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Sample records for agricultural practices continue

  1. Ancient lipids reveal continuity in culinary practices across the transition to agriculture in Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Oliver E.; Steele, Val J.; Fischer, Anders; Hartz, Sönke; Andersen, Søren H.; Donohoe, Paul; Glykou, Aikaterini; Saul, Hayley; Jones, D. Martin; Koch, Eva; Heron, Carl P.

    2011-01-01

    Farming transformed societies globally. Yet, despite more than a century of research, there is little consensus on the speed or completeness of this fundamental change and, consequently, on its principal drivers. For Northern Europe, the debate has often centered on the rich archaeological record of the Western Baltic, but even here it is unclear how quickly or completely people abandoned wild terrestrial and marine resources after the introduction of domesticated plants and animals at ∼4000 calibrated years B.C. Ceramic containers are found ubiquitously on these sites and contain remarkably well-preserved lipids derived from the original use of the vessel. Reconstructing culinary practices from this ceramic record can contribute to longstanding debates concerning the origins of farming. Here we present data on the molecular and isotopic characteristics of lipids extracted from 133 ceramic vessels and 100 carbonized surface residues dating to immediately before and after the first evidence of domesticated animals and plants in the Western Baltic. The presence of specific lipid biomarkers, notably ω-(o-alkylphenyl)alkanoic acids, and the isotopic composition of individual n-alkanoic acids clearly show that a significant proportion (∼20%) of ceramic vessels with lipids preserved continued to be used for processing marine and freshwater resources across the transition to agriculture in this region. Although changes in pottery use are immediately evident, our data challenge the popular notions that economies were completely transformed with the arrival of farming and that Neolithic pottery was exclusively associated with produce from domesticated animals and plants. PMID:22025697

  2. Ancient lipids reveal continuity in culinary practices across the transition to agriculture in Northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Craig, Oliver E; Steele, Val J; Fischer, Anders; Hartz, Sönke; Andersen, Søren H; Donohoe, Paul; Glykou, Aikaterini; Saul, Hayley; Jones, D Martin; Koch, Eva; Heron, Carl P

    2011-11-01

    Farming transformed societies globally. Yet, despite more than a century of research, there is little consensus on the speed or completeness of this fundamental change and, consequently, on its principal drivers. For Northern Europe, the debate has often centered on the rich archaeological record of the Western Baltic, but even here it is unclear how quickly or completely people abandoned wild terrestrial and marine resources after the introduction of domesticated plants and animals at ∼4000 calibrated years B.C. Ceramic containers are found ubiquitously on these sites and contain remarkably well-preserved lipids derived from the original use of the vessel. Reconstructing culinary practices from this ceramic record can contribute to longstanding debates concerning the origins of farming. Here we present data on the molecular and isotopic characteristics of lipids extracted from 133 ceramic vessels and 100 carbonized surface residues dating to immediately before and after the first evidence of domesticated animals and plants in the Western Baltic. The presence of specific lipid biomarkers, notably ω-(o-alkylphenyl)alkanoic acids, and the isotopic composition of individual n-alkanoic acids clearly show that a significant proportion (∼20%) of ceramic vessels with lipids preserved continued to be used for processing marine and freshwater resources across the transition to agriculture in this region. Although changes in pottery use are immediately evident, our data challenge the popular notions that economies were completely transformed with the arrival of farming and that Neolithic pottery was exclusively associated with produce from domesticated animals and plants. PMID:22025697

  3. AGRICULTURAL BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE EFFECTIVENESS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The Agricultural Best Management Practice Effectiveness Database contains the results of research projects which have collected water quality data for the purpose of determining the effectiveness of agricultural management practices in reducing pollutants ...

  4. Agricultural drainage practices in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, T. D.

    1986-02-01

    Agricultural drainage practices are reviewed under two main headings: arterial drainage of river catch-ments by developing main channels, and field drainage of smaller parcels of land using pipes and open trenches. The use of cost/benefit analysis on the arterial drainage program is considered and the inherent errors are discussed. Conservation of the environment is described as it applies to land-scaping, fisheries, and wildlife, and the drainage authorities are shown to have an enlightened attitude to proper preservation of the world around us.

  5. Continuing Professional Development: Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    Filipe, Helena P.; Silva, Eduardo D.; Stulting, Andries A.; Golnik, Karl C.

    2014-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) involves not only educational activities to enhance medical competence in medical knowledge and skills, but also in management, team building, professionalism, interpersonal communication, technology, teaching, and accountability. This paper aims at reviewing best practices to promote effective CPD. Principles and guidelines, as already defined by some professional societies and world organizations, are emphasized as core actions to best enhance an effective lifelong learning after residency. The personal learning plan (PLP) is discussed as the core of a well-structured CPD and we describe how it should be created. Fundamental CPD principles and how they are integrated in the framework of every physician's professional life will be described. The value of systematic and comprehensive CPD documentation and assessment is emphasized. Accreditation requirements and professional relationships with commercial sponsors are discussed. PMID:24791104

  6. Adoption of Improved Agricultural Practices in Uruguay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucks, Carlos Alberto

    Conducted in Uruguay during 1965-68, this study compared adoption rates for selected agricultural practices between one area which received an extension program and one which did not; and sought relationships between selected characteristics of individual farmers and the adoption of new practices. Data came from interviews with 69 experimental and…

  7. Carbon dynamics of contrasting agricultural practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghee, Claire; Hallett, Paul; Neilson, Roy; Robinson, David; Paterson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Application of organic amendments can improve soil quality and provide crop nutrients. To optimise these agricultural benefits from organic applications, the capacity of microbe-driven nutrient and carbon cycling must be understood and exploited. Consideration is therefore required of the complex interactions between the rhizosphere, microbial biomass and organic amendment. We hypothesise that the labile C present in root exudates of plants increases the mineralisation of organic matter in soil, constituting a mechanism to promote nutrient acquisition. This mechanism is known as the 'priming effect', but is poorly understood in the context of agricultural carbon and nutrient management. Field data from the Centre of Sustainable Cropping (CSC) research platform (Dundee, Scotland, UK) are utilised to build an understanding of soil C and N fluxes between contrasting agricultural practices. The field site uses a split-plot design to compare (i) compost amended soils with reduced tillage and chemical inputs and (ii) conventionally managed soils, reflective of current UK commercial arable practice. Significant differences (p= <0.001) were identified between compost amended and conventionally managed soils at field-scale with respect to soil microbial biomass (SMB), total organic carbon (TOC) and mineral nitrogen. Investigation into the priming effect within compost amended soils was subsequently undertaken under laboratory conditions. Stable isotope analysis and measurements of soil biotic parameters were used to quantify priming resulting from Spring Barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Optic) cultivation for (i) unamended and (ii) municipal compost incorporated soils. Compost treatments comprised amendments of 25, 50 and 150 t/Ha and planted soils were compared with unplanted controls. Soil mesocosms were maintained under controlled environmental conditions within labelling chambers supplied continuously with 13C-depleted CO2. Throughout a 41-day incubation period, soil CO2

  8. Continuous Improvement in Schools: Understanding the Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stephen; Kumari, Roshni

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates conceptually and practically what it means for schools to engage in the practice of continuous improvement. The analysis draws upon prior research and discussion to predict core elements of the practice of continuous improvement in schools. The predictions are then applied to a case study of continuous improvement efforts…

  9. Measures of the Effects of Agricultural Practices on Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Virginia H; Polasky, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Agriculture produces more than just crops. Agricultural practices have environmental impacts that affect a wide range of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity. Understanding the contribution of various agricultural practices to the range of ecosystem services would help inform choices about the most beneficial agricultural practices. To accomplish this, however, we must overcome a big challenge in measuring the impact of alternative agricultural practices on ecosystem services and of ecosystem services on agricultural production.

  10. Hyperspectral image classification for mapping agricultural tillage practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An efficient classification framework for mapping agricultural tillage practice using hyperspectral remote sensing imagery is proposed, which has the potential to be implemented practically to provide rapid, accurate, and objective surveying data for precision agricultural management and appraisal f...

  11. Practical application of remote sensing in agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Remote sensing program imagery from several types of platforms, from light aircraft to the LANDSAT (ERTS) satellites, have been utilized during the past few years, with preference for inexpensive imagery over expensive magnetic tapes. Emphasis has been on practical application of remote sensing data to increase crop yield by decreasing plant stress, disease, weeds and undesirable insects and by improving irrigation. Imagery obtained from low altitudes via aircraft provides the necessary resolution and complements but does not replace data from high altitude aircraft, Gemini and Apollo spacecraft, Skylab space station and LANDSAT satellites. Federal government centers are now able to supply imagery within about thirty days from data of order. Nevertheless, if the full potential of space imagery in practical agricultural operations is to be realized, the time span from date of imaging to user application needs to be shortened from the current several months to not more than two weeks.

  12. Care Practice #3: Continuous Labor Support

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jeanne; Amis, Debby; Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    This updated edition of Care Practice Paper #3 presents the evidence for the benefits of continuous support in labor. The role of the doula is explained. Women are encouraged to plan for continuous support during labor and to consider including a woman experienced with childbirth among their labor support team. PMID:18566654

  13. SOCIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN THE ADOPTION OF AGRICULTURAL BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary goal of this research was to determine the relevant socioeconomic, demographic and agricultural factors that influence the adoption and maintenance of agricultural best management practices. A general theoretic model describing the adoption of technology was modified ...

  14. Guide to good practices for continuing training

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this Guide to Good Practices for Continuing Training is to provide contractor training organizations with information and methods useful in the development and implementation of a continuing training program. DOE Order 5480.18A, ``Accreditation of Performance-Based Training for Category A Reactors and Nuclear Facilities,`` and DOE Order 5480.20, ``Personnel Selection, Qualification and Training Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities`` Chapter 1, Paragraph 7, require each facility to design and implement a continuing training program. Continuing training is necessary to ensure that facility personnel continually improve their ability to operate and maintain their facility in a safe and reliable manner. Continuing training also should enhance the professionalism of these individuals and should make them aware of the possible consequences of misoperation.

  15. Continuing education in physical rehabilitation and health issues of agricultural workers.

    PubMed

    Wilhite, Carla S; Jaco, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Limited attention has been devoted to the cultural and practice competencies needed by occupational therapy and physical therapy professionals who provide services to farming families impacted by chronic health or disability issues. Agricultural occupational safety and health should represent a continuum of services responsive to individuals, families, and agricultural communities across a life span and range of health status changes. Physical rehabilitation professionals have a key role in impacting an agricultural producer's sense of self-efficacy and capacities for returning to agricultural living and work. However, demonstration of competency is essential in providing person-centered rehabilitation services of assessment, evaluation, treatment planning, interventions, referrals, and discharge issues. The paper highlights methods utilized by a state AgrAbility program and a former National AgrAbility Project to develop a model of continuing education programming for occupational and physical therapists that evaluate and treat agricultural workers after acute injury or exacerbation of chronic health conditions. PMID:24959764

  16. Continuing professional development and ICT: target practice.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Reynolds, P A

    2008-07-26

    Ever-increasing needs and demands by dentists and all other members of the dental team for education and training at all levels - undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing - are straining the resources of existing providers of such education. At the same time, there are ever-increasing opportunities to develop online delivery and the use of a range of information and communication technology (ICT) systems and services further, in all aspects of dental education. This paper reviews recent developments that have led to an increased demand for dental postgraduate programmes and continuing professional development (CPD) courses in the United Kingdom and then discusses how ICT has and will impact on teaching practice. Examples include the use of teaching and learning resources in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and the increasing use of blended learning. The paper then explores the need for both teachers and students to adapt to the new environment to ensure they can benefit to the maximum and that teaching and learning practices are changed accordingly. PMID:18660775

  17. Cost of areal reduction of gulf hypoxia through agricultural practice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major share of the area of hypoxic growth in the Northern Gulf of Mexico has been attributed to nutrient run-off from agricultural fields, but no estimate is available for the cost of reducing Gulf hypoxic area using agricultural conservation practices. We apply the Soil and Water Assessment Tool ...

  18. Water quality monitoring of an agricultural watershed lake: the effectiveness of agricultural best management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beasley Lake is an oxbow lake located in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Plain (the Delta), a region of intensive agricultural activity. Due to intensive row-crop agricultural practices, the 915 ha watershed was sediment impaired when monitoring began in 1995 and was a candidate to assess the effect...

  19. An Analysis of Agricultural Mechanics Safety Practices in Agricultural Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Michael K.

    North Dakota secondary agricultural mechanics instructors were surveyed regarding instructional methods and materials, safety practices, and equipment used in the agricultural mechanics laboratory. Usable responses were received from 69 of 89 instructors via self-administered mailed questionnaires. Findings were consistent with results of similar…

  20. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: practical issues

    PubMed Central

    Saboo, Banshi D.; Talaviya, Praful A.

    2012-01-01

    The growing number of individuals with diabetes mellitus has prompted new way of treating these patients, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or insulin pump therapy is an increasingly form of intensive insulin therapy. An increasing number of individuals with diabetes mellitus individuals of all ages have started using insulin pump therapy. Not everyone is a good candidate for insulin pump therapy, and the clinician needs to be able to determine which patients are able to master the techniques required and to watch for the adverse reactions that may develop. Insulin pump increases quality of life of patient with diabetes mellitus with increasing satisfaction with treatment and decrease impact of diabetes mellitus. Manual errors by insulin pump users may lead to hypo or hyperglycemia, resulting into diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) sometimes. Some of practical aspect is associated with insulin pump therapy such as selection of candidates, handling of pump and selection of site, and pump setting, henceforth this review is prepared to explore and solve the practical problems or issues associated with pump therapy. PMID:23565394

  1. Effects of conservation practices on fishes within agricultural watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation practices have been regularly implemented within agricultural watersheds in the United States without documentation of their impacts. The goal of the ARS Conservation Effects Assessment Project Watershed Assessment Study is to quantify the effect of conservation practices within 14 agri...

  2. Continuous Passive Sampling of Solutes from Agricultural Subsurface Drainage Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblad Vendelboe, Anders; de Jonge, Hubert; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Wollesen de Jonge, Lis

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural subsurface tube drain systems play an important role in water and solute transport. One study, focusing on lowland agricultural catchments, showed that subsurface tube drainage contributed up to 80% of the annual discharge and 90% of the annual NO3 load from agricultural fields to the receiving water bodies. Knowledge of e.g. nutrient loads and drainage volumes, based on measurements and modelling, are important for adequate water quality management. Despite the importance of tube drain transport of solutes, monitoring data are scarce. This scarcity is a result of the existing monitoring techniques for flow and contaminant load from tube drains being expensive and labor-extensive. The study presented here aimed at developing a cheap, simple, and robust method to monitor solute loads from tube drains. The method is based on the newly developed Flowcap, which can be attached to existing tube drain outlets and can measure total flow, contaminant load and flow-averaged concentrations of solutes in the drainage. The Flowcap builds on the existing Sorbicell principle, a passive sampling system that measures average concentrations over longer periods of time (days to months) for various compounds. The Sorbicell consists of two compartments permeable to water. One compartment contains an adsorbent and one contains a tracer. When water passes through the Sorbicell the compound of interest is absorbed while a tracer is released. Using the tracer loss to calculate the volume of water that has passed the Sorbicell it is possible to calculate the average concentration of the compound. When mounting Sorbicells in the Flowcap, a flow-proportional part of the drainage is sampled from the main stream. To accommodate the wide range of drainage flow rates two Flowcaps with different capacities were tested in the laboratory: one with a capacity of 25 L min-1 (Q25) and one with a capacity of 256 L min-1 (Q256). In addition, Sorbicells with two different hydraulic

  3. Bodily-visual practices and turn continuation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Cecilia E; Thompson, Sandra A; Drake, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers points in turn construction where conversation researchers have shown that talk routinely continues beyond possible turn completion, but where we find bodily-visual behavior doing such turn extension work. The bodily-visual behaviors we examine share many features with verbal turn extensions, but we argue that embodied movements have distinct properties that make them well-suited for specific kinds of social action, including stance display and by-play in sequences framed as subsidiary to a simultaneous and related verbal exchange. Our study is in line with a research agenda taking seriously the point made by Goodwin (2000a, b, 2003), Hayashi (2003, 2005), Iwasaki (2009), and others that scholars seeking to account for practices in language and social interaction do themselves a disservice if they privilege the verbal dimension; rather, as suggested in Stivers/Sidnell (2005), each semiotic system/modality, while coordinated with others, has its own organization. With the current exploration of bodily-visual turn extensions, we hope to contribute to a growing understanding of how these different modes of organization are managed concurrently and in concert by interactants in carrying out their everyday social actions. PMID:23526861

  4. Bodily-visual practices and turn continuation

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Cecilia E.; Thompson, Sandra A.; Drake, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers points in turn construction where conversation researchers have shown that talk routinely continues beyond possible turn completion, but where we find bodily-visual behavior doing such turn extension work. The bodily-visual behaviors we examine share many features with verbal turn extensions, but we argue that embodied movements have distinct properties that make them well-suited for specific kinds of social action, including stance display and by-play in sequences framed as subsidiary to a simultaneous and related verbal exchange. Our study is in line with a research agenda taking seriously the point made by Goodwin (2000a, b, 2003), Hayashi (2003, 2005), Iwasaki (2009), and others that scholars seeking to account for practices in language and social interaction do themselves a disservice if they privilege the verbal dimension; rather, as suggested in Stivers/Sidnell (2005), each semiotic system/modality, while coordinated with others, has its own organization. With the current exploration of bodily-visual turn extensions, we hope to contribute to a growing understanding of how these different modes of organization are managed concurrently and in concert by interactants in carrying out their everyday social actions. PMID:23526861

  5. Assessment of the Adoption of Sustainable Agriculture Practices: Implications for Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonge, Adewale Johnson; Martin, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed farmers (115 of 150) were very positive about the profitability and compatibility of sustainable agriculture, although certain practices elicited negative reactions. They wanted research and development directed toward maximizing profitability and compatibility to facilitate their adoption of these practices. (SK)

  6. Factors associated with achieving continuity of care in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Martin; Mayor, Vidhu; Morris, Richard

    1986-01-01

    The continuity of care received by 128 patients in four Bristol group practices over a two-year period was measured. A high standard of continuity of care was found for many patients, even though they were registered with large training practices. Patients registered with practices operating personal lists received much better continuity of care than those registered with practices operating combined lists. Patients in the study regarded continuity of care as important, especially if they were registered with practices operating personal lists. All the doctors in the study appeared to regard continuity of care as important, although those operating personal lists were more positive in this view. PMID:3712344

  7. The Influence of Time Management Practices on Job Stress Level among Beginning Secondary Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Misty D.; Torres, Robert M.; Tummons, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring the stress of teachers continues to be important--particularly stress levels of beginning agriculture teachers. The study sought to describe the relationship between beginning teachers' perceived ability to manage their time and their level of stress. The Time Management Practices Inventory and the Job Stress Survey were used to measure…

  8. Protecting ground water: pesticides and agricultural practices. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The booklet presents the results of a project conducted by EPA's Office of Ground-Water Protection to evaluate the potential impacts of various agronomic, irrigation, and pesticide application practices on ground water. The report provides State and local water quality and agricultural officials with technical information to help in the development of programs to protect ground water from pesticide contamination. The report explains the principles involved in reducing the risk of pesticide contamination and describes what is known about the impact of various agricultural practices on pesticide leaching. It is hoped that the information will be helpful to water-quality officials in developing and implementing ground-water protection programs.

  9. Watershed scale influence of pesticide reduction practices on pesticides and fishes within channelized agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of pesticide reduction practices to reduce pesticide usage within agricultural watersheds has the potential to reduce pesticide concentrations within agricultural streams. The watershed scale influence of pesticide reduction practices on pesticides and the biota within agricultural he...

  10. Effects of conservation practices on fishes, amphibians, and reptiles within agricultural streams and wetlands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation practices have been traditionally used to manage soil and water resources to improve agricultural production, and now include methods to reduce the environmental impacts of agriculture on streams and wetlands. These practices have been regularly implemented within agricultural watershed...

  11. Knowledge Gained from Good Agricultural Practices Courses for Iowa Growers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Angela; Strohbehn, Catherine; Naeve, Linda; Domoto, Paul; Wilson, Lester

    2015-01-01

    Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) educational courses provide produce growers with the fundamental information for producing and processing safe produce. To determine the effectiveness of the current 7-hour GAP course provided in Iowa, growers were surveyed before and 7-14 days after the course to determine changes in knowledge and opinions.…

  12. Factors Influencing Practical Training Quality in Iranian Agricultural Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mojarradi, Gholamreza; Karamidehkordi, Esmail

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the factors influencing the practical training quality of agricultural higher education programmes from the senior students' perspective. The study was conducted in two public universities located in the north-west of Iran using a cross-sectional survey and structured interviews with a randomised sample of 254…

  13. The Meaning of Practices: Farmers' Conceptions in Agricultural Development Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Agricultural development programs often produce unexpected results. This can be attributed to the fact that the target-farmers already have their own knowledge and competencies which, in turn, determine their practices. In order to be adopted, an innovation has first to be discussed, and then appropriated by a local group of farmers in their…

  14. Continuing the Legacy: Democracy and Education Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Sara; Schwartz, Joni

    2012-01-01

    The American adult education and literacy movement in the early twentieth century had its roots deep in the study and practice of democracy (Ramdeholl, Giordani, Heaney, Yanow, 2010). From Lindeman, Dewey, Laubach, Horton, to Heaney and Brookfield, a persistent theme is the indispensable relationship between democracy and adult education. For…

  15. Effects of agricultural practices on organic matter degradation in ditches

    PubMed Central

    Hunting, Ellard R.; Vonk, J. Arie; Musters, C.J.M.; Kraak, Michiel H.S.; Vijver, Martina G.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural practices can result in differences in organic matter (OM) and agricultural chemical inputs in adjacent ditches, but its indirect effects on OM composition and its inherent consequences for ecosystem functioning remain uncertain. This study determined the effect of agricultural practices (dairy farm grasslands and hyacinth bulb fields) on OM degradation by microorganisms and invertebrates with a consumption and food preference experiment in the field and in the laboratory using natural OM collected from the field. Freshly cut grass and hyacinths were also offered to control for OM composition and large- and small mesh-sizes were used to distinguish microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption. Results show that OM decomposition by microorganisms and consumption by invertebrates was similar throughout the study area, but that OM collected from ditches adjacent grasslands and freshly cut grass and hyacinths were preferred over OM collected from ditches adjacent to a hyacinth bulb field. In the case of OM collected from ditches adjacent hyacinth bulb fields, both microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption were strongly retarded, likely resulting from sorption and accumulation of pesticides. This outcome illustrates that differences in agricultural practices can, in addition to direct detrimental effects on aquatic organisms, indirectly alter the functioning of adjacent aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26892243

  16. Effects of agricultural practices on organic matter degradation in ditches.

    PubMed

    Hunting, Ellard R; Vonk, J Arie; Musters, C J M; Kraak, Michiel H S; Vijver, Martina G

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural practices can result in differences in organic matter (OM) and agricultural chemical inputs in adjacent ditches, but its indirect effects on OM composition and its inherent consequences for ecosystem functioning remain uncertain. This study determined the effect of agricultural practices (dairy farm grasslands and hyacinth bulb fields) on OM degradation by microorganisms and invertebrates with a consumption and food preference experiment in the field and in the laboratory using natural OM collected from the field. Freshly cut grass and hyacinths were also offered to control for OM composition and large- and small mesh-sizes were used to distinguish microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption. Results show that OM decomposition by microorganisms and consumption by invertebrates was similar throughout the study area, but that OM collected from ditches adjacent grasslands and freshly cut grass and hyacinths were preferred over OM collected from ditches adjacent to a hyacinth bulb field. In the case of OM collected from ditches adjacent hyacinth bulb fields, both microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption were strongly retarded, likely resulting from sorption and accumulation of pesticides. This outcome illustrates that differences in agricultural practices can, in addition to direct detrimental effects on aquatic organisms, indirectly alter the functioning of adjacent aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26892243

  17. 7 CFR 58.315 - Continuous churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND...

  18. Sustainability of current agriculture practices, community perception, and implications for ecosystem health: an Indian study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Atanu; Patil, Shantagouda; Hugar, Lingappa B; vanLoon, Gary

    2011-12-01

    In order to support agribusiness and to attain food security for ever-increasing populations, most countries in the world have embraced modern agricultural technologies. Ecological consequences of the technocentric approaches, and their sustainability and impacts on human health have, however, not received adequate attention particularly in developing countries. India is one country that has undergone a rapid transformation in the field of agriculture by adopting strategies of the Green Revolution. This article provides a comparative analysis of the effects of older and newer paradigms of agricultural practices on ecosystem and human health within the larger context of sustainability. The study was conducted in three closely situated areas where different agricultural practices were followed: (a) the head-end of a modern canal-irrigated area, (b) an adjacent dryland, and (c) an area (the ancient area) that has been provided with irrigation for some 800 years. Data were collected by in-depth interviews of individual farmers, focus-group discussions, participatory observations, and from secondary sources. The dryland, receiving limited rainfall, continues to practice diverse cropping centered to a large extent on traditional coarse cereals and uses only small amounts of chemical inputs. On the other hand, modern agriculture in the head-end emphasizes continuous cropping of rice supported by extensive and indiscriminate use of agrochemicals. Market forces have, to a significant degree, influenced the ancient area to abandon much of its early practices of organic farming and to take up aspects of modern agricultural practice. Rice cultivation in the irrigated parts has changed the local landscape and vegetation and has augmented the mosquito population, which is a potential vector for malaria, Japanese encephalitis and other diseases. Nevertheless, despite these problems, perceptions of adverse environmental effects are lowest in the heavily irrigated area. PMID

  19. Agricultural employers' hiring and safety practices for adolescent workers.

    PubMed

    Lee, B C; Westaby, J D; Chyou, P H; Purschwitz, M A

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the "Safety Training for Employers and Supervisors of Adolescent Farmworkers" initiative is to improve the occupational health and safety knowledge and practices of agricultural employers and supervisors responsible for employees, ages 14 to 17 years. Surveys were sent to members of the National Council of Agricultural Employers and the Washington Growers League to measure attitudes regarding adolescent employees, current hiring and training practices, and future intentions. More than half of the respondents hire adolescents. Two-thirds were male, nearly three-quarters of the respondents had college or post-graduate degrees, and more than half were 50 years or older. The majority of respondents had positive perceptions of adolescents in terms of dependability, helpfulness, and work ethic. Among those who currently hire young workers, the most common reasons were to provide a job for children of friends and family and because they can work part-time to fill a labor demand. Among those not hiring adolescents, the most common reason was concern about child labor regulations and associated tasks (e.g., paperwork, monitoring hours). Respondents use a variety of safety training resources, especially posters and safety meetings. For the future, they expect to need more handout materials and training videos. Study results provide insights into barriers to the employment of young workers and suggest methods by which agricultural safety specialists can best assist those employers and producers who are willing to hire adolescents into agricultural work settings. PMID:17370911

  20. Carbon and Phosphorus in soil particulate fraction: effect of continuous agriculture, tillage and fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyngaard, N.; Echeverrıa, H. E.; Vidaurreta, A.; Picone, L. I.; Divito, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    In Argentinean Pampas region, the practice of intensive agriculture has diminished total organic carbon (TOC) content in soil. This degradation process can impact over phosphorus (P) organic fractions associated to it, and therefore limit soil capacity to provide P through mineralization. Along this line, P content in soil particulate fraction (PF) has been proposed as an index to estimate this capacity. The aims of this work were to evaluate (1) the effect of continuous agriculture, tillage and P fertilization over TOC and P fractions content in soil and PF, and (2) the stability of P-PF as a mineralization index. To this end, a long term experiment initiated in 2001 in Balcarce, Argentina, under continuous agriculture, was analyzed. There, two tillage systems - conventional till (CT) and no till (NT) - and two fertilization treatments - nitrogen (N) and N + P (NP) - were evaluated. Phosphorus rate was 30 kg ha-1 year-1. In each plot, the following parameters were determined in 2002, 2005, 2008 and 2011: TOC, P Bray, total P (Pt), inorganic P (Pi), and organic P (Po) content in the whole soil and in the PF. Also, C supply by residues and P soil balance during the experiment were calculated, and the P sorption capacity was determined in samples from 2011. C supply was greater in CT (7% relative to NT) and in NP (14% relative to N). However, TOC in soil was not modified neither by tillage or fertilization. Even though, C in the PF decreased (3% annually) by the use of continuous agriculture. This reduction was positively associated to the one observed in other soil properties as Pt, Pi and Po in the PF. P fertilization lessened this reduction in Pt (18,9 mg kg-1 in N and 23,1 mg kg-1 in NP in 2011) and Pi (4,2 mg kg-1 in N and 6,2 mg kg-1 in NP in 2011), but not in Po. This indicates that, Po is affected by management practices and, contrary to Pt, is stable to fertilization. Therefore Po can be studied as a potential P mineralization index. The difference among P

  1. Ecologically asynchronous agricultural practice erodes sustainability of the Loess Plateau of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianming; Wu, Jianguo; Kou, Xiaojun; Oliver, Chadwick; Mou, Pu; Ge, Jianping

    2010-06-01

    Sustainability of agricultural landscapes depends largely on land-use practices. As one of the most productive and widespread agricultural soils, loess is often deep and easily eroded, posing grand challenges for environmental sustainability around the world. One prime example is the Loess Plateau of China, which has been cultivated for more than 7500 years. Based on long-term data sets, this study demonstrates that the dominant agricultural practice, winter wheat cropping, continues to be the primary driver for the massive soil erosion and landscape modifications on the Loess Plateau. This traditional farming system is asynchronous with the dynamic rhythm between natural vegetation and climate in the region. In particular, the long summer fallow period for winter wheat fields is concurrent with the heavy-rainstorm season, which greatly accelerates soil erosion. Our finding indicates that common land-use practices that have lasted for thousands of years in China are not environmentally sustainable. Agriculture in this region has relied primarily on the continuous "mining" of the soil for the past several thousand years but does not have a one-thousand-year future because of myriad environmental and socioeconomic factors associated with soil erosion. To contain soil erosion and promote sustainability on the Loess Plateau, therefore, a change in the agricultural regime is needed to make sure that current and future agricultural practices follow the vegetation-climate rhythm. In addition, to achieve environmental, economic, and social sustainability in this region, multifunctional land-use planning is required to increase landscape diversity and functions (e.g., proper arrangement of crop fields, orchards, and protected areas). PMID:20597295

  2. Cost of areal reduction of gulf hypoxia through agricultural practice.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Gerald; Barnhart, Bradley L; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Arnold, Jeffrey G

    2015-02-01

    A major share of the area of hypoxic growth in the Northern Gulf of Mexico has been attributed to nutrient run-off from agricultural fields, but no estimate is available for the cost of reducing Gulf hypoxic area using agricultural conservation practices. We apply the Soil and Water Assessment Tool using observed daily weather to simulate the reduction in nitrogen loading in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) that would result from enrolling all row crop acreage in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Nitrogen loadings at the outlet of the UMRB are used to predict Gulf hypoxic area, and net cash farm rent is used as the price for participation in the CRP. Over the course of the 42 year simulation, direct CRP costs total more than $388 billion, and the Inter-Governmental Task Force goal of hypoxic area less than 5000 square kilometers is met in only two years. PMID:25461017

  3. Agricultural practices in grasslands detected by spatial remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Dusseux, Pauline; Vertès, Françoise; Corpetti, Thomas; Corgne, Samuel; Hubert-Moy, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    The major decrease in grassland surfaces associated with changes in their management that has been observed in many regions of the earth during the last half century has major impacts on environmental and socio-economic systems. This study focuses on the identification of grassland management practices in an intensive agricultural watershed located in Brittany, France, by analyzing the intra-annual dynamics of the surface condition of vegetation using remotely sensed and field data. We studied the relationship between one vegetation index (NDVI) and two biophysical variables (LAI and fCOVER) derived from a series of three SPOT images on one hand and measurements collected during field campaigns achieved on 120 grasslands on the other. The results show that the LAI appears as the best predictor for monitoring grassland mowing and grazing. Indeed, because of its ability to characterize vegetation status, LAI estimated from remote sensing data is a relevant variable to identify these practices. LAI values derived from the SPOT images were then classified based on the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) supervised algorithm. The results points out that the distribution of grassland management practices such as grazing and mowing can be mapped very accurately (Kappa index = 0.82) at a field scale over large agricultural areas using a series of satellite images. PMID:25182683

  4. Effect of Continuing Medical Education on Practice Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Robert C.

    1978-01-01

    Data are reported suggesting that a change in practice patterns did occur subsequent to a continuing medical education program. Twenty-eight physicians took a course in pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and followup surveys indicate its objectives were met. (LBH)

  5. Theme: Innovative Curriculum Ideas and Practices in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen theme articles discuss the following: curriculum ideas and innovations in agricultural education, agricultural literacy, Supervised Agricultural Experience, active learning, locating agricultural education resources, distance and web-based instruction, principles of forest management, professional development, and service learning. (JOW)

  6. Validation of good agricultural practices (GAP) on Minnesota vegetable farms.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Karin E; Umber, Jamie; Hultberg, Annalisa; Tong, Cindy; Schermann, Michele; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Bender, Jeff B

    2015-02-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Agriculture jointly published the "Guide to Minimize Microbial Food Safety Hazards for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables," which is used as a basis for Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) audits. To understand barriers to incorporation of GAP by Minnesota vegetable farmers, a mail survey completed in 2008 was validated with visits to a subset of the farms. This was done to determine the extent to which actual practices matched perceived practices. Two hundred forty-six producers completed the mail survey, and 27 participated in the on-farm survey. Over 75% of the on-farm survey respondents produced vegetables on 10 acres or less and had 10 or fewer employees. Of 14 questions, excellent agreement between on-farm interviews and mail survey responses was observed on two questions, four questions had poor or slight agreement, and eight questions had no agreement. Ninety-two percent of respondents by mail said "they took measures to keep animals and pests out of packing and storage buildings." However, with the on-site visit only 45% met this requirement. Similarly, 81% of respondents by mail said "measures were taken to reduce the risk of wild and/or domestic animals entering into fruit and vegetable growing areas." With direct observation, 70% of farms actually had taken measures to keep animals out of the growing areas. Additional, on-farm assessments were done regarding employee hygiene, training, presence of animals, water sources, and composting practices. This validation study demonstrated the challenge of creating nonleading and concise questions that are not open to broad interpretation from the respondents. If mail surveys are used to assess GAP, they should include open-ended questions and ranking systems to better assess farm practices. To provide the most accurate survey data for educational purposes or GAP audits, on-farm visits are recommended. PMID:25564923

  7. Faculty Development for Continuing Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Ivan L.; Leslie, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a framework for faculty development in continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) and collaborative practice. The framework is built on best practices in faculty development and CIPE. It was informed by local experience in the development, delivery, and evaluation of a faculty development program to promote capacity for…

  8. Do Career Goals Promote Continuous Learning among Practicing Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chi-Hung

    2010-01-01

    Practicing teachers often engage in continuous professional learning with certain career considerations. Based on achievement goal theory, this study explored the effects of career goals on teacher's learning using a sample of practicing teachers in Hong Kong. Two forms of career goals were assessed using a questionnaire. Professional learning…

  9. Grounding Continuous Professional Development (CPD) in Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Tracy; Clarke, Jane

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that developing a team-based approach to teaching and learning provides the basis for building commitment and continuous professional development in teaching practice among staff in higher education. A team approach that is grounded in practice leads to open communication and opportunities for formal and informal professional…

  10. Evaluation of Continuous Assessment Practice by University Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osadebe, Patrick U.

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the extent to which Continuous Assessment (CA) was practiced by university lecturers in Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria. The evaluation of continuous assessment focused on the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains of students' behaviour. That is teaching and learning should focus on these areas. Two research…

  11. Agricultural practices and irrigation water demand in Uttar Pradesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, J.; Buytaert, W.; Brozovic, N.; Mijic, A.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in farming practices within Uttar Pradesh, particularly advances in irrigation technology, have led to a significant drop in water tables across the region. While the acquisition of monitoring data in India is a challenge, current water use practices point towards water overdraught. This is exacerbated by government and state policies and practices, including the subsidising of electricity, seeds and fertilizer, and an agreement to buy all crops grown, promoting the over use of water resources. Taking India's predicted population growth, increases in industrialisation and climate change into account, both farmland and the water resources it depends upon will be subject to increased pressures in the future. This research is centred around irrigation demands on water resources within Uttar Pradesh, and in particular, quantifying those demands both spatially and temporally. Two aspects of this will be presented; the quantification of irrigation water applied and the characterisation of the spatial heterogeneity of water use practices. Calculating the volumes of applied irrigation water in the absence of observed data presents a major challenge and is achieved here through the use of crop models. Regional crop yields provided by statistical yearbooks are replicated by the crop models AquaCrop and InfoCrop, and by doing so the amount of irrigation water needed to produce the published yields is quantified. In addition, proxy information, for example electrical consumption for agricultural use, is used to verify the likely volumes of water abstracted from tubewells. Statistical analyses of borehole distribution and the characterisation of the spatial heterogeneity of water use practices, particularly farmer decision making, collected during a field trip are also presented. The evolution of agricultural practices, technological advancement and water use for irrigation is reconstructed through the use of multiple regression and principle component analysis

  12. Hyperspectral image classification for mapping agricultural tillage practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Qiong; Li, Wei; Du, Qian; Yang, Chenghai

    2015-01-01

    An efficient classification framework for mapping agricultural tillage practice using hyperspectral remote sensing imagery is proposed, which has the potential to be implemented practically to provide rapid, accurate, and objective surveying data for precision agricultural management and appraisal from large-scale remote sensing images. It includes a local region filter [i.e., Gaussian low-pass filter (GLF)] to extract spatial-spectral features, a dimensionality reduction process [i.e., local fisher's discriminate analysis (LFDA)], and the traditional k-nearest neighbor (KNN) classifier, and is denoted as GLF-LFDA-KNN. Compared to our previously used local average filter and adaptive weighted filter, the GLF also considers spatial features in a small neighborhood, but it emphasizes the central pixel itself and is data-independent; therefore, it can achieve the balance between classification accuracy and computational complexity. The KNN classifier has a lower computational complexity compared to the traditional support vector machine (SVM). After classification separability is enhanced by the GLF and LFDA, the less powerful KNN can outperform SVM and the overall computational cost remains lower. The proposed framework can also outperform the SVM with composite kernel (SVM-CK) that uses spatial-spectral features.

  13. General practitioners' continuing medical education within and outside their practice.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, P. A.; Allery, L. A.; Harding, K. G.; Hayes, T. M.

    1989-01-01

    To study continuing medical education 96 out of 101 general practitioners chosen at random from the list held by a family practitioner committee were interviewed. The results provided little evidence of regular attendance at local postgraduate centre meetings, though practice based educational meetings were common. Thirty one of the general practitioners worked in practices that held one or more practice based educational meetings each month at which the doctors provided the main educational content. Performance review was undertaken in the practices of 51 of the general practitioners, and 80 of the doctors recognised its value. The general practitioners considered that the most valuable educational activities occurred within the practice, the most valued being contact with partners. They asked for increased contact with hospital doctors. The development of general practitioners' continuing medical education should be based on the content of the individual general practitioner's day to day work and entail contact with his or her professional colleagues. PMID:2504381

  14. Agricultural Literacy: Clarifying a Vision for Practical Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David; Agnew, David; Trexler, Cary

    2008-01-01

    "Agricultural literacy" is a working concept with considerable range in meaning and impact. An overview of agricultural literacy curricula shows complementary deductive and inductive approaches to the systematic incorporation of agricultural education in K-12 classrooms. Based on positions discussed at the 2005 Agricultural Literacy Special…

  15. School Psychologists' Continuing Professional Development Preferences and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armistead, Leigh D.; Castillo, Jose M.; Curtis, Michael J.; Chappel, Ashley; Cunningham, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated school psychologists' continuing professional development (CPD) activities, topics, needs, motivations, financial expenditures, and opinions, as well as relationships between select demographic characteristics and certain CPD practices and preferences. A survey was mailed to 1,000 randomly selected Regular Members of…

  16. Promoting Reflective Practice in Continuing Education in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Educationalist Fred Korthagen elaborated a model in the 1980s for the relationship between the teacher educator and the teacher which embraces reflective practice as its guiding principle. In the present study, research was carried out into teacher development among a small group of language teachers working in continuing education in France.…

  17. Continuing to challenge practice to be evidence based.

    PubMed

    Makic, Mary Beth Flynn; Rauen, Carol; Jones, Kimmith; Fisk, Anna C

    2015-04-01

    Practice habits continue in clinical practice despite the availability of research and other forms of evidence that should be used to guide critical care practice interventions. This article is based on a presentation at the 2014 National Teaching Institute of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. The article is part of a series of articles that challenge critical care nurses to examine the evidence guiding nursing practice interventions. Four common practice interventions are reviewed: (1) weight-based medication administration, (2) chest tube patency maintenance, (3) daily interruption of sedation, and (4) use of chest physiotherapy in children. For weight-based administration of medication, the patient's actual weight should be measured, rather than using an estimate. The therapeutic effectiveness and dosages of medications used in obese patients must be critically evaluated. Maintaining patency of chest tubes does not require stripping and milking, which probably do more harm than good. Daily interruption of sedation and judicious use of sedatives are appropriate in most patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Traditional chest physiotherapy does not help children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, or asthma and does not prevent atelectasis after extubation. Critical care nurses are challenged to evaluate their individual practice and to adopt current evidence-based practice interventions into their daily practice. PMID:25834007

  18. The Influence of Perceptions of Practice Characteristics: An Examination of Agricultural Best Management Practice Adoption in Two Indiana Watersheds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Adam P.; Weinkauf, Denise Klotthor; Prokopy, Linda Stalker

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural best management practices (BMPs), or conservation practices, can help reduce nonpoint source pollution from agricultural lands, as well as provide valuable wildlife habitat. There is a large literature exploring factors that lead to a producer's voluntary adoption of BMPs, but there have been inconsistent findings. Generally, this…

  19. Modelling the effect of agricultural management practices on soil organic carbon stocks: does soil erosion matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeu, Elisabet; Van Wesemael, Bas; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decades, an increasing number of studies have been conducted to assess the effect of soil management practices on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. At regional scales, biogeochemical models such as CENTURY or Roth-C have been commonly applied. These models simulate SOC dynamics at the profile level (point basis) over long temporal scales but do not consider the continuous lateral transfer of sediment that takes place along geomorphic toposequences. As a consequence, the impact of soil redistribution on carbon fluxes is very seldom taken into account when evaluating changes in SOC stocks due to agricultural management practices on the short and long-term. To address this gap, we assessed the role of soil erosion by water and tillage on SOC stocks under different agricultural management practices in the Walloon region of Belgium. The SPEROS-C model was run for a 100-year period combining three typical crop rotations (using winter wheat, winter barley, sugar beet and maize) with three tillage scenarios (conventional tillage, reduced tillage and reduced tillage in combination with additional crop residues). The results showed that including soil erosion by water in the simulations led to a general decrease in SOC stocks relative to a baseline scenario (where no erosion took place). The SOC lost from these arable soils was mainly exported to adjacent sites and to the river system by lateral fluxes, with magnitudes differing between crop rotations and in all cases lower under conservation tillage practices than under conventional tillage. Although tillage erosion plays an important role in carbon redistribution within fields, lateral fluxes induced by water erosion led to a higher spatial and in-depth heterogeneity of SOC stocks with potential effects on the soil water holding capacity and crop yields. This indicates that studies assessing the effect of agricultural management practices on SOC stocks and other soil properties over the landscape should

  20. Continuing medical education for general practitioners: a practice format

    PubMed Central

    VanNieuwenborg, Lena; Goossens, Martine; De Lepeleire, Jan; Schoenmakers, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our current knowledge-based society and the many actualisations within the medical profession require a great responsibility of physicians to continuously develop and refine their skills. In this article, we reflect on some recent findings in the field of continuing education for professional doctors (continuing medical education, CME). Second, we describe the development of a CME from the Academic Center for General Practice (ACHG) of the KU Leuven. Methods First, we performed a literature study and we used unpublished data of a need assessment performed (2013) in a selected group of general practitioners. Second, we describe the development of a proposal to establish a CME programme for general practitioners. Results CME should go beyond the sheer acquisition of knowledge, and also seek changes in practice, attitudes and behaviours of physicians. The continuing education offerings are subject to the goals of the organising institution, but even more to the needs and desires of the end user. Conclusions Integrated education is crucial to meet the conditions for efficient and effective continuing education. The ACHG KU Leuven decided to offer a postgraduate programme consisting of a combination of teaching methods: online courses (self-study), contact courses (traditional method) and a materials database. PMID:26850504

  1. Promoting Sustainable Agricultural Practices Through Remote Sensing Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driese, K. L.; Sivanpillai, R.

    2007-12-01

    Ever increasing demand for food and fiber calls for farm management strategies such as effective use of chemicals and efficient water use that will maximize productivity while reducing adverse impacts on the environment. Remotely sensed data collected by satellites are a valuable resource for farmers and ranchers for gaining insights about farm and ranch productivity. While researchers in universities and agencies have made tremendous advances, technology transfer to end-users has lagged, preventing the farmers from taking advantage of this valuable resource. To overcome this barrier, the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC), a NASA funded program headed by the University of North Dakota, has been working with end-users to promote the use of remote sensing technology for sustainable agricultural practices. We will highlight the UMAC activities in Wyoming aimed at promoting this technology to sugar-beet farmers in the Big Horn Basin. To assist farmers who might not have a computer at home, we provide them to local county Cooperative Extension Offices pre-loaded with relevant imagery. Our targeted outreach activities have resulted in farmers requesting and using new and old Landsat images to identify growth anomalies and trends which have enabled them to develop management zones within their croplands.

  2. Designing impact assessments for evaluating ecological effects of agricultural conservation practices on streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation practices are regularly implemented within agricultural watersheds throughout the United States without evaluating their ecological impacts. Scientific evaluations documenting how habitat and aquatic biota within streams respond to these practices are needed for evaluating the effects o...

  3. Discrete and continuous water-quality data and hydrologic parameters from seven agricultural watersheds in the United States, 2002-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Lampe, David C.; Capel, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Field and analytical methods; discrete organic and non-organic water-quality data and associated quality-control data; and continuous hydrologic and water-quality parameters are reported for sites in California, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, and Washington. The sites were sampled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program?s Agricultural Chemicals Team study to better understand how environmental processes and agricultural practices interact to determine the transport and fate of agricultural chemicals in the environment.

  4. ASSESSING EFFECTS OF ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES ON WILDLIFE HABITAT IN IOWA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A habitat-change model was used to compare past, present, and future land cover and management practices to assess potential impacts of alternative agricultural practices on wildlife in two agricultural watersheds, Walnut Creek and Buck Creek, in central Iowa, USA. This approach ...

  5. From Agricultural Extension to Capacity Development: Exploring the Foundations of an Emergent Form of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauzon, Al

    2013-01-01

    This essay argues that capacity development is a response to changes in the organization and practice of agricultural extension as these changes have excluded small resource farmers. In this essay I trace the changes in the organization of agricultural extension through to the emergence of the concept and practice of capacity development. The idea…

  6. College Students' View of Biotechnology Products and Practices in Sustainable Agriculture Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture implies the use of products and practices that sustain production, protect the environment, ensure economic viability, and maintain rural community viability. Disagreement exists as to whether or not the products and practices of modern biotechnological support agricultural sustainability. The purpose of this study was to…

  7. Combining agricultural practices key to elevating soil microbial activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of soil health is an emerging topic in applied ecology, specifically as it pertains to the agriculture, which utilizes approximately 40% of earth’s land. However, rigorous quantification of soil health and the services provided by soil organisms to support agriculture production (e.g., n...

  8. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon for Agricultural Land Use Under Various Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Drewniak, B.; Song, J.; Prell, J.; Jacob, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Bioenergy is generating tremendous interest as an alternative energy source that is both environmentally friendly and economically competitive. The amount of land designated for agriculture is expected to expand, including changes in the current distribution of crops, as demand for biofuels increases as a carbon neutral alternative fuel source. However, the influence of agriculture on the carbon cycle is complex, and varies depending on land use change and management practices. The purpose of this research is to integrate agriculture in the carbon-nitrogen based Community Land Model (CLM) to evaluate the above and below ground carbon storage for corn, soybean, and wheat crop lands. The new model, CLM-Crop simulates carbon allocation during four growth stages, a soybean nitrogen fixation scheme, fertilizer, and harvest practices. We present results from this model simulation, which includes the impact of a new dynamic roots module to simulate the changing root structure and depth with growing season based on the availability of water and nitrogen in the root zone and a retranslocation scheme to simulate redistribution of nitrogen from leaves, roots, and stems to grain during organ development for crop yields, leaf area index (LAI), carbon allocation, and changes in soil carbon budgets under various practices such as fertilizer and residue management. Simulated crop yields for corn, soybean and wheat are in general agreement with measurements. Initial model results indicate a loss of soil organic carbon over cultivated lands after removal of natural vegetation which continues in the following years. Soil carbon in crop lands is a strong function of the residue management and has the potential to impact crop yields significantly.

  9. [Good agricultural practice (GAP) of Chinese materia medica (CMM) for ten years: achievements, problems and proposals].

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Shou-Dong; Wang, Gui-Hua; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Mei-Lan; He, Ya-Li; Han, Bang-Xing; Chen, Nai-Fu; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-04-01

    This paper aims to summarize the achievements during the implementation process of good agricultural practice (GAP) in Chinese Materia Medica (CMM), and on basis of analyzing the existing problems of GAP, to propose further implementation of GAP in TCM growing. Since the launch of GAP in CMM growing ten years ago, it has acquired great achievements, including: (1) The promulgation of a series of measures for the administration of the GAP approval in the CMM growing; (2) The expanded planting area of CMM; (3) The increased awareness of standardized CMM growing among farmers and enterprises; (4) The establishment of GAP implementation bases for CMM growing; (5) The improvement of theory and methodology for CMM growing; (6) The development of a large group of experts and scholars in GAP approval for CMM production. The problems existing in the production include: (1) A deep understanding of GAP and its certification is still needed; (2) The distribution of the certification base is not reasonable; (3) The geo-economics effect and the backward farming practices are thought to be the bottlenecks in the standardization of CMM growing and the scale production of CMM; (4) Low comparative effectiveness limits the development of the GAP; (5) The base of breeding improved variety is blank; (6) The immature of the cultivation technique lead to the risk of production process; (7) The degradation of soil microbial and the continuous cropping obstacle restrict the sustainable development of the GAP base. To further promote the health and orderly GAP in the CMM growing, the authors propose: (1) To change the mode of production; (2) To establish a sound standard system so as to ensure quality products for fair prices; (3) To fully consider the geo-economic culture and vigorously promote the definite cultivating of traditional Chinese medicinal materials; (4) To strengthen the transformation and generalization of basic researches and achievements, in order to provide technical

  10. Computers for the continuing education of practicing physicians.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, E P

    1989-01-01

    Computer-based medical education became practical with the wide-spread availability of personal computers and the ease of dialing in to a central computer via standard telephone lines with a modem. Continuing education credits can now be earned from the privacy and convenience of the physician's home or office via the computer. A variety of courses are available from national medical organizations, medical schools, and medical publishers. While examples can give a flavor of the type of courseware available, only hands-on use can help you decide if this style of education fits yours. PMID:10304121

  11. Evaluating sustainable water quality management in the U.S.: Urban, Agricultural, and Environmental Protection Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oel, P. R.; Alfredo, K. A.; Russo, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable water management typically emphasizes water resource quantity, with focus directed at availability and use practices. When attention is placed on sustainable water quality management, the holistic, cross-sector perspective inherent to sustainability is often lost. Proper water quality management is a critical component of sustainable development practices. However, sustainable development definitions and metrics related to water quality resilience and management are often not well defined; water quality is often buried in large indicator sets used for analysis, and the policy regulating management practices create sector specific burdens for ensuring adequate water quality. In this research, we investigated the methods by which water quality is evaluated through internationally applied indicators and incorporated into the larger idea of "sustainability." We also dissect policy's role in the distribution of responsibility with regard to water quality management in the United States through evaluation of three broad sectors: urban, agriculture, and environmental water quality. Our research concludes that despite a growing intention to use a single system approach for urban, agricultural, and environmental water quality management, one does not yet exist and is even hindered by our current policies and regulations. As policy continues to lead in determining water quality and defining contamination limits, new regulation must reconcile the disparity in requirements for the contaminators and those performing end-of-pipe treatment. Just as the sustainable development indicators we researched tried to integrate environmental, economic, and social aspects without skewing focus to one of these three categories, policy cannot continue to regulate a single sector of society without considering impacts to the entire watershed and/or region. Unequal distribution of the water pollution burden creates disjointed economic growth, infrastructure development, and policy

  12. Best Management Practices for sediment control in a Mediterranean agricultural watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahab, Ossama M. M.; Bingner, Ronald L.; Milillo, Fabio; Gentile, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion can lead to severe destruction of agricultural sustainability that affects not only productivity, but the entire ecosystem in the neighboring areas. Sediments transported together with the associated nutrients and chemicals can significantly impact downstream water bodies. Various conservation and management practices implemented individually or integrated together as a system can be used to reduce the negative impacts on agricultural watersheds from soil erosion. Hydrological models are useful tools for decision makers when selecting the most effective combination of management practices to reduce pollutant loads within a watershed system. The Annualized Agricultural Non-point Source (AnnAGNPS) pollutant loading management model can be used to analyze the effectiveness of diverse management and conservation practices that can control or reduce the impact of soil erosion processes and subsequent sediment loads in agricultural watersheds. A 506 km2 Mediterranean medium-size watershed (Carapelle) located in Apulia, Southern Italy was used as a case study to evaluate the model and best management practices (BMPs) for sediment load control. A monitoring station located at the Ordona bridge has been instrumented to continuously monitor stream flow and suspended sediment loads. The station has been equipped with an ultrasound stage meter and a stage recorder to monitor stream flow. An infrared optic probe was used to measure suspended sediment concentrations (Gentile et al., 2010 ). The model was calibrated and validated in the Carapelle watershed on an event basis (Bisantino et al., 2013), and the validated model was used to evaluate the effectiveness of BMPs on sediment reduction. Various management practices were investigated including evaluating the impact on sediment load of: (1) converting all cropland areas into forest and grass covered conditions; (2) converting the highest eroding cropland areas to forest or grass covered conditions; and (3

  13. 7 CFR 65.205 - Perishable agricultural commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Perishable agricultural commodity. 65.205 Section 65.205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING...

