using <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> information for multiscale environmental assessment of phosphorus risk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Matos Moreira, Mariana; Lemercier, Blandine; Michot, Didier; Dupas, Rémi; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for plant growth. In intensively farmed areas, excessive applications of animal manure and mineral P fertilizers to soils have raised both economic and ecological concerns. P accumulation in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils leads to increased P losses to surface waterbodies contributing to eutrophication. Increasing soil P content over time in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils is often correlated with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>; in Brittany (NW France), an intensive livestock farming region, soil P content is well correlated with animal density (Lemercier et al.,2008). Thus, a better understanding of the factors controlling P distribution is required to enable environmental assessment of P risk. The aim of this study was to understand spatial distribution of extractable (Olsen method) and total P contents and its controlling factors at the catchment scale in order to predict P contents at regional scale (Brittany). Data on soil morphology, soil tests (including P status, particles size, organic carbon…) for 198 punctual positions, crops succession since 20 years, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> systems, field and animal manure management were obtained on a well-characterized catchment (ORE Agrhys, 10 km²). A multivariate analysis with mixed quantitative variables and factors and a digital soil mapping approach were performed to identify variables playing a significant role in soil total and extractable P contents and distribution. Spatial analysis was performed by means of the Cubist model, a decision tree-based algorithm. Different scenarios were assessed, considering various panels of predictive variables: soil data, terrain attributes derived from digital elevation model, gamma-ray spectrometry (from airborne geophysical survey) and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> information. In the research catchment, mean extractable and total P content were 140.0 ± 63.4 mg/kg and 2862.7 ± 773.0 mg/kg, respectively. Organic and mineral P inputs, P balance, soil pH, and Al contents were</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=military+AND+families&pg=2&id=EJ1059436','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=military+AND+families&pg=2&id=EJ1059436"><span>An Intensive <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Initiative to Train Social Workers for Military Social Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Smith-Osborne, Alexa</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Specific standards exist for social work <span class="hlt">practice</span> with service members, military families, and veterans, whether in civilian or military <span class="hlt">practice</span> settings. Based on these standards, a <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education certificate for practitioners was designed with companion military social work coursework in the advanced graduate curriculum and field…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=natural+AND+resources&pg=4&id=EJ1041220','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=natural+AND+resources&pg=4&id=EJ1041220"><span><span class="hlt">Practice</span> Stories in Natural Resource Management <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Education: Springboards for Learning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stummann, Cathy Brown</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The use of stories from professional experience in <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional education has been on the rise in many fields, often aimed at bolstering capacity through sharing professional knowledge and/or supporting reflective <span class="hlt">practice</span>. <span class="hlt">Practice</span> stories are also suggested to be beneficial in supporting professional learning of new concepts. These…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC12C..05K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC12C..05K"><span>Identifying, monitoring and implementing "sustainable" <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> for smallholder farmers over large geographic areas in India and Vietnam</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kritee, K.; Ahuja, R.; Nair, D.; Esteves, T.; Rudek, J.; Thu Ha, T.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Industrial <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> systems, mostly in developed and some emerging economies, are far different from the small-holder farms (size <1 acre) in Asia and Africa. Along with our partners from non-governmental, corporate, academic and government sectors and tens of thousands of farming families, we have worked actively in five states in India and two provinces in Vietnam for the last five years to understand how sustainable and climate smart farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> can be monitored at small-holder farms. Here, any approach to monitor farming must begin by accounting for the tremendous management variability from farm to farm and also the current inability to ground-truth remote sensing data due to lack of relaible basic parameters (e.g., yields, N use, farm boundaries) which are necessary for calibrating empirical/biogeochemical models. While we <span class="hlt">continue</span> to learn from new research, we have found that it is crucial to follow some steps if sustainable farming programs are to succeed at small-holder farms Demographic data collection and GPS plot demarcation to establish farm size and ownership Baseline nutrient, water & energy use and crop yield determination via surveys and self-reporting which are verifiable through farmer networks given the importance of peer to peer learning in the dissemination of new techniques in such landscapes "Sustainable" <span class="hlt">practice</span> determination in consultation with local universities/NGO experts Measurements on representative plots for 3-4 years to help calibrate biogeochemical models and/or empirical equations and establish which <span class="hlt">practices</span> are truly "sustainable" (e.g., GHG emission reduction varies from 0-7 tCO2e/acre for different sustainable <span class="hlt">practices</span>). Propagation of sustainable <span class="hlt">practices</span> across the landscape via local NGOs/governments after analyzing the replicability of identified farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the light of local financial, cultural or socio-political barriers. We will present results from representative plots (including soil and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641148','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641148"><span>Combining Evidence-Based <span class="hlt">Practice</span>, Learner-Guided Education, and <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Andrew, Tahnee J; Theiss, Michelle</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Personal interest and investment in a topic can bring learning to life and affect real change in nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This article explains an innovative approach to combining learner-guided education and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education credit through a three-part approach to implementing evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This method can be used for nurses in any <span class="hlt">practice</span> setting to generate learner interest and participation, while improving patient care.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=framework+AND+education&pg=6&id=EJ1061427','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=framework+AND+education&pg=6&id=EJ1061427"><span>Dilemmas in <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Learning: Learning Inscribed in Frameworks or Elicited from <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reich, Ann; Rooney, Donna; Boud, David</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores a dilemma in <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional learning: the way learning is typically inscribed in <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional education (CPE) frameworks differs from that elicited from <span class="hlt">practice</span>. It examines these differences in relation to both different underlying assumptions about learning and varying epistemological perspectives as well…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1122538.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1122538.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Assessment in Primary Schools: The Case of Chagni, Ethiopia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Abejehu, Sintayehu Belay</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Continuous</span> assessment is part and parcel of instructional process that has to be taken as a key tool in educational quality assurance endeavor. Thus, this article examined the actual <span class="hlt">practice</span> of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> assessment in primary schools of Chagni City Administration, Ethiopia. To address this purpose the study employed descriptive survey design.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=welding&pg=4&id=ED518369','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=welding&pg=4&id=ED518369"><span>Community College Graduates' Perceptions of Adult Learning Instructional <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Employed in <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Programs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hinkson, Chandris Christina</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this mixed methods study was to examine <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education students' perceptions of adult education instructional <span class="hlt">practices</span> at an urban community college. The <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education students recently graduated from programs of law enforcement, truck driving, and health occupations. Perception analysis was based on the six principles…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Dentistry&pg=3&id=EJ879861','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Dentistry&pg=3&id=EJ879861"><span>Using Dentistry as a Case Study to Examine <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education and Its Impact on <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bullock, Alison; Firmstone, Vickie; Frame, John; Thomas, Hywel</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education is a defining characteristic of work in the professions. Yet the approach various professional groups take to <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD) differs widely in terms of regulatory frameworks and requirements, modes of delivery and funding. Importantly, little is understood about how CPD impacts on <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC14B..04D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC14B..04D"><span>Climate benefits of changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the context of heat wave mitigation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Davin, E.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Ciais, P.; Olioso, A.; Wang, T.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>About half of the terrestrial biosphere is under direct human influence through land management (i.e., <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas and managed forests). Changing management <span class="hlt">practices</span> is therefore a promising avenue for climate change mitigation. The mitigation potential arising from changes in land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> has been mainly evaluated in terms of carbon storage and GHG emissions [2]. On the other hand, these <span class="hlt">practices</span> can also influence climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface, but these effects have received less attention so far. Here we show that peak temperatures during heat heaves can be attenuated through cropland albedo management [2]. We first present observational evidence that a substantial summer albedo increase can be obtained by switching from conventional to no-till <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Then, using a regional climate model, we investigate the biogeophysical effect of a full conversion to no-till management over Europe. The cooling effect owing to albedo increase under no-till farming appears to be strongly amplified during warm events. This is due to the low cloud cover during these events, thus leading to a more efficient radiative cooling from albedo change. This implies a strong potential of no-till farming to mitigate heat wave impacts. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect remains the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till <span class="hlt">practice</span> is of the order of 2 degrees. These findings strongly suggest that the biogeophysical effect of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> should be considered in the design of climate mitigation policies involving land management. References:[1] Smith, P. et al. (2014): <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU). In Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT.......170G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT.......170G"><span>An investigation of the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of scientific inquiry in secondary science and <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> courses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Grady, Julie R.</p> <p></p> <p>The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study was to investigate the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of scientific inquiry in two secondary biology classes and one <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> class from different schools in different communities. The focus was on teachers' interests and intentions for the students' participation in inquiry, the voices contributing to the inquiry, and students' opportunities to confront their conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP) served as the context by providing students with opportunities to design and conduct original experiments to help elucidate the function(s) of a disabled gene in Arabidopsis thaliana . Transcripts of teacher and student semi-structured interviews, field notes of classroom observations and classroom conversations, and documents (e.g., student work, teacher handouts, school websites, PREP materials) were analyzed for evidence of the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of scientific inquiry. Teachers were interested in implementing inquiry because of potential student learning about scientific research and because PREP supports course content and is connected to a larger scientific project outside of the school. Teachers' intentions regarding the implementation of inquiry reflected the complexity of their courses and the students' previous experiences. All inquiries were student-directed. The biology students' participation more closely mirrored the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of scientists, while the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> students were more involved with the procedural display of scientific inquiry. All experiences could have been enhanced from additional knowledge-centered activities regarding scientific reasoning. No activities brought explicit attention to NOS. Biology activities tended to implicitly support NOS while the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> class activities tended to implicitly contradict NOS. Scientists' interactions contributed to implied support of the NOS. There were missed opportunities for explicit attention to NOS in all classes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.8639W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.8639W"><span>Impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on DOC leaching - results of a long-term lysimeter study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wagner, A.; Ollesch, G.; Seeger, J.; Meißner, R.; Rode, M.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes are recently increasing in surface waters of humid climate regions. Due to its substantial importance for leaching processes, aquatic foodwebs, and drinking water purification a better understanding of sources and pathways of DOC is needed. Therefore this study aims to analyse and simulate DOC fluxes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> ecosystems with selected crop rotations. A data set of 24 lysimeters of the UFZ Lysimeter station at Falkenberg (Saxony-Anhalt) covering nine years of DOC investigation has been selected and examined. The data set covers a wide range of climatic conditions with deviating management <span class="hlt">practices</span> for grasslands and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> crop rotations. The monthly DOC concentrations assessed in the leached water range from 2.4 to 34.1 mg /l. DOC concentrations depend on temperature, precipitation and discharge. The type of crop grown on the lysimeter is an important trigger for DOC leaching - especially lysimeters used as pasture, or planted with rape and carrots exhibit high DOC concentrations. Management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and fertilizer application modify the leaching of DOC and offer potentials to reduce DOC losses. The results form the basis of further process simulation studies and upscaling of the results to the small catchment scale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24682661','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24682661"><span>Irrigation water quality and the benefits of implementing good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> during tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) production.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Estrada-Acosta, M; Jiménez, M; Chaidez, C; León-Félix, J; Castro-Del Campo, N</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>The implementation of good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (GAP) from irrigation water to the tomato packaging process enhances the safety of fresh produce and its value throughout the food chain. The aim of the present study was to show that fresh produce farms that apply and enforce GAP could reduce the presence of Salmonella in finished produce. Samples were collected biweekly from six packing houses from the central region of Sinaloa, México, for the isolation of Salmonella spp by the ISO 6579:2002 method, and the isolated strains were serotyped and genotyped by the Kauffmman-White scheme and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), respectively. Salmonella strains were detected in 13 (36.1 %) irrigation water samples, while only two tomato samples were positive (5.5 %). Eight different serotypes were identified in irrigation water, and Salmonella Oranienburg (34 %) was the most prevalent; however, only Salmonella Agona and Salmonella Weltevreden were present on tomatoes. Salmonella Oranienburg was the most widely dispersed and variable serotype, with 10 different PFGE profiles. Salmonella Weltevreden was isolated from both types of samples, albeit with distinct genetic profiles, implying that the sources of contamination differ. These results confirm the utility of implementing good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce Salmonella contamination in irrigation water and the packaging process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/789070','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/789070"><span>New <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Isosorbide Production from Sorbitol: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Project Fact Sheet</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Carde, T.</p> <p>2001-09-12</p> <p>Isosorbide is a new polymer additive derived from corn (via sorbitol) that when copolymerized with polyethylene terephthalate (PET), increases the strength and rigidity of the plastic. This project will develop an economically-viable, <span class="hlt">continuous</span> catalytic process to convert sorbitol to isosorbide.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26073110','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26073110"><span>The effect of changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the density of Dermacentor reticulatus ticks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mierzejewska, Ewa J; Alsarraf, Mohammed; Behnke, Jerzy M; Bajer, Anna</p> <p>2015-07-30</p> <p>The impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>/ activities on the environment has been falling in many areas of Europe due to the widespread exodus of inhabitants from rural areas. The associated abandonment of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands has enabled a wide range of wild animals to prosper in the countryside, including birds, ungulates and large carnivores. One consequence has been the increase in ticks and associated tick-borne diseases which now constitute a greater threat for public health than earlier. The aim of the present study was to compare tick densities in different habitats (pasture, meadow, fallow land, post-fire areas) to assess the impact of different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on tick densities in vicinities close to human habitation. Between September 2011 and June 2014, 2985 Dermacentor reticulatus ticks were collected by conventional dragging, in the Mazowieckie (Mazovia) and Warmińsko-Mazurskie (Masuria) regions of Poland. In each region, 3 study sites were selected, each situated near surface water sources (i.e., ponds or canals). At each site, three neighboring habitats of surface area 150-600 m(2) were dragged: one on a cattle/horse pasture; the second on meadow; the third on fallow land (abandoned field or meadow), at least twice during each spring and autumn. Additionally, four post-fire areas (one in 2013 and three in 2014) were identified in the Mazowieckie region, and dragging was conducted there in spring and autumn, including in each case a 'control area' comprising intact unburned fallow land situated in close vicinity to the burned areas. Eight hundred D. reticulatus ticks were collected and the densities were compared by multifactorial ANOVA. The highest tick densities were recorded on the fallow lands, and the lowest - on the grazed pastures. Tick densities were up to 10 × times higher on the control sites compared to neighboring post-fire sites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.6578T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.6578T"><span>Key to GHG fluxes from organic soils: site characteristics, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> or water table management?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tiemeyer, Bärbel</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Drained peatlands are hotspots of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> is the major land use type for peatlands in Germany and other European countries, but strongly varies in its intensity regarding the groundwater level and the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management. Although the mean annual water table depth is sometimes proposed as an overall predictor for GHG emissions, there is a strong variability of its effects on different peatlands. Furthermore, re-wetting measures generally decrease carbon dioxide emissions, but may strongly increase methane emissions. We synthesized 250 annual GHG budgets for 120 different sites in 13 German peatlands. Carbon dioxide (net ecosystem exchange and ecosystem respiration), nitrous oxide and methane fluxes were measured with transparent and opaque manual chambers. Land management ranged from very intensive use with arable land or grassland with up to five cuts per year to partially or completely re-wetted peatlands. Besides the GHG fluxes, biomass yield, fertilisation, groundwater level, climatic data, vegetation composition and soil properties were measured. Overall, we found a large variability of the total GHG budget ranging from small uptakes to extremely high emissions (> 70 t CO2-equivalents/(ha yr)). At nearly all sites, carbon dioxide was the major component of the GHG budget. Site conditions, especially the nitrogen content of the unsaturated zone and the intra-annual water level distribution, controlled the GHG emissions of the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sites. Although these factors are influenced by natural conditions (peat type, regional hydrology), they could be modified by an improved water management. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> management such as the number of cuts had only a minor influence on the GHG budgets. At the level of individual peatlands, higher water levels always decreased carbon dioxide emissions. In nearly all cases, the trade-off between reduced carbon dioxide and increased methane emissions turned out in favour of the re</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Wheat&pg=5&id=ED045923','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Wheat&pg=5&id=ED045923"><span>Farmer's Incentives for Adoption of Recommended Farm <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Wheat Crop in Aligarh Intensive <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> District, India.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Vidyarthy, Gopal Saran</p> <p></p> <p>This study was undertaken to identify farmer incentives that led them to adopt wheat crop <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Aligarh Intensive <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> District Program: the association between the farmer's characteristics and adoption groups; the incentives that lead the farmers to adopt recommended wheat crop <span class="hlt">practices</span>; relationship between identified incentives…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4742M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4742M"><span>A complete and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> pesticide screening during one growing season in five small Swiss rivers with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mangold, Simon; Comte, Rahel; Doppler, Tobias; Wittmer, Irene; Moschet, Christoph; Stamm, Christian; Singer, Heinz; Kunz, Manuel</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> pesticides are regularly found in surface waters at concentration levels that raise ecotoxicological concerns. Due to large fluctuations in concentration over time and the potentially high number of pesticides in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds, it is difficult to obtain a comprehensive overview of the actual pollution level. This collaborative project between research and Swiss federal and cantonal authorities aimed for a comprehensive analysis of pesticide pollution in five small <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> streams to address this knowledge gap. The five rivers are located in catchments (1.5 to 9 km2) with intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> covering a wide range of crops, such as grains, vegetables, vineyards and orchards. Urban activities and influences are low. Twelve-hour composite samples were collected <span class="hlt">continuously</span> from March until the end of August with automatic sampling devices, resulting in 360 samples per site. Using precipitation and water level data, we differentiated between discharge events and low-flow periods. Samples taken during dry weather were pooled for the analysis. This procedure resulted in a complete concentration profile over the entire monitoring period covered by 60 samples per site. The analysis, using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (Orbitrap technology), involved a target screening of 248 pesticides including fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, as well as important transformation products. Data on the total number and distribution of pesticides, their detection frequency, crop specific applications and concentration time profiles will be presented. Preliminary results indicate substantial pesticide exposure since at least 20 different compounds were detected in all samples. One sample even contained a mixture of 80 pesticides. The majority of concentrations were in the low ng/L range but concentrations of a few compounds were very high (several micrograms/L) during discharge events as well as during low flow conditions</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EnMan..55..725M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EnMan..55..725M"><span>Identification and Prioritization of Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> to Reduce Methylmercury Exports from Wetlands and Irrigated <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Lands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McCord, Stephen A.; Heim, Wesley A.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's (Delta) beneficial uses for humans and wildlife are impaired by elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish. MeHg is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs. The total maximum daily load (TMDL) implementation plan aimed at reducing MeHg in Delta fish obligates dischargers to conduct MeHg control studies. Over 150 stakeholders collaborated to identify 24 management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (MPs) addressing MeHg nonpoint sources (NPS) in three categories: biogeochemistry (6), hydrology (14), and soil/vegetation (4). Land uses were divided into six categories: permanently and seasonally flooded wetlands, flooded and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands, floodplains, and brackish-fresh tidal marshes. Stakeholders scored MPs based on seven criteria: scientific certainty, costs, MeHg reduction potential, spatial applicability, technical capacity to implement, negative impacts to beneficial uses, and conflicting requirements. Semi-quantitative scoring for MPs applicable to each land use (totaling >400 individual scores) led to consensus-based prioritization. This process relied on <span class="hlt">practical</span> experience from diverse and accomplished NPS stakeholders and synthesis of 17 previous studies. Results provide a comprehensive, stakeholder-driven prioritization of MPs for wetland and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land managers. Final prioritization highlights the most promising MPs for <span class="hlt">practical</span> application and control study, and a secondary set of MPs warranting further evaluation. MPs that address hydrology and soil/vegetation were prioritized because experiences were positive and implementation appeared more feasible. MeHg control studies will need to address the TMDL conundrum that MPs effective at reducing MeHg exports could both exacerbate MeHg exposure and contend with other management objectives on site.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28242113','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28242113"><span>Evaluating the impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water resources: A probabilistic hydrologic modeling approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Prada, A F; Chu, M L; Guzman, J A; Moriasi, D N</p> <p>2017-02-24</p> <p>Evaluating the effectiveness of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in minimizing environmental impacts using models is challenged by the presence of inherent uncertainties during the model development stage. One issue faced during the model development stage is the uncertainty involved in model parameterization. Using a single optimized set of parameters (one snapshot) to represent baseline conditions of the system limits the applicability and robustness of the model to properly represent future or alternative scenarios. The objective of this study was to develop a framework that facilitates model parameter selection while evaluating uncertainty to assess the impacts of land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> at the watershed scale. The model framework was applied to the Lake Creek watershed located in southwestern Oklahoma, USA. A two-step probabilistic approach was implemented to parameterize the <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Policy/Environmental eXtender (APEX) model using global uncertainty and sensitivity analysis to estimate the full spectrum of total monthly water yield (WYLD) and total monthly Nitrogen loads (N) in the watershed under different land management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Twenty-seven models were found to represent the baseline scenario in which uncertainty of up to 29% and 400% in WYLD and N, respectively, is plausible. Changing the land cover to pasture manifested the highest decrease in N to up to 30% for a full pasture coverage while changing to full winter wheat cover can increase the N up to 11%. The methodology developed in this study was able to quantify the full spectrum of system responses, the uncertainty associated with them, and the most important parameters that drive their variability. Results from this study can be used to develop strategic decisions on the risks and tradeoffs associated with different management alternatives that aim to increase productivity while also minimizing their environmental impacts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25566831','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25566831"><span>Identification and prioritization of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce methylmercury exports from wetlands and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McCord, Stephen A; Heim, Wesley A</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's (Delta) beneficial uses for humans and wildlife are impaired by elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish. MeHg is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs. The total maximum daily load (TMDL) implementation plan aimed at reducing MeHg in Delta fish obligates dischargers to conduct MeHg control studies. Over 150 stakeholders collaborated to identify 24 management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (MPs) addressing MeHg nonpoint sources (NPS) in three categories: biogeochemistry (6), hydrology (14), and soil/vegetation (4). Land uses were divided into six categories: permanently and seasonally flooded wetlands, flooded and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands, floodplains, and brackish-fresh tidal marshes. Stakeholders scored MPs based on seven criteria: scientific certainty, costs, MeHg reduction potential, spatial applicability, technical capacity to implement, negative impacts to beneficial uses, and conflicting requirements. Semi-quantitative scoring for MPs applicable to each land use (totaling >400 individual scores) led to consensus-based prioritization. This process relied on <span class="hlt">practical</span> experience from diverse and accomplished NPS stakeholders and synthesis of 17 previous studies. Results provide a comprehensive, stakeholder-driven prioritization of MPs for wetland and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land managers. Final prioritization highlights the most promising MPs for <span class="hlt">practical</span> application and control study, and a secondary set of MPs warranting further evaluation. MPs that address hydrology and soil/vegetation were prioritized because experiences were positive and implementation appeared more feasible. MeHg control studies will need to address the TMDL conundrum that MPs effective at reducing MeHg exports could both exacerbate MeHg exposure and contend with other management objectives on site.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26196068','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26196068"><span>Assessing the impacts of sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> for water quality improvements in the Vouga catchment (Portugal) using the SWAT model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rocha, João; Roebeling, Peter; Rial-Rivas, María Ermitas</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The extensive use of fertilizers has become one of the most challenging environmental issues in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> catchment areas. In order to reduce the negative impacts from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> activities and to accomplish the objectives of the European Water Framework Directive we must consider the implementation of sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In this study, we assess sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> based on reductions in N-fertilizer application rates (from 100% to 0%) and N-application methods (single, split and slow-release) across key <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use classes in the Vouga catchment, Portugal. The SWAT model was used to relate sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> yields and N-NO3 water pollution deliveries. Results show that crop yields as well as N-NO3 exportation rates decrease with reductions in N-application rates and single N-application methods lead to lower crop yields and higher N-NO3 exportation rates as compared to split and slow-release N-application methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70019018','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70019018"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and vadose zone stratigraphy on nitrate concentration in ground water in Kansas, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Townsend, M.A.; Sleezer, R.O.; Macko, S.A.; ,</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Differences in nitrate-N concentrations in,around water in Kansas can be explained by variations in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and vadose-zone stratigraphy. In northwestern Kansas, past use of a local stream for tailwater runoff from irrigation and high fertilizer applications for sugar-beet farming resulted in high nitrate-N concentrations (12-60 mg L-1; in both soil and ground water. Nitrogen isotope values from the soil and ground water range from +4 to +8? which is typical for a fertilizer source. In parts of south-central Kansas, the use of crop rotation and the presence of both <span class="hlt">continuous</span> fine-textured layers and a reducing ground-water chemistry resulted in ground-water nitrate-N values of 10 mg L-1; in both soil and grounwater. Nitrogen isotope values of +3 to +7? indicate a fertilizer source. Crop rotation decreased nitrate-N values in the shallow ground water (9 m). However, deeper ground water showed increasing nitrate-N concentrations as a result of past farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMPA34A..09C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMPA34A..09C"><span>The Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) Initiative: Developing methods and best <span class="hlt">practices</span> for global <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Champagne, C.; Jarvis, I.; Defourny, P.; Davidson, A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> systems differ significantly throughout the world, making a 'one size fits all' approach to remote sensing and monitoring of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscapes problematic. The Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) was established in 2009 to bring together the global scientific community to work towards a set of best <span class="hlt">practices</span> and recommendations for using earth observation data to map, monitor and report on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity globally across an array of diverse <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> systems. These methods form the research and development component of the Group on Earth Observation Global <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Monitoring (GEOGLAM) initiative to harmonize global monitoring efforts and increase market transparency. The JECAM initiative brings together researchers from a large number of globally distributed, well monitored <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> test sites that cover a range of crop types, cropping systems and climate regimes. Each test site works independently as well as together across multiple sites to test methods, sensors and field data collection techniques to derive key <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> parameters, including crop type, crop condition, crop yield and soil moisture. The outcome of this project will be a set of best <span class="hlt">practices</span> that cover the range of remote sensing monitoring and reporting needs, including satellite data acquisition, pre-processing techniques, information retrieval and ground data validation. These outcomes provide the research and development foundation for GEOGLAM and will help to inform the development of the GEOGLAM "system of systems" for global <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> monitoring. The outcomes of the 2014 JECAM science meeting will be discussed as well as examples of methods being developed by JECAM scientists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2007/3001/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2007/3001/"><span>Investigating the Environmental Effects of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Natural Resources: Scientific Contributions of the U.S. Geological Survey to Enhance the Management of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Landscapes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>,</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) enhances and protects the quality of life in the United States by advancing scientific knowledge to facilitate effective management of hydrologic, biologic, and geologic resources. Results of selected USGS research and monitoring projects in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscapes are presented in this Fact Sheet. Significant environmental and social issues associated with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production include changes in the hydrologic cycle; introduction of toxic chemicals, nutrients, and pathogens; reduction and alteration of wildlife habitats; and invasive species. Understanding environmental consequences of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production is critical to minimize unintended environmental consequences. The preservation and enhancement of our natural resources can be achieved by measuring the success of improved management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and by adjusting conservation policies as needed to ensure long-term protection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12941975','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12941975"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to sustain crop yields and improve soil and environmental qualities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sainju, Upendra M; Whitehead, Wayne F; Singh, Bharat P</p> <p>2003-08-20</p> <p>In the past several decades, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> consisting of intensive tillage and high rate of fertilization to improve crop yields have resulted in the degradation of soil and environmental qualities by increasing erosion and nutrient leaching in the groundwater and releasing greenhouses gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O), that cause global warming in the atmosphere by oxidation of soil organic matter. Consequently, management <span class="hlt">practices</span> that sustain crop yields and improve soil and environmental qualities are needed. This paper reviews the findings of the effects of tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>, cover crops, and nitrogen (N) fertilization rates on crop yields, soil organic carbon (C) and N concentrations, and nitrate (NO3)-N leaching from the soil. Studies indicate that conservation tillage, such as no-till or reduced till, can increase soil organic C and N concentrations at 0- to 20-cm depth by as much as 7-17% in 8 years compared with conventional tillage without significantly altering crop yields. Similarly, cover cropping and 80-180 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) fertilization can increase soil organic C and N concentrations by as much as 4-12% compared with no cover cropping or N fertilization by increasing plant biomass and amount of C and N inputs to the soil. Reduced till, cover cropping, and decreased rate of N fertilization can reduce soil N leaching compared with conventional till, no cover cropping, and full rate of N fertilization. Management <span class="hlt">practices</span> consisting of combinations of conservation tillage, mixture of legume and nonlegume cover crops, and reduced rate of N fertilization have the potentials for sustaining crop yields, increasing soil C and N storage, and reducing soil N leaching, thereby helping to improve soil and water qualities. Economical and social analyses of such <span class="hlt">practices</span> are needed to find whether they are cost effective and acceptable to the farmers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H31I1232P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H31I1232P"><span>Effect of land tenure and stakeholders attitudes on optimization of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Piemonti, A. D.; Babbar-Sebens, M.; Luzar, E. J.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Modeled watershed management plans have become valuable tools for evaluating the effectiveness and impacts of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on hydrologic processes in watersheds. In multi-objective optimization approaches, several studies have focused on maximizing physical, ecological, or economic benefits of <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a specific location, without considering the relationship between social systems and social attitudes on the overall optimality of the <span class="hlt">practice</span> at that location. For example, objectives that have been commonly used in spatial optimization of <span class="hlt">practices</span> are economic costs, sediment loads, nutrient loads and pesticide loads. Though the benefits derived from these objectives are generally oriented towards community preferences, they do not represent attitudes of landowners who might operate their land differently than their neighbors (e.g. farm their own land or rent the land to someone else) and might have different social/personal drivers that motivate them to adopt the <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In addition, a distribution of such landowners could exist in the watershed, leading to spatially varying preferences to <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In this study we evaluated the effect of three different land tenure types on the spatial-optimization of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>. To perform the optimization, we used a uniform distribution of land tenure type and a spatially varying distribution of land tenure type. Our results show that for a typical Midwestern <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed, the most optimal solutions (i.e. highest benefits for minimum economic costs) found were for a uniform distribution of landowners who operate their own land. When a different land-tenure was used for the watershed, the optimized alternatives did not change significantly for nitrates reduction benefits and sediment reduction benefits, but were attained at economic costs much higher than the costs of the landowner who farms her/his own land. For example, landowners who rent to cash-renters would have to spend ~120</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70178064','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70178064"><span>Nitrate removal from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> drainage ditch sediments with amendments of organic carbon: Potential for an innovative best management <span class="hlt">practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Faust, Derek R.; Kröger, Robert; Miranda, Leandro E.; Rush, Scott A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> fertilizer applications have resulted in loading of nutrients to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> drainage ditches in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley. The purpose of this study was to determine effects of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) amendments on nitrate-nitrogen (NO3−-N) removal from overlying water, pore water, and sediment of an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> drainage ditch. Two experiments were conducted. In experiment 1, control (i.e., no amendment), DOC, and POC treatments were applied in laboratory microcosms for time intervals of 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. In experiment 2, control, DOC, and POC treatments were applied in microcosms at C/N ratios of 5:1, 10:1, 15:1, and 20:1. There were statistically significant effects of organic carbon amendments in experiment 1 (F2,71 = 27.1, P < 0.001) and experiment 2 (F2,53 = 39.1, P < 0.001), time (F1,71 = 14.5, P < 0.001) in experiment 1, and C/N ratio (F1,53 = 36.5, P < 0.001) in experiment 2. NO3−-N removal varied from 60 to 100 % in overlying water among all treatments. The lowest NO3−-N removals in experiment 1 were observed in the control at 14 and 28 days, which were significantly less than in DOC and POC 14- and 28-day treatments. In experiment 2, significantly less NO3−-N was removed in overlying water of the control compared to DOC and POC treatments at all C/N ratios. Amendments of DOC and POC made to drainage ditch sediment: (1) increased NO3−-N removal, especially over longer time intervals (14 to 28 days); (2) increased NO3−-N removal, regardless of C/N ratio; and (3) NO3−-N removal was best at a 5:1 C/N ratio. This study provides support for <span class="hlt">continued</span> investigation on the use of organic carbon amendments as a best management <span class="hlt">practice</span> for NO3−-N removal in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> drainage ditches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28215811','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28215811"><span>Intra-annual variation of the association between <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and stream nutrient concentrations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pearce, Nolan J T; Yates, Adam G</p> <p>2017-05-15</p> <p>Temporal variation may influence the ability of best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) to mitigate the loss of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> pollutants to streams. Our goal was to assess variation in mitigation effects of BMPs by examining the associations between instream nutrient concentrations and the abundance and location of four structural BMPs over a hydrologic year. Water samples were collected monthly (Nov. 2013-Oct. 2014) in 15 headwater streams representing a gradient of BMP use in Southern Ontario, Canada. Partial least squares (PLS) regression models were used to associate two groups of collinear nutrient forms with the abundance and location of BMPs, antecedent precipitation and time of year. BMP metrics in PLS models were associated with instream concentrations of major phosphorus forms and ammonium throughout the year. In contrast, total nitrogen and nitrate-nitrite were only associated with BMPs during snowmelt. BMP metrics associated with reductions of phosphorus and ammonium included greater abundances of riparian buffers and manure storage structures, but not livestock restriction fences. Likewise, the abundance and location riparian vegetation in areas capturing more surface runoff were associated with decreased stream nitrogen concentrations during snowmelt. However, the amount of tile drainage was associated with increased nitrogen concentrations following snowmelt, as well as with greater phosphorus and ammonium concentrations throughout the year. Overall, our findings indicate that increasing the abundance of riparian buffers and manure storage structures may decrease instream nutrient concentrations in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas. Additionally, the implementation of these structural BMPs appear to be an effective year-round strategy to assist management objectives in reducing phosphorus concentrations in small <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> streams and thus loadings to downstream tributaries. Further mitigation measures, such as managerial BMPs and controlled tile drainage, may be</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10166139','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10166139"><span>An assessment of <span class="hlt">practice</span> support and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> medical education needs of rural Pennsylvania family physicians.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Forti, E M; Martin, K E; Jones, R L; Herman, J M</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Family physicians provide the greatest proportion of care in rural communities. Yet, the number of physicians choosing family <span class="hlt">practice</span> and rural <span class="hlt">practice</span> has <span class="hlt">continued</span> to decline. Undesirable aspects of rural <span class="hlt">practice</span>, such as professional isolation and a lack of or inadequate resources, are assumed to be associated with this decline. This article reports on the <span class="hlt">practice</span> support and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> medical education needs of rural family physicians. A mail survey was conducted in 1993 on a purposive sample of family physicians in 39 of 67 rural-designated or urban Pennsylvania counties with low population densities. The physicians identified needs that included patient education materials and programs, community health promotion, federal regulation updates, technical assistance with computers and business management, database software and a videotape lending library, a drug hotline, and mini-fellowships on clinical skill development. A majority of respondents were willing to participate in clinical educational experiences for students and residents. Some physicians indicated a lack of interest in access to information through telecommunications, e.g., video conference referrals and consultations. Overall, findings revealed that family physicians need and are receptive to a variety of <span class="hlt">practice</span> support and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education programs. A <span class="hlt">practice</span> support program coupled with policy coordination among public and private organizations is likely to lessen complaints by rural primary care physicians.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23302087','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23302087"><span>Japanese consumer preferences for milk certified with the good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span>(GAP) label.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aizaki, Hideo; Nanseki, Teruaki; Zhou, Hui</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This study examined Japanese consumers' valuation of a good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> (GAP) label on packaged milk and investigated the effect of detailed GAP information on valuation. A total of 624 Japanese consumers were asked to select their most preferred milk through an online survey. The milk was assumed to have three attributes: the GAP label, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points certification, and price. The results showed that consumers' valuation of GAP was significantly positive. Although providing additional GAP information to a respondent who was aware of GAP and what it means had a positive effect on the consumers' valuation of GAP, provision of this information had no effect if the respondent knew about GAP either moderately or slightly, and had a negative effect if the respondent did not know about GAP at all. To increase broad consumer awareness and valuation of GAP, it is important to provide GAP information according to the requirements of consumers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1512969G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1512969G"><span>Integrating different knowledge sources and disciplines for <span class="hlt">practical</span> applications in Forest and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Engineering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Guzmán, Gema; Castillo, Carlos; Taguas, Encarnación</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>One of the aims of 'The Bologna Process' is to promote among the students the acquisition of <span class="hlt">practical</span>, social and creative skills to face real-life situations and to solve the difficulties they might find during their professional life. It involves an important change in the educational system, from a traditional approach focused on teaching, towards a new one that encourages learning. Under this context, University teaching implies the design of activities addressed to the dissemination of "know-how" to solve different problems associated with two technical disciplines: Forest and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Engineering. This study presents a preliminary experience where a group of information and communication technologies (ICT) such as, audiovisual resources (videos, reports and photo gallery), virtual visits to blogs and interactive activities have been used to provide a comprehensive knowledge of the environmental and sociocultural components of the landscape in order to facilitate the decision-making process in the engineering project context . With these tools, the students must study and characterize all these aspects in order to justify the chosen solutions and the project design. This approach was followed in the analysis of the limiting factors of <span class="hlt">practical</span> cases in projects about forestation, landscape restoration and hydrological planning. This communication shows how this methodology has been applied in Forest and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Engineering and the students' experience with these innovative tools. The use of ICTs involved a friendly framework that stimulated students' interest and made subjects more attractive, since it allowed to assess the complex relationships between landscape, history and economy. Furthermore, this type of activities promotes the interdisciplinary training and the acquisition of creative and autonomous skills which are not included in many cases into the main objectives of the subjects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=benefits+AND+agriculture&pg=4&id=EJ504425','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=benefits+AND+agriculture&pg=4&id=EJ504425"><span>Perceptions and <span class="hlt">Practices</span> of Georgia Guidance Counselors Regarding <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education Programs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Woodard, James; Herren, Ray V.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>In Georgia high schools with <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> programs, responses from 133 of 170 guidance counselors indicated that most felt <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> had benefits. Those who perceived their schools' programs to be of high quality supported <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>'s relevance for college-bound students and were more likely to place students in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> programs. As a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.2163C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.2163C"><span>Effectiveness of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil erosion processes in semi-arid areas of Zimbabwe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chikwari, Emmanuel; Mhaka, Luke; Gwandu, Tariro; Chipangura, Tafadzwa; Misi Manyanga, Amos; Sabastian Matsenyengwa, Nyasha; Rabesiranana, Naivo; Mabit, Lionel</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>- The application of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) in soil erosion and redistribution studies has gained popularity since the late 1980s. In Zimbabwe, soil erosion research was mostly based on conventional methods which included the use of erosion plots for quantitative measurements and erosion models for predicting soil losses. Only limited investigation to explore the possibility of using Caesium-137 (Cs-137) has been reported in the early 1990s for undisturbed and cultivated lands in Zimbabwe. In this study, the Cs-137 technique was applied to assess the impact of soil conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil losses and to develop strategies and support effective policies that help farmers in Zimbabwe for sustainable land management. The study was carried out at the Makoholi research station 30 km north of the Masvingo region which is located 260 km south of Harare. The area is semi-arid and the study site comprises coarse loamy sands, gleyic lixisols. The conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (CA) <span class="hlt">practices</span> used within the area since 1988 include (i) direct seeding (DS) with mulch, (ii) CA basins with mulch, and (iii) 18 years direct seeding, left fallow for seven years and turned into conventional tillage since 2012 (DS/F/C). The Cs-137 reference inventory was established at 214 ± 16 Bq/m2. The mean inventories for DS, CA basins and DS/F/C were 195, 190 and 214 Bq/m2 respectively. Using the conversion Mass Balance Model 2 on the Cs-137 data obtained along transects for each of the <span class="hlt">practices</span>, gross erosion rates were found to be 7.5, 7.3 and 2.6 t/ha/yr for direct seeding, CA basins and the DS/F/C while the net erosion rates were found to be 3.8, 4.6 and 0 t/ha/yr respectively. Sediment delivery ratios were 50%, 63% and 2% in the respective order. These preliminary results showed the effectiveness of DS over CA basins in erosion control. The efficiency of fallowing in controlling excessive soil loss was significant in the plot that started as DS for 18 years but left fallow for 7</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2007/3084/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2007/3084/"><span>Water and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span>-Chemical Transport in a Midwestern, Tile-Drained Watershed: Implications for Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Baker, Nancy T.; Stone, Wesley W.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Wilson, John T.