Science.gov

Sample records for agriculture community programs

  1. Building Rural Communities through School-Based Agriculture Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.; Henry, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a substantive theory for community development by school-based agriculture programs through grounded theory methodology. Data for the study included in-depth interviews and field observations from three school-based agriculture programs in three non-metropolitan counties across a Midwestern state. The…

  2. An Analysis of Agriculture and Horticulture Programs at Illinois Public Community Colleges. Accountability Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    Prepared as part of a state program review, this report presents results from a review undertaken of all agriculture and horticulture programs at Illinois public community colleges for fiscal year 1995. The first part focuses on the four agricultural programs reviewed: Agricultural Business and Management; Agricultural Production, Workers, and…

  3. Building Better Rural Places: Federal Programs for Sustainable Agriculture, Forestry, Conservation and Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berton, Valerie; Butler, Jennifer

    This guide is written for those seeking help from federal programs to foster innovative enterprises in agriculture and forestry in the United States. The guide describes program resources in value-added and diversified agriculture and forestry, sustainable land management, and community development. Programs are included based upon whether they…

  4. The Common Market Concept: Using Community Based Resources in New Ways to Deliver Innovative Agriculture Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Jim; Fischer, Larry

    The cooperative agricultural programs described in this report were undertaken by John Wood Community College (JWCC) as part of a "common market" instructional delivery system, which utilizes existing community resources through contractual agreements with area schools, businesses, and government agencies. The report first provides a rationale for…

  5. Community supported agriculture programs: a novel venue for theory-based health behavior change interventions.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Christopher M; Hughner, Renee Shaw; MacMillan, Lexi; Dumitrescu, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Local foods programs such as community supported agriculture programs (CSAs) and farmers' markets have increased greatly in popularity. However, little research has been conducted regarding the effect of involvement in local foods programs on diet-related attitudes and behaviors. A series of focus groups was conducted to identify the motives that propel individuals to join a CSA, the experiences of belonging to a CSA, and the diet-related outcomes of CSA membership. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a framework to categorize findings, data suggest the potential of CSAs as a viable intervention strategy for promoting healthful diets and behaviors.

  6. Community supported agriculture programs: a novel venue for theory-based health behavior change interventions.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Christopher M; Hughner, Renee Shaw; MacMillan, Lexi; Dumitrescu, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Local foods programs such as community supported agriculture programs (CSAs) and farmers' markets have increased greatly in popularity. However, little research has been conducted regarding the effect of involvement in local foods programs on diet-related attitudes and behaviors. A series of focus groups was conducted to identify the motives that propel individuals to join a CSA, the experiences of belonging to a CSA, and the diet-related outcomes of CSA membership. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a framework to categorize findings, data suggest the potential of CSAs as a viable intervention strategy for promoting healthful diets and behaviors. PMID:25706248

  7. Programs in Animal Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Don R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Five topics relating to programs in animal agriculture are addressed: (1) the future of animal agriculture; (2) preparing teachers in animal agriculture; (3) how animal programs help young people; (4) a nontraditional animal agriculture program; and (5) developing competencies in animal agriculture. (LRA)

  8. Factors Influencing College Choice for Students in Agriculture Programs: A Comparative Study of Community College and Land-Grant University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Shannon Kaye

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influenced college choice of students who recently enrolled (current freshmen and sophomores) in agriculture programs at Oklahoma's land-grant university, as compared to recently enrolled students (current freshmen and sophomores) in selected agriculture programs at public community colleges…

  9. Innovative Programs in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Developmental programs resulting from the increased emphasis on off-farm agricultural occupations and considered innovative by state wupervisors of agricultural education are described: (1) 17 high school vocational agriculture programs in horticulture, agricultural mechanics, forestry and conservation, agriculture and distribution, cooperative…

  10. Agricultural Occupations Programs Planning Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt, Thomas R.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A set of program planning guides that include seven areas (1) Agricultural Production, (2) Agricultural Supplies and Services, (3) Agricultural Mechanics, (4) Agricultural Products, (5) Ornamental Horticulture, (6) Agricultural Resources, and (7) Forestry, were developed and introduced to high school applied biological and agricultural occupations…

  11. Agricultural Occupations Program Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul E.; Mayer, Leon

    The major program objectives of agricultural occupations courses are (1) to develop agricultural competencies needed by individuals engaged in or preparing to engage in production agriculture, and in agricultural occupations other than production agriculture; (2) to develop an understanding of the career opportunities in agriculture; (3) to…

  12. Institutional Discrimination in Agricultural Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, William C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Examines history of discrimination within U.S. agricultural programs, specifically in U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Compares USDA employment and grant allocations for Blacks and Whites since Civil Rights Act of 1964. Cites other examples of institutional discrimination in federal agriculture programs. Calls for development of policy…

  13. Standards for Agricultural Occupations Programs in Illinois Community Colleges. Interim Report of the Community College Phase [Phase I] of Project RD1-A8-564 Entitled "Standards for Illinois ABAO Post-Secondary Programs and Secondary Programs in Cook County".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert W.; Hemp, Paul E.

    A study was made of Phase 1 of the long-term standards program for agricultural occupations programs for Illinois community colleges. The unique feature of this project was the procedure used to maximize the input of community college teachers in the validation and revision of the national standards. Survey instruments were sent to community…

  14. Feasibility of Using a Community-Supported Agriculture Program to Improve Fruit and Vegetable Inventories and Consumption in an Underresourced Urban Community

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Janae; Fish, Caitlin; D’Agostino, Ralph B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Direct-to-consumer marketing efforts, such as community-supported agriculture (CSA), have been proposed as a solution for disparities in fruit and vegetable consumption. Evaluations of such efforts have been limited. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of a CSA intervention to increase household inventory of fruits and vegetables and fruit and vegetable consumption of residents of an underresourced community. Methods For this randomized, controlled feasibility study, we recruited 50 low-income women with children. Intervention (n = 25) participants were offered 5 educational sessions and a box of fresh produce for 16 weeks; control participants were not offered the sessions nor were they included in the produce delivery. We collected data on participants’ home inventory of fruits and vegetables and on their consumption of fruits and vegetables at baseline (May 2012) and postintervention (August and September 2012). Results Of 55 potential participants, 50 were enrolled and 44 were reached for follow-up. We observed a significant increase in the number of foods in the household inventory of fruits and vegetables in the intervention group compared with the control group. The intervention group reported greater increases in fruit and vegetable consumption; however, these did not reach significance. Intervention participants picked up produce 9.2 (standard deviation = 4.58) of 16 weeks; challenges included transportation and work schedules. Most participants (20 of 21) expressed interest in continued participation; all stated a willingness to pay $10 per week, and some were willing to pay as much as $25 per week. Conclusion CSA is a feasible approach for providing fresh fruits and vegetables to an underresourced community. Future studies should evaluate the impact of such a program in a larger sample and should take additional steps to facilitate participation. PMID:23948337

  15. Identifying Innovative Agricultural Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayfield, John; Murphy, Tim; Briers, Gary; Lewis, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Researchers identified innovative agricultural education programs across the United States. A Delphi study was conducted with the teachers in innovative programs. According to the teachers, innovative programs in 2020 will use hands-on activities and will be run by highly motivated teachers. The purpose of innovative programs in the future will be…

  16. Exploring Community Partnerships in Agricultural and Extension Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Brenda; Stair, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The descriptive study reported here sought to discover how Extension and agricultural education programs develop and use community partnerships to enhance educational programming. The population was a census of all New Mexico Extension agents and agricultural education teachers. Agents partnered with 57 different agencies/organization and teachers…

  17. Pilot Programs in Agricultural Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binkley, Harold

    The joint supervisory and teacher education staffs developed criteria and surveyed needed agricultural competencies as a basis for course building. Teacher educators developed unit outlines for pilot programs in off-farm agricultural occupations conducted in Lafayette, Shelby County, Daviess County, and Reidland high schools. A quasi-experimental…

  18. Theme: Future Programs of Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jasper S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This issue, focusing on future programs of agricultural education, includes articles on the future of agriculture, bioelectronics, secondary programs, technical education in agriculture, young and adult farmer programs, instructional technology, and expanding opportunities for women. (CT)

  19. Impact of Vocational Agriculture/FFA on Community Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Tony; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The most widely recognized leaders in agriculture, business, communications, education, government, industry, professions, religion, and civic groups in six Oklahoma communities were identified. Responses from 369 (of 726) revealed that nearly half had participated in vocational agriculture/Future Farmers of America programs and felt that these…

  20. Microcomputers in Agriculture. A Resource Guide for California Community College Faculty in Agriculture & Natural Resources. Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This resource guide contains descriptions of microcomputer programs that are suitable for use in community college courses in agriculture and natural resources. Product descriptions are organized according to the following subject areas: agricultural business, animal production, farm mechanics, farm management, forestry and natural resources,…

  1. Campaigns in Agricultural Extension Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaven, John W.

    A booklet designed to aid those who use agricultural campaigns in their educational and advisory programs is presented. It is pointed out that a good campaign works as a chain reaction, inciting enthusiasm among workers and planners. The five steps in a well-organized campaign are: (1) planning, (2) preparing people for their jobs, (3) producing…

  2. A Landsat Agricultural Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaronson, A. C.; Buchman, P. E.; Wescott, T.; Fries, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the Landsat Agricultural Monitoring Program which was developed to identify, observe, and evaluate alarm conditions influencing Iowa corn production in 1976. Used in conjunction with climatic and field reports, studies were made of crop development, crop alarms (such as heavy rainfall, hail, tornadoes, and drought) and estimated crop yield.

  3. What's Context Got to Do with It? An Exploration of Leadership Development Programs for the Agricultural Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Eric K.; Rateau, Richard J.; Carter, Hannah S.; Strickland, L. Rochelle

    2012-01-01

    One method to develop leaders is through leadership development programs designed specifically for an intended context. The International Leadership Association (ILA) provides questions for designing programs such programs. This article reflects data collected during the process of developing a leadership program serving the broader agricultural…

  4. AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION IN THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCOLLUM, EARL

    RAPID CHANGE IN AGRICULTURE REQUIRES THAT TODAY'S AGRICULTURALIST BE A WELL-EDUCATED ARTICULATE TECHNICIAN. COMMUNITY COLLEGES CAN CONTRIBUTE THEIR GREATEST INFLUENCE ON THE FUTURE OF OUR SOCIETY AND NATION BY OFFERING SPECIALIZED AGRICULTURAL TECHNICIAN TRAINING FOR BOTH THOSE ENTERING THE FIELD AND THOSE WISHING TO UPDATE THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND…

  5. Building community capacity for agricultural injury prevention in a Navajo community.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, D; Willging, C; Hathorn, G; Benally, J

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of building community capacity to plan, implement, and evaluate culturally appropriate agricultural injury prevention programs on the Navajo Nation. Navajo farmers and ranchers, the community stakeholders in this model program, experience significantly greater farm-related occupational mortality compared to other ethnic groups in the southwestern U.S. In this population, effective agricultural injury prevention projects designed to change livestock and pesticide handling practices are likely to reduce agricultural-related injuries and deaths. Community-based organizations and community members may benefit from training to develop the capacity to undertake systematic planning and evaluation. Using a community-based participatory research approach that addressed the need for such training, a stakeholder group consisting of university faculty and community members implemented a sequential planning process that incorporated scientific principles and activities. Over five years, community stakeholders identified criteria to define capacity improvement and then proceeded to implement activities to enhance their ability to develop, implement, and evaluate agricultural injury prevention projects. Specifically, stakeholders developed, translated, and administered a baseline survey of agricultural practices among Navajo farmers and ranchers, used survey results to design two agricultural safety projects, and implemented and evaluated the interventions. The results of the evaluation of capacity building suggest that the project was successful. This project may serve as an innovative model for increasing community involvement in the development of agricultural injury prevention interventions with underserved populations where mortality and morbidity are high, and strategies for prevention have either not been effective or adequately studied. PMID:19266882

  6. Sustaining Rural Communities through Sustainable Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikerd, John

    A 5-year collaborative project between Missouri, Michigan State, and Nebraska Universities to provide new opportunities for rural community self-development through sustainable agriculture had mixed results. This happened because community members did not understand the principles of sustainability, and because the extension education system was…

  7. 77 FR 38015 - Community Programs Guaranteed Loans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Housing Service 7 CFR Part 3575 RIN 0575-AC92 Community Programs Guaranteed... (RHS) proposes to amend the regulations utilized to service the Community Facilities Guaranteed Loan... that are eligible for a Community Facilities Guaranteed Loan. The intended effect of this action is...