  14. 7 CFR 65.205 - Perishable agricultural commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Perishable agricultural commodity. 65.205 Section 65.205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING...

  15. 7 CFR 65.205 - Perishable agricultural commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Perishable agricultural commodity. 65.205 Section 65.205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING...

  16. 7 CFR 65.205 - Perishable agricultural commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Perishable agricultural commodity. 65.205 Section 65.205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING...

  17. 7 CFR 65.205 - Perishable agricultural commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Perishable agricultural commodity. 65.205 Section 65.205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING...

  18. The potential of agricultural practices to increase C storage in cropped soils: an assessment for France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenu, Claire; Angers, Denis; Métay, Aurélie; Colnenne, Caroline; Klumpp, Katja; Bamière, Laure; Pardon, Lenaic; Pellerin, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    Though large progress has been achieved in the last decades, net GHG emissions from the agricultural sector are still more poorly quantified than in other sectors. In this study, we examined i) technical mitigation options likely to store carbon in agricultural soils, ii) their potential of additional C storage per unit surface area and iii) applicable areas in mainland France. We considered only agricultural practices being technically feasible by farmers and involving no major change in either production systems or production levels. Moreover, only currently available techniques with validated efficiencies and presenting no major negative environmental impacts were taken into account. Four measures were expected to store additional C in agricultural soils: - Reducing tillage: either a switch to continuous direct seeding, direct seeding with occasional tillage once every five years, or continuous superficial (<15 cm) tillage. - Introducing cover crops in cropping systems: sown between two cash crops on arable farms, in orchards and vineyards (permanent or temporary cover cropping) . - Expanding agroforestry systems; planting of tree lines in cultivated fields and grasslands, and hedges around the field edges. - Increasing the life time of temporary sown grasslands: increase of life time to 5 years. The recent literature was reviewed in order to determine long term (>20yrs) C storage rates (MgC ha-1 y-1,) of cropping systems with and without the proposed practice. Then we analysed the conditions for potential application, in terms of feasibility, acceptance, limitation of yield losses and of other GHG emissions. According to the literature, additional C storage rates were 0.15 (0-0.3) MgC ha-1 y-1 for continuous direct seeding, 0.10 (0-0.2) MgC ha-1 y-1for occasional tillage one year in five, and 0.0 MgC ha-1 y-1 for superficial tillage. Cover crops were estimated to store 0.24 (0.13-0.37) MgC ha-1 y-1 between cash crops and 0.49 (0.23-0.72) MgC ha-1 y-1 when

  19. Private Agricultural Extension System in Kenya: Practice and Policy Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muyanga, Milu; Jayne, T. S.

    2008-01-01

    Private extension system has been at the centre of a debate triggered by inefficient public agricultural extension. The debate is anchored on the premise that the private sector is more efficient in extension service delivery. This study evaluates the private extension system in Kenya. It employs qualitative and quantitative methods. The results…

  20. Comparison of soil bacterial communities under diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tiehang; Chellemi, Dan O; Graham, Jim H; Martin, Kendall J; Rosskopf, Erin N

    2008-02-01

    The composition and structure of bacterial communities were examined in soil subjected to a range of diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices. Length heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) of bacterial DNA extracted from soil was used to generate amplicon profiles that were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistical methods. Five land management programs were initiated in July 2000: conventional, organic, continuous removal of vegetation (disk fallow), undisturbed (weed fallow), and bahiagrass pasture (Paspalum notatum var Argentine). Similar levels in the diversity of bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons were detected in soil samples collected from organically and conventionally managed plots 3 and 4 years after initiation of land management programs, whereas significantly lower levels of diversity were observed in samples collected from bahiagrass pasture. Differences in diversity were attributed to effects on how the relative abundance of individual amplicons were distributed (evenness) and not on the total numbers of bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons detected (richness). Similar levels of diversity were detected among all land management programs in soil samples collected after successive years of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cultivation. A different trend was observed after a multivariate examination of the similarities in genetic composition among soil bacterial communities. After 3 years of land management, similarities in genetic composition of soil bacterial communities were observed in plots where disturbance was minimized (bahiagrass and weed fallow). The genetic compositions in plots managed organically were similar to each other and distinct from bacterial communities in other land management programs. After successive years of tomato cultivation and damage from two major hurricanes, only the composition of soil bacterial communities within organically managed plots continued to maintain a high degree of similarity

  1. Influence of integrated watershed-scale agricultural conservation practices on lake water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed-scale management efforts to improve conservation of water resources in agricultural watersheds depend upon the effectiveness of integrated multiple agricultural best management practices at this scale. This requires large-scale, long-term (>10 y) studies measuring key water quality paramet...

  2. Effects of agricultural conservation practices on oxbow lake watersheds in the Mississippi River alluvial plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Globally, agricultural lands are considered to major sources of nonpoint source pollutants such as sediment, pesticides and nutrients in the United States. While conservation practices have been tested for their effectiveness in reducing agricultural related pollutants on test plot scales, they typ...

  3. Certified Organic Agriculture in Mexico: Market Connections and Certification Practices in Large and Small Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovar, Laura Gomez; Martin, Lauren; Cruz, Manuel Angel Gomez; Mutersbaugh, Tad

    2005-01-01

    Certification within organic agriculture exhibits flexibility with respect to practices used to demonstrate that a product meets published quality standards. This case study of Mexican certified-organic agriculture finds two forms. Indigenous smallholders of southern Mexico undertake a low-input, process-oriented organic farming in which…

  4. Evaluating alternative agricultural management practices for a minor agricultural watershed using the ADAPT method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a spatial-process based water quality model was calibrated (2001-2002) for flow, sediment, nitrate and phosphorus losses from the High Island Creek, a 3856 ha agricultural watershed located in south-central Minnesota. The calibrated model was used to evaluate alternative tillage and ...

  5. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadhira, Vebi; Kurniadi, Deddy; Juliastuti, E.; Sutiswan, Adeline

    2014-03-01

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  6. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    SciTech Connect

    Nadhira, Vebi Kurniadi, Deddy Juliastuti, E. Sutiswan, Adeline

    2014-03-24

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  7. The Virtual Practice: Using the Residents' Continuity Clinic to Teach Practice Management and Systems-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose A.; Faust, Cheryl; Kenyon, Angie

    2009-01-01

    Background Education in systems-based practice is a required component of all postgraduate medical education programs in the United States. Competency in this area requires that trainees have an understanding of the health care system sufficient to provide optimal care to patients. Most trainees in residency programs have little understanding of the complexities and challenges of present-day practice in the current system of care and consider themselves unprepared to undertake this activity following completion of training. Training in practice management in residency programs has not been emphasized as an important component of systems-based practice. Historically, practice management training in residency programs has been done using a fully didactic model, and residents have expressed a desire to learn this skill by becoming more directly involved in the operations and management of a practice. The patient visit touches many aspects of the health care system, including clinic operations, insurance, quality, and finances. Approach At our institution, we used the residents' continuity clinic practices as a vehicle to provide education in practice management and systems-based practice by creating a curriculum that included the residents' perceived gaps in knowledge regarding going into practice. This is known as the virtual practice. This curriculum is taught using data obtained from residents' practice to illustrate concepts in many areas, including primary practice operations, malpractice insurance, financial benchmarks, and career planning. Results Resident self-assessed knowledge of these areas increased after participating in the curriculum, and resident testimonials indicate satisfaction with the project. In addition, residents have become engaged and interested in how their effort translates into performance and how they participate in the health care system. PMID:21975715

  8. Continuous 'Passive' Registration of Non-Point Contaminant Loads Via Agricultural Subsurface Drain Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozemeijer, J.; Jansen, S.; de Jonge, H.; Lindblad Vendelboe, A.

    2014-12-01

    Considering their crucial role in water and solute transport, enhanced monitoring and modeling of agricultural subsurface tube drain systems is important for adequate water quality management. For example, previous work in lowland agricultural catchments has shown that subsurface tube drain effluent contributed up to 80% of the annual discharge and 90-92% of the annual NO3 loads from agricultural fields towards the surface water. However, existing monitoring techniques for flow and contaminant loads from tube drains are expensive and labor-intensive. Therefore, despite the unambiguous relevance of this transport route, tube drain monitoring data are scarce. The presented study aimed developing a cheap, simple, and robust method to monitor loads from tube drains. We are now ready to introduce the Flowcap that can be attached to the outlet of tube drains and is capable of registering total flow, contaminant loads, and flow-averaged concentrations. The Flowcap builds on the existing SorbiCells, a modern passive sampling technique that measures average concentrations over longer periods of time (days to months) for various substances. By mounting SorbiCells in our Flowcap, a flow-proportional part of the drain effluent is sampled from the main stream. Laboratory testing yielded good linear relations (R-squared of 0.98) between drainage flow rates and sampling rates. The Flowcap was tested in practice for measuring NO3 loads from two agricultural fields and one glasshouse in the Netherlands. The Flowcap registers contaminant loads from tube drains without any need for housing, electricity, or maintenance. This enables large-scale monitoring of non-point contaminant loads via tube drains, which would facilitate the improvement of contaminant transport models and would yield valuable information for the selection and evaluation of mitigation options to improve water quality.

  9. Agricultural Diversification and Marketing. Instructional Materials Developed for Secondary, Postsecondary, and Continuing Education Agriculture Programs in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Agriculture, Des Moines.

    These instructional materials on agricultural diversification and marketing were developed for use by Iowa's vocational and technical agricultural instructors and extension personnel. This document is one of three manuals making up a single package. (The other two are Christmas Tree Production and Marketing and Sod Production and Marketing). The…

  10. Evaluation of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) behaviour in agricultural soil through laboratory continuous studies.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-07-01

    The behaviour of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) in agricultural soil is investigated in the laboratory using continuous-flow soil column studies in order to simultaneously analyze the three main underlying phenomena (adsorption/desorption, degradation and transport). The continuous-flow soil column experiments generated the breakthrough curves for each LAS homologue, C10, C11, C12 and C13, and by adding them up, for total LAS, from which the relevant retention, degradation and transport parameters could be estimated, after proposing adequate models. Several transport equations were considered, including the degradation of the sorbate in solution and its retention by soil, under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions between the sorbent and the sorbate. In general, the results obtained for the estimates of those parameters that were common to the various models studied (such as the isotherm slope, first order degradation rate coefficient and the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient) were rather consistent, meaning that mass transfer limitations are not playing a major role in the experiments. These three parameters increase with the length of the LAS homologue chain. The study will provide the underlying conceptual framework and fundamental parameters to understand, simulate and predict the environmental behaviour of LAS compounds in agricultural soils. PMID:25765258

  11. Influence of agricultural practices on fruit quality of bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zahra, T R

    2011-09-15

    An experiment was carried out under plastic house conditions to compare the effect of four fermented organic matter sources (cattle, poultry and sheep manure in addition to 1:1:1 mixture of the three organic matter sources) in which 4 kg organic matter m(-2) were used, with that of the conventional agriculture (chemical fertilizers) treatments on Marvello red pepper fruit quality, by using a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replicates. Pepper fruits characteristics cultivated in soil supplemented with manure were generally better than those from plants grown in soil only. Addition of animal manure increased bell pepper fruit content of soluble solids, ascorbic acid, total phenols, crude fibre and intensity of red color as compare with conventional agriculture that produced fruits with higher titratable acidity, water content, lycopene and bigger fruit size. In most cases of animal manure treatments, best results were obtained by the sheep manure treatment that produced the highest TSS, while the worst results were obtained by the poultry manure treatment that produced the smallest fruit and lowest fruit lycopene content. PMID:22518928

  12. 40 CFR 63.11223 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the work practice and management practice standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the work practice and management practice standards? 63.11223 Section 63.11223 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS...

  13. Environmental Effects of Agricultural Practices - Summary of Workshop Held on June 14-16, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    A meeting between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners was held June 14-16, 2005, in Denver, CO, to discuss science issues and needs related to agricultural practices. The goals of the meeting were to learn about the (1) effects of agricultural practices on the environment and (2) tools for identifying and quantifying those effects. Achieving these goals required defining the environmental concerns, developing scientific actions to address assessment of environmental effects, and creating collaborations to identify future research requirements and technical gaps. Five areas of concern were discussed-emerging compounds; water availability; genetically modified organisms; effects of conservation practices on ecosystems; and data, methods, and tools for assessing effects of agricultural practices.

  14. Using knowledge of agricultural practices to enhance through-the-season interpretation of Landsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Pestre, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    Landsat data contain features that can be interpreted to produce information about crops, in support of crop estimation procedures. This paper considers ways in which detailed knowledge of agricultural practices and events might increase and improve the utilization of Landsat data in both the predictive and observational or measurement components of such procedures. Landsat observables related to agricultural practices and events throughout the cropping season are listed. Agricultural fields are identified as the preferred observational units for incorporating refined agricultural understanding, such as crop rotation patterns, into machine procedures. Uses of Landsat data from both prior seasons and the current season are considered, as is use of predictive models of crop appearance. The investigation of knowledge engineering systems tailored to through-the-season estimation problems is recommended for long range development.

  15. Selection criteria for water disinfection techniques in agricultural practices.

    PubMed

    Haute, Sam van; Sampers, Imca; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This paper comprises a selection tool for water disinfection methods for fresh produce pre- and postharvest practices. A variety of water disinfection technologies is available on the market and no single technology is the best choice for all applications. It can be difficult for end users to choose the technology that is best fit for a specific application. Therefore, the different technologies were characterized in order to identify criteria that influence the suitability of a technology for pre- or postharvest applications. Introduced criteria were divided into three principal components: (i) criteria related to the technology and which relate to the disinfection efficiency, (ii) attention points for the management and proper operation, and (iii) necessities in order to sustain the operation with respect to the environment. The selection criteria may help the end user of the water disinfection technology to obtain a systematic insight into all relevant aspects to be considered for preliminary decision making on which technologies should be put to feasibility testing for water disinfection in pre- and postharvest practices of the fresh produce chain. PMID:24279431

  16. Cost-Effective Allocation of Agricultural Best Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabi, M.; Govindaraju, R. S.; Engel, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    Implementation of conservation programs is perceived as being crucial for restoring and protecting waters and watersheds from nonpoint source pollution. Success of these programs depends to a great extent on planning tools that can assist the watershed management process. Herein, a novel optimization methodology is presented for deriving watershed-scale sediment and nutrient control plans that incorporate multiple, and often conflicting, objectives. The method combines the use of a watershed model (SWAT), representation of best management practices, an economic component, and a genetic algorithm-based spatial search procedure. For a small watershed in Indiana located in the Midwestern portion of the United States, selection and placement of best management practices by optimization was found to be nearly three times more cost-effective than targeting strategies for the same level of protection specified in terms of maximum monthly sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen loads. Conversely, for the same cost, the optimization plan reduced the maximum monthly loads by a factor of two when compared to the targeting plan. The optimization methodology developed in this paper can facilitate attaining water quality goals at significantly lower costs than commonly used cost-share and targeting strategies.

  17. Ergonomic risks and musculoskeletal disorders in production agriculture: recommendations for effective research to practice.

    PubMed

    Kirkhorn, Steven R; Earle-Richardson, Giulia; Banks, R J

    2010-07-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are increasingly recognized as a significant hazard of agricultural occupation. In agricultural jobs with significant physical labor, MSDs are typically the most frequently reported injury. Although not as lethal as tractor roll-overs, MSDs can result in disability, lost work time, and increased production costs. MSDs increase production costs as a result of worker absence, medical and insurance costs, decreased work capacity, and loss of employees to turnover and competition from other less physically demanding industries. This paper will provide an overview of what is currently known about MSDs in agriculture, including high-risk commodities, tasks and work practices, and the related regulatory factors and workers' compensation costs. As agricultural production practices evolve, the types of MSDs also change, as do ergonomic risk factors. One example is the previous higher rates of knee and hip arthritis identified in farmers in stanchion dairies evolving into upper extremity tendonitis, arthritis, and carpal tunnel syndrome now found in milking technicians in dairy milking parlors. This paper summarizes the presentation, "Musculoskeletal Disorders in Labor-Intensive Operations," at the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conference, "Be Safe, Be Profitable: Protecting Workers in Agriculture," January 27-28, 2010, Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The primary focus of the paper is to address current research on ergonomic solutions for MSDs in agriculture. These include improved tools, carts or equipment, as well as work practices. One of the key challenges in this area pertains to measurement, due to the fact that musculoskeletal strain is a chronic condition that can come and go, with self-reported pain as its only indicator. Alternative measurement methods will be discussed. Finally, the implementation of research into practice is reviewed, with an emphasis on best

  18. Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture within the United States is varied and produces a large value ($200 billion in 2002) of production across a wide range of plant and animal production systems. Because of this diversity, changes in climate will likely impact agriculture throughout the United States. Climate affects crop, ...

  19. Pesticide regulations for agriculture: Chemically flawed regulatory practice.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Donald S; Bruccoleri, Aldo G

    2016-08-01

    Two categories of pesticide soil models now exist. Government regulatory agencies use pesticide fate and transport hydrology models, including versions of PRZM.gw. They have good descriptions of pesticide transport by water flow. Their descriptions of chemical mechanisms are unrealistic, having been postulated using the universally accepted but incorrect pesticide soil science. The objective of this work is to report experimental tests of a pesticide soil model in use by regulatory agencies and to suggest possible improvements. Tests with experimentally based data explain why PRZM.gw predictions can be wrong by orders of magnitude. Predictive spreadsheet models are the other category. They are experimentally based, with chemical stoichiometry applied to integral kinetic rate laws for sorption, desorption, intra-particle diffusion, and chemical reactions. They do not account for pesticide transport through soils. Each category of models therefore lacks what the other could provide. They need to be either harmonized or replaced. Some preliminary tests indicate that an experimental mismatch between the categories of models will have to be resolved. Reports of pesticides in the environment and the medical problems that overlap geographically indicate that government regulatory practice needs to account for chemical kinetics and mechanisms. Questions about possible cause and effect links could then be investigated. PMID:27166991

  20. Research and implementation of good agricultural practice for traditional Chinese medicinal materials in Jilin Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changtian; Yan, Zhengfei; Zhang, Lianxue; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Jilin Province is one of the principal production bases of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in China with its typical preponderance in TCM resources, research and development power, and industrialization capacity. The province has 2,790 species of TCM materials in total. Over 20% of the TCM materials in common use are from Jilin Province. The province has established 36 good agricultural practice bases for 22 typical TCMs. The overall situation, in terms of collection, processing, and preparation, and the implementation of good agricultural practice of TCM materials in Jilin Province are summarized. PMID:25379000

  1. Practicing Conservation Agriculture to mitigate and adapt to Climate Change in Jordan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khresat, Saeb

    2016-04-01

    Climate change scenarios indicate that Jordan and the Middle East could suffer from reduced agricultural productivity and water availability among other negative impacts. Based on the projection models for the area, average temperature in Jordan is projected to increase between 1.2 and 1.6 °C by 2050. Projections for precipitation trends are projected to decrease by 16% by the year 2050. Evaporation is likely to increase due to higher temperatures. This is likely to increase the incidence of drought potential since precipitation is projected to decrease. The dominant form of agriculture system in Jordan is based on intensive tillage. This form of tillage has resulted in large losses of organic soil carbon, weaker soil structure, and cause compaction. It has negative effects on soil aeration, root development and water infiltration among other factors. There is a need to transform farming practices to conservation agriculture to sequester carbon so that climate change mitigation becomes an inherent property of future farming systems. Conservation Agriculture, a system avoiding or minimizing soil disturbance, combined with soil cover and crop diversification, is considered to be a sustainable production system that can also sequester carbon unlike tillage agriculture. Conservation agriculture promotes minimal disturbance of the soil by tillage (zero tillage), balanced application of chemical inputs and careful management of residues and wastes. This study was conducted to develop a clear understanding of the impacts and benefits of the two most common types of agriculture, traditional tillage agriculture and conservation agriculture with respect to their effects on land productivity and on soil carbon pools. The study results indicated that conservation agriculture contributed to the reduction of the farming systems' greenhouse gas emissions and enhance its role as carbon sinks. Also, it was found that by shifting to conservation agriculture labor cost needed for

  2. School Meal Programs: Sharing Information on Best Practices May Improve Programs' Operations. Report to the Secretary of Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    At the request of the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, this investigation identified state and local school food authorities' (SFA) management and operating practices recognized as best practice by the United State Department of Agriculture (USDA) or other officials. In addition, the study determined whether some of these practices could be…

  3. The Impact of the "Getting Practical: Improving Practical Work in Science" Continuing Professional Development Programme on Teachers' Ideas and Practice in Science Practical Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Ian; Reiss, Michael J.; Sharpe, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the widespread use of practical work in school it has been recognised that more needs to be done to improve its effectiveness in developing conceptual understanding. The "Getting Practical" CPD (Continuing Professional Development) programme was designed to contribute towards an improvement in the effectiveness of…

  4. Using continuous monitoring of physical parameters to better estimate phosphorus fluxes in a small agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaudo, Camille; Dupas, Rémi; Moatar, Florentina; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus fluxes in streams are subjected to high temporal variations, questioning the relevance of the monitoring strategies (generally monthly sampling) chosen to assist EU Directives to capture phosphorus fluxes and their variations over time. The objective of this study was to estimate the annual and seasonal P flux uncertainties depending on several monitoring strategies, with varying sampling frequencies, but also taking into account simultaneous and continuous time-series of parameters such as turbidity, conductivity, groundwater level and precipitation. Total Phosphorus (TP), Soluble Reactive Phosphorus (SRP) and Total Suspended Solids (TSS) concentrations were surveyed at a fine temporal frequency between 2007 and 2015 at the outlet of a small agricultural catchment in Brittany (Naizin, 5 km2). Sampling occurred every 3 to 6 days between 2007 and 2012 and daily between 2013 and 2015. Additionally, 61 storms were intensively surveyed (1 sample every 30 minutes) since 2007. Besides, water discharge, turbidity, conductivity, groundwater level and precipitation were monitored on a sub-hourly basis. A strong temporal decoupling between SRP and particulate P (PP) was found (Dupas et al., 2015). The phosphorus-discharge relationships displayed two types of hysteretic patterns (clockwise and counterclockwise). For both cases, time-series of PP and SRP were estimated continuously for the whole period using an empirical model linking P concentrations with the hydrological and physic-chemical variables. The associated errors of the estimated P concentrations were also assessed. These « synthetic » PP and SRP time-series allowed us to discuss the most efficient monitoring strategies, first taking into account different sampling strategies based on Monte Carlo random simulations, and then adding the information from continuous data such as turbidity, conductivity and groundwater depth based on empirical modelling. Dupas et al., (2015, Distinct export dynamics for

  5. 7 CFR 205.406 - Continuation of certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuation of certification. 205.406 Section 205.406 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC...

  6. Modeling the impacts of climate change and agricultural management practices on surface erosion in a dryland agricultural basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottenbreit, E.; Adam, J. C.; Barber, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of climate change and agricultural management practices on suspended sediment concentrations in the Potlach River basin in northwestern Idaho. Suspended sediment is a pollutant in many water systems and contributes to the impairment of streams. Conventional tillage practices and rain-on-snow events in the Palouse region of northern Idaho and eastern Washington can produce some of the highest sediment losses per acre in the United States. Climate change may lead to further problems as more frequent and intense winter storm events are predicted to occur. Many hydrological models have been developed which examine suspended sediment in river systems. The Potlatch River basin near Julietta, ID was examined using the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM), which has a sediment module that includes surface erosion and channel sediment transport. DHSVM was calibrated and evaluated over the historical period of streamflow observations and was used to predict soil erosion rates and suspended sediment concentrations using a range of downscaled Global Climate Models (GCMs) emissions scenarios for the year 2045. Furthermore, the sensitivity of suspended sediment concentrations to conventional versus convservative tillage practices was explored. The results show that as the projected climate-driven intensity of storms increase, more sediment is predicted in the Potlatch River. Suspended sediment and streamflow are predicted to increase during the late fall through the early spring. This increase occurs during times of heightened runoff when suspended sediment concentration in the river is highest. Three tillage scenarios were incorporated into DHSVM for winter wheat: conventional till, reduced till, and no till. Erosion and suspended sediment were higher during storm events under conventional agricultural tillage scenarios. In the long-term, this research can lead to examination of the effects of climate

  7. Responses of corn physiology and yield to six agricultural practices over three years in middle Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chih-Li; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Wang, Junming; Reddy, K. Chandra; Dennis, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Different agricultural practices may have substantial impacts on crop physiology and yield. However, it is still not entirely clear how multiple agricultural practices such as tillage, biochar and different nutrient applications could influence corn physiology and yield. We conducted a three-year field experiment to study the responses of corn physiology, yield, and soil respiration to six different agricultural practices. The six treatments included conventional tillage (CT) or no tillage (NT), in combination with nitrogen type (URAN or chicken litter) and application method, biochar, or denitrification inhibitor. A randomized complete block design was applied with six replications. Leaf photosynthetic rate, transpiration, plant height, leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and yield were measured. Results showed that different agricultural practices had significant effects on plant leaf photosynthesis, transpiration, soil respiration, height, and yield, but not on LAI and biomass. The average corn yield in the NT-URAN was 10.03 ton/ha, 28.9% more than in the CT-URAN. Compared to the NT-URAN, the NT-biochar had lower soil respiration and similar yield. All variables measured showed remarkable variations among the three years. Our results indicated that no tillage treatment substantially increased corn yield, probably due to the preservation of soil moisture during drought periods. PMID:27272142

  8. Occupational Safety and Health: A View of Current Practices in Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threeton, Mark D.; Ewing, John C.; Evanoski, Danielle C.

    2015-01-01

    Providing safe and secure teaching and learning environments within schools is an ongoing process which requires a significant amount of attention. Therefore, this study sought to: 1) explore safety and health practices within secondary Agricultural Mechanics Education; and 2) identify the perceived obstacles which appear to hinder implementation…

  9. Innovative best management practices for improving nutrient reductions in agricultural landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the burgeoning human population increases pressures on agriculture for increasing yields, the concomitant strain on the aquatic environment downstream is elevated through non-point source pollution. Traditional management practices of conservation tillage, terracing, and cover crops are good prac...

  10. Comparison of soil bacterial communities under diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The composition and structure of bacterial communities was examined in soil subjected to a range of diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices. Length heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) of bacterial DNA extracted from soil was used to generate amplicon profile...

  11. EFFECT OF MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON THE SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY IN AGRICULTURAL AND NATIVE SYSTEMS IN BRAZIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increase in agricultural practices in the Cerrado (tropical savannah) and Amazon regions in Brazil is causing drastic changes in the nutrient and carbon cycling of native areas. Because microorganisms play a key role in biogeochemical cycling, monitoring the shifts in the microb...

  12. Discriminating the effects of agricultural land management practices on soil fungal communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure of fungal communities was examined in soil subjected to five years of different agricultural land management and tomato production practices. Length heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) of fungal rDNA internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1) regions was used to create genomic...

  13. Low-grade weirs: The next step for an agricultural best management practice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Best management practices (BMPs) generally refer to measures that provide some level of environmental protection for downstream aquatic systems. In agricultural watersheds, BMPs aim to improve the water quality of runoff from the landscape by controlling or trapping pollutants that can potentially ...

  14. PRACTICAL SENSITIVITY AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS MODELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a practical evaluation framework for analysis of two complex, process-based agricultural system models, WEPP and RZWQM. The evaluation framework combines sensitivity analysis and the uncertainty analysis techniques of first order error analysis (FOA) and Monte Carlo simulation with Latin ...

  15. Animating Community Supported Agriculture in North East England: Striving for a "Caring Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Liz

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on a case study of a new Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) scheme in the north of England to draw attention to some of the ethical issues encountered when using a participatory action research approach to animating CSA. Both CSA and participatory action research have been associated with the concept of "caring practice" and an…

  16. Responses of corn physiology and yield to six agricultural practices over three years in middle Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chih-Li; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Wang, Junming; Reddy, K Chandra; Dennis, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Different agricultural practices may have substantial impacts on crop physiology and yield. However, it is still not entirely clear how multiple agricultural practices such as tillage, biochar and different nutrient applications could influence corn physiology and yield. We conducted a three-year field experiment to study the responses of corn physiology, yield, and soil respiration to six different agricultural practices. The six treatments included conventional tillage (CT) or no tillage (NT), in combination with nitrogen type (URAN or chicken litter) and application method, biochar, or denitrification inhibitor. A randomized complete block design was applied with six replications. Leaf photosynthetic rate, transpiration, plant height, leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and yield were measured. Results showed that different agricultural practices had significant effects on plant leaf photosynthesis, transpiration, soil respiration, height, and yield, but not on LAI and biomass. The average corn yield in the NT-URAN was 10.03 ton/ha, 28.9% more than in the CT-URAN. Compared to the NT-URAN, the NT-biochar had lower soil respiration and similar yield. All variables measured showed remarkable variations among the three years. Our results indicated that no tillage treatment substantially increased corn yield, probably due to the preservation of soil moisture during drought periods. PMID:27272142

  17. Integrating Federal and State data records to report progress in establishing agricultural conservation practices on Chesapeake Bay farms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hively, W. Dean; Devereux, Olivia H.; Claggett, Peter

    2013-01-01

    methods that were used by the USGS in 2012 to collect and process USDA agricultural conservation data, and also documents methods that were used by the jurisdictions to integrate Federal and State data records, reduce double counting, and provide an accurate reporting of conservation practices to the CBP Partnership’s Annual Progress Review. A similar tracking, reporting, and assessment will occur in future years, as State and Federal governments and nongovernmental organizations continue to work with farmers and conservation districts to reduce the impacts of agriculture on water-quality.

  18. Professional School Counselors' Career Development Practices and Continuing Education Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anctil, Tina M.; Smith, Carol Klose; Schenck, Paulette; Dahir, Carol

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the practices of professional school counselors in their delivery of career counseling. School counselors were found to spend significantly less time on career development than on personal-social and academic development. In addition, new professionals placed more priority on career counseling compared with their more…

  19. Continuity and Change in Literacy Practices: A Move towards Multiliteracies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitson, Lisbeth; Fletcher, Margaret; Kearney, Judith

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present findings from an empirical study-in-progress that investigates how a teacher integrates technology, specifically an Interactive Whiteboard (IWB), to teach multiliterate practices when reading multi-modal texts. This research was a collaboration between a teacher and a team of university-based researchers as they used…

  20. Effective Practices in Continuing Professional Development: Lessons from Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter; Porritt, Vivienne

    2009-01-01

    This book presents case studies of schools' journeys towards effective CPD practice as part of a TDA national project. It tells the story of the goals set and achieved, and the challenges and successes along the way. Each case study makes specific reference to the nine factors or approaches to CPD identified in the book as underpinning effective…

  1. Testing the Runoff Tool in Sicilian vineyards: adopting best management practices to prevent agricultural surface runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpriet; Dyson, Jeremy; Capri, Ettore

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades rainfall has become more intense in Sicily, making large proportions of steeply sloping agricultural land more vulnerable to soil erosion, mainly orchards and vineyards (Diodato and Bellocchi 2010). The prevention of soil degradation is indirectly addressed in the European Union's Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) and Sustainable Use Directive (2009/128/EC). As a consequence, new EU compliance conditions for food producers requires them to have tools and solutions for on-farm implementation of sustainable practices (Singh et al. 2014). The Agricultural Runoff and Best Management Practice Tool has been developed by Syngenta to help farm advisers and managers diagnose the runoff potential from fields with visible signs of soil erosion. The tool consists of 4 steps including the assessment of three key landscape factors (slope, topsoil permeability and depth to restrictive horizon) and 9 mainly soil and crop management factors influencing the runoff potential. Based on the runoff potential score (ranging from 0 to 10), which is linked to a runoff potential class, the Runoff Tool uses in-field and edge-of-the-field Best Management Practices (BMPs) to mitigate runoff (aligned with advice from ECPA's TOPPS-prowadis project). The Runoff tool needs testing in different regions and crops to create a number of use scenarios with regional/crop specific advice on BMPs. For this purpose the Tool has been tested in vineyards of the Tasca d'Almerita and Planeta wineries, which are large family-owned estates with long-standing tradition in viticulture in Sicily. In addition to runoff potential scores, Visual Soil Assessment (VSA) scores have been calculated to allow for a comparison between different diagnostic tools. VSA allows for immediate diagnosis of soil quality (a higher score means a better soil quality) including many indicators of runoff (Shepherd 2008). Runoff potentials were moderate to high in all tested fields. Slopes were classified as

  2. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Eeee of... - Continuous Compliance With Work Practice Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuous Compliance With Work Practice Standards 10 Table 10 to Subpart EEEE of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)...

  3. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Eeee of... - Continuous Compliance With Work Practice Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With Work Practice Standards 10 Table 10 to Subpart EEEE of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)...

  4. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Sssss of... - Continuous Compliance With Work Practice Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Continuous Compliance With Work Practice Standards 9 Table 9 to Subpart SSSSS of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)...

  5. Of birds, carbon and water: integrating multiple ecosystem service impacts to identify locations for agricultural conservation practice adoption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human use of the landscape for crop production can degrade ecosystem services. A number of agricultural conservation practices are touted as mitigating these impacts. Many of these practices are encouraged by incentive programs such as the Conservation Reserve Program administere...

  6. Integrating Aesthetics: Transforming Continuing Education through Africentric Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Auburn E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Manuscript written for the Adult Education Research Conference based on dissertation research completed at National Louis University. Purpose: To increase knowledge base of art based learning as a mode of anti-racist pedagogy and the use of an Africentric framework for continuing and professional education. Setting: African Centered…

  7. Faculty Compensation in Continuing Education: Theory versus Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Joyce A.

    1984-01-01

    Lawler's Motivation Model and other studies of reward systems are used to develop a policy assessment and development checklist for compensating continuing education faculty. The checklist includes institutional, reward system, and motivation factors that should be considered to encourage faculty participation. (SK)

  8. Continuing Education: A National Imperative for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K.; Havice, Pamela A.; Pruitt, Rosanne H.

    2006-01-01

    Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theory…

  9. Relating management practices and nutrient export in agricultural watersheds of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sprague, Lori A.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Relations between riverine export (load) of total nitrogen (N) and total phosphorus (P) from 133 large agricultural watersheds in the United States and factors affecting nutrient transport were evaluated using empirical regression models. After controlling for anthropogenic inputs and other landscape factors affecting nutrient transport-such as runoff, precipitation, slope, number of reservoirs, irrigated area, and area with subsurface tile drains-the relations between export and the area in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) (N) and conservation tillage (P) were positive. Additional interaction terms indicated that the relations between export and the area in conservation tillage (N) and the CRP (P) progressed from being clearly positive when soil erodibility was low or moderate, to being close to zero when soil erodibility was higher, to possibly being slightly negative only at the 90th to 95th percentile of soil erodibility values. Possible explanations for the increase in nutrient export with increased area in management practices include greater transport of soluble nutrients from areas in conservation tillage; lagged response of stream quality to implementation of management practices because of nitrogen transport in groundwater, time for vegetative cover to mature, and/or prior accumulation of P in soils; or limitations in the management practice and stream monitoring data sets. If lags are occurring, current nutrient export from agricultural watersheds may still be reflecting the influence of agricultural land-use practices that were in place before the implementation of these management practices.

  10. Effect of modifying land cover and long-term agricultural practices on the soil characteristics in native forest-land.

    PubMed

    Gol, Ceyhun; Dengiz, Orhan

    2008-09-01

    Natural forestland soils in the high land mountain ecosystems on the eastern Black sea region of Turkey are being seriously degraded and destructed due to intensive agricultural practices. In this study we examined four soil profiles selected from four sites in each of three adjacent land use types which are native forest, pasture and cultivated fields with corn and hazelnut to compare the soil physical, chemical and morphological properties modified after natural forestland transformation into cultivated land. Disturbed and undisturbed soil samples were collected from four sites. The effects of agricultural practices on soil properties taken from each three adjacent land use types were most clearly detected in the past 50 years with the land use change. Land use change and subsequent tillage practices resulted in significant decreases in organic matter, total porosity, total nitrogen and reduced soil aggregates stability. However, contents of available P were improved by application of phosphorous fertilizers in cultivated system. There was also a significant change in bulk density among cultivated, pasture and natural forest soils. Depending upon the increase in bulk density and disruption of pores by cultivation, total porosity decreased accordingly. The data show that long term continuous cultivation of the natural forest soils resulted in changes in physical and chemical characteristics of soils. PMID:19295064

  11. Analysis of the Continuing Decline in Use of Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Roger

    1997-01-01

    When responses from 135 of 222 New York secondary agriculture teachers were compared with a 1983 study, a 10% decrease in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) was found. Barriers were low level of summer employment, limited release time, less funding for transportation, and scheduling problems. A comprehensive overhaul of the concept and…

  12. Online Continuing Education for Health Professionals: Does Sticky Design Promote Practice-Relevance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaghab, Roxanne Ward; Maldonado, Carlos; Whitehead, Dongsook; Bartlett, Felicia; de Bittner, Magaly Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Online continuing education (CE) holds promise as an effective method for rapid dissemination of emerging evidence-based practices in health care. Yet, the field of CE continues to develop and delivery is predominately face-to-face programs. Practice-oriented online educational methods and e-learning platforms are not fully utilized. Educational…

  13. A Comparative Study on the Practice of Continuous Assessment between Addis Ababa and Unity Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeleke, Aytaged Sisay

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the practice of continuous assessment at Unity University College and Addis Ababa University. It has also investigated constraints instructors say they have been facing in implementing continuous assessment. Students' attitudes about the practice of this assessment mode towards their course achievements were…

  14. 40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Oxide Sterilizers Monitoring-Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.10420 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped... practice standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether...

  15. 40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Oxide Sterilizers Monitoring-Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.10420 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped... practice standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether...

  16. 40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Oxide Sterilizers Monitoring-Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.10420 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped... practice standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether...

  17. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Sssss of... - Continuous Compliance With Work Practice Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuous Compliance With Work... Compliance With Work Practice Standards As stated in § 63.9810, you must show continuous compliance with the work practice standards for affected sources according to the following table: For . . . For...

  18. Namibia specific climate smart agricultural land use practices: Challenges and opportunities for enhancing ecosystem services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Talamondjila Naanda, Martha; Bloemertz, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture is a backbone for many African economies, with an estimated 70% of Africans active in agricultural production. The sector often does not only directly contribute to, but sustains food security and poverty reduction efforts. Sustaining this productivity poses many challenges, particularly to small scale subsistence farmers (SSF) in dry land areas and semi-arid countries like Namibia. SSF in northern central Namibia mix crop and livestock production on degraded semi-arid lands and nutrient-poor sandy soils. They are fully dependent on agricultural production with limited alternative sources of income. Mostly, their agricultural harvests and outputs are low, not meeting their livelihood needs. At the same time, the land use is often not sustainable, leading to degradation. The Namibia case reveals that addressing underlying economic, social and environmental challenges requires a combination of farm level-soil management practices with a shift towards integrated landscape management. This forms the basis for SSF to adopt sustainable land management practices while building institutional foundations, like establishing SSF cooperatives. One way in which this has been tested is through the concept of incentive-based motivation, i.e. payment for ecosystem services (PES), in which some of the beneficiaries pay, for instance for farmers or land users, who provide the services. The farmers provide these services by substituting their unsustainable land and soil management and adopting new (climate smart agricultural) land use practices. Climate Smart Agricultural land use practices (CSA-LUP) are one way of providing ecosystem services, which could be fundamental to long-term sustainable soil and land management solutions in Africa. There are few PES cases which have been systematically studied from an institutional development structure perspective. This study presents lessons evolving from the notion that direct participation and involvement of local people

  19. Practices to reduce nitrate leaching and increase nitrogen use efficiency in irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quemada, Miguel; Baranski, Marcin; Nobel de Lange, Majimcha; Vallejo, Antonio; Cooper, Julia

    2013-04-01

    Despite the large body of research in irrigated agriculture, it is still not clear which practices most effectively reduce nitrate leaching (NL) while maintaining crop yield. A meta-analysis (MA) of published experimental results from agricultural irrigated systems was conducted to identify those agricultural practices that have proven effective at reducing NL and to quantify the scale of reduction that can be achieved. Forty-four scientific articles were identified which investigated four main strategies (water and fertilizer management, use of cover crops and fertilizer technology) creating a database with 279 observations on NL and 166 on crop yield. Management practices that adjust water application to crop needs reduced NL by a mean of 80% without a reduction in crop yield. Improved fertilizer management reduced NL by 40%, and the best relationship between yield and NL was obtained when applying the recommended N fertilizer rate. Applications above the recommended rate increased leaching without enhancing yield. Replacing a fallow with a non-legume cover crop (CC) reduced NL by 50% while using a legume CC did not have any effect on NL. Legume CC increased yield and N use efficiency while yields following non-legume CC were not different from the fallow. Improved fertilizer technology also decreased NL but was the least effective of the selected strategies. The risk of nitrate leaching from irrigated systems is high, but optimum management practices may mitigate this risk and maintain crop yields while enhancing environmental sustainability.

  20. The impact of the `Getting Practical: Improving Practical Work in Science' continuing professional development programme on teachers' ideas and practice in science practical work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Ian; Reiss, Michael J.; Sharpe, Rachael