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The study of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemicals is one of five national priority topics being addressed by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program in its second decade of studies, which began in 2001. Seven watersheds across the Nation were selected for the NAWQA <span class="hlt">agricultural</span>-chemical topical study. The watersheds selected represent a range of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> settings - with varying crop types and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> related to tillage, irrigation, artificial drainage, and chemical use - as well as a range of landscapes with different geology, soils, topography, climate, and hydrology (Capel and others, 2004). Chemicals selected for study include nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) and about 50 commonly used pesticides. This study design leads to an improved understanding of many factors that can affect the movement of water and chemicals in different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> settings. Information from these studies will help with decision making related to chemical use, conservation, and other farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> that are used to reduce runoff of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemicals and sediment from fields (Capel and others, 2004). This Fact Sheet highlights the results of the NAWQA <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemical study in the Leary Weber Ditch Watershed in Hancock County, Indiana. This watershed was selected to represent a tile-drained, corn and soybean, humid area typical in the Midwest.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/19243','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/19243"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land-management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality in northeastern Guilford County, North Carolina, 1985-90</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Harned, D.A.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The effects of different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land- management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on sediment, nutrients, and selected pesticides in surface water, and on nutrients and pesticides in ground water were studied in four small basins in the Piedmont of North Carolina. The basins included two adjacent basins in row-crop fields, a mixed land-use basin, and a forested basin. One of the row-crop fields was farmed using conservation land-management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, including strip cropping, contour plowing, field borders, and grassed waterways. The other field was farmed using standard land- management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, including <span class="hlt">continuous</span> cropping, straight-row plowing, and ungrassed waterways. The sediment yield for the standard land-management basin was 2.3 times that for the conservation land-management basin, 14.1 times that for the mixed land-use basin, and 19.5 times that for the forested basin. Nutrient concentra- tions in surface water from the row-crop and mixed land-use basins were higher than those in surface water for the forested basin. Nutrient concentra- tions in soil water and ground water beneath the row-crop basins were lower than those in surface- water runoff for these basins. The lowest nutrient concentrations measured in the row-crop basins generally were in soil-water samples collected just below the root zone (3-foot depth) and in ground water. No significant differences in pesticide concentrations were identified between the surface-water runoff from the standard land- management basin and that from the conservation land-management basin. Concentrations of the soil pesticides isopropalin and flumetralin were higher in the standard land-management basin than in the conservation land-management basin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1212984P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1212984P"><span>Water quality and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: the case study of southern Massaciuccoli reclaimed land (Tuscany, Italy)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pistocchi, Chiara; Baneschi, Ilaria; Basile, Paolo; Cannavò, Silvia; Guidi, Massimo; Risaliti, Rosalba; Rossetto, Rudy; Sabbatini, Tiziana; Silvestri, Nicola; Bonari, Enrico</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>Owing to increasing anthropogenic impacts, lagoons and wetlands are being exposed to environmental degradation. Therefore, the sustainable management of these environmental resources is a fundamental issue to maintain either the ecosystems and the human activity. The Massaciuccoli Lake is a coastal lake of fresh to brackish water surrounded by a marsh, which drains a total catchment of about 114 km2. Large part of the basin has been reclaimed since 1930 by means of pumping stations forcing water from the drained areas into the lake. The system is characterized by: high complexity of the hydrological setting; subsidence of the peaty soils in the reclaimed area (2 to 3 m in 70 years), that left the lake perched; reclaimed land currently devoted mainly to conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (e.g.: maize monoculture) along with some industrial sites, two sewage treatment plants and some relevant urban settlements; social conflicts among different land users because of the impact on water quality and quantity. The interaction between such a fragile natural system and human activities leads to an altered ecological status mainly due to eutrophication and water salinisation. Hence, the present work aims at identifying and assessing the sources of nutrients (phosphorous in particular) into the lake, and characterising land use and some socio-economic aspects focusing on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> systems, in order to set up suitable mitigation measures. Water quantity and quality in the most intensively cultivated sub-catchment, placed 0.5 to 3 m under m.s.l. were monitored in order to underlain the interaction between water and its nutrient load. Questionnaires and interviews to farmers were conducted to obtain information about <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, farm management, risks and constraints for farming activities. The available information about the natural system and land use were collected and organised in a GIS system: a conceptual model of surface water hydrodinamics was build up and 14</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1816403U','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1816403U"><span>Spatio-temporal optimization of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to achieve a sustainable development at basin level; framework of a case study in Colombia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Uribe, Natalia; corzo, Gerald; Solomatine, Dimitri</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The flood events present during the last years in different basins of the Colombian territory have raised questions on the sensitivity of the regions and if this regions have common features. From previous studies it seems important features in the sensitivity of the flood process were: land cover change, precipitation anomalies and these related to impacts of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> management and water management deficiencies, among others. A significant government investment in the outreach activities for adopting and promoting the Colombia National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) is being carried out in different sectors and regions, having as a priority the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> sector. However, more information is still needed in the local environment in order to assess were the regions have this sensitivity. Also the <span class="hlt">continuous</span> change in one region with seasonal <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> have been pointed out as a critical information for optimal sustainable development. This combined spatio-temporal dynamics of crops cycle in relation to climate change (or variations) has an important impact on flooding events at basin areas. This research will develop on the assessment and optimization of the aggregated impact of flood events due to determinate the spatio-temporal dynamic of changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A number of common best <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> have been identified to explore their effect in a spatial hydrological model that will evaluate overall changes. The optimization process consists on the evaluation of best performance in the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production, without having to change crops activities or move to other regions. To achieve this objectives a deep analysis of different models combined with current and future climate scenarios have been planned. An algorithm have been formulated to cover the parametric updates such that the optimal temporal identification will be evaluated in different region on the case study area. Different hydroinformatics</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartEEEE-app10.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartEEEE-app10.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Eeee of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 10 Table 10 to Subpart EEEE of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... tank at an existing, reconstructed, or new affected source meeting any set of tank capacity, and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartEEEE-app10.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartEEEE-app10.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Eeee of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 10 Table 10 to Subpart EEEE of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... new affected source meeting any set of tank capacity, and vapor pressure criteria specified in table...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1081279.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1081279.pdf"><span>Teachers' Perception and Implementation of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Assessment <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Secondary Schools in Ekiti-State, Nigeria</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Modup, Ale Veronica; Sunday, Omirin Michael</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study examined the <span class="hlt">practices</span> and implementation of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> assessment in Ekiti State Secondary Schools with special interest in Ado Local Government. The population for the study was the whole number of teachers in Ekiti State secondary school and the sample for the study was 160 secondary school teachers who were randomly selected from…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Record&pg=5&id=EJ1049781','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Record&pg=5&id=EJ1049781"><span>Record of Assessment Moderation <span class="hlt">Practice</span> (RAMP): Survey Software as a Mechanism of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Quality Improvement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnson, Genevieve Marie</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In higher education, assessment integrity is pivotal to student learning and satisfaction, and, therefore, a particularly important target of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> quality improvement. This paper reports on the preliminary development and application of a process of recording and analysing current assessment moderation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, with the aim of identifying…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22new+drug%22&pg=3&id=EJ139000','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22new+drug%22&pg=3&id=EJ139000"><span><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education for Non-<span class="hlt">Practicing</span> Professionals: A Case Study of a Program for Pharmacists</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Muth, James E.; And Others</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Extension Services in Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, has developed and evaluated a <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education course for non-<span class="hlt">practicing</span> professional pharmacists entitled "A Review of Selected New Drugs of 1972 and 1973." An audio cassette tape enabled participants, 88.3 percent of whom were women, to up-date their knowledge. (LH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=round+AND+robin&id=EJ823239','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=round+AND+robin&id=EJ823239"><span>Analyzing "Inconsistencies" in <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: Teachers' <span class="hlt">Continued</span> Use of Round Robin Reading</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ash, Gwynne Ellen; Kuhn, Melanie R.; Walpole, Sharon</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzed in-service teachers' and literacy coaches' perceptions of Round Robin Reading to begin developing an understanding of the persistence of this <span class="hlt">practice</span> in public schools in the United States. Surveying 80 teachers and 27 literacy coaches using an open-ended instrument, we found that many teachers <span class="hlt">continued</span> to use Round Robin…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=accountant&id=EJ1108127','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=accountant&id=EJ1108127"><span>A Framework of Best <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development for the Accounting Profession</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Lange, Paul; Jackling, Beverley; Basioudis, Ilias G.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The International Accounting Education Standards Board (IAESB) places a strong emphasis on individual professionals taking responsibility for their <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development (CPD). On the other hand, the roles performed by professional accountants have evolved out of <span class="hlt">practical</span> necessity to "best" suit the diverse needs of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ethiopia&pg=5&id=EJ1017112','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ethiopia&pg=5&id=EJ1017112"><span>High School English Teachers' and Students' Perceptions, Attitudes and Actual <span class="hlt">Practices</span> of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yigzaw, Abiy</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This study examined high school teachers' and students' perceptions, attitudes and actual <span class="hlt">practices</span> of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> assessment. The participants of the study were 41 teachers and 808 students in Injabara General and Preparatory, Tilili General Secondary, Mengesha Jembere General Secondary, and Dangila Preparatory schools in West Gojjam, Ethiopia.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Economy&pg=3&id=EJ1107427','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Economy&pg=3&id=EJ1107427"><span><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development in the Accounting Profession: <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Perceptions from the Asia Pacific Region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Lange, Paul; Jackling, Beverley; Suwardy, Themin</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Drawing on research in the sociology of professions as a reference point, this study examines the <span class="hlt">practices</span> and perceptions of professional accountants towards the requirements of IES7 on <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD). Responses from 1310 accountants in the Asia Pacific region suggest while increasing globalisation has led to more…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25517189','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25517189"><span>27th Annual APRN legislative update: advancements <span class="hlt">continue</span> for APRN <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Phillips, Susanne J</p> <p>2015-01-16</p> <p>As the tides of healthcare in the United States <span class="hlt">continue</span> to change, advanced <span class="hlt">practice</span> registered nurses (APRNs) are at the forefront of legislative history. This overview provides a snapshot of legislative and regulatory activity in 2014 as reported by state Boards of Nursing and nursing organizations representing APRNs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015QuIP...14.4339Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015QuIP...14.4339Z"><span>Application of <span class="hlt">practical</span> noiseless linear amplifier in no-switching <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum cryptography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Yichen; Yu, Song; Guo, Hong</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>We propose a modified no-switching <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution protocol by employing a <span class="hlt">practical</span> noiseless linear amplifier at the receiver to increase the maximal transmission distance and tolerable excess noise. A security analysis is presented to derive the secure bound of the protocol in presence of a Gaussian noisy lossy channel. Simulation results show that the modified protocol can not only transmit longer distance and tolerate more channel excess noise than the original protocol, but also distribute more secure keys in the enhanced region where we define a critical point to separate the enhanced and degenerative region. This critical point presents the condition of using a <span class="hlt">practical</span> noiseless linear amplifier in the no-switching <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum cryptography, which is meaningful and instructive to implement a <span class="hlt">practical</span> experiment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1610165P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1610165P"><span>Evaluating Lignite-Derived Products (LDPs) for <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> - Does Research Inform <span class="hlt">Practice</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Patti, Antonio; Rose, Michael; Little, Karen; Jackson, Roy; Cavagnaro, Timothy</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>. However, these growth benefits subsequently diminished over time. Insignificant growth benefits were observed for lucerne. The analysis of the literature and our own work indicates that it is difficult to account for all the possible variables where research is used to inform land management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Assisting farmers to conduct localised research in cooperative ventures is likely to bring about the best outcomes where site-specific research directly informs land management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1. Michael T. Rose, Antonio F. Patti, Karen R. Little, Alicia L. Brown, W. Roy Jackson, Timothy R. Cavagnaro, A Meta-Analysis and Review of Plant-Growth Response to Humic Substances: <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Implications for <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, Advances in Agronomy, 2013, 124, 37-89</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3832375','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3832375"><span>Changes in Soil Microbial Community Structure Influenced by <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in a Mediterranean Agro-Ecosystem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Zornoza, Raul; Scow, Kate</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> have proven to be unsuitable in many cases, causing considerable reductions in soil quality. Land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> can provide solutions to this problem and contribute to get a sustainable <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> model. The main objective of this work was to assess the effect of different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil microbial community structure (evaluated as abundance of phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA). Five different treatments were selected, based on the most common <span class="hlt">practices</span> used by farmers in the study area (eastern Spain): residual herbicides, tillage, tillage with oats and oats straw mulching; these <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> were evaluated against an abandoned land after farming and an adjacent long term wild forest coverage. The results showed a substantial level of differentiation in the microbial community structure, in terms of management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which was highly associated with soil organic matter content. Addition of oats straw led to a microbial community structure closer to wild forest coverage soil, associated with increases in organic carbon, microbial biomass and fungal abundances. The microbial community composition of the abandoned <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil was characterised by increases in both fungal abundances and the metabolic quotient (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), suggesting an increase in the stability of organic carbon. The ratio of bacteria:fungi was higher in wild forest coverage and land abandoned systems, as well as in the soil treated with oat straw. The most intensively managed soils showed higher abundances of bacteria and actinobacteria. Thus, the application of organic matter, such as oats straw, appears to be a sustainable management <span class="hlt">practice</span> that enhances organic carbon, microbial biomass and activity and fungal abundances, thereby changing the microbial community structure to one more similar to those observed in soils under wild forest coverage. PMID:24260409</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24260409','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24260409"><span>Changes in soil microbial community structure influenced by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a mediterranean agro-ecosystem.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Zornoza, Raul; Cerdà, Artemi; Scow, Kate</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> have proven to be unsuitable in many cases, causing considerable reductions in soil quality. Land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> can provide solutions to this problem and contribute to get a sustainable <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> model. The main objective of this work was to assess the effect of different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil microbial community structure (evaluated as abundance of phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA). Five different treatments were selected, based on the most common <span class="hlt">practices</span> used by farmers in the study area (eastern Spain): residual herbicides, tillage, tillage with oats and oats straw mulching; these <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> were evaluated against an abandoned land after farming and an adjacent long term wild forest coverage. The results showed a substantial level of differentiation in the microbial community structure, in terms of management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which was highly associated with soil organic matter content. Addition of oats straw led to a microbial community structure closer to wild forest coverage soil, associated with increases in organic carbon, microbial biomass and fungal abundances. The microbial community composition of the abandoned <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil was characterised by increases in both fungal abundances and the metabolic quotient (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), suggesting an increase in the stability of organic carbon. The ratio of bacteria:fungi was higher in wild forest coverage and land abandoned systems, as well as in the soil treated with oat straw. The most intensively managed soils showed higher abundances of bacteria and actinobacteria. Thus, the application of organic matter, such as oats straw, appears to be a sustainable management <span class="hlt">practice</span> that enhances organic carbon, microbial biomass and activity and fungal abundances, thereby changing the microbial community structure to one more similar to those observed in soils under wild forest coverage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol15-sec63-9635.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol15-sec63-9635.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.9635 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me? 63.9635 Section 63.9635 Protection of... demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard requirements in § 63.9591 by operating in...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7913.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7913.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7913 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards for separators? 63.7913 Section 63.7913... <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards for separators? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards in §...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18..172N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18..172N"><span>Interdependence of soil and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> in a two - year phytoremediation in situ experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nwaichi, Eucharia; Onyeike, Eugene; Frac, Magdalena; Iwo, Godknows</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>A two - year plant - based soil clean - up was carried out at a crude oil spill <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> site in a Niger Delta community in Nigeria to access further clean - up potentials of Cymbopogon citratus. Applied diagnostic ratios identified mixed petrogenic and pyrogenic sources as the main contributors of PAHs. Up to 90.8% sequestration was obtained for carcinogenic PAHs especially Benz (a) pyrene in a 2 - phase manner. A community level approach for assessing patterns of sole carbon source utilization by mixed microbial samples was employed to differentiate spatial and temporal changes in the soil microbial communities. In relation to pollution, soil conditioning notably decreased the lag times and showed mixed effects for colour development rates, maximum absorbance and the overall community pattern. For rate and utilization of different carbon substrates in BIOLOG wells, after day 3, in comparison to control soil communities, contamination with hydrocarbons and associated types increased amines and amides consumption. Consumption of carbohydrates in all polluted and unamended regimes decreased markedlyin comparison to those cultivated with C. citratus. We found a direct relationship between cellulose breakdown, measurable with B-glucosidase activity, organic matter content and CO2 realease within all soils in the present study. Organic amendment rendered most studied contaminants unavailable for uptake in preference to inorganic fertilizer in both study years. Generally, phytoremediation improved significantly the microbial community activity and thus would promote ecosystem restoration in relation to most patronised techniques. Supplementation with required nutrients, in a long - term design would present many ecological benefits. Keywords: <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> soils; Recovery; Hydrocarbon pollution; Ecology; Management <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4110T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4110T"><span>Soil organic carbon fractionation for improving <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil quality diagnosis in different management <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trigalet, Sylvain; Chartin, Caroline; Kruger, Inken; Carnol, Monique; Van Oost, Kristof; van Wesemael, Bas</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Preserving ecosystem functions of soil organic matter (SOM) in soils is a key challenge. The need for an efficient diagnosis of SOM state in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils is a priority in order to facilitate the detection of changes in soil quality as a result of changes in management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The nature of SOM is complex and cannot readily be monitored due to the heterogeneity of its components. Assessment of the SOM level dynamics, typically characterized as the bulk soil organic carbon (SOC), can be refined by taking into account carbon pools with different turnover rates and stability. Fractionating bulk SOC in meaningful soil organic fractions helps to better diagnose SOC status. By separating carbon associated with clay and fine silt particles (stable carbon with slow turnover rate) and carbon non-associated with this fraction (labile and intermediate carbon with higher turnover rates), effects of management can be detected more efficiently at different spatial and temporal scales. Until now, most work on SOC fractionation has focused on small spatial scales along management or time gradients. The present case study focuses on SOC fractionation applied in order to refine the interpretation of organic matter turnover and SOC sequestration for regional units in Wallonia with comparable climate, management and, to a certain extent, soil conditions. In each unit, random samples from specific land uses are analyzed in order to assess the Normal Operative Ranges (NOR) of SOC fraction contents for each unit and land use combination. Thus, SOC levels of the different fractions of a specific field in a given unit can be compared to its corresponding NOR. It will help to better diagnose <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil quality in terms of organic carbon compared to a bulk SOC diagnosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EnMan..38..253R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EnMan..38..253R"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Land Use and Best Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> to Control Nonpoint Water Pollution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ripa, Maria Nicoletta; Leone, Antonio; Garnier, Monica; Porto, Antonio Lo</p> <p>2006-08-01</p> <p>In recent years, improvements in point-source depuration technologies have highlighted the problems regarding <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> nonpoint (diffuse) sources, and this issue has become highly relevant from the environmental point of view. The considerable extension of the areas responsible for this kind of pollution, together with the scarcity of funds available to local managers, make minimizing the impacts of nonpoint sources on a whole basin a virtually impossible task. This article presents the results of a study intended to pinpoint those <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas, within a basin, that contribute most to water pollution, so that operations aimed at preventing and/or reducing this kind of pollution can be focused on them. With this aim, an innovative approach is presented that integrates a field-scale management model, a simple regression model, and a geographic information system (GIS). The Lake Vico basin, where recent studies highlighted a considerable increase in the trophic state, mainly caused by phosphorus (P) compounds deriving principally from the intensive cultivation of hazelnut trees in the lake basin, was chosen as the study site. Using the management model Groundwater Loading Effects of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management Systems (GLEAMS), the consequences, in terms of sediment yield and phosphorus export, of hazelnut tree cultivation were estimated on different areas of the basin with and without the application of a best management <span class="hlt">practice</span> (BMP) that consists of growing meadow under the trees. The GLEAMS results were successively extended to basin scale thanks to the application of a purposely designed regression model and of a GIS. The main conclusions can be summarized as follows: The effectiveness of the above-mentioned BMP is always greater for erosion reduction than for particulate P reduction, whatever the slope value considered; moreover, the effectiveness with reference to both particulate P and sediment yield production decreases as the slope increases. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2972292','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2972292"><span>Categorisation of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> risk factors in epidemiological publications: a survey of current <span class="hlt">practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background Reports of observational epidemiological studies often categorise (group) <span class="hlt">continuous</span> risk factor (exposure) variables. However, there has been little systematic assessment of how categorisation is <span class="hlt">practiced</span> or reported in the literature and no extended guidelines for the <span class="hlt">practice</span> have been identified. Thus, we assessed the nature of such <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the epidemiological literature. Two months (December 2007 and January 2008) of five epidemiological and five general medical journals were reviewed. All articles that examined the relationship between <span class="hlt">continuous</span> risk factors and health outcomes were surveyed using a standard proforma, with the focus on the primary risk factor. Using the survey results we provide illustrative examples and, combined with ideas from the broader literature and from experience, we offer guidelines for good <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Results Of the 254 articles reviewed, 58 were included in our survey. Categorisation occurred in 50 (86%) of them. Of those, 42% also analysed the variable <span class="hlt">continuously</span> and 24% considered alternative groupings. Most (78%) used 3 to 5 groups. No articles relied solely on dichotomisation, although it did feature prominently in 3 articles. The choice of group boundaries varied: 34% used quantiles, 18% equally spaced categories, 12% external criteria, 34% other approaches and 2% did not describe the approach used. Categorical risk estimates were most commonly (66%) presented as pairwise comparisons to a reference group, usually the highest or lowest (79%). Reporting of categorical analysis was mostly in tables; only 20% in figures. Conclusions Categorical analyses of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> risk factors are common. Accordingly, we provide recommendations for good <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Key issues include pre-defining appropriate choice of groupings and analysis strategies, clear presentation of grouped findings in tables and figures, and drawing valid conclusions from categorical analyses, avoiding injudicious use of multiple alternative analyses</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=farming+AND+practices&id=EJ1117352','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=farming+AND+practices&id=EJ1117352"><span>Influence of Voluntary Coffee Certifications on Cooperatives' Advisory Services and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> of Smallholder Farmers in Costa Rica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Snider, Anna; Kraus, Eva; Sibelet, Nicole; Bosselmann, Aske Skovmand; Faure, Guy</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: This article explores how voluntary certifications influence the way cooperatives provide advisory services to their members and the influence of these services on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Design/Methodology/Approach: Case studies were conducted in four representative Costa Rican cooperatives interviewing twenty interviewed cooperative…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dairy&pg=4&id=EJ1099733','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dairy&pg=4&id=EJ1099733"><span>The Role of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education and Extension in Influencing Best <span class="hlt">Practice</span> for Managing Mastitis in Dairy Cattle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dillon, E. J.; Hennessy, T.; Cullinan, J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: To examine the role of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> education and extension in influencing the adoption of best <span class="hlt">practice</span> with regard to herd-level mastitis management. Design/Methodology/Approach: Somatic cell count (SCC) is an indicator of herd health with regard to mastitis and is negatively related to productivity and profitability. Panel data…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=309186','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=309186"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> conservation planning framework: 1. Developing multi-<span class="hlt">practice</span> watershed planning scenarios and assessing nutrient reduction potential</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>We show that spatial data on soils, land use, and high-resolution topography, combined with knowledge of conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> effectiveness, can be leveraged to identify and assess alternatives to reduce nutrient discharge from small (HUC12) <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds. Databases comprising soil attrib...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=319144','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=319144"><span>Estimating the effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on phosphorus loads in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River basin (MARB) is important in terms of both the national economy and the nutrients discharged to the basin and the Gulf of Mexico. Conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> are installed on cropland to reduce the nutrient losses. A recent study by the Conservation Effec...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=328019','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=328019"><span>Effects of low-grade weirs on soil microbial communities to advance <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> for nitrate remediation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> activities throughout the Mississippi River Basin have been identified as a major source of nutrient pollution, particularly nitrogen from fertilizer application, to downstream waters including the Gulf of Mexico. Utilizing best management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, such as low-grade weirs have been id...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744689','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744689"><span>Remote sensing and GIS techniques for assessment of the soil water content in order to improve <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> and reduce the negative impact on groundwater: case study, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> area Ştefan cel Mare, Călăraşi County.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tevi, Giuliano; Tevi, Anca</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> based on non-customized irrigation and soil fertilization are harmful for the environment, and may pose a risk for human health. By <span class="hlt">continuing</span> the use of these <span class="hlt">practices</span>, it is not possible to ensure effective land management, which might be acquired by using advanced satellite technology configured for modern <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> development. The paper presents a methodology based on the correlation between remote sensing data and field observations, aiming to identify the key features and to establish an interpretation pattern for the inhomogeneity highlighted by the remote sensing data. Instead of using classical methods for the evaluation of land features (field analysis, measurements and mapping), the approach is to use high resolution multispectral and hyperspectral methods, in correlation with data processing and geographic information systems (GIS), in order to improve the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and mitigate their environmental impact (soil and shallow aquifer).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19965338','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19965338"><span>Sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: energy inputs and outputs, pesticide, fertilizer and greenhouse gas management.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Yue-Wen</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The food security issue was addressed by the development of "modern <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>" in the last century. But food safety issues and environment degradation were the consequences suffered as a result. Climate change has been recognized as the result of release of stored energy in fossil fuel into the atmosphere. Homogeneous crop varieties, machinery, pesticides and fertilizers are the foundation of uniform commodities in modern <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Fossil fuels are used to manufacture fertilizers and pesticides as well as the energy source for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> machinery, thus characterizes modern <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Bio-fuel production and the possibility of the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> system as a form of energy input are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4920370','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4920370"><span>Refining Operational <span class="hlt">Practice</span> for Controlling Introduced European Rabbits on <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Lands in New Zealand</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Latham, A. David M.; Latham, M. Cecilia; Nugent, Graham; Smith, James; Warburton, Bruce</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) pose a major threat to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production and conservation values in several countries. In New Zealand, population control via poisoning is a frontline method for limiting rabbit damage, with large areas commonly treated using the metabolic toxin sodium fluoroacetate (‘1080’) delivered in bait via aerial dispersal. However, this method is expensive and the high application rates of the active ingredient cause public antipathy towards it. To guide reductions in cost and toxin usage, we evaluated the economics and efficacy of rabbit control using an experimental approach of sowing 1080-bait in strips instead of the commonly-used broadcast sowing method (i.e. complete coverage). Over a 4-year period we studied aerial delivery of 0.02% 1080 on diced carrot bait over ~3500 ha of rabbit-prone land in the North and South islands. In each case, experimental sowing via strip patterns using 10–15 kg of bait per hectare was compared with the current best <span class="hlt">practice</span> of aerial broadcast sowing at 30–35 kg/ha. Operational kill rates exceeded 87% in all but one case and averaged 93–94% across a total of 19 treatment replicates under comparable conditions; there was no statistical difference in overall efficacy observed between the two sowing methods. We project that strip-sowing could reduce by two thirds the amount of active 1080 applied per hectare in aerial control operations against rabbits, both reducing the non-target poisoning risk and promoting cost savings to farming operations. These results indicate that, similarly to the recently-highlighted benefits of adopting strip-sowing for poison control of introduced brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, aerial strip-sowing of toxic bait could also be considered a best <span class="hlt">practice</span> method for rabbit control in pest control policy. PMID:27341209</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5026756','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5026756"><span>The impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on shallow groundwater in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hampson, S.K.; Sendlein, L.V.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)</p> <p>1993-03-01</p> <p>To study the effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the groundwater quality of the Inner Bluegrass Region of Kentucky, a large representative row crop and livestock production operation was chosen. Located in southeastern Bourbon County, the study area encompasses a 1,400 acre watershed underlain by limestones and shales of the Ordovician age Lexington Limestone Formation. Sampling and testing of surface water, ephemeral, and perennial spring waters began in the area in October, 1989. At crop and pasture micro-sites within the study area, nests containing porous-cup lysimeters and monitoring wells were installed prior to the 1992 growing season. Samples from the nest locations were analyzed for Nitrate-N, triazines, metolochlor, carbofuran, alachlor, and 2,4-D. While only ten per cent of the total samples from the study area showed triazine or Nitrate-N concentrations in excess of EPA limits, greater than 80 per cent of the samples showed concentrations of triazines above detection limits, and greater than 70 per cent of the samples contained concentrations of Nitrate-N above detection limits. Occurrences of detectable concentrations of triazines and Nitrate-N were more frequent at crop-site nests, than at pasture-site nests. Nests at both the crop and pasture sites indicated dilution of Nitrate-N and triazine concentrations with depth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4306849','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4306849"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> and Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Bacterial Contamination in Greenhouse versus Open Field Lettuce Production</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Holvoet, Kevin; Sampers, Imca; Seynnaeve, Marleen; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to gain insight into potential differences in risk factors for microbial contamination in greenhouse versus open field lettuce production. Information was collected on sources, testing, and monitoring and if applicable, treatment of irrigation and harvest rinsing water. These data were combined with results of analysis on the levels of Escherichia coli as a fecal indicator organism and the presence of enteric bacterial pathogens on both lettuce crops and environmental samples. Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) PCR signals (vt1 or vt2 positive and eae positive), Campylobacter spp., and Salmonella spp. isolates were more often obtained from irrigation water sampled from open field farms (21/45, 46.7%) versus from greenhouse production (9/75, 12.0%). The open field production was shown to be more prone to fecal contamination as the number of lettuce samples and irrigation water with elevated E. coli was significantly higher. Farmers comply with generic guidelines on good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> available at the national level, but monitoring of microbial quality, and if applicable appropriateness of water treatment, or water used for irrigation or at harvest is restricted. These results indicate the need for further elaboration of specific guidelines and control measures for leafy greens with regard to microbial hazards. PMID:25546272</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23189514','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23189514"><span>Utah farm owner/operators' safety <span class="hlt">practices</span> and risk awareness regarding confined space work in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pate, M L; Merryweather, A S</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to describe current safety <span class="hlt">practices</span> and risk awareness associated with confined spaces in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> among Utah farm owner/operators. There were 399 farm owner/operators in the sample. The final response rate was 82.2%. The typical farm owner/operator in this study was male, between the ages of 50 and 59, with some education beyond high school. Grain and dairy production comprised 48.7% of the operations responding to the survey. A majority (50.2%) of respondents reported having entered a confined space without an observer waiting from the outside. All but 9.5% of the respondents indicated that they had no written emergency response plan in the event of a confined space emergency involving an entrant. Only 49.1% of farm owner/operators perceived entering a grain bin while unloading as a high risk for fatal injury. More research is needed to determine the farmers' knowledge of the variety of hazards associated with confined space work. Few farm owner/operators reported using accessible safety equipment. A limited number of respondents indicated having access to gas monitors, lifeline and harness systems, or ventilation blowers with flexible ducting. This may be associated with the costs of the equipment, or lack of awareness of the need for specific safety equipment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20020710','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20020710"><span>Integrated resource management: Moving from rhetoric to <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Australian <span class="hlt">agriculture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bellamy, J.A.; Johnson, A.K.L.</p> <p>2000-03-01</p> <p>Implementing the concept of sustainability through integrated approaches to natural resource management poses enormous challenges for both the rural communities and government agencies concerned. This paper reviews the underlying rhetoric of sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> systems and the integrated resource management paradigm and identifies some of the challenges being experienced in translating this rhetoric into <span class="hlt">practice</span>. A relatively recently implemented community-based integrated catchment management (ICM) process in a rural community in northeast Australia is examined in terms of some of the lessons learned that may be relevant to other similar integrated resource management (IRM) processes. It reveals a pragmatic, opportunistic, and evolving implementation process based on adaptive learning rather than a more traditional rational planning approach. Some essential characteristics of a community-based IRM process are identified, including fostering communication; providing a structure that fosters cooperation and facilities coordination among community, industry, and government agencies; the integration of IRM principles into local government planning schemes; and an emergent strategic approach to IRM program implementation. The authors conclude by identifying some essential characteristics of an IRM process that can assist a community to adapt to, and manage change for, sustainable resource use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC33C1305L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC33C1305L"><span>Understanding the relative influence of climatic variations and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on crop yields at the US county level</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Leng, G.; Zhang, X.; Huang, M.; Yang, Q.; Rafique, R.; Asrar, G.; Leung, L. R.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Crop yields are largely determined by climate variations and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, such as irrigation, fertilization and residue management. Understanding the role of these factors in regulating crop yield variations is not only important for improved crop yield production, but also equally valuable for future crop yield prediction and food security assessments. Recently, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented and evaluated for simulating corn, soybean and cereals at coarse aerial resolutions of 2 degrees (2000x2000 km). To better understand the underlying mechanisms controlling yield variations, we implemented and validated the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> version of CLM (CLM-crop) at a 0.125 degree resolution over the Conterminous United States (CONUS). We conducted a suite of numerical experiments to untangle the relative influence of climatic variations (temperature, precipitation, and radiation) and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on yield variations for the past 30 years at the US county level. Preliminary results show that the model with default parameter settings captures well the temporal variations in crop yields, as compared with the actual yield reported by the US Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (USDA). However, the magnitude of simulated crop yields is substantially higher, especially in the Mid-western US. We find that improved characterization of fertilizers and irrigation <span class="hlt">practices</span> is key to model performance. Retrospectively (1979-2012), crop yields are more sensitive to changes in climate factors (such as temperature) than to changes in crop management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The results of this study advances understanding of the dominant factors in regulating the crop yield variations at the county level, which is essential for credible prediction of crop yields in a changing climate, under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Data+AND+Management&id=EJ1096383','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Data+AND+Management&id=EJ1096383"><span>Public Progress, Data Management and the Land Grant Mission: A Survey of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Researchers' <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Attitudes at Two Land-Grant Institutions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Peter; Eaker, Christopher; Swauger, Shea; Davis, Miriam L. E. Steiner</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This article reports results from a survey about data management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and attitudes sent to <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> researchers and extension personnel at the University of Tennessee Institute of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (UTIA) and the College of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Sciences and Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University. Results confirm agriculture…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/wsp/2435/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/wsp/2435/report.pdf"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land-management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality in northeastern Guilford County, North Carolina, 1985-90</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Harned, Douglas A.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>The effects of selected <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land-management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality were assessed in a comparative study of four small basins in the Piedmont province of North Carolina. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, such as tillage and applications of fertilizer and pesticides, are major sources of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides in surface water, and of nutrients and pesticides in ground water. The four study basins included two adjacent row-crop fields, a mixed land-use basin, and a forested basin. One of the row-crop fields (7.4 acres) was farmed by using conservation land-management (CLM) <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which included strip cropping, contour plowing, field borders, and grassed waterways. The other row-crop field (4.8 acres) was farmed by using standard land-management (SLM) <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which included <span class="hlt">continuous</span> cropping, straight-row plowing without regard to land topography, and poorly maintained waterways. The mixed land-use basin (665 acres) was monitored to compare water quality in surface water as SLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> were converted to CLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> during the project. The forested basin (44 acres) provided background surface-water hydrologic and chemical-quality conditions. Surface-water flow was reduced by 18 percent by CLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> compared to surface-water flow from the SLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> basin. The thickness of the unsaturated zone in the row-crop basins ranged from a few feet to 25 feet. Areas with thick unsaturated zones have a greater capacity to intercept and store nutrients and pesticides than do areas with thinner zones. Sediment concentrations and yields for the SLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> basin were considerably higher than those for the other basins. The median sediment concentration in surface water for the SLM basin was 3.4 times that of the CLM basin, 8.2 times that of the mixed land-use basin, and 38.4 times that of the forested basin. The total sediment yield for the SLM basin was 2.3 times that observed for the CLM basin, 14.1 times that observed for the mixed land</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5026D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5026D"><span>Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi diversity influenced by different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a semi-arid Mediterranean agro-ecosystem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>de Mar Alguacil, Maria; Torrecillas, Emma; Garcia-Orenes, Fuensanta; Torres, Maria Pilar; Roldan, Antonio</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study a field experiment was performed at the El Teularet-Sierra de Enguera Experimental Station (eastern Spain) to assess the influence during a 6-yr period of different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The management <span class="hlt">practices</span> included residual herbicide use, ploughing, ploughing + oats, addition of oat straw mulch and a control (land abandonment). Adjacent soil under natural vegetation was used as a reference for local, high-quality soil and as a control for comparison with the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils under different management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The AM fungal small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Thirty-six different phylotypes were identified, which were grouped in four families: Glomeraceae, Paraglomeraceae, Ambisporaceae and Claroideoglomeraceae. The first results showed significant differences in the distribution of the AMF phylotypes as consequence of the difference between <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Thus, the lowest diversity was observed for the plot that was treated with herbicide. The management <span class="hlt">practices</span> including ploughing and ploughing + oats had similar AMF diversity. Oat straw mulching yielded the highest number of different AMF sequence types and showed the highest diversity index. Thus, this treatment could be more suitable in sustainable soil use and therefore protection of biodiversity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24261037','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24261037"><span>Linking <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, mycorrhizal fungi, and traits mediating plant-insect interactions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barber, Nicholas A; Kiers, E Toby; Theis, Nina; Hazzard, Ruth V; Adler, Lynn S</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> management has profound effects on soil communities. Activities such as fertilizer inputs can modify the composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities, which form important symbioses with the roots of most crop plants. Intensive conventional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management may select for less mutualistic AMF with reduced benefits to host plants compared to organic management, but these differences are poorly understood. AMF are generally evaluated based on their direct growth effects on plants. However, mycorrhizal colonization also may alter plant traits such as tissue nutrients, defensive chemistry, or floral traits, which mediate important plant-insect interactions like herbivory and pollination. To determine the effect of AMF from different farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> on plant performance and traits that putatively mediate species interactions, we performed a greenhouse study by inoculating Cucumis sativus (cucumber, Cucurbitaceae) with AMF from conventional farms, organic farms, and a commercial AMF inoculum. We measured growth and a suite of plant traits hypothesized to be important predictors of herbivore resistance and pollinator attraction. Several leaf and root traits and flower production were significantly affected by AMF inoculum. Both conventional and organic AMF reduced leaf P content but increased Na content compared to control and commercial AMF. Leaf defenses were unaffected by AMF treatments, but conventional AMF increased root cucurbitacin C, the primary defensive chemical of C. sativus, compared to organic AMF. These effects may have important consequences for herbivore preference and population dynamics. AMF from both organic and conventional farms decreased flower production relative to commercial and control treatments, which may reduce pollinator attraction and plant reproduction. AMF from both farm types also reduced seed germination, but effects on plant growth were limited. Our results suggest that studies only considering AMF</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4663956','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4663956"><span>Child Sexual Abuse and <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Influence of Cultural <span class="hlt">Practices</span>: A Review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shafe, S; Hutchinson, G</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Aim: To provide information on the possible influence of cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> in perpetuating child sexual abuse and to examine documented examples of these cultural influences. Methods: A computer literature search was done of Medline, Science Direct, PSYCInfo, Embase and PubMed for keywords. There were also manual searches in the library of journals that are not accessible online. Keywords for searches included: sexual abuse, child abuse, psychopathology, name of countries (eg Jordan, China and Morocco), culture and cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Results: There is documented evidence of cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> that <span class="hlt">continue</span> to fuel the persistently high level of child sexual abuse across the globe. The definition has evolved to now include simple genital-genital and non-genital contact such as oral-genital contacts, exhibitionism and pornography. Conclusions: Cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> are no longer restricted to one geographical collection of people due to migratory influence, as these <span class="hlt">practices</span> may also spread to different groups who intermingle. There are few empirical studies of child sexual abuse in the Caribbean, but one factor that could be used as a proxy is age of first sexual activity. The World Bank reports that this age is youngest in the Caribbean and is likely to be significantly influenced by child sexual abuse. PMID:25803380</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Uuuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart UUUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... 