  8. A Community Returns to Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saavedra-Vela, Pilar

    1978-01-01

    Aiming to keep the land in the hands of the people, the Cooperativa del pueblo's first venture of steer grazing on land held communally was abandoned due to financial pressure and the community's social needs. Today its plans include teaching families to grow vegetables for longer periods in an organic manner and developing a marketing…

  9. 7 CFR 1940.591 - Community Program Guaranteed loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Community Program Guaranteed loans. 1940.591 Section 1940.591 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS...

  10. Agricultural Mechanics: Program Planning Guide: Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristol, Benton K.

    The program planning guide for agricultural mechanics was written to assist Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations (ABAO) teachers in enriching existing programs and/or to provide the basis for expansion of offerings to include additional materials for the cluster areas of agricultural power and machinery, structural and conveniences,…

  11. Urban Agriculture Program Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul E.; Ethridge, Jim

    Urban agriculture may be defined as those areas of agriculture that are practiced in metropolitan settings, plus knowledge and skills in agricultural subject areas which lead to vocational proficiency and improved quality of life or effective citizenship. Agriculture areas that are especially significant in urban settings include ornamental…

  12. EXTENSION IN RURAL COMMUNITIES, A MANUAL FOR AGRICULTURAL AND HOME EXTENSION WORKERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SAVILE, A.H.

    A PRACTICAL GUIDE IS PROVIDED FOR TRAINERS OF ADVISORY AND EXTENSION WORKERS AND LOCAL LEADERS IN AGRICULTURE AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN DEVELOPING NATIONS. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION, COMMUNITY SURVEY PROCEDURES, ELEMENTS OF PROGRAM PLANNING, AND PURPOSES AND METHODS OF PROGRAM EVALUATION ARE DESCRIBED. THEN FOLLOW TWO CHAPTERS…

  13. Agricultural Change, Community Change, and Rural Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitchen, Janet M.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the collapse of the rural community attendant on the demise of agriculture. Reports results of interviews of dairy farmers and their families in rural New York which suggest that farm problems exacerbate problems of rural poverty. Recommends effective intervention to prevent increasing rural economic poverty and social marginality. (DHP)

  14. Characteristics of Distinguished Programs of Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkenholz, Robert J.; Simonsen, Jon C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic program rankings are highly anticipated by many university administrators, faculty, and alumni. This study analyzed the perceptions of agricultural education departmental contact persons to identify esteemed post-secondary agricultural education programs and the distinguishing characteristics of each program. The ten most distinguished…

  15. COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAMS REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MACDOUGALL, MARY ANN

    SPECIAL PROGRAMS IN REMEDIAL READING, EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, SUMMER SCHOOL INSTRUCTION, AND SCHOOL-COMMUNITY COORDINATION ARE EVALUATED. ALTHOUGH THE REMEDIAL READING PROGRAM DID NOT ESTABLISH THE SUPERIORITY OF ANY PARTICULAR METHOD OF TEACHING, IT DEMONSTRATED THE VALUE OF HAVING A READING SPECIALIST ON THE SCHOOL STAFF. MOST 4-YEAR-OLD…

  16. 7 CFR 1940.591 - Community Program Guaranteed loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Community Program Guaranteed loans. 1940.591 Section... Loan and Grant Program Funds § 1940.591 Community Program Guaranteed loans. (a) Amount available for... transition formula for Community Program Guaranteed loans is not used. (e) Base allocation. See §...

  17. Agricultural Products: Program Planning Guide: Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welton, Richard; Robb, Sam

    The program planning guide for agricultural products was written to assist Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations (ABAO) teachers in enriching existing programs and/or to provide the basis for expansion of offerings to include additional materials for the cluster areas of meat and meat byproducts, dairy processing, fruit and vegetable…

  18. Undergraduate pharmacological training programs applicable to agricultural science majors.

    PubMed

    Stark, L G

    1977-01-01

    Undergraduate training programs leading to degrees in pharmacology or toxicology do not exist on most university campuses. Agricultural science students who may ultimately use large quantities of herbicides, pesticides, and other agricultural products may obtain degrees without any exposure to the disciplines of pharmacology or toxicology; some reasons for this are discussed. The design and implementation of some courses suited to the qualifications of most undergraduate agricultural science majors are outlined. In general, a blend of lectures, discussions, and student presentations facilitates adequate presentation of the course material. Specific suggestions for student term projects are mentioned. Some of the available textbooks suitable for undergraduate courses of this type are very briefly discussed. It is suggested that in order to educate nonacademic users of agricultural chemicals, pharmacologists and toxicologists may have to work closely with both industry and those closer to the agricultural community such as county agricultural extension agents and farm youth organizations.

  19. The Chillicothe Story--How a Comprehensive Vocational Agriculture Program Meets the Needs of Agricultural Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Gutshall, Bill

    1980-01-01

    Describes five elements of the vocational agriculture program at Chillicothe (Missouri) Area Vocational School: (1) production agriculture program, (2) agribusiness program, (3) postsecondary farm management program, (4) postsecondary farm equipment repair program, and (5) adult farm management core program. (LRA)

  20. Community Relations--A Tool in Your Program's Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redington, Scott

    1975-01-01

    The author discusses the planning and organizational aspects of publicity, advertising, radio programs, and public appearance that are necessary to provide continuous public and community relations programs for agricultural education. (EA)

  1. Viewpoint. Community-Supported Agriculture: Opportunities for Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Timothy P.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Community Farm of Ann Arbor, Michigan, in the context of critical social, economic, and environmental issues related to agriculture and the rural environment and the emerging movement for community-supported agriculture (CSA) in the United States. Discusses how CSA works, biodynamic agriculture, and opportunities for environmental…

  2. Molokai Community Needs Assessment for Agriculture Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzoli, Jean A.

    In order to assess the needs of agriculture (AG) education and ascertain the potential employment demand for pre-service and in-service training in agriculture over the next 5 years, Maui Community College (MCC) sent questionnaires to Molokai community businesses, inquiring about their agricultural labor demand. In December 1997, 68 questionnaires…

  3. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM... General § 701.44 Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. Contracts for ACP that are, or...

  4. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM... General § 701.44 Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. Contracts for ACP that are, or...

  5. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM... General § 701.44 Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. Contracts for ACP that are, or...

  6. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM... General § 701.44 Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. Contracts for ACP that are, or...

  7. Community Colleges and Agricultural Education: Strategies for Serving a New Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arman, Hal D.

    In this period of limited financial resources and educational manpower, community colleges can benefit from the application of strategic management techniques to determine how to use their resources most effectively while addressing community needs. At Delta College, this approach was adopted to assess community needs for agricultural programs and…

  8. Agricultural Business and Management Materials for Agricultural Education Programs. Core Agricultural Education Curriculum, Central Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Office of Agricultural Communications and Education.

    This curriculum guide contains 5 teaching units for 44 agricultural business and management cluster problem areas. These problem areas have been selected as suggested areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for secondary students enrolled in an agricultural education program. The five units are as follows: (1) agribusiness operation and…

  9. Community College Employee Wellness Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, L. Jay; Johnson, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the prevalence and characteristics of employee wellness programs in public community colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). A random sample of 250 public community colleges accredited by SACS was mailed a 46-item employee-wellness program survey. The survey solicited program information…

  10. The Cashmere Program--An Approach to Agriculture Career Education In Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockle, James

    1978-01-01

    Senior agriculture students in the "Careers in Agriculture" program at Cashmere (Washington) High School made arranged visits to community agriculture-related businesses, where they collected information about occupations with interviews, cameras, and tape recorders; they later organized their material into slide-tape presentations for school and…

  11. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... regulations for ACP contracts and the ACP program that were contained in the 7 CFR, parts 700 to 899, edition... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM...

  12. [Effects of agricultural practices on community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in agricultural ecosystem: a review].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ping-Ping; Li, Min; Liu, Run-Jin

    2011-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are rich in diversity in agricultural ecosystem, playing a vital role based on their unique community structure. Host plants and environmental factors have important effects on AM fungal community structure, so do the agricultural practices which deserve to pay attention to. This paper summarized the research advances in the effects of agricultural practices such as irrigation, fertilization, crop rotation, intercropping, tillage, and pesticide application on AM fungal community structure, analyzed the related possible mechanisms, discussed the possible ways in improving AM fungal community structure in agricultural ecosystem, and put forward a set of countermeasures, i.e., improving fertilization system and related integrated techniques, increasing plant diversity in agricultural ecosystem, and inoculating AM fungi, to enhance the AM fungal diversity in agricultural ecosystem. The existing problems in current agricultural practices and further research directions were also proposed.

  13. Application of Program Logic Model to Agricultural Technology Transfer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Framst, Gordon

    1995-01-01

    Program logic models provide a method of presenting program objectives schematically. This article presents a model that explicitly recognizes the ultimate societal-level benefits and accommodates identification of outputs, performance indicators, and targets. The model is illustrated with a hypothetical agricultural technology transfer program.…

  14. Agricultural Education Teacher Education Preservice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Samuel Clifton

    Intended to introduce a model, relevant preservice program for agricultural education teachers, this paper porposes a curriculum which for the most part meets the standards of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. Divided into seven sections, it covers the following topics: (1) the role of the teacher; (2) an agricultural…

  15. A Guide for Planning Programs in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichelberger, A. E.; And Others

    The general information necessary for planning a high school program in agricultural educated is provided, based on the following briefly described occupational areas: agricultural production, agricultural supplied/services, agricultural mechanics, agricultural products (processing, inspection, and marketing), agricultural resources (conversation,…

  16. Community Programs and Women's Participation: The Chinese Experience. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coady, David; Dai, Xinyi; Wang, Limin

    A community development program in rural China aimed to enhance women's economic and social opportunities as a means of lowering fertility rates. The program involved agricultural seminars and extension services, organized cultural and entertainment activities, and political meetings. Village leaders took part in seminars on community development,…

  17. Establishing Community College Honors Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, James

    Drawing from a literature review and survey of community colleges with honors programs, this paper presents a series of recommended strategies and tactics for the establishment and continuation of community college honors programs. The recommendations are structured around the five developmental stages of academic innovation identified by S. V.…

  18. The Ramathibodi Community Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, Prem; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The Ramathibodi Faculty of Medicine in Bangkok, Thailand, has developed a teaching and research program in community health aimed at brining the institution into close association with the health needs of the country. (Editor)

  19. A Viable Program of Education in Vocational Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atherton, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author advocates assessment of local vocational agriculture programs to determine their viability and growth by examining the systematization, development, and assimilation aspects of the program. (EA)

  20. Agricultural Programs at the Post High School Level; Special Report Prepared for the Pacific Regional Seminar in Agricultural Education (Olympia, May 15-19, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, James W.