    2014-09-01

    Background:Despite the widespread use of practical work in school it has been recognised that more needs to be done to improve its effectiveness in developing conceptual understanding. The 'Getting Practical' CPD (Continuing Professional Development) programme was designed to contribute towards an improvement in the effectiveness of practical work through initiating changes in teachers' predominantly 'hands-on' approach to practical work to one which manifests a more equitable balance between 'hands-on' and 'minds-on'. Purpose:To evaluate the impact of the Getting Practical: Improving Practical Work in Science CPD programme on teachers' ideas and practice in science practical work in primary and secondary schools in England. Programme description:The CPD programme was designed to improve the effectiveness of science practical work in developing conceptual understanding in primary and secondary schools in England. Sample:Ten teachers of primary science and 20 secondary science teachers. Design and methods:The study employed a condensed fieldwork strategy with data collected using interviews, observational field notes and pre- and post-CPD training observations in practical lessons within 30 schools. Results:Whilst the CPD programme was effective in getting teachers to reflect on the ideas associated with the Getting Practical programme, it was much less effective in bringing about changes in actual teaching practice. Conclusion:The findings suggest that if change, rather than only an enhanced awareness of the issues, is to be brought about in established teaching <span class="hlt">practice</span> then there is a need for ongoing support over an extended period of time. Furthermore, the impact of such CPD is more likely to be effective if it is undertaken by a senior member of a department or school with the full support of the SMT.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=policy+AND+networks+AND+social&pg=6&id=EJ905641','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=policy+AND+networks+AND+social&pg=6&id=EJ905641"><span id="translatedtitle">The Role of Networks of <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Webs of Influencers on Farmers' Engagement with and Learning about <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Innovations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Oreszczyn, Sue; Lane, Andy; Carr, Susan</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Drawing on the UK research project, "Farmers' understandings of GM crops within local communities", this paper considers the application of the concepts of communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span> and networks of <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> context. A brief review of theories about communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span> and networks of <span class="hlt">practice</span> is given and some of our findings…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712591','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712591"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in tile-drained subwatersheds of the Mackinaw River, Illinois.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lemke, A M; Kirkham, K G; Lindenbaum, T T; Herbert, M E; Tear, T H; Perry, W L; Herkert, J R</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) are widely promoted in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds as a means of improving water quality and ameliorating altered hydrology. We used a paired watershed approach to evaluate whether focused outreach could increase BMP implementation rates and whether BMPs could induce watershed-scale (4000 ha) changes in nutrients, suspended sediment concentrations, or hydrology in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed in central Illinois. Land use was >90% row crop <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> with extensive subsurface tile drainage. Outreach successfully increased BMP implementation rates for grassed waterways, stream buffers, and strip-tillage within the treatment watershed, which are designed to reduce surface runoff and soil erosion. No significant changes in nitrate-nitrogen (NO-N), total phosphorus (TP), dissolved reactive phosphorus, total suspended sediment (TSS), or hydrology were observed after implementation of these BMPs over 7 yr of monitoring. Annual NO-N export (39-299 Mg) in the two watersheds was equally exported during baseflow and stormflow. Mean annual TP export was similar between the watersheds (3.8 Mg) and was greater for TSS in the treatment (1626 ± 497 Mg) than in the reference (940 ± 327 Mg) watershed. Export of TP and TSS was primarily due to stormflow (>85%). Results suggest that the BMPs established during this study were not adequate to override nutrient export from subsurface drainage tiles. Conservation planning in tile-drained <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds will require a combination of surface-water BMPs and conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> that intercept and retain subsurface <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> runoff. Our study emphasizes the need to measure conservation outcomes and not just implementation rates of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>. PMID:21712591</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22480534','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22480534"><span id="translatedtitle">Emerging health risks associated with modern <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: a comprehensive study in India.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sarkar, Atanu; Aronson, Kristan J; Patil, Shantagouda; Hugar, Lingappa B; vanLoon, Gary W</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>In order to enhance food production, India has adopted modern <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and achieved noteworthy success. This achievement was essentially the result of a paradigm shift in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> that included high inputs of agrochemicals, water, and widespread <span class="hlt">practice</span> of monoculture, as well as bureaucratic changes that promoted these changes. There are very few comprehensive analyses of potential adverse health outcomes that may be related to these changes. The objective of this study is to identify health risks associated with modern <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the southern Indian state of Karnataka. This study aims to compare high-input and low-input <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and the consequences for health of people in these communities. The fieldwork was conducted from May to August, 2009 and included a survey carried out in six villages. Data were collected by in-depth personal interviews among 240 households and key informants, field observations, laboratory analyses, and data from secondary sources. The study identified four major visible impacts: occupational hazards, vector borne diseases, changing nutritional status, and inequity in development. In the high-input area, mechanization has resulted in more occurrences of serious accidents and injuries. Ecological changes due to rice cultivation in this area have further augmented mosquito breeding, and there has been a surge in the incidence of Japanese encephalitis and malaria. The traditional coarse cereals (complex carbohydrates, high protein) have been replaced by mill-polished rice (simple carbohydrate, low protein). The prevalence of overweight (BMI>25) has emerged as a new public health challenge, and this is most evident in large-landholding households, especially in the high-input <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> areas. In all agro-ecological areas, it was observed that women faced a greater risk of both extremes of under-nutrition and being overweight. Output-driven and market-oriented modern <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> have</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol15-sec63-10420.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol15-sec63-10420.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the management <span class="hlt">practice</span> requirements?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the management <span class="hlt">practice</span> requirements? 63.10420 Section 63.10420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-11584.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-11584.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.11584 - What are my initial and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance management <span class="hlt">practice</span> requirements?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are my initial and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance management <span class="hlt">practice</span> requirements? 63.11584 Section 63.11584 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27065409','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27065409"><span id="translatedtitle">Not All Antibiotic Use <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Food-Animal <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Afford the Same Risk.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Subbiah, Murugan; Mitchell, Shannon M; Call, Douglas R</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>The World Health Organization has identified quinolones, third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, and macrolides as the most important antibiotics in human medicine. In the context of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> use of antibiotics, the principle zoonotic agents of concern are , spp., , and spp. Antibiotic exposure provides a selective advantage to resistant strains of these bacteria relative to their susceptible conspecifics. This is a dose-dependent process, and consequently antibiotic use <span class="hlt">practices</span> that involve higher doses will exert greater and longer-lasting selective pressure in favor of resistant bacterial populations and will therefore increase the probability of transmission to people and other animals. Oral administration has a greater impact on enteric flora with the exception of fluoroquinolone treatments, which appear to affect the enteric flora equally if administered orally or parenterally. The use of quinolones in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> deserves heightened scrutiny because of the ease with which these broad-spectrum antibiotics favor spontaneously resistant bacteria in exposed populations. When present at sufficient concentrations, excreted antibiotics have the potential to selectively favor resistant bacteria in the environment and increase the probability of transmission to people and animals. The bioavailability of antibiotics varies greatly: some antibiotics remain active in soils (florfenicol, β-lactams), whereas others may be rapidly sorbed and thus not bioavailable (tetracycline, macrolides, quinolones). When considering the risks of different antibiotic use <span class="hlt">practices</span> in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, it would be prudent to focus attention on <span class="hlt">practices</span> that involve high doses, oral delivery, and residues of antibiotics that remain active in soils. PMID:27065409</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18..580S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18..580S"><span id="translatedtitle">Testing the Runoff Tool in Sicilian vineyards: adopting best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to prevent <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> surface runoff</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Singh, Manpriet; Dyson, Jeremy; Capri, Ettore</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Over the last decades rainfall has become more intense in Sicily, making large proportions of steeply sloping <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land more vulnerable to soil erosion, mainly orchards and vineyards (Diodato and Bellocchi 2010). The prevention of soil degradation is indirectly addressed in the European Union's Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) and Sustainable Use Directive (2009/128/EC). As a consequence, new EU compliance conditions for food producers requires them to have tools and solutions for on-farm implementation of sustainable <span class="hlt">practices</span> (Singh et al. 2014). The <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Runoff and Best Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Tool has been developed by Syngenta to help farm advisers and managers diagnose the runoff potential from fields with visible signs of soil erosion. The tool consists of 4 steps including the assessment of three key landscape factors (slope, topsoil permeability and depth to restrictive horizon) and 9 mainly soil and crop management factors influencing the runoff potential. Based on the runoff potential score (ranging from 0 to 10), which is linked to a runoff potential class, the Runoff Tool uses in-field and edge-of-the-field Best Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> (BMPs) to mitigate runoff (aligned with advice from ECPA's TOPPS-prowadis project). The Runoff tool needs testing in different regions and crops to create a number of use scenarios with regional/crop specific advice on BMPs. For this purpose the Tool has been tested in vineyards of the Tasca d'Almerita and Planeta wineries, which are large family-owned estates with long-standing tradition in viticulture in Sicily. In addition to runoff potential scores, Visual Soil Assessment (VSA) scores have been calculated to allow for a comparison between different diagnostic tools. VSA allows for immediate diagnosis of soil quality (a higher score means a better soil quality) including many indicators of runoff (Shepherd 2008). Runoff potentials were moderate to high in all tested fields. Slopes were classified as</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-310.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-310.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.310 - <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> products produced on an exempt or excluded operation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> products produced on an exempt or excluded operation. 205.310 Section 205.310 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014AGUFMGC23D0669X&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014AGUFMGC23D0669X&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Climate sensitivity of DSSAT under different <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios in China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xia, L.; Robock, A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Crop yields are sensitive to both <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> and climate changes. Under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios, crop yield may have different climate sensitivities. Since it is important to understand how future climate changes affect <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> productivity and what the potential adaptation strategies would be to compensate for possible negative impacts on crop production, we performed experiments to study climate sensitivity under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios for rice, maize and wheat in the top four production provinces in China using the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) crop model. The <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios include four categories: different amounts of nitrogen fertilizer or no nitrogen stress; irrigation turned on or off, or no water stress; all possible seeds in the DSSAT cultivar data base; and different planting dates. For the climate sensitivity test, the control climate is from 1998 to 2007, and we individually modify four climate variables: daily maximum and minimum temperature by +2 °C and -2 °C, daily precipitation by +20% and -20%, and daily solar radiation by + 20% and -20%. With more nitrogen fertilizer applied, crops are more sensitive to temperature changes as well as precipitation changes because of their release from nitrogen limitation. With irrigation turned on, crop yield sensitivity to temperature decreases in most of the regions depending on the amount of the local precipitation, since more water is available and soil temperature varies less with higher soil moisture. Those results indicate that there could be possible <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> adaptation strategies under certain future climate scenarios. For example, increasing nitrogen fertilizer usage by a certain amount might compensate for the negative impact on crop yield from climate changes. However, since crops are more sensitive to climate changes when there is more nitrogen fertilizer applied, if the climate changes are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11..656B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11..656B"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of different management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on fungal biodiversity in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borriello, R.; Lumini, E.; Bonfante, P.; Bianciotto, V.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Symbiotic associations between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots are widespread in natural environments and provide a range of benefits to the host plant. These include improved nutrition, enhanced resistance to soil-borne pests, diseases, and drought, as well as tolerance to heavy metals. In addition, the presence of a well developed AMF hyphal network improve the soil structure. As obligate mutualistic symbionts these fungi colonize the roots of many <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> crops and it is often claimed that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (use of fertilizers and biocides, tillage, dominance of monocultures and the growing of non-mycorrhizal crops) are detrimental to AMF. As a result, agro ecosystems impoverished in AMF may not get the fully expected range of benefits from these fungi. Using molecular markers on DNA extracted directly from soil and roots we studied the effects of different management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (tillage and nitrogen fertilization) on the AMF populations colonizing an experimental agro ecosystem in Central Italy. Fungi in roots and soil were identified by cloning and sequencing a region of ~550bp of the 18S rDNA and ~600bp of the 28S rDNA. In symbiosis with the maize roots we detected only members of Glomeraceae group A that showed decrement in number under nitrogen fertilization. Instead in soil were mainly present members of two AMF groups, respectively Gigasporaceae and Glomeraceae group A. In addition only the low input management <span class="hlt">practices</span> preserve also members of Diversisporaceae and Glomeraceae group B. From our study we can conclude that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> can directly or indirectly influence AMF biodiversity. The result of this study highlight the importance and significant effects of the long term nitrogen fertilization and tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span> on specific groups of fungi playing a key role in arable soils. The research was founded by Biodiversity Project (IPP-CNR) and by SOILSINK (FISR-MIUR)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/249771','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/249771"><span id="translatedtitle">An assessment of alternative <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practice</span> impacts on soil carbon in the corn belt</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barnwell, T.O. Jr.; Jackson, R.B.; Mulkey, L.A.</p> <p>1993-12-31</p> <p>This impact of alternative management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil C is estimated by a soil C mass balance modeling study that incorporates policy considerations in the analysis. A literature review of soil C modeling and impacts of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> has been completed. The models selected for use and/or modification to meet the needs of representing soil C cycles in agroecosystems and impacts of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> are CENTURY and DNDC. These models share a common ability to examine the impacts of alternative management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil organic C, and are readily accessible. An important aspect of this effort is the development of the modeling framework and methodology that define the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production systems and scenarios (i.e., crop-soil-climate combinations) to be assessed in terms of national policy, the integration of the model needs with available databases, and the operational mechanics of evaluating C sequestration potential with the integrated model/database system. We are working closely with EPA`s Office of Policy and Program Evaluation to define a reasonable set of policy alternatives for this assessment focusing on policy that might be affected through a revised Farm Bill, such as incentives to selectively promote conservation tillage, crop rotations, and/or good stewardship of the conservation reserve. Policy alternatives are translated into basic data for use in soil C models through economic models. These data, including such elements as <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, fertilization rates, and production levels are used in the soil C models to produce net carbon changes on a per unit area basis. The unit-area emissions are combined with areal-extent data in a GIS to produce an estimate of total carbon and nitrogen changes and thus estimate greenhouse benefits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1989/0267/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1989/0267/report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of controlled <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality in the Minnesota sand-plain aquifer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Anderson, H.W., Jr.; Stoner, J.D.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Recent studies of Minnesota's sand plains indicate that ground-water chemistry is related to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Surficial sand-plain aquifers cover 8,000,000 acres of Minnesota and are a major source of water for domestic use, irrigation, and some municipal systems. The sand-plain aquifers consist of sand and gravel deposits that are from 20 to greater than 100 feet thick and are covered by a thin sandy loam that generally is less than 2 feet thick. Sand-plain aquifers are recharged by the downward percolation of precipitation through the soil root zone and the unsaturated zone in the sand to the water table. The water table is the upper surface of the zone of saturation and forms the top of the sand-plain aquifer. Sand-plain aquifers are susceptible to contamination by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemicals (fertilizers and pesticides), if downward-percolating recharge water contains these chemicals. The concentrations of nitrate, pesticides, and some other chemical constituents fluctuate seasonally and differ with depth below the water table (Anderson, 1989). Despite the availability of water-quality data for about 260 wells that were collected during previous studies in three U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project areas in Minnesota, it is not known how concentrations of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemicals in ground water relate to the rate and timing of fertilizer and pesticide application or to the tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span> used. Field-scale research is needed to determine the effects of different farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the concentrations of nitrate, pesticides, and other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemicals in ground water in the unsaturated and saturated zones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..18.6873G&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..18.6873G&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on microbial nitrogen cyclers in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> land management has great influences on soil properties, in particular on microbial communities, due to their sensitivity to the perturbations of the soils. This is even more relevant in Mediterranean <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas under semi-arid conditions. The Mediterranean belt is suffering from an intense degradation of its soils due to the millennia of intense land use and due to unsustainable management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. As a consequence this area is suffering from a depletion of N content. In this work we investigated the effect of several traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on specific functional groups related to the nitrogen cycle in the soil. A field experiment was performed with orchard orange trees (citrus sinesis) in Eastern Spain to assess the long-term effects of ploughing with inorganic fertilization (PI) and ecological <span class="hlt">practices</span> (EP) (chipped pruned branches and weeds as well as manure from sheep and goats) on microbes that can undertake nitrogen fixation and denitrification. Nine samples of soil were taken from every treatment, near the drip irrigation point and in a zone without the influence of drip irrigation (between trees row), and total DNA extracted. DNA samples were stored at minus-20°C to be analysed by qPCR. Microbial populations involved in the N biochemical cycle were analysed by targeted amplification of key functional biomarker genes: the abundance of nifH (nitrogen fixation), nirS, nirK and nosZ (denitrification) detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR) has shown significant differences between treatments with higher abundance of all four genes in soils from ecological <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> treatments. This may indicate that the ecological treatment created conditions that are more suitable for N cyclers in the soil and a better fertility and quality status of these soils.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5905L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5905L"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> of three crops on the soil communities under Mediterranean conditions: field evaluation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Leitão, Sara; José Cerejeira, Maria; Abreu, Manuela; Sousa, José Paulo</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production relies on soil communities as the main actors in key soil processes necessary to maintain sustainable soil functioning. Soil biodiversity influences soil physical and chemical characteristics and thus the sustainability of crop and agro-ecosystems functioning. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (e.g.: soil tillage, pesticides and fertilizer applications, irrigation) may affects negatively or positively soil biodiversity and abundances by modifying the relationships between organisms in the soil ecosystem. The present study aimed to study the influence of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> of three crops (potato, onion and maize) under Mediterranean climate conditions on soil macro- and mesofauna during their entire crop cycles. Effects on soil communities were assessed at a higher tier of environmental risk assessment comprising field testing of indigenous edaphic communities in a selected study-site located in a major <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> region of Central Portugal, Ribatejo e Oeste, neighbouring protected wetlands. A reference site near the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> field site was selected as a Control site to compare the terrestrial communities' composition and variation along the crop cycle. The field soil and Control site soil are sandy loam soils. Crops irrigation was performed by center-pivot (automated sprinkler that rotates in a half a circle area) and by sprinklers. Soil macro- and mesofauna were collected at both sites (field and Control) using two methodologies through pitfall trapping and soil sampling. The community of soil macro- and mesofauna of the three crops field varied versus control site along the crops cycles. Main differences were due to arachnids, coleopterans, ants and adult Diptera presence and abundance. The feeding activity of soil fauna between control site and crop areas varied only for potato and onion crops vs. control site but not among crops. Concentration of pesticides residues in soil did not cause apparent negative effects on the soil</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFM.H33H1712J&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFM.H33H1712J&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Use of real-time and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> water quality monitoring in Iowa streams to inform conservation strategy in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscape</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jones, C. S.; Kim, S. W.; Davis, C. A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> watersheds in the Midwestern U.S. are major contributors of nutrients to the Mississippi River Basin and the Gulf of Mexico. Many states within the Upper Mississippi River Basin, including Iowa, are developing nutrient reduction strategies to reduce non-point and point source loads of nitrogen and phosphorous in an effort to reverse degradation of streams and lakes. Quantifying nutrient loads in Iowa and assessing loads transported within Iowa rivers are important components of Iowa's strategy. Nutrient loads estimated with data collected using traditional methods of grab sampling are expensive and have met with limited usefulness to the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> community when assessing the effectiveness of implemented conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>. New sensor technology is allowing for real-time measurement of nutrient loads in many Iowa rivers. IIHR Hydroscience and Engineering has deployed 22 nitrate-nitrogen sensors in several Iowa rivers to provide accurate measure of nutrient loads. Combined with 17 sensors operated by the USGS, the sensor network captures nutrient transport and loading patterns in rivers across the state. A new Iowa Water Quality Information System (IWQIS) is being developed to display and share the <span class="hlt">continuous</span>, real-time data. The data reported here will compare and contrast load calculations obtained using <span class="hlt">continuous</span> monitors with those from a more traditional grab samples. We also will demonstrate how <span class="hlt">continuous</span> nitrate monitoring informs watershed hydrology and the assessment of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> designed to reduce nutrient loss from farmed fields. Finally, we will establish that the costs of real time <span class="hlt">continuous</span> monitoring are modest when compared to grab sampling strategies and the costs of implementing conservation on productive lands in the Western Corn Belt of Iowa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPRS..101..110T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPRS..101..110T"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of MODIS spectral indices for determining rice paddy <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and hydroperiod</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tornos, Lucia; Huesca, Margarita; Dominguez, Jose Antonio; Moyano, Maria Carmen; Cicuendez, Victor; Recuero, Laura; Palacios-Orueta, Alicia</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Rice <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and hydroperiod dates must be determined to obtain information on water management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and their environmental effects. Spectral indices derived from an 8-day MODIS composite allows to identify rice phenometrics at varying degrees of success. The aims of this study were (1) to assess the dynamics of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI(1) and NDWI(2)) and Shortwave Angle Slope Index (SASI) in relation to rice <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and hydroperiod, and (2) to assess the capability for these indices to detect phenometrics in rice under different flooding regimes. Two rice farming areas in Spain that are governed under different water management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, the Ebro Delta and Orellana, were studied over a 12-year period (2001-2012). The index time series autocorrelation function was calculated to determine index dynamics in both areas. Secondly, average indices were calculated to identify significant points close to key <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and flooding dates, and index behaviors and capacities to identify phenometrics were assessed on a pixel level. The index autocorrelation function produced a regular pattern in both zones, being remarkably homogeneous in the Ebro Delta. It was concluded that a combination of NDVI, NDWI(1), NDWI(2) and SASI may improve the results obtained through each index. NDVI was more effective at detecting the heading date and flooding trends in the Ebro Delta. NDWI(1), NDWI(2) and SASI identified the harvest and the end of environmental flooding in the Delta, and the flooding in Orellana, more effectively. These results may set strong foundations for the development of new strategies in rice monitoring systems, providing useful information to policy makers and environmental studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=280013&keyword=sensor&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77970529&CFTOKEN=92028720','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=280013&keyword=sensor&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77970529&CFTOKEN=92028720"><span id="translatedtitle">Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams (Final Report)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This final report is a technical "best <span class="hlt">practices</span>" document describing sensor deployment for and collection of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> temperature and flow data at ungaged sites in wadeable streams. This document addresses questions related to equipment needs; configuration, placement, and ins...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=261911&keyword=non+AND+academic+AND+staff&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=68610221&CFTOKEN=66984079','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=261911&keyword=non+AND+academic+AND+staff&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=68610221&CFTOKEN=66984079"><span id="translatedtitle">Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams (External Review Draft)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This external review draft report is a technical "best <span class="hlt">practices</span>" document describing sensor deployment for and data collection of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> temperature and flow at ungaged sites in wadeable streams. This document addresses questions related to equipment needs; configuration, pl...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec110-8.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec110-8.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 110.8 - Rules of <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rules of <span class="hlt">practice</span>. 110.8 Section 110.8 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS RECORDKEEPING ON RESTRICTED USE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec205-238.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec205-238.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.238 - Livestock health care <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Livestock health care <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard. 205.238 Section 205.238 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-271.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-271.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facility pest management <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard. 205.271 Section 205.271 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-205.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-205.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.205 - Crop rotation <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Crop rotation <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard. 205.205 Section 205.205 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec205-271.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec205-271.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facility pest management <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard. 205.271 Section 205.271 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=political+AND+public&pg=7&id=EJ1041220','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=political+AND+public&pg=7&id=EJ1041220"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practice</span> Stories in Natural Resource Management <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Education: Springboards for Learning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stummann, Cathy Brown</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The use of stories from professional experience in <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional education has been on the rise in many fields, often aimed at bolstering capacity through sharing professional knowledge and/or supporting reflective <span class="hlt">practice</span>. <span class="hlt">Practice</span> stories are also suggested to be beneficial in supporting professional learning of new concepts. These…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-10420.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-10420.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the management <span class="hlt">practice</span> requirements?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the management <span class="hlt">practice</span> requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped... <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether each sterilization cycle contains a full load of items, and if not, a statement from a hospital central...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=military&id=EJ1059436','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=military&id=EJ1059436"><span id="translatedtitle">An Intensive <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Initiative to Train Social Workers for Military Social Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Smith-Osborne, Alexa</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Specific standards exist for social work <span class="hlt">practice</span> with service members, military families, and veterans, whether in civilian or military <span class="hlt">practice</span> settings. Based on these standards, a <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education certificate for practitioners was designed with companion military social work coursework in the advanced graduate curriculum and field…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFM.A21A0029D&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFM.A21A0029D&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Ammonia Emissions from the <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Sector of Argentina in a Context of Changing Technologies and <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dawidowski, L. E.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> is a key sector of the Argentinean economy, accounting for 6 to 8 5% of the GDP in the last ten years. Argentina switched in the 90´s from an articulated co-evolution between extensive livestock and crop farming, with annual rotation of crops and livestock, to intensive decoupled <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Under these new production schemes, ecosystems were supplied with more nutrients, generating increasing levels of wastes. Other changes have also occurred, associated with the shift of the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> frontier and the consequent reduction in the cattle stock. In addition, changes related to climate through the strong increase in rainfall in the 80s and 90s in the west Pampas, helped to boost <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> development. The <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> sector accounts for <span class="hlt">practically</span> all NH3 emissions in Argentina, however no inventory has been thus far available. To bridge this gap and particularly to have accurate input information to run coupled atmospheric chemistry models for secondary inorganic aerosols, we estimated 2000-2012 NH3 emissions, both at national and spatially disaggregated levels. Of particular interest for us was also temporal disaggregation as crops growing and temperature exhibit strong seasonal variability. As no NH3 inventory was available we also estimated related N2O emissions to verify our estimates with those of national GHG emission inventory (NEI). National NH3 emissions in 2012 amounted to 309.9 Gg, use of fertilizers accounted for 43.6%, manure management 18,9%, manure in pasture 36,0% and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> waste burning 1.5%. Our N2O estimates are in good agreement with the GHG-NEI. NH3 estimates in the EDGAR database for 2008 are 84.0% higher than ours for this year, and exhibit more significant differences per category, namely 113,6% higher for use of fertilizers and about 500% higher for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> waste burning. Urea dominates national NH3 emissions, accounting for 32,8% of the total and its use for wheat and corn crops dominates the trend.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED417343.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED417343.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Critical Assessment of Adult <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Curriculum Development in <span class="hlt">Practice</span>. Occasional Paper Number 3.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Benn, Roseanne, Ed.; Fieldhouse, Roger, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>This document contains six papers examining the theoretical and <span class="hlt">practical</span> development of university adult <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education (ACE) curricula in the late 1990s. The following are among the factors considered in "An Exploration of the Factors Affecting the Adult <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Curriculum" (Roseanne Benn): goals; cultural, political, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=welding&pg=4&id=ED518369','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=welding&pg=4&id=ED518369"><span id="translatedtitle">Community College Graduates' Perceptions of Adult Learning Instructional <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Employed in <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Programs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hinkson, Chandris Christina</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this mixed methods study was to examine <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education students' perceptions of adult education instructional <span class="hlt">practices</span> at an urban community college. The <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education students recently graduated from programs of law enforcement, truck driving, and health occupations. Perception analysis was based on the six principles…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=advertise&pg=3&id=EJ723887','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=advertise&pg=3&id=EJ723887"><span id="translatedtitle">Barriers to the Implementation of <span class="hlt">Continuity</span>-of-Care <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Child Care Centers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aguillard, Amber E.; Pierce, Sarah H.; Benedict, Joan H.; Burts, Diane C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This study examined barriers to the implementation of <span class="hlt">continuity</span>-of-care <span class="hlt">practices</span> in child care centers. We collected qualitative and quantitative data for 52 children at four centers that advertise their programs as <span class="hlt">continuity</span> programs. Of the 52 children, only 7 of the children had been cared for in a single child-caregiver dyad between the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Dentistry&pg=2&id=EJ879861','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Dentistry&pg=2&id=EJ879861"><span id="translatedtitle">Using Dentistry as a Case Study to Examine <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education and Its Impact on <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bullock, Alison; Firmstone, Vickie; Frame, John; Thomas, Hywel</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education is a defining characteristic of work in the professions. Yet the approach various professional groups take to <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD) differs widely in terms of regulatory frameworks and requirements, modes of delivery and funding. Importantly, little is understood about how CPD impacts on <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B11C0367E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B11C0367E"><span id="translatedtitle">Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land management changes: What <span class="hlt">practices</span> hold the best potential?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Eagle, A. J.; Olander, L.; Rice, C. W.; Haugen-Kozyra, K.; Henry, L. R.; Baker, J. S.; Jackson, R. B.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> within the United States have significant potential to mitigate greenhouse gases (GHGs) in voluntary market or regulatory contexts - by sequestering soil carbon or reducing N2O or CH4 emissions. Before these <span class="hlt">practices</span> can be utilized in active protocols or within a regulatory or farm bill framework, we need confidence in our ability to determine their impact on GHG emissions. We develop a side-by-side comparison of mitigation potential and implementation readiness for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> GHG mitigation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, with an extensive literature review. We also consider scientific certainty, environmental and social co-effects, economic factors, regional specificity, and possible implementation barriers. Biophysical GHG mitigation potential from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land management activities could reach more than 500 Mt CO2e/yr in the U.S. (7.1% of annual emissions). Up to 75% of the total potential comes from soil C sequestration. Economic potential is lower, given necessary resources to incentivize on-farm adaptations, but lower cost activities such as no-till, fertilizer N management, and cover crops show promise for near-term implementation in certain regions. Scientific uncertainty or the need for more research limit no-till and rice water management in some areas; and technical or other barriers need to be addressed before biochar, advanced crop breeding, and agroforestry can be widely embraced for GHG mitigation. Significant gaps in the current research and knowledge base exist with respect to interactions between tillage and N2O emissions, and with fertilizer application timing impacts on N2O emissions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27471508','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27471508"><span id="translatedtitle">Conservation <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Rainfed Uplands of India Improve Maize-Based System Productivity and Profitability.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pradhan, Aliza; Idol, Travis; Roul, Pravat K</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Traditional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> in rainfed uplands of India has been experiencing low <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity as the lands suffer from poor soil fertility, susceptibility to water erosion and other external pressures of development and climate change. A shift toward more sustainable cropping systems such as conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> production systems (CAPSs) may help in maintaining soil quality as well as improving crop production and farmer's net economic benefit. This research assessed the effects over 3 years (2011-2014) of reduced tillage, intercropping, and cover cropping <span class="hlt">practices</span> customized for maize-based production systems in upland areas of Odisha, India. The study focused on crop yield, system productivity and profitability through maize equivalent yield and dominance analysis. Results showed that maize grain yield did not differ significantly over time or among CAPS treatments while cowpea yield was considered as an additional yield in intercropping systems. Mustard and horsegram grown in plots after maize cowpea intercropping recorded higher grain yields of 25 and 37%, respectively, as compared to those without intercropping. Overall, the full CAPS implementation, i.e., minimum tillage, maize-cowpea intercropping and mustard residue retention had significantly higher system productivity and net benefits than traditional farmer <span class="hlt">practices</span>, i.e., conventional tillage, sole maize cropping, and no mustard residue retention. The dominance analysis demonstrated increasing benefits of combining conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> that exceeded thresholds for farmer adoption. Given the use of familiar crops and technologies and the magnitude of yield and income improvements, these types of CAPS should be acceptable and attractive for smallholder farmers in the area. This in turn should support a move toward sustainable intensification of crop production to meet future household income and nutritional needs. PMID:27471508</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4945640','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4945640"><span id="translatedtitle">Conservation <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Rainfed Uplands of India Improve Maize-Based System Productivity and Profitability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pradhan, Aliza; Idol, Travis; Roul, Pravat K.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Traditional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> in rainfed uplands of India has been experiencing low <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity as the lands suffer from poor soil fertility, susceptibility to water erosion and other external pressures of development and climate change. A shift toward more sustainable cropping systems such as conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> production systems (CAPSs) may help in maintaining soil quality as well as improving crop production and farmer’s net economic benefit. This research assessed the effects over 3 years (2011–2014) of reduced tillage, intercropping, and cover cropping <span class="hlt">practices</span> customized for maize-based production systems in upland areas of Odisha, India. The study focused on crop yield, system productivity and profitability through maize equivalent yield and dominance analysis. Results showed that maize grain yield did not differ significantly over time or among CAPS treatments while cowpea yield was considered as an additional yield in intercropping systems. Mustard and horsegram grown in plots after maize cowpea intercropping recorded higher grain yields of 25 and 37%, respectively, as compared to those without intercropping. Overall, the full CAPS implementation, i.e., minimum tillage, maize–cowpea intercropping and mustard residue retention had significantly higher system productivity and net benefits than traditional farmer <span class="hlt">practices</span>, i.e., conventional tillage, sole maize cropping, and no mustard residue retention. The dominance analysis demonstrated increasing benefits of combining conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> that exceeded thresholds for farmer adoption. Given the use of familiar crops and technologies and the magnitude of yield and income improvements, these types of CAPS should be acceptable and attractive for smallholder farmers in the area. This in turn should support a move toward sustainable intensification of crop production to meet future household income and nutritional needs. PMID:27471508</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15833257','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15833257"><span id="translatedtitle">Soil enzyme activities as affected by anthropogenic alterations: intensive <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and organic pollution.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gianfreda, Liliana; Antonietta Rao, Maria; Piotrowska, Anna; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Colombo, Claudio</p> <p>2005-04-01</p> <p>The activity of a range of enzymes related to the cycling of the main biologically important nutrients C, N, P and S was investigated in cultivated and non-cultivated soils from various parts of Europe. Two <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sites from North Italy under <span class="hlt">continuous</span> corn (Zea mays L.) with and without organic fertilization were compared. Two other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sites from South Italy under hazel (Corylus avellana L.) never flooded or repeatedly flooded over by uncontrolled urban and industrial wastes were investigated. The non-cultivated soils were from Middle and South Europe with different pollution history such as no-pollution and pollution with organic contaminants, which is phenanthrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> soils showed significant differences in some of physical-chemical properties (i.e. organic C, total and labile phosphate contents, available Ca and Mg) between the two sites studied. Enzyme activities of hazel sites periodically flooded by wastes were mainly higher than in the hazel sites never flooded. Sites under many years of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> corn showed dehydrogenase, invertase, arylsulphatase and beta-glucosidase activities generally lower than the soils under hazel either flooded or not by wastes. As compared to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils, non-cultivated soils heavily or moderately polluted by organic contaminants displayed much lower values or complete absence of enzymatic activities. Dissimilar, contradictory correlations between soil enzyme activities and the majority of soil properties were observed separately in the two groups of soils. When the whole set of enzyme activities and soil properties were considered, all significant correlations found separately for the groups of soils were lost. The overall results seem to confirm that no direct cause-effect relationships can be derived between the changes of a soil in response to a given factor and both the variations of the activity and the behaviour of the enzymes in soil</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1814094C&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1814094C&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> that store organic carbon in soils: is it only a matter of inputs ?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chenu, Claire; Cardinael, Rémi; Autret, Bénédicte; Chevallier, Tiphaine; Girardin, Cyril; Mary, Bruno</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Increasing the world soils carbon stocks by a factor of 4 per mil annually would compensate the annual net increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. This statement is the core of an initiative launched by the French government at the recent COP21, followed by many countries and international bodies, which attracts political attention to the storage potential of C in soils. Compared to forest and pasture soils, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils have a higher C storage potential, because they are often characterized by low C contents, and increasing their C content is associated with benefits in terms of soil properties and ecosystem services. Here we quantified, under temperate conditions, the additional C storage related to the implementation of two set of <span class="hlt">practices</span> that are recognized to be in the framework of agroecology: conservation tillage on the one hand and agroforestry on the other hand. These studies were based on long-term experiments, a 16-years comparison on cropping systems on luvisols in the Paris area and a 18-year-old silvoarable agroforestry trial, on fluvisols in southern France, the main crops being cereals in both cases. C stocks were measured on an equivalent soil mass basis. Both systems allowed for a net storage of C in soils, which are, for the equivalent of the 0-30 cm tilled layer, of 0.55 ± 0.16 t ha‑ 1 yr‑ 1 for conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (i.e. no tillage with permanent soil coverage with an associated plant, fescue or alfalfa) and of 0.25 ± 0.03 t ha-1 yr-1 for the agroforestry system. These results are in line with estimates proposed in a recent French national assessment concerning the potential of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Compared to recent literature, they further show that <span class="hlt">practices</span> that increase C inputs to soil through additional biomass production would be more effective to store C in soil (tree rows, cover crops in conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>) than <span class="hlt">practices</span>, such as no-tillage, that are assumed to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015EGUGA..1712696M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015EGUGA..1712696M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Using <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> information for multiscale environmental assessment of phosphorus risk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Matos Moreira, Mariana; Lemercier, Blandine; Michot, Didier; Dupas, Rémi; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for plant growth. In intensively farmed areas, excessive applications of animal manure and mineral P fertilizers to soils have raised both economic and ecological concerns. P accumulation in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils leads to increased P losses to surface waterbodies contributing to eutrophication. Increasing soil P content over time in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils is often correlated with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>; in Brittany (NW France), an intensive livestock farming region, soil P content is well correlated with animal density (Lemercier et al.,2008). Thus, a better understanding of the factors controlling P distribution is required to enable environmental assessment of P risk. The aim of this study was to understand spatial distribution of extractable (Olsen method) and total P contents and its controlling factors at the catchment scale in order to predict P contents at regional scale (Brittany). Data on soil morphology, soil tests (including P status, particles size, organic carbon…) for 198 punctual positions, crops succession since 20 years, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> systems, field and animal manure management were obtained on a well-characterized catchment (ORE Agrhys, 10 km²). A multivariate analysis with mixed quantitative variables and factors and a digital soil mapping approach were performed to identify variables playing a significant role in soil total and extractable P contents and distribution. Spatial analysis was performed by means of the Cubist model, a decision tree-based algorithm. Different scenarios were assessed, considering various panels of predictive variables: soil data, terrain attributes derived from digital elevation model, gamma-ray spectrometry (from airborne geophysical survey) and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> information. In the research catchment, mean extractable and total P content were 140.0 ± 63.4 mg/kg and 2862.7 ± 773.0 mg/kg, respectively. Organic and mineral P inputs, P balance, soil pH, and Al contents were</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC12C..05K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC12C..05K"><span id="translatedtitle">Identifying, monitoring and implementing "sustainable" <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> for smallholder farmers over large geographic areas in India and Vietnam</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kritee, K.; Ahuja, R.; Nair, D.; Esteves, T.; Rudek, J.; Thu Ha, T.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Industrial <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> systems, mostly in developed and some emerging economies, are far different from the small-holder farms (size <1 acre) in Asia and Africa. Along with our partners from non-governmental, corporate, academic and government sectors and tens of thousands of farming families, we have worked actively in five states in India and two provinces in Vietnam for the last five years to understand how sustainable and climate smart farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> can be monitored at small-holder farms. Here, any approach to monitor farming must begin by accounting for the tremendous management variability from farm to farm and also the current inability to ground-truth remote sensing data due to lack of relaible basic parameters (e.g., yields, N use, farm boundaries) which are necessary for calibrating empirical/biogeochemical models. While we <span class="hlt">continue</span> to learn from new research, we have found that it is crucial to follow some steps if sustainable farming programs are to succeed at small-holder farms Demographic data collection and GPS plot demarcation to establish farm size and ownership Baseline nutrient, water & energy use and crop yield determination via surveys and self-reporting which are verifiable through farmer networks given the importance of peer to peer learning in the dissemination of new techniques in such landscapes "Sustainable" <span class="hlt">practice</span> determination in consultation with local universities/NGO experts Measurements on representative plots for 3-4 years to help calibrate biogeochemical models and/or empirical equations and establish which <span class="hlt">practices</span> are truly "sustainable" (e.g., GHG emission reduction varies from 0-7 tCO2e/acre for different sustainable <span class="hlt">practices</span>). Propagation of sustainable <span class="hlt">practices</span> across the landscape via local NGOs/governments after analyzing the replicability of identified farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the light of local financial, cultural or socio-political barriers. We will present results from representative plots (including soil and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24032334','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24032334"><span id="translatedtitle">Blocked and alternating variable <span class="hlt">practice</span> and unintended spatial variations in <span class="hlt">continuous</span> aiming movements.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sherwood, David E; Fosler, Jessica</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The main goal of the study was to test a prediction of schema theory: a wider range of variable <span class="hlt">practice</span> would result in better transfer performance compared to a narrower range of variable <span class="hlt">practice</span> in less-studied, <span class="hlt">continuous</span> aiming movements. Constant and variable amplitude <span class="hlt">continuous</span> aiming movements were investigated in the preferred hand of participants of college age (N = 32; 8 men, 24 women). Participants made <span class="hlt">continuous</span> rapid reversal movements with a lever in the horizontal plane. Groups attempted to reach a short (20 degrees) target and a long target (either 45 degrees or 70 degrees) in separate constant-<span class="hlt">practice</span> conditions, but alternated between the two targets in a variable <span class="hlt">practice</span> condition. On the transfer test, participants alternated between unpracticed 10 degrees and 80 degrees targets. Four blocks of <span class="hlt">practice</span> trials were provided in each condition, with 20 movements made in each. Movements were more accurate and consistent during constant <span class="hlt">practice</span> compared to variable <span class="hlt">practice</span>, with the 20 degrees-70 degrees group having greater spatial errors compared to the 20 degrees-45 degrees group. Both groups performed equally well on the novel transfer test suggesting that adequate <span class="hlt">practice</span> variability had been provided during acquisition. PMID:24032334</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC14B..04D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC14B..04D"><span id="translatedtitle">Climate benefits of changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the context of heat wave mitigation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Davin, E.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Ciais, P.; Olioso, A.; Wang, T.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>About half of the terrestrial biosphere is under direct human influence through land management (i.e., <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas and managed forests). Changing management <span class="hlt">practices</span> is therefore a promising avenue for climate change mitigation. The mitigation potential arising from changes in land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> has been mainly evaluated in terms of carbon storage and GHG emissions [2]. On the other hand, these <span class="hlt">practices</span> can also influence climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface, but these effects have received less attention so far. Here we show that peak temperatures during heat heaves can be attenuated through cropland albedo management [2]. We first present observational evidence that a substantial summer albedo increase can be obtained by switching from conventional to no-till <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Then, using a regional climate model, we investigate the biogeophysical effect of a full conversion to no-till management over Europe. The cooling effect owing to albedo increase under no-till farming appears to be strongly amplified during warm events. This is due to the low cloud cover during these events, thus leading to a more efficient radiative cooling from albedo change. This implies a strong potential of no-till farming to mitigate heat wave impacts. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect remains the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till <span class="hlt">practice</span> is of the order of 2 degrees. These findings strongly suggest that the biogeophysical effect of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> should be considered in the design of climate mitigation policies involving land management. References:[1] Smith, P. et al. (2014): <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU). In Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 201.18 - Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Seeds § 201.18 Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 201.18 - Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Seeds § 201.18 Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 201.18 - Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Seeds § 201.18 Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 201.18 - Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Seeds § 201.18 Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec201-18.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 201.18 - Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Seeds § 201.18 Other <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> seeds...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT.......170G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT.......170G"><span id="translatedtitle">An investigation of the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of scientific inquiry in secondary science and <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> courses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Grady, Julie R.</p> <p></p> <p>The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study was to investigate the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of scientific inquiry in two secondary biology classes and one <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> class from different schools in different communities. The focus was on teachers' interests and intentions for the students' participation in inquiry, the voices contributing to the inquiry, and students' opportunities to confront their conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP) served as the context by providing students with opportunities to design and conduct original experiments to help elucidate the function(s) of a disabled gene in Arabidopsis thaliana . Transcripts of teacher and student semi-structured interviews, field notes of classroom observations and classroom conversations, and documents (e.g., student work, teacher handouts, school websites, PREP materials) were analyzed for evidence of the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of scientific inquiry. Teachers were interested in implementing inquiry because of potential student learning about scientific research and because PREP supports course content and is connected to a larger scientific project outside of the school. Teachers' intentions regarding the implementation of inquiry reflected the complexity of their courses and the students' previous experiences. All inquiries were student-directed. The biology students' participation more closely mirrored the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of scientists, while the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> students were more involved with the procedural display of scientific inquiry. All experiences could have been enhanced from additional knowledge-centered activities regarding scientific reasoning. No activities brought explicit attention to NOS. Biology activities tended to implicitly support NOS while the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> class activities tended to implicitly contradict NOS. Scientists' interactions contributed to implied support of the NOS. There were missed opportunities for explicit attention to NOS in all classes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009EGUGA..11.8639W&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009EGUGA..11.8639W&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on DOC leaching - results of a long-term lysimeter study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wagner, A.; Ollesch, G.; Seeger, J.; Meißner, R.; Rode, M.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes are recently increasing in surface waters of humid climate regions. Due to its substantial importance for leaching processes, aquatic foodwebs, and drinking water purification a better understanding of sources and pathways of DOC is needed. Therefore this study aims to analyse and simulate DOC fluxes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> ecosystems with selected crop rotations. A data set of 24 lysimeters of the UFZ Lysimeter station at Falkenberg (Saxony-Anhalt) covering nine years of DOC investigation has been selected and examined. The data set covers a wide range of climatic conditions with deviating management <span class="hlt">practices</span> for grasslands and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> crop rotations. The monthly DOC concentrations assessed in the leached water range from 2.4 to 34.1 mg /l. DOC concentrations depend on temperature, precipitation and discharge. The type of crop grown on the lysimeter is an important trigger for DOC leaching - especially lysimeters used as pasture, or planted with rape and carrots exhibit high DOC concentrations. Management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and fertilizer application modify the leaching of DOC and offer potentials to reduce DOC losses. The results form the basis of further process simulation studies and upscaling of the results to the small catchment scale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24682661','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24682661"><span id="translatedtitle">Irrigation water quality and the benefits of implementing good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> during tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) production.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Estrada-Acosta, M; Jiménez, M; Chaidez, C; León-Félix, J; Castro-Del Campo, N</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>The implementation of good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (GAP) from irrigation water to the tomato packaging process enhances the safety of fresh produce and its value throughout the food chain. The aim of the present study was to show that fresh produce farms that apply and enforce GAP could reduce the presence of Salmonella in finished produce. Samples were collected biweekly from six packing houses from the central region of Sinaloa, México, for the isolation of Salmonella spp by the ISO 6579:2002 method, and the isolated strains were serotyped and genotyped by the Kauffmman-White scheme and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), respectively. Salmonella strains were detected in 13 (36.1 %) irrigation water samples, while only two tomato samples were positive (5.5 %). Eight different serotypes were identified in irrigation water, and Salmonella Oranienburg (34 %) was the most prevalent; however, only Salmonella Agona and Salmonella Weltevreden were present on tomatoes. Salmonella Oranienburg was the most widely dispersed and variable serotype, with 10 different PFGE profiles. Salmonella Weltevreden was isolated from both types of samples, albeit with distinct genetic profiles, implying that the sources of contamination differ. These results confirm the utility of implementing good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce Salmonella contamination in irrigation water and the packaging process. PMID:24682661</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26073110','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26073110"><span id="translatedtitle">The effect of changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the density of Dermacentor reticulatus ticks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mierzejewska, Ewa J; Alsarraf, Mohammed; Behnke, Jerzy M; Bajer, Anna</p> <p>2015-07-30</p> <p>The impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>/ activities on the environment has been falling in many areas of Europe due to the widespread exodus of inhabitants from rural areas. The associated abandonment of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands has enabled a wide range of wild animals to prosper in the countryside, including birds, ungulates and large carnivores. One consequence has been the increase in ticks and associated tick-borne diseases which now constitute a greater threat for public health than earlier. The aim of the present study was to compare tick densities in different habitats (pasture, meadow, fallow land, post-fire areas) to assess the impact of different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on tick densities in vicinities close to human habitation. Between September 2011 and June 2014, 2985 Dermacentor reticulatus ticks were collected by conventional dragging, in the Mazowieckie (Mazovia) and Warmińsko-Mazurskie (Masuria) regions of Poland. In each region, 3 study sites were selected, each situated near surface water sources (i.e., ponds or canals). At each site, three neighboring habitats of surface area 150-600 m(2) were dragged: one on a cattle/horse pasture; the second on meadow; the third on fallow land (abandoned field or meadow), at least twice during each spring and autumn. Additionally, four post-fire areas (one in 2013 and three in 2014) were identified in the Mazowieckie region, and dragging was conducted there in spring and autumn, including in each case a 'control area' comprising intact unburned fallow land situated in close vicinity to the burned areas. Eight hundred D. reticulatus ticks were collected and the densities were compared by multifactorial ANOVA. The highest tick densities were recorded on the fallow lands, and the lowest - on the grazed pastures. Tick densities were up to 10 × times higher on the control sites compared to neighboring post-fire sites. PMID:26073110</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15137173','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15137173"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and river catchment characteristics on river and bathing water quality.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aitken, M N</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The objective was to investigate the potential risk of faecal indicator organism (FIO) bacteriological contamination of river catchments and coastal bathing waters from farm management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and to develop <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce the risk. A risk assessment on 117 farms was carried out in two river catchments in south-west Scotland. Manure storage facilities, farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>, field conditions and catchment characteristics were assessed. River samples at 33 locations were regularly taken and analysed for FIOs. Available manure storage capacity and farm management <span class="hlt">practices</span> are inadequate on a high proportion of farms and FIO contamination of watercourses was likely the result of effluent transported into watercourses due to non-collection or poor containment. In addition, surface run-off or leaching following land application of manure or intensive stocking in adverse conditions was a high risk on up to 50% of farms. The concentrations of FIOs in the streams of two sub-catchments with high livestock intensity was 4 to 8 times higher compared to the two sub-catchments which had a low livestock intensity. The majority of potential risks of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> pollution to watercourses may be eliminated through improved manure and dirty water management, forward planning of manure spreading activities and improved operational procedures. PMID:15137173</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24051650','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24051650"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practical</span> considerations for disaster preparedness and <span class="hlt">continuity</span> management in research facilities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mortell, Norman; Nicholls, Sam</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Many research facility managers, veterinarians and directors are familiar with the principles of Good Laboratory <span class="hlt">Practice</span>, requirements of the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International, tenets of biosecurity and standards of animal welfare and housing but may be less familiar with the ideas of business <span class="hlt">continuity</span>. But business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> considerations are as applicable to research facilities as they are to other institutions. The authors discuss how business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> principles can be applied in the research context and propose that such application, or 'research <span class="hlt">continuity</span> management,' enables a focused but wide-reaching approach to disaster preparedness. PMID:24051650</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.6578T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.6578T"><span id="translatedtitle">Key to GHG fluxes from organic soils: site characteristics, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> or water table management?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tiemeyer, Bärbel</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Drained peatlands are hotspots of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> is the major land use type for peatlands in Germany and other European countries, but strongly varies in its intensity regarding the groundwater level and the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management. Although the mean annual water table depth is sometimes proposed as an overall predictor for GHG emissions, there is a strong variability of its effects on different peatlands. Furthermore, re-wetting measures generally decrease carbon dioxide emissions, but may strongly increase methane emissions. We synthesized 250 annual GHG budgets for 120 different sites in 13 German peatlands. Carbon dioxide (net ecosystem exchange and ecosystem respiration), nitrous oxide and methane fluxes were measured with transparent and opaque manual chambers. Land management ranged from very intensive use with arable land or grassland with up to five cuts per year to partially or completely re-wetted peatlands. Besides the GHG fluxes, biomass yield, fertilisation, groundwater level, climatic data, vegetation composition and soil properties were measured. Overall, we found a large variability of the total GHG budget ranging from small uptakes to extremely high emissions (> 70 t CO2-equivalents/(ha yr)). At nearly all sites, carbon dioxide was the major component of the GHG budget. Site conditions, especially the nitrogen content of the unsaturated zone and the intra-annual water level distribution, controlled the GHG emissions of the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sites. Although these factors are influenced by natural conditions (peat type, regional hydrology), they could be modified by an improved water management. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> management such as the number of cuts had only a minor influence on the GHG budgets. At the level of individual peatlands, higher water levels always decreased carbon dioxide emissions. In nearly all cases, the trade-off between reduced carbon dioxide and increased methane emissions turned out in favour of the re</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25602207','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25602207"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on N loads in the Mississippi-atchafalaya river basin.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Santhi, C; Arnold, J G; White, M; Di Luzio, M; Kannan, N; Norfleet, L; Atwood, J; Kellogg, R; Wang, X; Williams, J R; Gerik, T</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>A modeling framework consisting of a farm-scale model, <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Policy Environmental Extender (APEX); a watershed-scale model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT); and databases was used in the Conservation Effects Assessment Project to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on cropland. APEX is used to simulate conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on cultivated cropland and Conservation Reserve Program land to assess the edge-of-field water-quality benefits. Flow and pollutant loadings from APEX are input to SWAT. SWAT simulates the remaining noncultivated land and routes flow and loads generated from noncultivated land, point sources, and cropland to the basin outlet. SWAT is used for assessing the effects of <span class="hlt">practices</span> on local and in-stream water-quality benefits. Each river basin is calibrated and validated for streamflow and loads at multiple gauging stations. The objectives of the current study are to estimate the effects of currently existing and additional conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on total N (TN) loads in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) and draw insights on TN load reductions necessary for reducing the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico. The effects of conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios on local and in-stream (riverine) water quality are evaluated. Model results indicate that conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> currently on cropland have reduced the TN losses to local waters between 20 and 59% in the six river basins within MARB and the TN load discharged to the Gulf by 17%. Further water-quality improvement can be obtained in the MARB with additional conservation treatment. PMID:25602207</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED286834.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED286834.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Research on and Development of Teaching by Instructors in the Dutch Training Centres for <span class="hlt">Practical</span> <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Beijaard, D.</p> <p></p> <p>Eleven training centers for <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> education in the Netherlands provide <span class="hlt">practical</span> courses for all levels of students or trainees. A sample of 29 experienced instructors was selected at random from the centers to participate in the research project designed to identify the didactical qualities of the instructors and to develop an…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Wheat&pg=5&id=ED045923','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Wheat&pg=5&id=ED045923"><span id="translatedtitle">Farmer's Incentives for Adoption of Recommended Farm <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Wheat Crop in Aligarh Intensive <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> District, India.