63—<span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards As required in § 63.5555(a), you must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the appropriate emission limits and work...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17084504','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17084504"><span>ISO 14 001 at the farm level: analysis of five methods for evaluating the environmental impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Galan, M B; Peschard, D; Boizard, H</p> <p>2007-02-01</p> <p>Faced with society's increasing expectations, the Common <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Policy (CAP) review considers environmental management to be an ever more critical criterion in the allocation of farm subsidies. With the goal of evaluating the environmental friendliness of farm <span class="hlt">practices</span>, France's <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> research and extension services have built a range of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span>/environmental diagnostic tools over recent years. The objective of the present paper is to compare the five tools most frequently used in France: IDEA, DIAGE, DIALECTE, DIALOGUE and INDIGO. All the tools have the same purpose: evaluation of the impact of farm <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the environment via indicators and monitoring of farm management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. When tested on a sample of large-scale farms in Picardie, the five tools sometimes produced completely different results: for a given farm, the most supposedly significant environmental impacts depend on the tool used. These results lead to differing environmental management plans and raise the question of the methods' pertinence. An analysis grid of diagnostic tools aimed at specifying their field of validity, limits and relevance was drawn up. The resulting comparative analysis enables to define each tool's domain of validity and allows to suggest lines of thought for developing more relevant tools for (i) evaluating a farm's environmental performance and (ii) helping farmers to develop a plan for improving <span class="hlt">practices</span> within the framework of an environmental management system.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24199496','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24199496"><span>Ecology and behavior of Anopheles arabiensis in relation to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in central Kenya.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Muturi, Ephantus J; Mwangangi, Joseph M; Beier, John C; Blackshear, Millon; Wauna, James; Sang, Rosemary; Mukabana, Wolfgang R</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Ecological changes associated with anthropogenic ecosystem disturbances can influence human risk of exposure to malaria and other vector-borne infectious diseases. This study in Mwea, Kenya, investigated the pattern of insecticide use in irrigated and nonirrigated agroecosystems and association with the density, survival, and blood-feeding behavior of the malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis. The parity rates of adult An. arabiensis from randomly selected houses were determined by examining their ovaries for tracheal distension, and polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the host blood meals. In addition, structured questionnaires were used to generate data on insecticide use. Anopheles arabiensis densities were highest in irrigated rice agroecosystems, intermediate in irrigated French beans agroecosystems, and lowest in the nonirrigated agroecosystem. Anopheles arabiensis adult survivorship was significantly lower in irrigated rice agroecosystems than in irrigated French beans agroecosystems. The human blood index (HBI) was significantly higher in the nonirrigated agroecosystem compared to irrigated agroecosystems. Moreover, there was marked variation in HBI among villages in irrigated agroecosystems with significantly lower HBI in Kangichiri and Mathangauta compared to Kiuria, Karima, and Kangai. The proportion of mosquitoes with mixed blood meals varied among villages ranging from 0.25 in Kangichiri to 0.83 in Kiuria. Sumithion, dimethoate, and alpha cypermethrin were the most commonly used insecticides. The 1st was used mostly in irrigated rice agroecosystems, and the last 2 were used mostly in irrigated French beans agroecosystems. These findings indicate that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> may influence the ecology and behavior of malaria vectors and ultimately the risk of malaria transmission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H51I0877G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H51I0877G"><span>Evaluation of the effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on sediment yield in the Colusa Basin, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gatzke, S. E.; Zhang, M.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to assess the impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) on sediment runoff from almond orchards in the lower Colusa Basin Drain watershed in the Sacramento Valley, California. This study used modeling techniques that include varying hydrologic parameters for both upland areas and small channels to quantify the effects of BMPs water quality. The BMPs simulated in this study are commonly used in almond orchards and include strip cropping, cover cropping, vegetative filter strips, grassed waterways and channel stabilization. The effectiveness of each BMP was simulated for an above average, below average and average rainfall year. Comparison of annual total watershed sediment loads for each BMP simulation showed that overall, channel stabilization and grassed waterways, which target in stream sediment erosion and transport, are the most effective BMPs with an estimated respective reduction in sediment load of 18% and 35% for a below average precipitation year, 13% and 26% for an above average precipitation year, and 17% and 30% for an average precipitation year. Simulations of BMPs designed to reduce sediment transport in upland areas, which include strip cropping and vegetative filter strips, estimated a reduction in total annual sediment load of less than 1% at the watershed outlet. These results indicated that in-stream sediment transport is the dominant sediment transport process in this watershed. Implementation of channel stabilization measures or grassed waterways on almond orchards is estimated to result in an annual reduction of total sediment load of 41,874 kg or 72,753 kg of sediment per square kilometer of almond orchard for an above average precipitation year.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036316','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036316"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and residual corn during spring crane and waterfowl migration in Nebraska</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Sherfy, M.H.; Anteau, M.J.; Bishop, A.A.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Nebraska's Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) is a major spring-staging area for migratory birds. Over 6 million ducks, geese, and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) stage there en route to tundra, boreal forest, and prairie breeding habitats, storing nutrients for migration and reproduction by consuming primarily corn remaining in fields after harvest (hereafter residual corn). In springs 2005-2007, we measured residual corn density in randomly selected harvested cornfields during early (n=188) and late migration (n=143) periods. We estimated the mean density of residual corn for the CPRV and examined the influence of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (post-harvest field management) and migration period on residual corn density. During the early migration period, residual corn density was greater in idle harvested fields than any other treatments of fields (42%, 48%, 53%, and 92% more than grazed, grazed and mulched, mulched, and tilled fields, respectively). Depletion of residual corn from early to late migration did not differ among post-harvest treatments but was greatest during the year when overall corn density was lowest (2006). Geometric mean early-migration residual corn density for the CPRV in 2005-2007 (42.4 kg/ha; 95% CI=35.2-51.5 kg/ha) was markedly lower than previously published estimates, indicating that there has been a decrease in abundance of residual corn available to waterfowl during spring staging. Increases in harvest efficiency have been implicated as a cause for decreasing corn densities since the 1970s. However, our data show that post-harvest management of cornfields also can substantially influence the density of residual corn remaining in fields during spring migration. Thus, managers may be able to influence abundance of high-energy foods for spring-staging migratory birds in the CPRV through programs that influence post-harvest management of cornfields. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1067738.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1067738.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Reflection on Interactive Three-Dimensional Teaching System in <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> and Forestry Colleges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lei, Zhimin</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Ever since the new curriculum was implemented, Sichuan <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> University that is characterized by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> science has conducted ideological and political teaching reform, explored a basic route to integrate scientific outlook on development into theoretical teaching and initially formed a human-oriented interactive three-dimensional…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JHyd..544..224M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JHyd..544..224M"><span>Conceptualizations of water security in the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sector: Perceptions, <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and paradigms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Malekian, Atefe; Hayati, Dariush; Aarts, Noelle</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Conceptions of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> water security are conditioned by larger understandings of being and reality. It is still unclear what such understandings mean for perspectives on water security in general and on causes and solutions related to perceived water security risks and problems in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sector in particular. Based on a systematic literature review, three conceptualizations of water security, related to different paradigms, are presented. Also the consequences of such conceptualizations for determining research objectives, research activities, and research outcomes on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> water security are discussed. The results showed that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> water security from a positivist paradigm referred to tangible and measurable water-related hazards and threats, such as floods and droughts, pollution, and so forth. A constructivist approach to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> water security, constituted by a process of interaction and negotiation, pointed at perceptions of water security of farmers and other stakeholders involved in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sector. A critical approach to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> water security focused on the processes of securing vulnerable farmers and others from wider political, social, and natural impediments to sufficient water supplies. The conclusions of the study suggest that paradigms, underlying approaches should be expressed, clarified, and related to one another in order to find optimal and complementary ways to study water security issues in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sector.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=world+AND+food+AND+production&pg=5&id=EJ780441','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=world+AND+food+AND+production&pg=5&id=EJ780441"><span>Multifunctional <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> in Policy and <span class="hlt">Practice</span>? A Comparative Analysis of Norway and Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bjorkhaug, Hilde; Richards, Carol Ann</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Ideals of productivist <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> in the Western world have faded as the unintended consequences of intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and pastoralism have contributed to rural decline and environmental problems. In Norway and Australia, there has been an increasing acceptance of the equal importance of social and environmental sustainability as well as…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED043826.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED043826.pdf"><span>Factors Associated with the Adoption of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span>; Kampong Bukit Kapar, Selangor, Malaysia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pesson, Lynn L.</p> <p></p> <p>The focus of this study was to procure data about adoption behavior of Malaysian smallholders (farmers) that would be useful in the instructional program in extension education at the College of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, Malaysia. Students interviewed 76 persons in a rural village of two hundred families, all engaged in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. The major sources of income…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=245354','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=245354"><span>Monitoring the Effect of Wetland Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in an <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Watershed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Due to the substantial effect of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> on the extent and ability of wetlands to function, the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (USDA) serves a key role in wetland conservation and restoration. The USDA has implemented several different conservation programs (e.g., the Wetland Reserve Program) wi...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Water&id=EJ1122913','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Water&id=EJ1122913"><span>Using Perceived Differences in Views of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Water Use to Inform <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lamm, Alexa J.; Taylor, Melissa R.; Lamm, Kevan W.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Water use has become increasingly contentious as the population grows and water resources become scarcer. Recent media coverage of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> water use has brought negative attention potentially influencing public and decision makers' attitudes towards <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Negative perceptions could result in uninformed decisions being made that impact…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.4573F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.4573F"><span>Evaluation of detailed water quality and quantity monitoring system in a small <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> catchment - discrete vs. <span class="hlt">continuous</span> approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fučík, Petr; Kaplická, Markéta; Kvítek, Tomáå.¡</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>To achieve the obligatory limits set up by the WFD (Water Frame Directive) in water bodies, there is an urgent need of attainments conc. water quality and quantity dynamics which can be gained only by a detailed monitoring. <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> monitoring system of surface, subsurface and ground waters is one of the essential tools, enabling to thoroughly understand the processes of water quality dynamics in a catchment as well as to trace the sources and pathways of pollutants during various rainfall - runoff events. In this paper, there are described results of concentrations and loads of N-NO3, N-NH4 and Ptot, realized by assessment and comparison of two different approaches - regular and intensive monitoring concepts. The analysis was carried out in five measuring points - in the catchment closing profile and in four subcatchments (three of them tile drained) of a small <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> catchment during the year 2009. Monitored catchment is located on the Kopaninský stream, which is situated in the south - eastern part of the Švihov drinking water reservoir basin on the Želivka river, in the Bohemo-Moravian Highland in the Czech Republic. The experimental catchment occupies 7.1 km2, dominating land use type is ploughland (50%), followed by forests (37%) and grasslands (12%). The catchment contains several measuring sites - profiles, equipped with V - notch type weirs and ultrasound probes connected to dataloggers for water level recording. The regular (discrete) monitoring lied in a fortnightly accomplished manual withdrawal of a 0.5 l sample from the upper third share of actual water column in the case of surface water courses, or directly from the tile drainage outlet, and measuring the actual water level (discharge). Average monthly load L (kg*month-1) was then calculated according to the following relationship: L = [ci*Qi+ci+1*Qi+1* 0.0864] n, where ci is concentration of a substance at the time of sampling (mg*l-1), Qiis discharge (l*s-1) at the sampling time, n is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartFFFF-app1.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartFFFF-app1.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Process Vents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span>...—Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Process Vents As required in § 63.2455, you must meet each emission limit and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard in the following table that applies to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartFFFF-app1.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartFFFF-app1.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Process Vents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span>...—Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Process Vents As required in § 63.2455, you must meet each emission limit and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard in the following table that applies to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol13-part63-subpartFFFF-app1.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol13-part63-subpartFFFF-app1.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Process Vents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span>... of Part 63—Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Process Vents As required in § 63.2455, you must meet each emission limit and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard in the following table...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartFFFF-app1.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartFFFF-app1.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Process Vents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span>... of Part 63—Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Process Vents As required in § 63.2455, you must meet each emission limit and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard in the following table...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=concept+AND+analysis+AND+continuing+AND+professional+AND+development&id=EJ1010331','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=concept+AND+analysis+AND+continuing+AND+professional+AND+development&id=EJ1010331"><span>Dispositional Development as a Form of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Professional Development: Centre-Based Reflective <span class="hlt">Practices</span> with Teachers of (Very) Young Children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Swim, Terri Jo; Isik-Ercan, Zeynep</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The nature of professional development in early childhood education has recently been reconceptualised, with accompanying changes in policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This paper draws from teacher education literature to define the components of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the context of early childhood education <span class="hlt">practice</span>. By relating…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Uuuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart UUUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards As required in § 63.5555(a), you must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the appropriate emission limits and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards according to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Uuuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart UUUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards As required in § 63.5555(a), you must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the appropriate emission limits and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards according to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27607653','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27607653"><span><span class="hlt">Practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution without finite sampling bandwidth effects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Huasheng; Wang, Chao; Huang, Peng; Huang, Duan; Wang, Tao; Zeng, Guihua</p> <p>2016-09-05</p> <p>In a <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution system, finite sampling bandwidth of the employed analog-to-digital converter at the receiver's side may lead to inaccurate results of pulse peak sampling. Then, errors in the parameters estimation resulted. Subsequently, the system performance decreases and security loopholes are exposed to eavesdroppers. In this paper, we propose a novel data acquisition scheme which consists of two parts, i.e., a dynamic delay adjusting module and a statistical power feedback-control algorithm. The proposed scheme may improve dramatically the data acquisition precision of pulse peak sampling and remove the finite sampling bandwidth effects. Moreover, the optimal peak sampling position of a pulse signal can be dynamically calibrated through monitoring the change of the statistical power of the sampled data in the proposed scheme. This helps to resist against some <span class="hlt">practical</span> attacks, such as the well-known local oscillator calibration attack.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21450394','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21450394"><span>Traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> enable sustainable remediation of highly polluted soils in Southern Spain for cultivation of food crops.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Madejón, P; Barba-Brioso, C; Lepp, N W; Fernández-Caliani, J C</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>This study relates elemental content of a range of edible crops grown in soils severely polluted by metals and metalloids as affected by traditional smallholder management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Five <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> plots close to a sulfidic waste dump were monitored. Soil analysis demonstrated elevated concentrations of As, Cu, Pb and Zn that were greatly in excess of maximum statutory limits for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils in the studied region. The main vegetables (lettuce, chard, onion, potatoes) and lemon, together with their associated soils, were measured for elemental content. Extractable soil element concentrations were very low. There were differences in elemental accumulation between crops, but none exceeded statutory concentrations in edible parts. Soil-plant transfer factors were uniformly low for all elements and crops. It is concluded that traditional soil management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (annual liming and application of animal manures) have created conditions for sustainable long-term safety use, with potential for multiple end-use, of these highly polluted soils.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5030/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5030/"><span>Effect of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Hydrology and Water Chemistry in a Small Irrigated Catchment, Yakima River Basin, Washington</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Henry M.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The role of irrigation and artificial drainage in the hydrologic cycle and the transport of solutes in a small <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> catchment in central Washington's Yakima Valley were explored using hydrologic, chemical, isotopic, age-dating, and mineralogical data from several environmental compartments, including stream water, ground water, overland flow, and streambed pore water. A conceptual understanding of catchment hydrology and solute transport was developed and an inverse end-member mixing analysis was used to further explore the effects of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> in this small catchment. The median concentrations of major solutes and nitrates were similar for the single field site and for the catchment outflow site, indicating that the net effects of transport processes for these constituents were similar at both scales. However, concentrations of nutrients were different at the two sites, suggesting that field-scale variations in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> as well as nearstream and instream biochemical processes are important components of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemical transformation and transport in this catchment. This work indicates that irrigation coupled with artificial drainage networks may exacerbate the ecological effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> runoff by increasing direct connectivity between fields and streams and minimizing potentially mitigating effects (denitrification and dilution, for example) of longer subsurface pathways.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol14-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol14-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Uuuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart UUUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUUU-app5.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Uuuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limits and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart UUUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4441352','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4441352"><span>Challenges of Applying <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education in Tehran Hospital <span class="hlt">Practice</span> as Viewed By Nurses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Khosravi, Laleh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Salehi, Tahmineh; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Although many planners of professional <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education programs believe that this type of education positively affects the nurses’ performance, the results obtained by conducted research do not confirm such a perspective. In fact, inadequate application of these trainings in clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> is among the most challenging areas in nursing <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Hence, this study was conducted to describe the challenges nurses encounter in order to apply what they have learned during <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education programs in clinical settings of TUMS hospitals. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 medical-surgical nurses who worked in the hospitals of Tehran University of Medical sciences. For sampling, after listing all the general hospitals, their wards were selected in proportion to hospital. Nurses filled out a questionnaire about factors affecting the application of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education. The questionnaire contained 43 items and the dimensions were supportive-organizational, individual, professional, and educational program design factors. The analysis was carried out using parametric and non-parametric method using SPSS 16 package. Results The results showed while 48.5% and 53.8% of nurses mentioned organizational and professional factors, respectively as the most inhibiting factors; only 2.25% of the nurses believed that organizational factors are facilitating. Conclusion The results obtained in this study are important regarding the fact that organizational and professional factors have a key role in applying or lack of application of learned materials. Thus, hospital authorities as well as nursing managers can provide the necessary condition in application of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education through promotion of facilitating factors and eliminating the hindering ones.  PMID:26005692</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17535461','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17535461"><span>Integrating social identity theory and the theory of planned behaviour to explain decisions to engage in sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fielding, Kelly S; Terry, Deborah J; Masser, Barbara M; Hogg, Michael A</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>The present research integrates core aspects of social identity theory with the theory of planned behaviour to investigate factors influencing engagement in sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Using a two-wave prospective design, two studies were conducted with samples of farmers (N = 609 and N = 259, respectively). At Time 1, a questionnaire survey assessed theory of planned behaviour variables in relation to engaging in riparian zone management (a sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span>). In addition, intergroup perceptions (i.e. relations between rural and urban groups), group norms and group identification were assessed. At Time 2, self-reported behaviour was measured. There was support for the integrated model across both studies. As predicted, past behaviour, attitudes and perceived behavioural control were significant predictors of intentions, and intentions significantly predicted self-reported behaviour. Group norms and intergroup perceptions were also significant predictors of intentions providing support for the inclusion of social identity concepts in the theory of planned behaviour. More supportive group norms were associated with higher intentions, especially for high-group identifiers. In contrast, more negative intergroup perceptions were associated with lower intentions and, unexpectedly, this effect only emerged for low-group identifiers. This suggests that in the context of decisions to engage in riparian zone management, an important sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span>, high identifiers are influenced predominantly by in-group rather than out-group considerations, whereas low identifiers may attend to cues from both the in-group and the out-group when making their decisions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=302217','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=302217"><span>Landuse and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practice</span> web-service (LAMPS) for agroecosystem modeling and conservation planning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Agroecosystem models and conservation planning tools require spatially and temporally explicit input data about <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management operations. The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is developing a Land Management and Operation Database (LMOD) which contains potential model input, howe...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=246191&keyword=difference+AND+waters&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=89806688&CFTOKEN=10199668','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=246191&keyword=difference+AND+waters&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=89806688&CFTOKEN=10199668"><span>Water Quality Response to Changes in <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Land Use <span class="hlt">Practices</span> at Headwater Streams in Georgia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Poorly managed <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds may be one of the most important contributors to high levels of bacterial and sediment loadings in surface waters. We investigated two cattle farms with differing management schemes to compare how physicochemical and meteorological parameter...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol15-sec63-11223.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol15-sec63-11223.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.11223 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> and management <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> and management <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards? 63.11223 Section 63.11223 Protection of... management <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards? (a) For affected sources subject to the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard or the management <span class="hlt">practices</span> of a tune-up, you must conduct a biennial performance tune-up according to paragraphs...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25391462','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25391462"><span>Trade-off between water pollution prevention, <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> profit, and farmer <span class="hlt">practice</span>--an optimization methodology for discussion on land-use adjustment in China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Jianchang; Zhang, Luoping; Zhang, Yuzhen; Deng, Hongbing</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> decision-making to control nonpoint source (NPS) water pollution may not be efficiently implemented, if there is no appropriate cost-benefit analysis on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. This paper presents an interval-fuzzy linear programming (IFLP) model to deal with the trade-off between <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> revenue, NPS pollution control, and alternative <span class="hlt">practices</span> through land adjustment for Wuchuan catchment, a typical <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> area in Jiulong River watershed, Fujian Province of China. From the results, the lower combination of <span class="hlt">practice</span> 1, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 2, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 3, and <span class="hlt">practice</span> 7 with the land area of 12.6, 5.2, 145.2, and 85.3 hm(2), respectively, could reduce NPS pollution load by 10%. The combination yields an income of 98,580 Chinese Yuan/a. If the pollution reduction is 15%, the higher combination need <span class="hlt">practice</span> 1, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 2, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 3, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 5, and <span class="hlt">practice</span> 7 with the land area of 54.4, 23.6, 18.0, 6.3, and 85.3 hm(2), respectively. The income of this combination is 915,170 Chinese Yuan/a. The sensitivity analysis of IFLP indicates that the cost-effective <span class="hlt">practices</span> are ranked as follows: <span class="hlt">practice</span> 7 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 2 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 1 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 5 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 3 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 6 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 4. In addition, the uncertainties in the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> NPS pollution control system could be effectively quantified by the IFLP model. Furthermore, to accomplish a reasonable and applicable project of land-use adjustment, decision-makers could also integrate above solutions with their own experience and other information.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/wsp/2449/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/wsp/2449/report.pdf"><span>Ground-water flow, geochemistry, and effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on nitrogen transport at study sites in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces, Patuxent River basin, Maryland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>McFarland, E. Randolph</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>In an effort to improve water quality in Chesapeake Bay, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> are being promoted that are intended to reduce contaminant transport to the Bay. The effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on nitrogen transport were assessed at two 10-acre study sites in the Patuxent River basin, Maryland, during 1986-92. Nitrogen load was larger in ground water than in surface runoff at both sites. At the study site in the Piedmont Province, nitrogen load in ground water decreased from 12 to 6 (lb/acre)/yr (pound per acre per year) as corn under no-till cultivation was replaced by no-till soybeans, <span class="hlt">continuous</span> alfalfa, and contoured strip crops alternated among corn, alfalfa, and soybeans. At the study site in the Coastal Plain Province, no-till soybeans resulted in a nitrogen load in ground water of 12.55 (lb/acre)/yr, whereas conventional-till soybeans resulted in a nitrogen load in ground water of 11.51 (lb/acre)/yr.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jwmg.135','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jwmg.135"><span>Location and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> influence spring use of harvested cornfields by cranes and geese in Nebraska</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Anteau, Michael J.; Sherfy, Mark H.; Bishop, Andrew A.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Millions of ducks, geese, and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; hereafter cranes) stop in the Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) of Nebraska to store nutrients for migration and reproduction by consuming corn remaining in fields after harvest. We examined factors that influence use of cornfields by cranes and geese (all mid-continent species combined; e.g., Anser, Chen, and Branta spp.) because it is a key step to efficient conservation planning aimed at ensuring that adequate food resources are available to migratory birds stopping in the CPRV. Distance to night-time roost site, segment of the CPRV (west to east), and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (post-harvest treatment of cornfields: idle, grazed, mulched, mulched and grazed, and tilled) were the most important and influential variables in our models for geese and cranes. Probability of cornfield use by geese and cranes decreased with increasing distance from the closest potential roosting site. The use of cornfields by geese increased with the density of corn present there during the early migration period, but field use by cranes appeared not to be influenced by early migration corn density. However, probability of cornfield use by cranes did increase with the amount of wet grassland habitat within 4.8 km of the field. Geese were most likely to use fields that were tilled and least likely to use fields that were mulched and grazed. Cranes were most likely to use fields that were mulched and least likely to use fields that were tilled, but grazing appeared not to influence the likelihood of field use by cranes. Geese were more likely to use cornfields in western segments of the CPRV, but cranes were more likely to use cornfields in eastern segments. Our data suggest that managers could favor crane use of fields and reduce direct competition with geese by reducing fall and spring tilling and increasing mulching. Moreover, crane conservation efforts would be most beneficial if they were focused in the eastern portions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036439','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036439"><span>Location and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> influence spring use of harvested cornfields by cranes and geese in Nebraska</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Anteau, M.J.; Sherfy, M.H.; Bishop, A.A.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Millions of ducks, geese, and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; hereafter cranes) stop in the Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) of Nebraska to store nutrients for migration and reproduction by consuming corn remaining in fields after harvest. We examined factors that influence use of cornfields by cranes and geese (all mid-continent species combined; e.g., Anser, Chen, and Branta spp.) because it is a key step to efficient conservation planning aimed at ensuring that adequate food resources are available to migratory birds stopping in the CPRV. Distance to night-time roost site, segment of the CPRV (west to east), and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (post-harvest treatment of cornfields: idle, grazed, mulched, mulched and grazed, and tilled) were the most important and influential variables in our models for geese and cranes. Probability of cornfield use by geese and cranes decreased with increasing distance from the closest potential roosting site. The use of cornfields by geese increased with the density of corn present there during the early migration period, but field use by cranes appeared not to be influenced by early migration corn density. However, probability of cornfield use by cranes did increase with the amount of wet grassland habitat within 4.8 km of the field. Geese were most likely to use fields that were tilled and least likely to use fields that were mulched and grazed. Cranes were most likely to use fields that were mulched and least likely to use fields that were tilled, but grazing appeared not to influence the likelihood of field use by cranes. Geese were more likely to use cornfields in western segments of the CPRV, but cranes were more likely to use cornfields in eastern segments. Our data suggest that managers could favor crane use of fields and reduce direct competition with geese by reducing fall and spring tilling and increasing mulching. Moreover, crane conservation efforts would be most beneficial if they were focused in the eastern portions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.5056C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.5056C"><span>Vineyard weeds control <span class="hlt">practices</span> impact on surface water transfers: using numerical tracer experiment coupled to a distributed hydrological model to manage <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> spatial arrangements.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Colin, F.; Moussa, R.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>In rural basins, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscape management highly influences water and pollutants transfers. Landuse, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and their spatial arrangements are at issue. Hydrological model are widely used to explore impacts of anthropogenic influences on experimental catchments. But planning all spatial arrangements leads to a possible cases count which cannot be considered. On the basis of the recent « numerical experiment » approach, we propose a « numerical tracer function » which had to be coupled to a distributed rainfall-runoff model. This function simulate the transfer of a virtual tracer successively spread on each distributed unit inside the catchment. It allows to rank hydrological spatial units according to their hydrological contribution to the surface flows, particularly at the catchment outlet. It was used with the distributed model MHYDAS in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> context. The case study concerns the experimental Roujan vine-growing catchment (1km², south of France) studied since 1992. In this Mediterranean context, we focus on the soil hydraulic conductivity distributed parameter because it highly depends on weed control <span class="hlt">practices</span> (chemical weeding induces a lot more runoff than mechanical weeding). We checked model sensitivity analysis to soil hydraulic conductivity spatial arrangement on runoff coefficient, peak discharge and catchment lag-time. Results show (i) the use of the tracer function is more efficient than a random approach to improve sensitivity to spatial arrangements from point of view of simulated discharge range, (ii) the first factor explaining hydrological simulations variability was <span class="hlt">practices</span> area ratio, (iii) variability induced by <span class="hlt">practices</span> spatial arrangements was significant on runoff coefficient and peak discharge for balanced <span class="hlt">practices</span> area ratio and on lag-time for low area ratio of chemical weeding <span class="hlt">practices</span>. From the actual situation on the experimental Roujan catchment (40% of tilled and 60% of non tilled vineyard</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22867863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22867863"><span>Heavy <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> workloads and low crop diversity are strong barriers to improving child feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the Bolivian Andes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jones, Andrew D; Cruz Agudo, Yesmina; Galway, Lindsay; Bentley, Jeffery; Pinstrup-Andersen, Per</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Most nutrition initiatives to date aimed at improving infant and young child feeding (IYCF) have emphasized addressing knowledge gaps through behavior change messaging with less focus on addressing the underlying environmental barriers that may shape these behaviors. This research integrates an analysis of longitudinal dietary data with qualitative data on barriers to improved child feeding to identify the nature and extent of the barriers caregivers face to improving IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a farming region of the Bolivian Andes, and to determine the relative influence of these barriers on caregivers' abilities to improve IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Sixty-nine caregivers were selected from a sample of 331 households that participated in a longitudinal survey assessing changes in IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span> among caregivers with children aged 0-36 months from March 2009 to March 2010. Forty-nine barriers within 12 categories of barriers were identified through semi-structured interviews with the 69 caregivers. The most frequently reported barriers were those related to women's time dedicated to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> labor, the limited diversity of household <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production, and lack of support for child feeding from spouses and mothers-in-law. In multivariate analyses controlling for several variables that could potentially influence IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span>, these barriers were negatively associated with changes to the diversity of child diets, child dietary energy intake, and child meal frequency. While knowledge gaps and individual-level influences affected IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span>, physical and social caregiving environments in this region of Bolivia were even more important. Behavior change communication alone will likely not address the social and environmental barriers to improved child feeding that often prevent translation of improved knowledge into action. Particularly in rural regions, <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> may strongly influence child feeding, not only indirectly through household food security, but also directly</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3434953','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3434953"><span>Heavy <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> workloads and low crop diversity are strong barriers to improving child feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the Bolivian Andes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jones, Andrew D; Agudo, Yesmina Cruz; Galway, Lindsay; Bentley, Jeffery; Pinstrup-Andersen, Per</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Most nutrition initiatives to date aimed at improving infant and young child feeding (IYCF) have emphasized addressing knowledge gaps through behavior change messaging with less focus on addressing the underlying environmental barriers that may shape these behaviors. This research integrates an analysis of longitudinal dietary data with qualitative data on barriers to improved child feeding to identify the nature and extent of the barriers caregivers face to improving IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a farming region of the Bolivian Andes, and to determine the relative influence of these barriers on caregivers’ abilities to improve IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Sixty-nine caregivers were selected from a sample of 331 households that participated in a longitudinal survey assessing changes in IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span> among caregivers with children aged 0–36 months from March 2009 to March 2010. Forty-nine barriers within 12 categories of barriers were identified through semi-structured interviews with the 69 caregivers. The most frequently reported barriers were those related to women’s time dedicated to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> labor, the limited diversity of household <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production, and lack of support for child feeding from spouses and mothers-in-law. In multivariate analyses controlling for several variables that could potentially influence IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span>, these barriers were negatively associated with changes to the diversity of child diets, child dietary energy intake, and child meal frequency. While knowledge gaps and individual-level influences affected IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span>, physical and social caregiving environments in this region of Bolivia were even more important. Behavior change communication alone will likely not address the social and environmental barriers to improved child feeding that often prevent translation of improved knowledge into action. Particularly in rural regions, <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> may strongly influence child feeding, not only indirectly through household food security, but also</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B14A..06D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B14A..06D"><span>Estimating Changes in Soil Organic Carbon Under Selected <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Residue and Fertilizer Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> with the Community Land Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Drewniak, B. A.; Prell, J.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Song, J.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Bioenergy from biofuels is becoming an increasingly important component of renewable energy, but generating biofuels from primarily <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> resources can put tremendous strain on land and water resources, including impacts on soil carbon storage. In order to evaluate the influence of cultivation on the terrestrial carbon cycle, we have integrated <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> representation into the coupled carbon-nitrogen Community Land Model (CLM-CN) framework through the addition of three new plant functional types: maize, soybean, and spring wheat. The new model, CLM-Crop is validated against observations from two AmeriFlux sites for carbon fluxes. We estimate changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) through several model simulations which include different land use scenarios with <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> distributions for the years 1990, 2000, and crops simulated as grassland, as well as changing management <span class="hlt">practices</span> such as fertilizer and residue. We consider changes in SOC from no fertilizer vs. current fertilizer inputs and three different post-harvest leaf and stem residue returns, which compare current residue amounts of 30-40% with a high residue return of 90% and a low residue return of 10%. Our results indicate that <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> disturbance has a significant impact on SOC, the largest impact as a result of small residue returns. The model simulates US soils have lost 15% of the total SOC since intensive cultivation began, but increasing the residue returned can decrease this loss by 5%. When grassland is converted to <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, local soils are estimated to lose 50-60% of the total SOC stored. Our results demonstrate the significance cultivation has on SOC storage and the role management <span class="hlt">practices</span> have on the carbon cycle.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec160-90.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec160-90.pdf"><span>7 CFR 160.90 - False, misleading, or deceitful <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... Section 160.90 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NAVAL STORES REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Labeling, Advertising and Packing § 160.90 False, misleading,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=279776','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=279776"><span>Associations between conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> and ecology: ecological responses of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> streams and lakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Conservation Effects Assessment Program (CEAP) Watershed Assessment Study goals are to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> at the watershed scale. Currently, a critical knowledge gap exists in linking conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> and their ecological effects on aquatic ecosy...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27553887','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27553887"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> anaerobic digestion power plants in Ireland and Germany: policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Auer, Agathe; Vande Burgt, Nathan H; Abram, Florence; Barry, Gerald; Fenton, Owen; Markey, Bryan K; Nolan, Stephen; Richards, Karl; Bolton, Declan; De Waal, Theo; Gordon, Stephen V; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Whyte, Paul; Zintl, Annetta</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>The process of anaerobic digestion (AD) is valued as a carbon-neutral energy source, while simultaneously treating organic waste, making it safer for disposal or use as a fertilizer on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land. The AD process in many European nations, such as Germany, has grown from use of small, localized digesters to the operation of large-scale treatment facilities, which contribute significantly to national renewable energy quotas. However, these large AD plants are costly to run and demand intensive farming of energy crops for feedstock. Current policy in Germany has transitioned to support funding for smaller digesters, while also limiting the use of energy crops. AD within Ireland, as a new technology, is affected by ambiguous governmental policies concerning waste and energy. A clear governmental strategy supporting on-site AD processing of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> waste will significantly reduce Ireland's carbon footprint, improve the safety and bioavailability of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> waste, and provide an indigenous renewable energy source. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007HESS...11.1811C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007HESS...11.1811C"><span>Assessment of alternative land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> using hydrological simulation and a decision support tool: Arborea <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> region, Sardinia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cau, P.; Paniconi, C.</p> <p>2007-11-01</p> <p>Quantifying the impact of land use on water supply and quality is a primary focus of environmental management. In this work we apply a semidistributed hydrological model (SWAT) to predict the impact of different land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemical yield over a long period of time for a study site situated in the Arborea region of central Sardinia, Italy. The physical processes associated with water movement, crop growth, and nutrient cycling are directly modeled by SWAT. The model simulations are used to identify indicators that reflect critical processes related to the integrity and sustainability of the ecosystem. Specifically we focus on stream quality and quantity indicators associated with anthropogenic and natural sources of pollution. A multicriteria decision support system is then used to develop the analysis matrix where water quality and quantity indicators for the rivers, lagoons, and soil are combined with socio-economic variables. The DSS is used to assess four options involving alternative watersheds designated for intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and dairy farming and the use or not of treated wastewater for irrigation. Our analysis suggests that of the four options, the most widely acceptable consists in the transfer of intensive <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to the larger watershed, which is less vulnerable, in tandem with wastewater reuse, which rates highly due to water scarcity in this region of the Mediterranean. More generally, the work demonstrates how both qualitative and quantitative methods and information can assist decision making in complex settings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf"><span>7 CFR 1450.208 - Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1450.208 Section 1450.208 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf"><span>7 CFR 1450.208 - Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1450.208 Section 1450.208 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf"><span>7 CFR 1450.208 - Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1450.208 Section 1450.208 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf"><span>7 CFR 1450.208 - Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1450.208 Section 1450.208 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511659A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511659A"><span>Impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on runoff and glyphosate peaks in a small vineyard catchment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Amiot, Audrey; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Jadas-Hécart, Alain; Landry, David; Sourice, Stéphane; Communal, Pierre-Yves; Ballouche, Aziz</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p> other presented parameters. Moreover, those coefficients seem not governed by meteorological variability but directly linked with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and in particular with tillage, not realised in 2009 as started in 2011 but increased in surface and number in 2012. To conlude, results show that whereas glyphosate concentrations decrease while the percentage of weeded areas increases, erosion increases. In order to confirm those results, the project is now focusing on glyphosate's sorption on unstable soil's particles. Acknowledgments This research has been funded by the BVVITI Regional project of the Contrat Regional Bassin Versant and Contrat Territorial supported by the Region Pays-de-la-Loire and the Water Agency Loire-Bretagne, as by the winegrower profession with FranceAgriMer, InterLoire and by the French Institute of vine and wine. We are grateful to the farmers and we specially acknowledge the municipality of Rochefort-sur-Loire.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=331109','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=331109"><span>Effects of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on phosphorus loss reduction from an Indiana <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Phosphorus losses from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands have caused serious eutrophication problems, particularly in Lake Erie. However, techniques that can effectively reduce total and soluble phosphorus losses from croplands and drainage channels can be difficult to implement and gauge. This modeling study was ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=321332','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=321332"><span>Impact of conservation land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil microbial function in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The USDA Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) involves removing <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land from production and replanting with native vegetation for the purpose of reducing agriculture’s impact on the environment. In 2002, part of the Beasley Lake watershed in the Mississippi Delta was enrolled in CRP. In ad...