    A general overview of post-high school education in agriculture is presented to show the wide variety of programs and their curricular structure for use by school administrators. Representative agricultural programs in community colleges, junior colleges, vocational and technical schools, area schools, and in specialized technical training…

  1. Model Course of Study for Agricultural Programs in Iowa. Preparing for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert A.; And Others

    Each section contained in this packet is necessary for designing an effective program of agriculture education. The curriculum guide that is developed from this model should include the same sections. The model includes: (1) community description; (2) school description; (3) goals and objectives of education in agriculture; (4) evaluation policy;…

  2. Emerging Educational and Agricultural Trends and their Impact on the Secondary Agricultural Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Ralsa Marshall, Jr.; Moore, Gary E.; Flowers, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify the emerging trends in education and agriculture and to determine their implications on the secondary agricultural education program. For this study, the researchers did a national solicitation for nominations with 1,160 national agricultural education leaders, state agricultural education leaders,…

  3. US Department of Agriculture School Breakfast Program.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, E; Davis, C

    1998-04-01

    This article reviews the history of the US Department of Agriculture School Breakfast Program (SBP) and provides a synthesis of factors influencing participation rates. Certain children are more likely to participate than others, such as those in lower grades and those from low-income households, and African American, Hispanic, and male students. A few studies in the past 25 y have examined the effectiveness of the SBP in improving the diets and nutritional status of children. The overall pattern that emerges from these studies is that the SBP contributes to improved nutrient intake in program participants. Less attention has been devoted to assessing the effects of SBP on cognitive development. Some of the evidence reviewed here suggests that the SBP significantly improves school performance and reduces absenteeism and tardiness. Future directions for research and operation of the SBP are discussed in light of the changing dietary profile of American children. PMID:9537632

  4. US Department of Agriculture School Breakfast Program.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, E; Davis, C

    1998-04-01

    This article reviews the history of the US Department of Agriculture School Breakfast Program (SBP) and provides a synthesis of factors influencing participation rates. Certain children are more likely to participate than others, such as those in lower grades and those from low-income households, and African American, Hispanic, and male students. A few studies in the past 25 y have examined the effectiveness of the SBP in improving the diets and nutritional status of children. The overall pattern that emerges from these studies is that the SBP contributes to improved nutrient intake in program participants. Less attention has been devoted to assessing the effects of SBP on cognitive development. Some of the evidence reviewed here suggests that the SBP significantly improves school performance and reduces absenteeism and tardiness. Future directions for research and operation of the SBP are discussed in light of the changing dietary profile of American children.

  5. Community Agricultural Processing Services: A Reflection of Urban Differentiation or County Agricultural Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Robert L.; Calloway, Michael O.

    Questionnaire data from 81 North Carolina communities were analyzed in 1981 to test the hypothesis that 5 institutional subcategories (education, general community services, transportation, agricultural services, and health and sanitation) exhibit the underlying characteristic of unidimensionality and that they reflect comparable levels of…

  6. 75 FR 77821 - Agricultural Water Enhancement Program and Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Commodity Credit Corporation Agricultural Water Enhancement Program and Cooperative... agreements with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) through either the Agricultural Water... Agricultural Water Enhancement Program Legislative Authority The Agricultural Water Enhancement Program...

  7. A TRAINING INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF TECHNICAL PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Cobleskill. Agricultural and Technical Coll.

    A TRAINING INSTITUTE WAS HELD FOR TEACHERS OF TECHNICAL PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURE IN WHICH SPEAKERS AND DISCUSSION GROUPS EXPLORED AND EXPLAINED (1) THE NEED FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE, (2) FACILITIES NECESSARY FOR SUCH INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS, (3) FACULTY REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHING COURSES IN THE TECHNICAL FIELDS OF AGRICULTURE, (4)…

  8. A Guide for Developing the Instructional Program in Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    This bulletin contains materials suggested for use by agricultural teachers in the improvement of their agricultural mechanics programs. In its function as a guide to planning a teaching program in agricultural mechanics the document outlines the principles and procedures in course planning, 12 guiding concepts in the teaching of agricultural…

  9. Administrative Problems of Technical Assistance to Community Development and Agricultural Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safa-Isfahani, Manouchehr

    An attempt was made to analyze the administrative problems of United States technical assistance to community development and agricultural extension programs in the Philippines, Pakistan, Iran, Thailand, and Nigeria, with emphasis on field problems and on the point of view of local administrators, field technicians, and local people. The concept…

  10. 77 FR 67433 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Community Advantage Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of extension of and changes to Community Advantage Pilot Program and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Community Advantage (``CA'') Pilot Program is a pilot program to increase SBA-guaranteed loans to...

  11. 76 FR 56262 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... Community Advantage Pilot Program (``CA Pilot Program'') (76 FR 9626). Pursuant to the authority provided to... ADMINISTRATION Community Advantage Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION: Notice of change to Community Advantage Pilot Program. SUMMARY: On February 18, 2011, SBA published a...

  12. Investigating Community Factors as Predictors of Rural 11th-Grade Agricultural Science Students' Choice of Careers in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedokun, Omolola A.; Balschweid, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the links between community contexts/factors and rural 11th-grade agricultural science students' choice of careers in agriculture. A logistic regression model was developed and tested to examine the extent to which nine measures of community contexts (i.e., membership in FFA, membership in 4-H, community attachment,…

  13. Hinds Community College MSEIP program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Student Assistant Antoinette Davis (left) of Utica; Carmella Forsythe, 13, of Clinton; Terri Henderson, 14, of Clinton; Tyra Greer, 12, of Port Gibson; and Kala Battle, 14, of Edwards, answer curriculum questions about NASA's Return to Flight mission exhibit at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The girls were on a field trip to StenniSphere with fellow participants in Hinds Community College's MSEIP (Minority Science Engineering Improvement Program) summer program. MSEIP encourages students to pursue and prepare for careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

  14. Community Participation in Tribal Diabetes Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    In the past five years, there has been a surge in the attention shown to community and community-based health programs among Native Americans, particularly for chronic health problems such as diabetes. Community participation in health programming--from the efforts of community health workers (CHWs), to participatory research, to the impact of…

  15. Teaching Materials for Environmental Related Courses in Agriculture Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohning, Kermit B.; Stitt, Thomas R.

    The lesson plans were designed to provide the practicing applied biological and agricultural occupations teacher with a series of units setting down a basic foundation in Environmental Education. Nine lesson plans cover (1) ecosystems and agriculture, (2) biotic communities and food chains, (3) energy and nutrient flow, (4) land use and supply,…

  16. Spanish for Agricultural Purposes: The Audio Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainous, Bruce H.; And Others

    The manual is meant to accompany and supplement the basic manual and to serve as support to the audio component of "Spanish for Agricultural Purposes," a one-semester course for North American agriculture specialists preparing to work in Latin America, consists of exercises to supplement readings presented in the course's basic manual and to…

  17. A STUDY OF THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM IN INDIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    THOTA, VYKUNTAPATHI

    AN OUTGROWTH OF MISSIONARY AND VOLUNTEER EFFORTS, THE INDIAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM HAS FOUR OBJECTIVES--(1) TO ASSIST EACH VILLAGE IN PLANNING AND CARRYING OUT INTEGRATED MULTI-PHASED FAMILY AND VILLAGE PLANS DIRECTED TOWARDS INCREASING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, (2) TO IMPROVE HEALTH PRACTICES, (3) TO PROVIDE THE REQUIRED EDUCATIONAL…

  18. Community Development Guide. "A Guide for Restructuring Community Development in Agricultural Education."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagley, Leon A.; And Others

    Information designed to acquaint teachers, teacher educators, and state supervisors of agricultural education with the concepts, roles, and procedures for developing a community development curriculum is presented in this guide. The first section is concerned with suggestions for restructuring materials relevant to teaching community development…

  19. Theme: The Role of Community Resources in the Agricultural Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Includes articles on character building in agricultural education, using community resources, cooperating with the community, identifying community resources, reintroducing field trips, enhancing career development through authentic learning, and sharing roots with the community. (JOW)

  20. Peer Rankings of the Leading Agricultural Teacher Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Through a mail survey, the authors determined what criteria agricultural teacher educators use to rate peer programs and which programs they considered best. Criteria included (1) faculty, (2) scholarship, and (3) overall program. Top programs named were Ohio State University and Iowa State University. (CH)

  1. Perceptions of Vocational Agriculture Instructors Regarding Knowledge and Importance of Including Selected Agricultural Mechanics Units in the Vocational Agriculture Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimgartner, Dale C.; Foster, Richard M.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of teachers in five northwestern states revealed that respondents in all states rated the units of arc welding and oxyacetylene welding as the most important units to be included in secondary vocational agriculture programs. (LRA)

  2. Comparison of soil bacterial communities under diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tiehang; Chellemi, Dan O; Graham, Jim H; Martin, Kendall J; Rosskopf, Erin N

    2008-02-01

    The composition and structure of bacterial communities were examined in soil subjected to a range of diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices. Length heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) of bacterial DNA extracted from soil was used to generate amplicon profiles that were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistical methods. Five land management programs were initiated in July 2000: conventional, organic, continuous removal of vegetation (disk fallow), undisturbed (weed fallow), and bahiagrass pasture (Paspalum notatum var Argentine). Similar levels in the diversity of bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons were detected in soil samples collected from organically and conventionally managed plots 3 and 4 years after initiation of land management programs, whereas significantly lower levels of diversity were observed in samples collected from bahiagrass pasture. Differences in diversity were attributed to effects on how the relative abundance of individual amplicons were distributed (evenness) and not on the total numbers of bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons detected (richness). Similar levels of diversity were detected among all land management programs in soil samples collected after successive years of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cultivation. A different trend was observed after a multivariate examination of the similarities in genetic composition among soil bacterial communities. After 3 years of land management, similarities in genetic composition of soil bacterial communities were observed in plots where disturbance was minimized (bahiagrass and weed fallow). The genetic compositions in plots managed organically were similar to each other and distinct from bacterial communities in other land management programs. After successive years of tomato cultivation and damage from two major hurricanes, only the composition of soil bacterial communities within organically managed plots continued to maintain a high degree of similarity

  3. 78 FR 26485 - Community Programs Guaranteed Loans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... Part 3575 RIN 0575-AC92 Community Programs Guaranteed Loans AGENCY: Rural Housing Service, USDA. ACTION... Community Facilities Guaranteed Loan Program in two separate sections, in order to clarify the types of projects that are eligible for a Community Facilities Guaranteed Loan. The intended effect of this...

  4. Measuring Community Programs and Policies in the Healthy Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Stephen B; Collie-Akers, Vicki L; Schultz, Jerry A; Kelley, Melinda

    2015-10-01

    Childhood obesity is a challenging public health issue facing communities throughout the U.S. Local efforts are believed to be essential to assuring environments that support physical activity and healthy food/beverage consumption among children and their families. However, little is known about how broadly and intensively communities are implementing combinations of programs and policies that address childhood nutrition, physical activity, and weight control. The Healthy Communities Study is a nationwide scientific study in diverse communities to identify characteristics of communities and programs that may be associated with childhood obesity. Data collection occurred in 2013-2015; data analysis will be completed in 2016. As part of the Healthy Communities Study, researchers designed a measurement system to assess the number and scope of community programs and policies and to examine possible associations between calculated "intensity" scores for these programs and policies and behavioral and outcome measures related to healthy weight among children. This report describes the protocol used to capture and code instances of community programs and policies, to characterize attributes of community programs and policies related to study hypotheses, and to calculate the intensity of combinations of community programs and policies (i.e., using the attributes of change strategy, duration, and reach). PMID:26384934

  5. Measuring Community Programs and Policies in the Healthy Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Stephen B; Collie-Akers, Vicki L; Schultz, Jerry A; Kelley, Melinda

    2015-10-01

    Childhood obesity is a challenging public health issue facing communities throughout the U.S. Local efforts are believed to be essential to assuring environments that support physical activity and healthy food/beverage consumption among children and their families. However, little is known about how broadly and intensively communities are implementing combinations of programs and policies that address childhood nutrition, physical activity, and weight control. The Healthy Communities Study is a nationwide scientific study in diverse communities to identify characteristics of communities and programs that may be associated with childhood obesity. Data collection occurred in 2013-2015; data analysis will be completed in 2016. As part of the Healthy Communities Study, researchers designed a measurement system to assess the number and scope of community programs and policies and to examine possible associations between calculated "intensity" scores for these programs and policies and behavioral and outcome measures related to healthy weight among children. This report describes the protocol used to capture and code instances of community programs and policies, to characterize attributes of community programs and policies related to study hypotheses, and to calculate the intensity of combinations of community programs and policies (i.e., using the attributes of change strategy, duration, and reach).

  6. Globalizing Agricultural Science and Education Programs for America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This document proposes an agenda for globalizing agricultural science and education which has implications for higher education, research, and extension programs at land-grant and similar universities. To enhance global competitiveness of U.S. agriculture through human resource development, institutions are urged to: globalize undergraduate and…

  7. Innovative Agricultural Education Secondary School Programs in Southeast Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagni, Arsenio O.; And Others

    In an effort to seek out and describe exemplary and innovative features of agricultural high schools in Asian countries, letters of inquiry were sent to the directors of agricultural education programs in Thailand, Republic of China, Japan, and South Korea informing them of a study tour planned by three members of the University of the Philipines…

  8. Benefits of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs: A Synthesis of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L.; Dyer, James E.