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Vidyarthy, Gopal Saran</p> <p></p> <p>This study was undertaken to identify farmer incentives that led them to adopt wheat crop <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Aligarh Intensive <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> District Program: the association between the farmer's characteristics and adoption groups; the incentives that lead the farmers to adopt recommended wheat crop <span class="hlt">practices</span>; relationship between identified incentives…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25566831','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25566831"><span id="translatedtitle">Identification and prioritization of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce methylmercury exports from wetlands and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McCord, Stephen A; Heim, Wesley A</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's (Delta) beneficial uses for humans and wildlife are impaired by elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish. MeHg is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs. The total maximum daily load (TMDL) implementation plan aimed at reducing MeHg in Delta fish obligates dischargers to conduct MeHg control studies. Over 150 stakeholders collaborated to identify 24 management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (MPs) addressing MeHg nonpoint sources (NPS) in three categories: biogeochemistry (6), hydrology (14), and soil/vegetation (4). Land uses were divided into six categories: permanently and seasonally flooded wetlands, flooded and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands, floodplains, and brackish-fresh tidal marshes. Stakeholders scored MPs based on seven criteria: scientific certainty, costs, MeHg reduction potential, spatial applicability, technical capacity to implement, negative impacts to beneficial uses, and conflicting requirements. Semi-quantitative scoring for MPs applicable to each land use (totaling >400 individual scores) led to consensus-based prioritization. This process relied on <span class="hlt">practical</span> experience from diverse and accomplished NPS stakeholders and synthesis of 17 previous studies. Results provide a comprehensive, stakeholder-driven prioritization of MPs for wetland and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land managers. Final prioritization highlights the most promising MPs for <span class="hlt">practical</span> application and control study, and a secondary set of MPs warranting further evaluation. MPs that address hydrology and soil/vegetation were prioritized because experiences were positive and implementation appeared more feasible. MeHg control studies will need to address the TMDL conundrum that MPs effective at reducing MeHg exports could both exacerbate MeHg exposure and contend with other management objectives on site. PMID:25566831</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EnMan..55..725M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EnMan..55..725M"><span id="translatedtitle">Identification and Prioritization of Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> to Reduce Methylmercury Exports from Wetlands and Irrigated <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Lands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McCord, Stephen A.; Heim, Wesley A.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's (Delta) beneficial uses for humans and wildlife are impaired by elevated methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish. MeHg is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs. The total maximum daily load (TMDL) implementation plan aimed at reducing MeHg in Delta fish obligates dischargers to conduct MeHg control studies. Over 150 stakeholders collaborated to identify 24 management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (MPs) addressing MeHg nonpoint sources (NPS) in three categories: biogeochemistry (6), hydrology (14), and soil/vegetation (4). Land uses were divided into six categories: permanently and seasonally flooded wetlands, flooded and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands, floodplains, and brackish-fresh tidal marshes. Stakeholders scored MPs based on seven criteria: scientific certainty, costs, MeHg reduction potential, spatial applicability, technical capacity to implement, negative impacts to beneficial uses, and conflicting requirements. Semi-quantitative scoring for MPs applicable to each land use (totaling >400 individual scores) led to consensus-based prioritization. This process relied on <span class="hlt">practical</span> experience from diverse and accomplished NPS stakeholders and synthesis of 17 previous studies. Results provide a comprehensive, stakeholder-driven prioritization of MPs for wetland and irrigated <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land managers. Final prioritization highlights the most promising MPs for <span class="hlt">practical</span> application and control study, and a secondary set of MPs warranting further evaluation. MPs that address hydrology and soil/vegetation were prioritized because experiences were positive and implementation appeared more feasible. MeHg control studies will need to address the TMDL conundrum that MPs effective at reducing MeHg exports could both exacerbate MeHg exposure and contend with other management objectives on site.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25527391','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25527391"><span id="translatedtitle">Bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of Vitis vinifera L. cultivated under distinct <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Argentina.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vega-Avila, A D; Gumiere, T; Andrade, P A M; Lima-Perim, J E; Durrer, A; Baigori, M; Vazquez, F; Andreote, F D</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Plants interact with a myriad of microbial cells in the rhizosphere, an environment that is considered to be important for plant development. However, the differential structuring of rhizosphere microbial communities due to plant cultivation under differential <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> remains to be described for most plant species. Here we describe the rhizosphere microbiome of grapevine cultivated under conventional and organic <span class="hlt">practices</span>, using a combination of cultivation-independent approaches. The quantification of bacterial 16S rRNA and nifH genes, by quantitative PCR (qPCR), revealed similar amounts of these genes in the rhizosphere in both vineyards. PCR-DGGE was used to detect differences in the structure of bacterial communities, including both the complete whole communities and specific fractions, such as Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and those harboring the nitrogen-fixing related gene nifH. When analyzed by a multivariate approach (redundancy analysis), the shifts observed in the bacterial communities were poorly explained by variations in the physical and chemical characteristics of the rhizosphere. These approaches were complemented by high-throughput sequencing (67,830 sequences) based on the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, identifying the major bacterial groups present in the rhizosphere of grapevines: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Acidobacteria, Cloroflexi, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes, which occur in distinct proportions in the rhizosphere from each vineyard. The differences might be related to the selection of plant metabolism upon distinct reservoirs of microbial cells found in each vineyard. The results fill a gap in the knowledge of the rhizosphere of grapevines and also show distinctions in these bacterial communities due to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. PMID:25527391</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19280037','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19280037"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparative study of model prediction of diffuse nutrient losses in response to changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vagstad, N; French, H K; Andersen, H E; Behrendt, H; Grizzetti, B; Groenendijk, P; Lo Porto, A; Reisser, H; Siderius, C; Stromquist, J; Hejzlar, J; Deelstra, J</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>This article presents a comparative study of modelled changes in nutrient losses from two European catchments caused by modifications in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The purpose was not to compare the actual models used, but rather to assess the uncertainties a manager may be faced with after receiving decision support from consultants using different models. Seven modelling teams were given the same data about two catchments and their management characteristics and were asked to model the same changes in management <span class="hlt">practices</span> using the model of their own choice. This can potentially cause accumulated 'errors' due to differences in the modelling teams' interpretation of relevant processes and definitions of boundary conditions (inputs). The study was carried out within the framework of the EUROHARP project, which aimed at harmonising procedures for quantifying diffuse losses of nitrogen and phosphorus from <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Models are important for assessing river basin management plans (RBMPs) as required e.g. under the EC Water Framework Directive and Action Plans under the EC Nitrates Directive. This article illustrates some challenges with respect to interpreting such modelling results. The selected management scenarios include changes in fertiliser application levels, changes in livestock numbers and changes in land-use and crop rotation systems. Seven models were applied for the same scenarios in the Enza catchment in Italy and the Zelivka catchment in the Czech Republic. All models had been calibrated and validated with respect to historical data of climatic conditions, water quality and discharge measurements. The modelling results reveal a variation in predicted effects of the management scenarios, causing different conclusions with respect to choice of best management <span class="hlt">practice</span> for reducing nutrient losses. The study demonstrates that it is important that care is taken by modellers and involved decision makers throughout the entire modelling process, both with regard</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26196068','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26196068"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the impacts of sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> for water quality improvements in the Vouga catchment (Portugal) using the SWAT model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rocha, João; Roebeling, Peter; Rial-Rivas, María Ermitas</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The extensive use of fertilizers has become one of the most challenging environmental issues in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> catchment areas. In order to reduce the negative impacts from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> activities and to accomplish the objectives of the European Water Framework Directive we must consider the implementation of sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In this study, we assess sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> based on reductions in N-fertilizer application rates (from 100% to 0%) and N-application methods (single, split and slow-release) across key <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use classes in the Vouga catchment, Portugal. The SWAT model was used to relate sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> yields and N-NO3 water pollution deliveries. Results show that crop yields as well as N-NO3 exportation rates decrease with reductions in N-application rates and single N-application methods lead to lower crop yields and higher N-NO3 exportation rates as compared to split and slow-release N-application methods. PMID:26196068</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70019018','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70019018"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and vadose zone stratigraphy on nitrate concentration in ground water in Kansas, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Townsend, M.A.; Sleezer, R.O.; Macko, S.A.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Differences in nitrate-N concentrations in,around water in Kansas can be explained by variations in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and vadose-zone stratigraphy. In northwestern Kansas, past use of a local stream for tailwater runoff from irrigation and high fertilizer applications for sugar-beet farming resulted in high nitrate-N concentrations (12-60 mg L-1; in both soil and ground water. Nitrogen isotope values from the soil and ground water range from +4 to +8? which is typical for a fertilizer source. In parts of south-central Kansas, the use of crop rotation and the presence of both <span class="hlt">continuous</span> fine-textured layers and a reducing ground-water chemistry resulted in ground-water nitrate-N values of 10 mg L-1; in both soil and grounwater. Nitrogen isotope values of +3 to +7? indicate a fertilizer source. Crop rotation decreased nitrate-N values in the shallow ground water (9 m). However, deeper ground water showed increasing nitrate-N concentrations as a result of past farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6859262','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6859262"><span id="translatedtitle">Guide to good <span class="hlt">practices</span> for <span class="hlt">continuing</span> training. [Contains a decision tree for training</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1993-02-01</p> <p>The purpose of this Guide to Good <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Training is to provide contractor training organizations with information and methods useful in the development and implementation of a <span class="hlt">continuing</span> training program. DOE Order 5480.18A, Accreditation of Performance-Based Training for Category A Reactors and Nuclear Facilities,'' and DOE Order 5480.20, Personnel Selection, Qualification and Training Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities'' Chapter 1, Paragraph 7, require each facility to design and implement a <span class="hlt">continuing</span> training program. <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> training is necessary to ensure that facility personnel <span class="hlt">continually</span> improve their ability to operate and maintain their facility in a safe and reliable manner. <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> training also should enhance the professionalism of these individuals and should make them aware of the possible consequences of misoperation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMPA34A..09C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMPA34A..09C"><span id="translatedtitle">The Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) Initiative: Developing methods and best <span class="hlt">practices</span> for global <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Champagne, C.; Jarvis, I.; Defourny, P.; Davidson, A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> systems differ significantly throughout the world, making a 'one size fits all' approach to remote sensing and monitoring of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscapes problematic. The Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) was established in 2009 to bring together the global scientific community to work towards a set of best <span class="hlt">practices</span> and recommendations for using earth observation data to map, monitor and report on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity globally across an array of diverse <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> systems. These methods form the research and development component of the Group on Earth Observation Global <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Monitoring (GEOGLAM) initiative to harmonize global monitoring efforts and increase market transparency. The JECAM initiative brings together researchers from a large number of globally distributed, well monitored <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> test sites that cover a range of crop types, cropping systems and climate regimes. Each test site works independently as well as together across multiple sites to test methods, sensors and field data collection techniques to derive key <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> parameters, including crop type, crop condition, crop yield and soil moisture. The outcome of this project will be a set of best <span class="hlt">practices</span> that cover the range of remote sensing monitoring and reporting needs, including satellite data acquisition, pre-processing techniques, information retrieval and ground data validation. These outcomes provide the research and development foundation for GEOGLAM and will help to inform the development of the GEOGLAM "system of systems" for global <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> monitoring. The outcomes of the 2014 JECAM science meeting will be discussed as well as examples of methods being developed by JECAM scientists.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010AGUFM.B11D0406W&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010AGUFM.B11D0406W&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Variability of Total Below Ground Carbon Allocation amongst Common <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Land Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span>: a Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wacha, K. M.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wilson, C. G.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Field measurements and numerical models are currently being used to estimate quantities of Total Belowground Carbon Allocation (TBCA) for three representative land uses, viz. corn, soybeans, and prairie bromegrass for CRP (Conservation Reserve Program) of an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> Iowa sub-watershed, located within the Clear Creek Watershed (CCW). Since it is difficult to measure TBCA directly, a mass balance approach has been implemented to estimate TBCA as follows: TBCA = FS + FE+ Δ(CS + CR + CL) - FA , where the term Fs denotes soil respiration; FE is the carbon content of the eroded/deposited soil; ΔCS, ΔCR, ΔCL denote the changes in carbon content of the mineral soil, plant roots, and litter layer, respectively; and FA is the above ground litter fall of dead plant material to the soil. The terms are hypothesized to have a huge impact on TBCA within <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> settings due to intensive tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>, water-driven soil erosion/deposition, and high usage of fertilizer. To test our hypothesis, field measurements are being performed at the plot scale, replicating common <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Soil respiration (FS) is being measured with an EGM-4 CO2 Gas Analyzer and SRC-1 Soil Respiration Chamber (PP Systems), soil moisture and temperature are recorded in the top 20 cm for each respective soil respiration measurement, and litter fall rates (FA) are acquired by collecting the residue in a calibrated pan. The change in carbon content of the soil (ΔCS), roots (ΔCR) and litter layer (ΔCL) are being analyzed by collecting soil samples throughout the life cycle of the plant. To determine the term FE for the three representative land management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, a funnel collection system located at the plot outlet was used for collecting the eroded material after natural rainfall events. Field measurements of TBCA at the plot scale via the mass balance approach are used to calibrate the numerical agronomic process model DAYCENT, which simulates the daily</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H31I1232P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H31I1232P"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of land tenure and stakeholders attitudes on optimization of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Piemonti, A. D.; Babbar-Sebens, M.; Luzar, E. J.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Modeled watershed management plans have become valuable tools for evaluating the effectiveness and impacts of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on hydrologic processes in watersheds. In multi-objective optimization approaches, several studies have focused on maximizing physical, ecological, or economic benefits of <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a specific location, without considering the relationship between social systems and social attitudes on the overall optimality of the <span class="hlt">practice</span> at that location. For example, objectives that have been commonly used in spatial optimization of <span class="hlt">practices</span> are economic costs, sediment loads, nutrient loads and pesticide loads. Though the benefits derived from these objectives are generally oriented towards community preferences, they do not represent attitudes of landowners who might operate their land differently than their neighbors (e.g. farm their own land or rent the land to someone else) and might have different social/personal drivers that motivate them to adopt the <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In addition, a distribution of such landowners could exist in the watershed, leading to spatially varying preferences to <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In this study we evaluated the effect of three different land tenure types on the spatial-optimization of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>. To perform the optimization, we used a uniform distribution of land tenure type and a spatially varying distribution of land tenure type. Our results show that for a typical Midwestern <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed, the most optimal solutions (i.e. highest benefits for minimum economic costs) found were for a uniform distribution of landowners who operate their own land. When a different land-tenure was used for the watershed, the optimized alternatives did not change significantly for nitrates reduction benefits and sediment reduction benefits, but were attained at economic costs much higher than the costs of the landowner who farms her/his own land. For example, landowners who rent to cash-renters would have to spend ~120</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..18.4742M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..18.4742M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">A complete and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> pesticide screening during one growing season in five small Swiss rivers with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mangold, Simon; Comte, Rahel; Doppler, Tobias; Wittmer, Irene; Moschet, Christoph; Stamm, Christian; Singer, Heinz; Kunz, Manuel</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> pesticides are regularly found in surface waters at concentration levels that raise ecotoxicological concerns. Due to large fluctuations in concentration over time and the potentially high number of pesticides in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds, it is difficult to obtain a comprehensive overview of the actual pollution level. This collaborative project between research and Swiss federal and cantonal authorities aimed for a comprehensive analysis of pesticide pollution in five small <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> streams to address this knowledge gap. The five rivers are located in catchments (1.5 to 9 km2) with intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> covering a wide range of crops, such as grains, vegetables, vineyards and orchards. Urban activities and influences are low. Twelve-hour composite samples were collected <span class="hlt">continuously</span> from March until the end of August with automatic sampling devices, resulting in 360 samples per site. Using precipitation and water level data, we differentiated between discharge events and low-flow periods. Samples taken during dry weather were pooled for the analysis. This procedure resulted in a complete concentration profile over the entire monitoring period covered by 60 samples per site. The analysis, using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (Orbitrap technology), involved a target screening of 248 pesticides including fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, as well as important transformation products. Data on the total number and distribution of pesticides, their detection frequency, crop specific applications and concentration time profiles will be presented. Preliminary results indicate substantial pesticide exposure since at least 20 different compounds were detected in all samples. One sample even contained a mixture of 80 pesticides. The majority of concentrations were in the low ng/L range but concentrations of a few compounds were very high (several micrograms/L) during discharge events as well as during low flow conditions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2007/3001/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2007/3001/"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating the Environmental Effects of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Natural Resources: Scientific Contributions of the U.S. Geological Survey to Enhance the Management of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Landscapes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) enhances and protects the quality of life in the United States by advancing scientific knowledge to facilitate effective management of hydrologic, biologic, and geologic resources. Results of selected USGS research and monitoring projects in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscapes are presented in this Fact Sheet. Significant environmental and social issues associated with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production include changes in the hydrologic cycle; introduction of toxic chemicals, nutrients, and pathogens; reduction and alteration of wildlife habitats; and invasive species. Understanding environmental consequences of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production is critical to minimize unintended environmental consequences. The preservation and enhancement of our natural resources can be achieved by measuring the success of improved management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and by adjusting conservation policies as needed to ensure long-term protection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26954003','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26954003"><span id="translatedtitle">Society for Academic <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 2, <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Facilitation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The Society for Academic <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, <span class="hlt">practice</span> facilitation, which is a common strategy in primary care to help <span class="hlt">practices</span> develop capacity and infrastructure to support their ability to improve patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe <span class="hlt">practice</span> facilitation, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report <span class="hlt">practice</span> facilitation efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of <span class="hlt">practice</span> facilitation. PMID:26954003</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23302087','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23302087"><span id="translatedtitle">Japanese consumer preferences for milk certified with the good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span>(GAP) label.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aizaki, Hideo; Nanseki, Teruaki; Zhou, Hui</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This study examined Japanese consumers' valuation of a good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> (GAP) label on packaged milk and investigated the effect of detailed GAP information on valuation. A total of 624 Japanese consumers were asked to select their most preferred milk through an online survey. The milk was assumed to have three attributes: the GAP label, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points certification, and price. The results showed that consumers' valuation of GAP was significantly positive. Although providing additional GAP information to a respondent who was aware of GAP and what it means had a positive effect on the consumers' valuation of GAP, provision of this information had no effect if the respondent knew about GAP either moderately or slightly, and had a negative effect if the respondent did not know about GAP at all. To increase broad consumer awareness and valuation of GAP, it is important to provide GAP information according to the requirements of consumers. PMID:23302087</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.B12A..04M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.B12A..04M"><span id="translatedtitle">Midwest Climate and <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> - Monitoring Tillage <span class="hlt">Practices</span> with NASA Remote Sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Makar, N. I.; Archer, S.; Rooks, K.; Sparks, K.; Trigg, C.; Lourie, J.; Wilkins, K.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Concerns about climate change have driven efforts to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> activity has drawn considerable attention because it accounts for nearly twelve percent of total anthropogenic emissions. Depending on the type of tillage method utilized, farm land can be either a source or a sink of carbon. Conventional tillage disturbs the soil and can release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Conservational tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span> have been advocated for their ability to sequester carbon, reduce soil erosion, maintain soil moisture, and increase long-term productivity. If carbon credit trading systems are implemented, a cost-effective, efficient tillage monitoring system is needed to enforce offset standards. Remote sensing technology can expedite the process and has shown promising results in distinguishing crop residue from soil. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> indices such as the CAI, SINDRI, and LCA illuminate the unique reflectance spectra of crop residue and are thus able to classify fields based on percent crop cover. The CAI requires hyperspectral data, as it relies on narrow bands within the shortwave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although limited in availability, hyperspectral data has been shown to produce the most accurate results for detecting crop residue on the soil. A new approach to using the CAI was the focus of this study. Previously acquired field data was located in a region covered by a Hyperion swath and is thus the primary study area. In previous studies, ground-based data were needed for each satellite swath to correctly calibrate the linear relationship between the index values and the fraction of residue cover. We hypothesized that there should be a standard method which is able to convert index values into residue classifications without ground data analysis. To do this, end index values for a particular data set were assumed to be associated with end values of residue cover percentages. This method may prove</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013EGUGA..1512969G&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013EGUGA..1512969G&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Integrating different knowledge sources and disciplines for <span class="hlt">practical</span> applications in Forest and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Engineering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Guzmán, Gema; Castillo, Carlos; Taguas, Encarnación</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>One of the aims of 'The Bologna Process' is to promote among the students the acquisition of <span class="hlt">practical</span>, social and creative skills to face real-life situations and to solve the difficulties they might find during their professional life. It involves an important change in the educational system, from a traditional approach focused on teaching, towards a new one that encourages learning. Under this context, University teaching implies the design of activities addressed to the dissemination of "know-how" to solve different problems associated with two technical disciplines: Forest and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Engineering. This study presents a preliminary experience where a group of information and communication technologies (ICT) such as, audiovisual resources (videos, reports and photo gallery), virtual visits to blogs and interactive activities have been used to provide a comprehensive knowledge of the environmental and sociocultural components of the landscape in order to facilitate the decision-making process in the engineering project context . With these tools, the students must study and characterize all these aspects in order to justify the chosen solutions and the project design. This approach was followed in the analysis of the limiting factors of <span class="hlt">practical</span> cases in projects about forestation, landscape restoration and hydrological planning. This communication shows how this methodology has been applied in Forest and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Engineering and the students' experience with these innovative tools. The use of ICTs involved a friendly framework that stimulated students' interest and made subjects more attractive, since it allowed to assess the complex relationships between landscape, history and economy. Furthermore, this type of activities promotes the interdisciplinary training and the acquisition of creative and autonomous skills which are not included in many cases into the main objectives of the subjects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.2163C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.2163C"><span id="translatedtitle">Effectiveness of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil erosion processes in semi-arid areas of Zimbabwe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chikwari, Emmanuel; Mhaka, Luke; Gwandu, Tariro; Chipangura, Tafadzwa; Misi Manyanga, Amos; Sabastian Matsenyengwa, Nyasha; Rabesiranana, Naivo; Mabit, Lionel</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>- The application of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) in soil erosion and redistribution studies has gained popularity since the late 1980s. In Zimbabwe, soil erosion research was mostly based on conventional methods which included the use of erosion plots for quantitative measurements and erosion models for predicting soil losses. Only limited investigation to explore the possibility of using Caesium-137 (Cs-137) has been reported in the early 1990s for undisturbed and cultivated lands in Zimbabwe. In this study, the Cs-137 technique was applied to assess the impact of soil conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil losses and to develop strategies and support effective policies that help farmers in Zimbabwe for sustainable land management. The study was carried out at the Makoholi research station 30 km north of the Masvingo region which is located 260 km south of Harare. The area is semi-arid and the study site comprises coarse loamy sands, gleyic lixisols. The conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (CA) <span class="hlt">practices</span> used within the area since 1988 include (i) direct seeding (DS) with mulch, (ii) CA basins with mulch, and (iii) 18 years direct seeding, left fallow for seven years and turned into conventional tillage since 2012 (DS/F/C). The Cs-137 reference inventory was established at 214 ± 16 Bq/m2. The mean inventories for DS, CA basins and DS/F/C were 195, 190 and 214 Bq/m2 respectively. Using the conversion Mass Balance Model 2 on the Cs-137 data obtained along transects for each of the <span class="hlt">practices</span>, gross erosion rates were found to be 7.5, 7.3 and 2.6 t/ha/yr for direct seeding, CA basins and the DS/F/C while the net erosion rates were found to be 3.8, 4.6 and 0 t/ha/yr respectively. Sediment delivery ratios were 50%, 63% and 2% in the respective order. These preliminary results showed the effectiveness of DS over CA basins in erosion control. The efficiency of fallowing in controlling excessive soil loss was significant in the plot that started as DS for 18 years but left fallow for 7</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=size+AND+dependent+AND+variable&id=EJ912791','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=size+AND+dependent+AND+variable&id=EJ912791"><span id="translatedtitle">An Effective Model for <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Training in Evidence-Based <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Parrish, Danielle E.; Rubin, Allen</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This study utilized a replicated one-group pretest-posttest design with 3 month follow-up to evaluate the impact of a one-day <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education training on the evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span> (EBP) process with community practitioners (N = 69). Outcome measures assessed the level of workshop participants' familiarity with the EBP process, their…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=perception&pg=7&id=EJ1107427','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=perception&pg=7&id=EJ1107427"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development in the Accounting Profession: <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Perceptions from the Asia Pacific Region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Lange, Paul; Jackling, Beverley; Suwardy, Themin</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Drawing on research in the sociology of professions as a reference point, this study examines the <span class="hlt">practices</span> and perceptions of professional accountants towards the requirements of IES7 on <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD). Responses from 1310 accountants in the Asia Pacific region suggest while increasing globalisation has led to more…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=+%22stakeholders+best+result%22+OR+%22interagency+organizations%22++OR+%22governance+structure%22++OR+%22best+practices%22++OR+responsibilities&pg=4&id=EJ1108127','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=+%22stakeholders+best+result%22+OR+%22interagency+organizations%22++OR+%22governance+structure%22++OR+%22best+practices%22++OR+responsibilities&pg=4&id=EJ1108127"><span id="translatedtitle">A Framework of Best <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development for the Accounting Profession</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Lange, Paul; Jackling, Beverley; Basioudis, Ilias G.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The International Accounting Education Standards Board (IAESB) places a strong emphasis on individual professionals taking responsibility for their <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development (CPD). On the other hand, the roles performed by professional accountants have evolved out of <span class="hlt">practical</span> necessity to "best" suit the diverse needs of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1081279.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1081279.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Teachers' Perception and Implementation of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Assessment <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Secondary Schools in Ekiti-State, Nigeria</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Modup, Ale Veronica; Sunday, Omirin Michael</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study examined the <span class="hlt">practices</span> and implementation of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> assessment in Ekiti State Secondary Schools with special interest in Ado Local Government. The population for the study was the whole number of teachers in Ekiti State secondary school and the sample for the study was 160 secondary school teachers who were randomly selected from…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartEEEE-app10.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartEEEE-app10.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Eeee of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart TT, UU, or H. i. Carrying out a leak detection and repair program in... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work... Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards As stated in §§ 63.2378(a) and (b) and 63.2386(c)(6), you must...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=improvement+AND+continuous&pg=2&id=EJ1049781','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=improvement+AND+continuous&pg=2&id=EJ1049781"><span id="translatedtitle">Record of Assessment Moderation <span class="hlt">Practice</span> (RAMP): Survey Software as a Mechanism of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Quality Improvement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnson, Genevieve Marie</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In higher education, assessment integrity is pivotal to student learning and satisfaction, and, therefore, a particularly important target of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> quality improvement. This paper reports on the preliminary development and application of a process of recording and analysing current assessment moderation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, with the aim of identifying…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=MEMBERSHIP+AND+FEES&pg=7&id=ED304538','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=MEMBERSHIP+AND+FEES&pg=7&id=ED304538"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education in Canadian Universities: A Summary Report of Policies and <span class="hlt">Practices</span>--1985.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brooke, W. Michael; Morris, John F.</p> <p></p> <p>This report collects, analyzes, and summarizes descriptive information on selected academic and administrative policies and <span class="hlt">practices</span> pertaining to part-time students and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education operations at Canadian universities. An introduction describes the study and the sample--the institutional membership of the Canadian Association for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvA..87e2309M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvA..87e2309M"><span id="translatedtitle">Wavelength attack on <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum-key-distribution system with a heterodyne protocol</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ma, Xiang-Chun; Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Liang, Lin-Mei</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>We present the wavelength attack on a <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum-key-distribution system with a heterodyne protocol, in which the transmittance of beam splitters at Bob's station is wavelength dependent. Our strategy is proposed independent of but analogous to that of Huang [arXiv:1206.6550v1 [quant-ph</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27213867','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27213867"><span id="translatedtitle">Modelling the impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on river water quality in Eastern England.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Taylor, Sam D; He, Yi; Hiscock, Kevin M</p> <p>2016-09-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> diffuse water pollution remains a notable global pressure on water quality, posing risks to aquatic ecosystems, human health and water resources and as a result legislation has been introduced in many parts of the world to protect water bodies. Due to their efficiency and cost-effectiveness, water quality models have been increasingly applied to catchments as Decision Support Tools (DSTs) to identify mitigation options that can be introduced to reduce <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> diffuse water pollution and improve water quality. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to the River Wensum catchment in eastern England with the aim of quantifying the long-term impacts of potential changes to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on river water quality. Calibration and validation were successfully performed at a daily time-step against observations of discharge, nitrate and total phosphorus obtained from high-frequency water quality monitoring within the Blackwater sub-catchment, covering an area of 19.6 km(2). A variety of mitigation options were identified and modelled, both singly and in combination, and their long-term effects on nitrate and total phosphorus losses were quantified together with the 95% uncertainty range of model predictions. Results showed that introducing a red clover cover crop to the crop rotation scheme applied within the catchment reduced nitrate losses by 19.6%. Buffer strips of 2 m and 6 m width represented the most effective options to reduce total phosphorus losses, achieving reductions of 12.2% and 16.9%, respectively. This is one of the first studies to quantify the impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> mitigation options on long-term water quality for nitrate and total phosphorus at a daily resolution, in addition to providing an estimate of the uncertainties of those impacts. The results highlighted the need to consider multiple pollutants, the degree of uncertainty associated with model predictions and the risk of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015QuIP...14.4339Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015QuIP...14.4339Z"><span id="translatedtitle">Application of <span class="hlt">practical</span> noiseless linear amplifier in no-switching <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum cryptography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Yichen; Yu, Song; Guo, Hong</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>We propose a modified no-switching <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution protocol by employing a <span class="hlt">practical</span> noiseless linear amplifier at the receiver to increase the maximal transmission distance and tolerable excess noise. A security analysis is presented to derive the secure bound of the protocol in presence of a Gaussian noisy lossy channel. Simulation results show that the modified protocol can not only transmit longer distance and tolerate more channel excess noise than the original protocol, but also distribute more secure keys in the enhanced region where we define a critical point to separate the enhanced and degenerative region. This critical point presents the condition of using a <span class="hlt">practical</span> noiseless linear amplifier in the no-switching <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum cryptography, which is meaningful and instructive to implement a <span class="hlt">practical</span> experiment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr9460','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr9460"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land-management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality in northeastern Guilford County, North Carolina, 1985-90</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Harned, D.A.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The effects of different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land- management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on sediment, nutrients, and selected pesticides in surface water, and on nutrients and pesticides in ground water were studied in four small basins in the Piedmont of North Carolina. The basins included two adjacent basins in row-crop fields, a mixed land-use basin, and a forested basin. One of the row-crop fields was farmed using conservation land-management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, including strip cropping, contour plowing, field borders, and grassed waterways. The other field was farmed using standard land- management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, including <span class="hlt">continuous</span> cropping, straight-row plowing, and ungrassed waterways. The sediment yield for the standard land-management basin was 2.3 times that for the conservation land-management basin, 14.1 times that for the mixed land-use basin, and 19.5 times that for the forested basin. Nutrient concentra- tions in surface water from the row-crop and mixed land-use basins were higher than those in surface water for the forested basin. Nutrient concentra- tions in soil water and ground water beneath the row-crop basins were lower than those in surface- water runoff for these basins. The lowest nutrient concentrations measured in the row-crop basins generally were in soil-water samples collected just below the root zone (3-foot depth) and in ground water. No significant differences in pesticide concentrations were identified between the surface-water runoff from the standard land- management basin and that from the conservation land-management basin. Concentrations of the soil pesticides isopropalin and flumetralin were higher in the standard land-management basin than in the conservation land-management basin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010EGUGA..1212984P&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010EGUGA..1212984P&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Water quality and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: the case study of southern Massaciuccoli reclaimed land (Tuscany, Italy)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pistocchi, Chiara; Baneschi, Ilaria; Basile, Paolo; Cannavò, Silvia; Guidi, Massimo; Risaliti, Rosalba; Rossetto, Rudy; Sabbatini, Tiziana; Silvestri, Nicola; Bonari, Enrico</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>Owing to increasing anthropogenic impacts, lagoons and wetlands are being exposed to environmental degradation. Therefore, the sustainable management of these environmental resources is a fundamental issue to maintain either the ecosystems and the human activity. The Massaciuccoli Lake is a coastal lake of fresh to brackish water surrounded by a marsh, which drains a total catchment of about 114 km2. Large part of the basin has been reclaimed since 1930 by means of pumping stations forcing water from the drained areas into the lake. The system is characterized by: high complexity of the hydrological setting; subsidence of the peaty soils in the reclaimed area (2 to 3 m in 70 years), that left the lake perched; reclaimed land currently devoted mainly to conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (e.g.: maize monoculture) along with some industrial sites, two sewage treatment plants and some relevant urban settlements; social conflicts among different land users because of the impact on water quality and quantity. The interaction between such a fragile natural system and human activities leads to an altered ecological status mainly due to eutrophication and water salinisation. Hence, the present work aims at identifying and assessing the sources of nutrients (phosphorous in particular) into the lake, and characterising land use and some socio-economic aspects focusing on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> systems, in order to set up suitable mitigation measures. Water quantity and quality in the most intensively cultivated sub-catchment, placed 0.5 to 3 m under m.s.l. were monitored in order to underlain the interaction between water and its nutrient load. Questionnaires and interviews to farmers were conducted to obtain information about <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, farm management, risks and constraints for farming activities. The available information about the natural system and land use were collected and organised in a GIS system: a conceptual model of surface water hydrodinamics was build up and 14</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1816403U&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1816403U&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Spatio-temporal optimization of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to achieve a sustainable development at basin level; framework of a case study in Colombia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Uribe, Natalia; corzo, Gerald; Solomatine, Dimitri</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The flood events present during the last years in different basins of the Colombian territory have raised questions on the sensitivity of the regions and if this regions have common features. From previous studies it seems important features in the sensitivity of the flood process were: land cover change, precipitation anomalies and these related to impacts of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> management and water management deficiencies, among others. A significant government investment in the outreach activities for adopting and promoting the Colombia National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) is being carried out in different sectors and regions, having as a priority the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> sector. However, more information is still needed in the local environment in order to assess were the regions have this sensitivity. Also the <span class="hlt">continuous</span> change in one region with seasonal <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> have been pointed out as a critical information for optimal sustainable development. This combined spatio-temporal dynamics of crops cycle in relation to climate change (or variations) has an important impact on flooding events at basin areas. This research will develop on the assessment and optimization of the aggregated impact of flood events due to determinate the spatio-temporal dynamic of changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A number of common best <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> have been identified to explore their effect in a spatial hydrological model that will evaluate overall changes. The optimization process consists on the evaluation of best performance in the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production, without having to change crops activities or move to other regions. To achieve this objectives a deep analysis of different models combined with current and future climate scenarios have been planned. An algorithm have been formulated to cover the parametric updates such that the optimal temporal identification will be evaluated in different region on the case study area. Different hydroinformatics</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-272.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-272.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.272 - Commingling and contact with prohibited substance prevention <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Commingling and contact with prohibited substance prevention <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard. 205.272 Section 205.272 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec205-272.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec205-272.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.272 - Commingling and contact with prohibited substance prevention <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Commingling and contact with prohibited substance prevention <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard. 205.272 Section 205.272 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-204.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-204.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.204 - Seeds and planting stock <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seeds and planting stock <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard. 205.204 Section 205.204 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-207.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-207.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.207 - Wild-crop harvesting <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wild-crop harvesting <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard. 205.207 Section 205.207 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-206.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec205-206.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.206 - Crop pest, weed, and disease management <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Crop pest, weed, and disease management <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard. 205.206 Section 205.206 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-9040.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-9040.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.9040 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards? 63.9040 Section 63.9040 Protection of... demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with each emission limit and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard in Table 1 to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol14-sec63-9040.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol14-sec63-9040.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.9040 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards? 63.9040 Section 63.9040 Protection of... demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with each emission limit and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard in Table 1 to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-9635.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-sec63-9635.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.9635 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me? 63.9635 Section 63.9635 Protection of... demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standard requirements in § 63.9591 by operating in...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014EGUGA..1610165P&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014EGUGA..1610165P&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating Lignite-Derived Products (LDPs) for <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> - Does Research Inform <span class="hlt">Practice</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Patti, Antonio; Rose, Michael; Little, Karen; Jackson, Roy; Cavagnaro, Timothy</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>. However, these growth benefits subsequently diminished over time. Insignificant growth benefits were observed for lucerne. The analysis of the literature and our own work indicates that it is difficult to account for all the possible variables where research is used to inform land management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Assisting farmers to conduct localised research in cooperative ventures is likely to bring about the best outcomes where site-specific research directly informs land management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1. Michael T. Rose, Antonio F. Patti, Karen R. Little, Alicia L. Brown, W. Roy Jackson, Timothy R. Cavagnaro, A Meta-Analysis and Review of Plant-Growth Response to Humic Substances: <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Implications for <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, Advances in Agronomy, 2013, 124, 37-89</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3832375','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3832375"><span id="translatedtitle">Changes in Soil Microbial Community Structure Influenced by <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in a Mediterranean Agro-Ecosystem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Zornoza, Raul; Scow, Kate</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> have proven to be unsuitable in many cases, causing considerable reductions in soil quality. Land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> can provide solutions to this problem and contribute to get a sustainable <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> model. The main objective of this work was to assess the effect of different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil microbial community structure (evaluated as abundance of phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA). Five different treatments were selected, based on the most common <span class="hlt">practices</span> used by farmers in the study area (eastern Spain): residual herbicides, tillage, tillage with oats and oats straw mulching; these <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> were evaluated against an abandoned land after farming and an adjacent long term wild forest coverage. The results showed a substantial level of differentiation in the microbial community structure, in terms of management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which was highly associated with soil organic matter content. Addition of oats straw led to a microbial community structure closer to wild forest coverage soil, associated with increases in organic carbon, microbial biomass and fungal abundances. The microbial community composition of the abandoned <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil was characterised by increases in both fungal abundances and the metabolic quotient (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), suggesting an increase in the stability of organic carbon. The ratio of bacteria:fungi was higher in wild forest coverage and land abandoned systems, as well as in the soil treated with oat straw. The most intensively managed soils showed higher abundances of bacteria and actinobacteria. Thus, the application of organic matter, such as oats straw, appears to be a sustainable management <span class="hlt">practice</span> that enhances organic carbon, microbial biomass and activity and fungal abundances, thereby changing the microbial community structure to one more similar to those observed in soils under wild forest coverage. PMID:24260409</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16091607','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16091607"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> influence flow regimes of headwater streams in western Iowa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tomer, M D; Meek, D W; Kramer, L A</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> tillage influences runoff and infiltration, but consequent effects on watershed hydrology are poorly documented. This study evaluated 25 yr (1971-1995) hydrologic records from four first-order watersheds in Iowa's loess hills. Two watersheds were under conventional tillage and two were under conservation (ridge) tillage, one of which was terraced. All four watersheds grew corn (Zea mays L.) every year. Flow-frequency statistics and autoregressive modeling were used to determine how conservation treatments influenced stream hydrology. The autoregressive modeling characterized variations in discharge, baseflow, and runoff at multi-year, annual, and shorter time scales. The ridge-tilled watershed (nonterraced) had 47% less runoff and 36% more baseflow than the conventional watershed of similar landform and slope. Recovery of baseflow after drought was quicker in the conservation watersheds, as evidenced by 365-d moving average plots, and 67% greater baseflow during the driest 2 yr. The two conventional watersheds were similar, except the steeper watershed discharged more runoff and baseflow during short (<30 d), wet periods. Significant multi-year and annual cycles occurred in all variables. Under ridge-till, seasonal (annual-cycle) variations in baseflow had greater amplitude, showing the seasonality of subsurface contaminant movement could increase under conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>. However, deviations from the modeled cycles of baseflow were also more persistent under conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, indicating baseflow was more stable. Indeed, flow-frequency curves showed wet-weather discharge decreased and dry-weather discharge increased under conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Although mean discharge increased in the conservation watersheds, variance and skewness of daily values were smaller. Ridge tillage with or without terraces increased stream discharge but reduced its variability. PMID:16091607</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..18.4110T&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..18.4110T&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Soil organic carbon fractionation for improving <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil quality diagnosis in different management <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trigalet, Sylvain; Chartin, Caroline; Kruger, Inken; Carnol, Monique; Van Oost, Kristof; van Wesemael, Bas</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Preserving ecosystem functions of soil organic matter (SOM) in soils is a key challenge. The need for an efficient diagnosis of SOM state in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils is a priority in order to facilitate the detection of changes in soil quality as a result of changes in management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The nature of SOM is complex and cannot readily be monitored due to the heterogeneity of its components. Assessment of the SOM level dynamics, typically characterized as the bulk soil organic carbon (SOC), can be refined by taking into account carbon pools with different turnover rates and stability. Fractionating bulk SOC in meaningful soil organic fractions helps to better diagnose SOC status. By separating carbon associated with clay and fine silt particles (stable carbon with slow turnover rate) and carbon non-associated with this fraction (labile and intermediate carbon with higher turnover rates), effects of management can be detected more efficiently at different spatial and temporal scales. Until now, most work on SOC fractionation has focused on small spatial scales along management or time gradients. The present case study focuses on SOC fractionation applied in order to refine the interpretation of organic matter turnover and SOC sequestration for regional units in Wallonia with comparable climate, management and, to a certain extent, soil conditions. In each unit, random samples from specific land uses are analyzed in order to assess the Normal Operative Ranges (NOR) of SOC fraction contents for each unit and land use combination. Thus, SOC levels of the different fractions of a specific field in a given unit can be compared to its corresponding NOR. It will help to better diagnose <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil quality in terms of organic carbon compared to a bulk SOC diagnosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..18..172N&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..18..172N&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Interdependence of soil and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> in a two - year phytoremediation in situ experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nwaichi, Eucharia; Onyeike, Eugene; Frac, Magdalena; Iwo, Godknows</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>A two - year plant - based soil clean - up was carried out at a crude oil spill <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> site in a Niger Delta community in Nigeria to access further clean - up potentials of Cymbopogon citratus. Applied diagnostic ratios identified mixed petrogenic and pyrogenic sources as the main contributors of PAHs. Up to 90.8% sequestration was obtained for carcinogenic PAHs especially Benz (a) pyrene in a 2 - phase manner. A community level approach for assessing patterns of sole carbon source utilization by mixed microbial samples was employed to differentiate spatial and temporal changes in the soil microbial communities. In relation to pollution, soil conditioning notably decreased the lag times and showed mixed effects for colour development rates, maximum absorbance and the overall community pattern. For rate and utilization of different carbon substrates in BIOLOG wells, after day 3, in comparison to control soil communities, contamination with hydrocarbons and associated types increased amines and amides consumption. Consumption of carbohydrates in all polluted and unamended regimes decreased markedlyin comparison to those cultivated with C. citratus. We found a direct relationship between cellulose breakdown, measurable with B-glucosidase activity, organic matter content and CO2 realease within all soils in the present study. Organic amendment rendered most studied contaminants unavailable for uptake in preference to inorganic fertilizer in both study years. Generally, phytoremediation improved significantly the microbial community activity and thus would promote ecosystem restoration in relation to most patronised techniques. Supplementation with required nutrients, in a long - term design would present many ecological benefits. Keywords: <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> soils; Recovery; Hydrocarbon pollution; Ecology; Management <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3538496','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3538496"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of a Primary Care <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education Program on Clinical <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Translating Theory Into <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Adams, Sandra G.; Pitts, Jennifer; Wynne, JoEllen; Yawn, Barbara P.; Diamond, Edward J.; Lee, Shuko; Dellert, Ed; Hanania, Nicola A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Objectives To describe the development and implementation process and assess the effect on self-reported clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> changes of a multidisciplinary, collaborative, interactive <span class="hlt">continuing</span> medical education (CME)/<span class="hlt">continuing</span> education (CE) program on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Multidisciplinary subject matter experts and education specialists used a systematic instructional design approach and collaborated with the American College of Chest Physicians and American Academy of Nurse Practitioners to develop, deliver, and reproduce a 1-day interactive COPD CME/CE program for 351 primary care clinicians in 20 US cities from September 23, 2009, through November 13, 2010. Results We recorded responses to demographic, self-confidence, and knowledge/comprehension questions by using an audience response system. Before the program, 173 of 320 participants (54.1%) had never used the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease recommendations for COPD. After the program, clinician self-confidence improved in all areas measured. In addition, participant knowledge and comprehension significantly improved (mean score, 77.1%-94.7%; P<.001). We implemented the commitment-to-change strategy in courses 6 through 20. A total of 271 of 313 participants (86.6%) completed 971 commitment-to-change statements, and 132 of 271 (48.7%) completed the follow-up survey. Of the follow-up survey respondents, 92 of 132 (69.7%) reported completely implementing at least one clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> change, and only 8 of 132 (6.1%) reported inability to make any clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> change after the program. Conclusion A carefully designed, interactive, flexible, dynamic, and reproducible COPD CME/CE program tailored to clinicians' needs that involves diverse instructional strategies and media can have short-term and long-term improvements in clinician self-confidence, knowledge/comprehension, and clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. PMID:22958990</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EnMan..38..253R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EnMan..38..253R"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Land Use and Best Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> to Control Nonpoint Water Pollution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ripa, Maria Nicoletta; Leone, Antonio; Garnier, Monica; Porto, Antonio Lo</p> <p>2006-08-01</p> <p>In recent years, improvements in point-source depuration technologies have highlighted the problems regarding <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> nonpoint (diffuse) sources, and this issue has become highly relevant from the environmental point of view. The considerable extension of the areas responsible for this kind of pollution, together with the scarcity of funds available to local managers, make minimizing the impacts of nonpoint sources on a whole basin a virtually impossible task. This article presents the results of a study intended to pinpoint those <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas, within a basin, that contribute most to water pollution, so that operations aimed at preventing and/or reducing this kind of pollution can be focused on them. With this aim, an innovative approach is presented that integrates a field-scale management model, a simple regression model, and a geographic information system (GIS). The Lake Vico basin, where recent studies highlighted a considerable increase in the trophic state, mainly caused by phosphorus (P) compounds deriving principally from the intensive cultivation of hazelnut trees in the lake basin, was chosen as the study site. Using the management model Groundwater Loading Effects of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management Systems (GLEAMS), the consequences, in terms of sediment yield and phosphorus export, of hazelnut tree cultivation were estimated on different areas of the basin with and without the application of a best management <span class="hlt">practice</span> (BMP) that consists of growing meadow under the trees. The GLEAMS results were successively extended to basin scale thanks to the application of a purposely designed regression model and of a GIS. The main conclusions can be summarized as follows: The effectiveness of the above-mentioned BMP is always greater for erosion reduction than for particulate P reduction, whatever the slope value considered; moreover, the effectiveness with reference to both particulate P and sediment yield production decreases as the slope increases. The</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16779698','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16779698"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> land use and best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to control nonpoint water pollution.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ripa, Maria Nicoletta; Leone, Antonio; Garnier, Monica; Lo Porto, Antonio</p> <p>2006-08-01</p> <p>In recent years, improvements in point-source depuration technologies have highlighted the problems regarding <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> nonpoint (diffuse) sources, and this issue has become highly relevant from the environmental point of view. The considerable extension of the areas responsible for this kind of pollution, together with the scarcity of funds available to local managers, make minimizing the impacts of nonpoint sources on a whole basin a virtually impossible task. This article presents the results of a study intended to pinpoint those <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas, within a basin, that contribute most to water pollution, so that operations aimed at preventing and/or reducing this kind of pollution can be focused on them. With this aim, an innovative approach is presented that integrates a field-scale management model, a simple regression model, and a geographic information system (GIS). The Lake Vico basin, where recent studies highlighted a considerable increase in the trophic state, mainly caused by phosphorus (P) compounds deriving principally from the intensive cultivation of hazelnut trees in the lake basin, was chosen as the study site. Using the management model Groundwater Loading Effects of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management Systems (GLEAMS), the consequences, in terms of sediment yield and phosphorus export, of hazelnut tree cultivation were estimated on different areas of the basin with and without the application of a best management <span class="hlt">practice</span> (BMP) that consists of growing meadow under the trees. The GLEAMS results were successively extended to basin scale thanks to the application of a purposely designed regression model and of a GIS. The main conclusions can be summarized as follows: The effectiveness of the above-mentioned BMP is always greater for erosion reduction than for particulate P reduction, whatever the slope value considered; moreover, the effectiveness with reference to both particulate P and sediment yield production decreases as the slope increases. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol7-sec800-60.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol7-sec800-60.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 800.60 - Deceptive actions and <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> GENERAL REGULATIONS Grain Handling... official personnel, any action or <span class="hlt">practice</span>, including the loading, weighing, handling, or sampling of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol7-sec800-60.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol7-sec800-60.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 800.60 - Deceptive actions and <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> GENERAL REGULATIONS Grain Handling... official personnel, any action or <span class="hlt">practice</span>, including the loading, weighing, handling, or sampling of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20655567','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20655567"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on mobilization of arsenic from sediments to groundwater in Bengal delta.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farooq, S H; Chandrasekharam, D; Berner, Z; Norra, S; Stüben, D</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>In the wake of the idea that surface derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays an important role in the mobilization of arsenic (As) from sediments to groundwater and may provide a vital tool in understanding the mechanism of As contamination (mobilization/fixation) in Bengal delta; a study has been carried out. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> fields that mainly cultivate rice (paddy fields) leave significantly large quantities of organic matter/organic carbon on the surface of Bengal delta which during monsoon starts decomposing and produces DOC. The DOC thus produced percolates down with rain water and mobilizes As from the sediments. Investigations on sediment samples collected from a paddy field clearly indicate that As coming on to the surface along with the irrigation water accumulates itself in the top few meters of sediment profile. The column experiments carried out on a 9 m deep sediment profile demonstrates that DOC has a strong potential to mobilize As from the paddy fields and the water recharging the aquifer through such <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> fields contain As well above the WHO limit thus contaminating the shallow groundwater. Experiment also demonstrates that decay of organic matter induces reducing condition in the sediments. Progressively increasing reducing conditions not only prevent the adsorption of As on mineral surfaces but also cause mobilization of previously sorbed arsenic. There seems to be a cyclic pattern where As from deeper levels comes to the surface with irrigational water, accumulates itself in the sediments, and ultimately moves down to the shallow groundwater. The extensive and <span class="hlt">continual</span> exploitation of intermediate/deep groundwater accelerates this cyclic process and helps in the movement of shallow contaminated groundwater to the deeper levels. PMID:20655567</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1485-19.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1485-19.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1485.19 - Employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1485.19 Section 1485.19 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF FOREIGN MARKETS FOR <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-10-31/pdf/2013-25845.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-10-31/pdf/2013-25845.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 65306 - Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-31</p> <p>...EPA is announcing a 30-day public comment period for the draft document titled, ``Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams'' (EPA/600/R-13/170). The EPA also is announcing that either ERG or Versar, EPA contractors for external scientific peer review, will select an independent group of experts to conduct a letter peer review of the draft document.......</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Milk&id=EJ1099733','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Milk&id=EJ1099733"><span id="translatedtitle">The Role of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education and Extension in Influencing Best <span class="hlt">Practice</span> for Managing Mastitis in Dairy Cattle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dillon, E. J.; Hennessy, T.; Cullinan, J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: To examine the role of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> education and extension in influencing the adoption of best <span class="hlt">practice</span> with regard to herd-level mastitis management. Design/Methodology/Approach: Somatic cell count (SCC) is an indicator of herd health with regard to mastitis and is negatively related to productivity and profitability. Panel data…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=225889','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=225889"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Wetland Ecosystem Services in a Wetland-Dominated Landscape: The Piedmont-Coastal Plain Region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>In the wetlands-rich eastern Coastal Plain and Piedmont region, diverse inland wetlands (riverine, depressional, wet flats) have been impacted by or converted to <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Farm Bill conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> that restore or enhance wetlands can return their ecological functions and services to the a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=319144','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=319144"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimating the effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on phosphorus loads in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River basin (MARB) is important in terms of both the national economy and the nutrients discharged to the basin and the Gulf of Mexico. Conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> are installed on cropland to reduce the nutrient losses. A recent study by the Conservation Effec...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=309186','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=309186"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> conservation planning framework: 1. Developing multi-<span class="hlt">practice</span> watershed planning scenarios and assessing nutrient reduction potential</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>We show that spatial data on soils, land use, and high-resolution topography, combined with knowledge of conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> effectiveness, can be leveraged to identify and assess alternatives to reduce nutrient discharge from small (HUC12) <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds. Databases comprising soil attrib...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=239505','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=239505"><span id="translatedtitle">Designing experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of precision <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on research fields. Part 1. Concepts for formulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The objective of this paper is to present a unique formulation methodology for designing experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of a precision <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> on a research farm field. We demonstrate an efficient method of combining the georeferenced treatment structure and the georeferenc...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19965338','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19965338"><span id="translatedtitle">Sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: energy inputs and outputs, pesticide, fertilizer and greenhouse gas management.