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=237934','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=237934"><span>The Impact of Crop, Pest, and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Mycotoxin Contamination of Field Crops</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by several fungal genera which occur in a wide variety of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> commodities worldwide. Health issues and economic losses due to mycotoxin contamination occur at all stages of the food and feed production process. Mycotoxigenic fungi...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED444413.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED444413.pdf"><span>SUNY College of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> and Technology at Morrisville: Selected Financial Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.</p> <p></p> <p>This audit report of the State University of New York (SUNY) College of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> and Technology at Morrisville addresses the question of whether the college management has established an effective system of internal control over its revenue, equipment, and student work-study payroll. The audit makes a number of observations and conclusions.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=319154','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=319154"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on N loads in the Mississippi-Atchafalya River Basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A modeling framework consisting of a farm-scale model, <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Policy Environmental Extender (APEX); a watershedscale model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT); and databases was used in the Conservation Effects Assessment Project to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation practi...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1817902G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1817902G"><span>Organic matter composition of soil macropore surfaces under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Glæsner, Nadia; Leue, Marin; Magid, Jacob; Gerke, Horst H.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Understanding the heterogeneous nature of soil, i.e. properties and processes occurring specifically at local scales is essential for best managing our soil resources for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production. Examination of intact soil structures in order to obtain an increased understanding of how soil systems operate from small to large scale represents a large gap within soil science research. Dissolved chemicals, nutrients and particles are transported through the disturbed plow layer of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil, where after flow through the lower soil layers occur by preferential flow via macropores. Rapid movement of water through macropores limit the contact between the preferentially moving water and the surrounding soil matrix, therefore contact and exchange of solutes in the water is largely restricted to the surface area of the macropores. Organomineral complex coated surfaces control sorption and exchange properties of solutes, as well as availability of essential nutrients to plant roots and to the preferentially flowing water. DRIFT (Diffuse Reflectance infrared Fourier Transform) Mapping has been developed to examine composition of organic matter coated macropores. In this study macropore surfaces structures will be determined for organic matter composition using DRIFT from a long-term field experiment on waste application to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil (CRUCIAL, close to Copenhagen, Denmark). Parcels with 5 treatments; accelerated household waste, accelerated sewage sludge, accelerated cattle manure, NPK and unfertilized, will be examined in order to study whether <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management have an impact on the organic matter composition of intact structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=229452','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=229452"><span>Assessing the importance of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce the ecological risk of pesticides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The use of pesticides in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, their potential to be transported beyond the intended target, and their possible risk to human and environmental health has been of public concern for many years. We utilized 5 years of field data from 3 vegetable production systems to evaluate the ability of ag...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Behaviorism&pg=6&id=EJ653220','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Behaviorism&pg=6&id=EJ653220"><span>Adult Education Philosophies <span class="hlt">Practiced</span> by <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education Teachers in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boone, Harry N.; Gartin, Stacy A.; Wright, Crystal B.; Lawrence, Layle D.; Odell, Kerry S.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Responses from 118 of 314 secondary <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> teachers indicated that three-fourths teach adults; about two-thirds identified with the progressive education philosophy, 21% with behaviorism; nearly half had no formal training in teaching adults. Effect size results suggest they may not have clearly defined adult education philosophies. (Contains…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvA..93b2315W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvA..93b2315W"><span><span class="hlt">Practical</span> security of <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution with finite sampling bandwidth effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Chao; Huang, Peng; Huang, Duan; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Practical</span> security of the <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) system with finite sampling bandwidth of analog-to-digital converter (ADC) at the receiver's side is investigated. We find that the finite sampling bandwidth effects may decrease the lower bound of secret key rate without awareness of the legitimate communicators. This leaves security loopholes for Eve to attack the system. In addition, this effect may restrains the linear relationship of secret key bit rate with repetition rate of the system; subsequently, there is a saturation value for the secret key bit rate with the repetition rate. To resist such kind of effects, we propose a dual sampling detection approach in which two ADCs are employed so that the finite sampling bandwidth effects are removed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1397408','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1397408"><span>Quality assurance and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> quality improvement: history, current <span class="hlt">practice</span>, and future directions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thomas, P C; Kettrick, R G; Singsen, B H</p> <p>1992-08-01</p> <p>Quality Assurance (QA) provides opportunities for physicians and allied health professionals to improve patient care and disease outcomes. Its goals are increased efficiency and efficacy in healthcare. QA activities are based upon objective criteria and systematic review and make important contributions to the effectiveness of hospitals and other care facilities. Successful programs help to maximize health status of patients while minimizing resource utilization. Beginning in 1917, early QA efforts were often informal and subjective but now include standards for QA and strategies for monitoring and evaluating patient care. Central to its new "Agenda for Change," the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations has embraced the concept of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> quality improvement (CQI). This moves the focus of review away from department- or practitioner-specific activities and toward a "systems" form of evaluation. CQI is rooted in patient-care realities, is easy to implement, is based upon scientific assessments, and solves <span class="hlt">practical</span> problems in an incremental and ongoing fashion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=34218','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=34218"><span>Global environmental impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> expansion: The need for sustainable and efficient <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tilman, David</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>The recent intensification of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, and the prospects of future intensification, will have major detrimental impacts on the nonagricultural terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of the world. The doubling of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> food production during the past 35 years was associated with a 6.87-fold increase in nitrogen fertilization, a 3.48-fold increase in phosphorus fertilization, a 1.68-fold increase in the amount of irrigated cropland, and a 1.1-fold increase in land in cultivation. Based on a simple linear extension of past trends, the anticipated next doubling of global food production would be associated with approximately 3-fold increases in nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization rates, a doubling of the irrigated land area, and an 18% increase in cropland. These projected changes would have dramatic impacts on the diversity, composition, and functioning of the remaining natural ecosystems of the world, and on their ability to provide society with a variety of essential ecosystem services. The largest impacts would be on freshwater and marine ecosystems, which would be greatly eutrophied by high rates of nitrogen and phosphorus release from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> fields. Aquatic nutrient eutrophication can lead to loss of biodiversity, outbreaks of nuisance species, shifts in the structure of food chains, and impairment of fisheries. Because of aerial redistribution of various forms of nitrogen, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> intensification also would eutrophy many natural terrestrial ecosystems and contribute to atmospheric accumulation of greenhouse gases. These detrimental environmental impacts of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> can be minimized only if there is much more efficient use and recycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in agroecosystems. PMID:10339530</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=310983','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=310983"><span>Development of the Land-use and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> web-Service (LAMPS) for generating crop rotations in space and time</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Agroecosystem models and conservation planning tools require spatially and temporally explicit input data about <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management operations. The Land-use and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> web-Service (LAMPS) provides crop rotation and management information for user-specified areas within...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21075916','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21075916"><span><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education course #3: current <span class="hlt">practices</span> and future trends in neuropathology assessment for developmental neurotoxicity testing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bolon, Brad; Garman, Robert H; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen G; Allan Johnson, G; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Krinke, Georg; Little, Peter B; Makris, Susan L; Mellon, R Daniel; Sulik, Kathleen K; Jensen, Karl</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education course on Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing (DNT) was designed to communicate current <span class="hlt">practices</span> for DNT neuropathology, describe promising innovations in quantitative analysis and noninvasive imaging, and facilitate a discussion among experienced neuropathologists and regulatory scientists regarding suitable DNT <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Conventional DNT neuropathology endpoints are qualitative histopathology and morphometric endpoints of particularly vulnerable sites (e.g., cerebral, cerebellar, or hippocampal thickness). Novel imaging and stereology measurements hold promise for automated analysis of factors that cannot be effectively examined in routinely processed specimens (e.g., cell numbers, fiber tract integrity). The panel recommended that dedicated DNT neuropathology data sets be acquired on a minimum of 8 sections (for qualitative assessment) or 3 sections (for quantitative linear and stereological analyses) using a small battery of stains to examine neurons and myelin. Where guidelines permit discretion, immersion fixation is acceptable for younger animals (postnatal day 22 or earlier), and peripheral nerves may be embedded in paraffin. Frequent concerns regarding DNT data sets include false-negative outcomes due to processing difficulties (e.g., lack of concordance among sections from different animals) and insensitive analytical endpoints (e.g., qualitative evaluation) as well as false-positive results arising from overinterpretation or misreading by inexperienced pathologists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28287357','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28287357"><span>A Review of Agents for Palliative Sedation/<span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Deep Sedation: Pharmacology and <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Applications.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bodnar, John</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Continuous</span> deep sedation at the end of life is a specific form of palliative sedation requiring a care plan that essentially places and maintains the patient in an unresponsive state because their symptoms are refractory to any other interventions. Because this application is uncommon, many providers may lack <span class="hlt">practical</span> experience in this specialized area and resources they can access are outdated, nonspecific, and/or not comprehensive. The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence- and experience-based reference that specifically addresses those medications and regimens and their <span class="hlt">practical</span> applications for this very narrow, but vital, aspect of hospice care. Patient goals in a hospital and hospice environments are different, so the manner in which widely used sedatives are dosed and applied can differ greatly as well. Parameters applied in end-of-life care that are based on experience and a thorough understanding of the pharmacology of those medications will differ from those applied in an intensive care unit or other medical environments. By recognizing these different goals and applying well-founded regimens geared specifically for end-of-life sedation, we can address our patients' symptoms in a more timely and efficacious manner.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1994/0507/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1994/0507/report.pdf"><span>Ground-water flow, geochemistry, and effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on nitrogen transport at study sites in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces, Patuxent River Basin, Maryland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>McFarland, E. Randolph</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>The effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on nitrogen transport were assessed at two 10-acre study sites in the Patuxent River Basin, Maryland, during 1986- 92. Nitrogen load was larger in ground water than in surface runoff at both sites. Denitrification and (or) long traveltimes of ground water at the study site in the Piedmont Province resulted in lower concentrations of nitrate than at the site in the Coastal Plain Province. The study period was brief compared to traveltimes of nitrogen in ground water of several decades. Therefore, the effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> were observed only in parts of both sites. At the Piedmont site, nitrate concentration in two springs was 7 mg/L (milligrams per liter) two years after corn was grown under no-till cultivation, and decreased to 3.5 mg/L during 4 years while cultivation <span class="hlt">practices</span> and crops included no-till soybeans, <span class="hlt">continuous</span> alfalfa, and contoured strips alternated among corn, alfalfa, and soybeans. Nitrogen load in ground water decreased from 12 to 6 (lb/acre)/yr (pounds per acre per year). At the Coastal Plain site, the concentration of nitrate in ground water decreased from 10 mg/L after soybeans were grown under no-till cultivation for 2 years, to 9 mg/L after soybeans were grown under conventional till cultivation for 3 years. No-till cultivation in 1988 resulted in a greater nitrogen load in ground water (12.55 (lbs/acre)/yr), as well as greater ground-water recharge and discharge, than conventional till cultivation in 1991 (11.51 (lbs/ acre)/yr), even though the amount and timing of precipitation for both years were similar.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9648E..0VQ','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9648E..0VQ"><span>Quantum hacking on a <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum cryptosystem by inserting an external light</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Qin, Hao; Kumar, Rupesh; Alleaume, Romain</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We report here a new side channel attack on a <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable (CV) quantum key distribution (QKD) system. Inspired by blinding attack in discrete-variable QKD, we formalize an attack strategy by inserting an external light into a CV QKD system implemented Gaussian-modulated coherent state protocol and show that our attack can compromise its <span class="hlt">practical</span> security. In this attack, we concern imperfections of a balanced homodyne detector used in CV QKD. According to our analysis, if one inserts an external light into Bob's signal port, due to the imperfect subtraction from the homodyne detector, the leakage of the external light contributes a displacement on the homodyne signal which causes detector electronics saturation. In consequence, Bob's quadrature measurement is not linear with the quadrature sent by Alice. By considering such vulnerability, a potential Eve can launch a full intercept-resend attack meanwhile she inserts an external light into Bob's signal port. By selecting proper properties of the external light, Eve actively controls the induced displacement value from the inserted light which results saturation of homodyne detection. In consequence, Eve can bias the excess noise due to the intercept-resend attack and the external light, such that Alice and Bob believe their excess noise estimation is below the null key threshold and they can still share a secret key. Our attack shows that the detector loopholes also exist in CV QKD, and it seems influence all the CV QKD systems using homodyne detection, since all the <span class="hlt">practical</span> detectors have finite detection range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1099655.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1099655.pdf"><span>Knowledge and Attitude of Secondary School Teachers towards <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Assessment <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Esan Central Senatorial District of Edo State</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Alufohai, P. J.; Akinlosotu, T. N.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The study investigated knowledge and attitude of secondary school teachers towards <span class="hlt">continuous</span> assessment (CA) <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Edo Central Senatorial District, Nigeria. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of gender, age, years of experience and area of educational specialization on teachers' attitude towards CA <span class="hlt">practices</span> in secondary…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7334.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7334.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7334 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me? 63.7334 Section 63.7334 Protection of... Requirements § 63.7334 How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me? (a) For each by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues subject to the work...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19042676','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19042676"><span>Perceptions of risk, stressors, and locus of control influence intentions to <span class="hlt">practice</span> safety behaviors in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Elkind, Pamela Dee</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This article argues that a combination of factors including risk perceptions, locus of control, and chronic stress influences farmers' intentions to behave safely. To demonstrate how these intervening variables influence behavioral intentions, results of 16 empirical research projects are superimposed upon an extensive literature review. Analyses include data collected from 3165 respondents via survey questionnaires, couple and key informant interviews, quasi-experimental evaluation instruments, and focus group dialogue. Using Ajzen's framework, this multilayered research process yields a wealth of both qualitative and quantitative data to support the argument. The results suggest that information alone will not affect behavior. Only when chronic stressors from occupational and structural processes are alleviated and coping mechanisms introduced, the political economy of farming improves, and farm populations perceive that they are in control of their work environment will meaningful reduction in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> injuries and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span>-related disease be possible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=264263','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=264263"><span>The contribution of arbusclar mycorrhizal fungi to the success or failure of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Good farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> are conducted for a variety of reasons. Farmers now include management <span class="hlt">practices</span> such as over wintering cover crops, reduced tillage, and crop rotation with the goals of reducing soil erosion, managing nutrient availability, building soil organic matter, controlling weeds, an...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/wsp/2493/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/wsp/2493/report.pdf"><span>Evaluation of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best-management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the Conestoga River headwaters, Pennsylvania; a summary report, 1982-90</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Lietman, Patricia L.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Pipe-outlet terracing was effective in reducing sediment losses from a field site, but total nitrogen and phosphorus losses with runoff were not significantly different before and after terracing. Median concentrations of dissolved nitrate in several ground-water sampling locations increased after terrace installation. Dissolved nitrate concentrations in ground water decreased significantly after nutrient-management implementation. Findings indicate that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span>-management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to improve water quality are most effective if their overall design effects on surface- and ground-water systems are considered in their design.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.B43I0540M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.B43I0540M"><span>Plant available silicon in South-east Asian rice paddy soils - relevance of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> and of abiotic factors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marxen, A.; Klotzbücher, T.; Vetterlein, D.; Jahn, R.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Background Silicon (Si) plays a crucial role in rice production. Si content of rice plants exceeds the content of other major nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorous or potassium. Recent studies showed that in some environments external supply of Si can enhance the growth of rice plants. Rice plants express specific Si transporters to absorb Si from soil solutions in form of silicic acid, which precipitates in tissue cells forming amorphous silica bodies, called phytoliths. The phytoliths are returned to soils with plant residues. They might be a main source of plant available silicic acid in soils. Aims In this study we assess the effects of rice paddy cultivation on the stocks of `reactive` Si fractions in mineral topsoils of rice paddy fields in contrasting landscapes. The `reactive` Si fractions are presumed to determine the release of plant-available silicic acid in soils. We consider the relevance of abiotic factors (mineral assemblage; soil weathering status) and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> for these fractions. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which were assumed to affect the stocks of `reactive` Si were (i) the usage of different rice varieties (which might differ in Si demand), (ii) straw residue management (i.e., whether straw residues are returned to the fields or removed and used e.g. as fodder), and (iii) yield level and number of crops per year. Material and methods Soils (top horizon of about 0-20 cm depth) were sampled from rice paddy fields in 2 mountainous and 5 lowland landscapes of contrasting geologic conditions in Vietnam and the Philippines. Ten paddy fields were sampled per landscape. The rice paddy management within landscapes differed when different farmers and/or communities managed the fields. We analysed the following fractions of `reactive` Si in the soils: acetate-extractable Si (dissolved and easily exchangeable Si), phosphate-extractable Si (adsorbed Si), oxalate extractable Si (Si associated with poorly-ordered sesquioxides), NaOH extractable Si</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1021941','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1021941"><span>Epidemiology of health and safety risks in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and related industries. <span class="hlt">Practical</span> applications for rural physicians.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zejda, J E; McDuffie, H H; Dosman, J A</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Epidemiologic studies document that work in the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sector is associated with many occupational health hazards. Exposure to organic dusts and airborne microorganisms and their toxins may lead to respiratory disorders. The burden of exposure-related chronic bronchitis, asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, organic-dust toxic syndrome, and chronic airflow limitation can be diminished by appropriate preventive measures. The contribution of exposures to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemicals to cancers and neurodegenerative disorders is being investigated. Some studies document that farmers and those in related industries are at higher risk for the development of cancer of the stomach, soft tissue sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Chronic encephalopathy and Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases are being studied in relation to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemicals. The possible carcinogenicity and neurotoxicity of pesticides emphasize the need to promote the safe use of chemicals. Another area for health promotion programs is disabling injuries and traumatic deaths. Farm accidents are important because of their frequent occurrence among young people and disturbing fatality rates. Other health issues of concern in these industries include skin diseases, hearing loss, and stress. PMID:8470386</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21728869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21728869"><span>Compliance with the North American Guidelines for Children's <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Tasks (NAGCAT) work <span class="hlt">practice</span> recommendations for youth working with large animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Asti, L; Canan, B D; Heaney, C; Ashida, S; Renick, K; Xiang, H; Stallones, L; Jepsen, S D; Crawford, J M; Wilkins, J R</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The North American Guidelines for Children's <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Tasks (NAGCAT) were developed to reduce the risk of childhood <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate compliance with NAGCAT-recommended work <span class="hlt">practices</span> (WPs) when youth work with large animals. On a daily basis, over a period of 10 weeks, youth self-reported the number of minutes they worked with a large animal and whether they followed the associated NAGCAT WP guidelines. Statistical analyses were conducted to compare boys to girls and to consider the effect of factors such as youth age, farm residence status, and selected parental characteristics. A high proportion of youth exhibited relatively low compliance for most of the five WPs evaluated. Respirators were rarely worn, but checking for people and obstacles in the area while working with large animals was commonly reported. In general, boys, especially the older boys, exhibited higher compliance than did girls. The results of our study demonstrate, in general, that youth are not following recommended NAGCAT WPs when working with large animals, identifying an area in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> safety and health requiring focused attention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ250341.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ250341.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Microbiology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brill, Winston J.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Elucidates strategies for applying microbiological techniques to traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Discusses the manipulation of microorganisms that live with plants and also the problems involved in the introduction of new genes into crop plants by recombinant DNA methods. (CS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=243323','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=243323"><span>Influence of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Micrometerological Spatial Variations at Local and Regional Scales</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfers significantly influence interactions and feedbacks between vegetation and boundary layer in relation with plant phenology and water status. The current study focused on linking micrometeorological conditions to cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> at the local and regional scales ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=221159','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=221159"><span>INFLUENCE OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> <span class="hlt">PRACTICES</span> ON MICROMETEOROLOGICAL SPATIAL VARIATIONS AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL SCALES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Soil - vegetation - atmosphere transfers significantly influence interactions and feedbacks between vegetation and boundary layer, in relation with plant phenology and water status. The current study focused on linking micrometeorological conditions to cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> at the local and regional sc...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26882523','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26882523"><span>Batch vs <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-feeding operational mode for the removal of pesticides from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> run-off by microalgae systems: A laboratory scale study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Matamoros, Víctor; Rodríguez, Yolanda</p> <p>2016-05-15</p> <p>Microalgae-based water treatment technologies have been used in recent years to treat different water effluents, but their effectiveness for removing pesticides from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> run-off has not yet been addressed. This paper assesses the effect of microalgae in pesticide removal, as well as the influence of different operation strategies (<span class="hlt">continuous</span> vs batch feeding). The following pesticides were studied: mecoprop, atrazine, simazine, diazinone, alachlor, chlorfenvinphos, lindane, malathion, pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos, endosulfan and clofibric acid (tracer). 2L batch reactors and 5L <span class="hlt">continuous</span> reactors were spiked to 10 μg L(-1) of each pesticide. Additionally, three different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were assessed (2, 4 and 8 days) in the <span class="hlt">continuous</span> feeding reactors. The batch-feeding experiments demonstrated that the presence of microalgae increased the efficiency of lindane, alachlor and chlorpyrifos by 50%. The <span class="hlt">continuous</span> feeding reactors had higher removal efficiencies than the batch reactors for pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos and lindane. Whilst longer HRTs increased the technology's effectiveness, a low HRT of 2 days was capable of removing malathion, pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos, and endosulfan by up to 70%. This study suggests that microalgae-based treatment technologies can be an effective alternative for removing pesticides from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> run-off.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19854143','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19854143"><span>Knowledge, perceptions and <span class="hlt">practices</span> of farming communities on linkages between malaria and <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> in Mvomero District, Tanzania.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mboera, Leonard E G; Shayo, Elizabeth H; Senkoro, Kesheni P; Rumisha, Susan F; Mlozi, Malongo R S; Mayala, Benjamin K</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>This study was carried out to determine knowledge, perceptions and <span class="hlt">practices</span> of farming communities on linkages between <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and malaria in Mvomero District in Tanzania. A total of 661 adult males and females were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Most respondents (85.6%) were engaged in crop production. Significantly, a larger proportion (55.2%) of the respondents had primary school education (P<0.001). Majority (88.2%) respondents described malaria as the most important public health problem. However, only 48.2% of the respondents had high knowledge of malaria. The level of knowledge on malaria was associated with level of education of the respondent. Those who had attended at least primary school education were more knowledgeable that those without formal education. A significantly larger proportion (67%) of the respondents experienced most malaria episodes during the rainy season (P<0.001). Respondents with low knowledge on malaria experienced 2.3 times more malaria cases in their households than those with higher knowledge. Respondents with low knowledge preferred to seek care from health facilities (OR: 7.28) than those with high knowledge (OR: 0.15). Rice farming was significantly associated with malaria transmission compared to either maize or sugarcane farming (P<0.001). Cattle, sheep and goats were the domestic animals most frequently incriminated to create aquatic habitats for mosquito breeding. Householders with formal education (OR: 4.6, CI: 1.33-15.89, P-value=0.016) and higher knowledge (OR: 1.7, CI: 1.15-2.55, P-value=0.008) reported to incur large losses when having a malaria case than those without education/low knowledge. Majority (60.2%) of the respondent owned at least an insecticide treated mosquito net (ITN). Respondents with higher knowledge of malaria were likely to own at least an ITN than those with low knowledge (P<0.001). In conclusion, the knowledge on malaria and its linkage with <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> among farming</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1813987T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1813987T"><span>Short-term soil loss by eolian erosion in response to different rain-fed <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tanner, Smadar; Katra, Itzhak; Zaady, Eli</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Eolian (wind) erosion is a widespread process and a major form of soil degradation in arid and semi-arid regions. The present study examined changes in soil properties and eolian soil loss at a field scale in response to different soil treatments in two rain-fed <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Field experiments with a boundary-layer wind tunnel and soil analysis were used to obtain the data. Two <span class="hlt">practices</span> with different soil treatments (after harvest), mechanical tillage and stubble grazing intensities, were applied in the fallow phase of the rotation (dry season). The mechanical tillage and the stubble grazing had an immediate and direct effects on soil aggregation but not on the soil texture, and the contents of soil water, organic matter, and CaCO3. Higher erosion rates, that was measured as fluxes of total eolian sediment and particulate matter <10 μm (PM10), were recorded under mechanical tillage and grazing intensities compared with the undisturbed topsoil of the control plots. The erosion rates were higher in grazing plots than in tillage plots. The calculated soil fluxes in this study indicate potentially rapid soil degradation due to loss of fine particles by wind. The finding may have implications for long-term management of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils in semi-arid areas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20069448','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20069448"><span>Monitoring changes in soil organic carbon pools, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the tropics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Verma, Bibhash C; Datta, Siba Prasad; Rattan, Raj K; Singh, Anil K</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Soil organic matter not only affects sustainability of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> ecosystems, but also extremely important in maintaining overall quality of environment as soil contains a significant part of global carbon stock. Hence, we attempted to assess the influence of different tillage and nutrient management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on various stabilized and active soil organic carbon pools, and their contribution to the extractable nitrogen phosphorus and sulfur. Our study confined to the assessment of impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the soil organic carbon pools and extractable nutrients under three important cropping systems, viz. soybean-wheat, maize-wheat, and rice-wheat. Results indicated that there was marginal improvement in Walkley and Black content in soil under integrated and organic nutrient management treatments in soybean-wheat, maize-wheat, and rice-wheat after completion of four cropping cycles. Improvement in stabilized pools of soil organic carbon (SOC) was not proportional to the applied amount of organic manures. While, labile pools of SOC were increased with the increase in amount of added manures. Apparently, green manure (Sesbania) was more effective in enhancing the lability of SOC as compared to farmyard manure and crop residues. The KMnO(4)-oxidizable SOC proved to be more sensitive and consistent as an index of labile pool of SOC compared to microbial biomass carbon. Under different cropping sequences, labile fractions of soil organic carbon exerted consistent positive effect on the extractable nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in soil.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESD...1.5855K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESD...1.5855K"><span>A hydro-sedimentary modelling system for flash flood propagation and hazard estimation under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kourgialas, N. N.; Karatzas, G. P.</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>A modelling system for the estimation of flash flood flow characteristics and sediment transport is developed in this study. The system comprises of three components: (a) a modelling framework based on the hydrological model HSPF, (b) the hydrodynamic module of the hydraulic model MIKE 11 (quasi-2-D), and (c) the advection-dispersion module of MIKE 11 as a sediment transport model. An important parameter in hydraulic modelling is the Manning's coefficient, an indicator of the channel resistance which is directly depended on riparian vegetation changes. Riparian vegetation effect on flood propagation parameters such as water depth (inundation), discharge, flow velocity, and sediment transport load is investigated in this study. Based on the obtained results, when the weed cutting percentage is increased, the flood wave depth decreases while flow discharge, velocity and sediment transport load increase. The proposed modelling system is used to evaluate and illustrate the flood hazard for different cutting riparian vegetation scenarios. For the estimation of flood hazard, a combination of the flood propagation characteristics of water depth, flow velocity and sediment load was used. Next, an optimal selection of the most appropriate <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> cutting <span class="hlt">practices</span> of riparian vegetation was performed. Ultimately, the model results obtained for different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> cutting <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios can be employed to create flood protection measures for flood prone areas. The proposed methodology was applied to the downstream part of a small mediterranean river basin in Crete, Greece.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NHESS..14..625K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NHESS..14..625K"><span>A hydro-sedimentary modeling system for flash flood propagation and hazard estimation under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kourgialas, N. N.; Karatzas, G. P.</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>A modeling system for the estimation of flash flood flow velocity and sediment transport is developed in this study. The system comprises three components: (a) a modeling framework based on the hydrological model HSPF, (b) the hydrodynamic module of the hydraulic model MIKE 11 (quasi-2-D), and (c) the advection-dispersion module of MIKE 11 as a sediment transport model. An important parameter in hydraulic modeling is the Manning's coefficient, an indicator of the channel resistance which is directly dependent on riparian vegetation changes. Riparian vegetation's effect on flood propagation parameters such as water depth (inundation), discharge, flow velocity, and sediment transport load is investigated in this study. Based on the obtained results, when the weed-cutting percentage is increased, the flood wave depth decreases while flow discharge, velocity and sediment transport load increase. The proposed modeling system is used to evaluate and illustrate the flood hazard for different riparian vegetation cutting scenarios. For the estimation of flood hazard, a combination of the flood propagation characteristics of water depth, flow velocity and sediment load was used. Next, a well-balanced selection of the most appropriate <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> cutting <span class="hlt">practices</span> of riparian vegetation was performed. Ultimately, the model results obtained for different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> cutting <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios can be employed to create flood protection measures for flood-prone areas. The proposed methodology was applied to the downstream part of a small Mediterranean river basin in Crete, Greece.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.B51F0348C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.B51F0348C"><span>Simulated crop yield in response to changes in climate and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: results from a simple process based model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Caldararu, S.; Smith, M. J.; Purves, D.; Emmott, S.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Global <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> will, in the future, be faced with two main challenges: climate change and an increase in global food demand driven by an increase in population and changes in consumption habits. To be able to predict both the impacts of changes in climate on crop yields and the changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> necessary to respond to such impacts we currently need to improve our understanding of crop responses to climate and the predictive capability of our models. Ideally, what we would have at our disposal is a modelling tool which, given certain climatic conditions and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, can predict the growth pattern and final yield of any of the major crops across the globe. We present a simple, process-based crop growth model based on the assumption that plants allocate above- and below-ground biomass to maintain overall carbon optimality and that, to maintain this optimality, the reproductive stage begins at peak nitrogen uptake. The model includes responses to available light, water, temperature and carbon dioxide concentration as well as nitrogen fertilisation and irrigation. The model is data constrained at two sites, the Yaqui Valley, Mexico for wheat and the Southern Great Plains flux site for maize and soybean, using a robust combination of space-based vegetation data (including data from the MODIS and Landsat TM and ETM+ instruments), as well as ground-based biomass and yield measurements. We show a number of climate response scenarios, including increases in temperature and carbon dioxide concentrations as well as responses to irrigation and fertiliser application.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22490036','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22490036"><span>Using social marketing to address barriers and motivators to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> safety and health best <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yoder, Aaron M; Murphy, Dennis J</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Social marketing is an intervention development strategy that pays considerable attention to barriers to and motivators for behavioral change or adoption of recommended behaviors. Barriers are obstacles that prevent individuals from changing or adopting behaviors and are often referred to as the "cons" or "costs" of doing something. Motivators, on the other hand, are factors that encourage individuals to change or adopt behaviors and are often referred to as the "pros," "benefits," or "influencing factors" of doing something. Importantly, social marketing does not target education or knowledge change as an end point; rather, it targets behavior change. Studies across several types of desired behaviors (e.g., smoking cessation, weight control, more exercise, sunscreen use, radon testing) using the Stages of Change model have found systematic relationships between stages of change and pros and cons of changing behavior. A review of literature identifies numerous research and intervention studies that directly reference social marketing in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> safety and health, studies that identify reasons why parents allow their children to be exposed to hazardous situations on the farm, and reasons why youth engage in risky behaviors, but only two studies were found that show evidence of systematically researching specific behavioral change motivating factors. The authors offer several suggestions to help address issues relating to social marketing and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> safety and health.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70159372','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70159372"><span>Use of multispectral Ikonos imagery for discriminating between conventional and conservation <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Vina, Andres; Peters, Albert J.; Ji, Lei</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>There is a global concern about the increase in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One method being discussed to encourage greenhouse gas mitigation efforts is based on a trading system whereby carbon emitters can buy effective mitigation efforts from farmers implementing conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>. These <span class="hlt">practices</span> sequester carbon from the atmosphere, and such a trading system would require a low-cost and accurate method of verification. Remote sensing technology can offer such a verification technique. This paper is focused on the use of standard image processing procedures applied to a multispectral Ikonos image, to determine whether it is possible to validate that farmers have complied with agreements to implement conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A principal component analysis (PCA) was performed in order to isolate image variance in cropped fields. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) statistical procedures were used to evaluate the capability of each Ikonos band and each principal component to discriminate between conventional and conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A logistic regression model was implemented on the principal component most effective in discriminating between conventional and conservation tillage, in order to produce a map of the probability of conventional tillage. The Ikonos imagery, in combination with ground-reference information, proved to be a useful tool for verification of conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3968896','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3968896"><span>Creating Minimum Harm <span class="hlt">Practice</span> ( MiHaP): a concept for <span class="hlt">continuous</span> improvement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Singh, Ranjit</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The author asks for the attention of leaders and all other stakeholders to calls of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and the UK National Health Service (NHS) to promote <span class="hlt">continuous</span> learning to reduce harm to patients. This paper presents a concept for structured bottom-up methodology that enables and empowers all stakeholders to identify, prioritize, and address safety challenges. This methodology takes advantage of the memory of the experiences of all persons involved in providing care. It respects and responds to the uniqueness of each setting by empowering and motivating all team members to commit to harm reduction. It is based on previously published work on “Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Research (BPR)” and on “Systematic Appraisal of Risk and Its Management for Error Reduction (SARAIMER)”. The latter approach, has been shown by the author (with Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) support), to reduce adverse events and their severity through empowerment, ownership and work satisfaction. The author puts forward a strategy for leaders to implement, in response to national and international calls for Better health, Better care, and Better value (the 3B’s of healthcare) in the US Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.  This is designed to enable and implement “ A promise to learn- a commitment to act”.  AHRQ has recently published “A Toolkit for Rapid-Cycle Patient Safety and Quality Improvement” that includes an adapted version of SARAIMER. PMID:24715965</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/438800','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/438800"><span><span class="hlt">Practical</span> robust stabilization of PMAC servo drive based on <span class="hlt">continuous</span> variable structure control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Grcar, B.; Cafuta, P.; Znidaric, M.</p> <p>1996-12-01</p> <p>In the paper the two stage control design of a high performance PMAC servo drive is described. In the first stage the nominal PMAC motor model is discussed as an analytical nonlinear system, transformed into the controllable canonical Brunovsky`s forms on the basis of input-output linearization. The influence of the load torque is considered implicitly by introducing the disturbance observer. Due to the sensitivity of the nominal model based control to parameter perturbations the linear tracking control is extended in the second stage by a <span class="hlt">continuous</span> variable structure stabilizing control derived from Lyapunov`s function of the augmented feedback system. The design of the variable structure control requires no knowledge of the upper bounds of the perturbation function; instead, it considers the variable bounds of the available control signal. Undesired chattering of states and controlled variables are excluded. The introduced two stage control design assures <span class="hlt">practical</span> robust stabilization for the class of bounded nonlinear perturbations satisfying the matching conditions without affecting the relative degree of the feedback system. Experimental results of the proposed PMAC servo drive control are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24715965','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24715965"><span>Creating Minimum Harm <span class="hlt">Practice</span> ( MiHaP): a concept for <span class="hlt">continuous</span> improvement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Singh, Ranjit</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The author asks for the attention of leaders and all other stakeholders to calls of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and the UK National Health Service (NHS) to promote <span class="hlt">continuous</span> learning to reduce harm to patients. This paper presents a concept for structured bottom-up methodology that enables and empowers all stakeholders to identify, prioritize, and address safety challenges. This methodology takes advantage of the memory of the experiences of all persons involved in providing care. It respects and responds to the uniqueness of each setting by empowering and motivating all team members to commit to harm reduction. It is based on previously published work on "Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Research (BPR)" and on "Systematic Appraisal of Risk and Its Management for Error Reduction (SARAIMER)". The latter approach, has been shown by the author (with Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) support), to reduce adverse events and their severity through empowerment, ownership and work satisfaction. The author puts forward a strategy for leaders to implement, in response to national and international calls for Better health, Better care, and Better value (the 3B's of healthcare) in the US Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. ( )This is designed to enable and implement " A promise to learn- a commitment to act".  AHRQ has recently published "A Toolkit for Rapid-Cycle Patient Safety and Quality Improvement" that includes an adapted version of SARAIMER.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1077458.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1077458.pdf"><span>The Impact of Micro-Teaching on the Teaching <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Performance of Undergraduate <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education Students in College of Education, Azare</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sa'ad, Tata Umar; Sabo, Shehu; Abdullahi, Aliyu Dahuwa</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Micro-teaching and teaching <span class="hlt">practices</span> are two integral parts of teacher education programme. Therefore, this study investigated the impact of micro-teaching on the teaching <span class="hlt">practice</span> of the undergraduate <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education Students admitted in 2012/2013 Academic session in College of Education, Azare, Bauchi State, Nigeria. The 400 level…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009GeCoA..73.4688P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009GeCoA..73.4688P"><span>Acidification processes and soil leaching influenced by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> revealed by strontium isotopic ratios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; Aquilina, Luc; Weyer, Christina; Molénat, Jérôme; Lischeid, Gunnar</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>In natural river systems, the chemical and isotopic composition of stream- and ground waters are mainly controlled by the geology and water-rock interactions. The leaching of major cations from soils has been recognized as a possible consequence of acidic deposition from atmosphere for over 30 years. Moreover, in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas, the application of physiological acid fertilizers and nitrogen fertilizers in the ammonia form may enhance the cation leaching through the soil profile into ground- and surface waters. This origin of leached cations has been studied on two small and adjacent <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> catchments in Brittany, western France. The study catchments are drained by two first-order streams, and mainly covered with cambisoils, issued from the alteration and weathering of a granodiorite basement. Precipitations, soil water- and NH 4 acetate-leachates, separated minerals, and stream waters have been investigated. Chemical element ratios, such as Ba/Sr, Na/Sr and Ca/Sr ratios, as well as Sr isotopic ratios are used to constrain the relative contribution from potential sources of stream water elements. Based on Sr isotopic ratio and element concentration, soil water- and NH 4 acetate leaching indicates (1) a dominant manure/slurry contribution in the top soil, representing a cation concentrated pool, with low 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios; (2) in subsoils, mineral dissolution is enhanced by fertilizer application, becoming the unique source of cations in the saprolite. The relatively high weathering rates encountered implies significant sources of cations which are not accessory minerals, but rather plagioclase and biotite dissolution. Stream water has a very different isotopic and chemical composition compared to soil water leaching suggesting that stream water chemistry is dominated by elements issued from mineral and rock weathering. <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, by applications of chemical and organic fertilizers, can influence the export of major base cations, such as Na +. Plagioclase</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28215015','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28215015"><span>Goose management schemes to resolve conflicts with <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>: Theory, <span class="hlt">practice</span> and effects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Eythórsson, Einar; Tombre, Ingunn M; Madsen, Jesper</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>In 2012, the four countries hosting the Svalbard population of pink-footed goose Anser brachyrhynchus along its flyway launched an International Species Management Plan for the population. One of the aims was to reduce conflicts between geese and <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> to an acceptable level. Since 2006, Norway has offered subsidies to farmers that provide refuge areas for geese on their land. We evaluate the mid-Norwegian goose management subsidy scheme, with a view to its adjustment to prevailing ecological and socio-economic parameters. The analysis indicates that the legitimacy of the scheme is highly dependent on transparency of knowledge management and accountability of management scheme to the farming community. Among farmers, as well as front-line officials, outcomes of prioritisation processes within the scheme are judged unfair when there is an evident mismatch between payments and genuine damage. We suggest how the scheme can be made more fair and responsive to ecological changes, within a framework of adaptive management.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=307771','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=307771"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> altered soybean seed protein, oil, fattyacids,sugars, and minerals in the Midsouth USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Management <span class="hlt">practices</span> such as seeding rate (SR), planting date (PD), and row-type (RT: single- and twin-rows) may alter seed nutrition in soybean. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of SR and PD on soybean seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars) and mineral...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=332361','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=332361"><span>Regional effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on nutrient transport in the Upper Mississippi River Basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Despite progress in the implementation of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, related improvements in water quality have been challenging to measure in larger river systems. In this paper we quantify these downstream effects by applying the empirical U.S. Geological Survey water-quality model SPARROW to inves...