    1997-01-01

    A review of literature from 1964 to 1993 identified the benefits of supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs, including agriculture knowledge and positive work attitudes. Classroom, SAE, and Future Farmers of America complemented each other. The research base is state specific and fragmented and lacks cohesiveness. (SK)

  9. Program Building Handbook for the Texas Agricultural Extension Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribble, Marie; And Others

    Guidelines and procedures which Texas Agricultural Extension Service personnel may use in working with local people in planning and carrying out county programs are provided in this handbook. The program building process is based on the philosophy that people have both the desire and ability to plan and carry out educational programs. The handbook…

  10. Teacher Perceptions of Factors Associated with Expanding Vocational Agriculture Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkenholz, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 201 Missouri vocational agriculture teachers assessed their perceptions on selected local curricular adjustments. Results indicated that teachers supported incorporation of agribusiness instruction. Local program expansion in other areas may be worthy of investigation. (CH)

  11. 75 FR 473 - Community Express Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... restructure the Community Express Pilot Program effective October 1, 2008. (73 FR 36950, June 30, 2008) The restructured pilot program was extended through December 31, 2009 (73 FR 36950). Extension of this restructured... ADMINISTRATION Community Express Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION:...

  12. Maryland Community Colleges 1980 Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Community Colleges, Annapolis.

    This report contains qualitative evaluations of 48 programs throughout the Maryland community college system, as well as a statewide evaluation of Teacher Education transfer programs. A summary of the Teacher Education programs is presented first, in which the purpose and role of teacher education in the community college, enrollment trends,…

  13. Problems associated with community mental health programs.

    PubMed

    Bindman, A J

    1966-12-01

    Community mental health programs vary in relation to their types of administrative and fiscal policy and structure. Discontinuity of services may increase due to proliferation of community-based programs, and community mental health personnel must be trained to deal with many needs and new programs. There will also be conflicts over individual professional interests versus community needs. Problems of staff recruitment will increase and concerted efforts are necessary to increase inservice education in order to re-shape professional roles. Psychologists in particular are interested in new developments in "community psychology" as a means of contributing to these efforts. PMID:24190853

  14. Extracting DNA of nematodes communities from Argentine Pampas agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Eduardo A; Covacevich, Fernanda; Studdert, Guillermo A; Pimentel, João P; Berbara, Ricardo L L

    2015-01-01

    We examined four strategies (Tris/EDTA, sodium dodecyl sulfate, Chelex 100 resin and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide -CTAB-) for extracting nucleic acid (DNA) from communities of nematodes. Nematodes were isolated from an agricultural area under different management of long-term crop rotation experiment from Argentina during three seasons. After DNA extraction, Polymerase Chain Reaction-amplifications were performed and considered as indicators of successful DNA extraction. The CTAB combined with proteinase K and phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol was the unique successful method because positive amplifications were obtained by using both eukaryotic and nematode specific primers. This work could contribute to biodiversity studies of nematodes on agroecosystems.

  15. Agriculture and Food Processes Branch program summary document

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The work of the Agriculture and Food Processes Branch within the US DOE's Office of Industrial Programs is discussed and reviewed. The Branch is responsible for assisting the food and agricultural sectors of the economy in increasing their energy efficiency by cost sharing with industry the development and demonstration of technologies industry by itself would not develop because of a greater than normal risk factor, but have significant energy conservation benefits. This task is made more difficult by the diversity of agriculture and the food industry. The focus of the program is now on the development and demonstration of energy conservation technology in high energy use industry sectors and agricultural functions (e.g., sugar processing, meat processing, irrigation, and crop drying, high energy use functions common to many sectors of the food industry (e.g., refrigeration, drying, and evaporation), and innovative concepts (e.g., energy integrated farm systems. Specific projects within the program are summarized. (LCL)

  16. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities.

    PubMed

    Almaguer, Miguel; Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Central America, Egypt, India and Sri Lanka have reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. This essay examines the disease's case definitions, epidemiology (disease burden, demographics, associated risk factors) and causal hypotheses, by reviewing published findings from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka, Egypt and India. The range of confirmed chronic kidney disease prevalence was 17.9%-21.1%. Prevalence of reduced glomerular filtration (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 body surface area) based on a single serum creatinine measurement was 0%-67% men and 0%-57% women. Prevalence was generally higher in male farmworkers aged 20-50 years, and varied by community economic activity and altitude. Cause was unknown in 57.4%-66.7% of patients. The dominant histopathological diagnosis was chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis. Associations were reported with agricultural work, agrochemical exposure, dehydration, hypertension, homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved. Further etiological research is needed, plus interventions to reduce preventable risk factors. PMID:24878644

  17. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities.

    PubMed

    Almaguer, Miguel; Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Central America, Egypt, India and Sri Lanka have reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. This essay examines the disease's case definitions, epidemiology (disease burden, demographics, associated risk factors) and causal hypotheses, by reviewing published findings from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka, Egypt and India. The range of confirmed chronic kidney disease prevalence was 17.9%-21.1%. Prevalence of reduced glomerular filtration (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 body surface area) based on a single serum creatinine measurement was 0%-67% men and 0%-57% women. Prevalence was generally higher in male farmworkers aged 20-50 years, and varied by community economic activity and altitude. Cause was unknown in 57.4%-66.7% of patients. The dominant histopathological diagnosis was chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis. Associations were reported with agricultural work, agrochemical exposure, dehydration, hypertension, homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved. Further etiological research is needed, plus interventions to reduce preventable risk factors.

  18. A Proposed Educational Program for Agricultural Development in Iraq.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsamarrae, Hatam Ali

    The general purpose of this study was to develop an educational program for agricultural development in Iraq, and to identify the best method for its implementation. The proposed program was based primarily upon relevant factors identified through data collection from the following sources: official records, current literature, and the writer's…

  19. The Mississippi Community College Fellowship Program (MCCFP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Billy; And Others

    The Mississippi Community College Fellowship Program (MCCFP), a project of the Department of Educational Leadership at Mississippi State University, is designed to assist in the identification, development, and training of the state's future community college leaders. Two participants are nominated by each of the 16 public community college…

  20. Community Education: Processes and Programs. Fastback 243.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Fallon, John A.

    This fastback examines the origins and meanings of community education. In the first chapter, the contemporary conditions that have spawned a renewed interest in the concept of community education are contrasted with the conditions that initiated the movement 25 years ago. The second chapter, which examines community education as a program,…

  1. Community Commons Program Development Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Kieta Osteen

    Community Commons (CC) is a collaborative partnership among Brevard Community College (BCC) (Florida) and over 40 social service organizations and agencies in Florida dedicated to providing education, job training, social services, recreation, and a drug free environment to communities of low income families. The project specifically seeks to…

  2. Drug Free Communities Support Program. Prevention Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Administered by the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), in partnership with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Drug Free Communities Support Program (DFC) is a federal grant program that provides funding to community-based coalitions that organize to prevent youth substance use. Since the…

  3. Organizing Small Business Programs in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Robert E.; Piland, William E.

    This manual contains guidelines for organizing small business programs in community colleges. Following an introductory discussion of the need for such a program both throughout the United States in general and in Illinois in particular, the role of the community college in facilitating small business development is examined. Guidelines are set…

  4. Community Support Programs in Rural Areas: Developing Programs without Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, William Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Describes "program without walls" for developing community services in rural areas. Emphasizes importance of creative collaboration and redesign of traditional support programs to offer comprehensive community services tailored to needs of rural families and individuals. Suggests practical applications of "without walls" model. (Author/TES)

  5. Using logic models in a community-based agricultural injury prevention project.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, Deborah; Willging, Cathleen; Hathorn, Gary; Benally, Jeannie

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has long promoted the logic model as a useful tool in an evaluator's portfolio. Because a logic model supports a systematic approach to designing interventions, it is equally useful for program planners. Undertaken with community stakeholders, a logic model process articulates the underlying foundations of a particular programmatic effort and enhances program design and evaluation. Most often presented as sequenced diagrams or flow charts, logic models demonstrate relationships among the following components: statement of a problem, various causal and mitigating factors related to that problem, available resources to address the problem, theoretical foundations of the selected intervention, intervention goals and planned activities, and anticipated short- and long-term outcomes. This article describes a case example of how a logic model process was used to help community stakeholders on the Navajo Nation conceive, design, implement, and evaluate agricultural injury prevention projects. PMID:19618808

  6. Building student community in a hybrid program.

    PubMed

    Schaber, Patricia; McGee, Corey; Jones, Terrianne

    2015-04-01

    The concept of student community has been shown to enhance learning, empower students, and increase engagement in the learning process. An occupational therapy program transformed classroom-based learning to a hybrid platform with over 70% of the course content online and expanded from one to two learning sites. Based on faculty concerns about occupational therapy students' experience of belonging to a community, this study compared student-perceived sense of community in the first and final didactic semesters of a hybrid Master's program. Using the Classroom and School Community Inventory and a Checklist of 24 Points of Contact, faculty found over 90% of students reported a sense of community with no significant differences from start to finish of the didactic program, or between learning sites. Furthermore, students reported informal, out-of-classroom interactions with colleagues, group assignments, and face-to-face classroom sessions as the strongest points of contact contributing to a sense of student community. PMID:25821882

  7. Horticulture Materials for Agricultural Education Programs. Core Agricultural Education Curriculum, Central Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Office of Agricultural Communications and Education.

    This curriculum guide contains five units with relevant problem areas for horticulture. These problem areas have been selected as suggested areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for secondary students enrolled in an agricultural education program. Each problem area includes some or all of the following components: related problem…

  8. ADAPTING THE FFA TO A CHANGING PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE. RESEARCH SERIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KANTER, EARL F.; BENDER, RALPH E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS NATIONAL STUDY WAS TO SUGGEST WAYS OF ADAPTING THE FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA (FFA) TO A CHANGING PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE THROUGH IDENTIFYING NEW PURPOSES OF THE FFA AND EVALUATING SELECTED OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES AND NATIONAL AND STATE FFA ACTIVITIES. MEMBERS OF THE UNITED STATES OFFICE OF EDUCATION, HEAD STATE…

  9. Art Works! Prevention Programs for Youth & Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Paula

    This book presents model programs that use art in prevention programs for youth. When faced with the serious threats that drugs, violence, and alienation pose for children, communities creatively respond by combining resources and talents. Their lessons are highlighted in this book, and these programs should encourage new collaborations for the…

  10. Middlesex Community College Software Technical Writing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlesex Community Coll., Bedford, MA.

    This document describes the Software Technical Writing Program at Middlesex Community College (Massachusetts). The program is a "hands-on" course designed to develop job-related skills in three major areas: technical writing, software, and professional skills. The program was originally designed in cooperation with the Massachusetts High…

  11. 75 FR 80561 - Community Express Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... indicated that the restructured pilot program would be extended through December 31, 2009 (73 FR 36950). On... implemented in October 2008, ] the pilot program was extended again through December 31, 2010 (75 FR 473). SBA... ADMINISTRATION Community Express Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION:...

  12. Microbial Community Structure and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Martinez, V. A.; Zobeck, T. M.; Gill, T. E.; Kennedy, A. C.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of agricultural management practices on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of semiarid soils of different textures in the Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in rotations with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and had different water management (irrigated or dryland) and tillage (conservation or conventional). Microbial community structure was investigated using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis by gas chromatography and enzyme activities, involved in C, N, P and S cycling of soils, were measured (mg product released per kg soil per h). The activities of b-glucosidase, b-glucosaminidase, alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase were significantly (P<0.05) increased in soils under cotton rotated with sorghum or wheat, and due to conservation tillage in comparison to continuous cotton under conventional tillage. Principal component analysis showed FAME profiles of these soils separated distinctly along PC1 (20 %) and PC2 (13 %) due to their differences in soil texture and management. No significant differences were detected in FAME profiles due to management practices for the same soils in this sampling period. Enzyme activities provide early indications of the benefits in microbial populations and activities and soil organic matter under crop rotations and conservation tillage in comparison to the typical practices in semiarid regions of continuous cotton and conventional tillage.