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Yue-Wen</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The food security issue was addressed by the development of "modern <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>" in the last century. But food safety issues and environment degradation were the consequences suffered as a result. Climate change has been recognized as the result of release of stored energy in fossil fuel into the atmosphere. Homogeneous crop varieties, machinery, pesticides and fertilizers are the foundation of uniform commodities in modern <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Fossil fuels are used to manufacture fertilizers and pesticides as well as the energy source for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> machinery, thus characterizes modern <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Bio-fuel production and the possibility of the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> system as a form of energy input are discussed. PMID:19965338</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1229227','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1229227"><span id="translatedtitle">No to mandatory <span class="hlt">continuing</span> medical education, Yes to mandatory <span class="hlt">practice</span> auditing and professional educational development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Donen, N</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The issue of mandatory <span class="hlt">continuing</span> medical education (CME) is controversial. Traditional measures mandate only attendance, not learning, and have no measurable performance end points. There is no evidence that current approaches to CME, mandatory or voluntary, produce sustainable changes in physician <span class="hlt">practices</span> or application of current knowledge. Ongoing educational development is an important value in a professional, and there is an ethical obligation to keep up to date. Mandating self-audit of the effect of individual learning on physician's <span class="hlt">practices</span> and evaluation by the licensing authority are effective ways of ensuring the public are protected. The author recommends the use of a personal portfolio to document sources of learning, the effect of learning and the auditing of their applications on <span class="hlt">practice</span> patterns and patient outcomes. A series of principles are proposed to govern its application. PMID:9580734</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4920370','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4920370"><span id="translatedtitle">Refining Operational <span class="hlt">Practice</span> for Controlling Introduced European Rabbits on <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Lands in New Zealand</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Latham, A. David M.; Latham, M. Cecilia; Nugent, Graham; Smith, James; Warburton, Bruce</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) pose a major threat to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production and conservation values in several countries. In New Zealand, population control via poisoning is a frontline method for limiting rabbit damage, with large areas commonly treated using the metabolic toxin sodium fluoroacetate (‘1080’) delivered in bait via aerial dispersal. However, this method is expensive and the high application rates of the active ingredient cause public antipathy towards it. To guide reductions in cost and toxin usage, we evaluated the economics and efficacy of rabbit control using an experimental approach of sowing 1080-bait in strips instead of the commonly-used broadcast sowing method (i.e. complete coverage). Over a 4-year period we studied aerial delivery of 0.02% 1080 on diced carrot bait over ~3500 ha of rabbit-prone land in the North and South islands. In each case, experimental sowing via strip patterns using 10–15 kg of bait per hectare was compared with the current best <span class="hlt">practice</span> of aerial broadcast sowing at 30–35 kg/ha. Operational kill rates exceeded 87% in all but one case and averaged 93–94% across a total of 19 treatment replicates under comparable conditions; there was no statistical difference in overall efficacy observed between the two sowing methods. We project that strip-sowing could reduce by two thirds the amount of active 1080 applied per hectare in aerial control operations against rabbits, both reducing the non-target poisoning risk and promoting cost savings to farming operations. These results indicate that, similarly to the recently-highlighted benefits of adopting strip-sowing for poison control of introduced brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, aerial strip-sowing of toxic bait could also be considered a best <span class="hlt">practice</span> method for rabbit control in pest control policy. PMID:27341209</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5026756','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5026756"><span id="translatedtitle">The impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on shallow groundwater in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hampson, S.K.; Sendlein, L.V.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)</p> <p>1993-03-01</p> <p>To study the effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the groundwater quality of the Inner Bluegrass Region of Kentucky, a large representative row crop and livestock production operation was chosen. Located in southeastern Bourbon County, the study area encompasses a 1,400 acre watershed underlain by limestones and shales of the Ordovician age Lexington Limestone Formation. Sampling and testing of surface water, ephemeral, and perennial spring waters began in the area in October, 1989. At crop and pasture micro-sites within the study area, nests containing porous-cup lysimeters and monitoring wells were installed prior to the 1992 growing season. Samples from the nest locations were analyzed for Nitrate-N, triazines, metolochlor, carbofuran, alachlor, and 2,4-D. While only ten per cent of the total samples from the study area showed triazine or Nitrate-N concentrations in excess of EPA limits, greater than 80 per cent of the samples showed concentrations of triazines above detection limits, and greater than 70 per cent of the samples contained concentrations of Nitrate-N above detection limits. Occurrences of detectable concentrations of triazines and Nitrate-N were more frequent at crop-site nests, than at pasture-site nests. Nests at both the crop and pasture sites indicated dilution of Nitrate-N and triazine concentrations with depth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4306849','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4306849"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> and Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Bacterial Contamination in Greenhouse versus Open Field Lettuce Production</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Holvoet, Kevin; Sampers, Imca; Seynnaeve, Marleen; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to gain insight into potential differences in risk factors for microbial contamination in greenhouse versus open field lettuce production. Information was collected on sources, testing, and monitoring and if applicable, treatment of irrigation and harvest rinsing water. These data were combined with results of analysis on the levels of Escherichia coli as a fecal indicator organism and the presence of enteric bacterial pathogens on both lettuce crops and environmental samples. Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) PCR signals (vt1 or vt2 positive and eae positive), Campylobacter spp., and Salmonella spp. isolates were more often obtained from irrigation water sampled from open field farms (21/45, 46.7%) versus from greenhouse production (9/75, 12.0%). The open field production was shown to be more prone to fecal contamination as the number of lettuce samples and irrigation water with elevated E. coli was significantly higher. Farmers comply with generic guidelines on good <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> available at the national level, but monitoring of microbial quality, and if applicable appropriateness of water treatment, or water used for irrigation or at harvest is restricted. These results indicate the need for further elaboration of specific guidelines and control measures for leafy greens with regard to microbial hazards. PMID:25546272</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744689','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744689"><span id="translatedtitle">Remote sensing and GIS techniques for assessment of the soil water content in order to improve <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> and reduce the negative impact on groundwater: case study, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> area Ştefan cel Mare, Călăraşi County.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tevi, Giuliano; Tevi, Anca</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> based on non-customized irrigation and soil fertilization are harmful for the environment, and may pose a risk for human health. By <span class="hlt">continuing</span> the use of these <span class="hlt">practices</span>, it is not possible to ensure effective land management, which might be acquired by using advanced satellite technology configured for modern <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> development. The paper presents a methodology based on the correlation between remote sensing data and field observations, aiming to identify the key features and to establish an interpretation pattern for the inhomogeneity highlighted by the remote sensing data. Instead of using classical methods for the evaluation of land features (field analysis, measurements and mapping), the approach is to use high resolution multispectral and hyperspectral methods, in correlation with data processing and geographic information systems (GIS), in order to improve the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and mitigate their environmental impact (soil and shallow aquifer). PMID:22744689</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFMGC33C1305L&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFMGC33C1305L&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding the relative influence of climatic variations and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on crop yields at the US county level</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Leng, G.; Zhang, X.; Huang, M.; Yang, Q.; Rafique, R.; Asrar, G.; Leung, L. R.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Crop yields are largely determined by climate variations and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, such as irrigation, fertilization and residue management. Understanding the role of these factors in regulating crop yield variations is not only important for improved crop yield production, but also equally valuable for future crop yield prediction and food security assessments. Recently, the Community Land Model (CLM) has been augmented and evaluated for simulating corn, soybean and cereals at coarse aerial resolutions of 2 degrees (2000x2000 km). To better understand the underlying mechanisms controlling yield variations, we implemented and validated the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> version of CLM (CLM-crop) at a 0.125 degree resolution over the Conterminous United States (CONUS). We conducted a suite of numerical experiments to untangle the relative influence of climatic variations (temperature, precipitation, and radiation) and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on yield variations for the past 30 years at the US county level. Preliminary results show that the model with default parameter settings captures well the temporal variations in crop yields, as compared with the actual yield reported by the US Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (USDA). However, the magnitude of simulated crop yields is substantially higher, especially in the Mid-western US. We find that improved characterization of fertilizers and irrigation <span class="hlt">practices</span> is key to model performance. Retrospectively (1979-2012), crop yields are more sensitive to changes in climate factors (such as temperature) than to changes in crop management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The results of this study advances understanding of the dominant factors in regulating the crop yield variations at the county level, which is essential for credible prediction of crop yields in a changing climate, under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/wsp/2435/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/wsp/2435/report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land-management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality in northeastern Guilford County, North Carolina, 1985-90</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Harned, Douglas A.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>The effects of selected <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land-management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality were assessed in a comparative study of four small basins in the Piedmont province of North Carolina. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, such as tillage and applications of fertilizer and pesticides, are major sources of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides in surface water, and of nutrients and pesticides in ground water. The four study basins included two adjacent row-crop fields, a mixed land-use basin, and a forested basin. One of the row-crop fields (7.4 acres) was farmed by using conservation land-management (CLM) <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which included strip cropping, contour plowing, field borders, and grassed waterways. The other row-crop field (4.8 acres) was farmed by using standard land-management (SLM) <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which included <span class="hlt">continuous</span> cropping, straight-row plowing without regard to land topography, and poorly maintained waterways. The mixed land-use basin (665 acres) was monitored to compare water quality in surface water as SLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> were converted to CLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> during the project. The forested basin (44 acres) provided background surface-water hydrologic and chemical-quality conditions. Surface-water flow was reduced by 18 percent by CLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> compared to surface-water flow from the SLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> basin. The thickness of the unsaturated zone in the row-crop basins ranged from a few feet to 25 feet. Areas with thick unsaturated zones have a greater capacity to intercept and store nutrients and pesticides than do areas with thinner zones. Sediment concentrations and yields for the SLM <span class="hlt">practices</span> basin were considerably higher than those for the other basins. The median sediment concentration in surface water for the SLM basin was 3.4 times that of the CLM basin, 8.2 times that of the mixed land-use basin, and 38.4 times that of the forested basin. The total sediment yield for the SLM basin was 2.3 times that observed for the CLM basin, 14.1 times that observed for the mixed land</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2856588','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2856588"><span id="translatedtitle">Malaria knowledge and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> that promote mosquito breeding in two rural farming communities in Oyo State, Nigeria</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> such as the use of irrigation during rice cultivation, the use of ponds for fish farming and the storage of water in tanks for livestock provide suitable breeding grounds for anthropophylic mosquitoes. The most common anthropophylic mosquito in Nigeria which causes much of the morbidity and mortality associated with malaria is the anopheles mosquito. Farmers are therefore at high risk of malaria - a disease which seriously impacts on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity. Unfortunately information relating to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and farmers' behavioural antecedent factors that could assist malaria programmers plan and implement interventions to reduce risk of infections among farmers is scanty. Farmers' knowledge about malaria and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> which favour the breeding of mosquitoes in Fashola and Soku, two rural farming communities in Oyo State were therefore assessed in two rural farming communities in Oyo State. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study involved the collection of data through the use of eight Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and the interview of 403 randomly selected farmers using semi-structured questionnaires. These sets of information were supplemented with observations of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> made in 40 randomly selected farms. The FGD data were recorded on audio-tapes, transcribed and subjected to content analysis while the quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results Most respondents in the two communities had low level of knowledge of malaria causation as only 12.4% stated that mosquito bite could transmit the disease. Less than half (46.7%) correctly mentioned the signs and symptoms of malaria as high body temperature, body pains, headache, body weakness and cold/fever. The reported main methods for preventing mosquito bites in the farming communities included removal of heaps of cassava tuber peelings (62.3%), bush burning/clearing (54.6%) and clearing of</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5026D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5026D"><span id="translatedtitle">Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi diversity influenced by different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a semi-arid Mediterranean agro-ecosystem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>de Mar Alguacil, Maria; Torrecillas, Emma; Garcia-Orenes, Fuensanta; Torres, Maria Pilar; Roldan, Antonio</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study a field experiment was performed at the El Teularet-Sierra de Enguera Experimental Station (eastern Spain) to assess the influence during a 6-yr period of different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The management <span class="hlt">practices</span> included residual herbicide use, ploughing, ploughing + oats, addition of oat straw mulch and a control (land abandonment). Adjacent soil under natural vegetation was used as a reference for local, high-quality soil and as a control for comparison with the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils under different management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The AM fungal small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Thirty-six different phylotypes were identified, which were grouped in four families: Glomeraceae, Paraglomeraceae, Ambisporaceae and Claroideoglomeraceae. The first results showed significant differences in the distribution of the AMF phylotypes as consequence of the difference between <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Thus, the lowest diversity was observed for the plot that was treated with herbicide. The management <span class="hlt">practices</span> including ploughing and ploughing + oats had similar AMF diversity. Oat straw mulching yielded the highest number of different AMF sequence types and showed the highest diversity index. Thus, this treatment could be more suitable in sustainable soil use and therefore protection of biodiversity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=management&pg=5&id=EJ1096383','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=management&pg=5&id=EJ1096383"><span id="translatedtitle">Public Progress, Data Management and the Land Grant Mission: A Survey of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Researchers' <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Attitudes at Two Land-Grant Institutions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Peter; Eaker, Christopher; Swauger, Shea; Davis, Miriam L. E. Steiner</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This article reports results from a survey about data management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and attitudes sent to <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> researchers and extension personnel at the University of Tennessee Institute of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (UTIA) and the College of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Sciences and Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University. Results confirm agriculture…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4663956','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4663956"><span id="translatedtitle">Child Sexual Abuse and <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Influence of Cultural <span class="hlt">Practices</span>: A Review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shafe, S; Hutchinson, G</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Aim: To provide information on the possible influence of cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> in perpetuating child sexual abuse and to examine documented examples of these cultural influences. Methods: A computer literature search was done of Medline, Science Direct, PSYCInfo, Embase and PubMed for keywords. There were also manual searches in the library of journals that are not accessible online. Keywords for searches included: sexual abuse, child abuse, psychopathology, name of countries (eg Jordan, China and Morocco), culture and cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Results: There is documented evidence of cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> that <span class="hlt">continue</span> to fuel the persistently high level of child sexual abuse across the globe. The definition has evolved to now include simple genital-genital and non-genital contact such as oral-genital contacts, exhibitionism and pornography. Conclusions: Cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> are no longer restricted to one geographical collection of people due to migratory influence, as these <span class="hlt">practices</span> may also spread to different groups who intermingle. There are few empirical studies of child sexual abuse in the Caribbean, but one factor that could be used as a proxy is age of first sexual activity. The World Bank reports that this age is youngest in the Caribbean and is likely to be significantly influenced by child sexual abuse. PMID:25803380</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24261037','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24261037"><span id="translatedtitle">Linking <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, mycorrhizal fungi, and traits mediating plant-insect interactions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barber, Nicholas A; Kiers, E Toby; Theis, Nina; Hazzard, Ruth V; Adler, Lynn S</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> management has profound effects on soil communities. Activities such as fertilizer inputs can modify the composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities, which form important symbioses with the roots of most crop plants. Intensive conventional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management may select for less mutualistic AMF with reduced benefits to host plants compared to organic management, but these differences are poorly understood. AMF are generally evaluated based on their direct growth effects on plants. However, mycorrhizal colonization also may alter plant traits such as tissue nutrients, defensive chemistry, or floral traits, which mediate important plant-insect interactions like herbivory and pollination. To determine the effect of AMF from different farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> on plant performance and traits that putatively mediate species interactions, we performed a greenhouse study by inoculating Cucumis sativus (cucumber, Cucurbitaceae) with AMF from conventional farms, organic farms, and a commercial AMF inoculum. We measured growth and a suite of plant traits hypothesized to be important predictors of herbivore resistance and pollinator attraction. Several leaf and root traits and flower production were significantly affected by AMF inoculum. Both conventional and organic AMF reduced leaf P content but increased Na content compared to control and commercial AMF. Leaf defenses were unaffected by AMF treatments, but conventional AMF increased root cucurbitacin C, the primary defensive chemical of C. sativus, compared to organic AMF. These effects may have important consequences for herbivore preference and population dynamics. AMF from both organic and conventional farms decreased flower production relative to commercial and control treatments, which may reduce pollinator attraction and plant reproduction. AMF from both farm types also reduced seed germination, but effects on plant growth were limited. Our results suggest that studies only considering AMF</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24199496','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24199496"><span id="translatedtitle">Ecology and behavior of Anopheles arabiensis in relation to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in central Kenya.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Muturi, Ephantus J; Mwangangi, Joseph M; Beier, John C; Blackshear, Millon; Wauna, James; Sang, Rosemary; Mukabana, Wolfgang R</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Ecological changes associated with anthropogenic ecosystem disturbances can influence human risk of exposure to malaria and other vector-borne infectious diseases. This study in Mwea, Kenya, investigated the pattern of insecticide use in irrigated and nonirrigated agroecosystems and association with the density, survival, and blood-feeding behavior of the malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis. The parity rates of adult An. arabiensis from randomly selected houses were determined by examining their ovaries for tracheal distension, and polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the host blood meals. In addition, structured questionnaires were used to generate data on insecticide use. Anopheles arabiensis densities were highest in irrigated rice agroecosystems, intermediate in irrigated French beans agroecosystems, and lowest in the nonirrigated agroecosystem. Anopheles arabiensis adult survivorship was significantly lower in irrigated rice agroecosystems than in irrigated French beans agroecosystems. The human blood index (HBI) was significantly higher in the nonirrigated agroecosystem compared to irrigated agroecosystems. Moreover, there was marked variation in HBI among villages in irrigated agroecosystems with significantly lower HBI in Kangichiri and Mathangauta compared to Kiuria, Karima, and Kangai. The proportion of mosquitoes with mixed blood meals varied among villages ranging from 0.25 in Kangichiri to 0.83 in Kiuria. Sumithion, dimethoate, and alpha cypermethrin were the most commonly used insecticides. The 1st was used mostly in irrigated rice agroecosystems, and the last 2 were used mostly in irrigated French beans agroecosystems. These findings indicate that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> may influence the ecology and behavior of malaria vectors and ultimately the risk of malaria transmission. PMID:24199496</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H51I0877G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H51I0877G"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of the effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on sediment yield in the Colusa Basin, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gatzke, S. E.; Zhang, M.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to assess the impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) on sediment runoff from almond orchards in the lower Colusa Basin Drain watershed in the Sacramento Valley, California. This study used modeling techniques that include varying hydrologic parameters for both upland areas and small channels to quantify the effects of BMPs water quality. The BMPs simulated in this study are commonly used in almond orchards and include strip cropping, cover cropping, vegetative filter strips, grassed waterways and channel stabilization. The effectiveness of each BMP was simulated for an above average, below average and average rainfall year. Comparison of annual total watershed sediment loads for each BMP simulation showed that overall, channel stabilization and grassed waterways, which target in stream sediment erosion and transport, are the most effective BMPs with an estimated respective reduction in sediment load of 18% and 35% for a below average precipitation year, 13% and 26% for an above average precipitation year, and 17% and 30% for an average precipitation year. Simulations of BMPs designed to reduce sediment transport in upland areas, which include strip cropping and vegetative filter strips, estimated a reduction in total annual sediment load of less than 1% at the watershed outlet. These results indicated that in-stream sediment transport is the dominant sediment transport process in this watershed. Implementation of channel stabilization measures or grassed waterways on almond orchards is estimated to result in an annual reduction of total sediment load of 41,874 kg or 72,753 kg of sediment per square kilometer of almond orchard for an above average precipitation year.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036316','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036316"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and residual corn during spring crane and waterfowl migration in Nebraska</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Sherfy, M.H.; Anteau, M.J.; Bishop, A.A.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Nebraska's Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) is a major spring-staging area for migratory birds. Over 6 million ducks, geese, and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) stage there en route to tundra, boreal forest, and prairie breeding habitats, storing nutrients for migration and reproduction by consuming primarily corn remaining in fields after harvest (hereafter residual corn). In springs 2005-2007, we measured residual corn density in randomly selected harvested cornfields during early (n=188) and late migration (n=143) periods. We estimated the mean density of residual corn for the CPRV and examined the influence of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (post-harvest field management) and migration period on residual corn density. During the early migration period, residual corn density was greater in idle harvested fields than any other treatments of fields (42%, 48%, 53%, and 92% more than grazed, grazed and mulched, mulched, and tilled fields, respectively). Depletion of residual corn from early to late migration did not differ among post-harvest treatments but was greatest during the year when overall corn density was lowest (2006). Geometric mean early-migration residual corn density for the CPRV in 2005-2007 (42.4 kg/ha; 95% CI=35.2-51.5 kg/ha) was markedly lower than previously published estimates, indicating that there has been a decrease in abundance of residual corn available to waterfowl during spring staging. Increases in harvest efficiency have been implicated as a cause for decreasing corn densities since the 1970s. However, our data show that post-harvest management of cornfields also can substantially influence the density of residual corn remaining in fields during spring migration. Thus, managers may be able to influence abundance of high-energy foods for spring-staging migratory birds in the CPRV through programs that influence post-harvest management of cornfields. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+AND+childhood+AND+development&pg=4&id=EJ1010331','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+AND+childhood+AND+development&pg=4&id=EJ1010331"><span id="translatedtitle">Dispositional Development as a Form of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Professional Development: Centre-Based Reflective <span class="hlt">Practices</span> with Teachers of (Very) Young Children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Swim, Terri Jo; Isik-Ercan, Zeynep</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The nature of professional development in early childhood education has recently been reconceptualised, with accompanying changes in policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This paper draws from teacher education literature to define the components of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the context of early childhood education <span class="hlt">practice</span>. By relating…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23590423','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23590423"><span id="translatedtitle">The role of ePortfolios in supporting <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development in <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gordon, Jennifer A; Campbell, Craig M</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>ePortfolios, based on models of reflective <span class="hlt">practice</span>, are viewed as important tools in facilitating and supporting lifelong learning across the medical education continuum. MAINPORT, the ePortfolio designed by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, supports the <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD) and lifelong learning of specialist physicians <span class="hlt">practicing</span> in Canada by providing tools to develop CPD plans, set and track progress of established learning goals, document and reflect on learning activities, and create the foundation for physicians to manage their learning. In this article, the authors summarize the key design principles of the Royal College's ePortfolio: learner-centered; interoperable; ease of access. The current core functionality as well as future planned functionality for MAINPORT are described under three domains: recording and reflecting on completed CPD activities; managing learning in <span class="hlt">practice</span>; accessing learning resources and programs. The future MAINPORT will evolve to become a foundational tool to support the shift towards competency-based medical education across the continuum of medical education; from residency to retirement. MAINPORT will facilitate the ability of physicians to demonstrate their expertise over time and how their learning has enabled improvements to their <span class="hlt">practice</span> in contributing to improved health outcomes for patients. PMID:23590423</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27194606','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27194606"><span id="translatedtitle">Early Bubble <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Positive Airway Pressure: Investigating Interprofessional Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for the NICU Team.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Casey, Jessica L; Newberry, Desi; Jnah, Amy</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Premature neonates delivered <32 completed weeks gestation are unprepared to handle the physiologic demands of extrauterine life. Within the respiratory system, alveolar instability and collapse can cause decreased functional residual capacity, impaired oxygenation, and hypoxemia leading to respiratory distress syndrome. Supportive measures are indicated immediately after birth to establish physiologic stability including bubble <span class="hlt">continuous</span> positive airway pressure (CPAP) or endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. CPAP is a noninvasive, gentle mode of ventilation that can mitigate the effects of lung immaturity, but prolonged use can increase the risk for nasal breakdown. Strategies to mitigate this risk must be infused as best <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the NICU environment. The purpose of this article is to propose an evidence-based best <span class="hlt">practice</span> care bundle for the early initiation of CPAP in the delivery room and associated skin barrier protection strategies for premature neonates <32 weeks gestation and weighing <1,500 g. PMID:27194606</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27607653','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27607653"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution without finite sampling bandwidth effects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Huasheng; Wang, Chao; Huang, Peng; Huang, Duan; Wang, Tao; Zeng, Guihua</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>In a <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution system, finite sampling bandwidth of the employed analog-to-digital converter at the receiver's side may lead to inaccurate results of pulse peak sampling. Then, errors in the parameters estimation resulted. Subsequently, the system performance decreases and security loopholes are exposed to eavesdroppers. In this paper, we propose a novel data acquisition scheme which consists of two parts, i.e., a dynamic delay adjusting module and a statistical power feedback-control algorithm. The proposed scheme may improve dramatically the data acquisition precision of pulse peak sampling and remove the finite sampling bandwidth effects. Moreover, the optimal peak sampling position of a pulse signal can be dynamically calibrated through monitoring the change of the statistical power of the sampled data in the proposed scheme. This helps to resist against some <span class="hlt">practical</span> attacks, such as the well-known local oscillator calibration attack. PMID:27607653</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=245354','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=245354"><span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring the Effect of Wetland Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in an <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Watershed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Due to the substantial effect of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> on the extent and ability of wetlands to function, the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (USDA) serves a key role in wetland conservation and restoration. The USDA has implemented several different conservation programs (e.g., the Wetland Reserve Program) wi...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=farming+AND+practices&pg=7&id=EJ780441','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=farming+AND+practices&pg=7&id=EJ780441"><span id="translatedtitle">Multifunctional <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> in Policy and <span class="hlt">Practice</span>? A Comparative Analysis of Norway and Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bjorkhaug, Hilde; Richards, Carol Ann</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Ideals of productivist <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> in the Western world have faded as the unintended consequences of intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and pastoralism have contributed to rural decline and environmental problems. In Norway and Australia, there has been an increasing acceptance of the equal importance of social and environmental sustainability as well as…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED043826.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED043826.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Factors Associated with the Adoption of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span>; Kampong Bukit Kapar, Selangor, Malaysia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pesson, Lynn L.</p> <p></p> <p>The focus of this study was to procure data about adoption behavior of Malaysian smallholders (farmers) that would be useful in the instructional program in extension education at the College of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, Malaysia. Students interviewed 76 persons in a rural village of two hundred families, all engaged in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. The major sources of income…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1067738.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1067738.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Reflection on Interactive Three-Dimensional Teaching System in <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> and Forestry Colleges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lei, Zhimin</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Ever since the new curriculum was implemented, Sichuan <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> University that is characterized by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> science has conducted ideological and political teaching reform, explored a basic route to integrate scientific outlook on development into theoretical teaching and initially formed a human-oriented interactive three-dimensional…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/wri/1987/4118/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/wri/1987/4118/report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best-management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on total phosphorus yields in the Johnson Brook and Lovejoy Pond watersheds, Kennebec County, Maine, 1980-84</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Maloney, Thomas J.; Sowles, John W.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Analysis of daily phosphorus yield and streamflow data collected before and after implementation of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the Johnson Brook watershed in south-central Maine indicated statistically significant reductions in phosphorus loading in all flow categories. Reduction of median loadings for five flow categories ranged from 26% to 90%. The annual total phosphorus yield was reduced 17% after implementation of the best management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The observed phosphorus yield reduction is considerable because of two streamflow factors. First, the period after implementation of the best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> had eight more storms. Periods of storm runoff in the post-implementation period had 31 days with greater than average streamflow, and a maximum daily streamflow more than three times greater than those observed in the pre-implementation period. Second, the annual streamflow was 128% greater in the year after the management <span class="hlt">practices</span> were implemented. Because the potential for phosphorous transport increases with runoff, and greater yields are possible when the volume of water increases, a higher phosphorus yield would be expected in the post-implementation period than during the pre-implementation period, if other factors had remained unchanged. The reductions in phosphorous yield in the study area are not expected to have a significant effect on the eutrophic conditions observed in Lovejoy Pond. Phosphorous concentrations in the pond will <span class="hlt">continue</span> to be capable of supporting algal blooms. However, the intensity and duration of blooms are expected to be less than those observed before best management <span class="hlt">practice</span> implementation. (Author 's abstract)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol14-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol14-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol14-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol15/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol15-part63-subpartNNNNN-app5.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 5 Table 5 to Subpart NNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 39 to Subpart Uuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines 39 Table 39 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-part63-subpartKKKKK-app6.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-part63-subpartKKKKK-app6.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkkk of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 6 Table 6 to Subpart KKKKK of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-part63-subpartKKKKK-app6.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-part63-subpartKKKKK-app6.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkkk of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Emission Limitations and Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards 6 Table 6 to Subpart KKKKK of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 39 to Subpart Uuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines 39 Table 39 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 39 to Subpart Uuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines 39 Table 39 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol13-part63-subpartUUU-app39.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 39 to Subpart Uuu of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards for HAP Emissions From Bypass Lines 39 Table 39 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5030/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5030/"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Hydrology and Water Chemistry in a Small Irrigated Catchment, Yakima River Basin, Washington</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Henry M.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The role of irrigation and artificial drainage in the hydrologic cycle and the transport of solutes in a small <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> catchment in central Washington's Yakima Valley were explored using hydrologic, chemical, isotopic, age-dating, and mineralogical data from several environmental compartments, including stream water, ground water, overland flow, and streambed pore water. A conceptual understanding of catchment hydrology and solute transport was developed and an inverse end-member mixing analysis was used to further explore the effects of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> in this small catchment. The median concentrations of major solutes and nitrates were similar for the single field site and for the catchment outflow site, indicating that the net effects of transport processes for these constituents were similar at both scales. However, concentrations of nutrients were different at the two sites, suggesting that field-scale variations in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> as well as nearstream and instream biochemical processes are important components of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> chemical transformation and transport in this catchment. This work indicates that irrigation coupled with artificial drainage networks may exacerbate the ecological effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> runoff by increasing direct connectivity between fields and streams and minimizing potentially mitigating effects (denitrification and dilution, for example) of longer subsurface pathways.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11916344','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11916344"><span id="translatedtitle">New choices for <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education: a statewide survey of the <span class="hlt">practices</span> and preferences of nurse practitioners.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Charles, Patricia A; Mamary, Edward M</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Technological innovations in the past decade have made possible several promising new modes for delivering <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education (CE). Offering a wide variety of educational approaches is necessary to satisfy the different learning needs and preferences of program participants. <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education planners need to assess the preferences and <span class="hlt">practices</span> of Advanced Practitioners of Nursing (APNs) when choosing the modes they will offer for delivering CE programs. A survey was conducted with the entire population of licensed APNs in Nevada to assess <span class="hlt">practices</span>, preferences, and barriers to use of various CE delivery modes. In-person conferences and live satellite conferences were the most frequently used methods. The top three preferences, in rank order, were in-person conference, print-based self-study, and interactive video conference. Live satellite conference was the least preferred method of earning CE credits. Computer-based modes of CE delivery, which include the Internet and CD-ROM, were among the least used. Findings from this study provide useful information for planners of CE programs for APNs. Data acquired in this study also address the dearth of information related to computer use by APNs for obtaining CE. PMID:11916344</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.5056C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.5056C"><span id="translatedtitle">Vineyard weeds control <span class="hlt">practices</span> impact on surface water transfers: using numerical tracer experiment coupled to a distributed hydrological model to manage <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> spatial arrangements.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Colin, F.; Moussa, R.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>In rural basins, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscape management highly influences water and pollutants transfers. Landuse, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and their spatial arrangements are at issue. Hydrological model are widely used to explore impacts of anthropogenic influences on experimental catchments. But planning all spatial arrangements leads to a possible cases count which cannot be considered. On the basis of the recent « numerical experiment » approach, we propose a « numerical tracer function » which had to be coupled to a distributed rainfall-runoff model. This function simulate the transfer of a virtual tracer successively spread on each distributed unit inside the catchment. It allows to rank hydrological spatial units according to their hydrological contribution to the surface flows, particularly at the catchment outlet. It was used with the distributed model MHYDAS in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> context. The case study concerns the experimental Roujan vine-growing catchment (1km², south of France) studied since 1992. In this Mediterranean context, we focus on the soil hydraulic conductivity distributed parameter because it highly depends on weed control <span class="hlt">practices</span> (chemical weeding induces a lot more runoff than mechanical weeding). We checked model sensitivity analysis to soil hydraulic conductivity spatial arrangement on runoff coefficient, peak discharge and catchment lag-time. Results show (i) the use of the tracer function is more efficient than a random approach to improve sensitivity to spatial arrangements from point of view of simulated discharge range, (ii) the first factor explaining hydrological simulations variability was <span class="hlt">practices</span> area ratio, (iii) variability induced by <span class="hlt">practices</span> spatial arrangements was significant on runoff coefficient and peak discharge for balanced <span class="hlt">practices</span> area ratio and on lag-time for low area ratio of chemical weeding <span class="hlt">practices</span>. From the actual situation on the experimental Roujan catchment (40% of tilled and 60% of non tilled vineyard</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=246191&keyword=cattle&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=65044429&CFTOKEN=37174343','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=246191&keyword=cattle&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=65044429&CFTOKEN=37174343"><span id="translatedtitle">Water Quality Response to Changes in <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Land Use <span class="hlt">Practices</span> at Headwater Streams in Georgia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Poorly managed <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watersheds may be one of the most important contributors to high levels of bacterial and sediment loadings in surface waters. We investigated two cattle farms with differing management schemes to compare how physicochemical and meteorological parameter...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=302217','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=302217"><span id="translatedtitle">Landuse and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practice</span> web-service (LAMPS) for agroecosystem modeling and conservation planning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Agroecosystem models and conservation planning tools require spatially and temporally explicit input data about <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management operations. The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is developing a Land Management and Operation Database (LMOD) which contains potential model input, howe...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2659923','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2659923"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practice</span> Audit in Gastroenterology (PAGE) program: A novel approach to <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Armstrong, David; Hollingworth, Roger; Gardiner, Tara; Klassen, Michael; Smith, Wendy; Hunt, Richard H; Barkun, Alan; Gould, Michael; Leddin, Desmond</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND: <span class="hlt">Practice</span> audit is an important component of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development that may more readily be undertaken if it were less complex. This qualitative study assessed the use of personal digital assistants to facilitate data collection and review. METHODS: Personal digital assistants programmed with standard questionnaires related to upper gastrointestinal endoscopies (<span class="hlt">Practice</span> Audit in Gastroenterology-Endoscopy [‘PAGE-Endo’]) and colonoscopies (PAGE-Colonoscopy [‘PAGE-Colo’]) were provided to Canadian gastroenterologists, surgeons and internists. Over a three-week audit period, participants recorded indications, and the expected (E) and reported (R) findings for each procedure. Thereafter, participants recorded compliance with reporting, the ease of use and value of the PAGE program, and their willingness to perform another audit. RESULTS: Over 15 to 18 months, 173 participants completed PAGE-Endo (6168 procedures) and 111 completed PAGE-Colo (4776 procedures). Most respondents noted that PAGE was easy to use (99%), beneficial (88% to 95%), and that they were willing undertake another audit (92% to 95%). In PAGE-Endo, alarm features were prevalent (55%), but major reported findings were less common than expected: esophagitis (E 29.9%, R 14.8%), esophageal stricture (E 8.3%, R 3.6%), gastric ulcer (E 17.0%, R 4.7%), gastric cancer (E 4.3%, R 1.0%) and duodenal ulcer (E 11.5%, R 5.7%). In PAGE-Colo, more colonoscopies were performed for symptom investigation (55%) than for screening (25%) or surveillance (20%). There were marked interprovincial variations with respect to sedation, biopsies and technical aspects of colonoscopy. CONCLUSION: Secure, real-time data entry with review of aggregate and individual data in the PAGE program provided an acceptable, straightforward methodology for accredited <span class="hlt">practice</span> audit activities. PAGE has considerable potential for <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development in gastroenterology and other specialties</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25391462','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25391462"><span id="translatedtitle">Trade-off between water pollution prevention, <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> profit, and farmer <span class="hlt">practice</span>--an optimization methodology for discussion on land-use adjustment in China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Jianchang; Zhang, Luoping; Zhang, Yuzhen; Deng, Hongbing</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> decision-making to control nonpoint source (NPS) water pollution may not be efficiently implemented, if there is no appropriate cost-benefit analysis on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. This paper presents an interval-fuzzy linear programming (IFLP) model to deal with the trade-off between <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> revenue, NPS pollution control, and alternative <span class="hlt">practices</span> through land adjustment for Wuchuan catchment, a typical <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> area in Jiulong River watershed, Fujian Province of China. From the results, the lower combination of <span class="hlt">practice</span> 1, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 2, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 3, and <span class="hlt">practice</span> 7 with the land area of 12.6, 5.2, 145.2, and 85.3 hm(2), respectively, could reduce NPS pollution load by 10%. The combination yields an income of 98,580 Chinese Yuan/a. If the pollution reduction is 15%, the higher combination need <span class="hlt">practice</span> 1, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 2, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 3, <span class="hlt">practice</span> 5, and <span class="hlt">practice</span> 7 with the land area of 54.4, 23.6, 18.0, 6.3, and 85.3 hm(2), respectively. The income of this combination is 915,170 Chinese Yuan/a. The sensitivity analysis of IFLP indicates that the cost-effective <span class="hlt">practices</span> are ranked as follows: <span class="hlt">practice</span> 7 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 2 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 1 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 5 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 3 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 6 > <span class="hlt">practice</span> 4. In addition, the uncertainties in the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> NPS pollution control system could be effectively quantified by the IFLP model. Furthermore, to accomplish a reasonable and applicable project of land-use adjustment, decision-makers could also integrate above solutions with their own experience and other information. PMID:25391462</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3434953','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3434953"><span id="translatedtitle">Heavy <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> workloads and low crop diversity are strong barriers to improving child feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the Bolivian Andes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jones, Andrew D; Agudo, Yesmina Cruz; Galway, Lindsay; Bentley, Jeffery; Pinstrup-Andersen, Per</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Most nutrition initiatives to date aimed at improving infant and young child feeding (IYCF) have emphasized addressing knowledge gaps through behavior change messaging with less focus on addressing the underlying environmental barriers that may shape these behaviors. This research integrates an analysis of longitudinal dietary data with qualitative data on barriers to improved child feeding to identify the nature and extent of the barriers caregivers face to improving IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a farming region of the Bolivian Andes, and to determine the relative influence of these barriers on caregivers’ abilities to improve IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Sixty-nine caregivers were selected from a sample of 331 households that participated in a longitudinal survey assessing changes in IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span> among caregivers with children aged 0–36 months from March 2009 to March 2010. Forty-nine barriers within 12 categories of barriers were identified through semi-structured interviews with the 69 caregivers. The most frequently reported barriers were those related to women’s time dedicated to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> labor, the limited diversity of household <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production, and lack of support for child feeding from spouses and mothers-in-law. In multivariate analyses controlling for several variables that could potentially influence IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span>, these barriers were negatively associated with changes to the diversity of child diets, child dietary energy intake, and child meal frequency. While knowledge gaps and individual-level influences affected IYCF <span class="hlt">practices</span>, physical and social caregiving environments in this region of Bolivia were even more important. Behavior change communication alone will likely not address the social and environmental barriers to improved child feeding that often prevent translation of improved knowledge into action. Particularly in rural regions, <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> may strongly influence child feeding, not only indirectly through household food security, but also</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=279776','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=279776"><span id="translatedtitle">Associations between conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> and ecology: ecological responses of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> streams and lakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Conservation Effects Assessment Program (CEAP) Watershed Assessment Study goals are to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> at the watershed scale. Currently, a critical knowledge gap exists in linking conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> and their ecological effects on aquatic ecosy...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvA..93b2315W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvA..93b2315W"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practical</span> security of <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution with finite sampling bandwidth effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Chao; Huang, Peng; Huang, Duan; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Practical</span> security of the <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) system with finite sampling bandwidth of analog-to-digital converter (ADC) at the receiver's side is investigated. We find that the finite sampling bandwidth effects may decrease the lower bound of secret key rate without awareness of the legitimate communicators. This leaves security loopholes for Eve to attack the system. In addition, this effect may restrains the linear relationship of secret key bit rate with repetition rate of the system; subsequently, there is a saturation value for the secret key bit rate with the repetition rate. To resist such kind of effects, we propose a dual sampling detection approach in which two ADCs are employed so that the finite sampling bandwidth effects are removed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21075916','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21075916"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education course #3: current <span class="hlt">practices</span> and future trends in neuropathology assessment for developmental neurotoxicity testing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bolon, Brad; Garman, Robert H; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen G; Allan Johnson, G; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Krinke, Georg; Little, Peter B; Makris, Susan L; Mellon, R Daniel; Sulik, Kathleen K; Jensen, Karl</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education course on Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing (DNT) was designed to communicate current <span class="hlt">practices</span> for DNT neuropathology, describe promising innovations in quantitative analysis and noninvasive imaging, and facilitate a discussion among experienced neuropathologists and regulatory scientists regarding suitable DNT <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Conventional DNT neuropathology endpoints are qualitative histopathology and morphometric endpoints of particularly vulnerable sites (e.g., cerebral, cerebellar, or hippocampal thickness). Novel imaging and stereology measurements hold promise for automated analysis of factors that cannot be effectively examined in routinely processed specimens (e.g., cell numbers, fiber tract integrity). The panel recommended that dedicated DNT neuropathology data sets be acquired on a minimum of 8 sections (for qualitative assessment) or 3 sections (for quantitative linear and stereological analyses) using a small battery of stains to examine neurons and myelin. Where guidelines permit discretion, immersion fixation is acceptable for younger animals (postnatal day 22 or earlier), and peripheral nerves may be embedded in paraffin. Frequent concerns regarding DNT data sets include false-negative outcomes due to processing difficulties (e.g., lack of concordance among sections from different animals) and insensitive analytical endpoints (e.g., qualitative evaluation) as well as false-positive results arising from overinterpretation or misreading by inexperienced pathologists. PMID:21075916</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6325622','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6325622"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education program evaluation for course improvement, participant effect and utilization in clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Faulk, L G</p> <p>1984-04-01</p> <p>An evaluation of a single <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education (CE) program was conducted by the presenter to assess impact of the offering and gather information for course improvement. The purpose of this evaluation was to document if and to what extent the learners attained the program's objectives and also to systematically examine the program to see how it might be improved. The third purpose was to document if participants' interest was stimulated by the program and if they actually used the information in clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> or at least found it helpful. Fifty-five nurses participated in completing a pretest and posttest, reactionnaire at the conclusion of the program and follow-up questionnaire. Participants made significantly (p less than .05) better scores on the posttests as compared to the pretest. On the evaluation form, 98% of the nurses responded that they had learned new facts, and 75% indicated that information was moderately new. In addition, a slight majority (58%) responded that they changed their beliefs about assertiveness. Of returned follow-up questionnaires, 95% told others about the program, and 59% read articles. All nurses indicated they had found the information useful, and 87% had actually used the information in clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This study documents a method for CE administrators and educators to evaluate the impact of CE and provide information for course improvement. The evaluation supports the program's worth. Participants benefited in terms of knowledge and interest. In addition, program strengths/weaknesses were identified. PMID:6325622</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RScEd..44..949M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RScEd..44..949M"><span id="translatedtitle">Rethinking the Theory and <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development: Science Teachers' Perspectives</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mansour, Nasser; EL-Deghaidy, Heba; Alshamrani, Saeed; Aldahmash, Abdulwali</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to investigate science teachers' views of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD) provision in Saudi Arabia and science teachers' perspectives of the CPD contextual issues that have an impact on putting the learning emerging from the CPD programmes into <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The study used mixed methods (open-ended questionnaires and interviews) with Saudi Arabian science teachers framed by a socio-cultural perspective. This study argues that science teachers' voices concerning their professional development needs should be the key guide for their CPD. Our study shows the significance of engaging critically with science teachers' voices and views of their CPD programme. One of the unique findings of this study indicated CPD programmes should take place at school where teachers have the opportunity to collaborate with others in an authentic context and where they can participate in the content of the CPD that directly meets their needs within their work context. The study has shown that science teacher development can be effective and successful when science teachers are able to talk with each other as part of the learning activities of the CPD programmes about what they are doing in the classroom, and how they can implement the ideas of the CPD programmes into their classroom and school settings. This might shed light on why teachers were either able or unable to put some aspects of their CPD learning into <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19005952','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19005952"><span id="translatedtitle">Best medical <span class="hlt">practices</span> in social accountability and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development: a survey and literature review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thompson, Laurence G; Davis, Penny M</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The authors surveyed Canadian medical schools to identify gaps in current <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD) with reference to social accountability and compared the results to best <span class="hlt">practices</span> identified in a literature review. The literature review identified 15 relevant articles. Several themes on best <span class="hlt">practices</span> emerged. In a fundamental social contract with society, physicians receive privileges in return for responding to social needs. CPD is part of this contract. To meet the terms of the contract, CPD must be credible, unbiased and respond to social needs. Physicians have a responsibility to maintain quality; CPD is one tool to do that. CPD should be measured against values of relevance, quality, cost effectiveness, and equity. The survey asked all 17 Canadian medical schools to report CPD initiatives that respond to societal needs. Eleven schools responded with descriptions of 28 such initiatives. Most initiatives focused on values of quality and relevance; fewer focused on cost effectiveness. Most often, initiatives addressed medical expertise and interprofessional collaboration, least often health advocacy. Faculty initiated most initiatives, rather than students, community or society. These findings lead to recommendations for future directions of CPD. PMID:19005952</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015SPIE.9648E..0VQ&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015SPIE.9648E..0VQ&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantum hacking on a <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum cryptosystem by inserting an external light</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Qin, Hao; Kumar, Rupesh; Alleaume, Romain</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We report here a new side channel attack on a <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable (CV) quantum key distribution (QKD) system. Inspired by blinding attack in discrete-variable QKD, we formalize an attack strategy by inserting an external light into a CV QKD system implemented Gaussian-modulated coherent state protocol and show that our attack can compromise its <span class="hlt">practical</span> security. In this attack, we concern imperfections of a balanced homodyne detector used in CV QKD. According to our analysis, if one inserts an external light into Bob's signal port, due to the imperfect subtraction from the homodyne detector, the leakage of the external light contributes a displacement on the homodyne signal which causes detector electronics saturation. In consequence, Bob's quadrature measurement is not linear with the quadrature sent by Alice. By considering such vulnerability, a potential Eve can launch a full intercept-resend attack meanwhile she inserts an external light into Bob's signal port. By selecting proper properties of the external light, Eve actively controls the induced displacement value from the inserted light which results saturation of homodyne detection. In consequence, Eve can bias the excess noise due to the intercept-resend attack and the external light, such that Alice and Bob believe their excess noise estimation is below the null key threshold and they can still share a secret key. Our attack shows that the detector loopholes also exist in CV QKD, and it seems influence all the CV QKD systems using homodyne detection, since all the <span class="hlt">practical</span> detectors have finite detection range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4428421','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4428421"><span id="translatedtitle">The Sustainability of Improvements from <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development in Pharmacy <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Learning Behaviors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Delate, Thomas; Newlon, Carey L.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objective. To assess the long-term sustainability of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD) training in pharmacy <span class="hlt">practice</span> and learning behaviors. Methods. This was a 3-year posttrial survey of pharmacists who had participated in an unblinded randomized controlled trial of CPD. The online survey assessed participants’ perceptions of pharmacy <span class="hlt">practice</span>, learning behaviors, and sustainability of CPD. Differences between groups on the posttrial survey responses and changes from the trial’s follow-up survey to the posttrial survey responses within the intervention group were compared. Results. Of the 91 pharmacists who completed the original trial, 72 (79%) participated in the sustainability survey. Compared to control participants, a higher percentage of intervention participants reported in the sustainability survey that they had utilized the CPD concept (45.7% vs 8.1%) and identified personal learning objectives (68.6% vs 43.2%) during the previous year. Compared to their follow-up survey responses, lower percentages of intervention participants reported identifying personal learning objectives (94.3% vs 68.6%), documenting their learning plan (82.9% vs 22.9%) and participating in learning by doing (42.9% vs 14.3%) in the sustainability survey. In the intervention group, many of the improvements to pharmacy <span class="hlt">practice</span> items were sustained over the 3-year period but were not significantly different from the control group. Conclusion. Sustainability of a CPD intervention over a 3-year varied. While CPD-trained pharmacists reported utilizing CPD concepts at a higher rate than control pharmacists, their CPD learning behaviors diminished over time. PMID:25995511</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013EGUGA..1511659A&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013EGUGA..1511659A&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on runoff and glyphosate peaks in a small vineyard catchment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Amiot, Audrey; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Jadas-Hécart, Alain; Landry, David; Sourice, Stéphane; Communal, Pierre-Yves; Ballouche, Aziz</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p> other presented parameters. Moreover, those coefficients seem not governed by meteorological variability but directly linked with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and in particular with tillage, not realised in 2009 as started in 2011 but increased in surface and number in 2012. To conlude, results show that whereas glyphosate concentrations decrease while the percentage of weeded areas increases, erosion increases. In order to confirm those results, the project is now focusing on glyphosate's sorption on unstable soil's particles. Acknowledgments This research has been funded by the BVVITI Regional project of the Contrat Regional Bassin Versant and Contrat Territorial supported by the Region Pays-de-la-Loire and the Water Agency Loire-Bretagne, as by the winegrower profession with FranceAgriMer, InterLoire and by the French Institute of vine and wine. We are grateful to the farmers and we specially acknowledge the municipality of Rochefort-sur-Loire.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7913.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7913.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.7913 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards for separators? 63.7913 Section 63.7913... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Separators § 63.7913 How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards for separators? (a) You...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1099655.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1099655.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge and Attitude of Secondary School Teachers towards <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Assessment <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Esan Central Senatorial District of Edo State</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Alufohai, P. J.; Akinlosotu, T. N.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The study investigated knowledge and attitude of secondary school teachers towards <span class="hlt">continuous</span> assessment (CA) <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Edo Central Senatorial District, Nigeria. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of gender, age, years of experience and area of educational specialization on teachers' attitude towards CA <span class="hlt">practices</span> in secondary…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=civil+AND+engineering+AND+innovation&id=EJ1071711','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=civil+AND+engineering+AND+innovation&id=EJ1071711"><span id="translatedtitle">Can Teaching Be Evaluated through Reflection on Student Performance in <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Assessment? A Case Study of <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Engineering Modules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McNabola, Aonghus; O'Farrell, Ciara</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Research and <span class="hlt">practice</span> is presented on the use of student assessments as part of reflective <span class="hlt">practice</span> to evaluate teaching. Case studies are presented in the delivery of Engineering modules across a number of years at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Both student performance in <span class="hlt">continuous</span> assessment and student feedback on assessments…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1817902G&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1817902G&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Organic matter composition of soil macropore surfaces under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Glæsner, Nadia; Leue, Marin; Magid, Jacob; Gerke, Horst H.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Understanding the heterogeneous nature of soil, i.e. properties and processes occurring specifically at local scales is essential for best managing our soil resources for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production. Examination of intact soil structures in order to obtain an increased understanding of how soil systems operate from small to large scale represents a large gap within soil science research. Dissolved chemicals, nutrients and particles are transported through the disturbed plow layer of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil, where after flow through the lower soil layers occur by preferential flow via macropores. Rapid movement of water through macropores limit the contact between the preferentially moving water and the surrounding soil matrix, therefore contact and exchange of solutes in the water is largely restricted to the surface area of the macropores. Organomineral complex coated surfaces control sorption and exchange properties of solutes, as well as availability of essential nutrients to plant roots and to the preferentially flowing water. DRIFT (Diffuse Reflectance infrared Fourier Transform) Mapping has been developed to examine composition of organic matter coated macropores. In this study macropore surfaces structures will be determined for organic matter composition using DRIFT from a long-term field experiment on waste application to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil (CRUCIAL, close to Copenhagen, Denmark). Parcels with 5 treatments; accelerated household waste, accelerated sewage sludge, accelerated cattle manure, NPK and unfertilized, will be examined in order to study whether <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management have an impact on the organic matter composition of intact structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=319154','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=319154"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on N loads in the Mississippi-Atchafalya River Basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A modeling framework consisting of a farm-scale model, <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Policy Environmental Extender (APEX); a watershedscale model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT); and databases was used in the Conservation Effects Assessment Project to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation practi...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=229452','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=229452"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the importance of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce the ecological risk of pesticides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The use of pesticides in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, their potential to be transported beyond the intended target, and their possible risk to human and environmental health has been of public concern for many years. We utilized 5 years of field data from 3 vegetable production systems to evaluate the ability of ag...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED444413.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED444413.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">SUNY College of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> and Technology at Morrisville: Selected Financial Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.</p> <p></p> <p>This audit report of the State University of New York (SUNY) College of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> and Technology at Morrisville addresses the question of whether the college management has established an effective system of internal control over its revenue, equipment, and student work-study payroll. The audit makes a number of observations and conclusions.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=321332','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=321332"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of conservation land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil microbial function in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The USDA Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) involves removing <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land from production and replanting with native vegetation for the purpose of reducing agriculture’s impact on the environment. In 2002, part of the Beasley Lake watershed in the Mississippi Delta was enrolled in CRP. In ad...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=behaviorism&pg=5&id=EJ653220','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=behaviorism&pg=5&id=EJ653220"><span id="translatedtitle">Adult Education Philosophies <span class="hlt">Practiced</span> by <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education Teachers in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boone, Harry N.; Gartin, Stacy A.; Wright, Crystal B.; Lawrence, Layle D.; Odell, Kerry S.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Responses from 118 of 314 secondary <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> teachers indicated that three-fourths teach adults; about two-thirds identified with the progressive education philosophy, 21% with behaviorism; nearly half had no formal training in teaching adults. Effect size results suggest they may not have clearly defined adult education philosophies. (Contains…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=331109','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=331109"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on phosphorus loss reduction from an Indiana <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Phosphorus losses from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands have caused serious eutrophication problems, particularly in Lake Erie. However, techniques that can effectively reduce total and soluble phosphorus losses from croplands and drainage channels can be difficult to implement and gauge. This modeling study was ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1466-10.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1466-10.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1466.10 - Conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1466.10 Section 1466.10 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INCENTIVES PROGRAM Contracts and Payments § 1466.10...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1450.208 - Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1450.208 Section 1450.208 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1450.208 - Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1450.208 Section 1450.208 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1450.208 - Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1450.208 Section 1450.208 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol10-sec1450-208.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1450.208 - Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Eligible <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 1450.208 Section 1450.208 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22455974','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22455974"><span id="translatedtitle">Radiocesium and radioiodine in soil particles agitated by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: field observation after the Fukushima nuclear accident.