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=workshop+AND+practice&pg=4&id=EJ1085441','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=workshop+AND+practice&pg=4&id=EJ1085441"><span>Colorado's AgrAbility Project's Effects on KASA and <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Changes with <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Producers and Professionals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fetsch, Robert J.; Jackman, Danielle M.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Disability rates resulting from work-related injuries remain steadily high among farmers and ranchers. To address the gap in services within this population, USDA implemented AgrAbility nationally. Using part of Bennett's hierarchical model, the current study evaluated the KASA and <span class="hlt">practice</span> change levels of 401 farmers and ranchers and compared…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=weather+AND+impact&pg=3&id=EJ900204','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=weather+AND+impact&pg=3&id=EJ900204"><span>Impact of Long Farm Working Hours on Child Safety <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Settings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Marlenga, Barbara; Pahwa, Punam; Hagel, Louise; Dosman, James; Pickett, William</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: To characterize working hours of adult farm owner-operators and their spouses by season, and to examine associations between working hours and farm safety <span class="hlt">practices</span> affecting children. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data collected as part of an existing study of injury and its determinants.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.9068B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.9068B"><span>Watershed basin management and <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: an application case for flooding areas in Piemonte.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bianco, G.; Franzi, L.; Valvassore, U.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Watershed basin management in Piemonte (Italy) is a challenging issue that forces the local Authorities to a careful land planning in the frame of a sustainable economy. Different and contrasting objectives should be taken into account and balanced in order to find the best or the most "reasonable" choice under many constraints. Frequently the need for flood risk reduction and the demand for economical exploitation of floodplain areas represent the most conflicting aspects that influence watershed management politics. Actually, flood plains have been the preferred places for socio-economical activities, due to the availability of water, fertility of soil and the easiness of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil exploitation. Sometimes the bed and planform profile adjustments of a river, as a consequence of natural processes, can impede some anthropogenic activities in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, such as the erosion of areas used for crops, the impossibility of water diversion, the deposition of pollutants on the ground, with effects on the economy and on the social life of local communities. In these cases watershed basin management should either balance the opposite demands, as the protection of economic activities (that implies generally canalized rivers and levees construction) and the need of favouring the river morphological stability, allowing the flooding in the inundation areas. In the paper a case study in Piemonte region (Tortona irrigation district) is shown and discussed. The effects of the Scrivia river planform adjustment on water diversion and soil erodibility force the local community and the authority of the irrigation district to ask for flood protection and river bed excavation. A mathematical model is also applied to study the effects of local river channel excavation on flood risk. Some countermeasures are also suggested to properly balance the opposite needs in the frame of a watershed basin management.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26678422','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26678422"><span>28th Annual APRN Legislative Update: Advancements <span class="hlt">continue</span> for APRN <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Phillips, Susanne J</p> <p>2016-01-16</p> <p>The Annual Legislative Update discusses the legislative accomplishments in the areas of <span class="hlt">practice</span> authority, reimbursement, and prescriptive authority that have the most impact on nurse practitioners and other advanced <span class="hlt">practice</span> nurses across the country.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lupo&id=EJ295914','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lupo&id=EJ295914"><span><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education in Micro-Computers for Academic and <span class="hlt">Practicing</span> Psychologists.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lupo, James V.; Ware, Mark E.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>A workshop designed to teach participants how to use microcomputers for <span class="hlt">practice</span> management, psychological testing, word processing, peripheral interface, and data analysis was found to meet the interests and needs of both academic and <span class="hlt">practicing</span> psychologists. (RM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242132','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242132"><span>Spatial multiobjective optimization of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> using a SWAT model and an evolutionary algorithm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rabotyagov, Sergey; Campbell, Todd; Valcu, Adriana; Gassman, Philip; Jha, Manoj; Schilling, Keith; Wolter, Calvin; Kling, Catherine</p> <p>2012-12-09</p> <p>Finding the cost-efficient (i.e., lowest-cost) ways of targeting conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> investments for the achievement of specific water quality goals across the landscape is of primary importance in watershed management. Traditional economics methods of finding the lowest-cost solution in the watershed context (e.g.,(5,12,20)) assume that off-site impacts can be accurately described as a proportion of on-site pollution generated. Such approaches are unlikely to be representative of the actual pollution process in a watershed, where the impacts of polluting sources are often determined by complex biophysical processes. The use of modern physically-based, spatially distributed hydrologic simulation models allows for a greater degree of realism in terms of process representation but requires a development of a simulation-optimization framework where the model becomes an integral part of optimization. Evolutionary algorithms appear to be a particularly useful optimization tool, able to deal with the combinatorial nature of a watershed simulation-optimization problem and allowing the use of the full water quality model. Evolutionary algorithms treat a particular spatial allocation of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a watershed as a candidate solution and utilize sets (populations) of candidate solutions iteratively applying stochastic operators of selection, recombination, and mutation to find improvements with respect to the optimization objectives. The optimization objectives in this case are to minimize nonpoint-source pollution in the watershed, simultaneously minimizing the cost of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A recent and expanding set of research is attempting to use similar methods and integrates water quality models with broadly defined evolutionary optimization methods(3,4,9,10,13-15,17-19,22,23,25). In this application, we demonstrate a program which follows Rabotyagov et al.'s approach and integrates a modern and commonly used SWAT water quality model(7) with a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3598409','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3598409"><span>Spatial Multiobjective Optimization of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> using a SWAT Model and an Evolutionary Algorithm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rabotyagov, Sergey; Campbell, Todd; Valcu, Adriana; Gassman, Philip; Jha, Manoj; Schilling, Keith; Wolter, Calvin; Kling, Catherine</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Finding the cost-efficient (i.e., lowest-cost) ways of targeting conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> investments for the achievement of specific water quality goals across the landscape is of primary importance in watershed management. Traditional economics methods of finding the lowest-cost solution in the watershed context (e.g.,5,12,20) assume that off-site impacts can be accurately described as a proportion of on-site pollution generated. Such approaches are unlikely to be representative of the actual pollution process in a watershed, where the impacts of polluting sources are often determined by complex biophysical processes. The use of modern physically-based, spatially distributed hydrologic simulation models allows for a greater degree of realism in terms of process representation but requires a development of a simulation-optimization framework where the model becomes an integral part of optimization. Evolutionary algorithms appear to be a particularly useful optimization tool, able to deal with the combinatorial nature of a watershed simulation-optimization problem and allowing the use of the full water quality model. Evolutionary algorithms treat a particular spatial allocation of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a watershed as a candidate solution and utilize sets (populations) of candidate solutions iteratively applying stochastic operators of selection, recombination, and mutation to find improvements with respect to the optimization objectives. The optimization objectives in this case are to minimize nonpoint-source pollution in the watershed, simultaneously minimizing the cost of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A recent and expanding set of research is attempting to use similar methods and integrates water quality models with broadly defined evolutionary optimization methods3,4,9,10,13-15,17-19,22,23,25. In this application, we demonstrate a program which follows Rabotyagov et al.'s approach and integrates a modern and commonly used SWAT water quality model7 with a</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1816914P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1816914P"><span>Conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to enhance soil organic in Lombardy plain (Northern Italy)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Perego, Alessia; Giussani, Andrea; Corsi, Stefano; Tosini, Andrea; Acutis, Marco</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>It has been demonstrated that conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (CA) determines a long-term increase in soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in cropland. The present study aimed to estimate the amount of SOC stored in soil of Lombardy plain (Northern Italy) following the change from tillage <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (TA) to CA by using crop ARMOSA crop over 23 years (1989-2011). The territorial analysis was performed at agrarian region scale (AR) after identification of the representative crops rotation and soil types. The land use information were data available at cadastral scale and referred to 5 years (from 2007 to 2011). The meteorological data (i.e. maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation) were measured at 14 monitoring stations. Solar radiation was estimated using the equation of the Bristow and Campbell model (1994). A spatial interpolation method was used to extend the meteorological data throughout the entire plain of the region by employing Thiessen polygon method; the meteorological data of the polygon were assigned to each AR. ARMOSA was parameterized to simulate the two tillage systems. For TA and CA scenario the depth of tillage was limited to 35 and 10 cm, respectively; crop residual incorporation was not simulated under CA. In TA scenario, we used the parameters calibrated and validated by Perego et al.(2013) on a wide dataset collected at six monitoring sites in Lombardy plain. In CA, the rate of C decomposition of humified organic C was assumed to be smaller by 30% in no-tillage than in TA (Oorts et al., 2007). The model results showed a significant improve of SOC (p<0.01) from TA to CA under all the crop rotations with a potential SOC sequestration ranged from 0.1 to 0.48 t C ha-1 y-1. While soil type did not affect significantly the SOC sequestration, crop residue determined relevant increases in SOC. That was particularly evident in grain maize monoculture with or without cover crop. References: Oorts K., Garnier P., Findeling A., Mary B., Richard G., Nicolardot B</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4294T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4294T"><span>Mitigation scenario analysis: modelling the impacts of changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on surface water quality at the catchment scale</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Taylor, Sam; He, Yi; Hiscock, Kevin</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Increasing human pressures on the natural environment through the demand for increased <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity have exacerbated and deteriorated water quality conditions within many environments due to an unbalancing of the nutrient cycle. As a consequence, increased <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> diffuse water pollution has resulted in elevated concentrations of nutrients within surface water and groundwater bodies. This deterioration in water quality has direct consequences for the health of aquatic ecosystems and biodiversity, human health, and the use of water as a resource for public water supply and recreation. To mitigate these potential impacts and to meet commitments under the EU Drinking Water and Water Framework Directives, there is a need to improve our understanding of the impacts that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use and management <span class="hlt">practices</span> have on water quality. Water quality models are one of the tools available which can be used to facilitate this aim. These simplified representations of the physical environment allow a variety of changes to be simulated within a catchment, including for example changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use and management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, allowing for predictions of the impacts of those measures on water quality to be developed and an assessment to be made of their effectiveness in improving conditions. The aim of this research is to apply the water quality model SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to the Wensum catchment (area 650 km2), situated in the East of England, to predict the impacts of potential changes in land use and land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality as part of a process to select those measures that in combination will have the greatest potential to improve water quality. Model calibration and validation is conducted at three sites within the catchment against observations of river discharge and nitrate and total phosphorus loads at a monthly time-step using the optimisation algorithm SUFI-2 (Sequential Uncertainty Fitting Version 2</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC13A1134F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC13A1134F"><span>High-Resolution Biogeochemical Simulation Identifies <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Opportunities for Bioenergy Landscape Intensification Across Diverse US <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Regions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Field, J.; Adler, P. R.; Evans, S.; Paustian, K.; Marx, E.; Easter, M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The sustainability of biofuel expansion is strongly dependent on the environmental footprint of feedstock production, including both direct impacts within feedstock-producing areas and potential leakage effects due to disruption of existing food, feed, or fiber production. Assessing and minimizing these impacts requires novel methods compared to traditional supply chain lifecycle assessment. When properly validated and applied at appropriate spatial resolutions, biogeochemical process models are useful for simulating how the productivity and soil greenhouse gas fluxes of cultivating both conventional crops and advanced feedstock crops respond across gradients of land quality and management intensity. In this work we use the DayCent model to assess the biogeochemical impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> residue collection, establishment of perennial grasses on marginal cropland or conservation easements, and intensification of existing cropping at high spatial resolution across several real-world case study landscapes in diverse US <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> regions. We integrate the resulting estimates of productivity, soil carbon changes, and nitrous oxide emissions with crop production budgets and lifecycle inventories, and perform a basic optimization to generate landscape cost/GHG frontiers and determine the most <span class="hlt">practical</span> opportunities for low-impact feedstock provisioning. The optimization is constrained to assess the minimum combined impacts of residue collection, land use change, and intensification of existing <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> necessary for the landscape to supply a commercial-scale biorefinery while maintaining exiting food, feed, and fiber production levels. These techniques can be used to assess how different feedstock provisioning strategies perform on both economic and environmental criteria, and sensitivity of performance to environmental and land use factors. The included figure shows an example feedstock cost-GHG mitigation tradeoff frontier for a commercial-scale cellulosic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26921883','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26921883"><span>Bee Abundance and Nutritional Status in Relation to Grassland Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in an <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Landscape.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Smith, Griffin W; Debinski, Diane M; Scavo, Nicole A; Lange, Corey J; Delaney, John T; Moranz, Raymond A; Miller, James R; Engle, David M; Toth, Amy L</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Grasslands provide important resources for pollinators in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscapes. Managing grasslands with fire and grazing has the potential to benefit plant and pollinator communities, though there is uncertainty about the ideal approach. We examined the relationships among burning and grazing regimes, plant communities, and Bombus species and Apis mellifera L. abundance and nutritional indicators at the Grand River Grasslands in southern Iowa and northern Missouri. Treatment regimes included burn-only, grazed-and-burned, and patch-burn graze (pastures subdivided into three temporally distinct fire patches with free access by cattle). The premise of the experimental design was that patch-burn grazing would increase habitat heterogeneity, thereby providing more diverse and abundant floral resources for pollinators. We predicted that both bee abundance and individual bee nutritional indicators (bee size and lipid content) would be positively correlated with floral resource abundance. There were no significant differences among treatments with respect to bee abundance. However, some of the specific characteristics of the plant community showed significant relationships with bee response variables. Pastures with greater abundance of floral resources had greater bee abundance but lower bee nutritional indicators. Bee nutritional variables were positively correlated with vegetation height, but, in some cases, negatively correlated with stocking rate. These results suggest grassland site characteristics such as floral resource abundance and stocking rate are of potential importance to bee pollinators and suggest avenues for further research to untangle the complex interactions between grassland management, plant responses, and bee health.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10842822','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10842822"><span>Health risk in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> villages <span class="hlt">practicing</span> wastewater irrigation in central Mexico: perspectives for protection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cifuentes, E; Blumenthal, U; Ruiz-Palacios, G; Bennett, S; Quigley, M</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>9,435 individuals participated in a cross-sectional survey in the irrigation districts of the Mezquital Valley (central Mexico). Exposure groups were: 848 households irrigating with untreated wastewater, 544 households irrigating with the effluent from a series of interconnected reservoirs, and 928 households farming with natural rainfall. The unit of analysis was the individual, and the health outcomes included diarrhoeal diseases and Ascaris lumbricoides infection. Water quality was assessed using faecal coliforms (FC) and nematode eggs, as suggested by (WHO, 1989) for the safe use of wastewater in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Children from households irrigating with untreated wastewater (10(8) FC/100 mL and 135 nematode eggs/L) had a 33% higher risk of diarrhoeal diseases and a fivefold increase in risk of A. lumbricoides infection (OR = 5.71) compared to children from the control group, farming with rainfall. The risk of A. lumbricoides infection in older individuals was even higher (OR = 13.18). The final analysis showed that drinking unboiled water and cultivating vegetables crops were both associated with a higher risk of diarrheal diseases (OR = 1.45 and 2.00); individuals infected with A. lumbricoides infection came mostly from landless households with poorer dwellings and low standards of sanitation (OR = 2.20, 2.23, 1.72 and 1.43, respectively). These results are discussed in the context of health protection measures and policy recommendations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19560869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19560869"><span>Parasite control in the age of drug resistance and changing <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Molento, Marcelo Beltrão</p> <p>2009-08-07</p> <p>The benefits of using antiparasitic drugs in farm animals are unquestionable. However, despite anthelmintic use as the predominant control strategy, extreme parasite infection cases are appearing in sheep and goat production; these impact productivity and have show mortality rates reaching pre-drug use levels. This was a predictable situation resulting from the loss of efficacy by all available products, particularly when some products were used as the sole intervention. The concepts of agroecology and holistic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, which advocate the use of integrated management strategies, such as target selected treatment, herbal medicine, and the application of other parasite control alternatives, are not completely new, but are undergoing a resurgence because of their more sustainable appeal. The objective of this review article is to examine the problem of parasite control in the face of parasite drug resistance and to outline some strategies that may be used in parasite control programmes. Before they are accepted and recommended by the WAAVP, agroecological methods such as those listed above and described in detail herein should be validated based on scientific evidence of their efficacy for parasite control and should be tested for both host and environmental safety.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA556412','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA556412"><span>Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Access to Care. How the most Successful Clinics are Improving both Access and <span class="hlt">Continuity</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-24</p> <p>access and <span class="hlt">continuity</span> Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Access to Care 24 January 2011 CAPT Maureen Padden MD MPH FAAFP 1 Military Health System Conference Navy Medicine...JAN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Access to Care. How the most...enrollees will call for urgent visits – 45 to 55 of 10,000 enrollees – Rate will vary depending on day of week  Many open access <span class="hlt">practices</span> have found: – 50</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28078369','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28078369"><span>Effectiveness of Integrated Best Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Mitigation of Atrazine and Metolachlor in an <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Lake Watershed.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lizotte, Richard; Locke, Martin; Bingner, Ronald; Steinriede, R Wade; Smith, Sammie</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>The study examined the influence of land-use (cropping patterns) and integrated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) on spring herbicide levels in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed. Atrazine and metolachlor were applied for weed control during spring of 1998-2002, 2005, and 2007-2013. Watershed-wide mass of applied herbicides ranged from 12.7 to 209.2 g atrazine and 10.9-302.2 g metolachlor with greatest application during 1998, 2009-2010 (atrazine) and 2007-2013 (metolachlor). Spring herbicide concentrations in Beasley Lake water ranged from below detection to 3.54 μg atrazine/L and 3.01 μg metolachlor/L. Multiple linear regression analyses with cropping patterns, BMPs, rainfall and time as independent variables, showed atrazine applications were associated with increases in cotton acreage and quail buffer, while metolachlor applications increased over time. Multiple linear regressions showed lake atrazine concentrations were associated with conservation tillage, rainfall, and corn, while lake metolachlor concentrations were associated with the cumulative metolachlor application and sediment retention pond installation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007HESSD...4..747C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007HESSD...4..747C"><span>Assessment of alternative land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> using hydrological simulation and a decision support tool: Arborea <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> region, Sardinia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cau, P.; Paniconi, C.</p> <p>2007-04-01</p> <p>Quantifying the impact of land use on water supply and quality is a primary focus of environmental management. In this work we apply a semidistributed hydrological model (SWAT) to predict the impact of different land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemical yield for a study site situated in the Arborea region of central Sardinia, Italy. The physical processes associated with water movement, crop growth, and nutrient cycling are directly modeled by SWAT. The model simulations are used to identify indicators that reflect critical processes related to the integrity and sustainability of the ecosystem. Specifically we focus on stream quality and quantity indicators associated with anthropogenic and natural sources of pollution. A multicriteria decision support system is then used to develop the analysis matrix where water quality and quantity indicators for the rivers, lagoons, and soil are combined with socio-economic variables. The DSS is used to assess four options involving alternative watersheds designated for intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and dairy farming and the use or not of treated wastewater for irrigation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26618711','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26618711"><span>Cultivar and Year Rather than <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Affect Primary and Secondary Metabolites in Apple Fruit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Le Bourvellec, Carine; Bureau, Sylvie; Renard, Catherine M G C; Plenet, Daniel; Gautier, Hélène; Touloumet, Line; Girard, Thierry; Simon, Sylvaine</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Many biotic and abiotic parameters affect the metabolites involved in the organoleptic and health value of fruits. It is therefore important to understand how the growers' decisions for cultivar and orchard management can affect the fruit composition. <span class="hlt">Practices</span>, cultivars and/or year all might participate to determine fruit composition. To hierarchize these factors, fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids contents, titratable acidity, individual sugars and organics acids, and phenolics were measured in three apple cultivars ('Ariane', 'Melrose' and 'Smoothee') managed under organic, low-input and conventional management. Apples were harvested at commercial maturity in the orchards of the cropping system experiment BioREco at INRA Gotheron (Drôme, 26) over the course of three years (2011, 2012 and 2013). The main factors affecting primary and secondary metabolites, in both apple skin and flesh, were by far the cultivar and the yearly conditions, while the management system had a very limited effect. When considering the three cultivars and the year 2011 to investigate the effect of the management system per se, only few compounds differed significantly between the three systems and in particular the total phenolic content did not differ significantly between systems. Finally, when considering orchards grown in the same pedoclimatic conditions and of the same age, instead of the usual organic vs. conventional comparison, the effect of the management system on the apple fruit quality (Fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, individual sugars, organic acids, and phenolics) was very limited to non-significant. The main factors of variation were the cultivar and the year of cropping rather than the cropping system. More generally, as each management system (e.g. conventional, organic…) encompasses a great variability of <span class="hlt">practices</span>, this highlights the importance of accurately documenting orchard <span class="hlt">practices</span> and design beside the generic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4664253','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4664253"><span>Cultivar and Year Rather than <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Affect Primary and Secondary Metabolites in Apple Fruit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Renard, Catherine M. G. C.; Plenet, Daniel; Gautier, Hélène; Touloumet, Line; Girard, Thierry; Simon, Sylvaine</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Many biotic and abiotic parameters affect the metabolites involved in the organoleptic and health value of fruits. It is therefore important to understand how the growers' decisions for cultivar and orchard management can affect the fruit composition. <span class="hlt">Practices</span>, cultivars and/or year all might participate to determine fruit composition. To hierarchize these factors, fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids contents, titratable acidity, individual sugars and organics acids, and phenolics were measured in three apple cultivars (‘Ariane’, ‘Melrose’ and ‘Smoothee’) managed under organic, low-input and conventional management. Apples were harvested at commercial maturity in the orchards of the cropping system experiment BioREco at INRA Gotheron (Drôme, 26) over the course of three years (2011, 2012 and 2013). The main factors affecting primary and secondary metabolites, in both apple skin and flesh, were by far the cultivar and the yearly conditions, while the management system had a very limited effect. When considering the three cultivars and the year 2011 to investigate the effect of the management system per se, only few compounds differed significantly between the three systems and in particular the total phenolic content did not differ significantly between systems. Finally, when considering orchards grown in the same pedoclimatic conditions and of the same age, instead of the usual organic vs. conventional comparison, the effect of the management system on the apple fruit quality (Fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, individual sugars, organic acids, and phenolics) was very limited to non-significant. The main factors of variation were the cultivar and the year of cropping rather than the cropping system. More generally, as each management system (e.g. conventional, organic…) encompasses a great variability of <span class="hlt">practices</span>, this highlights the importance of accurately documenting orchard <span class="hlt">practices</span> and design beside the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.B53C0676H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.B53C0676H"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on greenhouse gas emissions (N2O, CH4 and CO2) from corn fields</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hui, D.; Wang, J.; Jima, T.; Dennis, S.; Stockert, C.; Smart, D.; Bhattarai, S.; Brown, K.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, C.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The United States is, by far, the largest producer of corn (Zea mays L.) in the world. Recent increases in fertilizer cost and concerns over global climate change have farmers and others interested in more efficient fertilization management and greenhouse gas emissions reductions. To seek the best management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, we conducted field experiments during the 2012 growing season at Tennessee State University <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Research and Demonstration Center in Nashville, TN. Six treatments were applied including regular URAN application [2 times], multiple URAN applications [4 times], denitrification inhibitor with regular URAN application, and chicken litter plus regular URAN application in no-tilled plots, and URAN application plus bio-char in tilled plots, all compared to regular URAN application in conventional tilled plots. Each treatment was replicated six times (blocks). We measured N2O, CO2 and CH4 emissions using a closed chamber method after rainfall events, fertilizer applications or every two weeks whichever was shorter. Corresponding soil NH4+-N and NO3--N, soil temperature and moisture were also measured during the gas sampling. Plant physiology and growth were measured about every two weeks. While preliminary results indicate that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on some days, particularly after rainfall events, CH4 flux was not influenced by the treatments during most of the days. Plots with bio-char showed significantly lower N2O emissions. We also measured N2O flux in a commercial corn field using the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique to ground verify the chamber based N2O emissions at the field scale. Results obtained with the EC technique seem comparable with the chamber method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614282H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614282H"><span>Influence of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on C stabilization pathways in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> volcanic ash soils (Canary Islands, Spain)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hernandez, Zulimar; María Álvarez, Ana; Carral, Pilar; de Figueiredo, Tomas; Almendros, Gonzalo</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Although C stabilization mechanisms in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils are still controversial [1], a series of overlapped pathways has been suggested [2] such as: i) insolubilization of low molecular weight precursors of soil organic matter (SOM) with reactive minerals through physical and chemical bonding, ii) selective accumulation of biosynthetic substances which are recalcitrant because of its inherent chemical composition, and iii) preservation and furter diagenetic transformation of particulate SOM entrapped within resistant microaggregates, where diffusion of soil enzymes is largely hampered. In some environments where carbohydrate and N compounds are not readily biodegraded, e.g., with water saturated micropores, an ill-known C stabilization pathway may involve the formation of Maillard's reaction products [3]. In all cases, these pathways converge in the formation of recalcitrant macromolecular substances, sharing several properties with the humic acid (HA) fraction [4]. In template forests, the selective preservation and further microbial reworking of plant biomass has been identified as a prevailing mechanism in the accumulation of recalcitrant SOM forms [5]. However, in volcanic ash soils with intense organomineral interactions, condensation reactions of low molecular weight precursors with short-range minerals may be the main mechanism [6]. In order to shed some light about the effect of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management on soil C stabilization processes on volcanic ash soils, the chemical composition of HA and some structural proxies of SOM informing on its origin and potential resistance to biodegradation, were examined in 30 soils from Canary Islands (Spain) by visible, infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, elementary analysis and pyrolytic techniques. The results of multivariate treatments, suggested at least three simultaneous C stabilization biogeochemical trends: i) diagenetic alteration of plant biomacromolecules in soils receiving</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27243625','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27243625"><span>Regional Effects of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Nutrient Transport in the Upper Mississippi River Basin.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>García, Ana María; Alexander, Richard B; Arnold, Jeffrey G; Norfleet, Lee; White, Michael J; Robertson, Dale M; Schwarz, Gregory</p> <p>2016-07-05</p> <p>Despite progress in the implementation of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, related improvements in water quality have been challenging to measure in larger river systems. In this paper we quantify these downstream effects by applying the empirical U.S. Geological Survey water-quality model SPARROW to investigate whether spatial differences in conservation intensity were statistically correlated with variations in nutrient loads. In contrast to other forms of water quality data analysis, the application of SPARROW controls for confounding factors such as hydrologic variability, multiple sources and environmental processes. A measure of conservation intensity was derived from the USDA-CEAP regional assessment of the Upper Mississippi River and used as an explanatory variable in a model of the Upper Midwest. The spatial pattern of conservation intensity was negatively correlated (p = 0.003) with the total nitrogen loads in streams in the basin. Total phosphorus loads were weakly negatively correlated with conservation (p = 0.25). Regional nitrogen reductions were estimated to range from 5 to 34% and phosphorus reductions from 1 to 10% in major river basins of the Upper Mississippi region. The statistical associations between conservation and nutrient loads are consistent with hydrological and biogeochemical processes such as denitrification. The results provide empirical evidence at the regional scale that conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> have had a larger statistically detectable effect on nitrogen than on phosphorus loadings in streams and rivers of the Upper Mississippi Basin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70174013','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70174013"><span>Regional effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on nutrient transport in the Upper Mississippi River Basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Garcia, Ana Maria.; Alexander, Richard B.; Arnold, Jeffrey G.; Norfleet, Lee; White, Michael J.; Robertson, Dale; Schwarz, Gregory</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Despite progress in the implementation of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, related improvements in water quality have been challenging to measure in larger river systems. In this paper we quantify these downstream effects by applying the empirical U.S. Geological Survey water-quality model SPARROW to investigate whether spatial differences in conservation intensity were statistically correlated with variations in nutrient loads. In contrast to other forms of water quality data analysis, the application of SPARROW controls for confounding factors such as hydrologic variability, multiple sources and environmental processes. A measure of conservation intensity was derived from the USDA-CEAP regional assessment of the Upper Mississippi River and used as an explanatory variable in a model of the Upper Midwest. The spatial pattern of conservation intensity was negatively correlated (p = 0.003) with the total nitrogen loads in streams in the basin. Total phosphorus loads were weakly negatively correlated with conservation (p = 0.25). Regional nitrogen reductions were estimated to range from 5 to 34% and phosphorus reductions from 1 to 10% in major river basins of the Upper Mississippi region. The statistical associations between conservation and nutrient loads are consistent with hydrological and biogeochemical processes such as denitrification. The results provide empirical evidence at the regional scale that conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> have had a larger statistically detectable effect on nitrogen than on phosphorus loadings in streams and rivers of the Upper Mississippi Basin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24337194','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24337194"><span>Adoption potential of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in sub-Saharan Africa: results from five case studies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ndah, Hycenth Tim; Schuler, Johannes; Uthes, Sandra; Zander, Peter; Traore, Karim; Gama, Mphatso-S; Nyagumbo, Isaiah; Triomphe, Bernard; Sieber, Stefan; Corbeels, Marc</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Despite the reported benefits of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (CA), its wider up-scaling in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has remained fairly limited. This paper shows how a newly developed qualitative expert assessment approach for CA adoption (QAToCA) was applied to determine its adoption potential in SSA. CA adoption potential is not a predictor of observed adoption rates. Instead, our aim was to systematically check relevant factors that may be influencing its adoption. QAToCA delivers an assessment of how suitable conditions "and thus the likelihood for CA adoption" are. Results show that the high CA adoption potentials exhibited by the Malawi and Zambia case relate mostly to positive institutional factors. On the other hand, the low adoption potential of the Zimbabwe case, in spite of observed higher estimates, is attributed mainly to unstable and less secured market conditions for CA. In the case of Southern Burkina Faso, the potential for CA adoption is determined to be high, and this assessment deviates from lower observed figures. This is attributed mainly to strong competition of CA and livestock for residues in this region. Lastly, the high adoption potential found in Northern Burkina Faso is explained mainly by the fact that farmers here have no alternative other than to adopt the locally adapted CA system-Zaï farming. Results of this assessment should help promoters of CA in the given regions to reflect on their activities and to eventually adjust or redesign them based on a more explicit understanding of where problems and opportunities are found.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10926720','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10926720"><span>Predictors of blood lead levels in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> villages <span class="hlt">practicing</span> wastewater irrigation in Central Mexico.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cifuentes, E; Villanueva, J; Sanin, L H</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>To investigate whether the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> use of untreated wastewater (i.e. crop irrigation) was associated with elevated blood lead levels in a farming population in the Mezquital Valley and which risk factors, other than exposure to untreated wastewater, were associated with elevated blood lead levels, lead levels were measured in venous blood obtained from 735 individuals. Blood samples were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Food habits and dietary intake were gathered by interview, using a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. The average blood lead level was 7.8 microg/dL (SD 4.66 microg/dL; range 1.2-36.7 microg/dL). 23% of the study population had blood lead levels exceeding 10 microg/dL. The use of lead-glazed ceramics (LGC) was significantly associated with elevated lead levels (p = < 0.001). Other significant variables included age, gender (males), and non-farming-related occupations (e.g., technicians, factory workers). p = 0.005, 0.08, and 0.001, respectively. When the analysis was stratified by the use of LGC for food preparation, an inverse relationship between higher daily calcium intake and blood lead level was detected (beta = - 0.040, p = < 0.05). Thus, blood lead levels were positively associated with the use of LGC. Calcium intake showed a protective effect, maybe by decreasing absorption of lead in the gastrointestinal tract. No association between occupational exposure to untreated wastewater or crop consumption and blood lead levels was detected. Further environmental and health surveillance is recommended.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EnMan..53..620N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EnMan..53..620N"><span>Adoption Potential of Conservation <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Sub-Saharan Africa: Results from Five Case Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ndah, Hycenth Tim; Schuler, Johannes; Uthes, Sandra; Zander, Peter; Traore, Karim; Gama, Mphatso-S.; Nyagumbo, Isaiah; Triomphe, Bernard; Sieber, Stefan; Corbeels, Marc</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Despite the reported benefits of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (CA), its wider up-scaling in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has remained fairly limited. This paper shows how a newly developed qualitative expert assessment approach for CA adoption (QAToCA) was applied to determine its adoption potential in SSA. CA adoption potential is not a predictor of observed adoption rates. Instead, our aim was to systematically check relevant factors that may be influencing its adoption. QAToCA delivers an assessment of how suitable conditions "and thus the likelihood for CA adoption" are. Results show that the high CA adoption potentials exhibited by the Malawi and Zambia case relate mostly to positive institutional factors. On the other hand, the low adoption potential of the Zimbabwe case, in spite of observed higher estimates, is attributed mainly to unstable and less secured market conditions for CA. In the case of Southern Burkina Faso, the potential for CA adoption is determined to be high, and this assessment deviates from lower observed figures. This is attributed mainly to strong competition of CA and livestock for residues in this region. Lastly, the high adoption potential found in Northern Burkina Faso is explained mainly by the fact that farmers here have no alternative other than to adopt the locally adapted CA system—Zaï farming. Results of this assessment should help promoters of CA in the given regions to reflect on their activities and to eventually adjust or redesign them based on a more explicit understanding of where problems and opportunities are found.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol14-sec63-7334.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol14-sec63-7334.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7334 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... to me? (a) For each by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues subject to the work <span class="hlt">practice</span>... of the coke mass. End observations of a push when the quench car enters the quench tower. (i) For...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-sec63-7334.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-sec63-7334.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7334 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... to me? (a) For each by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues subject to the work <span class="hlt">practice</span>... of the coke mass. End observations of a push when the quench car enters the quench tower. (i) For...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7334.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7334.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7334 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... to me? (a) For each by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues subject to the work <span class="hlt">practice</span>... of the coke mass. End observations of a push when the quench car enters the quench tower. (i) For...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=childhood+AND+feeding&pg=3&id=EJ869624','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=childhood+AND+feeding&pg=3&id=EJ869624"><span>Parent and Staff Expectations for <span class="hlt">Continuity</span> of Home <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in the Child Care Setting for Families with Diverse Cultural Backgrounds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Gioia, Katey</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The use of childcare services for very young children (birth to three years) has increased dramatically in the past two decades (Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2004). This article investigates the expectations for cultural <span class="hlt">continuity</span> of caregiving <span class="hlt">practices</span> (with particular emphasis on sleep and feeding) between…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=concept+AND+analysis+AND+continuing+AND+professional+AND+development&pg=4&id=ED342920','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=concept+AND+analysis+AND+continuing+AND+professional+AND+development&pg=4&id=ED342920"><span>The Pause Model: A Qualitative Method of Self-Directed <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education for Professionals with Social <span class="hlt">Practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Liebowitz, Steven E.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper introduces the Pause Model, an innovative means of integrating self-directed learning and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional education. Since the method was developed for professionals such as counselors, educators, and managers who <span class="hlt">practice</span> in social settings, the paper begins with an explanation of a few of the unique attributes of professional…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=product+AND+process+AND+design+AND+principles&pg=6&id=ED563141','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=product+AND+process+AND+design+AND+principles&pg=6&id=ED563141"><span>Practitioner-Reseach as Dissertation: Exploring the <span class="hlt">Continuities</span> between <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Research in a Community College ESL Classroom</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jain, Rashi</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Traditional notions around "research" and "teaching" tend to project the two as separate, often conflicting, activities. My dissertation challenges this perceived dichotomy and explores points of connections, or <span class="hlt">continuities</span>, between teaching and research through my own <span class="hlt">practice</span> as an adjunct community-college English as a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=telemedicine&id=EJ759153','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=telemedicine&id=EJ759153"><span>Telemedicine for Access to Quality Care on Medical <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Medical Education in a Global Arena</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rafiq, Azhar; Merrell, Ronald C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Health care <span class="hlt">practices</span> <span class="hlt">continue</span> to evolve with technological advances integrating computer applications and patient information management into telemedicine systems. Telemedicine can be broadly defined as the use of information technology to provide patient care and share clinical information from one geographic location to another. Telemedicine…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 39 to Subpart Uuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work... Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines As stated in § 63.1569(c)(1), you... the device is operating properly and whether flow is present in the bypass line. 2. Option 2:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 39 to Subpart Uuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work... Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines As stated in § 63.1569(c)(1), you... the device is operating properly and whether flow is present in the bypass line. 2. Option 2:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol14-sec63-7334.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol14-sec63-7334.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7334 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... to me? (a) For each by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues subject to the work <span class="hlt">practice</span>... oven in a battery at least once every 90 days. If an oven cannot be observed during a 90-day...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1110647M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1110647M"><span>Patterns and processes of nutrient transfers from land to water: a catchment approach to evaluate Good <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in Ireland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mellander, P.-E.; Melland, A. R.; Shortle, G.; Wall, D.; Mechan, S.; Buckley, C.; Fealy, R.; Jordan, P.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p> grassland soils; areas where arable production represents a significant landuse; and catchments on productive and unproductive aquifers. The catchments were identified using a GIS-based multicriteria decision analysis with objective criteria that included landuse data (including <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and settlement statistics) combined with soils and geology data to evaluate the risk of P and N loss. Shortlisted catchments were then finalised using <span class="hlt">practical</span> criteria based on the potential for hydrometry and hydrochemistry research. In each catchment, a conceptual model approach is being used to hypothesize the sources, seasonal mobilisation and pathways of nutrients and water through the soil/subsoil system and transfer into surface and ground water systems to stratify each catchment experimental design. Knowledge of the nutrient management of each catchment farm and resulting soil fertility will be used to monitor the sources of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> N and P. Environmental soil nutrient tests will provide baselines and checks on the potential for mobilisation. Areas of high soil fertility that are coincident with high surface or sub-surface hydrological connectivity will be monitored for subsequent nutrient transfer. Other potential nutrient source loads within the catchments, such as rural waste-water treatment plants and domestic septic systems, will be factored in as non-<span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sources. Similarly, the potential for farmyard transfers will also be assessed. The net balance of nutrient transfer at the catchment outlets will be monitored using a high resolution method that is coincident with hydrometric measurements to ensure that there is a full understanding of the inter-dependence between point and diffuse nutrient transfers and hydrodynamics. This source to transfer approach is highly appropriate and a move towards inductive understanding of nutrient use and export in river catchments - the scale at which policies for water resources management will be assessed under the WFD. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H21K..05M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H21K..05M"><span>Effects of Land Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Cold Region Hydrological Processes in an <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Prairie Basin (Invited)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mahmood, T. H.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Wheater, H. S.; Baulch, H. M.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Conservation tillage including zero and reduced tillage, crop rotation and upstream reservoirs are commonly implemented as beneficial management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) in the Canadian Prairies. However, their effects are strongly dependent on interactions with cold region hydrological processes, such as wind redistribution of snow, snowmelt, infiltration to frozen soils and evaporation, due to strong coupling between land surface characteristics and hydrology. These interactions are poorly understood and few studies have investigated them using a physically-based modeling framework. In this study, we deploy a physically-based, semi-distributed cold regions hydrological model (CRHM) to investigate the impacts of land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the South Tobacco Creek Basin (STC) which forms part of the Red River Basin in southern Manitoba, Canada. The STC (~73 km2) is set in a gently rolling landscape of low relief (~200 m). Detailed field data such as crop type, tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>, crop residue and planting and harvesting dates are available from 1995 and are used to parameterize the model. While the majority of parameters are specified a priori, we have manually calibrated roughness and initial soil water storage parameters to compare the simulations with runoff observations at multiple scales (upstream catchment, mid-basin gauge and outlet gauge) and snow observations during 2000-2001 water year. The calibrated model based on the 2000-2001 period is further evaluated over the 2001-2011 period, which includes high inter-annual variability. The results suggest good agreement between observations and simulations and provide insight into hydrological controls. Snowmelt runoff is a major contributor to streamflow while the contribution of summer rainfall runoff is highly variable. The evaporative fraction is high during dry years (2002-2004) indicating a vertical flux controlled mass balance while the runoff fraction dominates during wet years (2005-2011), suggesting overland</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4332302','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4332302"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> altered soybean seed protein, oil, fatty acids, sugars, and minerals in the Midsouth USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bellaloui, Nacer; Bruns, H. Arnold; Abbas, Hamed K.; Mengistu, Alemu; Fisher, Daniel K.; Reddy, Krishna N.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Information on the effects of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soybean seed composition is scarce. Therefore, the objective of this research was to investigate the effects of planting date (PD) and seeding rate (SR) on seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars) and seed minerals (B, P, and Fe) in soybean grown in two row-types (RTs) on the Mississippi Delta region of the Midsouth USA. Two field experiments were conducted in 2009 and 2010 on Sharkey clay and Beulah fine sandy loam soil at Stoneville, MS, USA, under irrigated conditions. Soybean were grown in 102 cm single-rows and 25 cm twin-rows in 102 cm centers at SRs of 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m-2. The results showed that in May and June planting, protein, glucose, P, and B concentrations increased with increased SR, but at the highest SRs (40 and 50 seeds m-2), the concentrations remained constant or declined. Palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acid concentrations were the least responsive to SR increases. Early planting resulted in higher oil, oleic acid, sucrose, B, and P on both single and twin-rows. Late planting resulted in higher protein and linolenic acid, but lower oleic acid and oil concentrations. The changes in seed constituents could be due to changes in environmental factors (drought and temperature), and nutrient accumulation in seeds and leaves. The increase of stachyose sugar in 2010 may be due to a drier year and high temperature in 2010 compared to 2009; suggesting the possible role of stachyose as an environmental stress compound. Our research demonstrated that PD, SR, and RT altered some seed constituents, but the level of alteration in each year dependent on environmental factors such as drought and temperature. This information benefits growers and breeders for considering agronomic <span class="hlt">practices</span> to select for soybean seed nutritional qualities under drought and high heat conditions. PMID:25741347</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25741347','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25741347"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> altered soybean seed protein, oil, fatty acids, sugars, and minerals in the Midsouth USA.