  13. Master Plan and Inventory of Programs for the California Community Colleges. Revised Spring 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    Current and projected programs in California Community Colleges are provided in this master plan and inventory of programs. The programs are in the following subject areas: Agriculture and Natural Resources; Architecture and Environmental Design; Regional Studies; Biological Sciences; Business and Management; Communications; Computer and…

  14. Agriculture and Food Processes Branch program summary document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The food industry, its energy consumption, and its energy conservation targets are discussed. Activities of the Agriculture and Food Processes Branch are described. Summaries of research, development, and demonstration programs of the Branch are given. The programs are categorized into the following: energy integrated farm systems; irrigation systems; crop drying systems; fertilizer; dairy and milk processing; meat processing; sugar processing; citrus processing; ethanol production; food processing efficiency systems; and food sterilization. Summaries are presented of 26 completed projects. (MCW)

  15. Agricultural Market News Programming of Wisconsin Radio and Television Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroupa, Eugene A.; And Others

    This study was designed to determine what Wisconsin's 92 AM and 107 FM radio and 18 television stations were providing as agricultural market information programming. Data were collected via a two-phase survey. It was found that the number of stations giving farm and market news were 79% of AM, 56% of FM, and 1% of television stations based on a…

  16. The Community Involvement Program: Recognizing Community-Based Learning. A Report of the National Dissemination Project for the Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community Coll. Education, Seattle. Research and Planning Office.

    The Community Involvement Program is a statewide community college program in Washington offering credit for community-based learning. Excerpts from several Community Involvement Program reports are presented: (1) overview of the Community Involvement Program (from the final report)--the CIP facilitated the development of a community-based…

  17. Kansas Tree Program Aids Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullins, William S.

    1973-01-01

    Since State and Extension Forestry at Kansas State University received specific funding from the U.S. Forest Service for community forestry programs, the university has received requests for assistance from more than 200 Kansas towns. (GB)

  18. Discovering Community: Activities for Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute on Out-of-School Time, Wellesley College, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The project activities highlighted in this publication were conducted within the framework of school-based afterschool programs operated by community-based organizations. The intention of the Discovering Community initiative, created by The After-School Corporation and MetLife Foundation, is to foster greater collaborations and mutual respect…

  19. Women's Programs at Public Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Donald D.; And Others

    In order to discover what kinds of programs and services were being provided for female students and community members, a survey was designed and mailed to the deans of students of all public community colleges in the United States during the fall of 1974. The data presented here represent responses from 577 institutions (88 percent). The survey…

  20. THE FLINT COMMUNITY SCHOOL PROGRAM, AN OVERVIEW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BATES, GUY J.; AND OTHERS

    THE PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL HAD BECOME THE IDEAL CENTER FOR COMMUNITY EDUCATION IN FLINT. IT WAS THE PRACTICAL PLACE FOR CARRYING THE CONSTANTLY CHANGING ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMS OF THE COMMUNITY. THE APPROACH USED TO FACILITATE HUMAN UNDERSTANDING AND INTERACTION INCLUDED, FIRST, GETTING THE PEOPLE INTO THE SCHOOLS, WHERE THEY BECAME INTERESTED.…

  1. Community Arts Study Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFee, June K.

    This study sought ways in which the staff and students of a School of Architecture could work with townspeople, teachers, and teenagers in studying the environmental conditions in their communities. Three types of communities participated. Three types of programs were carried out. They were: (1) townspeople, school personnel and teenagers studied…

  2. Community College Programs for Public Service Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Les; Hamilton, Randy H.

    This publication is a "Design for Action" of the Institute for Local Self Government to re-direct the vocational-technical local government education and training programs through the community colleges to provide urban government manpower. The community college is uniquely qualified to provide significant continuing education and training needed…

  3. Summer programming in rural communities: unique challenges.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ruthellen; Harper, Stacey; Gamble, Susan

    2007-01-01

    During the past several decades, child poverty rates have been higher in rural than in urban areas, and now 2.5 million children live in deep poverty in rural America. Studies indicate that poor children are most affected by the typical "summer slide." Summer programming has the ability to address the issues of academic loss, nutritional loss, and the lack of safe and constructive enrichment activities. However, poor rural communities face three major challenges in implementing summer programming: community resources, human capital, and accessibility. The success of Energy Express, a statewide award-winning six-week summer reading and nutrition program in West Virginia, documents strategies for overcoming the challenges faced by poor, rural communities in providing summer programs. Energy Express (1) uses community collaboration to augment resources and develop community ownership, (2) builds human capital and reverses the acknowledged brain drain by engaging college students and community volunteers in meaningful service, and (3) increases accessibility through creative transportation strategies. West Virginia University Extension Service, the outreach arm of the land-grant institution, partners with AmeriCorps, a national service program, and various state and local agencies and organizations to implement a program that produces robust results. PMID:17623413

  4. Summer programming in rural communities: unique challenges.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ruthellen; Harper, Stacey; Gamble, Susan

    2007-01-01

    During the past several decades, child poverty rates have been higher in rural than in urban areas, and now 2.5 million children live in deep poverty in rural America. Studies indicate that poor children are most affected by the typical "summer slide." Summer programming has the ability to address the issues of academic loss, nutritional loss, and the lack of safe and constructive enrichment activities. However, poor rural communities face three major challenges in implementing summer programming: community resources, human capital, and accessibility. The success of Energy Express, a statewide award-winning six-week summer reading and nutrition program in West Virginia, documents strategies for overcoming the challenges faced by poor, rural communities in providing summer programs. Energy Express (1) uses community collaboration to augment resources and develop community ownership, (2) builds human capital and reverses the acknowledged brain drain by engaging college students and community volunteers in meaningful service, and (3) increases accessibility through creative transportation strategies. West Virginia University Extension Service, the outreach arm of the land-grant institution, partners with AmeriCorps, a national service program, and various state and local agencies and organizations to implement a program that produces robust results.

  5. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Agriculture Production (Program CIP: 01.0301--Agricultural Prod. Workers & Mgrs.). Secondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for agriculture production I and II. Presented first are a program…

  6. Barriers to Successful Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs in Semi-Rural and Urban High School Agricultural Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whaley, David C.; Lucero, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Interviews with educators and students examined the value of and identified barriers to effective use of supervised agricultural experiences (SAE) in a Los Angeles high school and a semirural Colorado high school. Both programs overcame diverse challenges to develop valuable experiential learning through SAEs. Recommendations provide strategies…

  7. Handicapped Programs: California Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Richard

    This report examines the legal responsibility of the California Community Colleges (CCC) toward handicapped individuals as specified in federal and state legislation. The report first reviews the salient features of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, including an examination of the legal definition of "handicapped individual" and short…

  8. How to Start Intergenerational Programs in Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document is designed for use by community organizers in creating, developing and maintaining an intergenerational program. Starting with a brief overview of the Maryland Intergenerational Coalition, the document describes (in short, bulleted entries) the activities and accomplishments of various intergenerational programs in Maryland, such as…

  9. Maryland Community Colleges Instructional Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Community Colleges, Annapolis.

    Guidelines are presented for consideration in the development, review, submission, and approval of all new instructional programs in the Maryland Community Colleges (MCC). The first section of the manual explains: (1) operational definitions for transfer and occupational programs; (2) the five-year state plan listing; (3) letters of intent and…

  10. Community College Exemplary Instructional Programs, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fideler, Elizabeth F., Ed.; Bazer, Gerald, Ed.

    Third in an annual series, this volume presents brief descriptions of a number of outstanding community college instructional programs identified by the National Council of Instructional Administrators (NCIA). Each description includes the address and telephone number of the college in which the program operates, and the names of the college…

  11. Community-Based Teacher Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Jacquelyn; And Others

    This is a report on off-campus, community-based urban teacher education programs in three of the Metropolitan areas in Michigan: Detroit, Pontiac, and Flint. The described purpose of the program is to provide a new teacher with experience for working with urban youth in a changing society, to develop leaders who possess a "feel" for the community…

  12. Community College Older Adult Program Development Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getskow, Veronica

    This guide provides information and suggestions for developing programs that meet the needs of older adults at community colleges. Recommended procedures are presented for the following stages of program development: (1) leadership influences, highlighting the process of hiring effective leaders, key leadership skills, and leaders'…

  13. Switch for Good Community Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Tabitha; Amran, Martha

    2013-11-19

    Switch4Good is an energy-savings program that helps residents reduce consumption from behavior changes; it was co-developed by Balfour Beatty Military Housing Management (BB) and WattzOn in Phase I of this grant. The program was offered at 11 Navy bases. Three customer engagement strategies were evaluated, and it was found that Digital Nudges (a combination of monthly consumption statements with frequent messaging via text or email) was most cost-effective.

  14. Using CDBG to Support Community-Based Youth Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrico, Roxana

    2008-01-01

    This brief provides policymakers, stakeholders, community leaders, and program developers working in or with community-based youth programs with a basic understanding of how the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) is structured, how community-based youth programs fit into CDBG purposes and activities, and how communities nationwide are using…

  15. Career Preparation Programs for Potential Agribusinessmen, Agricultural Agency Employees, and Agricultural Instructors. Final Report. July 1, 1976-June 30, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Univ., State College. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    The purpose of the project was to develop innovative agricultural education programs within the comprehensive high school setting in selected school districts in the state of Mississippi, with the project's second year (described here) focusing on continuing existing specialized career preparation program in agriculture and continuing to orient…

  16. Latinos with Diabetes and Food Insecurity in an Agricultural Community

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Gerardo; Morales, Leo S.; Isiordia, Marilu; de Jaimes, Fatima Nunez; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Noguera, Christine; Mangione, Carol M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Latinos from agricultural communities have a high prevalence of food insecurity and are at increased risk of obesity and diabetes, yet little is known about the associations between food insecurity and diabetes outcomes. Objective To examine the associations between food insecurity and diabetes outcomes among rural Latinos. Methods Cross-sectional survey with medical chart abstraction of 250 Latinos with diabetes. Primary outcomes are the control of three intermediate diabetes outcomes (hemoglobin A1C ≤ 8.0%, LDL-cholesterol ≤ 100 mg/dl, and blood pressure ≤ 140/90 mmHg), a composite of control of the three, and receipt of 6 processes of care. Secondary outcomes are cost-related medication underuse and participation in self-care activities. Results Fifty-two percent of patients reported food insecurity and one-in-four reported cost-related medication underuse. Patients with food insecurity were more likely to report cost-related medication underuse (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.49; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.30, 4.98; p = 0.003); less likely to meet the composite measure for control of the 3 intermediate outcomes (AOR 0.24; 95% CI 0.07, 0.84; p < 0.05), and less likely to receive a dilated eye exam (AOR 0.37; 95% CI 0.18, 0.77; p < 0.05) and annual foot exams (AOR 0.42; 95% CI 0.20, 0.84; p < 0.05) compared to those who were food secure. Conclusion Among this rural Latino population, food insecurity was independently associated with not having control of the intermediate diabetes outcomes captured in the composite measure, not receiving dilated eye and foot exams, and with self-reporting cost-related medication underuse. PMID:25811632

  17. Agricultural Change: Consequences for Southern Farms and Rural Communities. Westview Special Studies in Agricultural Science and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Joseph J., Ed.

    The 17 articles in this volume are designed to shed light on what farmers are experiencing during the current farm crisis and why. They also examine what current agricultural change means for rural life and rural communities, and what southern farming may be like in the foreseeable future. The articles represent contemporary research and…

  18. Needlestick Injuries in Agriculture Workers and Prevention Programs.

    PubMed

    Buswell, Minden L; Hourigan, Mary; Nault, André J; Bender, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    were nonspecific. NSI in agriculture workers and veterinarians can result in significant bodily injury and loss of work. There is a need for varied and comprehensive educational programs for agricultural workers and veterinarians to prevent NSI on livestock operations.

  19. The SDGs Will Require Integrated Agriculture, Nutrition, and Health at the Community Level.

    PubMed

    Canavan, Chelsey R; Graybill, Lauren; Fawzi, Wafaie; Kinabo, Joyce

    2016-03-01

    Child malnutrition is an urgent and complex issue and requires integrated approaches across agriculture, nutrition, and health. This issue has gained prominence at the global level. While national-level efforts are underway in many countries, there is little information on how to integrate at the community level. Here, we offer a community-based approach using cadres of agricultural and community health workers, drawing on qualitative work we have conducted in Tanzania. Agriculture is an important driver of nutritional and health outcomes, and improving child health will require practical solutions for integration that can add to the evidence base.