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yamaguchi, N; Eguchi, S; Fujiwara, H; Hayashi, K; Tsukada, H</p> <p>2012-05-15</p> <p>Three weeks after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, we determined the activity concentrations of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs in atmospheric dust fugitively resuspended from soil particles due to soil surface perturbation by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The atmospheric concentrations of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs increased because of the agitation of soil particles by a hammer-knife mower and a rotary tiller. Coarse soil particles were primarily agitated by the perturbation of the soil surface of Andosols. For dust particles smaller than 10 μm, the resuspension factors of radiocesium during the operation of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> equipment were 16-times higher than those under background condition. Before tillage, most of the radionuclides accumulated within a few cm of the soil surface. Tillage diluted their concentration in the uppermost soil layer. PMID:22455974</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=34218','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=34218"><span id="translatedtitle">Global environmental impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> expansion: The need for sustainable and efficient <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tilman, David</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>The recent intensification of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, and the prospects of future intensification, will have major detrimental impacts on the nonagricultural terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of the world. The doubling of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> food production during the past 35 years was associated with a 6.87-fold increase in nitrogen fertilization, a 3.48-fold increase in phosphorus fertilization, a 1.68-fold increase in the amount of irrigated cropland, and a 1.1-fold increase in land in cultivation. Based on a simple linear extension of past trends, the anticipated next doubling of global food production would be associated with approximately 3-fold increases in nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization rates, a doubling of the irrigated land area, and an 18% increase in cropland. These projected changes would have dramatic impacts on the diversity, composition, and functioning of the remaining natural ecosystems of the world, and on their ability to provide society with a variety of essential ecosystem services. The largest impacts would be on freshwater and marine ecosystems, which would be greatly eutrophied by high rates of nitrogen and phosphorus release from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> fields. Aquatic nutrient eutrophication can lead to loss of biodiversity, outbreaks of nuisance species, shifts in the structure of food chains, and impairment of fisheries. Because of aerial redistribution of various forms of nitrogen, <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> intensification also would eutrophy many natural terrestrial ecosystems and contribute to atmospheric accumulation of greenhouse gases. These detrimental environmental impacts of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> can be minimized only if there is much more efficient use and recycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in agroecosystems. PMID:10339530</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=310983','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=310983"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of the Land-use and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> web-Service (LAMPS) for generating crop rotations in space and time</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Agroecosystem models and conservation planning tools require spatially and temporally explicit input data about <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management operations. The Land-use and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> web-Service (LAMPS) provides crop rotation and management information for user-specified areas within...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=264263','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=264263"><span id="translatedtitle">The contribution of arbusclar mycorrhizal fungi to the success or failure of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Good farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> are conducted for a variety of reasons. Farmers now include management <span class="hlt">practices</span> such as over wintering cover crops, reduced tillage, and crop rotation with the goals of reducing soil erosion, managing nutrient availability, building soil organic matter, controlling weeds, an...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.B13C0541W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.B13C0541W"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantifying the Impact of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Land Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Soil Carbon Dynamics at Different Temporal and Spatial Scales</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wilson, C. G.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wacha, K.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Vast amounts of rich, organic topsoil are lost from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscapes each year through the combination of both tillage- and rainfall-induced erosion. The implications of these losses lead to soil and water quality degradation, as well as decreased biomass production and grain yields within a watershed. Further, the effects of land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil carbon can be felt at a much larger scale in terms of the global carbon cycle, where the interactions of carbon between the atmosphere, vegetation, and soil are highly dynamic. During tillage- and rainfall-induced erosion, organic material encapsulated within soil aggregates are dislodged and redistributed along the hillslope. Additionally, this redistribution increases decomposition rates and the release of carbon dioxide fluxes to the atmosphere by changing soil texture, bulk density, and water holding capacities, which are key parameters that affect microbial activity. In this ongoing study, the combination of extensive field data, geo-spatial tools, and a coupled erosion (Water Erosion Prediction Project) - biogeochemical (CENTURY) model were used to assess the soil carbon sequestration potential for representative crop rotations in a highly productive <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> watershed, at various spatial and temporal scales. Total Belowground Carbon Allocation was selected as a metric to assess carbon sequestration because it implements a mass balance approach of the various carbon fluxes stemming from soil detachment (erosion/deposition), heterotrophic respiration from microbial decomposition, and plant production. The results from this study show that the use of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> can sequester 35 g C/m2 within the soils of the studied watershed over a 2-year crop rotation. Extrapolating to the watershed scale shows that the system is a net sink of carbon. Providing accurate assessment of the carbon fluxes associated with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> can provide much insight to global climate</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012AGUFM.B43I0540M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012AGUFM.B43I0540M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Plant available silicon in South-east Asian rice paddy soils - relevance of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> and of abiotic factors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marxen, A.; Klotzbücher, T.; Vetterlein, D.; Jahn, R.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Background Silicon (Si) plays a crucial role in rice production. Si content of rice plants exceeds the content of other major nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorous or potassium. Recent studies showed that in some environments external supply of Si can enhance the growth of rice plants. Rice plants express specific Si transporters to absorb Si from soil solutions in form of silicic acid, which precipitates in tissue cells forming amorphous silica bodies, called phytoliths. The phytoliths are returned to soils with plant residues. They might be a main source of plant available silicic acid in soils. Aims In this study we assess the effects of rice paddy cultivation on the stocks of `reactive` Si fractions in mineral topsoils of rice paddy fields in contrasting landscapes. The `reactive` Si fractions are presumed to determine the release of plant-available silicic acid in soils. We consider the relevance of abiotic factors (mineral assemblage; soil weathering status) and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> for these fractions. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which were assumed to affect the stocks of `reactive` Si were (i) the usage of different rice varieties (which might differ in Si demand), (ii) straw residue management (i.e., whether straw residues are returned to the fields or removed and used e.g. as fodder), and (iii) yield level and number of crops per year. Material and methods Soils (top horizon of about 0-20 cm depth) were sampled from rice paddy fields in 2 mountainous and 5 lowland landscapes of contrasting geologic conditions in Vietnam and the Philippines. Ten paddy fields were sampled per landscape. The rice paddy management within landscapes differed when different farmers and/or communities managed the fields. We analysed the following fractions of `reactive` Si in the soils: acetate-extractable Si (dissolved and easily exchangeable Si), phosphate-extractable Si (adsorbed Si), oxalate extractable Si (Si associated with poorly-ordered sesquioxides), NaOH extractable Si</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=221159','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=221159"><span id="translatedtitle">INFLUENCE OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> <span class="hlt">PRACTICES</span> ON MICROMETEOROLOGICAL SPATIAL VARIATIONS AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL SCALES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Soil - vegetation - atmosphere transfers significantly influence interactions and feedbacks between vegetation and boundary layer, in relation with plant phenology and water status. The current study focused on linking micrometeorological conditions to cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> at the local and regional sc...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=243323','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=243323"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Micrometerological Spatial Variations at Local and Regional Scales</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfers significantly influence interactions and feedbacks between vegetation and boundary layer in relation with plant phenology and water status. The current study focused on linking micrometeorological conditions to cultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> at the local and regional scales ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009EGUGA..1110647M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009EGUGA..1110647M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Patterns and processes of nutrient transfers from land to water: a catchment approach to evaluate Good <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in Ireland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mellander, P.-E.; Melland, A. R.; Shortle, G.; Wall, D.; Mechan, S.; Buckley, C.; Fealy, R.; Jordan, P.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p> grassland soils; areas where arable production represents a significant landuse; and catchments on productive and unproductive aquifers. The catchments were identified using a GIS-based multicriteria decision analysis with objective criteria that included landuse data (including <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and settlement statistics) combined with soils and geology data to evaluate the risk of P and N loss. Shortlisted catchments were then finalised using <span class="hlt">practical</span> criteria based on the potential for hydrometry and hydrochemistry research. In each catchment, a conceptual model approach is being used to hypothesize the sources, seasonal mobilisation and pathways of nutrients and water through the soil/subsoil system and transfer into surface and ground water systems to stratify each catchment experimental design. Knowledge of the nutrient management of each catchment farm and resulting soil fertility will be used to monitor the sources of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> N and P. Environmental soil nutrient tests will provide baselines and checks on the potential for mobilisation. Areas of high soil fertility that are coincident with high surface or sub-surface hydrological connectivity will be monitored for subsequent nutrient transfer. Other potential nutrient source loads within the catchments, such as rural waste-water treatment plants and domestic septic systems, will be factored in as non-<span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sources. Similarly, the potential for farmyard transfers will also be assessed. The net balance of nutrient transfer at the catchment outlets will be monitored using a high resolution method that is coincident with hydrometric measurements to ensure that there is a full understanding of the inter-dependence between point and diffuse nutrient transfers and hydrodynamics. This source to transfer approach is highly appropriate and a move towards inductive understanding of nutrient use and export in river catchments - the scale at which policies for water resources management will be assessed under the WFD. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3968896','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3968896"><span id="translatedtitle">Creating Minimum Harm <span class="hlt">Practice</span> ( MiHaP): a concept for <span class="hlt">continuous</span> improvement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Singh, Ranjit</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The author asks for the attention of leaders and all other stakeholders to calls of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and the UK National Health Service (NHS) to promote <span class="hlt">continuous</span> learning to reduce harm to patients. This paper presents a concept for structured bottom-up methodology that enables and empowers all stakeholders to identify, prioritize, and address safety challenges. This methodology takes advantage of the memory of the experiences of all persons involved in providing care. It respects and responds to the uniqueness of each setting by empowering and motivating all team members to commit to harm reduction. It is based on previously published work on “Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Research (BPR)” and on “Systematic Appraisal of Risk and Its Management for Error Reduction (SARAIMER)”. The latter approach, has been shown by the author (with Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) support), to reduce adverse events and their severity through empowerment, ownership and work satisfaction. The author puts forward a strategy for leaders to implement, in response to national and international calls for Better health, Better care, and Better value (the 3B’s of healthcare) in the US Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.  This is designed to enable and implement “ A promise to learn- a commitment to act”.  AHRQ has recently published “A Toolkit for Rapid-Cycle Patient Safety and Quality Improvement” that includes an adapted version of SARAIMER. PMID:24715965</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1813987T&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1813987T&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Short-term soil loss by eolian erosion in response to different rain-fed <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tanner, Smadar; Katra, Itzhak; Zaady, Eli</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Eolian (wind) erosion is a widespread process and a major form of soil degradation in arid and semi-arid regions. The present study examined changes in soil properties and eolian soil loss at a field scale in response to different soil treatments in two rain-fed <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Field experiments with a boundary-layer wind tunnel and soil analysis were used to obtain the data. Two <span class="hlt">practices</span> with different soil treatments (after harvest), mechanical tillage and stubble grazing intensities, were applied in the fallow phase of the rotation (dry season). The mechanical tillage and the stubble grazing had an immediate and direct effects on soil aggregation but not on the soil texture, and the contents of soil water, organic matter, and CaCO3. Higher erosion rates, that was measured as fluxes of total eolian sediment and particulate matter <10 μm (PM10), were recorded under mechanical tillage and grazing intensities compared with the undisturbed topsoil of the control plots. The erosion rates were higher in grazing plots than in tillage plots. The calculated soil fluxes in this study indicate potentially rapid soil degradation due to loss of fine particles by wind. The finding may have implications for long-term management of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils in semi-arid areas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014NHESS..14..625K&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014NHESS..14..625K&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">A hydro-sedimentary modeling system for flash flood propagation and hazard estimation under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kourgialas, N. N.; Karatzas, G. P.</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>A modeling system for the estimation of flash flood flow velocity and sediment transport is developed in this study. The system comprises three components: (a) a modeling framework based on the hydrological model HSPF, (b) the hydrodynamic module of the hydraulic model MIKE 11 (quasi-2-D), and (c) the advection-dispersion module of MIKE 11 as a sediment transport model. An important parameter in hydraulic modeling is the Manning's coefficient, an indicator of the channel resistance which is directly dependent on riparian vegetation changes. Riparian vegetation's effect on flood propagation parameters such as water depth (inundation), discharge, flow velocity, and sediment transport load is investigated in this study. Based on the obtained results, when the weed-cutting percentage is increased, the flood wave depth decreases while flow discharge, velocity and sediment transport load increase. The proposed modeling system is used to evaluate and illustrate the flood hazard for different riparian vegetation cutting scenarios. For the estimation of flood hazard, a combination of the flood propagation characteristics of water depth, flow velocity and sediment load was used. Next, a well-balanced selection of the most appropriate <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> cutting <span class="hlt">practices</span> of riparian vegetation was performed. Ultimately, the model results obtained for different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> cutting <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios can be employed to create flood protection measures for flood-prone areas. The proposed methodology was applied to the downstream part of a small Mediterranean river basin in Crete, Greece.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESD...1.5855K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESD...1.5855K"><span id="translatedtitle">A hydro-sedimentary modelling system for flash flood propagation and hazard estimation under different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kourgialas, N. N.; Karatzas, G. P.</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>A modelling system for the estimation of flash flood flow characteristics and sediment transport is developed in this study. The system comprises of three components: (a) a modelling framework based on the hydrological model HSPF, (b) the hydrodynamic module of the hydraulic model MIKE 11 (quasi-2-D), and (c) the advection-dispersion module of MIKE 11 as a sediment transport model. An important parameter in hydraulic modelling is the Manning's coefficient, an indicator of the channel resistance which is directly depended on riparian vegetation changes. Riparian vegetation effect on flood propagation parameters such as water depth (inundation), discharge, flow velocity, and sediment transport load is investigated in this study. Based on the obtained results, when the weed cutting percentage is increased, the flood wave depth decreases while flow discharge, velocity and sediment transport load increase. The proposed modelling system is used to evaluate and illustrate the flood hazard for different cutting riparian vegetation scenarios. For the estimation of flood hazard, a combination of the flood propagation characteristics of water depth, flow velocity and sediment load was used. Next, an optimal selection of the most appropriate <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> cutting <span class="hlt">practices</span> of riparian vegetation was performed. Ultimately, the model results obtained for different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> cutting <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios can be employed to create flood protection measures for flood prone areas. The proposed methodology was applied to the downstream part of a small mediterranean river basin in Crete, Greece.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.B51F0348C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.B51F0348C"><span id="translatedtitle">Simulated crop yield in response to changes in climate and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>: results from a simple process based model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Caldararu, S.; Smith, M. J.; Purves, D.; Emmott, S.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Global <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> will, in the future, be faced with two main challenges: climate change and an increase in global food demand driven by an increase in population and changes in consumption habits. To be able to predict both the impacts of changes in climate on crop yields and the changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> necessary to respond to such impacts we currently need to improve our understanding of crop responses to climate and the predictive capability of our models. Ideally, what we would have at our disposal is a modelling tool which, given certain climatic conditions and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, can predict the growth pattern and final yield of any of the major crops across the globe. We present a simple, process-based crop growth model based on the assumption that plants allocate above- and below-ground biomass to maintain overall carbon optimality and that, to maintain this optimality, the reproductive stage begins at peak nitrogen uptake. The model includes responses to available light, water, temperature and carbon dioxide concentration as well as nitrogen fertilisation and irrigation. The model is data constrained at two sites, the Yaqui Valley, Mexico for wheat and the Southern Great Plains flux site for maize and soybean, using a robust combination of space-based vegetation data (including data from the MODIS and Landsat TM and ETM+ instruments), as well as ground-based biomass and yield measurements. We show a number of climate response scenarios, including increases in temperature and carbon dioxide concentrations as well as responses to irrigation and fertiliser application.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-03-23/pdf/2011-6827.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-03-23/pdf/2011-6827.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 16324 - Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order; <span class="hlt">Continuance</span> Referendum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-03-23</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1218 Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order; <span class="hlt">Continuance</span> Referendum AGENCY: <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Referendum order. SUMMARY: This... <span class="hlt">practice</span> and procedure, Advertising, Consumer information, Marketing agreements, Blueberry...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70159372','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70159372"><span id="translatedtitle">Use of multispectral Ikonos imagery for discriminating between conventional and conservation <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Vina, Andres; Peters, Albert J.; Ji, Lei</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>There is a global concern about the increase in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One method being discussed to encourage greenhouse gas mitigation efforts is based on a trading system whereby carbon emitters can buy effective mitigation efforts from farmers implementing conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>. These <span class="hlt">practices</span> sequester carbon from the atmosphere, and such a trading system would require a low-cost and accurate method of verification. Remote sensing technology can offer such a verification technique. This paper is focused on the use of standard image processing procedures applied to a multispectral Ikonos image, to determine whether it is possible to validate that farmers have complied with agreements to implement conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A principal component analysis (PCA) was performed in order to isolate image variance in cropped fields. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) statistical procedures were used to evaluate the capability of each Ikonos band and each principal component to discriminate between conventional and conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A logistic regression model was implemented on the principal component most effective in discriminating between conventional and conservation tillage, in order to produce a map of the probability of conventional tillage. The Ikonos imagery, in combination with ground-reference information, proved to be a useful tool for verification of conservation tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=soil+AND+microbiology&pg=3&id=EJ250341','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=soil+AND+microbiology&pg=3&id=EJ250341"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Microbiology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brill, Winston J.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Elucidates strategies for applying microbiological techniques to traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Discusses the manipulation of microorganisms that live with plants and also the problems involved in the introduction of new genes into crop plants by recombinant DNA methods. (CS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26882523','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26882523"><span id="translatedtitle">Batch vs <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-feeding operational mode for the removal of pesticides from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> run-off by microalgae systems: A laboratory scale study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Matamoros, Víctor; Rodríguez, Yolanda</p> <p>2016-05-15</p> <p>Microalgae-based water treatment technologies have been used in recent years to treat different water effluents, but their effectiveness for removing pesticides from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> run-off has not yet been addressed. This paper assesses the effect of microalgae in pesticide removal, as well as the influence of different operation strategies (<span class="hlt">continuous</span> vs batch feeding). The following pesticides were studied: mecoprop, atrazine, simazine, diazinone, alachlor, chlorfenvinphos, lindane, malathion, pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos, endosulfan and clofibric acid (tracer). 2L batch reactors and 5L <span class="hlt">continuous</span> reactors were spiked to 10 μg L(-1) of each pesticide. Additionally, three different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were assessed (2, 4 and 8 days) in the <span class="hlt">continuous</span> feeding reactors. The batch-feeding experiments demonstrated that the presence of microalgae increased the efficiency of lindane, alachlor and chlorpyrifos by 50%. The <span class="hlt">continuous</span> feeding reactors had higher removal efficiencies than the batch reactors for pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos and lindane. Whilst longer HRTs increased the technology's effectiveness, a low HRT of 2 days was capable of removing malathion, pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos, and endosulfan by up to 70%. This study suggests that microalgae-based treatment technologies can be an effective alternative for removing pesticides from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> run-off. PMID:26882523</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1077458.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1077458.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The Impact of Micro-Teaching on the Teaching <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Performance of Undergraduate <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education Students in College of Education, Azare</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sa'ad, Tata Umar; Sabo, Shehu; Abdullahi, Aliyu Dahuwa</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Micro-teaching and teaching <span class="hlt">practices</span> are two integral parts of teacher education programme. Therefore, this study investigated the impact of micro-teaching on the teaching <span class="hlt">practice</span> of the undergraduate <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education Students admitted in 2012/2013 Academic session in College of Education, Azare, Bauchi State, Nigeria. The 400 level…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009GeCoA..73.4688P&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009GeCoA..73.4688P&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Acidification processes and soil leaching influenced by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> revealed by strontium isotopic ratios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine; Aquilina, Luc; Weyer, Christina; Molénat, Jérôme; Lischeid, Gunnar</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>In natural river systems, the chemical and isotopic composition of stream- and ground waters are mainly controlled by the geology and water-rock interactions. The leaching of major cations from soils has been recognized as a possible consequence of acidic deposition from atmosphere for over 30 years. Moreover, in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> areas, the application of physiological acid fertilizers and nitrogen fertilizers in the ammonia form may enhance the cation leaching through the soil profile into ground- and surface waters. This origin of leached cations has been studied on two small and adjacent <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> catchments in Brittany, western France. The study catchments are drained by two first-order streams, and mainly covered with cambisoils, issued from the alteration and weathering of a granodiorite basement. Precipitations, soil water- and NH 4 acetate-leachates, separated minerals, and stream waters have been investigated. Chemical element ratios, such as Ba/Sr, Na/Sr and Ca/Sr ratios, as well as Sr isotopic ratios are used to constrain the relative contribution from potential sources of stream water elements. Based on Sr isotopic ratio and element concentration, soil water- and NH 4 acetate leaching indicates (1) a dominant manure/slurry contribution in the top soil, representing a cation concentrated pool, with low 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios; (2) in subsoils, mineral dissolution is enhanced by fertilizer application, becoming the unique source of cations in the saprolite. The relatively high weathering rates encountered implies significant sources of cations which are not accessory minerals, but rather plagioclase and biotite dissolution. Stream water has a very different isotopic and chemical composition compared to soil water leaching suggesting that stream water chemistry is dominated by elements issued from mineral and rock weathering. <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>, by applications of chemical and organic fertilizers, can influence the export of major base cations, such as Na +. Plagioclase</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=229654','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=229654"><span id="translatedtitle">Reducing the Environmental Risk of Pesticides: Implications of Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Production</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A common management <span class="hlt">practice</span> for the production of fresh-market vegetables uses polyethylene (plastic) mulch to increase soil temperature, maintain soil moisture and reduce weed pressure. However, multiple applications of fungicides and insecticides are required, and rain events afford more runoff ...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=307771','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=307771"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> altered soybean seed protein, oil, fattyacids,sugars, and minerals in the Midsouth USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Management <span class="hlt">practices</span> such as seeding rate (SR), planting date (PD), and row-type (RT: single- and twin-rows) may alter seed nutrition in soybean. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of SR and PD on soybean seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars) and mineral...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Project+AND+2013&id=EJ1085441','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Project+AND+2013&id=EJ1085441"><span id="translatedtitle">Colorado's AgrAbility Project's Effects on KASA and <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Changes with <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Producers and Professionals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fetsch, Robert J.; Jackman, Danielle M.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Disability rates resulting from work-related injuries remain steadily high among farmers and ranchers. To address the gap in services within this population, USDA implemented AgrAbility nationally. Using part of Bennett's hierarchical model, the current study evaluated the KASA and <span class="hlt">practice</span> change levels of 401 farmers and ranchers and compared…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=health+AND+hazards&pg=5&id=EJ900204','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=health+AND+hazards&pg=5&id=EJ900204"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of Long Farm Working Hours on Child Safety <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Settings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Marlenga, Barbara; Pahwa, Punam; Hagel, Louise; Dosman, James; Pickett, William</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: To characterize working hours of adult farm owner-operators and their spouses by season, and to examine associations between working hours and farm safety <span class="hlt">practices</span> affecting children. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data collected as part of an existing study of injury and its determinants.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=332361','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=332361"><span id="translatedtitle">Regional effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on nutrient transport in the Upper Mississippi River Basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Despite progress in the implementation of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, related improvements in water quality have been challenging to measure in larger river systems. In this paper we quantify these downstream effects by applying the empirical U.S. Geological Survey water-quality model SPARROW to inves...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4028191','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4028191"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Quality Improvement in Daily Clinical <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: A Proof of Concept Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lorch, Jonathan A.; Pollak, Victor E.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Quality Improvement (CQI) is an iterative process of: planning to improve a product or process, plan implementation, analyzing and comparing results against those expected, and corrective action on differences between actual and expected results. It is little used in clinical medicine. Anemia, a complex problem in End Stage Renal Disease patients, served to test the ability of an unique electronic medical record (EMR) optimized for daily care to empower CQI in <span class="hlt">practice</span>. We used data collected during daily care, stored in the EMR, and organized to display temporal relationships between clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic events. Our aims were optimal hemoglobin with minimum epoetin, and maintaining stable hemoglobin and epoetin. The study was done on 250 patients treated by maintenance hemodialysis (HD), receiving epoetin prior to February 1, 2010 and followed to July 31, 2011. Repleting iron, ensuring iron sufficiency, slow epoetin reduction, and decision support tools enabling data display over long periods in patient-centered reports were key elements. Epoetin dose, adjusted 6–8 weekly, was based on current clinical conditions and past responses. Hemoglobin increased by months 1–2; epoetin decreased from month 4. By months 16–18, epoetin had decreased 42% to 9,720 units/week while hemoglobin increased 8% to 123.6 g/L. Hemoglobin and epoetin were stable from month 7 onward. New epoetin orders decreased 83%. Transferrin saturation increased after the study start. Individual patient hemoglobin variation decreased by 23%, range by 27%. Mortality, 11.78 per 100 patient years, was 42% less than United States dialysis patient mortality. Allowable epoetin charges decreased by $15.33 per treatment and were $22.88 less than current Medicare allowance. The study validates the hypothesis that an EMR optimized for daily patient care can empower CQI in clinical medicine and serve to monitor medical care quality and cost. PMID:24844323</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27100331','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27100331"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic adjustment in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to economic incentives aiming to decrease fertilizer application.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sun, Shanxia; Delgado, Michael S; Sesmero, Juan P</p> <p>2016-07-15</p> <p>Input- and output-based economic policies designed to reduce water pollution from fertilizer runoff by adjusting management <span class="hlt">practices</span> are theoretically justified and well-understood. Yet, in <span class="hlt">practice</span>, adjustment in fertilizer application or land allocation may be sluggish. We provide <span class="hlt">practical</span> guidance for policymakers regarding the relative magnitude and speed of adjustment of input- and output-based policies. Through a dynamic dual model of corn production that takes fertilizer as one of several production inputs, we measure the short- and long-term effects of policies that affect the relative prices of inputs and outputs through the short- and long-term price elasticities of fertilizer application, and also the total time required for different policies to affect fertilizer application through the adjustment rates of capital and land. These estimates allow us to compare input- and output-based policies based on their relative cost-effectiveness. Using data from Indiana and Illinois, we find that input-based policies are more cost-effective than their output-based counterparts in achieving a target reduction in fertilizer application. We show that input- and output-based policies yield adjustment in fertilizer application at the same speed, and that most of the adjustment takes place in the short-term. PMID:27100331</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1816914P&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1816914P&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> to enhance soil organic in Lombardy plain (Northern Italy)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Perego, Alessia; Giussani, Andrea; Corsi, Stefano; Tosini, Andrea; Acutis, Marco</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>It has been demonstrated that conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (CA) determines a long-term increase in soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in cropland. The present study aimed to estimate the amount of SOC stored in soil of Lombardy plain (Northern Italy) following the change from tillage <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (TA) to CA by using crop ARMOSA crop over 23 years (1989-2011). The territorial analysis was performed at agrarian region scale (AR) after identification of the representative crops rotation and soil types. The land use information were data available at cadastral scale and referred to 5 years (from 2007 to 2011). The meteorological data (i.e. maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation) were measured at 14 monitoring stations. Solar radiation was estimated using the equation of the Bristow and Campbell model (1994). A spatial interpolation method was used to extend the meteorological data throughout the entire plain of the region by employing Thiessen polygon method; the meteorological data of the polygon were assigned to each AR. ARMOSA was parameterized to simulate the two tillage systems. For TA and CA scenario the depth of tillage was limited to 35 and 10 cm, respectively; crop residual incorporation was not simulated under CA. In TA scenario, we used the parameters calibrated and validated by Perego et al.(2013) on a wide dataset collected at six monitoring sites in Lombardy plain. In CA, the rate of C decomposition of humified organic C was assumed to be smaller by 30% in no-tillage than in TA (Oorts et al., 2007). The model results showed a significant improve of SOC (p<0.01) from TA to CA under all the crop rotations with a potential SOC sequestration ranged from 0.1 to 0.48 t C ha-1 y-1. While soil type did not affect significantly the SOC sequestration, crop residue determined relevant increases in SOC. That was particularly evident in grain maize monoculture with or without cover crop. References: Oorts K., Garnier P., Findeling A., Mary B., Richard G., Nicolardot B</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4294T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4294T"><span id="translatedtitle">Mitigation scenario analysis: modelling the impacts of changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on surface water quality at the catchment scale</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Taylor, Sam; He, Yi; Hiscock, Kevin</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Increasing human pressures on the natural environment through the demand for increased <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity have exacerbated and deteriorated water quality conditions within many environments due to an unbalancing of the nutrient cycle. As a consequence, increased <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> diffuse water pollution has resulted in elevated concentrations of nutrients within surface water and groundwater bodies. This deterioration in water quality has direct consequences for the health of aquatic ecosystems and biodiversity, human health, and the use of water as a resource for public water supply and recreation. To mitigate these potential impacts and to meet commitments under the EU Drinking Water and Water Framework Directives, there is a need to improve our understanding of the impacts that <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use and management <span class="hlt">practices</span> have on water quality. Water quality models are one of the tools available which can be used to facilitate this aim. These simplified representations of the physical environment allow a variety of changes to be simulated within a catchment, including for example changes in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use and management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, allowing for predictions of the impacts of those measures on water quality to be developed and an assessment to be made of their effectiveness in improving conditions. The aim of this research is to apply the water quality model SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to the Wensum catchment (area 650 km2), situated in the East of England, to predict the impacts of potential changes in land use and land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality as part of a process to select those measures that in combination will have the greatest potential to improve water quality. Model calibration and validation is conducted at three sites within the catchment against observations of river discharge and nitrate and total phosphorus loads at a monthly time-step using the optimisation algorithm SUFI-2 (Sequential Uncertainty Fitting Version 2</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1026935','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1026935"><span id="translatedtitle">National health insurance in America--can we <span class="hlt">practice</span> with it? Can we <span class="hlt">continue</span> to <span class="hlt">practice</span> without it?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Grumbach, K</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Health insurance in the United States is failing patients and physicians alike. In this country 37 million uninsured face economic barriers to care, and the health of many suffers as a result. The "corporatization" of medical care threatens professional values with an unprecedented administrative and commercial intrusion into the daily <span class="hlt">practice</span> of medicine. Competitive strategies have also failed their most ostensible goal--cost control. In contrast, Canada offers a model of a national health insurance plan that provides universal and comprehensive coverage, succeeds at restraining health care inflation, and does little to abrogate the clinical autonomy of physicians in private <span class="hlt">practice</span>. I propose that American physicians relent in their historical opposition to national health insurance and participate in the development of a universal, public insurance plan responsive to the needs of both patients and physicians. Images PMID:2672604</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFMGC13A1134F&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFMGC13A1134F&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">High-Resolution Biogeochemical Simulation Identifies <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Opportunities for Bioenergy Landscape Intensification Across Diverse US <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Regions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Field, J.; Adler, P. R.; Evans, S.; Paustian, K.; Marx, E.; Easter, M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The sustainability of biofuel expansion is strongly dependent on the environmental footprint of feedstock production, including both direct impacts within feedstock-producing areas and potential leakage effects due to disruption of existing food, feed, or fiber production. Assessing and minimizing these impacts requires novel methods compared to traditional supply chain lifecycle assessment. When properly validated and applied at appropriate spatial resolutions, biogeochemical process models are useful for simulating how the productivity and soil greenhouse gas fluxes of cultivating both conventional crops and advanced feedstock crops respond across gradients of land quality and management intensity. In this work we use the DayCent model to assess the biogeochemical impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> residue collection, establishment of perennial grasses on marginal cropland or conservation easements, and intensification of existing cropping at high spatial resolution across several real-world case study landscapes in diverse US <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> regions. We integrate the resulting estimates of productivity, soil carbon changes, and nitrous oxide emissions with crop production budgets and lifecycle inventories, and perform a basic optimization to generate landscape cost/GHG frontiers and determine the most <span class="hlt">practical</span> opportunities for low-impact feedstock provisioning. The optimization is constrained to assess the minimum combined impacts of residue collection, land use change, and intensification of existing <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> necessary for the landscape to supply a commercial-scale biorefinery while maintaining exiting food, feed, and fiber production levels. These techniques can be used to assess how different feedstock provisioning strategies perform on both economic and environmental criteria, and sensitivity of performance to environmental and land use factors. The included figure shows an example feedstock cost-GHG mitigation tradeoff frontier for a commercial-scale cellulosic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JHyd..379..339G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JHyd..379..339G"><span id="translatedtitle">Potential risks of nitrate pollution in aquifers from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the Nurra region, northwestern Sardinia, Italy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ghiglieri, Giorgio; Barbieri, Giulio; Vernier, Antonio; Carletti, Alberto; Demurtas, Nicola; Pinna, Rosanna; Pittalis, Daniele</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>SummaryThe paper describes the methodological and innovative approach, which aims to evaluate the potential risk of nitrate pollution in aquifers from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> by combining intrinsic aquifer vulnerability to contamination, according to the SINTACS R5 method, with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> nitrates hazard assessment, according to the IPNOA index. The proposed parametric model adopts a geographically based integrated evaluation system, comprising qualitative and semi-quantitative indicators. In some cases, the authors have modified this model, revising and adjusting scores and weights of the parameter to account for the different environmental conditions, and calibrating accordingly. The method has been successfully implemented and validated in the pilot area of the Alghero coastal plain (northwestern Sardinia, Italy) where aquifers with high productivity are present. The classes with a major score (high potential risk) are in the central part of the plain, in correspondence with the most productive aquifers, where most actual or potential pollution sources are concentrated. These are mainly represented by intensive <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> activities, by industrial agglomerate and diffused urbanisation. For calibrating the model and optimizing and/or weighting the examined factors, the modelling results were validated by comparison with groundwater quality data, in particular nitrate content, and with the potential pollution sources census data. The parametric method is a popular approach to groundwater vulnerability assessment, in contrast to groundwater flow model and statistical method ones: it is, indeed, relatively inexpensive and straightforward, and use data commonly available or that can be estimated. The zoning of nitrate vulnerable areas provides regional authorities with a useful decision support tool for planning land-use properly managing groundwater and combating and/or mitigating desertification processes. However, a careful validation of the results is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4664253','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4664253"><span id="translatedtitle">Cultivar and Year Rather than <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Affect Primary and Secondary Metabolites in Apple Fruit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Renard, Catherine M. G. C.; Plenet, Daniel; Gautier, Hélène; Touloumet, Line; Girard, Thierry; Simon, Sylvaine</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Many biotic and abiotic parameters affect the metabolites involved in the organoleptic and health value of fruits. It is therefore important to understand how the growers' decisions for cultivar and orchard management can affect the fruit composition. <span class="hlt">Practices</span>, cultivars and/or year all might participate to determine fruit composition. To hierarchize these factors, fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids contents, titratable acidity, individual sugars and organics acids, and phenolics were measured in three apple cultivars (‘Ariane’, ‘Melrose’ and ‘Smoothee’) managed under organic, low-input and conventional management. Apples were harvested at commercial maturity in the orchards of the cropping system experiment BioREco at INRA Gotheron (Drôme, 26) over the course of three years (2011, 2012 and 2013). The main factors affecting primary and secondary metabolites, in both apple skin and flesh, were by far the cultivar and the yearly conditions, while the management system had a very limited effect. When considering the three cultivars and the year 2011 to investigate the effect of the management system per se, only few compounds differed significantly between the three systems and in particular the total phenolic content did not differ significantly between systems. Finally, when considering orchards grown in the same pedoclimatic conditions and of the same age, instead of the usual organic vs. conventional comparison, the effect of the management system on the apple fruit quality (Fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, individual sugars, organic acids, and phenolics) was very limited to non-significant. The main factors of variation were the cultivar and the year of cropping rather than the cropping system. More generally, as each management system (e.g. conventional, organic…) encompasses a great variability of <span class="hlt">practices</span>, this highlights the importance of accurately documenting orchard <span class="hlt">practices</span> and design beside the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26618711','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26618711"><span id="translatedtitle">Cultivar and Year Rather than <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Affect Primary and Secondary Metabolites in Apple Fruit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Le Bourvellec, Carine; Bureau, Sylvie; Renard, Catherine M G C; Plenet, Daniel; Gautier, Hélène; Touloumet, Line; Girard, Thierry; Simon, Sylvaine</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Many biotic and abiotic parameters affect the metabolites involved in the organoleptic and health value of fruits. It is therefore important to understand how the growers' decisions for cultivar and orchard management can affect the fruit composition. <span class="hlt">Practices</span>, cultivars and/or year all might participate to determine fruit composition. To hierarchize these factors, fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids contents, titratable acidity, individual sugars and organics acids, and phenolics were measured in three apple cultivars ('Ariane', 'Melrose' and 'Smoothee') managed under organic, low-input and conventional management. Apples were harvested at commercial maturity in the orchards of the cropping system experiment BioREco at INRA Gotheron (Drôme, 26) over the course of three years (2011, 2012 and 2013). The main factors affecting primary and secondary metabolites, in both apple skin and flesh, were by far the cultivar and the yearly conditions, while the management system had a very limited effect. When considering the three cultivars and the year 2011 to investigate the effect of the management system per se, only few compounds differed significantly between the three systems and in particular the total phenolic content did not differ significantly between systems. Finally, when considering orchards grown in the same pedoclimatic conditions and of the same age, instead of the usual organic vs. conventional comparison, the effect of the management system on the apple fruit quality (Fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, individual sugars, organic acids, and phenolics) was very limited to non-significant. The main factors of variation were the cultivar and the year of cropping rather than the cropping system. More generally, as each management system (e.g. conventional, organic…) encompasses a great variability of <span class="hlt">practices</span>, this highlights the importance of accurately documenting orchard <span class="hlt">practices</span> and design beside the generic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=telemedicine&id=EJ759153','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=telemedicine&id=EJ759153"><span id="translatedtitle">Telemedicine for Access to Quality Care on Medical <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Medical Education in a Global Arena</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rafiq, Azhar; Merrell, Ronald C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Health care <span class="hlt">practices</span> <span class="hlt">continue</span> to evolve with technological advances integrating computer applications and patient information management into telemedicine systems. Telemedicine can be broadly defined as the use of information technology to provide patient care and share clinical information from one geographic location to another. Telemedicine…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7334.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7334.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.7334 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... to me? (a) For each by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues subject to the work <span class="hlt">practice</span>... for each oven and records indicating the legitimate operational reason for any change in the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7334.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7334.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.7334 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards that apply to me?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance... to me? (a) For each by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues subject to the work <span class="hlt">practice</span>... for each oven and records indicating the legitimate operational reason for any change in the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sleep+AND+articles&pg=5&id=EJ869624','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sleep+AND+articles&pg=5&id=EJ869624"><span id="translatedtitle">Parent and Staff Expectations for <span class="hlt">Continuity</span> of Home <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in the Child Care Setting for Families with Diverse Cultural Backgrounds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Gioia, Katey</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The use of childcare services for very young children (birth to three years) has increased dramatically in the past two decades (Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2004). This article investigates the expectations for cultural <span class="hlt">continuity</span> of caregiving <span class="hlt">practices</span> (with particular emphasis on sleep and feeding) between…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol14-sec63-7908.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol14-sec63-7908.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7908.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol13-sec63-7908.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol14-sec63-7908.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol14-sec63-7908.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7908.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7908.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-sec63-7908.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol14-sec63-7908.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... compliance with the emissions limitations and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=THESIS+AND+DOCTORAL&pg=4&id=ED563141','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=THESIS+AND+DOCTORAL&pg=4&id=ED563141"><span id="translatedtitle">Practitioner-Reseach as Dissertation: Exploring the <span class="hlt">Continuities</span> between <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Research in a Community College ESL Classroom</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jain, Rashi</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Traditional notions around "research" and "teaching" tend to project the two as separate, often conflicting, activities. My dissertation challenges this perceived dichotomy and explores points of connections, or <span class="hlt">continuities</span>, between teaching and research through my own <span class="hlt">practice</span> as an adjunct community-college English as a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Ethiopia&pg=4&id=EJ1017112','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Ethiopia&pg=4&id=EJ1017112"><span id="translatedtitle">High School English Teachers' and Students' Perceptions, Attitudes and Actual <span class="hlt">Practices</span> of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yigzaw, Abiy</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This study examined high school teachers' and students' perceptions, attitudes and actual <span class="hlt">practices</span> of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> assessment. The participants of the study were 41 teachers and 808 students in Injabara General and Preparatory, Tilili General Secondary, Mengesha Jembere General Secondary, and Dangila Preparatory schools in West Gojjam,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2578358','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2578358"><span id="translatedtitle">Applications of a Nursing Knowledge Based System for Nursing <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: Inservice, <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education, and Standards of Care</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ryan, Sheila A.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>A knowledge base of nursing theory supports computerized consultation to nursing service administrators and staff about patient care. Three scenarios portray different nurses utilizing the system for inservice development, <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education, and development of standards of care or protocols for <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The advantages of the system including cost savings are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70174013','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70174013"><span id="translatedtitle">Regional effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> on nutrient transport in the Upper Mississippi River Basin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Garcia, Ana Maria.; Alexander, Richard B.; Arnold, Jeffrey G.; Norfleet, Lee; White, Michael J.; Robertson, Dale; Schwarz, Gregory</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Despite progress in the implementation of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, related improvements in water quality have been challenging to measure in larger river systems. In this paper we quantify these downstream effects by applying the empirical U.S. Geological Survey water-quality model SPARROW to investigate whether spatial differences in conservation intensity were statistically correlated with variations in nutrient loads. In contrast to other forms of water quality data analysis, the application of SPARROW controls for confounding factors such as hydrologic variability, multiple sources and environmental processes. A measure of conservation intensity was derived from the USDA-CEAP regional assessment of the Upper Mississippi River and used as an explanatory variable in a model of the Upper Midwest. The spatial pattern of conservation intensity was negatively correlated (p = 0.003) with the total nitrogen loads in streams in the basin. Total phosphorus loads were weakly negatively correlated with conservation (p = 0.25). Regional nitrogen reductions were estimated to range from 5 to 34% and phosphorus reductions from 1 to 10% in major river basins of the Upper Mississippi region. The statistical associations between conservation and nutrient loads are consistent with hydrological and biogeochemical processes such as denitrification. The results provide empirical evidence at the regional scale that conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> have had a larger statistically detectable effect on nitrogen than on phosphorus loadings in streams and rivers of the Upper Mississippi Basin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27243625','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27243625"><span id="translatedtitle">Regional Effects of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Nutrient Transport in the Upper Mississippi River Basin.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>García, Ana María; Alexander, Richard B; Arnold, Jeffrey G; Norfleet, Lee; White, Michael J; Robertson, Dale M; Schwarz, Gregory</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Despite progress in the implementation of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, related improvements in water quality have been challenging to measure in larger river systems. In this paper we quantify these downstream effects by applying the empirical U.S. Geological Survey water-quality model SPARROW to investigate whether spatial differences in conservation intensity were statistically correlated with variations in nutrient loads. In contrast to other forms of water quality data analysis, the application of SPARROW controls for confounding factors such as hydrologic variability, multiple sources and environmental processes. A measure of conservation intensity was derived from the USDA-CEAP regional assessment of the Upper Mississippi River and used as an explanatory variable in a model of the Upper Midwest. The spatial pattern of conservation intensity was negatively correlated (p = 0.003) with the total nitrogen loads in streams in the basin. Total phosphorus loads were weakly negatively correlated with conservation (p = 0.25). Regional nitrogen reductions were estimated to range from 5 to 34% and phosphorus reductions from 1 to 10% in major river basins of the Upper Mississippi region. The statistical associations between conservation and nutrient loads are consistent with hydrological and biogeochemical processes such as denitrification. The results provide empirical evidence at the regional scale that conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> have had a larger statistically detectable effect on nitrogen than on phosphorus loadings in streams and rivers of the Upper Mississippi Basin. PMID:27243625</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=HASS&pg=3&id=ED050438','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=HASS&pg=3&id=ED050438"><span id="translatedtitle">Project Ideals: Curriculum and Instruction <span class="hlt">Practices</span> for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Learner Progress (Area G).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hass, Glen</p> <p></p> <p>This pamphlet surveys the research and literature concerned with the effects of curriculum and instructional <span class="hlt">practices</span> on pupil progress. Specific topics include (1) student grade acceleration and retardation, and elimination from school; (2) graded vs nongraded curriculum and school organization; (3) teaching and curriculum <span class="hlt">practices</span> for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ctcs&pg=3&id=EJ775620','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ctcs&pg=3&id=EJ775620"><span id="translatedtitle">The Role of Reflection in Implementing Learning from <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education into <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lowe, Mandy; Rappolt, Susan; Jaglal, Susan; MacDonald, Geraldine</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: Although the use of reflection to facilitate learning and its application in <span class="hlt">practice</span> has been widely advocated, there is little empirical research to establish whether or not health professionals use reflection to integrate learning into clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Particularly troublesome is the lack of empirically based theory underlying…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=xenophobia&pg=2&id=EJ979187','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=xenophobia&pg=2&id=EJ979187"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Continued</span> Relevance of "Teaching to Transgress: Education as the <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Freedom"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bullen, Pauline E.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In 1994, bell hooks' work, Teaching to Transgress--Education as the <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Freedom was first published and this work re-examines it for its intent to counter the devaluation of teaching and on the basis that it addresses the urgent need for changes in teaching <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Because of the intransience of racism and the various "isms" that are…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Henry+AND+failure&id=EJ941165','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Henry+AND+failure&id=EJ941165"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhancing <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Improvement by Facilitating Practitioner Interactivity: New Roles for Providers of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Medical Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Parboosingh, I. John; Reed, Virginia A.; Palmer, James Caldwell; Bernstein, Henry H.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Research into networking and interactivity among practitioners is providing new information that has the potential to enhance the effectiveness of <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvement initiatives. This commentary reviews the evidence that practitioner interactivity can facilitate emergent learning and behavior change that lead to <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvements. Insights…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012AGUFM.B53C0676H&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012AGUFM.B53C0676H&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on greenhouse gas emissions (N2O, CH4 and CO2) from corn fields</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hui, D.; Wang, J.; Jima, T.; Dennis, S.; Stockert, C.; Smart, D.; Bhattarai, S.; Brown, K.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, C.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The United States is, by far, the largest producer of corn (Zea mays L.) in the world. Recent increases in fertilizer cost and concerns over global climate change have farmers and others interested in more efficient fertilization management and greenhouse gas emissions reductions. To seek the best management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, we conducted field experiments during the 2012 growing season at Tennessee State University <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Research and Demonstration Center in Nashville, TN. Six treatments were applied including regular URAN application [2 times], multiple URAN applications [4 times], denitrification inhibitor with regular URAN application, and chicken litter plus regular URAN application in no-tilled plots, and URAN application plus bio-char in tilled plots, all compared to regular URAN application in conventional tilled plots. Each treatment was replicated six times (blocks). We measured N2O, CO2 and CH4 emissions using a closed chamber method after rainfall events, fertilizer applications or every two weeks whichever was shorter. Corresponding soil NH4+-N and NO3--N, soil temperature and moisture were also measured during the gas sampling. Plant physiology and growth were measured about every two weeks. While preliminary results indicate that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on some days, particularly after rainfall events, CH4 flux was not influenced by the treatments during most of the days. Plots with bio-char showed significantly lower N2O emissions. We also measured N2O flux in a commercial corn field using the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique to ground verify the chamber based N2O emissions at the field scale. Results obtained with the EC technique seem comparable with the chamber method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614282H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614282H"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on C stabilization pathways in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> volcanic ash soils (Canary Islands, Spain)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hernandez, Zulimar; María Álvarez, Ana; Carral, Pilar; de Figueiredo, Tomas; Almendros, Gonzalo</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Although C stabilization mechanisms in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils are still controversial [1], a series of overlapped pathways has been suggested [2] such as: i) insolubilization of low molecular weight precursors of soil organic matter (SOM) with reactive minerals through physical and chemical bonding, ii) selective accumulation of biosynthetic substances which are recalcitrant because of its inherent chemical composition, and iii) preservation and furter diagenetic transformation of particulate SOM entrapped within resistant microaggregates, where diffusion of soil enzymes is largely hampered. In some environments where carbohydrate and N compounds are not readily biodegraded, e.g., with water saturated micropores, an ill-known C stabilization pathway may involve the formation of Maillard's reaction products [3]. In all cases, these pathways converge in the formation of recalcitrant macromolecular substances, sharing several properties with the humic acid (HA) fraction [4]. In template forests, the selective preservation and further microbial reworking of plant biomass has been identified as a prevailing mechanism in the accumulation of recalcitrant SOM forms [5]. However, in volcanic ash soils with intense organomineral interactions, condensation reactions of low molecular weight precursors with short-range minerals may be the main mechanism [6]. In order to shed some light about the effect of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management on soil C stabilization processes on volcanic ash soils, the chemical composition of HA and some structural proxies of SOM informing on its origin and potential resistance to biodegradation, were examined in 30 soils from Canary Islands (Spain) by visible, infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, elementary analysis and pyrolytic techniques. The results of multivariate treatments, suggested at least three simultaneous C stabilization biogeochemical trends: i) diagenetic alteration of plant biomacromolecules in soils receiving</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11858321','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11858321"><span id="translatedtitle">NPACE nurse practitioner <span class="hlt">practice</span> characteristics, salary, and benefits survey: 1999. Nurse Practitioner Associates for <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pulcini, J; Vampola, D</p> <p>2000-11-01</p> <p>The purpose of this article is to present the results of a <span class="hlt">practice</span> characteristics, salary, and benefits survey of 1,557 nurse practitioners from the United States who attended national nurse practitioner conferences in Las Vegas, Nevada, Orlando, Florida, Chicago, Illinois, and Boston, Massachusetts, in 1999. Specific data are presented on the demographics of the population, <span class="hlt">practice</span> characteristics and responsibilities, benefits for full- and part-time employees, and salary by region, years of <span class="hlt">practice</span>, type of certification, and location of the <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The salary data were compared with the 1995-1996 and 1996-1997 NPACE <span class="hlt">practice</span> characteristics, salary, and benefits surveys (Pulcini & Fitzgerald, 1997; Pulcini, Vampola, & Fitzgerald, 1998). PMID:11858321</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10926720','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10926720"><span id="translatedtitle">Predictors of blood lead levels in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> villages <span class="hlt">practicing</span> wastewater irrigation in Central Mexico.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cifuentes, E; Villanueva, J; Sanin, L H</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>To investigate whether the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> use of untreated wastewater (i.e. crop irrigation) was associated with elevated blood lead levels in a farming population in the Mezquital Valley and which risk factors, other than exposure to untreated wastewater, were associated with elevated blood lead levels, lead levels were measured in venous blood obtained from 735 individuals. Blood samples were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Food habits and dietary intake were gathered by interview, using a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. The average blood lead level was 7.8 microg/dL (SD 4.66 microg/dL; range 1.2-36.7 microg/dL). 23% of the study population had blood lead levels exceeding 10 microg/dL. The use of lead-glazed ceramics (LGC) was significantly associated with elevated lead levels (p = < 0.001). Other significant variables included age, gender (males), and non-farming-related occupations (e.g., technicians, factory workers). p = 0.005, 0.08, and 0.001, respectively. When the analysis was stratified by the use of LGC for food preparation, an inverse relationship between higher daily calcium intake and blood lead level was detected (beta = - 0.040, p = < 0.05). Thus, blood lead levels were positively associated with the use of LGC. Calcium intake showed a protective effect, maybe by decreasing absorption of lead in the gastrointestinal tract. No association between occupational exposure to untreated wastewater or crop consumption and blood lead levels was detected. Further environmental and health surveillance is recommended. PMID:10926720</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24337194','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24337194"><span id="translatedtitle">Adoption potential of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in sub-Saharan Africa: results from five case studies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ndah, Hycenth Tim; Schuler, Johannes; Uthes, Sandra; Zander, Peter; Traore, Karim; Gama, Mphatso-S; Nyagumbo, Isaiah; Triomphe, Bernard; Sieber, Stefan; Corbeels, Marc</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Despite the reported benefits of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (CA), its wider up-scaling in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has remained fairly limited. This paper shows how a newly developed qualitative expert assessment approach for CA adoption (QAToCA) was applied to determine its adoption potential in SSA. CA adoption potential is not a predictor of observed adoption rates. Instead, our aim was to systematically check relevant factors that may be influencing its adoption. QAToCA delivers an assessment of how suitable conditions "and thus the likelihood for CA adoption" are. Results show that the high CA adoption potentials exhibited by the Malawi and Zambia case relate mostly to positive institutional factors. On the other hand, the low adoption potential of the Zimbabwe case, in spite of observed higher estimates, is attributed mainly to unstable and less secured market conditions for CA. In the case of Southern Burkina Faso, the potential for CA adoption is determined to be high, and this assessment deviates from lower observed figures. This is attributed mainly to strong competition of CA and livestock for residues in this region. Lastly, the high adoption potential found in Northern Burkina Faso is explained mainly by the fact that farmers here have no alternative other than to adopt the locally adapted CA system-Zaï farming. Results of this assessment should help promoters of CA in the given regions to reflect on their activities and to eventually adjust or redesign them based on a more explicit understanding of where problems and opportunities are found. PMID:24337194</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EnMan..53..620N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EnMan..53..620N"><span id="translatedtitle">Adoption Potential of Conservation <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Sub-Saharan Africa: Results from Five Case Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ndah, Hycenth Tim; Schuler, Johannes; Uthes, Sandra; Zander, Peter; Traore, Karim; Gama, Mphatso-S.; Nyagumbo, Isaiah; Triomphe, Bernard; Sieber, Stefan; Corbeels, Marc</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Despite the reported benefits of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> (CA), its wider up-scaling in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has remained fairly limited. This paper shows how a newly developed qualitative expert assessment approach for CA adoption (QAToCA) was applied to determine its adoption potential in SSA. CA adoption potential is not a predictor of observed adoption rates. Instead, our aim was to systematically check relevant factors that may be influencing its adoption. QAToCA delivers an assessment of how suitable conditions "and thus the likelihood for CA adoption" are. Results show that the high CA adoption potentials exhibited by the Malawi and Zambia case relate mostly to positive institutional factors. On the other hand, the low adoption potential of the Zimbabwe case, in spite of observed higher estimates, is attributed mainly to unstable and less secured market conditions for CA. In the case of Southern Burkina Faso, the potential for CA adoption is determined to be high, and this assessment deviates from lower observed figures. This is attributed mainly to strong competition of CA and livestock for residues in this region. Lastly, the high adoption potential found in Northern Burkina Faso is explained mainly by the fact that farmers here have no alternative other than to adopt the locally adapted CA system—Zaï farming. Results of this assessment should help promoters of CA in the given regions to reflect on their activities and to eventually adjust or redesign them based on a more explicit understanding of where problems and opportunities are found.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013AGUFM.H21K..05M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013AGUFM.H21K..05M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Land Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Cold Region Hydrological Processes in an <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Prairie Basin (Invited)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mahmood, T. H.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Wheater, H. S.; Baulch, H. M.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Conservation tillage including zero and reduced tillage, crop rotation and upstream reservoirs are commonly implemented as beneficial management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) in the Canadian Prairies. However, their effects are strongly dependent on interactions with cold region hydrological processes, such as wind redistribution of snow, snowmelt, infiltration to frozen soils and evaporation, due to strong coupling between land surface characteristics and hydrology. These interactions are poorly understood and few studies have investigated them using a physically-based modeling framework. In this study, we deploy a physically-based, semi-distributed cold regions hydrological model (CRHM) to investigate the impacts of land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the South Tobacco Creek Basin (STC) which forms part of the Red River Basin in southern Manitoba, Canada. The STC (~73 km2) is set in a gently rolling landscape of low relief (~200 m). Detailed field data such as crop type, tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>, crop residue and planting and harvesting dates are available from 1995 and are used to parameterize the model. While the majority of parameters are specified a priori, we have manually calibrated roughness and initial soil water storage parameters to compare the simulations with runoff observations at multiple scales (upstream catchment, mid-basin gauge and outlet gauge) and snow observations during 2000-2001 water year. The calibrated model based on the 2000-2001 period is further evaluated over the 2001-2011 period, which includes high inter-annual variability. The results suggest good agreement between observations and simulations and provide insight into hydrological controls. Snowmelt runoff is a major contributor to streamflow while the contribution of summer rainfall runoff is highly variable. The evaporative fraction is high during dry years (2002-2004) indicating a vertical flux controlled mass balance while the runoff fraction dominates during wet years (2005-2011), suggesting overland</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4332302','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4332302"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> altered soybean seed protein, oil, fatty acids, sugars, and minerals in the Midsouth USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bellaloui, Nacer; Bruns, H. Arnold; Abbas, Hamed K.; Mengistu, Alemu; Fisher, Daniel K.; Reddy, Krishna N.