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bellaloui, Nacer; Bruns, H Arnold; Abbas, Hamed K; Mengistu, Alemu; Fisher, Daniel K; Reddy, Krishna N</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Information on the effects of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soybean seed composition is scarce. Therefore, the objective of this research was to investigate the effects of planting date (PD) and seeding rate (SR) on seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars) and seed minerals (B, P, and Fe) in soybean grown in two row-types (RTs) on the Mississippi Delta region of the Midsouth USA. Two field experiments were conducted in 2009 and 2010 on Sharkey clay and Beulah fine sandy loam soil at Stoneville, MS, USA, under irrigated conditions. Soybean were grown in 102 cm single-rows and 25 cm twin-rows in 102 cm centers at SRs of 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m(-2). The results showed that in May and June planting, protein, glucose, P, and B concentrations increased with increased SR, but at the highest SRs (40 and 50 seeds m(-2)), the concentrations remained constant or declined. Palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acid concentrations were the least responsive to SR increases. Early planting resulted in higher oil, oleic acid, sucrose, B, and P on both single and twin-rows. Late planting resulted in higher protein and linolenic acid, but lower oleic acid and oil concentrations. The changes in seed constituents could be due to changes in environmental factors (drought and temperature), and nutrient accumulation in seeds and leaves. The increase of stachyose sugar in 2010 may be due to a drier year and high temperature in 2010 compared to 2009; suggesting the possible role of stachyose as an environmental stress compound. Our research demonstrated that PD, SR, and RT altered some seed constituents, but the level of alteration in each year dependent on environmental factors such as drought and temperature. This information benefits growers and breeders for considering agronomic <span class="hlt">practices</span> to select for soybean seed nutritional qualities under drought and high heat conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16834881','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16834881"><span>GPs' attitudes to personal <span class="hlt">continuity</span>: findings from everyday <span class="hlt">practice</span> differ from postal surveys.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schers, Henk; Bor, Hans; van den Bosch, Wil; Grol, Richard</p> <p>2006-07-01</p> <p>We conducted a study in which we measured GPs' attitudes towards personal <span class="hlt">continuity</span> directly after consultations, and identified which factors predicted its perceived importance. Moreover, we related these data to attitudes as measured by a postal survey. GPs varied considerably in their attitudes towards personal <span class="hlt">continuity</span>. <span class="hlt">Continuity</span> was valued for serious and psychosocial issues and also for routine checks for a chronic illness. There was no relation whatsoever between the importance that individual GPs attached to <span class="hlt">continuity</span> after consultations, and their scores on the postal survey.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=devaluation&pg=5&id=EJ979187','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=devaluation&pg=5&id=EJ979187"><span>The <span class="hlt">Continued</span> Relevance of "Teaching to Transgress: Education as the <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Freedom"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bullen, Pauline E.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In 1994, bell hooks' work, Teaching to Transgress--Education as the <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Freedom was first published and this work re-examines it for its intent to counter the devaluation of teaching and on the basis that it addresses the urgent need for changes in teaching <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Because of the intransience of racism and the various "isms" that are…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=HASS&pg=4&id=ED050438','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=HASS&pg=4&id=ED050438"><span>Project Ideals: Curriculum and Instruction <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Learner Progress (Area G).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hass, Glen</p> <p></p> <p>This pamphlet surveys the research and literature concerned with the effects of curriculum and instructional <span class="hlt">practices</span> on pupil progress. Specific topics include (1) student grade acceleration and retardation, and elimination from school; (2) graded vs nongraded curriculum and school organization; (3) teaching and curriculum <span class="hlt">practices</span> for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21320564','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21320564"><span>Bioinformatics and the allergy assessment of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> biotechnology products: industry <span class="hlt">practices</span> and recommendations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ladics, Gregory S; Cressman, Robert F; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Herman, Rod A; Privalle, Laura; Song, Ping; Ward, Jason M; McClain, Scott</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>Bioinformatic tools are being increasingly utilized to evaluate the degree of similarity between a novel protein and known allergens within the context of a larger allergy safety assessment process. Importantly, bioinformatics is not a predictive analysis that can determine if a novel protein will ''become" an allergen, but rather a tool to assess whether the protein is a known allergen or is potentially cross-reactive with an existing allergen. Bioinformatic tools are key components of the 2009 CodexAlimentarius Commission's weight-of-evidence approach, which encompasses a variety of experimental approaches for an overall assessment of the allergenic potential of a novel protein. Bioinformatic search comparisons between novel protein sequences, as well as potential novel fusion sequences derived from the genome and transgene, and known allergens are required by all regulatory agencies that assess the safety of genetically modified (GM) products. The objective of this paper is to identify opportunities for consensus in the methods of applying bioinformatics and to outline differences that impact a consistent and reliable allergy safety assessment. The bioinformatic comparison process has some critical features, which are outlined in this paper. One of them is a curated, publicly available and well-managed database with known allergenic sequences. In this paper, the best <span class="hlt">practices</span>, scientific value, and food safety implications of bioinformatic analyses, as they are applied to GM food crops are discussed. Recommendations for conducting bioinformatic analysis on novel food proteins for potential cross-reactivity to known allergens are also put forth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26691919','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26691919"><span>Evolution and Phylogenetic Diversity of Yam Species (Dioscorea spp.): Implication for Conservation and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ngo Ngwe, Marie Florence Sandrine; Omokolo, Denis Ndoumou; Joly, Simon</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Yams (Dioscorea spp.) consist of approximately 600 species. Presently, these species are threatened by genetic erosion due to many factors such as pest attacks and farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In parallel, complex taxonomic boundaries in this genus makes it more challenging to properly address the genetic diversity of yam and manage its germplasm. As a first step toward evaluating and preserving the genetic diversity yam species, we use a phylogenetic diversity (PD) approach that has the advantage to investigate phylogenetic relationships and test hypotheses of species monophyly while alleviating to the problem of ploidy variation within and among species. The Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of 62 accessions from 7 species from three regions of Cameroon showed that most Dioscorea sections were monophyletic, but species within sections were generally non-monophyletic. The wild species D. praehensilis and cultivated D. cayenensis were the species with the highest PD. At the opposite, D. esculenta has a low PD and future studies should focus on this species to properly address its conservation status. We also show that wild species show a stronger genetic structure than cultivated species, which potentially reflects the management of the yam germplasm by farmers. These findings show that phylogenetic diversity is a promising approach for an initial investigation of genetic diversity in a crop consisting of closely related species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5256232','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5256232"><span>Assessing and enhancing quality through outcomes-based <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD): a review of current <span class="hlt">practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wallace, S.; May, S. A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Numerous professional bodies have questioned whether traditional input-based <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD) schemes are effective at measuring genuine learning and improving <span class="hlt">practice</span> performance and patient health. The most commonly used type of long-established CPD activities, such as conferences, lectures and symposia, have been found to have a limited effect on improving practitioner competence and performance, and no significant effect on patient health outcomes. Additionally, it is thought that the impact of many CPD activities is reduced when they are undertaken in isolation outside of a defined structure of directed learning. In contrast, CPD activities which are interactive, encourage reflection on <span class="hlt">practice</span>, provide opportunities to <span class="hlt">practice</span> skills, involve multiple exposures, help practitioners to identify between current performance and a standard to be achieved, and are focused on outcomes, are the most effective at improving <span class="hlt">practice</span> and patient health outcomes. PMID:27856985</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27424116','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27424116"><span>Environmentally-friendly <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and their acceptance by smallholder farmers in China-A case study in Xinxiang County, Henan Province.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Luo, Liangguo; Qin, Lihuan; Wang, Yan; Wang, Qian</p> <p>2016-11-15</p> <p>Intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> with high inputs has resulted in rapid development of crop production in China, accompanied by negative environmental effects such as serious non-point source <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> pollution. Implementation of environmentally-friendly <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> can effectively prevent such pollution. However, the acceptance and adoption of such <span class="hlt">practices</span> are related not only to associated risks and potential benefits, but also to farmers' attitudes to and knowledge of scientifically validated <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In the presented study we surveyed views of a stratified sample of 150 smallholder farmers and 10 extension service experts from Xinxiang, a high grain-producing county in Henan Province, China. Their opinions were explored in personal interviews using a questionnaire with three sections. The first section mainly sought information on surveyed farmers' demographic characteristics like gender, age and education. The second section concerned their awareness of the environmental problems and losses of yields associated with customary over-fertilization <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and their main concerns about new <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The third section addressed farmers' attitudes to, and the extension service experts' professional evaluations of, five selected <span class="hlt">practices</span> in terms of the importance of seven factors (time demands, costs, risks, compatibility, complexity, trialability and observability). Acceptance indices were calculated from the responses to rank farmers' willingness to accept the five environmentally-friendly <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and thus identify the most appropriate to promote in the study area. The results show that costs, followed by risks and observability, are the more important factors affecting farmers' decisions to adopt a <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The results also indicate that no or minimum tillage and returning straw to the field are the most appropriate <span class="hlt">practices</span> to promote initially at large scale in Xinxiang. The others could be popularized gradually after providing</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24309231','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24309231"><span>Application of analytical hierarchy process for effective selection of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best management <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Giri, Subhasis; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In this study an analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was used for ranking best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) in the Saginaw River Watershed based on environmental, economic and social factors. Three spatial targeting methods were used for placement of BMPs on critical source areas (CSAs). The environment factors include sediment, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus reductions at the subbasin level and the watershed outlet. Economic factors were based on total BMP cost, including installation, maintenance, and opportunity costs. Social factors were divided into three favorability rankings (most favorable, moderately favorable, and least favorable) based on area allocated to each BMP. Equal weights (1/3) were considered for the three main factors while calculating the BMP rank by AHP. In this study three scenarios were compared. A comprehensive approach in which environmental, economic, and social aspects are simultaneously considered (Scenario 1) versus more traditional approaches in which both environmental and economic aspects were considered (Scenario 2) or only environmental aspects (sediment, TN, and TP) were considered (Scenario 3). In Scenario 1, only stripcropping (moderately favorable) was selected on all CSAs at the subbasin level, whereas stripcropping (49-69% of CSAs) and residue management (most favorable, 31-51% of CSAs) were selected by AHP based on the watershed outlet and three spatial targeting methods. In Scenario 2, native grass was eliminated by moderately preferable BMPs (stripcropping) both at the subbasin and watershed outlet levels due the lower BMP implementations cost compared to native grass. Finally, in Scenario 3, at subbasin level, the least socially preferable BMP (native grass) was selected in 100% of CSAs due to greater pollution reduction capacity compared to other BMPs. At watershed level, nearly 50% the CSAs selected stripcropping, and the remaining 50% of CSAs selected native grass and residue management equally.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=91916','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=91916"><span>Leaching of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Diverse Soils under Various <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gagliardi, Joel V.; Karns, Jeffrey S.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Application of animal manures to soil as crop fertilizers is an important means for recycling the nitrogen and phosphorus which the manures contain. Animal manures also contain bacteria, including many types of pathogens. Manure pathogen levels depend on the source animal, the animal's state of health, and how the manure was stored or treated before use. Rainfall may result in pathogen spread into soil by runoff from stored or unincorporated manure or by leaching through the soil profile. Steady rainfall consisting of 16.5 mm h−1 was applied to 100-mm disturbed soil cores that were treated with manure and inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain B6914. The level of B6914 in leachate was near the inoculum level each hour for 8 h, as was the level of B6914 at several soil depths after 24 h, indicating that there was a high rate of growth. Bacterial movement through three different types of soil was then compared by using disturbed (tilled) and intact (no-till) soil cores and less intense rainfall consisting of 25.4 mm on 4 consecutive days and then four more times over a 17-day period. Total B6914 levels exceeded the inoculum levels for all treatments except intact clay loam cores. B6914 levels in daily leachate samples decreased sharply with time, although the levels were more constant when intact sandy loam cores were used. The presence of manure often increased total B6914 leachate and soil levels in intact cores but had the opposite effect on disturbed soil cores. Ammonia and nitrate levels correlated with B6914 and total coliform levels in leachate. We concluded that tillage <span class="hlt">practice</span>, soil type, and method of pathogen delivery affect but do not prevent vertical E. coli O157:H7 and coliform transport in soil and that soluble nitrogen may enhance transport. PMID:10698745</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-10420.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-10420.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the management <span class="hlt">practice</span> requirements?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether each sterilization cycle contains a full load of items, and if not, a statement from a hospital central services..., and Records...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol15-sec63-10420.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol15-sec63-10420.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the management <span class="hlt">practice</span> requirements?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether each sterilization cycle contains a full load of items, and if not, a statement from a hospital central services..., and Records...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23246760','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23246760"><span>Production of carbonaceous adsorbents from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> by-products and novolac resin under a <span class="hlt">continuous</span> countercurrent flow type pyrolysis operation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ioannou, Z; Simitzis, J</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Carbonaceous adsorbents based on novolac resin (N) and olive stone biomass (B) in a proportion of 20/80 and 40/60 w./w. N/O were produced. The specimens were cured (c) and pyrolyzed/carbonized (C) up to 1000 °C under a <span class="hlt">continuous</span> countercurrent flow type pyrolysis operation (N20B-cC, N40B-cC). Commercial activated carbon (AC) was used for comparison reasons. Methylene blue adsorption from its aqueous solutions onto the adsorbents and kinetic analysis were investigated. The specific surface area of adsorbents and the gross calorific values (GCV) of cured materials were determined. The results show that N40B-cC presents lower weight loss and shrinkage but higher methylene blue adsorption than N20B-cC. Pseudo-second order mechanism describes better methylene blue adsorption onto all adsorbents. The specific surface area of carbonaceous and the gross calorific values of cured materials follow the order: AC>N20B-cC>N40B-cC and N100-c>N40B-c>N20B-c>B respectively. Olive stone biomass may constitute a suitable precursor for the production of carbonaceous materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4537R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4537R"><span>Water quality impact assessment of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> Beneficial Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> (BMPs) simulated for a regional catchment in Quebec, Eastern Canada</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rousseau, Alain N.; Hallema, Dennis W.; Gumiere, Silvio J.; Savary, Stéphane; Hould Gosselin, Gabriel</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Water quality has become a matter of increasing concern over the past four decades as a result of the intensification of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, and more particularly so in Canada where <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> has evolved into the largest non-point source of surface water pollution. The Canadian WEBs project (Watershed Evaluation of Beneficial Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span>, BMPs) was initiated in order to determine the efficiency of BMPs in improving the surface water quality of rural catchments, and the economic aspects related to their implementation on the same scale. In this contribution we use the integrated watershed modelling platform GIBSI (Gestion Intégrée des Bassins versants à l'aide d'un Système Informatisé) to evaluate the effects of various BMPs on sediment and nutrient yields and, in close relation to this, the surface water quality for the Beaurivage River catchment (718 km2) in Quebec, eastern Canada. A base scenario of the catchment is developed by calibrating the different models of the GIBSI platform, namely HYDROTEL for hydrology, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) for soil erosion, the Erosion-Productivity Impact Calculator (EPIC) of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for contaminant transport and fate, and QUAL2E for stream water quality. Four BMPs were analysed: (1) vegetated riparian buffer strips, (2) precision slurry application, (3) transition of all cereal and corn fields to grassland (grassland conversion), and (4) no-tillage on corn fields. Simulations suggest that riparian buffer strips and grassland conversion are more effective in terms of phosphorus, nitrogen and sediment load reduction than precision slurry application and no-tillage on corn fields. The results furthermore indicate the need for a more profound understanding of sediment dynamics in streams and on riparian buffer strips.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27104552','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27104552"><span>Eating Behaviours of Preadolescent Children over Time: Stability, <span class="hlt">Continuity</span> and the Moderating Role of Perceived Parental Feeding <span class="hlt">Practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Houldcroft, Laura; Farrow, Claire; Haycraft, Emma</p> <p>2016-04-20</p> <p>The links between childhood eating behaviours and parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> are well-established in younger children, but there is a lack of research examining these variables in a preadolescent age group, particularly from the child's perspective, and longitudinally. This study firstly aimed to examine the <span class="hlt">continuity</span> and stability of preadolescent perceptions of their parents' controlling feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> (pressure to eat and restriction) over a 12 month period. The second aim was to explore if perceptions of parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> moderated the relationship between preadolescents' eating behaviours longitudinally. Two hundred and twenty nine preadolescents (mean age at recruitment 8.73 years) completed questionnaires assessing their eating behaviours and their perceptions of parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> at two time points, 12 months apart (T1 and T2). Preadolescents' perceptions of their parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> remained stable. Perceptions of restriction and pressure to eat were <span class="hlt">continuous</span>. Perceptions of parental pressure to eat and restriction significantly moderated the relationships between eating behaviours at T1 and T2. The findings from this study suggest that in a preadolescent population, perceptions of parental pressure to eat and restriction of food may exacerbate the development of problematic eating behaviours.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847099','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847099"><span>Eating Behaviours of Preadolescent Children over Time: Stability, <span class="hlt">Continuity</span> and the Moderating Role of Perceived Parental Feeding <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Houldcroft, Laura; Farrow, Claire; Haycraft, Emma</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The links between childhood eating behaviours and parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> are well-established in younger children, but there is a lack of research examining these variables in a preadolescent age group, particularly from the child’s perspective, and longitudinally. This study firstly aimed to examine the <span class="hlt">continuity</span> and stability of preadolescent perceptions of their parents’ controlling feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> (pressure to eat and restriction) over a 12 month period. The second aim was to explore if perceptions of parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> moderated the relationship between preadolescents’ eating behaviours longitudinally. Two hundred and twenty nine preadolescents (mean age at recruitment 8.73 years) completed questionnaires assessing their eating behaviours and their perceptions of parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> at two time points, 12 months apart (T1 and T2). Preadolescents’ perceptions of their parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> remained stable. Perceptions of restriction and pressure to eat were <span class="hlt">continuous</span>. Perceptions of parental pressure to eat and restriction significantly moderated the relationships between eating behaviours at T1 and T2. The findings from this study suggest that in a preadolescent population, perceptions of parental pressure to eat and restriction of food may exacerbate the development of problematic eating behaviours. PMID:27104552</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ259001.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ259001.pdf"><span>Break-even Analysis: A <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Tool for Administrators of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Noel, James</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Explains how break-even analysis can help the <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education administrator in planning by clarifying the relationship between costs, volume, and surplus revenues. Also explains the concepts of fixed, variable, and semivariable costs. (CT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23890937','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23890937"><span><span class="hlt">Practical</span> considerations for the dosing and adjustment of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Galvagno, Samuel M; Hong, Caron M; Lissauer, Matthew E; Baker, Andrew K; Murthi, Sarah B; Herr, Daniel L; Stein, Deborah M</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Familiarity with the initiation, dosing, adjustment, and termination of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a core skill for contemporary intensivists. Guidelines for how to administer CRRT in the intensive care unit are not well documented. The purpose of this review is to discuss the modalities, terminology, and components of CRRT, with an emphasis on the <span class="hlt">practical</span> aspects of dosing, adjustments, and termination. Management of electrolyte and acid-base derangements commonly encountered with acute renal failure is emphasized. Knowledge regarding the <span class="hlt">practical</span> aspects of managing CRRT in the intensive care unit is a prerequisite for achieving desired physiological end points.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JHyd..326..122L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JHyd..326..122L"><span>Analysis of the dynamics of soil infiltrability of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils from <span class="hlt">continuous</span> rainfall-runoff measurements on small plots</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Léonard, J.; Ancelin, O.; Ludwig, B.; Richard, G.</p> <p>2006-07-01</p> <p>In this study, data from <span class="hlt">continuous</span> measurement of natural rainfall and runoff rates on nine 2 m 2 runoff plots were used to analyse the dynamics of infiltration and how it relates to the evolution of the soil surface state. All measurements were performed on two cropped sites in northern France on low slope loess soils, with low rainfall intensities. Crops represented were maize, wheat and sugar beet. Infiltrability was characterized at the scale of the plot and of the rainfall event by a single parameter, the constant infiltrability that yields an excess rainfall hyetograph with a volume equal to the measured runoff volume ( ϕ index). Results indicated that: (1) even if the runoff plots were installed on two catchments where water erosion was important, the observed runoff volumes and intensities were very small. The runoff to rainfall ratio was typically less than 5% at the season to year scale; (2) the apparent infiltrability ϕ cannot be defined independently from rainfall intensity when runoff at the outlet of a plot comes from only a subset of the plot area. The relationship between rainfall intensity and apparent infiltrability can be used to estimate the relative runoff contributing area (≈0.10-0.35 in ourcase); (3) the development and nature of surface crusting has a major influence on the apparent infiltrability: there is a progressive shift of ϕ toward low values when crusting develops, which is predominantly due to an increase in the relative contributing area. From a methodological point of view, failure to include the rainfall intensity dependence of infiltrability in runoff modelling could introduce large errors on runoff predictions. This relationship between rainfall intensity and apparent infiltrability should thus be analysed when possible, and soil surface state characterization should include more information about connection between the different parts of a plot and its outlet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26642167','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26642167"><span>Talking about a (business <span class="hlt">continuity</span>) revolution: Why best <span class="hlt">practices</span> are wrong and possible solutions for getting them right.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Armour, Mark</p> <p></p> <p>The business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> profession has been following a methodology that has barely evolved since its inception. Unfortunately, the stodgy, labour-intensive <span class="hlt">practices</span> of the past are poorly suited to today's fast-paced and ever-changing work environments. Proposed herein is a new approach to the discipline. Just as agile methodology revolutionised project management, new tactics in preparedness can drastically change how this profession is practised. That is the hope. If there is to be any significant change in business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> ahead, it may just take a revolution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21958405','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21958405"><span>Proceedings of the "Arthritis, <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, and Rural Life: state of the art research, <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and applications" conference, West Lafayette, Indiana, May 11-13, 2011.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cook, Kathryn E; Field, William E</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>This article presents proceedings of the first national conference to assemble professionals to address the issue of arthritis in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. The "Arthritis, <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, and Rural Life: State of the Art Research, <span class="hlt">Practices</span>, and Applications" conference, May 11-13, 2011, at the Purdue University Beck <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Center in West Lafayette, Indiana, focused on increasing awareness and education in the prevention, effects, care, and treatment of arthritis specific to farmers. Presentations included a contextualizing keynote and sessions addressing the prevention and treatment of arthritis in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, including topics such as traditional arthritis therapies, alternative treatments, assistive technology, and ergonomic techniques and modifications. Participants discussed particular issues on a field trip to several Purdue University research farms addressing ergonomics. The conference concluded with a farmer panel, where attendees heard personal stories from farmers suffering from the effects of arthritis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B51D0050F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B51D0050F"><span>Simulating Sustainable P Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Tile-Drained Landscapes of Central Ohio Using the <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Policy Environmental Extender (APEX)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ford, W. I., III; King, K.; Williams, M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Despite extensive application of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> to minimize sediment P delivery to streams, hypoxic conditions and harmful algal blooms persist in receiving water bodies. Tile-drainage networks are a focal point for reducing soluble P in the food-producing Midwestern United States in that they promote higher connectivity between upland soils and stream channels which decreases soil contact time, and biogeochemical alterations. A critical next step to reduce the environmental impact and maintain sustainable <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> is to implement best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) under a holistic framework that considers adverse effects to water resources and crop production, while maintaining economic feasibility. The objective of this study was to apply a robust numerical model, the <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Policy Environmental Extender (APEX), in a tile-drained landscape in Central Ohio in order to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of BMPs on soluble and particulate P delivery to stream channels. The model was applied and evaluated at two adjacent edge-of-field sites with similar soil, topographic and management characteristics (except for tillage and tile installation on the south field in 2012, preceded by more than 20 years of no-till operations). Three years of daily discharge, total suspended solids, soluble P, soluble N (NO3 and NH4), total P, total N, and crop yields were utilized to verify the model performance. Prevalent BMPs simulated within the modeling framework included drainage water management, tillage and crop rotations, the 4Rs framework (right fertilizer source, rate, time, and placement), and bioreactors. Results of the study quantify the ability of the numerical model to simulate hydrology and P transport for surface runoff and subsurface tile drainage and highlight modifications that improve model performance. Further, results highlight BMPs that effectively reduce P loads to streams while maintaining crop yields, which can later be used to inform BMPs</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol7-sec701-15.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol7-sec701-15.pdf"><span>7 CFR 701.15 - Starting <span class="hlt">practices</span> before cost-share request is submitted; non-entitlement to payment; payment...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Starting <span class="hlt">practices</span> before cost-share request is submitted; non-entitlement to payment; payment subject to the availability of funds. 701.15 Section 701.15 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> CONSERVATION...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24648367','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24648367"><span>Consequences of a lack of standardization of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education terminology: the case of <span class="hlt">practice</span> facilitation and educational outreach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Van Hoof, Thomas J; Miller, Nicole E</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Systematic reviews published in the quality improvement and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education literature have noted that the lack of standardized terminology for categorizing and describing various interventions in published studies is a major obstacle to drawing conclusions about their effectiveness. A case in point is <span class="hlt">practice</span> facilitation and educational outreach. Although they are 2 long-standing interventions with some common characteristics, researchers studying 1 intervention may be unfamiliar with the other given the relatively separate literatures that have developed around both sets of terms. A comparison of articles included in recent systematic reviews of <span class="hlt">practice</span> facilitation and educational outreach revealed a small but significant overlap of articles, journals, key words, and noncorresponding authors, but no overlap of corresponding authors. Based on these findings, the authors join the call for the creation of an intervention taxonomy and its application to these and other <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education interventions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=317612&keyword=noaa&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78720376&CFTOKEN=50797785','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=317612&keyword=noaa&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78720376&CFTOKEN=50797785"><span>Mining Information form a Coupled Air Quality Model to Examine the Impacts of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Air and Groundwater Quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Attributing nitrogen (N) in the environment to emissions from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> is difficult because of the complex and inter-related chemical and biological reactions associated with N and its cascading effects across land, air and water. Such analyses are criti...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Clinical+AND+pharmacy+AND+pharmacy+AND+practice&pg=3&id=EJ522989','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Clinical+AND+pharmacy+AND+pharmacy+AND+practice&pg=3&id=EJ522989"><span>A <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Community Pharmacy <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Experience: Design and Evaluation of Instructional Materials.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Thomas, Selby Greer; And Others</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>A two-year community pharmacy clinical experience using self-directed learning modules is described and evaluated. The modules were designed to stimulate interest in community pharmacy, motivate learning by demonstrating applicability of didactic work to contemporary <span class="hlt">practice</span>, develop communication and psychosocial skills, and promote…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Medical+AND+ethics&pg=7&id=EJ628950','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Medical+AND+ethics&pg=7&id=EJ628950"><span>Lifelong Learning in Ethical <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: A Challenge for <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Medical Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kenny, Nuala; Sargeant, Joan; Allen, Michael</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Questionnaires and small-group discussions with a physician-ethicist revealed that physicians had very little formal ethics training in medical school. They did not feel they needed a very high level of confidence regarding ethical issues in <span class="hlt">practice</span>, but lacked a systematic approach to identification and analysis of ethical issues. (Contains 24…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21986188','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21986188"><span>Stability and <span class="hlt">continuity</span> of parentally reported child eating behaviours and feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> from 2 to 5 years of age.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farrow, C; Blissett, J</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>Previous research suggests that many eating behaviours are stable in children but that obesigenic eating behaviours tend to increase with age. This research explores the stability (consistency in individual levels over time) and <span class="hlt">continuity</span> (consistency in group levels over time) of child eating behaviours and parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> in children between 2 and 5 years of age. Thirty one participants completed measures of child eating behaviours, parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> and child weight at 2 and 5 years of age. Child eating behaviours and parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> remained stable between 2 and 5 years of age. There was also good <span class="hlt">continuity</span> in measures of parental restriction and monitoring of food intake, as well as in mean levels of children's eating behaviours and BMI over time. Mean levels of maternal pressure to eat significantly increased, whilst mean levels of desire to drink significantly decreased, between 2 and 5 years of age. These findings suggest that children's eating behaviours are stable and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> in the period prior to 5 years of age. Further research is necessary to replicate these findings and to explore why later developmental increases are seen in children's obesigenic eating behaviours.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=229671','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=229671"><span>Handbook of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Geophysics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Geophysical methods <span class="hlt">continue</span> to show great promise for use in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. The term “<span class="hlt">agricultural</span> geophysics” denotes a subdiscipline of geophysics that is focused only on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> applications. The Handbook of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Geophysics was compiled to include a comprehensive overview of the geoph...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866287','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866287"><span><span class="hlt">Practical</span> substrate and apparatus for static and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> monitoring by surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Vo-Dinh, Tuan</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A substrate for use in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is disclosed, comprising a support, preferably flexible, coated with roughness-imparting microbodies and a metallized overcoating. Also disclosed is apparatus for using the aforesaid substrate in <span class="hlt">continuous</span> and static SERS trace analyses, especially of organic compounds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ272890.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ272890.pdf"><span>The Effects of a <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Course on Dental Hygiene <span class="hlt">Practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Young, Lynda J.; And Others</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Thirty-three dental hygienists were evaluated to measure the immediate and long-term effects of a <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education course on their knowledge, attitudes, and clinical skills. A significant immediate gain in knowledge was found, but no increased ability to apply skills learned was demonstrated. However, students rated themselves as more skilled.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=registration&pg=6&id=EJ959277','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=registration&pg=6&id=EJ959277"><span>Re-Thinking <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development through Changing Metaphors and Location in Professional <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boud, David; Hager, Paul</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Many professions have requirements for professional development activities to ensure <span class="hlt">continuing</span> registration or membership. These commonly focus on participation in a limited range of activities. This paper questions the assumptions behind such approaches and what alternatives might be considered. It explores the suitability of metaphors used for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+learning+AND+communities+AND+improvement+AND+teaching+AND+skills&pg=2&id=EJ1048310','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+learning+AND+communities+AND+improvement+AND+teaching+AND+skills&pg=2&id=EJ1048310"><span>From Needs Assessment to Communities of <span class="hlt">Practice</span> for Online <span class="hlt">Continuing</span>-Education Programming</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Feltenberger Beaver, Alaina; Johnson, Fenimore; Sinkinson, Caroline</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study identifies the professional development needs of instructors teaching online using quantitative and qualitative methods. Twenty-six participants from a convenience sample at the University of Colorado, Boulder's Division of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education (CE) were surveyed in a Faculty Needs Assessment (FNA) that was open to participants from…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=olivier&id=ED524948','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=olivier&id=ED524948"><span>Teacher Perceptions of Professional Learning Communities: Communities that <span class="hlt">Practice</span> <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Learning within Christian Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Marley, Diann Wylie</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A challenge in both Christian and public K-12 education is to create schools where teachers and students are <span class="hlt">continually</span> learning and improving. In schools that have experienced improved teaching instruction and increased learning, a common organizational structure has been found. One such organizational structure can be defined as professional…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartEEEE-app10.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartEEEE-app10.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Eeee of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance by . . . 1. Internal floating roof (IFR) storage tank at an existing, reconstructed, or... to this subpart, items 1 through 5. a. Install a floating roof designed and operated according to the applicable specifications in § 63.1063(a) and (b). i. Visually inspecting the floating roof deck,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=customer+AND+profile&pg=7&id=ED401796','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=customer+AND+profile&pg=7&id=ED401796"><span>Turning <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Quality Improvement into Institutional <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: The Tools and Techniques.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cornesky, Robert A.</p> <p></p> <p>This manual is intended to assist managers of support units at institutions of higher education in the implementation of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Quality Improvement (CQI). The purpose is to describe a cooperative model for CQI which will permit managers to evaluate the quality of their units and institution, and by using the described tools and techniques, to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=adult+AND+hypertension&pg=5&id=EJ386649','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=adult+AND+hypertension&pg=5&id=EJ386649"><span>Management of Hypertension in Private <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: A Randomized Controlled Trial in <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Medical Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gullion, David S.; And Others</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>A randomized control trial was used to evaluate a physician education program designed to improve physician management of patients' hypertension, hypertension-related behaviors, and diastolic blood pressure. It was suggested that more intensive <span class="hlt">continuing</span> medical education programs are needed to improve physician performance and patient outcome.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crimes+AND+against+AND+women&pg=6&id=EJ690362','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crimes+AND+against+AND+women&pg=6&id=EJ690362"><span>Toward a National Research Agenda on Violence Against Women: <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> the Dialogue on Research and <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jordan, Carol E.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>This two-part special issue does not presume to set the nation's research agenda on violence against women (VAW), nor is it the first attempt to contribute to how that agenda might be informed. Instead, this issue <span class="hlt">continues</span> the dialogue about the empirical study of VAW started by and participated in by many others before. Any attempt at something…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20873631','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20873631"><span>[Reduction effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on non-point source pollution in a watershed in Three Gorges Reservoir Area].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huang, Zhi-Lin; Tian, Yao-Wu; Xiao, Wen-Fa; Liu, Zhi-Yan</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>Taking a typical watershed in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA) as test object, the AnnAGNPS model was used to evaluate the reduction effects of different cropping, different fertilization level, conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practice</span> (CTP), conservation reserve program (CRP), and conversion of cropland into forestland program (CCFP) on the output of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> non-point source pollution (NPS) in the watershed. The simulation results showed that different cropping had no significant difference in the effect of reducing sediment yield, but had significant difference in the effect of reducing phosphorus output. Fertilization level had significant effects on the outputs of total nitrogen and total phosphorus. CTP decreased the sediment yield significantly but increased the nutrient output. CRP reduced sediment yield, but had less effect in reducing nutrient output. CCFP reduced both sediment yield and nutrient output significantly. After the implementation of CCFP, the sediment yield output on the croplands with a slope greater than 10 degrees was less than 5 t x hm(-2) and the nutrient output was within the permissible limit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641334','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641334"><span>Measuring the Contribution of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> to Observed Trends and Recent Condition in Water Quality Indicators in Ohio, USA.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miltner, Robert J</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Over the last three decades, significant investments made to upgrade wastewater infrastructure and manage pollution from diffuse sources have resulted in measurably improved water quality and biological conditions in Ohio's rivers and streams. Conservation measures to reduce soil loss appear to have contributed significantly to the improvement witnessed over the last two decades and should therefore be <span class="hlt">continued</span>. Within the most recent timeframe examined, little difference was found in either total phosphorus or suspended sediment concentration in relation to conservation measures, indicating that the environmental benefits of measures targeting soil loss may be approaching an asymptote. Conservation measures targeting livestock and forage management, however, appear to have reduced nitrogen concentrations within the recent time frame. An examination of the interrelationships between habitat quality, conservation measures, and land use indicated that water quality was generally mediated by interactions with stream habitat quality. However, the positive effect of habitat quality was reduced in catchments draining fine-textured soils. The implication of these latter two findings suggest that proscriptively adding natural function to the large network of ditched and maintained conveyances draining <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands would substantially improve water quality, but management at the field level is necessary to minimize phosphorus losses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19848109','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19848109"><span>Drug evaluation and the permissive principle: <span class="hlt">continuities</span> and contradictions between standards and <span class="hlt">practices</span> in antidepressant regulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abraham, John; Davis, Courtney</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Pharmaceuticals are not permitted on to the market unless they are granted regulatory approval. The regulatory process is, therefore, crucial in whether or not a drug is widely prescribed. Regulatory agencies have developed standards of performance that pharmaceuticals are supposed to meet before entering the market. Regulation of technologies is often discussed by reference to the precautionary principle. In contrast, this paper develops the concept of the 'permissive principle' as a way of understanding the departure of regulators' <span class="hlt">practices</span> from standards of drug efficacy to which regulatory agencies themselves subscribe. By taking a case study of antidepressant regulation in the UK and the USA, the mechanisms of permissive regulatory <span class="hlt">practices</span> are examined. An STS methodology of both spatial (international) and temporal comparisons of regulatory <span class="hlt">practices</span> with regulatory standards is employed to identify the nature and extent of the permissive regulation. It is found that the permissive principle was adopted by drug regulators in the UK and the USA, but more so by the former than the latter. Evidently, permissive regulation, which favours the commercial interests of the drug manufacturer, but is contrary to the interests of patients, may penetrate to the heart of regulatory science. On the other hand, permissive regulation of specific drugs should not be regarded as an inevitable result of marketing strategies and concomitant networks deployed by powerful pharmaceutical companies, because the extent of permissive regulation may vary according to the intra-institutional normative commitments of regulators to uphold their technical standards against the commercial interests of the manufacturer. Likely sociological factors that can account for such permissive regulatory <span class="hlt">practices</span> are 'corporate bias', secrecy and excessive regulatory trust in the pharmaceutical industry in the UK, political expediency and ideological capture in the USA, combined in both countries</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23519068','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23519068"><span>Burn center journal club promotes clinical research, <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education, and evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fowler, Laura; Gottschlich, Michele M; Kagan, Richard J</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to characterize the structure, policy, implementation, and outcome measures of a burn team journal club to assess its effectiveness in promoting multidisciplinary education relative to research competency, clinical knowledge, and evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span>. After 2 years of a new multidisciplinary format, an anonymous quality assurance survey was distributed to staff members of a regional pediatric burn center to evaluate the impact of the journal club on clinical and research indicators. The 24 journal club meetings evaluated in this study included a variety of topics, among which were wound healing, infection, nutrition, metabolism, sleep, medications, alternative medicine, research compliance, and child abuse. The speakers included a variety of hospital personnel: 26% researchers, 23% physicians, 20% registered nurses, and 31% other disciplines and attendance mean was 29 participants per session (range 17-50). Survey results from 30 respondents indicated that 100% judged the program to be valuable to personal educational needs and 83% indicated that format did not warrant change. According to self-report data, the journal club enhanced medical knowledge (90%), patient care (73%), research competency (70%), critical thinking (63%), and evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span> (63%). Results indicate that the journal club program was well received by participants, and promoted enhanced knowledge and improved patient care. In the future, barriers to research initiatives and integration of research findings into <span class="hlt">practice</span> warrant follow-up study. Journal club should be incorporated into the learning curriculum of burn practitioners as a means to promote critical thinking, research competency, and evidence-based clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26897617','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26897617"><span>Implementing business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> management systems and sharing best <span class="hlt">practices</span> at a European bank.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aronis, Stelios; Stratopoulos, Georgios</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper provides an overview of the methodology applied by the Alpha Bank Group in order to implement a business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> management (BCM) programme to its parent company (Alpha Bank SA), as well as to its subsidiaries in Albania, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Greece, Romania, Serbia, UK and Ukraine. It also reviews the problems faced, how they were overcome and the lessons learned. When implementing a BCM programme in a large organisation, it is very important to follow the methodology described by BCM standard ISO 22301, otherwise the business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> plan is unlikely to work efficiently or comply with the business recovery requirements, as well as with the requirements of other interested parties, such as customers, regulatory authorities, vendors, service providers, critical associates, etc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23260699','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23260699"><span>Axial and centrifugal <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-flow rotary pumps: a translation from pump mechanics to clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Smedira, Nicholas G; Hoercher, Katherine J; Massiello, Alex; Lee, Sangjin; Horvath, David J; Starling, Randall C</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The recent success of <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-flow circulatory support devices has led to the growing acceptance of these devices as a viable therapeutic option for end-stage heart failure patients who are not responsive to current pharmacologic and electrophysiologic therapies. This article defines and clarifies the major classification of these pumps as axial or centrifugal <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-flow devices by discussing the difference in their inherent mechanics and describing how these features translate clinically to pump selection and patient management issues. Axial vs centrifugal pump and bearing design, theory of operation, hydrodynamic performance, and current vs flow relationships are discussed. A review of axial vs centrifugal physiology, pre-load and after-load sensitivity, flow pulsatility, and issues related to automatic physiologic control and suction prevention algorithms is offered. Reliability and biocompatibility of the two types of pumps are reviewed from the perspectives of mechanical wear, implant life, hemolysis, and pump deposition. Finally, a glimpse into the future of <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-flow technologies is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/agriculture/agriculture-climate-change','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/agriculture/agriculture-climate-change"><span><span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>: Climate Change</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Climate change affects <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> producers because <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and fisheries depend on specific climate conditions. Temperature changes can cause crop planting dates to shift. Droughts and floods due to climate change may hinder farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=permaculture&id=EJ539958','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=permaculture&id=EJ539958"><span>Traditional <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> and Permaculture.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pierce, Dick</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Discusses benefits of combining traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> techniques with the concepts of "permaculture," a framework for revitalizing traditions, culture, and spirituality. Describes school, college, and community projects that have assisted American Indian communities in revitalizing sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> that incorporate…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2939635','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2939635"><span>A specialist-generalist classification of the arable flora and its response to changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p> developed in stable environments are valid in highly disturbed environments such as agro-ecosystems. The approach developed here to classify arable weeds according to the breadth of their ecological niche is robust and applicable to a wide range of organisms. It is also sensitive to disturbance regime and we show here that recent changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, i.e. increased levels of disturbance have favoured the most generalist species, hence leading to biotic homogenisation in arable landscapes. PMID:20809982</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22039428','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22039428"><span><span class="hlt">PRACTICAL</span> METHODS FOR <span class="hlt">CONTINUOUS</span> GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION USING PULSAR TIMING DATA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ellis, J. A.; Jenet, F. A.; McLaughlin, M. A.