  20. [A community program to stimulate smoking cessation].

    PubMed

    Villalbí, J R; Ballestín, M; Surós, C; de Miguel-Blondel, E; Cabello, R

    1992-01-01

    A community program to stimulate smoking cessation developed on the 1988 World No-smoking Day in the city of Barcelona (Spain) is presented. Participants in this program could make a written commitment to quit, and received support materials by mail. The results are evaluated in a sample of participants: 69% declare having quit on the specified date, and 29% do not smoke after one year.

  1. Ruminal Methanogen Community in Dairy Cows Fed Agricultural Residues of Corn Stover, Rapeseed, and Cottonseed Meals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengpeng; Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Xingwen; Zhang, Yangdong; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-07-13

    The purpose was to reveal changes in the methanogen community in the rumen of dairy cows fed agricultural residues of corn stover, rapeseed, and cottonseed meals, compared with alfalfa hay or soybean meal. Analysis was based on cloning and sequencing the methyl coenzyme M reductase α-subunit gene of ruminal methanogens. Results revealed that predicted methane production was increased while population of ruminal methanogens was not significantly affected when cows were fed diets containing various amounts of agricultural residues. Richness and diversity of methanogen community were markedly increased by addition of agricultural residues. The dominant ruminal methanogens shared by all experimental groups belonged to rumen cluster C, accounting for 71% of total, followed by the order Methanobacteriales (29%). Alterations of ruminal methanogen community and prevalence of particular species occurred in response to fed agricultural residue rations, suggesting the possibility of regulating target methanogens to control methane production by dairy cows fed agricultural residues. PMID:27322573

  2. Informed Consumer Choice in Community Rehabilitation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen-Foley, Debra L.; Rosenthal, David A.; Thomas, Dale F.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated consumer and staff member perceptions regarding the extent of consumer choice and participatory planning in community-based rehabilitation programs (CRPs) and the relationship between these elements, satisfaction, and outcomes. Consumers reported moderate to high levels of choice in services and employment goals, and…

  3. Community Colleges and JTPA: Issues and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yglesias, Kenneth D., Ed.

    This collection of papers describes the role of the public community college in contracting with local Private Industry Councils (PIC) through the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA). Some papers examine training programs and special assessment and intake projects funded by the JTPA, while others discuss vocational assessment procedures that are…

  4. Thoughts about School and Community Sports Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magill, John F.

    1983-01-01

    A reasonable, well-balanced high school interscholastic sports program should emphasize involvement, skill development, and carry-over. It should not stress sports for the few gifted or talented participants. Middle school needs and the advantages of coordinated school-community physical education activities are discussed. (PP)

  5. Community-Based Clinical Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailit, Howard

    1999-01-01

    This "theme" issue offers 17 articles all on the subject of dentistry education programs sponsored by the Macy project, a 24-month effort to assess the feasibility of "community-based clinical dental education." Following an introduction, articles are grouped into those concerning problems (financing dental education, public financing of dental…

  6. An Economic Analysis of USDA Erosion Control Programs: A New Perspective. Agricultural Economic Report No. 560.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohbehn, Roger, Ed.

    A study analyzed the total (public and private) economic costs and benefits of three U.S. Department of Agriculture erosion control programs. These were the Conservation Technical Assistance Program, Great Plains Conservation Program, and Agricultural Conservation Program. Significant efforts at funding for current programs were directed to…

  7. Climate warming and agricultural stressors interact to determine stream periphyton community composition.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Jeremy J; Salis, Romana K; Lear, Gavin; Townsend, Colin R; Matthaei, Christoph D

    2015-01-01

    Lack of knowledge about how the various drivers of global climate change will interact with multiple stressors already affecting ecosystems is the basis for great uncertainty in projections of future biological change. Despite concerns about the impacts of changes in land use, eutrophication and climate warming in running waters, the interactive effects of these stressors on stream periphyton are largely unknown. We manipulated nutrients (simulating agricultural runoff), deposited fine sediment (simulating agricultural erosion) (two levels each) and water temperature (eight levels, 0-6 °C above ambient) simultaneously in 128 streamside mesocosms. Our aim was to determine the individual and combined effects of the three stressors on the algal and bacterial constituents of the periphyton. All three stressors had pervasive individual effects, but in combination frequently produced synergisms at the population level and antagonisms at the community level. Depending on sediment and nutrient conditions, the effect of raised temperature frequently produced contrasting response patterns, with stronger or opposing effects when one or both stressors were augmented. Thus, warming tended to interact negatively with nutrients or sediment by weakening or reversing positive temperature effects or strengthening negative ones. Five classes of algal growth morphology were all affected in complex ways by raised temperature, suggesting that these measures may prove unreliable in biomonitoring programs in a warming climate. The evenness and diversity of the most abundant bacterial taxa increased with temperature at ambient but not with enriched nutrient levels, indicating that warming coupled with nutrient limitation may lead to a more evenly distributed bacterial community as temperatures rise. Freshwater management decisions that seek to avoid or mitigate the negative effects of agricultural land use on stream periphyton should be informed by knowledge of the interactive effects of

  8. Climate warming and agricultural stressors interact to determine stream periphyton community composition.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Jeremy J; Salis, Romana K; Lear, Gavin; Townsend, Colin R; Matthaei, Christoph D

    2015-01-01

    Lack of knowledge about how the various drivers of global climate change will interact with multiple stressors already affecting ecosystems is the basis for great uncertainty in projections of future biological change. Despite concerns about the impacts of changes in land use, eutrophication and climate warming in running waters, the interactive effects of these stressors on stream periphyton are largely unknown. We manipulated nutrients (simulating agricultural runoff), deposited fine sediment (simulating agricultural erosion) (two levels each) and water temperature (eight levels, 0-6 °C above ambient) simultaneously in 128 streamside mesocosms. Our aim was to determine the individual and combined effects of the three stressors on the algal and bacterial constituents of the periphyton. All three stressors had pervasive individual effects, but in combination frequently produced synergisms at the population level and antagonisms at the community level. Depending on sediment and nutrient conditions, the effect of raised temperature frequently produced contrasting response patterns, with stronger or opposing effects when one or both stressors were augmented. Thus, warming tended to interact negatively with nutrients or sediment by weakening or reversing positive temperature effects or strengthening negative ones. Five classes of algal growth morphology were all affected in complex ways by raised temperature, suggesting that these measures may prove unreliable in biomonitoring programs in a warming climate. The evenness and diversity of the most abundant bacterial taxa increased with temperature at ambient but not with enriched nutrient levels, indicating that warming coupled with nutrient limitation may lead to a more evenly distributed bacterial community as temperatures rise. Freshwater management decisions that seek to avoid or mitigate the negative effects of agricultural land use on stream periphyton should be informed by knowledge of the interactive effects of

  9. Maternal and child assistance programs; model application form--HHS, Department of Agriculture. Notice.

    PubMed

    1991-12-01

    This notice publishes a model application form that States have the option of using in full, in part, with modification or not at all. It would be used by pregnant women or by children under 6 years of age to apply for benefits simultaneously under several congressionally specified "maternal and child assistance programs": (1) The Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act; (2) the Health Care for the Homeless grant program under section 340 of the Public Health Service Act; (3) the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Services block grand program under title V of the Social Security Act; (4) the Migrant and Community Health Centers programs under sections 329 and 330 of the Public Health Service Act; (5) the Head Start program under the Head Start Act; and (6) the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) under section 17 of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966. This notice is published in accordance with section 6506(a) of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989 (OBRA '89) (Pub. L. 101-239), which requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, to develop a model application form for the specified maternal and child assistance programs for publication in the Federal Register. This model application form represents a first effort to develop a joint model application form covering the programs mandated by Congress. If modifications are necessary due to changes in program requirements, or States or other user experience, they will be pursued.

  10. Investigation of denitrifying microbe communities within an agricultural drainage system fitted with low-grade weirs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancing wetland characteristics in agricultural drainage ditches with the use of low-grade weirs, has been identified as a potential best management practice (BMP) to mitigate nutrient runoff from agriculture landscapes. This study examined microbe community abundance and diversity involved in den...

  11. Relations between retired agricultural land, water quality, and aquatic-community health, Minnesota River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Lee, Kathy E.; McLees, James M.; Niemela, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of agricultural land retirement on water quality and aquatic-community health was investigated in the Minnesota River Basin. Eighty-two sites, with drainage areas ranging from 4.3 to 2200 km2, were examined for nutrient concentrations, measures of aquatic-community health (e.g., fish index of biotic integrity [IBI] scores), and environmental factors (e.g., drainage area and amount of agricultural land retirement). The relation of proximity of agricultural land retirement to the stream was determined by calculating the land retirement percent in various riparian zones. Spearman's rho results indicated that IBI score was not correlated to the percentage of agricultural land retirement at the basin scale (p = 0.070); however, IBI score was correlated to retired land percentage in the 50- to 400-m riparian zones surrounding the streams (p < 0.05), indicating that riparian agricultural land retirement may have more influence on aquatic-community health than does agricultural land retirement in upland areas. Multivariate analysis of covariance and analysis of covariance models indicated that other environmental factors (such as drainage area and lacustrine and palustrine features) commonly were correlated to aquatic-community health measures, as were in-stream factors (standard deviation of water depth and substrate type). These results indicate that although agricultural land retirement is significantly related to fish communities as measured by the IBI scores, a combination of basin, riparian, and in-stream factors act together to influence IBI scores.

  12. European Community`s program in marine resources development

    SciTech Connect

    Lenoble, J.P.; Jarmache, E.

    1995-12-01

    The European Community launched already several research program in the different fields of social and industrial activities. The Fourth Framework Programme is divided into 4 main activities comporting a total of 18 programs. These programs are dealing with general topics as information and communication, industrial technologies, environment, life sciences and technologies, energy, transport and socioeconomic research. One line is devoted to marine sciences and technology, but offshore activities could also be included in the other topics as offshore oil and gas in energy, ship building and harbor in transport, aquaculture and fisheries in life sciences and technology, etc. In order to maintain a coherent approach toward offshore activities, the European maritime industries met intensively front 1991 to 1994 and recommended a series of proposal for Research and Development of marine resources. The methodology and content of these proposals is exposed.

  13. 20 CFR 638.543 - Community relations program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Community relations program. 638.543 Section... PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.543 Community relations program. Each center operator shall establish a community relations program, which shall...

  14. 20 CFR 638.543 - Community relations program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Community relations program. 638.543 Section... PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.543 Community relations program. Each center operator shall establish a community relations program, which shall...

  15. Wisconsin Radio and Television Agricultural Market News Programming. Wisconsin Agricultural Extension Service Research Report No. R2615, April 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroupa, Eugene A.; Walker, Douglas K.

    The study determined what Wisconsin's 102 AM, 107 FM, and 21 television stations were providing as agricultural market information programming and documented the amount, timing, frequency, and completeness of broadcast agricultural market news reports. Data were collected on the sources of market price information, types of commodity and price…

  16. Summer Enrichment Programs: Providing Agricultural Literacy and Career Exploration to Gifted and Talented Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, John G.; Broyles, Thomas W.; Seibel, G. Andrew; Anderson, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    As agriculture continues to evolve and become more complex, the demand for qualified college graduates to fill agricultural careers exceeds supply. This study focused on a summer enrichment program that strives to expose gifted and talented students to the diverse nature of agricultural careers through the integration of agriculture and science.…

  17. A Program in Agricultural Education in Nevada Based on Off-Farm Agricultural Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Howard Harward

    To investigate the further development of agricultural education in Nevada in light of current and future opportunities for employment in off-farm agricultural occupations, personal interviews were conducted with 363 agricultural firms and 30 agricultural agencies. Data were summarized for the 148 companies where some employees needed agricultural…

  18. Procuring incentives for community health promotion programs.

    PubMed

    Engelberg, M; Elder, J P; Hammond, N; Boskin, W; Molgaard, C A

    1987-01-01

    Many community health promotion programs have used incentives to encourage participation and to reward health behavior change. To minimize expenses and to enhance a sense of shared responsibility, a number of projects have turned to community merchants as a source of incentives. This study investigated the relative effectiveness of solicitation methods used to procure incentives from local merchants for community health promotion programs. The effect of setting, i.e. level of urban development, and type of business were also analyzed in terms of procurement rates. Two hundred and eighteen merchants were solicited to gain incentives for two programs. Twenty-four incentives were procured at a total value of $480. Telemarketing and face-to-face contact had similar procurement rates, restaurants were by far the type of business most likely to donate, and rural merchants provided incentives significantly more often than urban merchants, while developing urban area merchants' donation rates were midway in between. Telemarketing was the solicitation method clearly most cost effective.