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Information on the effects of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soybean seed composition is scarce. Therefore, the objective of this research was to investigate the effects of planting date (PD) and seeding rate (SR) on seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars) and seed minerals (B, P, and Fe) in soybean grown in two row-types (RTs) on the Mississippi Delta region of the Midsouth USA. Two field experiments were conducted in 2009 and 2010 on Sharkey clay and Beulah fine sandy loam soil at Stoneville, MS, USA, under irrigated conditions. Soybean were grown in 102 cm single-rows and 25 cm twin-rows in 102 cm centers at SRs of 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m-2. The results showed that in May and June planting, protein, glucose, P, and B concentrations increased with increased SR, but at the highest SRs (40 and 50 seeds m-2), the concentrations remained constant or declined. Palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acid concentrations were the least responsive to SR increases. Early planting resulted in higher oil, oleic acid, sucrose, B, and P on both single and twin-rows. Late planting resulted in higher protein and linolenic acid, but lower oleic acid and oil concentrations. The changes in seed constituents could be due to changes in environmental factors (drought and temperature), and nutrient accumulation in seeds and leaves. The increase of stachyose sugar in 2010 may be due to a drier year and high temperature in 2010 compared to 2009; suggesting the possible role of stachyose as an environmental stress compound. Our research demonstrated that PD, SR, and RT altered some seed constituents, but the level of alteration in each year dependent on environmental factors such as drought and temperature. This information benefits growers and breeders for considering agronomic <span class="hlt">practices</span> to select for soybean seed nutritional qualities under drought and high heat conditions. PMID:25741347</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1110647M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1110647M"><span id="translatedtitle">Patterns and processes of nutrient transfers from land to water: a catchment approach to evaluate Good <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in Ireland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mellander, P.-E.; Melland, A. R.; Shortle, G.; Wall, D.; Mechan, S.; Buckley, C.; Fealy, R.; Jordan, P.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p> grassland soils; areas where arable production represents a significant landuse; and catchments on productive and unproductive aquifers. The catchments were identified using a GIS-based multicriteria decision analysis with objective criteria that included landuse data (including <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and settlement statistics) combined with soils and geology data to evaluate the risk of P and N loss. Shortlisted catchments were then finalised using <span class="hlt">practical</span> criteria based on the potential for hydrometry and hydrochemistry research. In each catchment, a conceptual model approach is being used to hypothesize the sources, seasonal mobilisation and pathways of nutrients and water through the soil/subsoil system and transfer into surface and ground water systems to stratify each catchment experimental design. Knowledge of the nutrient management of each catchment farm and resulting soil fertility will be used to monitor the sources of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> N and P. Environmental soil nutrient tests will provide baselines and checks on the potential for mobilisation. Areas of high soil fertility that are coincident with high surface or sub-surface hydrological connectivity will be monitored for subsequent nutrient transfer. Other potential nutrient source loads within the catchments, such as rural waste-water treatment plants and domestic septic systems, will be factored in as non-<span class="hlt">agricultural</span> sources. Similarly, the potential for farmyard transfers will also be assessed. The net balance of nutrient transfer at the catchment outlets will be monitored using a high resolution method that is coincident with hydrometric measurements to ensure that there is a full understanding of the inter-dependence between point and diffuse nutrient transfers and hydrodynamics. This source to transfer approach is highly appropriate and a move towards inductive understanding of nutrient use and export in river catchments - the scale at which policies for water resources management will be assessed under the WFD. The</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21671279','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21671279"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhancing <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvement by facilitating practitioner interactivity: new roles for providers of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> medical education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Parboosingh, I John; Reed, Virginia A; Caldwell Palmer, James; Bernstein, Henry H</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Research into networking and interactivity among practitioners is providing new information that has the potential to enhance the effectiveness of <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvement initiatives. This commentary reviews the evidence that practitioner interactivity can facilitate emergent learning and behavior change that lead to <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvements. Insights from learning theories provide a framework for understanding emergent learning as the product of interactions between individuals in trusted relationships, such as occurs in communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This framework helps explain why some groups respond more favorably to improvement initiatives than others. Failure to take advantage of practitioner interactivity may explain in part the disappointingly low mean rates of <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvement reported in studies of the effectiveness of <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvement projects. Examples of improvement models in primary care settings that explicitly use relationship building and facilitation techniques to enhance practitioner interactivity are provided. Ingredients of a curriculum to teach relationship building in communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span> and facilitation skills to enhance learning in small group education sessions are explored. Sufficient evidence exists to support the roles of relationships and interactivity in <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvement initiatives such that we recommend the development of training programs to teach these skills to CME providers. PMID:21671279</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26003184','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26003184"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of nitrate leakage and N2O emission from five environmental-friendly <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> using fuzzy logic method and empirical formula.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qin, Lihuan; Wang, Yan; Wu, Yongfeng; Wang, Qian; Luo, Liangguo</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> nonpoint source pollution in China has been the major environmental problem, so environmental-friendly <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (EAPs) must be promoted to improve environmental quality. However, the most suitable <span class="hlt">practices</span> for each <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> region must first be identified. Thus, in the presented study a fuzzy-logic method and a revised empirical formula were used to assess nitrate leakage and N2O emissions, respectively, and to compare five EAPs in Xinxiang, a major grain-producing county in Henan Province, China. The required information was collected in face-to-face interviews with 10 extension service experts from the county, using a questionnaire to explore their opinions of the EAPs currently adopted by smallholder farmers, as well as the amounts, frequencies, varieties and proportions of nitrogen fertilizers applied annually. The results indicate that reduced tillage, soil testing and fertilizer recommendations would be the most appropriate <span class="hlt">practices</span> to initially promote on a large scale in Xinxiang. PMID:26003184</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol8-sec989-62.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol8-sec989-62.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 989.62 - Authorization for prohibition of trade <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorization for prohibition of trade <span class="hlt">practices</span>. 989.62 Section 989.62 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartDDDD-app8.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol12-part63-subpartDDDD-app8.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Dddd of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With the Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Requirements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... Composite Wood Products Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDD, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart DDDD of Part 63—<span class="hlt">Continuous</span>... miscellaneous coating operations Use non-HAP coatings as defined in § 63.2292 <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> to use non-HAP...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartDDDD-app8.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol12/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol12-part63-subpartDDDD-app8.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Dddd of... - <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Compliance With the Work <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Requirements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... Composite Wood Products Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDD, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart DDDD of Part 63—<span class="hlt">Continuous</span>... miscellaneous coating operations Use non-HAP coatings as defined in § 63.2292 <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> to use non-HAP...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol14-sec63-11584.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol14/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol14-sec63-11584.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.11584 - What are my initial and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance management <span class="hlt">practice</span> requirements?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS... to, monitoring results, review of operation and maintenance procedures, review of operation and... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are my initial and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007iioe.book..521C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007iioe.book..521C"><span id="translatedtitle">One <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Auditing <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in China: Data-oriented Online Auditing(DOOA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Jiang, Yu-Quan</p> <p></p> <p>Application of information technologies (IT) in the field of audit is worth studying. <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> auditing (CA) is an active research domain in computer-assisted audit field. In this paper, the concept of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> auditing is analyzed firstly. Then, based on analysis on research literatures of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> auditing, technique realization methods are classified into embedded mode and separate mode. According to the condition of implementing online auditing in China, data-oriented online auditing (DOOA) used in China is also one of separate mode of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> auditing. And the principle of DOOA is analyzed. Furthermore, the advantages and disadvantages of DOOA are also discussed. Finally, advices to implement DOOA in China are given, and the future research topics related to <span class="hlt">continuous</span> auditing are also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol6/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol6-sec631-11.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol6/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol6-sec631-11.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 631.11 - Conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> maintenance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> maintenance. 631.11 Section 631.11 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol6/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol6-sec631-11.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol6/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol6-sec631-11.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 631.11 - Conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> maintenance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> maintenance. 631.11 Section 631.11 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol6/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol6-sec631-11.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol6/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol6-sec631-11.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 631.11 - Conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> maintenance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> maintenance. 631.11 Section 631.11 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol6/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol6-sec631-11.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol6/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol6-sec631-11.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 631.11 - Conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> maintenance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> maintenance. 631.11 Section 631.11 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4686806','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4686806"><span id="translatedtitle">Evolution and Phylogenetic Diversity of Yam Species (Dioscorea spp.): Implication for Conservation and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ngo Ngwe, Marie Florence Sandrine; Omokolo, Denis Ndoumou; Joly, Simon</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Yams (Dioscorea spp.) consist of approximately 600 species. Presently, these species are threatened by genetic erosion due to many factors such as pest attacks and farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In parallel, complex taxonomic boundaries in this genus makes it more challenging to properly address the genetic diversity of yam and manage its germplasm. As a first step toward evaluating and preserving the genetic diversity yam species, we use a phylogenetic diversity (PD) approach that has the advantage to investigate phylogenetic relationships and test hypotheses of species monophyly while alleviating to the problem of ploidy variation within and among species. The Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of 62 accessions from 7 species from three regions of Cameroon showed that most Dioscorea sections were monophyletic, but species within sections were generally non-monophyletic. The wild species D. praehensilis and cultivated D. cayenensis were the species with the highest PD. At the opposite, D. esculenta has a low PD and future studies should focus on this species to properly address its conservation status. We also show that wild species show a stronger genetic structure than cultivated species, which potentially reflects the management of the yam germplasm by farmers. These findings show that phylogenetic diversity is a promising approach for an initial investigation of genetic diversity in a crop consisting of closely related species. PMID:26691919</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21320564','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21320564"><span id="translatedtitle">Bioinformatics and the allergy assessment of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> biotechnology products: industry <span class="hlt">practices</span> and recommendations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ladics, Gregory S; Cressman, Robert F; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Herman, Rod A; Privalle, Laura; Song, Ping; Ward, Jason M; McClain, Scott</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>Bioinformatic tools are being increasingly utilized to evaluate the degree of similarity between a novel protein and known allergens within the context of a larger allergy safety assessment process. Importantly, bioinformatics is not a predictive analysis that can determine if a novel protein will ''become" an allergen, but rather a tool to assess whether the protein is a known allergen or is potentially cross-reactive with an existing allergen. Bioinformatic tools are key components of the 2009 CodexAlimentarius Commission's weight-of-evidence approach, which encompasses a variety of experimental approaches for an overall assessment of the allergenic potential of a novel protein. Bioinformatic search comparisons between novel protein sequences, as well as potential novel fusion sequences derived from the genome and transgene, and known allergens are required by all regulatory agencies that assess the safety of genetically modified (GM) products. The objective of this paper is to identify opportunities for consensus in the methods of applying bioinformatics and to outline differences that impact a consistent and reliable allergy safety assessment. The bioinformatic comparison process has some critical features, which are outlined in this paper. One of them is a curated, publicly available and well-managed database with known allergenic sequences. In this paper, the best <span class="hlt">practices</span>, scientific value, and food safety implications of bioinformatic analyses, as they are applied to GM food crops are discussed. Recommendations for conducting bioinformatic analysis on novel food proteins for potential cross-reactivity to known allergens are also put forth. PMID:21320564</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847099','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847099"><span id="translatedtitle">Eating Behaviours of Preadolescent Children over Time: Stability, <span class="hlt">Continuity</span> and the Moderating Role of Perceived Parental Feeding <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Houldcroft, Laura; Farrow, Claire; Haycraft, Emma</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The links between childhood eating behaviours and parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> are well-established in younger children, but there is a lack of research examining these variables in a preadolescent age group, particularly from the child’s perspective, and longitudinally. This study firstly aimed to examine the <span class="hlt">continuity</span> and stability of preadolescent perceptions of their parents’ controlling feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> (pressure to eat and restriction) over a 12 month period. The second aim was to explore if perceptions of parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> moderated the relationship between preadolescents’ eating behaviours longitudinally. Two hundred and twenty nine preadolescents (mean age at recruitment 8.73 years) completed questionnaires assessing their eating behaviours and their perceptions of parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> at two time points, 12 months apart (T1 and T2). Preadolescents’ perceptions of their parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> remained stable. Perceptions of restriction and pressure to eat were <span class="hlt">continuous</span>. Perceptions of parental pressure to eat and restriction significantly moderated the relationships between eating behaviours at T1 and T2. The findings from this study suggest that in a preadolescent population, perceptions of parental pressure to eat and restriction of food may exacerbate the development of problematic eating behaviours. PMID:27104552</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27104552','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27104552"><span id="translatedtitle">Eating Behaviours of Preadolescent Children over Time: Stability, <span class="hlt">Continuity</span> and the Moderating Role of Perceived Parental Feeding <span class="hlt">Practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Houldcroft, Laura; Farrow, Claire; Haycraft, Emma</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The links between childhood eating behaviours and parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> are well-established in younger children, but there is a lack of research examining these variables in a preadolescent age group, particularly from the child's perspective, and longitudinally. This study firstly aimed to examine the <span class="hlt">continuity</span> and stability of preadolescent perceptions of their parents' controlling feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> (pressure to eat and restriction) over a 12 month period. The second aim was to explore if perceptions of parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> moderated the relationship between preadolescents' eating behaviours longitudinally. Two hundred and twenty nine preadolescents (mean age at recruitment 8.73 years) completed questionnaires assessing their eating behaviours and their perceptions of parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> at two time points, 12 months apart (T1 and T2). Preadolescents' perceptions of their parental feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> remained stable. Perceptions of restriction and pressure to eat were <span class="hlt">continuous</span>. Perceptions of parental pressure to eat and restriction significantly moderated the relationships between eating behaviours at T1 and T2. The findings from this study suggest that in a preadolescent population, perceptions of parental pressure to eat and restriction of food may exacerbate the development of problematic eating behaviours. PMID:27104552</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=91916','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=91916"><span id="translatedtitle">Leaching of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Diverse Soils under Various <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gagliardi, Joel V.; Karns, Jeffrey S.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Application of animal manures to soil as crop fertilizers is an important means for recycling the nitrogen and phosphorus which the manures contain. Animal manures also contain bacteria, including many types of pathogens. Manure pathogen levels depend on the source animal, the animal's state of health, and how the manure was stored or treated before use. Rainfall may result in pathogen spread into soil by runoff from stored or unincorporated manure or by leaching through the soil profile. Steady rainfall consisting of 16.5 mm h−1 was applied to 100-mm disturbed soil cores that were treated with manure and inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain B6914. The level of B6914 in leachate was near the inoculum level each hour for 8 h, as was the level of B6914 at several soil depths after 24 h, indicating that there was a high rate of growth. Bacterial movement through three different types of soil was then compared by using disturbed (tilled) and intact (no-till) soil cores and less intense rainfall consisting of 25.4 mm on 4 consecutive days and then four more times over a 17-day period. Total B6914 levels exceeded the inoculum levels for all treatments except intact clay loam cores. B6914 levels in daily leachate samples decreased sharply with time, although the levels were more constant when intact sandy loam cores were used. The presence of manure often increased total B6914 leachate and soil levels in intact cores but had the opposite effect on disturbed soil cores. Ammonia and nitrate levels correlated with B6914 and total coliform levels in leachate. We concluded that tillage <span class="hlt">practice</span>, soil type, and method of pathogen delivery affect but do not prevent vertical E. coli O157:H7 and coliform transport in soil and that soluble nitrogen may enhance transport. PMID:10698745</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27424116','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27424116"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmentally-friendly <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and their acceptance by smallholder farmers in China-A case study in Xinxiang County, Henan Province.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Luo, Liangguo; Qin, Lihuan; Wang, Yan; Wang, Qian</p> <p>2016-11-15</p> <p>Intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> with high inputs has resulted in rapid development of crop production in China, accompanied by negative environmental effects such as serious non-point source <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> pollution. Implementation of environmentally-friendly <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> can effectively prevent such pollution. However, the acceptance and adoption of such <span class="hlt">practices</span> are related not only to associated risks and potential benefits, but also to farmers' attitudes to and knowledge of scientifically validated <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In the presented study we surveyed views of a stratified sample of 150 smallholder farmers and 10 extension service experts from Xinxiang, a high grain-producing county in Henan Province, China. Their opinions were explored in personal interviews using a questionnaire with three sections. The first section mainly sought information on surveyed farmers' demographic characteristics like gender, age and education. The second section concerned their awareness of the environmental problems and losses of yields associated with customary over-fertilization <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and their main concerns about new <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The third section addressed farmers' attitudes to, and the extension service experts' professional evaluations of, five selected <span class="hlt">practices</span> in terms of the importance of seven factors (time demands, costs, risks, compatibility, complexity, trialability and observability). Acceptance indices were calculated from the responses to rank farmers' willingness to accept the five environmentally-friendly <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and thus identify the most appropriate to promote in the study area. The results show that costs, followed by risks and observability, are the more important factors affecting farmers' decisions to adopt a <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The results also indicate that no or minimum tillage and returning straw to the field are the most appropriate <span class="hlt">practices</span> to promote initially at large scale in Xinxiang. The others could be popularized gradually after providing</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23890937','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23890937"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practical</span> considerations for the dosing and adjustment of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Galvagno, Samuel M; Hong, Caron M; Lissauer, Matthew E; Baker, Andrew K; Murthi, Sarah B; Herr, Daniel L; Stein, Deborah M</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Familiarity with the initiation, dosing, adjustment, and termination of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a core skill for contemporary intensivists. Guidelines for how to administer CRRT in the intensive care unit are not well documented. The purpose of this review is to discuss the modalities, terminology, and components of CRRT, with an emphasis on the <span class="hlt">practical</span> aspects of dosing, adjustments, and termination. Management of electrolyte and acid-base derangements commonly encountered with acute renal failure is emphasized. Knowledge regarding the <span class="hlt">practical</span> aspects of managing CRRT in the intensive care unit is a prerequisite for achieving desired physiological end points. PMID:23890937</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26642167','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26642167"><span id="translatedtitle">Talking about a (business <span class="hlt">continuity</span>) revolution: Why best <span class="hlt">practices</span> are wrong and possible solutions for getting them right.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Armour, Mark</p> <p></p> <p>The business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> profession has been following a methodology that has barely evolved since its inception. Unfortunately, the stodgy, labour-intensive <span class="hlt">practices</span> of the past are poorly suited to today's fast-paced and ever-changing work environments. Proposed herein is a new approach to the discipline. Just as agile methodology revolutionised project management, new tactics in preparedness can drastically change how this profession is practised. That is the hope. If there is to be any significant change in business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> ahead, it may just take a revolution. PMID:26642167</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18689748','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18689748"><span id="translatedtitle">Water quality trends and changing <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a midwest U.S. watershed, 1994-2006.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Renwick, William H; Vanni, Michael J; Zhang, Qianyi; Patton, Jon</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Sediment and nutrient concentrations in surface water in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> regions are strongly influenced by <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> activities. In the Corn Belt, recent changes in farm management <span class="hlt">practices</span> are likely to affect water quality, yet there are few data on these linkages at the landscape scale. We report on trends in concentrations of N as ammonium (NH(4)) and nitrate (NO(3)), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), and suspended sediment (SS) in three Corn Belt streams with drainage areas of 12 to 129 km(2) for 1994 through 2006. During this period, there has been an increase in conservation tillage, a decline in fertilizer use, and consolidation of animal feeding operations in our study watersheds and throughout the Corn Belt. We use an autoregressive moving average model to include the effects of discharge and season on concentrations, LOWESS plots, and analyses of changes in the relation between discharge and concentration. We found significant declines in mean monthly concentrations of NH(4) at all three streams over the 13-yr period, declines in SRP and SS in two of the three streams, and a decline in NO(3) in one stream. When trend coefficients are converted to percent per year and weighted by drainage, area changes in concentration are -8.5% for NH(4), -5.9% for SRP, -6.8% for SS, and -0.8% for NO(3). Trends in total N and P are strongly tied to trends in NO(3), SRP, and SS and indicate that total P is declining, whereas total N is not. PMID:18689748</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.H31F0724R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.H31F0724R"><span id="translatedtitle">Combining Water Quality and Cost-Benefit Analysis to Examine the Implications of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Best Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rao, N. S.; Easton, Z. M.; Lee, D. R.; Steenhuis, T. S.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Nutrient runoff from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> fields threatens water quality and can impair habitats in many watersheds. Agencies consider these potential risks as they determine acceptable levels of nutrient loading. For example, in the New York City (NYC) watershed, the Environmental Protection Agency's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for phosphorus (P) has been set at 15μg P L-1 to protect against eutrophication and bacterial outbreaks. In the NYC watersheds <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> Best Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> (BMPs) are the primary means to control nonpoint source P loading. BMPs include riparian buffers, filter strips, manure storage facilities, crop rotation, stripcropping, tree planting and nutrient management plans (NMPs). Water quality research on BMPs to date has included studies on site-specificity of different BMPs, short and long term BMP efficacy, and placement of BMPs with respect to critical source areas. A necessary complement to studies addressing water quality aspects of different BMPs are studies examining the cost-benefit aspects of BMPs. In general, there are installment, maintenance and opportunity costs associated with each BMP, and there are benefits, including cost share agreements between farmers and farm agencies, and increased efficiency of farm production and maintenance. Combining water quality studies and related cost-benefit analyses would help planners and watershed managers determine how best improve water quality. Our research examines the costs-benefit structure associated with BMP scenarios on a one-farm headwater watershed in the Catskill Mountains of NY. The different scenarios include "with and without" BMPs, combinations of BMPs, and different BMP placements across <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> fields. The costs associated with each BMP scenarios are determined using information from farm agencies and watershed planning agencies. With these data we perform a cost-benefit analysis for the different BMP scenarios and couple the water quality modeling using the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Clinical+AND+Pharmacy&pg=6&id=EJ522989','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Clinical+AND+Pharmacy&pg=6&id=EJ522989"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Community Pharmacy <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Experience: Design and Evaluation of Instructional Materials.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Thomas, Selby Greer; And Others</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>A two-year community pharmacy clinical experience using self-directed learning modules is described and evaluated. The modules were designed to stimulate interest in community pharmacy, motivate learning by demonstrating applicability of didactic work to contemporary <span class="hlt">practice</span>, develop communication and psychosocial skills, and promote…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=manhattan+AND+project+AND+world&id=ED202993','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=manhattan+AND+project+AND+world&id=ED202993"><span id="translatedtitle">Phenomenological Perspectives in Adult <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education: Implications for Research and <span class="hlt">Practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Collins, Michael</p> <p></p> <p>Some of the leading concepts of phenomenology have direct relevance for the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of adult education. Adults bring to the learning experience a vast stock of assimilated knowledge. Very important to the process is the notion of critical reflection as a constituent of this stock of knowledge--the knowledge is not merely stored but is judged and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ949702.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ949702.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Discrete <span class="hlt">Continuity</span>: On the Relation between Research and Art <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Riley, Tim</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This short article discusses the nature of research and art <span class="hlt">practice</span> and makes a case for the necessary intermingling of these activities. It does not attempt to define a space for art to operate as research, quite the opposite: research is an operating structure for the process and production of, among other things, art. It is regarded as…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B51D0050F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B51D0050F"><span id="translatedtitle">Simulating Sustainable P Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Tile-Drained Landscapes of Central Ohio Using the <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Policy Environmental Extender (APEX)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ford, W. I., III; King, K.; Williams, M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Despite extensive application of conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> to minimize sediment P delivery to streams, hypoxic conditions and harmful algal blooms persist in receiving water bodies. Tile-drainage networks are a focal point for reducing soluble P in the food-producing Midwestern United States in that they promote higher connectivity between upland soils and stream channels which decreases soil contact time, and biogeochemical alterations. A critical next step to reduce the environmental impact and maintain sustainable <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> is to implement best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) under a holistic framework that considers adverse effects to water resources and crop production, while maintaining economic feasibility. The objective of this study was to apply a robust numerical model, the <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Policy Environmental Extender (APEX), in a tile-drained landscape in Central Ohio in order to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of BMPs on soluble and particulate P delivery to stream channels. The model was applied and evaluated at two adjacent edge-of-field sites with similar soil, topographic and management characteristics (except for tillage and tile installation on the south field in 2012, preceded by more than 20 years of no-till operations). Three years of daily discharge, total suspended solids, soluble P, soluble N (NO3 and NH4), total P, total N, and crop yields were utilized to verify the model performance. Prevalent BMPs simulated within the modeling framework included drainage water management, tillage and crop rotations, the 4Rs framework (right fertilizer source, rate, time, and placement), and bioreactors. Results of the study quantify the ability of the numerical model to simulate hydrology and P transport for surface runoff and subsurface tile drainage and highlight modifications that improve model performance. Further, results highlight BMPs that effectively reduce P loads to streams while maintaining crop yields, which can later be used to inform BMPs</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=225406','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=225406"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> and Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Nutrients Losses from the St. Joseph River Watershed, Northeast Indiana</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> has been identified as a primary contributor to nutrients that cause algal blooms in the Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie. Since 2002, we have been monitoring water quality from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> drainage ditches in the St. Joseph River watershed to assess the impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and conserva...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23246760','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23246760"><span id="translatedtitle">Production of carbonaceous adsorbents from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> by-products and novolac resin under a <span class="hlt">continuous</span> countercurrent flow type pyrolysis operation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ioannou, Z; Simitzis, J</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Carbonaceous adsorbents based on novolac resin (N) and olive stone biomass (B) in a proportion of 20/80 and 40/60 w./w. N/O were produced. The specimens were cured (c) and pyrolyzed/carbonized (C) up to 1000 °C under a <span class="hlt">continuous</span> countercurrent flow type pyrolysis operation (N20B-cC, N40B-cC). Commercial activated carbon (AC) was used for comparison reasons. Methylene blue adsorption from its aqueous solutions onto the adsorbents and kinetic analysis were investigated. The specific surface area of adsorbents and the gross calorific values (GCV) of cured materials were determined. The results show that N40B-cC presents lower weight loss and shrinkage but higher methylene blue adsorption than N20B-cC. Pseudo-second order mechanism describes better methylene blue adsorption onto all adsorbents. The specific surface area of carbonaceous and the gross calorific values of cured materials follow the order: AC>N20B-cC>N40B-cC and N100-c>N40B-c>N20B-c>B respectively. Olive stone biomass may constitute a suitable precursor for the production of carbonaceous materials. PMID:23246760</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+development+AND+teaching&pg=5&id=EJ1048310','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+development+AND+teaching&pg=5&id=EJ1048310"><span id="translatedtitle">From Needs Assessment to Communities of <span class="hlt">Practice</span> for Online <span class="hlt">Continuing</span>-Education Programming</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Feltenberger Beaver, Alaina; Johnson, Fenimore; Sinkinson, Caroline</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study identifies the professional development needs of instructors teaching online using quantitative and qualitative methods. Twenty-six participants from a convenience sample at the University of Colorado, Boulder's Division of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education (CE) were surveyed in a Faculty Needs Assessment (FNA) that was open to participants…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=power+AND+now&id=EJ947737','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=power+AND+now&id=EJ947737"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development for Scottish Teachers: Tensions in Policy and <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Brien, Jim</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper reflects on the development of teacher <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD) in Scotland, a constituent part of the United Kingdom that now has significant devolved powers within the United Kingdom--from a time when INSET was ill-coordinated and unvalued to the present reliance on CPD, with substantial investment, as the agent of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12878899','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12878899"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practicing</span> the art of nursing through student-designed <span class="hlt">continuing</span> case study and cooperative learning.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Baumberger-Henry, Mary</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Theorists over the years have debated the art versus the science of nursing, keeping each form distinct and separate from the other. The author presents a way for students to learn the art of nursing through a scientific rational approach of student-designed <span class="hlt">continuing</span> case study and cooperative learning. PMID:12878899</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=registration&pg=5&id=EJ959277','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=registration&pg=5&id=EJ959277"><span id="translatedtitle">Re-Thinking <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development through Changing Metaphors and Location in Professional <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boud, David; Hager, Paul</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Many professions have requirements for professional development activities to ensure <span class="hlt">continuing</span> registration or membership. These commonly focus on participation in a limited range of activities. This paper questions the assumptions behind such approaches and what alternatives might be considered. It explores the suitability of metaphors used for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED367830.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED367830.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Good <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Vocational Education: The Role of Academic Staff. UCACE Occasional Paper No. 10.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Parker, Stella; Gray, Sue</p> <p></p> <p>A study concentrated on the occupational goals of academic staff in British higher education who work for some or part of their time as practitioners of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> vocational education (CVE). The sample consisted of 27 academic staff working in 3 polytechnics, 4 universities, and 1 polyversity and 3 Regional Development Agents (RDAs). The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866287','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866287"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practical</span> substrate and apparatus for static and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> monitoring by surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Vo-Dinh, Tuan</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A substrate for use in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is disclosed, comprising a support, preferably flexible, coated with roughness-imparting microbodies and a metallized overcoating. Also disclosed is apparatus for using the aforesaid substrate in <span class="hlt">continuous</span> and static SERS trace analyses, especially of organic compounds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=advertisement+AND+objective&pg=5&id=ED143378','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=advertisement+AND+objective&pg=5&id=ED143378"><span id="translatedtitle">Relative Effectiveness of Dissemination <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Used by Illinois Public Community Colleges in Adult and <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hardig, Robert J.</p> <p></p> <p>In a broad-based survey to determine what community colleges are doing to publicize adult and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education programs and the effectiveness of that publicity, administrators ranked the following dissemination methods in order of importance: course schedules, newspaper advertisements, newspaper stories, program flyers, and word of mouth. Word…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=national+AND+kentucky+AND+university&pg=4&id=EJ690362','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=national+AND+kentucky+AND+university&pg=4&id=EJ690362"><span id="translatedtitle">Toward a National Research Agenda on Violence Against Women: <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> the Dialogue on Research and <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jordan, Carol E.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>This two-part special issue does not presume to set the nation's research agenda on violence against women (VAW), nor is it the first attempt to contribute to how that agenda might be informed. Instead, this issue <span class="hlt">continues</span> the dialogue about the empirical study of VAW started by and participated in by many others before. Any attempt at something…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=work+AND+collaborative+AND+primary&id=EJ811508','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=work+AND+collaborative+AND+primary&id=EJ811508"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Professional Development on Group Work <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Scottish Primary Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Thurston, A.; Christie, D.; Howe, C. J.; Tolmie, A.; Topping, K. J.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The present study investigated the effects of a <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD) initiative that provided collaborative group work skills training for primary school teachers. The study collected data from 24 primary school classrooms in different schools in a variety of urban and rural settings. The sample was composed of 332 pupils,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Olivier&id=ED524948','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Olivier&id=ED524948"><span id="translatedtitle">Teacher Perceptions of Professional Learning Communities: Communities that <span class="hlt">Practice</span> <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Learning within Christian Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Marley, Diann Wylie</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A challenge in both Christian and public K-12 education is to create schools where teachers and students are <span class="hlt">continually</span> learning and improving. In schools that have experienced improved teaching instruction and increased learning, a common organizational structure has been found. One such organizational structure can be defined as professional…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=michael+AND+portal&pg=3&id=EJ759124','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=michael+AND+portal&pg=3&id=EJ759124"><span id="translatedtitle">Standardizing Evaluation of On-Line <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Medical Education: Physician Knowledge, Attitudes, and Reflection on <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Casebeer, Linda; Kristofco, Robert E.; Strasser, Sheryl; Reilly, Michael; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Rabin, Andrew; Zheng, Shimin; Karp, Simone; Myers, Lloyd</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: Physicians increasingly earn <span class="hlt">continuing</span> medical education (CME) credits through on-line courses, but there have been few rigorous evaluations to determine their effects. The present study explores the feasibility of implementing standardized evaluation templates and tests them to evaluate 30 on-line CME courses. Methods: A time…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4461716','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4461716"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge translation from <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education to physiotherapy <span class="hlt">practice</span> in classifying patients with low back pain</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Karvonen, Eira; Paatelma, Markku; Kesonen, Jukka-Pekka; Heinonen, Ari O</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: Physical therapists have used <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education as a method of improving their skills in conducting clinical examination of patients with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate how well the pathoanatomical classification of patients in acute or subacute LBP can be learned and applied through a <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education format. The patients were seen in a direct access setting. Methods: The study was carried out in a large health-care center in Finland. The analysis included a total of 57 patient evaluations generated by six physical therapists on patients with LBP. We analyzed the consistency and level of agreement of the six physiotherapists’ (PTs) diagnostic decisions, who participated in a 5-day, intensive <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education session and also compared those with the diagnostic opinions of two expert physical therapists, who were blind to the original diagnostic decisions. Evaluation of the physical therapists’ clinical examination of the patients was conducted by the two experts, in order to determine the accuracy and percentage agreement of the pathoanatomical diagnoses. Results: The percentage of agreement between the experts and PTs was 72–77%. The overall inter-examiner reliability (kappa coefficient) for the subgroup classification between the six PTs and two experts was 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.47–0.77], indicating good agreement between the PTs and the two experts. The overall inter-examiner reliability between the two experts was 0.63 (0.49–0.77) indicating good level of agreement. Discussion: Our results indicate that PTs’ were able to apply their <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education training to clinical reasoning and make consistently accurate pathoanatomic based diagnostic decisions for patients with LBP. This would suggest that <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education short-courses provide a reasonable format for knowledge translation (KT) by which physical therapists can learn and apply new information related to the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=317612&keyword=mining+AND+environment&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77956600&CFTOKEN=15333029','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=317612&keyword=mining+AND+environment&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77956600&CFTOKEN=15333029"><span id="translatedtitle">Mining Information form a Coupled Air Quality Model to Examine the Impacts of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Air and Groundwater Quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Attributing nitrogen (N) in the environment to emissions from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> is difficult because of the complex and inter-related chemical and biological reactions associated with N and its cascading effects across land, air and water. Such analyses are criti...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23519068','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23519068"><span id="translatedtitle">Burn center journal club promotes clinical research, <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education, and evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fowler, Laura; Gottschlich, Michele M; Kagan, Richard J</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to characterize the structure, policy, implementation, and outcome measures of a burn team journal club to assess its effectiveness in promoting multidisciplinary education relative to research competency, clinical knowledge, and evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span>. After 2 years of a new multidisciplinary format, an anonymous quality assurance survey was distributed to staff members of a regional pediatric burn center to evaluate the impact of the journal club on clinical and research indicators. The 24 journal club meetings evaluated in this study included a variety of topics, among which were wound healing, infection, nutrition, metabolism, sleep, medications, alternative medicine, research compliance, and child abuse. The speakers included a variety of hospital personnel: 26% researchers, 23% physicians, 20% registered nurses, and 31% other disciplines and attendance mean was 29 participants per session (range 17-50). Survey results from 30 respondents indicated that 100% judged the program to be valuable to personal educational needs and 83% indicated that format did not warrant change. According to self-report data, the journal club enhanced medical knowledge (90%), patient care (73%), research competency (70%), critical thinking (63%), and evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span> (63%). Results indicate that the journal club program was well received by participants, and promoted enhanced knowledge and improved patient care. In the future, barriers to research initiatives and integration of research findings into <span class="hlt">practice</span> warrant follow-up study. Journal club should be incorporated into the learning curriculum of burn practitioners as a means to promote critical thinking, research competency, and evidence-based clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. PMID:23519068</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19848109','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19848109"><span id="translatedtitle">Drug evaluation and the permissive principle: <span class="hlt">continuities</span> and contradictions between standards and <span class="hlt">practices</span> in antidepressant regulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abraham, John; Davis, Courtney</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Pharmaceuticals are not permitted on to the market unless they are granted regulatory approval. The regulatory process is, therefore, crucial in whether or not a drug is widely prescribed. Regulatory agencies have developed standards of performance that pharmaceuticals are supposed to meet before entering the market. Regulation of technologies is often discussed by reference to the precautionary principle. In contrast, this paper develops the concept of the 'permissive principle' as a way of understanding the departure of regulators' <span class="hlt">practices</span> from standards of drug efficacy to which regulatory agencies themselves subscribe. By taking a case study of antidepressant regulation in the UK and the USA, the mechanisms of permissive regulatory <span class="hlt">practices</span> are examined. An STS methodology of both spatial (international) and temporal comparisons of regulatory <span class="hlt">practices</span> with regulatory standards is employed to identify the nature and extent of the permissive regulation. It is found that the permissive principle was adopted by drug regulators in the UK and the USA, but more so by the former than the latter. Evidently, permissive regulation, which favours the commercial interests of the drug manufacturer, but is contrary to the interests of patients, may penetrate to the heart of regulatory science. On the other hand, permissive regulation of specific drugs should not be regarded as an inevitable result of marketing strategies and concomitant networks deployed by powerful pharmaceutical companies, because the extent of permissive regulation may vary according to the intra-institutional normative commitments of regulators to uphold their technical standards against the commercial interests of the manufacturer. Likely sociological factors that can account for such permissive regulatory <span class="hlt">practices</span> are 'corporate bias', secrecy and excessive regulatory trust in the pharmaceutical industry in the UK, political expediency and ideological capture in the USA, combined in both countries</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26897617','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26897617"><span id="translatedtitle">Implementing business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> management systems and sharing best <span class="hlt">practices</span> at a European bank.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aronis, Stelios; Stratopoulos, Georgios</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper provides an overview of the methodology applied by the Alpha Bank Group in order to implement a business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> management (BCM) programme to its parent company (Alpha Bank SA), as well as to its subsidiaries in Albania, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Greece, Romania, Serbia, UK and Ukraine. It also reviews the problems faced, how they were overcome and the lessons learned. When implementing a BCM programme in a large organisation, it is very important to follow the methodology described by BCM standard ISO 22301, otherwise the business <span class="hlt">continuity</span> plan is unlikely to work efficiently or comply with the business recovery requirements, as well as with the requirements of other interested parties, such as customers, regulatory authorities, vendors, service providers, critical associates, etc. PMID:26897617</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000WRR....36.3653R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000WRR....36.3653R"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimating soil water-holding capacities by linking the Food and <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Organization Soil map of the world with global pedon databases and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> pedotransfer functions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Reynolds, C. A.; Jackson, T. J.; Rawls, W. J.</p> <p>2000-12-01</p> <p>Spatial soil water-holding capacities were estimated for the Food and <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Organization (FAO) digital Soil Map of the World (SMW) by employing <span class="hlt">continuous</span> pedotransfer functions (PTF) within global pedon databases and linking these results to the SMW. The procedure first estimated representative soil properties for the FAO soil units by statistical analyses and taxotransfer depth algorithms [Food and <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Organization (FAO), 1996]. The representative soil properties estimated for two layers of depths (0-30 and 30-100 cm) included particle-size distribution, dominant soil texture, organic carbon content, coarse fragments, bulk density, and porosity. After representative soil properties for the FAO soil units were estimated, these values were substituted into three different pedotransfer functions (PTF) models by Rawls et al. [1982], Saxton et al. [1986], and Batjes [1996a]. The Saxton PTF model was finally selected to calculate available water content because it only required particle-size distribution data and results closely agreed with the Rawls and Batjes PTF models that used both particle-size distribution and organic matter data. Soil water-holding capacities were then estimated by multiplying the available water content by the soil layer thickness and integrating over an effective crop root depth of 1 m or less (i.e., encountered shallow impermeable layers) and another soil depth data layer of 2.5 m or less.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20515298','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20515298"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practical</span> aspects and considerations when switching between <span class="hlt">continuous</span> subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple daily injections.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Meneghini, Luigi; Sparrow-Bodenmiller, Jane</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>Insulin pump therapy is considered the gold standard for insulin management in patients requiring full physiologic insulin replacement. Compared to traditional delivery of short- and long-acting insulin preparations by multiple daily insulin injections, delivery of insulin via <span class="hlt">continuous</span> subcutaneous infusion brings with it several advantages, which in the past have translated into better glycemic control and treatment satisfaction. Delivery of insulin via pump reduces the number needle insertions (from four or five per day to once every 2-3 days), allows for greater flexibility of insulin delivery with regard to both the basal and prandial component, facilitates portability of the insulin preparation, and allows for more accurate dosing. <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> subcutaneous insulin infusion does have some drawbacks, including a greater risk of inadvertent insulin non-delivery, greater costs of therapy, and the need to be "tethered" with some systems that might be considered "burdensome" or even undesirable to some patients. For the most part patients who initiate insulin pump therapy are satisfied and <span class="hlt">continue</span> using the technology, but there might be instances that arise that require the re-introduction of insulin delivery by pen or syringe. This article will review some of the reasons and strategies for switching from one mode of delivery to the other. PMID:20515298</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23260699','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23260699"><span id="translatedtitle">Axial and centrifugal <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-flow rotary pumps: a translation from pump mechanics to clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Smedira, Nicholas G; Hoercher, Katherine J; Massiello, Alex; Lee, Sangjin; Horvath, David J; Starling, Randall C</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The recent success of <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-flow circulatory support devices has led to the growing acceptance of these devices as a viable therapeutic option for end-stage heart failure patients who are not responsive to current pharmacologic and electrophysiologic therapies. This article defines and clarifies the major classification of these pumps as axial or centrifugal <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-flow devices by discussing the difference in their inherent mechanics and describing how these features translate clinically to pump selection and patient management issues. Axial vs centrifugal pump and bearing design, theory of operation, hydrodynamic performance, and current vs flow relationships are discussed. A review of axial vs centrifugal physiology, pre-load and after-load sensitivity, flow pulsatility, and issues related to automatic physiologic control and suction prevention algorithms is offered. Reliability and biocompatibility of the two types of pumps are reviewed from the perspectives of mechanical wear, implant life, hemolysis, and pump deposition. Finally, a glimpse into the future of <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-flow technologies is presented. PMID:23260699</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3107169','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3107169"><span id="translatedtitle">Do aluminium-based phosphate binders <span class="hlt">continue</span> to have a role in contemporary nephrology <span class="hlt">practice</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background Aluminium-containing phosphate binders have long been used for treatment of hyperphosphatemia in dialysis patients. Their safety became controversial in the early 1980's after reports of aluminium related neurological and bone disease began to appear. Available historical evidence however, suggests that neurological toxicity may have primarily been caused by excessive exposure to aluminium in dialysis fluid, rather than aluminium-containing oral phosphate binders. Limited evidence suggests that aluminium bone disease may also be on the decline in the era of aluminium removal from dialysis fluid, even with <span class="hlt">continued</span> use of aluminium binders. Discussion The K/DOQI and KDIGO guidelines both suggest avoiding aluminium-containing binders. These guidelines will tend to promote the use of the newer, more expensive binders (lanthanum, sevelamer), which have limited evidence for benefit and, like aluminium, limited long-term safety data. Treating hyperphosphatemia in dialysis patients <span class="hlt">continues</span> to represent a major challenge, and there is a large body of evidence linking serum phosphate concentrations with mortality. Most nephrologists agree that phosphate binders have the potential to meaningfully reduce mortality in dialysis patients. Aluminium is one of the cheapest, most effective and well tolerated of the class, however there are no prospective or randomised trials examining the efficacy and safety of aluminium as a binder. Aluminium <span class="hlt">continues</span> to be used as a binder in Australia as well as some other countries, despite concern about the potential for toxicity. There are some data from selected case series that aluminium bone disease may be declining in the era of reduced aluminium content in dialysis fluid, due to rigorous water testing. Summary This paper seeks to revisit the contemporary evidence for the safety record of aluminium-containing binders in dialysis patients. It puts their use into the context of the newer, more expensive binders and increasing</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641334','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641334"><span id="translatedtitle">Measuring the Contribution of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> to Observed Trends and Recent Condition in Water Quality Indicators in Ohio, USA.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miltner, Robert J</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Over the last three decades, significant investments made to upgrade wastewater infrastructure and manage pollution from diffuse sources have resulted in measurably improved water quality and biological conditions in Ohio's rivers and streams. Conservation measures to reduce soil loss appear to have contributed significantly to the improvement witnessed over the last two decades and should therefore be <span class="hlt">continued</span>. Within the most recent timeframe examined, little difference was found in either total phosphorus or suspended sediment concentration in relation to conservation measures, indicating that the environmental benefits of measures targeting soil loss may be approaching an asymptote. Conservation measures targeting livestock and forage management, however, appear to have reduced nitrogen concentrations within the recent time frame. An examination of the interrelationships between habitat quality, conservation measures, and land use indicated that water quality was generally mediated by interactions with stream habitat quality. However, the positive effect of habitat quality was reduced in catchments draining fine-textured soils. The implication of these latter two findings suggest that proscriptively adding natural function to the large network of ditched and maintained conveyances draining <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands would substantially improve water quality, but management at the field level is necessary to minimize phosphorus losses. PMID:26641334</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24019373','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24019373"><span id="translatedtitle">Proportion of physicians in large group <span class="hlt">practices</span> <span class="hlt">continued</span> to grow in 2009-11.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Welch, W Pete; Cuellar, Alison Evans; Stearns, Sally C; Bindman, Andrew B</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Payers and advocates for improved health care quality are raising expectations for greater care coordination and accountability for care delivery, and physician groups may be responding by becoming larger. We used Medicare claims from the period 2009-11, merged with information from the Medicare provider enrollment database, to measure whether physician group sizes have been increasing over time and in association with physician characteristics. All US physicians serving Medicare fee-for-service patients in any <span class="hlt">practice</span> setting were included. The percentage of physicians in groups of more than fifty increased from 30.9 percent in 2009 to 35.6 percent in 2011. This shift occurred across all specialty categories, both sexes, and all age groups, although it was more prominent among physicians under age forty than those age sixty or older. The movement of physicians into groups is not a new phenomenon, but our data suggest that the groups are larger than surveys have previously indicated. Questions for future studies include whether there are significant cost savings or quality improvements associated with increased <span class="hlt">practice</span> size. PMID:24019373</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27469263','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27469263"><span id="translatedtitle">Determining Adequate Margins in Head and Neck Cancers: <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and <span class="hlt">Continued</span> Challenges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Williams, Michelle D</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Margin assessment remains a critical component of oncologic care for head and neck cancer patients. As an integrated team, both surgeons and pathologists work together to assess margins in these complex patients. Differences in method of margin sampling can impact obtainable information and effect outcomes. Additionally, what distance is an "adequate or clear" margin for patient care <span class="hlt">continues</span> to be debated. Ultimately, future studies and potentially secondary modalities to augment pathologic assessment of margin assessment (i.e., in situ imaging or molecular assessment) may enhance local control in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:27469263</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23775912','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23775912"><span id="translatedtitle">Demoralization in health professional <span class="hlt">practice</span>: development, amelioration, and implications for <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gabel, Stewart</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Demoralization is a feeling state of dejection, hopelessness, and a sense of personal "incompetence" that may be tied to a loss of or threat to one's own goals or values. It has an existential dimension when beliefs and values about oneself are disconfirmed. Numerous sources describe high rates of dissatisfaction and burnout in physicians and other health professionals. This article reviews historical and empirical findings that describe the professional and personal value orientations of physicians and other health professionals. It reviews empirical and theoretical findings to consider the implications of conflict between these values and negatively perceived ethical and values orientations of health care organizations and commercial health care entities. Conflicts between personal and professional values of health professionals and larger health care related organizations and commercial entities with which they are associated may contribute to the development of demoralization and burnout. Physicians and other health professionals frequently experience values related conflicts with larger social, organizational or bureaucratic systems. These conflicts place health professionals at risk for demoralization and burnout. "Remoralization," or renewal of morale, depends on the reestablishment of the potential for fulfillment of one's values in the work environment. This depends on organizational, group, and personal efforts. <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> education and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development programs should have a programmatic focus on the importance of a values orientation in health care and support program development aimed at recognizing, addressing, and reducing demoralization and its potential for negative health care consequences for health professionals and patients. PMID:23775912</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4830372','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4830372"><span id="translatedtitle">Family physicians’ <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development activities: current <span class="hlt">practices</span> and potential for new options</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lindsay, Elizabeth; Wooltorton, Eric; Hendry, Paul; Williams, Kathryn; Wells, George</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background As part of needs assessment processes, our Faculty of Medicine (FOM) <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development office investigated the differences between physicians who do and those who do not frequently participate in planned group learning to gain insight into their interest in new forms of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional development (CPD). Method We sent a 19 item questionnaire to 485 randomly selected physicians of the 1050 family physicians in Eastern Ontario. The questionnaire examined present participation and satisfaction with CPD activities and perceptions regarding the potential impact of those; and appetite for new opportunities to meet their learning needs. Results Of the 151 (31%) physicians responding, 61% reported attending at least one FOM group learning program in the past 18 months (attenders) and 39% had not (non-attenders). Non-attenders indicated less satisfaction (p = 0.04) with present opportunities and requested development in newer approaches such as support for self-learning, on-line opportunities, and simulation. Conclusions Although there are high levels of satisfaction with the present CPD system that predominantly offers large group learning options, a substantial number of physicians expressed interest in accessing new options such as personal study and on-line resources. PMID:27103951</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26885295','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26885295"><span id="translatedtitle">Nonparametric statistical tests for the <span class="hlt">continuous</span> data: the basic concept and the <span class="hlt">practical</span> use.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nahm, Francis Sahngun</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Conventional statistical tests are usually called parametric tests. Parametric tests are used more frequently than nonparametric tests in many medical articles, because most of the medical researchers are familiar with and the statistical software packages strongly support parametric tests. Parametric tests require important assumption; assumption of normality which means that distribution of sample means is normally distributed. However, parametric test can be misleading when this assumption is not satisfied. In this circumstance, nonparametric tests are the alternative methods available, because they do not required the normality assumption. Nonparametric tests are the statistical methods based on signs and ranks. In this article, we will discuss about the basic concepts and <span class="hlt">practical</span> use of nonparametric tests for the guide to the proper use. PMID:26885295</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4754273','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4754273"><span id="translatedtitle">Nonparametric statistical tests for the <span class="hlt">continuous</span> data: the basic concept and the <span class="hlt">practical</span> use</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Conventional statistical tests are usually called parametric tests. Parametric tests are used more frequently than nonparametric tests in many medical articles, because most of the medical researchers are familiar with and the statistical software packages strongly support parametric tests. Parametric tests require important assumption; assumption of normality which means that distribution of sample means is normally distributed. However, parametric test can be misleading when this assumption is not satisfied. In this circumstance, nonparametric tests are the alternative methods available, because they do not required the normality assumption. Nonparametric tests are the statistical methods based on signs and ranks. In this article, we will discuss about the basic concepts and <span class="hlt">practical</span> use of nonparametric tests for the guide to the proper use. PMID:26885295</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9789774','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9789774"><span id="translatedtitle">The effects of <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional education on the clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> of nurses: a review of the literature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wood, I</p> <p>1998-06-01</p> <p>In recent years, nurse education in the United Kingdom has undergone some major organisational changes, not least the move into higher education institutions. Concurrently, developments in the professionalisation of nursing through the UKCC's post registration education and <span class="hlt">practice</span> reforms have led to nurses being required to identify their own educational needs. Having identified their own needs, nurses are then faced with a plethora of post registration education programmes which are aimed to facilitate their learning and, directly or indirectly, improve patient care. However, do these programmes positively influence nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span> and the standard of care delivered? This paper reviews the literature regarding the effects that <span class="hlt">continuing</span> professional education (CPE) programmes have upon the clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> of nurses. The review draws on papers primarily from North America and the UK and highlights the methodological approaches used to discover if and how nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span> is influenced. The impact of CPE on nurses as individuals is detailed along with the effects of CPE on the delivery of patient care. PMID:9789774</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18260451','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18260451"><span id="translatedtitle">[Applicability of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production systems simulator (APSIM) in simulating the production and water use of wheat-maize <span class="hlt">continuous</span> cropping system in North China Plain].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Lin; Zheng, You-fei; Yu, Qiang; Wang, En-li</p> <p>2007-11-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Production Systems Simulator (APSIM) was applied to simulate the 1999-2001 field experimental data and the 2002-2003 water use data at the Yucheng Experiment Station under Chinese Ecosystem Research Network, aimed to verify the applicability of the model to the wheat-summer maize <span class="hlt">continuous</span> cropping system in North China Plain. The results showed that the average errors of the simulations of leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and soil moisture content in 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 field experiments were 27.61%, 24.59% and 7.68%, and 32.65%, 35.95% and 10.26%, respectively, and those of LAI and biomass on the soils with high and low moisture content in 2002-2003 were 26.65% and 14.52%, and 23.91% and 27.93%, respectively. The simulations of LAI and biomass accorded well with the measured values, with the coefficients of determination being > 0.85 in 1999-2000 and 2002-2003, and 0.78 in 2000-2001, indicating that APSIM had a good applicability in modeling the crop biomass and soil moisture content in the <span class="hlt">continuous</span> cropping system, but the simulation error of LAI was a little larger. PMID:18260451</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=229671','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=229671"><span id="translatedtitle">Handbook of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Geophysics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Geophysical methods <span class="hlt">continue</span> to show great promise for use in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. The term “<span class="hlt">agricultural</span> geophysics” denotes a subdiscipline of geophysics that is focused only on <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> applications. The Handbook of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Geophysics was compiled to include a comprehensive overview of the geoph...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23641242','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23641242"><span id="translatedtitle">Ca. Nitrososphaera and Bradyrhizobium are inversely correlated and related to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in long-term field experiments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhalnina, Kateryna; de Quadros, Patricia D; Gano, Kelsey A; Davis-Richardson, Austin; Fagen, Jennie R; Brown, Christopher T; Giongo, Adriana; Drew, Jennifer C; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Arp, Dan J; Camargo, Flavio A O; Daroub, Samira H; Clark, Ian M; McGrath, Steve P; Hirsch, Penny R; Triplett, Eric W</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> land management, such as fertilization, liming, and tillage affects soil properties, including pH, organic matter content, nitrification rates, and the microbial community. Three different study sites were used to identify microorganisms that correlate with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use and to determine which factors regulate the relative abundance of the microbial signatures of the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land-use. The three sites included in this study are the Broadbalk Experiment at Rothamsted Research, UK, the Everglades <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Area, Florida, USA, and the Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan, USA. The effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management on the abundance and diversity of bacteria and archaea were determined using high throughput, barcoded 16S rRNA sequencing. In addition, the relative abundance of these organisms was correlated with soil features. Two groups of microorganisms involved in nitrogen cycle were highly correlated with land use at all three sites. The ammonia oxidizing-archaea, dominated by Ca. Nitrososphaera, were positively correlated with <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> while a ubiquitous group of soil bacteria closely related to the diazotrophic symbiont, Bradyrhizobium, was negatively correlated with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management. Analysis of successional plots showed that the abundance of ammonia oxidizing-archaea declined and the abundance of bradyrhizobia increased with time away from <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. This observation suggests that the effect of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> on the relative abundance of these genera is reversible. Soil pH and NH3 concentrations were positively correlated with archaeal abundance but negatively correlated with the abundance of Bradyrhizobium. The high correlations of Ca. Nitrososphaera and Bradyrhizobium abundances with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management at three long-term experiments with different edaphoclimatic conditions allowed us to suggest these two genera as signature microorganisms for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use. PMID:23641242</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3640186','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3640186"><span id="translatedtitle">Ca. Nitrososphaera and Bradyrhizobium are inversely correlated and related to <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in long-term field experiments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhalnina, Kateryna; de Quadros, Patricia D.; Gano, Kelsey A.; Davis-Richardson, Austin; Fagen, Jennie R.; Brown, Christopher T.; Giongo, Adriana; Drew, Jennifer C.