</p> <p>2012-07-10</p> <p>Gravitational waves (GWs) are tiny ripples in the fabric of space time predicted by Einstein's general relativity. Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are well poised to detect low-frequency (10{sup -9}-10{sup -7} Hz) GWs in the near future. There has been a significant amount of research into the detection of a stochastic background of GWs from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs). Recent work has shown that single <span class="hlt">continuous</span> sources standing out above the background may be detectable by PTAs operating at a sensitivity sufficient to detect the stochastic background. The most likely sources of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> GWs in the pulsar timing frequency band are extremely massive and/or nearby SMBHBs. In this paper we present detection strategies including various forms of matched filtering and power spectral summing. We determine the efficacy and computational cost of such strategies. It is shown that using an optimal matched filter explicitly including the poorly constrained pulsar distances with a grid-based method is computationally infeasible. We show that an Earth-term-matched filter constructed using only the correlated signal terms is robust, computationally viable and highly sensitive to GW signals. We further show that a simple power spectral summing technique is nearly equivalent to the Earth-term-matched filter in terms of the minimum detectable amplitude. Both of these techniques are only a factor of two less sensitive than the computationally unrealizable optimal matched filter. We also show that a pairwise matched filter, taking the pulsar distances into account, is comparable to the optimal matched filter for the single template case and comparable to the Earth-term-matched filter for many search templates. Finally, using simulated data optimal quality, we place a theoretical minimum detectable strain amplitude of h > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} from <span class="hlt">continuous</span> GWs at frequencies on the order {approx}1/T{sub obs}.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24693930','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24693930"><span>Transactive memory system as a measure of collaborative <span class="hlt">practice</span> in a geriatrics team: implications for <span class="hlt">continuing</span> interprofessional education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tan, Keng Teng; Adzhahar, Fadzli Bin Baharom; Lim, Issac; Chan, Mark; Lim, Wee Shiong</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The interprofessional team meeting is a model of care in which members of the interprofessional team come together with their individual expertise to provide holistic care for the patient. Additionally, interprofessional team meetings serve as a platform for <span class="hlt">continuing</span> interprofessional education as healthcare professionals come together to learn with, from, and about each other to enhance collaboration and patient care. Utilizing the transactive memory system (TMS) framework, this paper aims to demonstrate the utility of TMS as a measure of interprofessional collaborative <span class="hlt">practice</span> based on a pilot study in an interprofessional geriatrics team. Questionnaires were administered to 78 members who regularly participated in the interprofessional team meetings. The quality of perceived TMS was measured by the cumulative scores on two previously validated scales. Logistic regression analyses revealed that TMS was a significant predictor of satisfaction with interprofessional team meeting experience and clinical work, whereas TMS scores significantly increased with greater number of interprofessional team meetings attended. Reliability analysis indicated high internal consistency while in factor analysis, each scale was predicated on a dual factor structure instead of the original tri-dimensional structure. Our results indicate the novel use of TMS as a valid and reliable measure of interprofessional collaborative <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Implications for the role of TMS in <span class="hlt">continuous</span> interprofessional education, collaborative <span class="hlt">practice</span>, and patient care are also presented.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3640186','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3640186"><span>Ca. Nitrososphaera and Bradyrhizobium are inversely correlated and related to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in long-term field experiments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhalnina, Kateryna; de Quadros, Patricia D.; Gano, Kelsey A.; Davis-Richardson, Austin; Fagen, Jennie R.; Brown, Christopher T.; Giongo, Adriana; Drew, Jennifer C.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Arp, Dan J.; Camargo, Flavio A. O.; Daroub, Samira H.; Clark, Ian M.; McGrath, Steve P.; Hirsch, Penny R.; Triplett, Eric W.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> land management, such as fertilization, liming, and tillage affects soil properties, including pH, organic matter content, nitrification rates, and the microbial community. Three different study sites were used to identify microorganisms that correlate with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use and to determine which factors regulate the relative abundance of the microbial signatures of the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land-use. The three sites included in this study are the Broadbalk Experiment at Rothamsted Research, UK, the Everglades <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Area, Florida, USA, and the Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan, USA. The effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management on the abundance and diversity of bacteria and archaea were determined using high throughput, barcoded 16S rRNA sequencing. In addition, the relative abundance of these organisms was correlated with soil features. Two groups of microorganisms involved in nitrogen cycle were highly correlated with land use at all three sites. The ammonia oxidizing-archaea, dominated by Ca. Nitrososphaera, were positively correlated with <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> while a ubiquitous group of soil bacteria closely related to the diazotrophic symbiont, Bradyrhizobium, was negatively correlated with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management. Analysis of successional plots showed that the abundance of ammonia oxidizing-archaea declined and the abundance of bradyrhizobia increased with time away from <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. This observation suggests that the effect of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> on the relative abundance of these genera is reversible. Soil pH and NH3 concentrations were positively correlated with archaeal abundance but negatively correlated with the abundance of Bradyrhizobium. The high correlations of Ca. Nitrososphaera and Bradyrhizobium abundances with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management at three long-term experiments with different edaphoclimatic conditions allowed us to suggest these two genera as signature microorganisms for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use. PMID:23641242</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23775912','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23775912"><span>Demoralization in health professional <span class="hlt">practice</span>: development, amelioration, and implications for <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gabel, Stewart</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Demoralization is a feeling state of dejection, hopelessness, and a sense of personal "incompetence" that may be tied to a loss of or threat to one's own goals or values. It has an existential dimension when beliefs and values about oneself are disconfirmed. Numerous sources describe high rates of dissatisfaction and burnout in physicians and other health professionals. This article reviews historical and empirical findings that describe the professional and personal value orientations of physicians and other health professionals. It reviews empirical and theoretical findings to consider the implications of conflict between these values and negatively perceived ethical and values orientations of health care organizations and commercial health care entities. Conflicts between personal and professional values of health professionals and larger health care related organizations and commercial entities with which they are associated may contribute to the development of demoralization and burnout. Physicians and other health professionals frequently experience values related conflicts with larger social, organizational or bureaucratic systems. These conflicts place health professionals at risk for demoralization and burnout. "Remoralization," or renewal of morale, depends on the reestablishment of the potential for fulfillment of one's values in the work environment. This depends on organizational, group, and personal efforts. <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development programs should have a programmatic focus on the importance of a values orientation in health care and support program development aimed at recognizing, addressing, and reducing demoralization and its potential for negative health care consequences for health professionals and patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19023106','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19023106"><span>Spanish-speaking patients perceive high quality care in resident <span class="hlt">continuity</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: a CORNET study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krugman, Scott D; Parra-Roide, Lilia; Hobson, Wendy L; Garfunkel, Lynn C; Serwint, Janet R</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Prior research has demonstrated that limited English proficiency in Hispanic patients is associated with adverse health outcomes. The authors sought to compare the perception of primary care in resident <span class="hlt">practices</span> between Spanish-speaking and English-speaking parents using a previously validated tool, the Parents' Perception of Primary Care. Using survey results from 19 CORNET sites nationwide, they compared mean scores for each primary care domain and the full scale between the groups using Student's t test. Multiple linear regression models compared outcomes controlling for demographic variables. Of the 2122 analyzable surveys, 490 (23%) were completed in Spanish and 1632 (77%) in English. The mean scores for each domain and the total scale were not statistically different between the 2 groups. After adjustment, Spanish-speaking parents rated communication significantly higher. Resident clinics may use systems to provide high quality care to Spanish-speaking patients, which may help other sites improve care.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10661285','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10661285"><span>[The initial and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education of hospital nursing personnel: alternating <span class="hlt">practical</span> work with education].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Goudeaux, A</p> <p>1998-09-01</p> <p>Who, as a trainer, has never heard this irritating leitmotiv on the lips of those who work in the area? Therefore, each of them is convinced that the other is wrong or does not do what he should. Beyond the anecdote, the problem of the difficult conjunction between school and the real world is posed. Two places and two logics: the first one is concerned with learning, the second one considers production as its daily objective. But the words of our imaginary interlocutor also remind us of the confrontation between two fields: theory and <span class="hlt">practice</span> and their apparently irrecondilable nature. Two disconnected worlds in which the students come and go with the frequent impression that they live two lives. There is a lot of professional literature on the subject of the "hands on" theory of education. The pedagogical device to which we refer enables the trainee to eventually make a link between what he learns at school and what he does during his training period. Once this has been asserted, it seems to us that the problem still remains unresolved. How can you create links between theory and <span class="hlt">practice</span>? Which skills are required for the trainers? Which training device is necessary? The hypothesis of the paper we are presenting is that the question of work is at the centre of the problematics of "hands on" education. Work appears as the interface between the world of school and the one of field work. This assertion means that the practive produces knowledge just as research does and we must therefore accept that the practitioners carry on their work thanks to the accumulation, the construction and the transmission of this <span class="hlt">practical</span> knowledge. Assuming that the question of work serves as a link between theory and practive means reconciling the vision of the teacher and the one of the practitioner. It implies that the trainer must make the effort of going on the field to observe, to understand and formalize what this knowledge coming from the daily experience is made of. This</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=322691','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=322691"><span>Edge-of-field research to quantify the impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality in Ohio</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Drainage is needed to sustain <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production to meet the demands of a growing global population, but it also transports nutrients from fields to surface water bodies. The State of Ohio is facing the tremendous challenge of maintaining <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production while protecting the environment...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22stakeholders+best+result%22+OR+%22interagency+organizations%22+OR+%22governance+structure%22+OR+%22best+practices%22+OR+responsibilities&pg=4&id=EJ870948','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22stakeholders+best+result%22+OR+%22interagency+organizations%22+OR+%22governance+structure%22+OR+%22best+practices%22+OR+responsibilities&pg=4&id=EJ870948"><span>From Best <span class="hlt">Practice</span> to Best Fit: A Framework for Designing and Analyzing Pluralistic <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Advisory Services Worldwide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Birner, Regina; Davis, Kristin; Pender, John; Nkonya, Ephraim; Anandajayasekeram, Ponniah; Ekboir, Javier; Mbabu, Adiel; Spielman, David J.; Horna, Daniela; Benin, Samuel; Cohen, Marc</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The article provides a conceptual framework and discusses research methods for analyzing pluralistic <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> advisory services. The framework can also assist policy-makers in identifying reform options. It addresses the following question: Which forms of providing and financing <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> advisory services work best in which situation? The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21800367','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21800367"><span>Anatomy's use of unclaimed bodies: reasons against <span class="hlt">continued</span> dependence on an ethically dubious <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jones, D Gareth; Whitaker, Maja I</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>The use of unclaimed bodies has been one of the distinguishing features of the anatomy profession since the passing of nineteenth century legislation aimed at solving the problem of grave robbing. Only in more recent years has the use of bequeathed bodies supplanted dependence upon unclaimed bodies in many (but not all) countries. We argue that this dependence has opened the profession to a range of questionable ethical <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Starting with contraventions of the early Anatomy Acts, we trace the manner in which the legitimacy of using unclaimed bodies has exposed vulnerable groups to dissection without their consent. These groups have included the impoverished, the mentally ill, African Americans, slaves, and stigmatized groups during the Nazi era. Unfortunately, ethical constraints have not been imposed on the use of unclaimed bodies. The major public plastination exhibitions of recent years invite us to revisit these issues, even though some like Body Worlds claim to use bequeathed bodies. The widespread use of unclaimed bodies in institutional settings has lent to these public exhibitions a modicum of legitimacy that is needed even when donated bodies are employed. This is because the notion of donation has changed as demonstrated by consideration of the principles of beneficence and non-maleficence. We conclude that anatomists should cease using unclaimed bodies. Difficult as this will be in some cultures, the challenge for anatomists is to establish relationships of trust with their local communities and show how body donation can assist both the community and the profession.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/457317','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/457317"><span>Analysis of post audits for Gulf of Mexico completions leads to <span class="hlt">continuous</span> improvement in completion <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pashen, M.A.; McLeod, H.O. Jr.</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>Final production rate alone is not an adequate measure of the success of a well completion. Rather, we must estimate the {open_quotes}potential{close_quotes} of a reservoir and judge the ultimate success of a completion on how close we come to achieving this potential. Specific productivity indexes (SPI`s - BFPD/(PSI*FT)), specific injectivity indexes SII`s - (BFPD/(PSI*FT)), and completion efficiencies (CE`s -percent of Darcy radial flow) can be calculated at various times throughout a well completion. Analysis of these data quantifies the efficiency of the completion after each individual completion operation, allowing a determination of the effects of each completion <span class="hlt">practice</span> to be made. In addition to completion efficiency data, a comparison of gravel placement volumes behind casing helps quantify optimum gravel packing procedures. Twenty-two Gulf of Mexico completions have been analyzed using this technique. This paper will detail the results of this analysis, in particular the productivity effects of various methods of underbalanced perforating, gravel packing, and well control. Items of discussion include: the effects of underbalanced perforating on well performance, the effects of flowback after perforating on perforation tunnel cleaning, productivity impacts of various types of well control methods following perforating and gravel packing, and comparisons of gravel pack design parameters and gravel placement behind casing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3821326','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3821326"><span><span class="hlt">Practical</span> Strategies for Stable Operation of HFF-QCM in <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Air Flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wessels, Alexander; Klöckner, Bernhard; Siering, Carsten; Waldvogel, Siegfried R.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Currently there are a few fields of application using quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Because of environmental conditions and insufficient resolution of the microbalance, chemical sensing of volatile organic compounds in an open system was as yet not possible. In this study we present strategies on how to use 195 MHz fundamental quartz resonators for a mobile sensor platform to detect airborne analytes. Commonly the use of devices with a resonant frequency of about 10 MHz is standard. By increasing the frequency to 195 MHz the frequency shift increases by a factor of almost 400. Unfortunately, such kinds of quartz crystals tend to exhibit some challenges to obtain a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. It was possible to reduce the noise in frequency in a <span class="hlt">continuous</span> air flow of 7.5 m/s to 0.4 Hz [i.e., σ(τ) = 2 × 10−9] by elucidating the major source of noise. The air flow in the vicinity of the quartz was analyzed to reduce turbulences. Furthermore, we found a dependency between the acceleration sensitivity and mechanical stress induced by an internal thermal gradient. By reducing this gradient, we achieved reduction of the sensitivity to acceleration by more than one decade. Hence, the resulting sensor is more robust to environmental conditions such as temperature, acceleration and air flow. PMID:24021970</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17067863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17067863"><span><span class="hlt">Continuous</span> brain-function monitoring: state of the art in clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hellström-Westas, Lena; Rosén, Ingmar</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Continuous</span> electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring gives direct information on brain function in newborn infants needing intensive care. To improve the possibilities of long-term monitoring, the EEG is time-compressed and recorded with a reduced number of electrodes. A trend measure of the EEG, the amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), has proved capable of giving relevant information in newborn infants of differing levels of maturity. The electrocortical background activity gives information on the level of brain activity, which is associated with outcome in both term asphyxiated infants and in preterm infants. However, the background activity is also affected by several medications, and this must be considered when interpreting the aEEG trace. The aEEG also reveals subclinical epileptic seizure activity, and can be used for evaluation of anti-epileptic treatment. The aEEG should be used as a complement to the standard EEG, and close collaboration between neonatologists and clinical neurophysiologists is necessary for optimal performance of EEG monitoring.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319965','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319965"><span>Enabling <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Quality Improvement in <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: The Role and Contribution of Facilitation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Harvey, Gillian; Lynch, Elizabeth</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Facilitating the implementation of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> quality improvement (CQI) is a complex undertaking. Numerous contextual factors at a local, organizational, and health system level can influence the trajectory and ultimate success of an improvement program. Some of these contextual factors are amenable to modification, others less so. As part of planning and implementing healthcare improvement, it is important to assess and build an understanding of contextual factors that might present barriers to or enablers of implementation. On the basis of this initial diagnosis, it should then be possible to design and implement the improvement intervention in a way that is responsive to contextual barriers and enablers, often described as “tailoring” the implementation approach. Having individuals in the active role of facilitators is proposed as an effective way of delivering a context-sensitive, tailored approach to implementing CQI. This paper presents an overview of the facilitator role in implementing CQI. Drawing on empirical evidence from the use of facilitator roles in healthcare, the type of skills and knowledge required will be considered, along with the type of facilitation strategies that can be employed in the implementation process. Evidence from both case studies and systematic reviews of facilitation will be reviewed and key lessons for developing and studying the role in the future identified. PMID:28275594</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvA..94a2325Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvA..94a2325Q"><span>Quantum hacking: Saturation attack on <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Qin, Hao; Kumar, Rupesh; Alléaume, Romain</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We identify and study a security loophole in <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) implementations, related to the imperfect linearity of the homodyne detector. By exploiting this loophole, we propose an active side-channel attack on the Gaussian-modulated coherent-state CVQKD protocol combining an intercept-resend attack with an induced saturation of the homodyne detection on the receiver side (Bob). We show that an attacker can bias the excess noise estimation by displacing the quadratures of the coherent states received by Bob. We propose a saturation model that matches experimental measurements on the homodyne detection and use this model to study the impact of the saturation attack on parameter estimation in CVQKD. We demonstrate that this attack can bias the excess noise estimation beyond the null key threshold for any system parameter, thus leading to a full security break. If we consider an additional criterion imposing that the channel transmission estimation should not be affected by the attack, then the saturation attack can only be launched if the attenuation on the quantum channel is sufficient, corresponding to attenuations larger than approximately 6 dB. We moreover discuss the possible countermeasures against the saturation attack and propose a countermeasure based on Gaussian postselection that can be implemented by classical postprocessing and may allow one to distill the secret key when the raw measurement data are partly saturated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AIPC.1699b0001K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AIPC.1699b0001K"><span><span class="hlt">Practical</span> development of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> supercritical fluid process using high pressure and high temperature micromixer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kawasaki, Shin-Ichiro; Sue, Kiwamu; Ookawara, Ryuto; Wakashima, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Akira</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>In the synthesis of metal oxide fine particles by <span class="hlt">continuous</span> supercritical hydrothermal method, the particle characteristics are greatly affected by not only the reaction conditions (temperature, pressure, residence time, concentration, etc.), but also the heating rate from ambient to reaction temperature. Therefore, the heating method by direct mixing of starting solution at room temperature with supercritical water is a key technology for the particle production having smaller size and narrow distribution. In this paper, mixing engineering study through comparison between conventional T-shaped mixers and recently developed swirl mixers was carried out in the hydrothermal synthesis of NiO nanoparticles from Ni(NO3)2 aqueous solution at 400 °C and 30 MPa. Inner diameter in the mixers and total flow rates were varied. Furthermore, the heating rate was calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Relationship between the heating rate and the average particle size were discussed. It was clarified that the miniaturization of mixer inner diameter and the use of the swirl flow were effective for improving mixing performance and contributed to produce small and narrow distribution particle under same experimental condition of flow rate, temperature, pressure, residence time, and concentration of the starting materials. We have focused the mixer optimization due to a difference in fluid viscosity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28275594','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28275594"><span>Enabling <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Quality Improvement in <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: The Role and Contribution of Facilitation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Harvey, Gillian; Lynch, Elizabeth</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Facilitating the implementation of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> quality improvement (CQI) is a complex undertaking. Numerous contextual factors at a local, organizational, and health system level can influence the trajectory and ultimate success of an improvement program. Some of these contextual factors are amenable to modification, others less so. As part of planning and implementing healthcare improvement, it is important to assess and build an understanding of contextual factors that might present barriers to or enablers of implementation. On the basis of this initial diagnosis, it should then be possible to design and implement the improvement intervention in a way that is responsive to contextual barriers and enablers, often described as "tailoring" the implementation approach. Having individuals in the active role of facilitators is proposed as an effective way of delivering a context-sensitive, tailored approach to implementing CQI. This paper presents an overview of the facilitator role in implementing CQI. Drawing on empirical evidence from the use of facilitator roles in healthcare, the type of skills and knowledge required will be considered, along with the type of facilitation strategies that can be employed in the implementation process. Evidence from both case studies and systematic reviews of facilitation will be reviewed and key lessons for developing and studying the role in the future identified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf"><span>7 CFR 205.406 - <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>..., Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.406 <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification. (a) To <span class="hlt">continue</span>... information, as applicable, to the certifying agent: (1) An updated organic production or handling system...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf"><span>7 CFR 205.406 - <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>..., Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.406 <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification. (a) To <span class="hlt">continue</span>... information, as applicable, to the certifying agent: (1) An updated organic production or handling system...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf"><span>7 CFR 205.406 - <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>..., Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.406 <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification. (a) To <span class="hlt">continue</span>... information, as applicable, to the certifying agent: (1) An updated organic production or handling system...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf"><span>7 CFR 205.406 - <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>..., Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.406 <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification. (a) To <span class="hlt">continue</span>... information, as applicable, to the certifying agent: (1) An updated organic production or handling system...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf"><span>7 CFR 205.406 - <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>..., Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.406 <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification. (a) To <span class="hlt">continue</span>... information, as applicable, to the certifying agent: (1) An updated organic production or handling system...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span>7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> EXPORT PROGRAMS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span>7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS PROGRAMS TO...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span>7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> EXPORT PROGRAMS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span>7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS PROGRAMS TO...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span>7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> EXPORT PROGRAMS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf"><span>7 CFR 56.69 - Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>. 56.69 Section 56.69 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>... Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Any willful misrepresentation or any deceptive...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf"><span>7 CFR 56.69 - Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>. 56.69 Section 56.69 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>... Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Any willful misrepresentation or any deceptive...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf"><span>7 CFR 56.69 - Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>. 56.69 Section 56.69 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>... Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Any willful misrepresentation or any deceptive...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B12C..05G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B12C..05G"><span>Mining Environmental Data from a Coupled Modelling System to Examine the Impact of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Groundwater and Air Quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Garcia, V.; Cooter, E. J.; Hayes, B.; Murphy, M. S.; Bash, J. O.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Excess nitrogen (N) resulting from current <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> can leach into sources of drinking water as nitrate, increasing human health risks of 'blue baby syndrome', hypertension, and some cancers and birth defects. Nitrogen also enters the atmosphere from land surfaces forming air pollution increasing human health risks of pulmonary and cardio-vascular disease. Characterizing and attributing nitrogen from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> is difficult due to the complex and inter-related chemical and biological reactions associated with the nitrogen cascade. Coupled physical process-based models, however, present new opportunities to investigate relationships among environmental variables on new scales; particularly because they link emission sources with meteorology and the pollutant concentration ultimately found in the environment. In this study, we applied a coupled meteorology (NOAA-WRF), <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> (USDA-EPIC) and air quality modelling system (EPA-CMAQ) to examine the impact of nitrogen inputs from corn production on ecosystem and human health and wellbeing. The coupled system accounts for the nitrogen flux between the land surface and air, and the soil surface and groundwater, providing a unique opportunity to examine the effect of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> such as type and timing of fertilization, tilling and irrigation on both groundwater and air quality across the conterminous US. In conducting the study, we first determined expected relationships based on literature searches and then identified model variables as direct or surrogate variables. We performed extensive and methodical multi-variate regression modelling and variable selection to examine associations between <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and environmental condition. We then applied the regression model to predict and contrast pollution levels between two corn production scenarios (Figure 1). Finally, we applied published health functions (e.g., spina bifida and cardio</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26034271','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26034271"><span>Financial competitiveness of organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> on a global scale.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Crowder, David W; Reganold, John P</p> <p>2015-06-16</p> <p>To promote global food and ecosystem security, several innovative farming systems have been identified that better balance multiple sustainability goals. The most rapidly growing and contentious of these systems is organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Whether organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> can <span class="hlt">continue</span> to expand will likely be determined by whether it is economically competitive with conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Here, we examined the financial performance of organic and conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> by conducting a meta-analysis of a global dataset spanning 55 crops grown on five continents. When organic premiums were not applied, benefit/cost ratios (-8 to -7%) and net present values (-27 to -23%) of organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> were significantly lower than conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. However, when actual premiums were applied, organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> was significantly more profitable (22-35%) and had higher benefit/cost ratios (20-24%) than conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Although premiums were 29-32%, breakeven premiums necessary for organic profits to match conventional profits were only 5-7%, even with organic yields being 10-18% lower. Total costs were not significantly different, but labor costs were significantly higher (7-13%) with organic farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Studies in our meta-analysis accounted for neither environmental costs (negative externalities) nor ecosystem services from good farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which likely favor organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. With only 1% of the global <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land in organic production, our findings suggest that organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> can <span class="hlt">continue</span> to expand even if premiums decline. Furthermore, with their multiple sustainability benefits, organic farming systems can contribute a larger share in feeding the world.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=240018','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=240018"><span>Drivers Impacting the Adoption of Sustainable <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Production Systems of the Northeast and Southeast U.S</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> production responds to economic, social, environmental, and technological drivers operating both internal and external to the production system. These drivers influence producers’ decision making processes, and act to shape the individual production systems through modification of produ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17874309','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17874309"><span>Impact of intensive <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on drinking water quality in the Evros region (NE Greece) by GIS analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nikolaidis, C; Mandalos, P; Vantarakis, A</p> <p>2008-08-01</p> <p>Chemical fertilizers are used extensively in modern <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, in order to improve yield and productivity of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> products. However, nutrient leaching from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil into groundwater resources poses a major environmental and public health concern. The Evros region is one of the largest <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas in Northern Greece, extending over 1.5 million acres of cultivated land. Many of its drinking water resources are of groundwater origin and lie within <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas. In order to assess the impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> fertilizers on drinking water quality in this region, tap-water samples from 64 different locations were collected and analyzed for the presence of nitrates (NO(3)(-)), nitrites (NO(2)(-)), ammonium (NH(4)(+)), sulfate (SO(4)(-2)) and phosphate (PO(4)(-3)). These chemicals were selected based on the information that ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and inorganic phosphate were the primary fertilizers used in local crop production. NO(3)(-), SO(4)(-2) and PO(4)(-3) levels exceeding accepted values were recorded in 6.25, 4.70 and 9.38% of all sampling points, respectively. NO(2)(-) and NH(4)(+) concentrations, on the other hand, were inside the permitted range. The data generated were introduced into a geographic information system (GIS) program for computer analysis and projection maps representing afflicted areas were created. Our results indicate a profound geographic correlation in the surface distribution of primary contaminants in areas of intensified <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production. Thus, drinking water pollution in these areas can be attributed to excessive fertilizer use from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22535287','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22535287"><span><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> land management options following large-scale environmental contamination - evaluation for Fukushima affected <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vandenhove, Hildegarde</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has raised questions about the accumulation of radionuclides in soils, the transfer in the food chain and the possibility of <span class="hlt">continued</span> restricted future land use. This paper summarizes what is generally understood about the application of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> countermeasures as a land management option to reduce the radionuclides transfer in the food chain and to facilitate the return of potentially affected soils to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in areas impacted by a nuclear accident. (authors)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol7-sec701-112.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol7-sec701-112.pdf"><span>7 CFR 701.112 - Eligible ECP <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible ECP <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 701.112 Section 701.112 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... structures or installations where cover is needed to prevent erosion and/or siltation or to accomplish...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol7-sec701-112.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol7-sec701-112.pdf"><span>7 CFR 701.112 - Eligible ECP <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Eligible ECP <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 701.112 Section 701.112 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... structures or installations where cover is needed to prevent erosion and/or siltation or to accomplish...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol7-sec701-12.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol7-sec701-12.pdf"><span>7 CFR 701.12 - Eligible ECP <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible ECP <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 701.12 Section 701.12 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... conjunction with eligible structures or installations where cover is needed to prevent erosion...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ865355.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ865355.pdf"><span>The Effectiveness of Instructional Methods Based on Learning Style Preferences of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Students: A Research Tool for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Improvement for Faculty in Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fazarro, Dominick E.; Pannkuk, Tim; Pavelock, Dwayne; Hubbard, Darcy</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study was conducted to research learning style preferences of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> students. Specifically, the objectives which guided the study were: (1) to determine the learning style preferences of undergraduate <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> students enrolled in a given Soil Science course and (2) to ascertain if there were differences in the students' course…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.B24A..01M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.B24A..01M"><span>Effect of Tillage and Non-tillage <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practice</span> on Nitrogen Losses as NO and N2O in Tropical Corn Fields at Guarico State, Venezuela.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marquina, S.; Rojas, A.; Donoso, L.; Rasse, R.; Giuliante, A.; Corona, O.; Perez, T.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>We evaluated the effect of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on NO and N2O emissions from corn fields at Northern Guárico, one of Venezuelan largest cereal production regions. Historically, the most common <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> in these regions has been mono cropping. Tillage (T) and non-tillage (NT) of soils represent approximately 30 and 70% of the planted area, respectively. Comparative studies of the nitrogen losses associated with these <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> are not available for these regions. This study was conducted at the farm "Tierra Nueva", Guárico State (9° 23' 33'' N, 66° 38' 30'' W) in two corn fields under tillage and non-tillage <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> during the growing season (June-August 2006). A dry tropical forest, the primary ecosystem of the region, was evaluated for the same period of time. The corn and the forest fields were adjacent; therefore, they were exposed to the same meteorological conditions. The mean annual precipitation of the area is 622±97.3 mm (last 5 years). The soils are Vertisols (Typic Haplusterts). Nutrient soil concentrations (as nitrate and ammonium), water soil content and pH soil were measured in the fields for the same period of time. Soils were fertilized and planted simultaneously by a planting machine provided with a furrow opener where the fertilizer and seeds are incorporated between 0-10 cm depths. Tillage soils were fertilized on June 1st 2006 with 65 kgN/ha of NPK (13:18:16/3MgO, 3S; N as NH4Cl), whereas non-tillage soils were fertilized the next day with 56 kgN/ha of NPK (12:25:12/3MgO, 3S; N as NH4Cl). Second fertilization of both fields was done thirty-seven days later by broadcast adding 58 kgN/ha approximately, using nitrophosphate as fertilizer (NP 33-3: 33% N total; 16.7% N- NO3- and 16.6% N- NH4+). In general, NO and N2O soil emissions from both corn fields increased after fertilization events, and depend on water soil content and nutrient soil concentration. N2O soil emissions were 11 and 9 times larger in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23772570','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23772570"><span>Use of the Filter-Sandwich carriers in <span class="hlt">continuous</span> effectiveness monitoring of slurry treatment methods as an element improving biosafety in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Skowron, Krzysztof; Olszewska, Halina; Paluszak, Piotr; Skowron, Karolina Jadwiga; Bauza-Kaszewska, Justyna</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Slurry, due to high microbiological contamination, requires hygienization before spreading. The <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> usage of treated slurry has to guarantee biosafety. Therefore, constant monitoring of the slurry treatment process should be conducted. The use of Filter-Sandwich carriers seems to be a prospective solution. The aim of the research was to test whether Filter-Sandwich carriers influence the survivability of microorganisms during the slurry hygienization process and hence, whether they are safe for the environment. Raw cattle and swine slurry with different dry matter content was the research material. Salmonella Senftenberg W775 rods were introduced directly into the slurry and into the carriers placed in the liquid excrements stored at 4 and 20ºC, and underwent anaerobic digestion at 35ºC. The number of tested bacteria obtained from the slurry and carriers was determined using the MPN method with proper microbiological media. The values of physicochemical parameters of the raw and treated slurry were determined, both for the carriers and for slurry only. Biosafety control was also conducted for the carriers in slurry containers. The differences in the theoretical survivability between Salmonella Senftenberg W775 re-isolated from the slurry and the carriers, and in the values of the selected physicochemical parameters obtained at the end of the process, were not statistically significant. The re-contamination of the sterile slurry caused by the bacteria in the carrier was not observed after placement of the carrier with inoculated material. The conducted research proves the usefulness of Filter-Sandwich carriers for <span class="hlt">continuous</span> hygienization monitoring of the slurry treatment process. This refers not only to the semi-technical scale, but also to the full-scale process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=318021','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=318021"><span>Soil carbon and soil respiration in conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> with vegetables in Siem Reap, Cambodia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A balance between food production and environmental protection is required to sustainably feed a growing population. The resource saving concept of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> aims to achieve this balance through implementing simultaneously three conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>; no-till, <span class="hlt">continuous</span> soil cover, ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4407123','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4407123"><span>Impact of College-Administered Quality <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Assessments: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Repeat Peer Assessments of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Competence in Physiotherapists</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>O'Donovan, Mary Jane; Campbell, Fiona</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Purpose: The College of Physiotherapists of Ontario (CPO) developed its peer <span class="hlt">practice</span> assessment (PA) process under statutory requirements for quality assurance. Each year, a small percentage of physiotherapists, most selected at random, undergo PA. To shed light on <span class="hlt">continuing</span> competence, we report outcomes from physiotherapists who have had two PAs. Methods: Records were extracted for physiotherapists with two unrelated PAs. Demographic features, peer assessors' scores, and consequent outcome decisions were examined. Outcomes were examined cross-sectionally (vs. other PAs in the same time period) and longitudinally (within cohort). Results: Between 2004 and 2012, 117 Ontario physiotherapists underwent two unrelated PAs, typically 5–7 years apart. This cohort was representative of Ontario physiotherapists in terms of sex ratios, education, and years in <span class="hlt">practice</span>. At the first PA (PA1), this cohort's outcomes were similar to those of other physiotherapists; at the second PA (PA2), they were better than others undergoing PA1 in the same period (p=0.02). The cohort's outcomes were better at PA2 than at PA1 (p<0.001). Conclusions: Physiotherapists are likely to meet professional standards in a repeat PA 5–7 years after an initial one. Additional research is required to identify risk factors for not meeting standards. The findings provide empirical evidence to guide ongoing development of the CPO's quality management program. PMID:25931670</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=concept+AND+analysis+AND+continuing+AND+professional+AND+development&pg=2&id=EJ759255','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=concept+AND+analysis+AND+continuing+AND+professional+AND+development&pg=2&id=EJ759255"><span>Research to <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in "The Journal of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education in the Health Professions": A Thematic Analysis of Volumes 1 through 24</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>MacIntosh-Murray, Anu; Perrier, Laure; Davis, David</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: Authors have stressed the importance of the broader contextual influences on <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvement and learning and have expressed concern about gaps between research and <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This implies a potential expansion of the knowledge base for <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education in the health professions (CEHP) and an increased emphasis on research…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Ann+AND+Berlin&id=ED261172','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Ann+AND+Berlin&id=ED261172"><span>Proceedings of the Annual Midwest Research-to-<span class="hlt">Practice</span> Conference in Adult and <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education (4th, Ann Arbor, Michigan, October 10-11, 1985).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Berlin, L. S., Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>This document contains the following papers on <span class="hlt">practical</span> applications of research on adult and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education: "Elderly Criminal Behavior: Linking Research to <span class="hlt">Practice</span>," by Donald J. Bachand and Carl I. Brahce; "Father? Teacher? Friend? Instructor-Student Relationships in a Refugee Class," by Gary J. Bekker; "The Small Group: Understanding…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=304896','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=304896"><span>A short-term assessment of carbon dioxide fluxes under contrasting <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and soil management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Zimbabwe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Two of the biggest problems facing humankind are feeding an exponentially growing human population and preventing the negative effects of climate change from record concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs). <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> could address both of these problems. For example, tillage and cover...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=theme&pg=3&id=EJ1122970','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=theme&pg=3&id=EJ1122970"><span>The Chasm between Beliefs and <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: A Case Study of the Epistemological Positions of Pre-Service <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Roberts, Richie; Baker, Marshall A.; Goossen, Carmelita E.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Recent trends in epistemological research suggest that teachers' epistemological beliefs influence the approaches he or she employs in both teaching and learning. Therefore, the purpose of this instrumental case study was to understand the initial epistemological positions of pre-service <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> education teachers at Oklahoma State…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=254537','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=254537"><span>Evaluation of Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> to Mitigate Pesticide Transport and Ecological Risk of Runoff from <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> and Turf Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Highly managed biotic systems such as <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> crops and golf courses often require multiple applications of pesticides that may be transported with runoff to surrounding surface waters. Pesticides have been detected in surface waters of rural and urban watersheds invoking concern of their sour...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.5666A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.5666A"><span>Discussion about decision support systems using <span class="hlt">continuous</span> multi-criteria methods for planning in areas with hydro-basins, <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and forests, from examples in Argentine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anton, J. M.; Grau, J. B.; Tarquis, A. M.; Andina, D.; Cisneros, J. M.; Sanchez, E.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The authors were involved last years in projects considering diverse decision problems on the use of some regions in Argentine, and also related to rivers or rural services in them. They used sets of multi-criteria decision methods, first discrete when the problem included few distinct alternatives, such as e.g. forestry, traditional or intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. For attributes they were different effects, classified then in environmental, economic and social criteria. Extending to other gentler areas, such as at South of the Province of Córdoba, Arg., they have balanced more delicately effects of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> levels of actions, with a combination of Goal Programming linked methods, and they adopted compromises to have precise solutions. That has shown, and in part open, a line of research, as the setting of such models require various kinds of definitions and valuations, including optimizations, goals with penalties in deviations and restrictions. That can be in diverse detail level and horizon, in presence of various technical and human horizons, and that can influence politics of use of terrain and production that will require public and private agents. The research will consider consideration of use and conservation of soils, human systems and agro productions, and hence models for optimization, preferably in such Goal Programming ways. That will require considering various systems of models, first in theory to be reliable, and then in different areas to evaluate the quality of conclusions, and maybe that successively if results are found advantageous. The Bayesian ways will be considered, but they would require a prospective of sets of precise future states of nature or markets with elicited probabilities, which are neither evident nor decisive for the moment, as changes may occur in years but will be very unexpected or uncertain. The results will be lines of models to aid to establish policies of use of territories, by public agencies setting frames for private</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUSM...B42A09C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUSM...B42A09C"><span>Regional Limits to Sequestration of Atmospheric C in Soils: Influence of Soil C Fractions and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Conant, R. T.; Six, J.; Paustian, K.; Paul, E. A.</p> <p>2001-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> management has substantial effects on C output from soil, primarily through tillage, and on quantity and amount of C input to soil through residue management. The dynamics of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management impacts are reasonably well understood and soil C responses are adequately predicted by a number of soil organic matter models in most systems. However, some data suggests that responses to increases in residue return do not always lead to increased soil C, as most models would predict; some soils appear to be saturated with respect to C. Therefore, models may over-predict the capacity of soils to stabilize soil C in some regions. Similarly, soil C levels may be near saturation in some systems and estimates of C sequestration potential in these systems may be too large. Conversely, soils in other regions are substantially below saturation level and could stabilize significant amounts of C in soils. The purpose of this presentation is to explore the implications of the concept of soil C saturation to identify areas (1) likely to be saturated with respect to soil C, (2) likely to become saturated with changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management, and (3) areas far from saturation capable of stabilizing large amounts of C in soil. We compare output from a new model that explicitly accounts for limits to physical protection of soil organic matter with a more traditional soil organic matter model for a range of long-term <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> research plots with different cultivation, rotation, and fertilization treatments. The result is a map of soils saturated with respect to C and of areas with soil C saturation deficits of varying magnitude.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744157','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744157"><span>Spatial variation of soil salinity in the Mexicali Valley, Mexico: application of a <span class="hlt">practical</span> method for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> monitoring.