  19. Culturally relevant model program to prevent and reduce agricultural injuries.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, D L; Hathorn, G; Benally, J; Ortega, C

    2014-07-01

    Limited research has explored pesticide injury prevention among American Indian farmers. In a five-year agricultural intervention, a university-community partnership, including the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, New Mexico State University, Shiprock Area Cooperative Extension Service, and Navajo Nation communities, used a culturally relevant model to introduce and maintain safe use of integrated pest management techniques. We applied the Diffusion of Innovations theory and community-based approaches to tailor health promotion strategies for our intervention. In a longitudinal study with repeated measures, we trained six "model farmers" to be crop management experts in pesticide safety, application, and control. Subsequently, these model farmers worked with 120 farm families randomized into two groups: intervention (Group 1) and delayed intervention (Group 2). Measurements included a walk-through analysis, test of knowledge and attitudes, and yield analysis. Both groups demonstrated improvements in pesticide storage behaviors after training. Test scores regarding safety practices improved significantly: from 57.3 to 72.4 for Group 1 and from 52.6 to 76.3 for Group 2. Group 1 maintained their knowledge and safety practices after the intervention. Attitudes about pesticides and communication of viewpoints changed across the study years. With pesticides and fertilizer, the number of corn ears increased by 56.3% and yield (kg m(-2)) of alfalfa increased by 41.2%. The study combined traditional farming practices with culturally relevant approaches and behavior change theory to affect knowledge, safety practices, attitudes, communication channels, and crop yield. Storage behaviors, use of pesticides and safety and application equipment, and safety practice knowledge changed significantly, as did attitudes about social networking, social support, and the compatibility and relative advantage of pesticides for farms. PMID:25174150

  20. Culturally relevant model program to prevent and reduce agricultural injuries.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, D L; Hathorn, G; Benally, J; Ortega, C

    2014-07-01

    Limited research has explored pesticide injury prevention among American Indian farmers. In a five-year agricultural intervention, a university-community partnership, including the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, New Mexico State University, Shiprock Area Cooperative Extension Service, and Navajo Nation communities, used a culturally relevant model to introduce and maintain safe use of integrated pest management techniques. We applied the Diffusion of Innovations theory and community-based approaches to tailor health promotion strategies for our intervention. In a longitudinal study with repeated measures, we trained six "model farmers" to be crop management experts in pesticide safety, application, and control. Subsequently, these model farmers worked with 120 farm families randomized into two groups: intervention (Group 1) and delayed intervention (Group 2). Measurements included a walk-through analysis, test of knowledge and attitudes, and yield analysis. Both groups demonstrated improvements in pesticide storage behaviors after training. Test scores regarding safety practices improved significantly: from 57.3 to 72.4 for Group 1 and from 52.6 to 76.3 for Group 2. Group 1 maintained their knowledge and safety practices after the intervention. Attitudes about pesticides and communication of viewpoints changed across the study years. With pesticides and fertilizer, the number of corn ears increased by 56.3% and yield (kg m(-2)) of alfalfa increased by 41.2%. The study combined traditional farming practices with culturally relevant approaches and behavior change theory to affect knowledge, safety practices, attitudes, communication channels, and crop yield. Storage behaviors, use of pesticides and safety and application equipment, and safety practice knowledge changed significantly, as did attitudes about social networking, social support, and the compatibility and relative advantage of pesticides for farms.

  1. Modeling a phosphorus credit trading program in an agricultural watershed.

    PubMed

    Corrales, Juliana; Naja, G Melodie; Bhat, Mahadev G; Miralles-Wilhelm, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Water quality and economic models were linked to assess the economic and environmental benefits of implementing a phosphorus credit trading program in an agricultural sub-basin of Lake Okeechobee watershed, Florida, United States. The water quality model determined the effects of rainfall, land use type, and agricultural management practices on the amount of total phosphorus (TP) discharged. TP loadings generated at the farm level, reaching the nearby streams, and attenuated to the sub-basin outlet from all sources within the sub-basin, were estimated at 106.4, 91, and 85 mtons yr(-)(1), respectively. Almost 95% of the TP loadings reaching the nearby streams were attributed to agriculture sources, and only 1.2% originated from urban areas, accounting for a combined TP load of 87.9 mtons yr(-)(1). In order to compare a Least-Cost Abatement approach to a Command-and-Control approach, the most cost effective cap of 30% TP reduction was selected, and the individual allocation was set at a TP load target of 1.6 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) (at the nearby stream level). The Least-Cost Abatement approach generated a potential cost savings of 27% ($1.3 million per year), based on an optimal credit price of $179. Dairies (major buyer), ornamentals, row crops, and sod farms were identified as potential credit buyers, whereas citrus, improved pastures (major seller), and urban areas were identified as potential credit sellers. Almost 81% of the TP credits available for trading were exchanged. The methodology presented here can be adapted to deal with different forms of trading sources, contaminants, or other technologies and management practices.

  2. Modeling a phosphorus credit trading program in an agricultural watershed.

    PubMed

    Corrales, Juliana; Naja, G Melodie; Bhat, Mahadev G; Miralles-Wilhelm, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Water quality and economic models were linked to assess the economic and environmental benefits of implementing a phosphorus credit trading program in an agricultural sub-basin of Lake Okeechobee watershed, Florida, United States. The water quality model determined the effects of rainfall, land use type, and agricultural management practices on the amount of total phosphorus (TP) discharged. TP loadings generated at the farm level, reaching the nearby streams, and attenuated to the sub-basin outlet from all sources within the sub-basin, were estimated at 106.4, 91, and 85 mtons yr(-)(1), respectively. Almost 95% of the TP loadings reaching the nearby streams were attributed to agriculture sources, and only 1.2% originated from urban areas, accounting for a combined TP load of 87.9 mtons yr(-)(1). In order to compare a Least-Cost Abatement approach to a Command-and-Control approach, the most cost effective cap of 30% TP reduction was selected, and the individual allocation was set at a TP load target of 1.6 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) (at the nearby stream level). The Least-Cost Abatement approach generated a potential cost savings of 27% ($1.3 million per year), based on an optimal credit price of $179. Dairies (major buyer), ornamentals, row crops, and sod farms were identified as potential credit buyers, whereas citrus, improved pastures (major seller), and urban areas were identified as potential credit sellers. Almost 81% of the TP credits available for trading were exchanged. The methodology presented here can be adapted to deal with different forms of trading sources, contaminants, or other technologies and management practices. PMID:24907668

  3. HEALTH AND EXPOSURE RESEARCH FOR THE AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITY: THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study (AHS) is a collaborative effort between the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The AHS is the...

  4. Training Civic Bridge Builders: Outcomes of Community Leadership Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Kari Hall

    2011-01-01

    As rural communities experience rapid economic, demographic, and political change, program interventions that focus on the development of community leadership capacity could be valuable. Community leadership development programs have been deployed in rural U.S. communities for the past 30 years by university extension units, chambers of commerce,…

  5. 12 CFR 952.5 - Community Investment Cash Advance Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Community Investment Cash Advance Programs. 952... OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS COMMUNITY INVESTMENT CASH ADVANCE PROGRAMS § 952.5 Community Investment Cash... targeted community lending at the appropriate targeted income levels. (3) Each Bank may offer RDF...

  6. An Off-Campus Graduate Program in Agriculture at Iowa State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, D. G.; Crawford, H. R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an off-campus program leading to a Master's Degree in Agriculture from Iowa State University. Discusses the program's objectives, the degree requirements, delivery system, program history, composition of participants, faculty involvement, and problems encountered. (TW)

  7. Nematode Communities in Organically and Conventionally Managed Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Deborah A.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of nematode community indices requires a reference to a relatively undisturbed community. Maturity and trophic diversity index values were compared for five pairs of certified organically and conventionally managed soils in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Available nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium) was estimated at various lag periods relative to times of sampling for nematode communities to determine the strength of correlative relationship between nematode communities and nitrogen availability. Soils were sampled six times yearly in 1993 and 1994 to determine the best time of year to sample. Maturity values for plant parasites were greater in organically than conventionally managed soils, and differences between management systems were greater in fall than spring months. However, other maturity and diversity indices did not differ between the two management practices. Differences in crop species grown in the two systems accounted for most differences observed in the community of plant-parasitic nematodes. Indices of free-living nematodes were correlated negatively with concentrations of ammonium, whereas indices of plant-parasitic nematodes were correlated positively with concentrations of nitrate. Due to the similarity of index values between the two systems, organically managed soils are not suitable reference sites for monitoring and assessing the biological aspects of soil quality for annually harvested crops. PMID:19270884

  8. 24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and urban planning. “Community building academic program” or “academic program” excludes social and... building academic program or academic program means a graduate degree program whose purpose and focus is to educate students in community building. “Community building academic program” or “academic...

  9. 24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., and urban planning. “Community building academic program” or “academic program” excludes social and... building academic program or academic program means a graduate degree program whose purpose and focus is to educate students in community building. “Community building academic program” or “academic...

  10. [Characteristics of soil nematode community of different agricultural areas in Jiangsu Province, China].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jia-guo; Liu, Bei-bei; Mao, Miao; Ye, Cheng-long; Yu, Li; Hu, Feng

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigated the genus diversity of soil nematodes of different agricultural areas in Jiangsu Province, analyzed the relationship between soil nematodes and soil environmental factors, and discussed the roles of soil nematodes as biological indicators of soil health. The results showed that, a total of 41 nematode genera were found in all six agricultural areas, belonging to 19 families, 7 orders, 2 classes. The numbers and community compositions of nematodes were obviously influenced by soil texture, fertilization and tillage practices. In all six agricultural areas, the numbers of nematodes in coastal agricultural area (400 individuals per 100 g dry soil) were significantly larger than that in Xuhuai, Ningzhenyang, and riverside agricultural areas. While the smallest number of nematodes was found in Yanjiang agricultural area (232 individuals per 100 g dry soil), which might be due to the differences in soil texture, annual rainfall and annual air temperature and other factors. The dominant genera of nematodes were similar in the adjacent agricultural areas. Correlation analysis showed that there was a significant positive correlation between the number of soil nematodes and levels of soil nutrients (soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available nitrogen, available potassium and available phosphorus). Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated the total nitrogen, available potassium and pH obviously affected some soil nematode genera. The analysis of spatial distribution characteristics of soil nematode community in farmland of Jiangsu Province could provide data for health assessment of agricultural ecosystems. PMID:26915207

  11. Urbanisation effects on the functional diversity of avian agricultural communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi-Codaccioni, Ondine; Clobert, Jean; Julliard, Romain

    2009-09-01

    Urbanisation is affecting ecological communities worldwide. Despite the disproportionate impact on farmland over other habitats, the effect on farmland bird communities has been poorly studied. Considering the still-alarming conservation status of farmland birds, investigations into the effects of pressures such as urbanisation on those communities could be of great interest for their conservation. We studied the urbanisation effects on functional diversity using existing indices designed for the purpose of standardisation. This study uses a functional character measuring species habitat specialisation for indices calculation. A bird survey was conducted on 92 plots of 1 × 1 km chosen after stratification on the proportion of urban area and farmland habitat (either 0, 25, 50, 75%), with the focus on farmland habitat. Two aspects of urbanisation were studied: the intensity and the age of the urbanisation. Functional richness was found to decrease with urbanisation, while functional evenness and divergence increased in a nonlinear way. No significant difference was observed in functional richness and evenness with urbanisation age, however extreme ages of urbanisation (young and old) showed higher niche differentiation concerning specialisation. This implies less important resource competition for species and a more vulnerable state for the ecosystem. Using functional diversity indices based on specialisation allows a better insight in the consequences of urbanisation on diversity/ecosystem-community functioning, which is of crucial importance in the face of global changes.