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Arp, Dan J.; Camargo, Flavio A. O.; Daroub, Samira H.; Clark, Ian M.; McGrath, Steve P.; Hirsch, Penny R.; Triplett, Eric W.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> land management, such as fertilization, liming, and tillage affects soil properties, including pH, organic matter content, nitrification rates, and the microbial community. Three different study sites were used to identify microorganisms that correlate with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use and to determine which factors regulate the relative abundance of the microbial signatures of the <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land-use. The three sites included in this study are the Broadbalk Experiment at Rothamsted Research, UK, the Everglades <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Area, Florida, USA, and the Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan, USA. The effects of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management on the abundance and diversity of bacteria and archaea were determined using high throughput, barcoded 16S rRNA sequencing. In addition, the relative abundance of these organisms was correlated with soil features. Two groups of microorganisms involved in nitrogen cycle were highly correlated with land use at all three sites. The ammonia oxidizing-archaea, dominated by Ca. Nitrososphaera, were positively correlated with <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> while a ubiquitous group of soil bacteria closely related to the diazotrophic symbiont, Bradyrhizobium, was negatively correlated with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management. Analysis of successional plots showed that the abundance of ammonia oxidizing-archaea declined and the abundance of bradyrhizobia increased with time away from <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. This observation suggests that the effect of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> on the relative abundance of these genera is reversible. Soil pH and NH3 concentrations were positively correlated with archaeal abundance but negatively correlated with the abundance of Bradyrhizobium. The high correlations of Ca. Nitrososphaera and Bradyrhizobium abundances with <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management at three long-term experiments with different edaphoclimatic conditions allowed us to suggest these two genera as signature microorganisms for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land use. PMID:23641242</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27514514','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27514514"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continued</span> efforts to translate diabetes cardiovascular outcome trials into clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Avogaro, Angelo; Fadini, Gian Paolo; Sesti, Giorgio; Bonora, Enzo; Del Prato, Stefano</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Diabetic patients suffer from a high rate of cardiovascular events and such risk increases with HbA1c. However, lowering HbA1c does not appear to yield the same benefit on macrovascular endpoints, as observed for microvascular endpoints. As the number of glucose-lowering medications increases, clinicians have to consider several open questions in the management of type 2 diabetes, one of which is the cardiovascular risk profile of each regimen. Recent placebo-controlled cardiovascular outcome trials (CVOTs) have responded to some of these questions, but careful interpretation is needed. After general disappointment around CVOTs assessing safety of DPP-4 inhibitors (SAVOR, TECOS, EXAMINE) and the GLP-1 receptor agonist lixisenatide (ELIXA), the EMPA-REG Outcome trial and the LEADER trial have shown superiority of the SGLT2-I empagliflozin and the GLP-1RA liraglutide, respectively, on the 3-point MACE outcome (cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke) and cardiovascular, as well as all-cause mortality. While available mechanistic studies largely support a cardioprotective effect of GLP-1, the ability of SGLT2 inhibitor(s) to prevent cardiovascular death was unexpected and deserves future investigation. We herein review the results of completed CVOTs of glucose-lowering medications and suggest a possible treatment algorithm based on cardiac and renal co-morbidities to translate CVOT findings into clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. PMID:27514514</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21800367','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21800367"><span id="translatedtitle">Anatomy's use of unclaimed bodies: reasons against <span class="hlt">continued</span> dependence on an ethically dubious <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jones, D Gareth; Whitaker, Maja I</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>The use of unclaimed bodies has been one of the distinguishing features of the anatomy profession since the passing of nineteenth century legislation aimed at solving the problem of grave robbing. Only in more recent years has the use of bequeathed bodies supplanted dependence upon unclaimed bodies in many (but not all) countries. We argue that this dependence has opened the profession to a range of questionable ethical <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Starting with contraventions of the early Anatomy Acts, we trace the manner in which the legitimacy of using unclaimed bodies has exposed vulnerable groups to dissection without their consent. These groups have included the impoverished, the mentally ill, African Americans, slaves, and stigmatized groups during the Nazi era. Unfortunately, ethical constraints have not been imposed on the use of unclaimed bodies. The major public plastination exhibitions of recent years invite us to revisit these issues, even though some like Body Worlds claim to use bequeathed bodies. The widespread use of unclaimed bodies in institutional settings has lent to these public exhibitions a modicum of legitimacy that is needed even when donated bodies are employed. This is because the notion of donation has changed as demonstrated by consideration of the principles of beneficence and non-maleficence. We conclude that anatomists should cease using unclaimed bodies. Difficult as this will be in some cultures, the challenge for anatomists is to establish relationships of trust with their local communities and show how body donation can assist both the community and the profession. PMID:21800367</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24081816','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24081816"><span id="translatedtitle">The impact of stormwater treatment areas and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality in the Everglades Protection Area.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Entry, James A; Gottlieb, Andrew</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Half of the original Everglades system has been lost to drainage and development. What remains is included within the boundaries of the Everglades Protection Area (EPA), comprised of three Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) and Everglades National Park (Park). Inflows to the EPA contain elevated nutrient concentrations. Best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) were implemented and six large wetlands called stormwater treatment areas (STAs) were constructed to improve water quality. We analyzed water quality in the WCAs and Park and performed an economic analysis of the STAs to remove nutrients from EPA inflows. In general, nutrient concentrations in all WCAs were higher during the pre-STA period than after the STAs became operational. In WCA2 and the Park, total phosphorus (TP) trends showed more negative slopes prior, as compared to after, the STAs became operational. These results suggest that BMPs lead to large initial decreases in nutrient export resulting in improved downstream water quality. A preliminary economic analysis shows that operation and management of the STAs are complicated and cost intensive. Comparing the cost of phosphorus (P) removal from water entering the EPA using BMPs and STAs may not currently be viable. BMPs prevent P from being applied to, or leaving from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> fields while STAs remove P from stormwater. We expect nutrient concentrations in water flowing into and out of the STAs to decline as both BMPs and STAs become more effective. We suggest an economic analysis of BMPs, STAs, and other potential approaches to determine the most cost-effective methods to reduce nutrient concentrations and related stressors affecting the Everglades. PMID:24081816</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Benefits+AND+community+AND+gardening&pg=3&id=EJ539958','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Benefits+AND+community+AND+gardening&pg=3&id=EJ539958"><span id="translatedtitle">Traditional <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> and Permaculture.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pierce, Dick</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Discusses benefits of combining traditional <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> techniques with the concepts of "permaculture," a framework for revitalizing traditions, culture, and spirituality. Describes school, college, and community projects that have assisted American Indian communities in revitalizing sustainable <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> that incorporate cultural…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3172974','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3172974"><span id="translatedtitle">Use of <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Electronic Fetal Monitoring in a Preterm Fetus: Clinical Dilemmas and Recommendations for <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Afors, Karolina; Chandraharan, Edwin</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The aim of intrapartum <span class="hlt">continuous</span> electronic fetal monitoring using a cardiotocograph (CTG) is to identify a fetus exposed to intrapartum hypoxic insults so that timely and appropriate action could be instituted to improve perinatal outcome. Features observed on a CTG trace reflect the functioning of somatic and autonomic nervous systems and the fetal response to hypoxic or mechanical insults during labour. Although, National Guidelines on electronic fetal monitoring exist for term fetuses, there is paucity of recommendations based on scientific evidence for monitoring preterm fetuses during labour. Lack of evidence-based recommendations may pose a clinical dilemma as preterm births account for nearly 8% (1 in 13) live births in England and Wales. 93% of these preterm births occur after 28 weeks, 6% between 22–27 weeks, and 1% before 22 weeks. Physiological control of fetal heart rate and the resultant features observed on the CTG trace differs in the preterm fetus as compared to a fetus at term making interpretation difficult. This review describes the features of normal fetal heart rate patterns at different gestations and the physiological responses of a preterm fetus compared to a fetus at term. We have proposed an algorithm “ACUTE” to aid management. PMID:21922045</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3821326','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3821326"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practical</span> Strategies for Stable Operation of HFF-QCM in <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Air Flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wessels, Alexander; Klöckner, Bernhard; Siering, Carsten; Waldvogel, Siegfried R.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Currently there are a few fields of application using quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Because of environmental conditions and insufficient resolution of the microbalance, chemical sensing of volatile organic compounds in an open system was as yet not possible. In this study we present strategies on how to use 195 MHz fundamental quartz resonators for a mobile sensor platform to detect airborne analytes. Commonly the use of devices with a resonant frequency of about 10 MHz is standard. By increasing the frequency to 195 MHz the frequency shift increases by a factor of almost 400. Unfortunately, such kinds of quartz crystals tend to exhibit some challenges to obtain a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. It was possible to reduce the noise in frequency in a <span class="hlt">continuous</span> air flow of 7.5 m/s to 0.4 Hz [i.e., σ(τ) = 2 × 10−9] by elucidating the major source of noise. The air flow in the vicinity of the quartz was analyzed to reduce turbulences. Furthermore, we found a dependency between the acceleration sensitivity and mechanical stress induced by an internal thermal gradient. By reducing this gradient, we achieved reduction of the sensitivity to acceleration by more than one decade. Hence, the resulting sensor is more robust to environmental conditions such as temperature, acceleration and air flow. PMID:24021970</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016PhRvA..94a2325Q&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016PhRvA..94a2325Q&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantum hacking: Saturation attack on <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Qin, Hao; Kumar, Rupesh; Alléaume, Romain</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We identify and study a security loophole in <span class="hlt">continuous</span>-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) implementations, related to the imperfect linearity of the homodyne detector. By exploiting this loophole, we propose an active side-channel attack on the Gaussian-modulated coherent-state CVQKD protocol combining an intercept-resend attack with an induced saturation of the homodyne detection on the receiver side (Bob). We show that an attacker can bias the excess noise estimation by displacing the quadratures of the coherent states received by Bob. We propose a saturation model that matches experimental measurements on the homodyne detection and use this model to study the impact of the saturation attack on parameter estimation in CVQKD. We demonstrate that this attack can bias the excess noise estimation beyond the null key threshold for any system parameter, thus leading to a full security break. If we consider an additional criterion imposing that the channel transmission estimation should not be affected by the attack, then the saturation attack can only be launched if the attenuation on the quantum channel is sufficient, corresponding to attenuations larger than approximately 6 dB. We moreover discuss the possible countermeasures against the saturation attack and propose a countermeasure based on Gaussian postselection that can be implemented by classical postprocessing and may allow one to distill the secret key when the raw measurement data are partly saturated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=+%22stakeholders+best+result%22+OR+%22interagency+organizations%22++OR+%22governance+structure%22++OR+%22best+practices%22++OR+responsibilities&pg=3&id=EJ870948','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=+%22stakeholders+best+result%22+OR+%22interagency+organizations%22++OR+%22governance+structure%22++OR+%22best+practices%22++OR+responsibilities&pg=3&id=EJ870948"><span id="translatedtitle">From Best <span class="hlt">Practice</span> to Best Fit: A Framework for Designing and Analyzing Pluralistic <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Advisory Services Worldwide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Birner, Regina; Davis, Kristin; Pender, John; Nkonya, Ephraim; Anandajayasekeram, Ponniah; Ekboir, Javier; Mbabu, Adiel; Spielman, David J.; Horna, Daniela; Benin, Samuel; Cohen, Marc</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The article provides a conceptual framework and discusses research methods for analyzing pluralistic <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> advisory services. The framework can also assist policy-makers in identifying reform options. It addresses the following question: Which forms of providing and financing <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> advisory services work best in which situation? The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=322691','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=322691"><span id="translatedtitle">Edge-of-field research to quantify the impacts of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water quality in Ohio</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Drainage is needed to sustain <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production to meet the demands of a growing global population, but it also transports nutrients from fields to surface water bodies. The State of Ohio is facing the tremendous challenge of maintaining <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production while protecting the environment...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=286271','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=286271"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Traditional and New <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Pathogen and Biological Control Agents Populations and on Soil Suppressiveness</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>By 2050, there will be 9 billion people on earth to feed using the same amount or less land and water as is currently available for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> production. Currently about one third of all <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> commodities grown worldwide are lost to diseases, insects and other pests. Soilborne diseases ac...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4118845','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4118845"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of Dabigatran Therapy in “Real-World” <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in Hong Kong</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ho, Mei Han; Ho, Chi Wai; Cheung, Emmanuel; Chan, Pak Hei; Hai, Jo Jo; Chan, Koon Ho; Chan, Esther W.; Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit; Tse, Hung Fat; Siu, Chung Wah</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Dabigatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor, possesses several advantages over warfarin that can in principle simplify the management of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). Nonetheless it remains unclear whether these advantages can translate to clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> and encourage long-term therapy. The objective was to describe long-term dabigatran therapy for stroke prevention in AF and to identify risk factors for discontinuation of therapy. Methods and Results We studied 467 consecutive Chinese patients (72±11 years, male: 53.8%) with a mean CHA2DS2-VASc score of 3.6 prescribed dabigatran for stroke prevention in AF from March 2010 to September 2013. Over a mean follow-up of 16 months, 101 patients (21.6%) permanently discontinued dabigatran. The mean time-to-discontinuation was 8 months. The most common reason for discontinuation was dyspepsia (30.7%), followed by other adverse events (17.8%) such as minor bleeding (8.9%), major gastrointestinal bleeding (7.9%), and intracranial hemorrhage (1%). Other reasons included dosing frequency (5.9%), fear of side effects (4.0%), lack of laboratory monitoring (1.0%), and cost (1.0%). Multivariable analysis revealed that low baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.02), absence of hypertension (p = 0.01), and prior use of a proton-pump inhibitor (p = 0.02) and H2-receptor blocker (p = 0.01) were independent predictors of drug discontinuation. In addition, there were altogether 9 ischemic strokes (1.5%/years), 3 intracranial hemorrhages (0.5%/year), and 24 major gastrointestinal bleedings (4.1%/year). Conclusion Dabigatran discontinuation is very common amongst Chinese AF patients. This reveals a management gap in the prevention of stroke in AF. PMID:25084117</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.C33F0604O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.C33F0604O"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continuous</span> monitoring of surface CO2 flux and soil gas concentrations in an <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soil under the snow cover manipulation experiment in Hokkaido, northern Japan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ohkubo, S.; Yanai, Y.; Nagata, O.; Iwata, Y.; Hirota, T.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>In the eastern part of Hokkaido, northern Japan, a timing of snow fall has been getting earlier and soil-frost depth has been decreasing in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land year by year since late 1980. It is reported that the significant decrease in frost depths was due to the early development of snow cover that insulates ground from cold. <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> land is usually managed by human operations and so there is a possibility of controlling greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is therefore important how snow and soil frost influence the dynamics of GHGs. CO2 is one of the main GHGs. We <span class="hlt">continuously</span> and automatically observed CO2 flux above soil or snow surface and CO2 concentration in soil at 10 cm depth, using automatically controlled chambers and CO2 sensors over <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land at Sapporo site (141°25’E, 43°05’N) in northern Japan. Observations were conducted from 25 September 2009 to 31 May 2010, with occasional manual observations. We prepared two experimental plots, an untreated control and a snow cover removal plot, to evaluate the influence of soil-frost and snow depth on CO2 dynamics. Acquired automatic data in CO2 flux and soil gas CO2 concentration generally have diurnal variations which had a positive peak in the daytime as affected by soil temperature, except winter period. Rainfall increased CO2 flux and soil gas CO2 concentration. During soil freezing and snow covered period, few CO2 flux was observed. Soil gas CO2 concentration had been increasing during soil freezing period. After soil thawing, CO2 flux had increased and CO2 concentration had decreased temporarily. These phenomena being seen regardless of soil temperature, supportred that snow and soil-frost layer prevent gas diffusion to the air. The gas diffusion coefficient calculated from CO2 flux and soil gas CO2 concentration during soil gas CO2 concentration had been increasing during soil freezing period, was less than about one order of magnitudes of those in other periods. Temperature response</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23561124','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23561124"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of biogenic amine and polyphenol profiles of grape berries and wines obtained following conventional, organic and biodynamic <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and oenological <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tassoni, Annalisa; Tango, Nunzio; Ferri, Maura</p> <p>2013-08-15</p> <p>The bio-active compounds present in food and beverages have a high potential influence on the future health of humans. The levels of biogenic amines, anthocyanins, polyphenols and antioxidant activity were measured in white (Pignoletto) and red (Sangiovese) grape berries and wines from the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy) obtained following conventional, organic and biodynamic <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and oenological <span class="hlt">practices</span>. No significant difference was shown among the samples coming from different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and winemaking <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Principal Component Analysis was also performed. Biogenic amine amounts were higher in red than in white berries, while in the wines an opposite trend was observed, with histamine, tyramine and putrescine being the most abundant in Pignoletto wines. Red grapes and wines were richer in anthocyanins and showed higher antioxidant activity than white ones. The total level of polyphenols was similar in red and white berries, but with different metabolite profiles depending on the grape variety. PMID:23561124</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17305172','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17305172"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> reuse <span class="hlt">practices</span> and relevant guidelines for the alba rancho WWTP (primary and secondary facultative ponds) in Cochabamba, Bolivia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zabalaga, J; Amy, G; von Münch, E</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Many cities in developing countries are experiencing high population growth, which is generating chaotic and unplanned development, reducing land areas available for <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, and polluting surface and groundwater. Consequently, the reuse of untreated or partially treated wastewater for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> irrigation is increasing in arid and semi-arid regions in developing countries. Cochabamba city in Bolivia also has a high population growth. The climatic characteristics and the lack of clean water sources in this city are forcing the <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> sector to use treated and untreated wastewater for irrigation. We investigated the effluent quality of the Alba Rancho Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and the existing effluent reuse <span class="hlt">practices</span> for irrigation of fodder crops in the surrounding <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land (La Mayca area). The plant uses primary and secondary facultative ponds, and does not achieve the required effluent quality (according to Bolivian environmental law) for effluent BOD, COD, TDS and faecal coliforms. This paper also includes a brief comparison of guidelines for wastewater reuse in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> from several developing and developed countries, comparing the parameters measured as pollution indicators. It appears that for developed countries, the main concern is the health risk that reuse can cause to the farmers and consumers. For developing countries on the other hand, pollution reduction is currently the major aim in their guidelines and standards. PMID:17305172</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014AGUFM.B12C..05G&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014AGUFM.B12C..05G&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Mining Environmental Data from a Coupled Modelling System to Examine the Impact of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Groundwater and Air Quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Garcia, V.; Cooter, E. J.; Hayes, B.; Murphy, M. S.; Bash, J. O.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Excess nitrogen (N) resulting from current <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> can leach into sources of drinking water as nitrate, increasing human health risks of 'blue baby syndrome', hypertension, and some cancers and birth defects. Nitrogen also enters the atmosphere from land surfaces forming air pollution increasing human health risks of pulmonary and cardio-vascular disease. Characterizing and attributing nitrogen from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> is difficult due to the complex and inter-related chemical and biological reactions associated with the nitrogen cascade. Coupled physical process-based models, however, present new opportunities to investigate relationships among environmental variables on new scales; particularly because they link emission sources with meteorology and the pollutant concentration ultimately found in the environment. In this study, we applied a coupled meteorology (NOAA-WRF), <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> (USDA-EPIC) and air quality modelling system (EPA-CMAQ) to examine the impact of nitrogen inputs from corn production on ecosystem and human health and wellbeing. The coupled system accounts for the nitrogen flux between the land surface and air, and the soil surface and groundwater, providing a unique opportunity to examine the effect of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> such as type and timing of fertilization, tilling and irrigation on both groundwater and air quality across the conterminous US. In conducting the study, we first determined expected relationships based on literature searches and then identified model variables as direct or surrogate variables. We performed extensive and methodical multi-variate regression modelling and variable selection to examine associations between <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management <span class="hlt">practices</span> and environmental condition. We then applied the regression model to predict and contrast pollution levels between two corn production scenarios (Figure 1). Finally, we applied published health functions (e.g., spina bifida and cardio</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec56-54.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec56-54.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 56.54 - Charges for <span class="hlt">continuous</span> grading performed on a nonresident basis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... Federal Register citations to § 56.54, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding...) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec56-52.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol3-sec56-52.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 56.52 - Charges for <span class="hlt">continuous</span> grading performed on a resident basis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume...) <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURAL</span> MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol5-sec380-1.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol5-sec380-1.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 380.1 - Scope and applicability of rules of <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> promulgated in subpart H of part 1, subtitle A, title 7 CFR are the Rules of... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope and applicability of rules of <span class="hlt">practice</span>. 380.1 Section 380.1 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) ANIMAL AND PLANT...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> EXPORT PROGRAMS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS PROGRAMS TO...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> EXPORT PROGRAMS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS PROGRAMS TO...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol10/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol10-sec1484-32.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 1484.32 - Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Must Cooperators follow specific employment <span class="hlt">practices</span>? 1484.32 Section 1484.32 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> EXPORT PROGRAMS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec56-69.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 56.69 - Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>. 56.69 Section 56.69 <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Regulations of the Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> (<span class="hlt">Continued</span>... Misrepresentation, deceptive, or fraudulent act or <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Any willful misrepresentation or any deceptive...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=240018','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=240018"><span id="translatedtitle">Drivers Impacting the Adoption of Sustainable <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Production Systems of the Northeast and Southeast U.S</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> production responds to economic, social, environmental, and technological drivers operating both internal and external to the production system. These drivers influence producers’ decision making processes, and act to shape the individual production systems through modification of produ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.406 - <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>..., Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.406 <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification. (a) To <span class="hlt">continue</span>... information, as applicable, to the certifying agent: (1) An updated organic production or handling system...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.406 - <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>..., Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.406 <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification. (a) To <span class="hlt">continue</span>... information, as applicable, to the certifying agent: (1) An updated organic production or handling system...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.406 - <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>..., Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.406 <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification. (a) To <span class="hlt">continue</span>... information, as applicable, to the certifying agent: (1) An updated organic production or handling system...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol3-sec205-406.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 205.406 - <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>..., Inspections, Marketing <span class="hlt">Practices</span>), DEPARTMENT OF <span class="hlt">AGRICULTURE</span> (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.406 <span class="hlt">Continuation</span> of certification. (a) To <span class="hlt">continue</span>... information, as applicable, to the certifying agent: (1) An updated organic production or handling system...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25631403','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25631403"><span id="translatedtitle">Bovine cysticercosis in slaughtered cattle as an indicator of Good <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> (GAP) and epidemiological risk factors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rossi, Gabriel Augusto Marques; Hoppe, Estevam Guilherme Lux; Mathias, Luis Antonio; Martins, Ana Maria Centola Vidal; Mussi, Leila Aparecida; Prata, Luiz Francisco</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>This study focused on estimating the economic losses resulting from cysticercosis at beef cattle farms that supply an export slaughterhouse located in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, and to identify the epidemiological risks factors involved in the disease to ascertain if these farms adopt Good <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> (GAP). To this, we used data recorded in 2012 by Brazil's Federal Inspection Service (SIF) on the daily occurrence of the disease, according to the farm from which the animals originated. In addition, the associated risk factors were determined based on a case-control study at 48 farms. Cysticercosis was detected in 2.26% (95% CI 2.2-2.33) of the 190,903 bovines supplied by 556 farms in the following four states: 2.92% (95% CI 2.83-3.03) in São Paulo, 1.81% (95% CI 1.71-1.93) in Minas Gerais, 0.71% (95% CI 0.6-0.82) in Goiás and 1.11% (95% CI 0.79-1.57) in Mato Grosso do Sul, with significant differences in the epidemiological indices of these states. Cysticercosis was detected at 58.45% (95% CI 54.36-62.55) of the farms of this study, representing estimated economic losses of US$312,194.52 for the farmers. Lower prevalence of this disease were found at the farms qualified for exports to the European Union, indicating a statistically significant difference from those not qualified to export to Europe. The access of cattle to non-controlled water sources, as well as sport fishing activities near the farms, was identified as risk factors. Cysticercosis causes considerable losses in Brazil's beef supply chain, with lower prevalence appearing only at farms qualified to export to the European Union. As for the access of cattle to non-controlled water sources, this is an indication that GAP are not implemented by some farms, demonstrating the violation of international agreements by the industry and the farms. PMID:25631403</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.B24A..01M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.B24A..01M"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Tillage and Non-tillage <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practice</span> on Nitrogen Losses as NO and N2O in Tropical Corn Fields at Guarico State, Venezuela.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marquina, S.; Rojas, A.; Donoso, L.; Rasse, R.; Giuliante, A.; Corona, O.; Perez, T.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>We evaluated the effect of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on NO and N2O emissions from corn fields at Northern Guárico, one of Venezuelan largest cereal production regions. Historically, the most common <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> in these regions has been mono cropping. Tillage (T) and non-tillage (NT) of soils represent approximately 30 and 70% of the planted area, respectively. Comparative studies of the nitrogen losses associated with these <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> are not available for these regions. This study was conducted at the farm "Tierra Nueva", Guárico State (9° 23' 33'' N, 66° 38' 30'' W) in two corn fields under tillage and non-tillage <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> during the growing season (June-August 2006). A dry tropical forest, the primary ecosystem of the region, was evaluated for the same period of time. The corn and the forest fields were adjacent; therefore, they were exposed to the same meteorological conditions. The mean annual precipitation of the area is 622±97.3 mm (last 5 years). The soils are Vertisols (Typic Haplusterts). Nutrient soil concentrations (as nitrate and ammonium), water soil content and pH soil were measured in the fields for the same period of time. Soils were fertilized and planted simultaneously by a planting machine provided with a furrow opener where the fertilizer and seeds are incorporated between 0-10 cm depths. Tillage soils were fertilized on June 1st 2006 with 65 kgN/ha of NPK (13:18:16/3MgO, 3S; N as NH4Cl), whereas non-tillage soils were fertilized the next day with 56 kgN/ha of NPK (12:25:12/3MgO, 3S; N as NH4Cl). Second fertilization of both fields was done thirty-seven days later by broadcast adding 58 kgN/ha approximately, using nitrophosphate as fertilizer (NP 33-3: 33% N total; 16.7% N- NO3- and 16.6% N- NH4+). In general, NO and N2O soil emissions from both corn fields increased after fertilization events, and depend on water soil content and nutrient soil concentration. N2O soil emissions were 11 and 9 times larger in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15296140','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15296140"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Practical</span> experiences with start-up and operation of a <span class="hlt">continuously</span> aerated lab-scale SHARON reactor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Van Hulle, S W H; Van Den Broeck, S; Maertens, J; Villez, K; Schelstraete, G; Volcke, E I P; Vanrolleghem, P A</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Partial nitrification techniques, such as the <span class="hlt">continuously</span> aerated SHARON process, have been denoted for quite a while as very promising for improved sustainability of wastewater treatment. Combination of such a SHARON process with the Anammox process, where ammonium is oxidised with nitrite to nitrogen gas under anoxic conditions, leads to cost-efficient and sustainable nitrogen removal from concentrated streams. In this study <span class="hlt">practical</span> experiences during start-up and operation of a lab-scale SHARON reactor are discussed. Special attention is given to the start-up in view of possible toxic effects of high ammonium and nitrite concentrations (up to 4000 mgN/l) on the nitrifier population and because the reactor was inoculated with sludge from a SBR reactor operated under completely different conditions. Because of these considerations, the reactor was first operated as a SBR to prevent biomass wash out and to allow the selection of a strong nitrifying population. A month after the inoculation the reactor was switched to normal chemostat operation. As a result the nitrite oxidisers were washed out and only the ammonium oxidisers persisted in the reactor. In this contribution also some <span class="hlt">practical</span> considerations, such as mixing, evaporation and wall growth, concerning the operation of a <span class="hlt">continuously</span> aerated SHARON reactor are discussed. These considerations are not trivial, since the reactor will be used for kinetic characterisation and modelling studies. Finally the performance of the SHARON reactor under different conditions is discussed in view of its coupling with an Anammox unit. Full nitrification was proven to be feasible for nitrogen loads up to 1.5 g/l d, indicating the possibility of the SHARON process to treat highly loaded nitrogen streams. PMID:15296140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2483640','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2483640"><span id="translatedtitle">Improving the repeat prescribing process in a busy general <span class="hlt">practice</span>. A study using <span class="hlt">continuous</span> quality improvement methodology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cox, S.; Wilcock, P.; Young, J.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>PROBLEM: A need to improve service to patients by reducing the time wasted by reception staff so that the 48 hour target for processing repeat prescription requests for patient collection could be achieved. DESIGN: An interprofessional team was established within the <span class="hlt">practice</span> to tackle the area of repeat prescribing which had been identified as a priority by <span class="hlt">practice</span> reception staff. The team met four times in three months and used <span class="hlt">continuous</span> quality improvement (CQI) methodology (including the Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle) with the assistance of an external facilitator. BACKGROUND AND SETTING: A seven partner <span class="hlt">practice</span> serving the 14,000 patients on the northern outskirts of Bournemouth including a large council estate and a substantial student population from Bournemouth University. The repeat prescribing process is computerised. KEY MEASURES FOR IMPROVEMENT: Reducing turn around times for repeat prescription requests. Reducing numbers of requests which need medical records to be checked to issue the script. Feedback to staff about the working of the process. STRATEGIES FOR CHANGE: Using a Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle for guidance, the team decided to (a) coincide repeat medications and to record on the computer drugs prescribed during visits; (b) give signing of prescriptions a higher priority and bring them to doctors' desks at an agreed time; and (c) move the site for printing prescriptions to the reception desk so as to facilitate face to face queries. EFFECTS OF CHANGE: Prescription turnaround within 48 hours increased from 95% to 99% with reduced variability case to case and at a reduced cost. The number of prescriptions needing records to be looked at was reduced from 18% to 8.6%. This saved at least one working day of receptionist time each month. Feedback from all staff within the <span class="hlt">practice</span> indicated greatly increased satisfaction with the newly designed process. LESSONS LEARNT: The team's experience suggests that a combination of audit and improvement methodology</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26034271','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26034271"><span id="translatedtitle">Financial competitiveness of organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> on a global scale.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Crowder, David W; Reganold, John P</p> <p>2015-06-16</p> <p>To promote global food and ecosystem security, several innovative farming systems have been identified that better balance multiple sustainability goals. The most rapidly growing and contentious of these systems is organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Whether organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> can <span class="hlt">continue</span> to expand will likely be determined by whether it is economically competitive with conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Here, we examined the financial performance of organic and conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> by conducting a meta-analysis of a global dataset spanning 55 crops grown on five continents. When organic premiums were not applied, benefit/cost ratios (-8 to -7%) and net present values (-27 to -23%) of organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> were significantly lower than conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. However, when actual premiums were applied, organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> was significantly more profitable (22-35%) and had higher benefit/cost ratios (20-24%) than conventional <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. Although premiums were 29-32%, breakeven premiums necessary for organic profits to match conventional profits were only 5-7%, even with organic yields being 10-18% lower. Total costs were not significantly different, but labor costs were significantly higher (7-13%) with organic farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Studies in our meta-analysis accounted for neither environmental costs (negative externalities) nor ecosystem services from good farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>, which likely favor organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. With only 1% of the global <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> land in organic production, our findings suggest that organic <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> can <span class="hlt">continue</span> to expand even if premiums decline. Furthermore, with their multiple sustainability benefits, organic farming systems can contribute a larger share in feeding the world. PMID:26034271</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4407123','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4407123"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of College-Administered Quality <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Assessments: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Repeat Peer Assessments of <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Competence in Physiotherapists</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>O'Donovan, Mary Jane; Campbell, Fiona</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Purpose: The College of Physiotherapists of Ontario (CPO) developed its peer <span class="hlt">practice</span> assessment (PA) process under statutory requirements for quality assurance. Each year, a small percentage of physiotherapists, most selected at random, undergo PA. To shed light on <span class="hlt">continuing</span> competence, we report outcomes from physiotherapists who have had two PAs. Methods: Records were extracted for physiotherapists with two unrelated PAs. Demographic features, peer assessors' scores, and consequent outcome decisions were examined. Outcomes were examined cross-sectionally (vs. other PAs in the same time period) and longitudinally (within cohort). Results: Between 2004 and 2012, 117 Ontario physiotherapists underwent two unrelated PAs, typically 5–7 years apart. This cohort was representative of Ontario physiotherapists in terms of sex ratios, education, and years in <span class="hlt">practice</span>. At the first PA (PA1), this cohort's outcomes were similar to those of other physiotherapists; at the second PA (PA2), they were better than others undergoing PA1 in the same period (p=0.02). The cohort's outcomes were better at PA2 than at PA1 (p<0.001). Conclusions: Physiotherapists are likely to meet professional standards in a repeat PA 5–7 years after an initial one. Additional research is required to identify risk factors for not meeting standards. The findings provide empirical evidence to guide ongoing development of the CPO's quality management program. PMID:25931670</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15369168','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15369168"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Continuity</span> through best <span class="hlt">practice</span>: design and implementation of a nurse-led community leg-ulcer service.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lorimer, Karen</p> <p>2004-06-01</p> <p>The design of the new service was intended to facilitate <span class="hlt">continuity</span>. The results after the first year of the new service revealed that care was both more effective and more efficient for all types of leg ulcers (Harrison, Graham, Friedberg, & Lorimer, 2003). Healing rates had dramatically improved, the frequency of nursing visits decreased, and supply costs declined. With the new service, comprehensive standardized assessments are made at baseline on all new admissions for home leg-ulcer care, and reassessments are regularly scheduled if the condition does not improve. With the evidence-based protocol, all providers and sectors of care are "working from the same script." Specific information is obtained on the client's health history, leg-ulcer history, preferences, and social context. <span class="hlt">Continuity</span> is further facilitated through implementation of the primary nurse model, whereby one provider is responsible for developing the care plan and for subsequent evaluation and revision. Management <span class="hlt">continuity</span> is advanced through health-care reorganization, with the development of an expert, dedicated nursing team, a consistent approach to training and skill development, improved coordination, an interdisciplinary approach for referral and consultation, and <span class="hlt">continuous</span> quality improvement measures for education and <span class="hlt">practice</span> audit. A number of strategies tailored to the new service have been highly effective. Strategic alliances among the researchers, home-care authority, nursing agency, nurses, and physicians are essential to the success of both design and implementation. Ongoing interdisciplinary and intersectoral communication expedites the referral process and helps to resolve issues as they develop. The majority of physicians have been very supportive of the use of the protocol and the evidence-based service. Surveys of care recipients have been mostly positive. Nurses who have been surveyed concerning the supports to implementation of the evidence-based service have</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=McBride&pg=7&id=ED261172','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=McBride&pg=7&id=ED261172"><span id="translatedtitle">Proceedings of the Annual Midwest Research-to-<span class="hlt">Practice</span> Conference in Adult and <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education (4th, Ann Arbor, Michigan, October 10-11, 1985).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Berlin, L. S., Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>This document contains the following papers on <span class="hlt">practical</span> applications of research on adult and <span class="hlt">continuing</span> education: "Elderly Criminal Behavior: Linking Research to <span class="hlt">Practice</span>," by Donald J. Bachand and Carl I. Brahce; "Father? Teacher? Friend? Instructor-Student Relationships in a Refugee Class," by Gary J. Bekker; "The Small Group: Understanding…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=211349','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=211349"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparing production <span class="hlt">practices</span> and costs for <span class="hlt">continuous</span> corn and corn-soybean cropping systems: A National Survey of 2005 corn-for-grain producers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Forecasts for increased corn acreage will likely lead to an increase in <span class="hlt">continuous</span> corn cropping systems which may require producers to adjust their production <span class="hlt">practices</span> compared to the more widely <span class="hlt">practiced</span> corn-soybean rotation system. Using 2005 field-level data from a probability-based national...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24296147','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24296147"><span id="translatedtitle">A cost-effective and <span class="hlt">practical</span> polybenzanthrone-based fluorescent sensor for efficient determination of palladium (II) ion and its application in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> crops and environment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Ge; Wen, Yangping; Guo, Chaoqun; Xu, Jingkun; Lu, Baoyang; Duan, Xuemin; He, Haohua; Yang, Jun</p> <p>2013-12-17</p> <p>A highly selective and sensitive fluorescent chemosensor suitable for <span class="hlt">practical</span> measurement of palladium ion (Pd(2+)) in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> crops and environment samples has been successfully fabricated using polybenzanthrone (PBA). PBA was facilely electrosynthesized in the mixed electrolyte of acetonitrile and boron trifluoride diethyl etherate. The fluorescence intensity of PBA showed a linear response to Pd(2+) in the concentration range of 5 nM-0.12 mM with a detection limit of 0.277 nM and quantification limit of 0.925 nM. Different compounds existing in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> crops and environment such as common metal ions, anions, natural amino acids, carbohydrates, and organic acids were used to examine the selectivity of the as-fabricated sensor, and no obvious fluorescence change could be observed in these interferents and their mixtures. A possible mechanism was proposed that the coordination of PBA and Pd(2+) enhance the aggregation of polymer chains, which led to a significant quenching of PBA emission, and this was further confirmed by absorption spectra monitoring and transmission electron microscopy. The excellent performance of the proposed sensor and satisfactory results of the Pd(2+) determination in <span class="hlt">practical</span> samples suggested that the PBA-based fluorescent sensor for the determination of Pd(2+) will be a good candidate for application in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and environment. PMID:24296147</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ865355.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ865355.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The Effectiveness of Instructional Methods Based on Learning Style Preferences of <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Students: A Research Tool for <span class="hlt">Continuous</span> Improvement for Faculty in Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fazarro, Dominick E.; Pannkuk, Tim; Pavelock, Dwayne; Hubbard, Darcy</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study was conducted to research learning style preferences of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> students. Specifically, the objectives which guided the study were: (1) to determine the learning style preferences of undergraduate <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> students enrolled in a given Soil Science course and (2) to ascertain if there were differences in the students' course…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=254537','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=254537"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> to Mitigate Pesticide Transport and Ecological Risk of Runoff from <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> and Turf Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Highly managed biotic systems such as <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> crops and golf courses often require multiple applications of pesticides that may be transported with runoff to surrounding surface waters. Pesticides have been detected in surface waters of rural and urban watersheds invoking concern of their sour...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=304896','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=304896"><span id="translatedtitle">A short-term assessment of carbon dioxide fluxes under contrasting <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> and soil management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Zimbabwe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Two of the biggest problems facing humankind are feeding an exponentially growing human population and preventing the negative effects of climate change from record concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs). <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> could address both of these problems. For example, tillage and cover...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=318021','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=318021"><span id="translatedtitle">Soil carbon and soil respiration in conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> with vegetables in Siem Reap, Cambodia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A balance between food production and environmental protection is required to sustainably feed a growing population. The resource saving concept of conservation <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> aims to achieve this balance through implementing simultaneously three conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span>; no-till, <span class="hlt">continuous</span> soil cover, ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7540.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol13-sec63-7540.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 63.7540 - How do I demonstrate <span class="hlt">continuous</span> compliance with the emission limits and work <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) AIR PROGRAMS (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (<span class="hlt">CONTINUED</span>) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27322563','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27322563"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating the Impact of Legacy P and <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Nutrient Loads from the Maumee River Watershed.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Muenich, Rebecca Logsdon; Kalcic, Margaret; Scavia, Donald</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The recent resurgence of hypoxia and harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie, driven substantially by phosphorus loads from <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>, have led the United States and Canada to begin developing plans to meet new phosphorus load targets. To provide insight into which <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> management options could help reach these targets, we tested alternative <span class="hlt">agricultural</span>-land-use and land-management scenarios on phosphorus loads to Lake Erie. These scenarios highlight certain constraints on phosphorus load reductions from changes in the Maumee River Watershed (MRW), which contributes roughly half of the phosphorus load to the lake's western basin. We evaluate the effects on phosphorus loads under nutrient management strategies, reduction of fertilizer applications, employing vegetative buffers, and implementing widespread cover crops and alternative cropping changes. Results indicate that even if fertilizer application ceased, it may take years to see desired decreases in phosphorus loads, especially if we experience greater spring precipitation or snowmelt. Scenarios also indicate that widespread conversions to perennial crops that may be used for biofuel production are capable of substantially reducing phosphorus loads. This work demonstrates that a combination of legacy phosphorus, land management, land use, and climate should all be considered when seeking phosphorus-loading solutions. PMID:27322563</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012EGUGA..14.5666A&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012EGUGA..14.5666A&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Discussion about decision support systems using <span class="hlt">continuous</span> multi-criteria methods for planning in areas with hydro-basins, <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> and forests, from examples in Argentine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anton, J. M.; Grau, J. B.; Tarquis, A. M.; Andina, D.; Cisneros, J. M.; Sanchez, E.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The authors were involved last years in projects considering diverse decision problems on the use of some regions in Argentine, and also related to rivers or rural services in them. They used sets of multi-criteria decision methods, first discrete when the problem included few distinct alternatives, such as e.g. forestry, traditional or intensive <span class="hlt">agriculture</span>. For attributes they were different effects, classified then in environmental, economic and social criteria. Extending to other gentler areas, such as at South of the Province of Córdoba, Arg., they have balanced more delicately effects of <span class="hlt">continuous</span> levels of actions, with a combination of Goal Programming linked methods, and they adopted compromises to have precise solutions. That has shown, and in part open, a line of research, as the setting of such models require various kinds of definitions and valuations, including optimizations, goals with penalties in deviations and restrictions. That can be in diverse detail level and horizon, in presence of various technical and human horizons, and that can influence politics of use of terrain and production that will require public and private agents. The research will consider consideration of use and conservation of soils, human systems and agro productions, and hence models for optimization, preferably in such Goal Programming ways. That will require considering various systems of models, first in theory to be reliable, and then in different areas to evaluate the quality of conclusions, and maybe that successively if results are found advantageous. The Bayesian ways will be considered, but they would require a prospective of sets of precise future states of nature or markets with elicited probabilities, which are neither evident nor decisive for the moment, as changes may occur in years but will be very unexpected or uncertain. The results will be lines of models to aid to establish policies of use of territories, by public agencies setting frames for private</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=244287','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=244287"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of conventional and organic <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the phenolic content in eggplant pulp: Plant-to-plant variation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Consumer awareness, pesticide and fertilizer contaminations, and environmental concerns have resulted in increased demand for organically grown farm products. The present study evaluates the influence that organic versus conventional farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> exert on the total phenolic content in eggplant...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=masonry&pg=5&id=ED181257','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=masonry&pg=5&id=ED181257"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Education. <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Structures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.</p> <p></p> <p>This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> education students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> structures. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) shop safety, (2) identification and general use of hand tools, (3) power tools, (4) carpentry, (5) blueprint…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H51H0699T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H51H0699T"><span id="translatedtitle">Complex hydrologic changes in frequency-magnitude response due to shifting <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the Midwestern U.S.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Takbiri, Z.; Czuba, J. A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Hydrologic change is occurring in many basins throughout the Midwestern U.S. not only in the mean annual streamflow but across a spectrum of magnitudes and frequencies. Disentangling the causative mechanisms responsible for these changes such as anthropogenic factors, e.g., artificial drainage to increase <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity, and climatic shifts in precipitation patterns is important for planning effective mitigation strategies. We have begun unraveling these changes in a human impacted <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> landscape in the Midwestern U.S., specifically two subbasins of the Minnesota River Basin in Minnesota: the Redwood and Whetstone River Basins, where there has been a shift in <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> from small grains to soybeans. This shift occurred at different times for each basin (1976 and 1991, respectively) and when soy covered about 20% of the basin area an apparent shift in the hydrologic regime also occurred as evidence by visual inspection of the hydrographs. Precisely quantifying the nature of this hydrologic regime shift however is a challenge and this work adds in this direction. Using Copulas and the joint probability distribution of daily precipitation and streamflow, we quantified a significantly higher dependence between precipitation and streamflow increments in the mid-quantiles (0.1-0.6; attributed to the artificial drainage to the stream rather than the slower infiltration and subsurface runoff) and no significant change for high quantiles (because for extreme storms the artificially fast drainage does not differ much hydrologically from the naturally fast overland flow). We further performed a multi-scale analysis of streamflow increments via wavelets to quantify the changes in the magnitude and frequency of the rising and falling limbs of hydrographs, confirming the above findings. Since precipitation changes were confirmed not to be significant, it is suggested that streamflow changes are largely driven by a change in land use and not climate in these</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744157','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744157"><span id="translatedtitle">Spatial variation of soil salinity in the Mexicali Valley, Mexico: application of a <span class="hlt">practical</span> method for <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> monitoring.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Judkins, Gabriel; Myint, Soe</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>The degradation of irrigated lands through the process of soil salinization, or the buildup of salts in the soil, has hampered recent increases in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> productivity and threatens the sustainability of large-scale cultivation in critical <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> regions of the world. Rapid detection of soil salinity on a regional basis has been identified as key for effective mitigation of such land degradation. The ability to detect regional patterns of soil salinity at an accuracy sufficient for regional-scale resource management is demonstrated using Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery. A case study of the Mexicali Valley of Baja California, Mexico was selected due to the region's <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> significance and concern for future soil salinity increases. Surface soil salinity was mapped using georeferenced field measurements of electrical conductivity (EC), collected concurrently with Landsat 5 TM imagery. Correlations between EC measurements and common indices derived from the satellite imagery were used to produce a model of soil salinity through regression analysis. Landsat band 7, TNDVI, PCA 1, Tasseled Cap 3 and Tasseled Cap 5 were found to offer the most promising correlations with surface soil salinity. Generally low levels of soil salinity were detected, however, distinct areas of elevated surface salinity were detected at levels potentially impacting sensitive crops cultivated within the region. The difficulty detecting low levels of salinity and the mid-range spatial resolution of Landsat 5 TM imagery restrict the applicability of this methodology to the study of broad regional patterns of degradation most appropriate for use by regional resource managers. PMID:22744157</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20153067','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20153067"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of an Assessment Tool for <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Best Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Implementation in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Priority Watersheds—Upper East River, Tributary to Green Bay, Wisconsin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Merriman, Katherine R.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The Great Lakes face a number of serious challenges that cause damage to water quality, habitat, ecology, and coastal health. Excess nutrients from point and nonpoint sources have a history of causing harmful algal blooms (HABs); since the late 1990s, a resurgence of HABs have forced beach closures and resulted in water quality impairments across the Great Lakes. Studies increasingly point to phosphorus (P) runoff from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands as the cause of these HABs. In 2010, the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) was launched to revitalize the Great Lakes. The GLRI aims to address the challenges facing the Great Lakes and provide a framework for restoration and protection. As part of this effort, the Priority Watersheds Work Group (PWWG), cochaired by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>-Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA–NRCS), is targeting Priority Watersheds (PWs) to reduce the amount of P reaching the Great Lakes. Within the PWs, USDA–NRCS identifies small-scale subbasins with high concentrations of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> for coordinated nutrient reduction efforts and enhanced monitoring and modeling. The USDA–NRCS supplies financial and/or technical assistance to producers to install or implement best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) to lessen the negative effects of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> to water quality; additional funding is provided by the GLRI through USDA–NRCS to saturate the small-scale subbasins with BMPs. The watershed modeling component, introduced in this fact sheet, assesses the effectiveness of USDA–NRCS funded BMPs, and nutrient reductions because of GLRI or other funding programs are differentiated. Modeling scenarios consider BMPs that have already been applied and those planned to be implemented across the small-scale subbasins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20153065','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20153065"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of an Assessment Tool for <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Best Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Iimplementation in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Priority Watersheds—Alger Creek, Tributary to Saginaw River, Michigan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Merriman, Katherine R.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The Great Lakes face a number of serious challenges that cause damage to water quality, habitat, ecology, and coastal health. Excess nutrients from point and nonpoint sources have a history of causing harmful algal blooms (HABs); since the late 1990s, a resurgence of HABs have forced beach closures and resulted in water quality impairments across the Great Lakes. Studies increasingly point to phosphorus (P) runoff from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> lands as the cause of these HABs. In 2010, the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) was launched to revitalize the Great Lakes. The GLRI aims to address the challenges facing the Great Lakes and provide a framework for restoration and protection. As part of this effort, the Priority Watersheds Work Group (PWWG), cochaired by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span>-Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA–NRCS), is targeting Priority Watersheds (PWs) to reduce the amount of P reaching the Great Lakes. Within the PWs, USDA–NRCS identifies small-scale subbasins with high concentrations of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> for coordinated nutrient reduction efforts and enhanced monitoring and modeling. The USDA–NRCS supplies financial and/or technical assistance to producers to install or implement best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) to lessen the negative effects of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> to water quality; additional funding is provided by the GLRI through USDA–NRCS to saturate the small-scale subbasins with BMPs. The watershed modeling component, introduced in this fact sheet, assesses the effectiveness of USDA–NRCS funded BMPs, and nutrient reductions because of GLRI or other funding programs are differentiated. Modeling scenarios consider BMPs that have already been applied and those planned to be implemented across the small-scale subbasins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26279315','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26279315"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> on mobile bla genes: IncI1-bearing CTX-M, SHV, CMY and TEM in Escherichia coli from intensive farming soils.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jones-Dias, Daniela; Manageiro, Vera; Caniça, Manuela</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Many calls have been made to address antibiotic resistance in an environmental perspective. With this study, we showed the widespread presence of high-level antibiotic resistant isolates on a collection of non-susceptible Gram-negative bacteria (n = 232) recovered from soils. Bacteria were selected using amoxicillin, cefotaxime and imipenem, from sites representing different <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> (extensive, intensive and organic). Striking levels of non-susceptibility were noticed in intensive soils for norfloxacin (74%), streptomycin (50.7%) and tetracycline (46.6%); indeed, the exposure to intensive <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> constituted a risk factor for non-susceptibility to many antibiotics, multidrug resistance and production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL). Analyses of non-susceptibility highlighted that environmental and clinical bacteria from the same species might not share the same intrinsic resistance patterns, raising concerns for therapy choices in environment-borne infections. The multiple sequence-type IncI1-driven spread of penicillinases (blaTEM-1, blaTEM-135), ESBL (blaSHV-12 and blaCTX-M-1) and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases (blaCMY-2), produced by isolates that share their molecular features with isolates from humans and animals, suggests contamination of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> soils. This is also the first appearance of IncI1/ST28-harbouring blaCTX-M-1, which should be monitored to prevent their establishment as successfully dispersed plasmids. This research may help disclose paths of contamination by mobile antibiotic resistance determinants and the risks for their dissemination. PMID:26279315</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21138289','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21138289"><span id="translatedtitle">Trend reversal of nitrate in Danish groundwater--a reflection of <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and nitrogen surpluses since 1950.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hansen, Birgitte; Thorling, Laerke; Dalgaard, Tommy; Erlandsen, Mogens</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. First, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends, and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Second, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Third, groundwater recharge CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two data sets. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s, while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. PMID:21138289</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6342925','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6342925"><span id="translatedtitle">Studies on the <span class="hlt">practical</span> application of producer gas from <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> residues as supplementary fuel for diesel engines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cruz, I.E.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Gasification of various <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> residues in down-draft, fixed bed gas producers and the utilization of the gas in small diesel engines converted for dual-fuel operation were studied at the College of Engineering, University of the Philippines. Such <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> residues as coconut shells, wood waste, rice hulls and corn cobs were readily gasified in gas producers of simple design. Cleaning of the gas before its use in diesel engines presented some problems. Use of charcoal in the gas producers to provide gas to a 5-brake horsepower single cylinder engine and a 65-brake horsepower six cylinder engine proved satisfactory. With charcoal as fuel, the percentage of the total energy from diesel oil replaced by producer gas and utilized in the single cylinder engine was higher (79%) compared to that in the six cylinder engine (73%). The thermal efficiency of the bigger gas producer, however was significantly better (85%) compared to the smaller gas producer (70%). The total gasification rate of the bigger reactor (20 kg/h) was 8 times that (2.5 kg/h) of the smaller reactor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.B54A..01P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.B54A..01P"><span id="translatedtitle">Nitrogen Losses as N2O and NO After Non-tillage <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in a Tropical Corn Field at Guarico State, Venezuela.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Perez, T. J.; Gil, J. A.; Marquina, S.; Donoso, L. E.; Trumbore, S. E.; Tyler, S. C.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>Historically, the most common <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Northern Guárico, one of Venezuelan largest cereal production regions, has been mono cropping, with extensive tillage operations that usually causes rapid soil degradation and nitrogen losses. Alternative production systems, such as non-tillage <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, have been extensively implemented during the last few years. However, studies of the nitrogen losses associated with these alternative <span class="hlt">practices</span> are not widely available. This study was conducted at "Fundo Tierra Nueva", Guárico State (9°23'33" N, 66° 38'30" W) in a corn field under the non-tillage <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span>, during the growing season June-August 2005. The soils are Vertisols (Typic Haplusterts). The area has two well defined precipitation seasons: wet (May-October) and dry (November-April). The mean annual precipitation of the area is 622±97.3 mm (last 5 years). Because the irrigation of the crop depends on precipitation, the planting is scheduled during the months of highest precipitation in June-July. We measured nitrogenous gas emissions (N2O and NO), concentrations of total nitrogen (NT), NH4+ and NO3- in soil (0-100 cm) after fertilization to estimate the nitrogen losses. We also measured CO2 emissions to evaluate the relationship of microbial respiration to the emissions of nitrogenous trace gases. Soils were fertilized with 54 kgN/ha (NPK 12:24:12, nitrogen as NH4Cl) and planted simultaneously by a planting machine provided with a furrow opener where the fertilizer and seeds are incorporated between 0-10 cm depth. Thirty days later, soils were fertilized by broadcast addition of 18 kgN/ha (as ammonium nitrate). Nitrous oxide emissions were highly dependant on the water content. Prior to fertilization N2O emissions were very low. Right after fertilization the emissions increased by a factor of 5 compared to pre-fertilization levels and increased to 100 times larger after the first heavy rain. NO emissions did not increase</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED203174.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED203174.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Urban <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> Program Planning Guide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hemp, Paul E.; Ethridge, Jim</p> <p></p> <p>Urban <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> may be defined as those areas of <span class="hlt">agriculture</span> that are <span class="hlt">practiced</span> in metropolitan settings, plus knowledge and skills in <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> subject areas which lead to vocational proficiency and improved quality of life or effective citizenship. <span class="hlt">Agriculture</span> areas that are especially significant in urban settings include ornamental…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=231393','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=231393"><span id="translatedtitle">Predicting Long-term Soil Organic Matter Dynamics as affected by <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Management <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Using the CQESTR Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Management of soil organic matter (SOM) is important for soil productivity and responsible utilization of crop residues. Carbon (C) models are needed to predict long-term effects of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on C storage in soils and to estimate the benefits when considering alternative management practi...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED295046.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED295046.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The Midwest Research to <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Conference in Adult and <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> Education (East Lansing, Michigan, October 8-9, 1987).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Levine, S. Joseph, Ed.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>The following papers are included: "Facilitating Adult Learning in Graduate Programs" (Bauer); "Toward Synergistic Delivery of Adult <span class="hlt">Agricultural</span> Education" (Cano, Miller); "Proposing a Needs Assessment Model for Academic Program Development" (Claus); "Preferred Learning Styles of University of Wisconsin External Degree Students and Their Impact…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=287043','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=287043"><span id="translatedtitle">Curve numbers for long-term no-till corn and <span class="hlt">agricultural</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> with high watershed infiltration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Curve Number (CN) method is an engineering and land management tool for estimating surface runoff from rainstorms. There are few watershed runoff records available during which a no-till crop was growing and hence there are few field-measured CN values. We investigated CN under <span class="hlt">continuous</span> long-...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED361532.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED361532.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Midwest Research-to-<span class="hlt">Practice</span> Annual Conference in Adult <span class="hlt">Continuing</span> and Community Education. Conference Proceedings (11th, Manhattan, Kansas, October 8-9, 1992).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kansas State Univ., Manhattan. Coll. of Education.</p> <p></p> <p>A conference on research to <span class="hlt">practice</span> in adult, <span class="hlt">continuing</span> and community education included the following papers: "Education as a Community Intervention Strategy" (Ashcraft, Andrews); "Assessing Educational Needs of Adults: An Ohio Extension Example" (Bratkovich, Miller); "Questions and Issues Related to a Lack of Multicultural Research in Adult…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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