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Judkins, Gabriel; Myint, Soe</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>The degradation of irrigated lands through the process of soil salinization, or the buildup of salts in the soil, has hampered recent increases in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity and threatens the sustainability of large-scale cultivation in critical <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> regions of the world. Rapid detection of soil salinity on a regional basis has been identified as key for effective mitigation of such land degradation. The ability to detect regional patterns of soil salinity at an accuracy sufficient for regional-scale resource management is demonstrated using Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery. A case study of the Mexicali Valley of Baja California, Mexico was selected due to the region's <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> significance and concern for future soil salinity increases. Surface soil salinity was mapped using georeferenced field measurements of electrical conductivity (EC), collected concurrently with Landsat 5 TM imagery. Correlations between EC measurements and common indices derived from the satellite imagery were used to produce a model of soil salinity through regression analysis. Landsat band 7, TNDVI, PCA 1, Tasseled Cap 3 and Tasseled Cap 5 were found to offer the most promising correlations with surface soil salinity. Generally low levels of soil salinity were detected, however, distinct areas of elevated surface salinity were detected at levels potentially impacting sensitive crops cultivated within the region. The difficulty detecting low levels of salinity and the mid-range spatial resolution of Landsat 5 TM imagery restrict the applicability of this methodology to the study of broad regional patterns of degradation most appropriate for use by regional resource managers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EnMan..50..478J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EnMan..50..478J"><span>Spatial Variation of Soil Salinity in the Mexicali Valley, Mexico: Application of a <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Method for <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Judkins, Gabriel; Myint, Soe</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>The degradation of irrigated lands through the process of soil salinization, or the buildup of salts in the soil, has hampered recent increases in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity and threatens the sustainability of large-scale cultivation in critical <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> regions of the world. Rapid detection of soil salinity on a regional basis has been identified as key for effective mitigation of such land degradation. The ability to detect regional patterns of soil salinity at an accuracy sufficient for regional-scale resource management is demonstrated using Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery. A case study of the Mexicali Valley of Baja California, Mexico was selected due to the region's <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> significance and concern for future soil salinity increases. Surface soil salinity was mapped using georeferenced field measurements of electrical conductivity (EC), collected concurrently with Landsat 5 TM imagery. Correlations between EC measurements and common indices derived from the satellite imagery were used to produce a model of soil salinity through regression analysis. Landsat band 7, TNDVI, PCA 1, Tasseled Cap 3 and Tasseled Cap 5 were found to offer the most promising correlations with surface soil salinity. Generally low levels of soil salinity were detected, however, distinct areas of elevated surface salinity were detected at levels potentially impacting sensitive crops cultivated within the region. The difficulty detecting low levels of salinity and the mid-range spatial resolution of Landsat 5 TM imagery restrict the applicability of this methodology to the study of broad regional patterns of degradation most appropriate for use by regional resource managers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=244287','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=244287"><span>Influence of conventional and organic <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the phenolic content in eggplant pulp: Plant-to-plant variation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Consumer awareness, pesticide and fertilizer contaminations, and environmental concerns have resulted in increased demand for organically grown farm products. The present study evaluates the influence that organic versus conventional farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> exert on the total phenolic content in eggplant...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED203174.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED203174.pdf"><span>Urban <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Program Planning Guide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hemp, Paul E.; Ethridge, Jim</p> <p></p> <p>Urban <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> may be defined as those areas of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> that are <span class="hlt">practiced</span> in metropolitan settings, plus knowledge and skills in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> subject areas which lead to vocational proficiency and improved quality of life or effective citizenship. <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> areas that are especially significant in urban settings include ornamental…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28324851','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28324851"><span>Assessing the impacts of Best Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on nitrate pollution in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> dominated lowland catchment considering environmental protection versus economic development.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Haas, Marcelo B; Guse, Björn; Fohrer, Nicola</p> <p>2017-03-15</p> <p>Water quality is strongly affected by nitrate inputs in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> catchments. Best Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> (BMPs) are alternative <span class="hlt">practices</span> aiming to mitigate the impacts derived from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> activities and to improve water quality. Management activities are influenced by different governmental policies like the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG). Their distinct goals can be contrasting and hamper an integrated sustainable development. Both need to be addressed in the actual conjuncture in rural areas. Ecohydrological models like the SWAT model are important tools for land cover and land use changes investigation and the assessment of BMPs implementation effects on water quality. Thus, in this study, buffer strip, fertilization reduction and alternative crops were considered as BMPs and were implemented in the SWAT model for the Treene catchment. Their efficiency in terms of nitrate loads reduction related to implementation costs at the catchment scale was investigated. The <span class="hlt">practices</span> correspond to the catchment conditions and are based on small and mid areal changes. Furthermore, the BMPs were evaluated from the perspective of ecologic and economic policies. The results evidenced different responses of the BMPs. The critical periods in winter were addressed by most of the BMPs. However, some <span class="hlt">practices</span> like pasture land increase need to be implemented in greater area for better results in comparison to current activities. Furthermore, there is a greater nitrate reduction potential by combining BMPs containing fertilization reduction, buffer strips and soil coverage in winter. The discussion about efficiency showed the complexity of costs stipulation and the relation with arable land and yield losses. Furthermore, as the government policies can be divergent an integrated approach considering all the involved actors is important and seeks a sustainable development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18274032','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18274032"><span>Delivering biodefense <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education to military medical providers by allowing a biodefense educational curriculum to unfold in <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>D'Alessandro, Donna M; D'Alessandro, Michael P</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>A challenge today is how to deliver initial and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education on biodefense to military medical providers in a manner that can be integrated into their workflow and lifestyle. A summative evaluation of a prototypical biodefense digital library (BDL) and learning collaboratory was performed. The BDL posted daily links to biodefense news stories from January 2004 to December 2005. Four evaluations were completed, that is, content evaluation, curriculum comparison with a biodefense graduate program, usage evaluation, and impact factor analysis. News stories (N = 678) came from a broad range of authoritative national and international news sources (N = 178). News stories covered all of the categories in the required and elective formal biodefense graduate program courses. The BDL was consistently displayed on the first page of the top three Internet search engines, meaning that it was among the top 10 authoritative Internet sites on biodefense. Presenting biodefense news stories to busy military medical providers in an organized chronological fashion produces an unstructured biodefense educational curriculum that unfolds in <span class="hlt">practice</span> and becomes an educational resource that is ultimately well regarded and may be efficient to use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H51H0699T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H51H0699T"><span>Complex hydrologic changes in frequency-magnitude response due to shifting <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the Midwestern U.S.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Takbiri, Z.; Czuba, J. A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Hydrologic change is occurring in many basins throughout the Midwestern U.S. not only in the mean annual streamflow but across a spectrum of magnitudes and frequencies. Disentangling the causative mechanisms responsible for these changes such as anthropogenic factors, e.g., artificial drainage to increase <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity, and climatic shifts in precipitation patterns is important for planning effective mitigation strategies. We have begun unraveling these changes in a human impacted <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscape in the Midwestern U.S., specifically two subbasins of the Minnesota River Basin in Minnesota: the Redwood and Whetstone River Basins, where there has been a shift in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> from small grains to soybeans. This shift occurred at different times for each basin (1976 and 1991, respectively) and when soy covered about 20% of the basin area an apparent shift in the hydrologic regime also occurred as evidence by visual inspection of the hydrographs. Precisely quantifying the nature of this hydrologic regime shift however is a challenge and this work adds in this direction. Using Copulas and the joint probability distribution of daily precipitation and streamflow, we quantified a significantly higher dependence between precipitation and streamflow increments in the mid-quantiles (0.1-0.6; attributed to the artificial drainage to the stream rather than the slower infiltration and subsurface runoff) and no significant change for high quantiles (because for extreme storms the artificially fast drainage does not differ much hydrologically from the naturally fast overland flow). We further performed a multi-scale analysis of streamflow increments via wavelets to quantify the changes in the magnitude and frequency of the rising and falling limbs of hydrographs, confirming the above findings. Since precipitation changes were confirmed not to be significant, it is suggested that streamflow changes are largely driven by a change in land use and not climate in these</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20397404','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20397404"><span>Reductions in non-point source pollution through different management <span class="hlt">practices</span> for an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tian, Yaowu; Huang, Zhilin; Xiao, Wenfa</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Non-point source water pollution generated by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production is considered a major environmental issue in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA) of China. The Annualised <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Non-Point Source Pollution (AnnAGNPS) model was selected to assess the impact of the application of various management treats, including seven crops, five fertilizer levels and three-group management <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios, on water quality from Heigou River Watershed in TGRA. The scenario subsets include conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practice</span> (CTP), conservation reserve program (CRP) and conversion of cropland into forestland program (CCFP). Results indicated that tea can not be replaced by other crops because comparatively tea resulted in a higher sediment yield. CTP with no-tillage was more effective to reduce sediment yield, but could increased nutrient loss. CRP reduced sediment yield significantly, but slightly benefited on nutrient loss. CCFP reduced not only sediment yield but also the nutrient loss significantly. The conversion of cropland with a slope greater than 10 degrees into forestland was found to be the best scenario as the sediment yield export is less than 5 tons/ha and nutrient loss is within the permissible limit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22218174','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22218174"><span>Using the soil and water assessment tool to estimate achievable water quality targets through implementation of beneficial management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yang, Qi; Benoy, Glenn A; Chow, Thien Lien; Daigle, Jean-Louis; Bourque, Charles P-A; Meng, Fan-Rui</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Runoff from crop production in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds can cause widespread soil loss and degradation of surface water quality. Beneficial management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) for soil conservation are often implemented as remedial measures because BMPs can reduce soil erosion and improve water quality. However, the efficacy of BMPs may be unknown because it can be affected by many factors, such as farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>, land-use, soil type, topography, and climatic conditions. As such, it is difficult to estimate the impacts of BMPs on water quality through field experiments alone. In this research, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool was used to estimate achievable performance targets of water quality indicators (sediment and soluble P loadings) after implementation of combinations of selected BMPs in the Black Brook Watershed in northwestern New Brunswick, Canada. Four commonly used BMPs (flow diversion terraces [FDTs], fertilizer reductions, tillage methods, and crop rotations), were considered individually and in different combinations. At the watershed level, the best achievable sediment loading was 1.9 t ha(-1) yr(-1) (89% reduction compared with default scenario), with a BMP combination of crop rotation, FDT, and no-till. The best achievable soluble P loading was 0.5 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) (62% reduction), with a BMP combination of crop rotation and FDT and fertilizer reduction. Targets estimated through nonpoint source water quality modeling can be used to evaluate BMP implementation initiatives and provide milestones for the rehabilitation of streams and rivers in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2015/3066/fs20153066.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2015/3066/fs20153066.pdf"><span>Development of an Assessment Tool for <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Best Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Implementation in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Priority Watersheds—Eagle Creek, Tributary to Maumee River, Ohio</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Merriman, Katherine R.</p> <p>2015-11-19</p> <p>The Great Lakes face a number of serious challenges that cause damage to water quality, habitat, ecology, and coastal health. Excess nutrients from point and nonpoint sources have a history of causing harmful algal blooms (HABs); since the late 1990s, a resurgence of HABs have forced beach closures and resulted in water quality impairments across the Great Lakes. Studies increasingly point to phosphorus (P) runoff from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands as the cause of these HABs. In 2010, the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) was launched to revitalize the Great Lakes. The GLRI aims to address the challenges facing the Great Lakes and provide a framework for restoration and protection. As part of this effort, the Priority Watersheds Work Group (PWWG), cochaired by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>-Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA–NRCS), is targeting Priority Watersheds (PWs) to reduce the amount of P reaching the Great Lakes. Within the PWs, USDA–NRCS identifies small-scale subbasins with high concentrations of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> for coordinated nutrient reduction efforts and enhanced monitoring and modeling. The USDA–NRCS supplies financial and/or technical assistance to producers to install or implement best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) to lessen the negative effects of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> to water quality; additional funding is provided by the GLRI through USDA–NRCS to saturate the small-scale subbasins with BMPs. The watershed modeling component, introduced in this fact sheet, assesses the effectiveness of USDA–NRCS funded BMPs, and nutrient reductions because of GLRI or other funding programs are differentiated. Modeling scenarios consider BMPs that have already been applied and those planned to be implemented across the small-scale subbasins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2015/3067/fs20153067.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2015/3067/fs20153067.pdf"><span>Development of an Assessment Tool for <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Best Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Iimplementation in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Priority Watersheds—Alger Creek, Tributary to Saginaw River, Michigan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Merriman, Katherine R.</p> <p>2015-11-19</p> <p>The Great Lakes face a number of serious challenges that cause damage to water quality, habitat, ecology, and coastal health. Excess nutrients from point and nonpoint sources have a history of causing harmful algal blooms (HABs); since the late 1990s, a resurgence of HABs have forced beach closures and resulted in water quality impairments across the Great Lakes. Studies increasingly point to phosphorus (P) runoff from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands as the cause of these HABs. In 2010, the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) was launched to revitalize the Great Lakes. The GLRI aims to address the challenges facing the Great Lakes and provide a framework for restoration and protection. As part of this effort, the Priority Watersheds Work Group (PWWG), cochaired by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>-Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA–NRCS), is targeting Priority Watersheds (PWs) to reduce the amount of P reaching the Great Lakes. Within the PWs, USDA–NRCS identifies small-scale subbasins with high concentrations of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> for coordinated nutrient reduction efforts and enhanced monitoring and modeling. The USDA–NRCS supplies financial and/or technical assistance to producers to install or implement best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) to lessen the negative effects of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> to water quality; additional funding is provided by the GLRI through USDA–NRCS to saturate the small-scale subbasins with BMPs. The watershed modeling component, introduced in this fact sheet, assesses the effectiveness of USDA–NRCS funded BMPs, and nutrient reductions because of GLRI or other funding programs are differentiated. Modeling scenarios consider BMPs that have already been applied and those planned to be implemented across the small-scale subbasins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2015/3065/fs20153065.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2015/3065/fs20153065.pdf"><span>Development of an Assessment Tool for <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Best Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Implementation in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Priority Watersheds—Upper East River, Tributary to Green Bay, Wisconsin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Merriman, Katherine R.</p> <p>2015-11-19</p> <p>The Great Lakes face a number of serious challenges that cause damage to water quality, habitat, ecology, and coastal health. Excess nutrients from point and nonpoint sources have a history of causing harmful algal blooms (HABs); since the late 1990s, a resurgence of HABs have forced beach closures and resulted in water quality impairments across the Great Lakes. Studies increasingly point to phosphorus (P) runoff from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands as the cause of these HABs. In 2010, the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) was launched to revitalize the Great Lakes. The GLRI aims to address the challenges facing the Great Lakes and provide a framework for restoration and protection. As part of this effort, the Priority Watersheds Work Group (PWWG), cochaired by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>-Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA–NRCS), is targeting Priority Watersheds (PWs) to reduce the amount of P reaching the Great Lakes. Within the PWs, USDA–NRCS identifies small-scale subbasins with high concentrations of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> for coordinated nutrient reduction efforts and enhanced monitoring and modeling. The USDA–NRCS supplies financial and/or technical assistance to producers to install or implement best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) to lessen the negative effects of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> to water quality; additional funding is provided by the GLRI through USDA–NRCS to saturate the small-scale subbasins with BMPs. The watershed modeling component, introduced in this fact sheet, assesses the effectiveness of USDA–NRCS funded BMPs, and nutrient reductions because of GLRI or other funding programs are differentiated. Modeling scenarios consider BMPs that have already been applied and those planned to be implemented across the small-scale subbasins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24611988','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24611988"><span>Soil and geography are more important determinants of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal communities than management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Swiss <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jansa, Jan; Erb, Angela; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Smilauer, Petr; Egli, Simon</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous soil fungi, forming mutualistic symbiosis with a majority of terrestrial plant species. They are abundant in nearly all soils, less diverse than soil prokaryotes and other intensively studied soil organisms and thus are promising candidates for universal indicators of land management legacies and soil quality degradation. However, insufficient data on how the composition of indigenous AMF varies along soil and landscape gradients have hampered the definition of baselines and effect thresholds to date. Here, indigenous AMF communities in 154 <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils collected across Switzerland were profiled by quantitative real-time PCR with taxon-specific markers for six widespread AMF species. To identify the key determinants of AMF community composition, the profiles were related to soil properties, land management and site geography. Our results indicate a number of well-supported dependencies between abundances of certain AMF taxa and soil properties such as pH, soil fertility and texture, and a surprising lack of effect of available soil phosphorus on the AMF community profiles. Site geography, especially the altitude and large geographical distance, strongly affected AMF communities. Unexpected was the apparent lack of a strong land management effect on the AMF communities as compared to the other predictors, which could be due to the rarity of highly intensive and unsustainable land management in Swiss <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. In spite of the extensive coverage of large geographical and soil gradients, we did not identify any taxon suitable as an indicator of land use among the six taxa we studied.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21138289','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21138289"><span>Trend reversal of nitrate in Danish groundwater--a reflection of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and nitrogen surpluses since 1950.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hansen, Birgitte; Thorling, Laerke; Dalgaard, Tommy; Erlandsen, Mogens</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. First, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends, and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Second, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Third, groundwater recharge CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two data sets. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s, while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.B54A..01P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.B54A..01P"><span>Nitrogen Losses as N2O and NO After Non-tillage <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in a Tropical Corn Field at Guarico State, Venezuela.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Perez, T. J.; Gil, J. A.; Marquina, S.; Donoso, L. E.; Trumbore, S. E.; Tyler, S. C.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>Historically, the most common <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Northern Guárico, one of Venezuelan largest cereal production regions, has been mono cropping, with extensive tillage operations that usually causes rapid soil degradation and nitrogen losses. Alternative production systems, such as non-tillage <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, have been extensively implemented during the last few years. However, studies of the nitrogen losses associated with these alternative <span class="hlt">practices</span> are not widely available. This study was conducted at "Fundo Tierra Nueva", Guárico State (9°23'33" N, 66° 38'30" W) in a corn field under the non-tillage <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span>, during the growing season June-August 2005. The soils are Vertisols (Typic Haplusterts). The area has two well defined precipitation seasons: wet (May-October) and dry (November-April). The mean annual precipitation of the area is 622±97.3 mm (last 5 years). Because the irrigation of the crop depends on precipitation, the planting is scheduled during the months of highest precipitation in June-July. We measured nitrogenous gas emissions (N2O and NO), concentrations of total nitrogen (NT), NH4+ and NO3- in soil (0-100 cm) after fertilization to estimate the nitrogen losses. We also measured CO2 emissions to evaluate the relationship of microbial respiration to the emissions of nitrogenous trace gases. Soils were fertilized with 54 kgN/ha (NPK 12:24:12, nitrogen as NH4Cl) and planted simultaneously by a planting machine provided with a furrow opener where the fertilizer and seeds are incorporated between 0-10 cm depth. Thirty days later, soils were fertilized by broadcast addition of 18 kgN/ha (as ammonium nitrate). Nitrous oxide emissions were highly dependant on the water content. Prior to fertilization N2O emissions were very low. Right after fertilization the emissions increased by a factor of 5 compared to pre-fertilization levels and increased to 100 times larger after the first heavy rain. NO emissions did not increase</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3811214','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3811214"><span>Coherence among Different Microbial Source Tracking Markers in a Small <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Stream with or without Livestock Exclusion <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wilkes, Graham; Brassard, Julie; Edge, Thomas A.; Gannon, Victor; Jokinen, Cassandra C.; Jones, Tineke H.; Marti, Romain; Neumann, Norman F.; Ruecker, Norma J.; Sunohara, Mark; Topp, Edward</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Over 1,400 water samples were collected biweekly over 6 years from an intermittent stream protected and unprotected from pasturing cattle. The samples were monitored for host-specific Bacteroidales markers, Cryptosporidium species/genotypes, viruses and coliphages associated with humans or animals, and bacterial zoonotic pathogens. Ruminant Bacteroidales markers did not increase within the restricted cattle access reach of the stream, whereas the ruminant Bacteroidales marker increased significantly in the unrestricted cattle access reach. Human Bacteroidales markers significantly increased downstream of homes where septic issues were documented. Wildlife Bacteroidales markers were detected downstream of the cattle exclusion <span class="hlt">practice</span> where stream and riparian habitat was protected, but detections decreased after the unrestricted pasture, where the stream and riparian zone was unprotected from livestock. Detection of a large number of human viruses was shown to increase downstream of homes, and similar trends were observed for the human Bacteroidales marker. There was considerable interplay among biomarkers with stream flow, season, and the cattle exclusion <span class="hlt">practices</span>. There were no to very weak associations with Bacteroidales markers and bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens. Overall, discrete sample-by-sample coherence among the different microbial source tracking markers that expressed a similar microbial source was minimal, but spatial trends were physically meaningful in terms of land use (e.g., beneficial management <span class="hlt">practice</span>) effects on sources of fecal pollution. PMID:23913430</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23913430','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23913430"><span>Coherence among different microbial source tracking markers in a small <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> stream with or without livestock exclusion <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wilkes, Graham; Brassard, Julie; Edge, Thomas A; Gannon, Victor; Jokinen, Cassandra C; Jones, Tineke H; Marti, Romain; Neumann, Norman F; Ruecker, Norma J; Sunohara, Mark; Topp, Edward; Lapen, David R</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Over 1,400 water samples were collected biweekly over 6 years from an intermittent stream protected and unprotected from pasturing cattle. The samples were monitored for host-specific Bacteroidales markers, Cryptosporidium species/genotypes, viruses and coliphages associated with humans or animals, and bacterial zoonotic pathogens. Ruminant Bacteroidales markers did not increase within the restricted cattle access reach of the stream, whereas the ruminant Bacteroidales marker increased significantly in the unrestricted cattle access reach. Human Bacteroidales markers significantly increased downstream of homes where septic issues were documented. Wildlife Bacteroidales markers were detected downstream of the cattle exclusion <span class="hlt">practice</span> where stream and riparian habitat was protected, but detections decreased after the unrestricted pasture, where the stream and riparian zone was unprotected from livestock. Detection of a large number of human viruses was shown to increase downstream of homes, and similar trends were observed for the human Bacteroidales marker. There was considerable interplay among biomarkers with stream flow, season, and the cattle exclusion <span class="hlt">practices</span>. There were no to very weak associations with Bacteroidales markers and bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens. Overall, discrete sample-by-sample coherence among the different microbial source tracking markers that expressed a similar microbial source was minimal, but spatial trends were physically meaningful in terms of land use (e.g., beneficial management <span class="hlt">practice</span>) effects on sources of fecal pollution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ERL.....9d4004F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ERL.....9d4004F"><span>Effects of ecological and conventional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> intensification <span class="hlt">practices</span> on maize yields in sub-Saharan Africa under potential climate change</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Folberth, Christian; Yang, Hong; Gaiser, Thomas; Liu, Junguo; Wang, Xiuying; Williams, Jimmy; Schulin, Rainer</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Much of Africa is among the world’s regions with lowest yields in staple food crops, and climate change is expected to make it more difficult to catch up in crop production in particular in the long run. Various agronomic measures have been proposed for lifting <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production in Africa and to adapt it to climate change. Here, we present a projection of potential climate change impacts on maize yields under different intensification options in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) using an agronomic model, GIS-based EPIC (GEPIC). Fallow and nutrient management options taken into account are (a) conventional intensification with high mineral N supply and a bare fallow, (b) moderate mineral N supply and cowpea rotation, and (c) moderate mineral N supply and rotation with a fast growing N fixing tree Sesbania sesban. The simulations suggest that until the 2040s rotation with Sesbania will lead to an increase in yields due to increasing N supply besides improving water infiltration and soils’ water holding capacity. Intensive cultivation with a bare fallow or an herbaceous crop like cowpea in the rotation is predicted to result in lower yields and increased soil erosion during the same time span. However, yields are projected to decrease in all management scenarios towards the end of the century, should temperature increase beyond critical thresholds. The results suggest that the effect of eco-intensification as a sole means of adapting <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> to climate change is limited in Sub-Saharan Africa. Highly adverse temperatures would rather have to be faced by improved heat tolerant cultivars, while strongly adverse decreases in precipitation would have to be faced by expanding irrigation where feasible. While the evaluation of changes in agro-environmental variables like soil organic carbon, erosion, and soil humidity hints that these are major factors influencing climate change resilience of the field crop, no direct relationship between these factors, crop yields, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=288340','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=288340"><span>Precision <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Precision <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> is a new farming <span class="hlt">practice</span> that has been developing since late 1980s. It has been variously referred to as precision farming, prescription farming, site-specific crop management, to name but a few. There are numerous definitions for precision <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, but the central concept...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec70-41.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec70-41.pdf"><span>7 CFR 70.41 - Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>...) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS... terms “United States” or “U.S.” in conjunction with the grade of the product; (e) The use of any of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf"><span>7 CFR 56.69 - Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>...) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS... the product; (e) The use of any of the aforesaid terms or any official stamp, symbol, label, seal,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol5/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol5-sec380-1.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol5/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol5-sec380-1.pdf"><span>7 CFR 380.1 - Scope and applicability of rules of <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Scope and applicability of rules of <span class="hlt">practice</span>. 380.1 Section 380.1 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...) The Plant Protection Act, section 424 (7 U.S.C. 7734), (2) Endangered Species Act Amendments of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol5-sec380-1.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol5-sec380-1.pdf"><span>7 CFR 380.1 - Scope and applicability of rules of <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scope and applicability of rules of <span class="hlt">practice</span>. 380.1 Section 380.1 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...) The Plant Protection Act, section 424 (7 U.S.C. 7734), (2) Endangered Species Act Amendments of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/nps/nonpoint-source-agriculture','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/nps/nonpoint-source-agriculture"><span>Nonpoint Source: <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> runoff as a nonpoint source category of pollution. Resouces to learn more a bout conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce water quality impacts from storm water run off and ground water infiltration</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Information+AND+retrieval+AND+skills&pg=2&id=EJ788898','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Information+AND+retrieval+AND+skills&pg=2&id=EJ788898"><span>Learning about Teachers' Accomplishment in "Learning Skills for Science" <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: The Use of Portfolios in an Evidence-Based <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Professional Development Programme</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Scherz, Zahava; Bialer, Liora; Eylon, Bat-Sheva</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The study in this paper was carried out in the framework of an evidence-based <span class="hlt">continuous</span> professional development (CPD) programme in which teachers documented evidence about their <span class="hlt">practice</span> in a portfolio. The context of the CPD was related to the "Learning Skills for Science" (LSS) programme, which advocates the incorporation of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED361532.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED361532.pdf"><span>Midwest Research-to-<span class="hlt">Practice</span> Annual Conference in Adult <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> and Community Education. Conference Proceedings (11th, Manhattan, Kansas, October 8-9, 1992).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kansas State Univ., Manhattan. Coll. of Education.</p> <p></p> <p>A conference on research to <span class="hlt">practice</span> in adult, <span class="hlt">continuing</span> and community education included the following papers: "Education as a Community Intervention Strategy" (Ashcraft, Andrews); "Assessing Educational Needs of Adults: An Ohio Extension Example" (Bratkovich, Miller); "Questions and Issues Related to a Lack of Multicultural Research in Adult…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED471123.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED471123.pdf"><span>Proceedings of the Annual Midwest Research-to-<span class="hlt">Practice</span> Conference in Adult, <span class="hlt">Continuing</span>, and Community Education (21st, DeKalb, Illinois, October 9-11, 2002).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Orem, Richard A., Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>This document contains 41 papers and 11 poster session presentations from a conference on research-to-<span class="hlt">practice</span> in adult, <span class="hlt">continuing</span>, and community education. The following are among the papers included: "Learning in a Multicultural Environment" (Mansur Abdullah, Cory Eisenberg, Willard C. Hall Jr., Pauline Valvo); "How to Engage in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27589822','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27589822"><span>Factors affecting the stable isotopes ratios in groundwater impacted by intense <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: A case study from the Nile Valley of Egypt.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mohammed, Abdel Mawgoud; Krishnamurthy, R V; Kehew, Alan E; Crossey, Laura J; Karlstrom, Karl K</p> <p>2016-12-15</p> <p>The monitoring of stable isotopes (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) in water can provide a sensitive indicator of water loss by evaporation. We obtained water samples from surface water and groundwater from both the young and old alluvial plains in the central part of the Nile Valley of Egypt. Groundwater is the only source for irrigation in the old alluvial plains while both surface water (River Nile and irrigation canals) and groundwater are used in the young alluvial plain. Results showed different isotopic compositions between each group of samples and hydrologic connections between shallow groundwater and surface water in the young alluvial plain. The δ(18)O and δ(2)H relationship of the samples collected from the desert areas of the old alluvial plains below <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands define an evaporation line with a slope of 4.5 and low deuterium excess of <-14‰. These values can be attributed to return flow of irrigation water that has been subjected to evaporative processes, further amplified by intense <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Average evaporative losses were estimated to be between 31% and 36%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16760516','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16760516"><span>Impact of education on knowledge, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and community actions for mosquito control and mosquito-borne disease prevention in rice ecosystems in Sri Lanka.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yasuoka, Junko; Mangione, Thomas W; Spielman, Andrew; Levins, Richard</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>Mosquito-borne diseases are a major public health threat in Sri Lanka. A 20-week pilot education program to improve community knowledge and mosquito control with participatory and non-chemical approaches was developed, implemented, and evaluated using pre-educational and post-educational surveys in two intervention and two comparison villages. Correlates of baseline knowledge were sex, number of family members, ratio of family members with malaria history, school education level, and availability of electricity at the residence. Participation in the educational program led to improved knowledge of mosquito ecology and disease epidemiology, changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and an increase in environmentally sound measures for mosquito control and disease prevention. The variety of actions at the post-educational stage were determined by improved knowledge, but not by sociodemographic characteristics. Such community-based educational interventions are effective in increasing understanding and active involvement in mosquito control and disease prevention in rice ecosystems regardless of sociodemographic characteristics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25699645','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25699645"><span>Investigation of the photochemical changes of chlorogenic acids induced by ultraviolet light in model systems and in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> with Stevia rebaudiana cultivation as an example.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Karaköse, Hande; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Deshpande, Sagar; Kuhnert, Nikolai</p> <p>2015-04-08</p> <p>Mono- and diacyl chlorogenic acids undergo photochemical trans-cis isomerization under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photochemical equilibrium composition was established for eight selected derivatives. In contrast to all other dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives, cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid) undergoes a [2 + 2] photochemical cycloaddition reaction, constituting a first example of Schmidt's law in a natural product family. The relevance of photochemical isomerization in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> was investigated using 120 samples of Stevia rebaudiana leave samples grown under defined cultivation conditions. Ratios of cis to trans chlorogenic acids were determined in leaf samples and correlated with climatic and harvesting conditions. The data indicate a clear correlation between the formation of cis-caffeoyl derivatives and sunshine hours prior to harvesting and illustrate the relevance of UV exposure to plant material affecting its phytochemical composition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70173471','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70173471"><span>Effects of hydrology, watershed size, and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on sediment yields in two river basins in Iowa and Mississippi</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Merten, Gustavo Henrique; Welch, Heather L.; Tomer, M.D.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The specific sediment yield (SSY) from watersheds is the result of the balance between natural, scale-dependent erosion and deposition processes, but can be greatly altered by human activities. In general, the SSY decreases along the course of a river as sediments are trapped in alluvial plains and other sinks. However, this relation between SSY and basin area can actually be an increasing one when there is a predominance of channel erosion relative to hillslope erosion. The US Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study of suspended sediment in the Iowa River basin (IRB), Iowa, and the Yazoo River basin (YRB), Mississippi, from 2006 through 2008. Within each river basin, the SSY from four largely <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds of various sizes (2.3 to 35,000 km2 [0.9 to 13,513 mi2]) was investigated. In the smallest watersheds, YRB sites had greater SSY compared to IRB sites due to higher rain erosivity, more erodible soils, more overland flow, and fluvial geomorphological differences. Watersheds in the YRB showed a steady decrease in SSY with increasing drainage basin area, whereas in the IRB, the maximum SSY occurred at the 30 to 500 km2 (11.6 to 193 mi2) scale. Subsurface tile drainage and limits to channel downcutting restrict the upstream migration of sediment sources in the IRB. Nevertheless, by comparing the SSY-basin size scaling relationships with estimated rates of field erosion under conservation and conventional tillage treatments reported in previous literature, we show evidence that the SSY-basin size relationship in both the IRB and YRB remain impacted by historical erosion rates that occurred prior to conservation efforts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1811244K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1811244K"><span>Temporal variability of CO2 and N2O emissions in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> long-term field trial regarding effects of different management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and extreme weather effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Koal, Philipp; Schilling, Rolf; Gerl, Georg; Pritsch, Karin; Munch, Jean Charles</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>In order to achieve a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, modern agronomic management <span class="hlt">practices</span> need to be established. Therefore, to assess the effect of different farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> on greenhouse gas emissions, reliable data are required. The experiment covers and compares main aspects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management for a better implementation of sustainable land use. The focus lies on the determination and interpretation of greenhouse gas emissions, where the effects of diverse tillage systems and fertilisation <span class="hlt">practices</span> of an integrated farming system as well as the impacts of extreme weather conditions are observed. In addition, with analysis of the alterable biological, physical and chemical soil properties a link between the impact of different management systems on greenhouse gas emissions and the observed cycle of matter in the soil, especially the nitrogen and carbon cycle, is enabled. Measurements have been carried out on long-term field trials at the Research Farm Scheyern located in a Tertiary hilly landscape approximately 40 km north of Munich (South Germany). The long-term integrated farming system trial was started in 1992. Since then parcels of land (each around 0.2-0.4 ha) with a particular interior plot set-up have been conducted with the same crop rotation, tillage and fertilisation <span class="hlt">practice</span> referring to integrated farming management. Thus, the management impacts on the soil of more than 20 years have been examined. Fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 have been monitored since 2007 for the integrated farming system trial using an automated system which consists of chambers (0.4 m2 area) with a motor-driven lid, an automated gas sampling unit, an on-line gas chromatographic analysis system, and a control and data logging unit. Precipitation and temperature data have been observed for the experimental field to include weather effects. The main outcomes are the analysis of temporal and spatial dynamics of greenhouse gas emissions influenced by management</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7744.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7744.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7744 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance Requirements § 63.7744 How do I... chemical composition of all catalyst binder formulations applied in each furan warm box mold or core making line at a new or existing iron and steel foundry to demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-sec63-7744.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-sec63-7744.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7744 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance Requirements § 63.7744 How do I... chemical composition of all catalyst binder formulations applied in each furan warm box mold or core making line at a new or existing iron and steel foundry to demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7744.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7744.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7744 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance Requirements § 63.7744 How do I... chemical composition of all catalyst binder formulations applied in each furan warm box mold or core making line at a new or existing iron and steel foundry to demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol14-sec63-7744.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol14-sec63-7744.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7744 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance Requirements § 63.7744 How do I... chemical composition of all catalyst binder formulations applied in each furan warm box mold or core making line at a new or existing iron and steel foundry to demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol14-sec63-7744.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol14-sec63-7744.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.7744 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance Requirements § 63.7744 How do I... chemical composition of all catalyst binder formulations applied in each furan warm box mold or core making line at a new or existing iron and steel foundry to demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol14-sec63-8246.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol14-sec63-8246.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.8246 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... recovery unit vent, you must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the applicable emission limit specified... <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the applicable mercury emission limit by reducing the mercury emissions data to 52... higher than the applicable mercury emissions limit in § 63.8190(a)(2). To obtain the data to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-sec63-8246.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-sec63-8246.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.8246 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the applicable mercury emission limit by reducing the mercury emissions data to 52-week averages using Equation 1 of § 63.8243 and maintaining the 52-week average mercury emissions...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol14-sec63-8246.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol14-sec63-8246.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.8246 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the applicable mercury emission limit by reducing the mercury emissions data to 52-week averages using Equation 1 of § 63.8243 and maintaining the 52-week average mercury emissions...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-8246.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-8246.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.8246 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the applicable mercury emission limit by reducing the mercury emissions data to 52-week averages using Equation 1 of § 63.8243 and maintaining the 52-week average mercury emissions...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-8246.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-8246.pdf"><span>40 CFR 63.8246 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the applicable mercury emission limit by reducing the mercury emissions data to 52-week averages using Equation 1 of § 63.8243 and maintaining the 52-week average mercury emissions...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 39 to Subpart Uuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 39 Table 39 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—<span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work... operating properly and whether flow is present in the bypass line. 2. Option 2: Car-seal or...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf"><span>40 CFR Table 39 to Subpart Uuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 39 Table 39 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—<span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work... operating properly and whether flow is present in the bypass line. 2. Option 2: Car-seal or...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=structures+AND+innovative+AND+organizations&pg=7&id=ED522150','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=structures+AND+innovative+AND+organizations&pg=7&id=ED522150"><span>The Shifting Landscape of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Higher Education: Case Studies of Strategic Planning and Resource Allocation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Research Intensive Universities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Grant, Mary S.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education units enable institutions of higher education to extend university resources to the larger community for the purposes of addressing key issues in the community, region, and state. <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education units have been engaged in strategic planning exercises since the I980's and have developed organizational models and methods…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol1-sec8-7.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol1-sec8-7.pdf"><span>7 CFR 8.7 - <span class="hlt">Continued</span> use.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, United States Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, for approval. (b) ... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Continued</span> use. 8.7 Section 8.7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Office of the Secretary of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 4-H CLUB NAME AND EMBLEM § 8.7 <span class="hlt">Continued</span> use. (a) The...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol1-sec8-7.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol1-sec8-7.pdf"><span>7 CFR 8.7 - <span class="hlt">Continued</span> use.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, United States Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, for approval. (b) ... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Continued</span> use. 8.7 Section 8.7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Office of the Secretary of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 4-H CLUB NAME AND EMBLEM § 8.7 <span class="hlt">Continued</span> use. (a) The...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol1-sec8-7.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol1-sec8-7.pdf"><span>7 CFR 8.7 - <span class="hlt">Continued</span> use.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, United States Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, for approval. (b) ... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Continued</span> use. 8.7 Section 8.7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Office of the Secretary of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 4-H CLUB NAME AND EMBLEM § 8.7 <span class="hlt">Continued</span> use. (a) The...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760021536','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760021536"><span>Use of remote sensing in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pettry, D. E.; Powell, N. L.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>The remote sensing studies of (a) cultivated peanut areas in Southeastern Virginia; (b) studies at the Virginia Truck and Ornamentals Research Station near Painter, Virginia, the Eastern Virginia Research Station near Warsaw, Virginia, the Tidewater Research and <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Center near Suffolk, Virginia, and the Southern Piedmont Research and <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Center Blackstone, Virginia; and (c) land use classification studies at Virginia Beach, Virginia are presented. The <span class="hlt">practical</span> feasibility of using false color infrared imagery to detect and determine the areal extent of peanut disease infestation of Cylindrocladium black rot and Sclerotinia blight is demonstrated. These diseases pose a severe hazard to this major <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> food commodity. The value of remote sensing technology in terrain analyses and land use classification of diverse land areas is also investigated. <span class="hlt">Continued</span> refinement of spectral signatures of major agronomic crops and documentation of pertinent environmental variables have provided a data base for the generation of an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span>-environmental prediction model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Global+AND+Positioning+AND+System&pg=2&id=EJ940155','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Global+AND+Positioning+AND+System&pg=2&id=EJ940155"><span>Advancing Technology: GPS and GIS Outreach Training for <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Producers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Flynn, Allison; Arnold, Shannon</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and Global Information Systems (GIS) has made significant impacts on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production <span class="hlt">practices</span>. However, constant changes in the technologies require <span class="hlt">continuing</span> educational updates. The outreach program described here introduces the operation, use, and applications of GPS receivers and GIS…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1122319.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1122319.pdf"><span>Recruiting Strategically: Increasing Enrollment in Academic Programs of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Baker, Lauri M.; Settle, Quisto; Chiarelli, Christy; Irani, Tracy</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">continues</span> to struggle to find enough qualified students to advance the industry. Thus, recruiting <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvement is imperative. This study assessed the efficacy of message strategies, message channels, recruiting materials, and messages for recruiting students into an academic program with low enrollment. Focus groups were…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol7-sec701-37.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol7-sec701-37.pdf"><span>7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the <span class="hlt">practice</span> life span.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the <span class="hlt">practice</span> life span. In the event... during the <span class="hlt">practice</span> life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol7-sec701-37.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol7-sec701-37.pdf"><span>7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the <span class="hlt">practice</span> life span.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the <span class="hlt">practice</span> life span. In the event... during the <span class="hlt">practice</span> life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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