  12. Determining the Individual, Organizational, and Community Level Outcomes of a Community Leadership Development Program as Perceived by the Program Alumni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Susan Johnston

    2012-01-01

    The need for community leaders is increasing while the supply of community leaders is decreasing, leaving a gap in community leadership. Community leadership development programs (CLDP) are the most common approach to leadership development, yet the effects of CLDPs are rarely determined. In order to sustain programs that develop potential…

  13. Urban Agriculture Programs on the Rise: Agriculture Education Model Can Reach Students Other Classes Leave Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritsch, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural education begins with hands-on classroom and laboratory instruction. Because agriculture is such a broad topic, schools typically tailor agriculture class offerings to match the interests of the student population, needs of nearby businesses and industry, or topics relevant to their state's standard assessments. Within most…

  14. Relative impacts of land-use, management intensity and fertilization on microbial community structure in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of agricultural land management practices on soil prokaryotic diversity have not been well described. Soil microbial communities under three agricultural management systems (conventionally tilled cropland, hayed pasture, and grazed pasture) and two fertilizer systems [inorganic fertilizer (I...

  15. A Study of Existing Pre-vocational Agriculture Programs in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Barbara Ann; Miller, W. Wade

    A study was conducted to determine what subject areas should be taught in a prevocational agriculture program, as perceived by instructors with existing prevocational programs. Following a review of literature that found only a few sources on prevocational agriculture programs, most of them guides for middle school curricula, a survey instrument…

  16. 12 CFR 617.7430 - Are institutions required to participate in state agricultural loan mediation programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... state agricultural loan mediation programs? 617.7430 Section 617.7430 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT... Mediation Programs § 617.7430 Are institutions required to participate in state agricultural loan mediation programs? (a) If initiated by a borrower, System institutions must participate in state mediation...

  17. Impact of the Changing Farm Economy on Rural Communities. Evaluation of Interrelationships between Agriculture and the Economy of Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansford, Notie H., Jr.; Jones, Lonnie L.

    A reduction in agricultural activity in a rural farming community will result in reduced activity in almost every sector of the local economy. The result may be measured in loss of employment and income. This report provides a method to estimate such economic impacts with a minimum of data collection and manipulation. Most of the input data…

  18. Fish communities of benchmark streams in agricultural areas of eastern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, D.J.; Peterson, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Fish communities were surveyed at 20 stream sites in agricultural areas in eastern Wisconsin in 1993 and 1995 as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. These streams, designated "benchmark streams," were selected for study because of their potential use as regional references for healthy streams in agricultural areas, based on aquatic communities, habitat, and water chemistry. The agricultural benchmark streams were selected from four physical settings, or relatively homogeneous units (RHU's), that differ in bedrock type, texture of surficial deposits, and land use. Additional data were collected along with the fish-community data, including measures of habitat, water chemistry, and population surveys of algae and benthic invertebrates. Of the 20 sites, 19 are classified as trout (salmonid) streams. Fish species that require cold or cool water were the most commonly collected. At least one species of trout was collected at 18 sites, and trout were the most abundant species at 13 sites. The species with the greatest collective abundance, and collected at 18 of the 20 sites, were mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), a coldwater species. The next most abundant species were brown trout (Salmo trutta), followed by brook trout (Salvelinusfontinalis), creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus), and longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae). In all, 31 species of fish were collected. The number of species per stream ranged from 2 to 14, and the number of individuals collected ranged from 19 to 264. According to Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) scores, 5 sites were rated excellent, 10 sites rated good, 4 rated fair, and 1 rated poor. The ratings of the five sites in the fair to poor range were low for various reasons. Two sites appeared to have more warmwater species than was ideal for a high-quality coldwater stream. One was sampled during high flow and the results may not be valid for periods of normal flow; the other may have been populated by migrating

  19. Community supported agriculture membership in Arizona. An exploratory study of food and sustainability behaviours.

    PubMed

    MacMillan Uribe, Alexandra L; Winham, Donna M; Wharton, Christopher M

    2012-10-01

    Community supported agriculture (CSA) programs have become a viable source of locally produced foods and represent a new way to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among individuals. Because CSAs represent a way for consumers to acquire healthy foods while providing financial support to local farmers, CSA involvement could reflect, and be related to, greater concern with both health and environmental impact of food choice. As such, the aim of this study was to examine whether ecological attitudes of CSA members could predict food- and sustainability-related behaviours. Using an online survey, respondents answered questions about attitudes towards the environment, as well behaviours related to food purchases, family food preparation, composting, recycling and minimising food-packaging waste. A total of 115 CSA member responses were collected. Ordinary least squares (OLS) multivariate regression analysis was used to investigate the predictive validity of environmental attitudes on measures of behaviours. A large portion of participants reported the amount and variety of fruits and vegetables their households ate increased as a result of joining a CSA program. Ecological sensitivity was a significant predictor of sustainability-related behaviours as well as money spent eating out and times eaten away from home per week. However, it was not predictive of family involvement in home food preparation. PMID:22698977

  20. Community supported agriculture membership in Arizona. An exploratory study of food and sustainability behaviours.

    PubMed

    MacMillan Uribe, Alexandra L; Winham, Donna M; Wharton, Christopher M

    2012-10-01

    Community supported agriculture (CSA) programs have become a viable source of locally produced foods and represent a new way to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among individuals. Because CSAs represent a way for consumers to acquire healthy foods while providing financial support to local farmers, CSA involvement could reflect, and be related to, greater concern with both health and environmental impact of food choice. As such, the aim of this study was to examine whether ecological attitudes of CSA members could predict food- and sustainability-related behaviours. Using an online survey, respondents answered questions about attitudes towards the environment, as well behaviours related to food purchases, family food preparation, composting, recycling and minimising food-packaging waste. A total of 115 CSA member responses were collected. Ordinary least squares (OLS) multivariate regression analysis was used to investigate the predictive validity of environmental attitudes on measures of behaviours. A large portion of participants reported the amount and variety of fruits and vegetables their households ate increased as a result of joining a CSA program. Ecological sensitivity was a significant predictor of sustainability-related behaviours as well as money spent eating out and times eaten away from home per week. However, it was not predictive of family involvement in home food preparation.

  1. Progress and needs in agricultural research, development, and applications programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. G.; Myers, V. I.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic nature of agriculture requires repetitive resource assessments such as those from remote sensing. Until recently, the use of remote sensing in agriculture has been limited primarily to site specific investigations without large-scale evaluations. Examples of successful applications at various user levels are provided. The stage of development for applying remote sensing to many agricultural problems is assessed, and goals for planning future data characteristics for increased use in agriculture are suggested.

  2. A Critical Analysis of Community College Journalism Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterthun, Stuart J.

    Community college journalism programs have a long-standing tradition of being transfer programs, which, in contrast to career programs, often take longer, are more expensive, and offer no guarantee of a job after graduation. If community colleges offered intensive 2-year technical journalism programs that mixed basic skills such a composition,…

  3. Guide to Programs at New Jersey Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nespoli, Lawrence A.; Farbman, Jacob C.

    The New Jersey Council of Community Colleges designed this program guide to serve as an overview of instructional credit and noncredit programs available at the state's 19 community colleges. The guide includes a multi-page matrix that offers an overview of all career and transfer programs available and which colleges offer these programs. Credit…

  4. Changes in soil microbial community structure following the abandonment of agricultural terraces in mountainous areas of Eastern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Zornoza, R.; Guerrero, C.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Scow, K.M.; Arcenegui, V.; Mataix-Beneyto, J.

    2012-01-01

    In Eastern Spain, almond trees have been cultivated in terraced orchards for centuries, forming an integral part of the Mediterranean forest scene. In the last decades, orchards have been abandoned due to changes in society. This study investigates effects of changes in land use from forest to agricultural land and the posterior land abandonment on soil microbial community, and the influence of soil physico-chemical properties on the microbial community composition (assessed as abundances of phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA). For this purpose, three land uses (forest, agricultural and abandoned agricultural) at four locations in SE Spain were selected. Multivariate analysis showed a substantial level of differentiation in microbial community structure according to land use. The microbial communities of forest soils were highly associated with soil organic matter content. However, we have not found any physical or chemical soil property capable of explaining the differences between agricultural and abandoned agricultural soils. Thus, it was suggested that the cessation of the perturbation caused by agriculture and shifts in vegetation may have led to changes in the microbial community structure. PLFAs indicative of fungi and ratio of fungal to bacterial PLFAs were higher in abandoned agricultural soils, whereas the relative abundance of bacteria was higher in agricultural soils. Actinomycetes were generally lower in abandoned agricultural soils, while the proportions of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhyzal fungi were, as a general trend, higher in agricultural and abandoned agricultural soils than in forests. Total microbial biomass and richness increased as agricultural < abandoned agricultural < forest soils. PMID:22291451

  5. Multiple intervention research programs in community health.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nancy; Mill, Judy; Kothari, Anita R

    2004-03-01

    The authors describe an organizing framework for multiple interventions in community health. The framework provides a foundation for programmatic research on multiple interventions and poses critical questions that need to be addressed in the next generation of research in this field. Multiple intervention programs are characterized by the use of multiple strategies targeted at multiple levels of the socio-ecological system and delivered to multiple target audiences. Consequently, they complement the growing literature on the broad determinants of health and health promotion. The authors describe a 4-stage framework and identify gaps and challenges in this field of research. There are 5 key research areas requiring concerted action; researchers must: examine nested determinants, develop integrated conceptual frameworks, examine ways to optimize synergies among interventions, describe spin-offs from multiple intervention programs, and monitor the sustainability of their impact.

  6. Dynamic edge effects in small mammal communities across a conservation-agricultural interface in Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Zachary M; McCleery, Robert A; Collier, Bret A; Fletcher, Robert J; Silvy, Nova J; Taylor, Peter J; Monadjem, Ara

    2013-01-01

    Across the planet, high-intensity farming has transformed native vegetation into monocultures, decreasing biodiversity on a landscape scale. Yet landscape-scale changes to biodiversity and community structure often emerge from processes operating at local scales. One common process that can explain changes in biodiversity and community structure is the creation of abrupt habitat edges, which, in turn, generate edge effects. Such effects, while incredibly common, can be highly variable across space and time; however, we currently lack a general analytical framework that can adequately capture such spatio-temporal variability. We extend previous approaches for estimating edge effects to a non-linear mixed modeling framework that captures such spatio-temporal heterogeneity and apply it to understand how agricultural land-uses alter wildlife communities. We trapped small mammals along a conservation-agriculture land-use interface extending 375 m into sugarcane plantations and conservation land-uses at three sites during dry and wet seasons in Swaziland, Africa. Sugarcane plantations had significant reductions in species richness and heterogeneity, and showed an increase in community similarity, suggesting a more homogenized small mammal community. Furthermore, our modeling framework identified strong variation in edge effects on communities across sites and seasons. Using small mammals as an indicator, intensive agricultural practices appear to create high-density communities of generalist species while isolating interior species in less than 225 m. These results illustrate how agricultural land-use can reduce diversity across the landscape and that effects can be masked or magnified, depending on local conditions. Taken together, our results emphasize the need to create or retain natural habitat features in agricultural mosaics.

  7. Dynamic Edge Effects in Small Mammal Communities across a Conservation-Agricultural Interface in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Zachary M.; McCleery, Robert A.; Collier, Bret A.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Silvy, Nova J.; Taylor, Peter J.; Monadjem, Ara

    2013-01-01

    Across the planet, high-intensity farming has transformed native vegetation into monocultures, decreasing biodiversity on a landscape scale. Yet landscape-scale changes to biodiversity and community structure often emerge from processes operating at local scales. One common process that can explain changes in biodiversity and community structure is the creation of abrupt habitat edges, which, in turn, generate edge effects. Such effects, while incredibly common, can be highly variable across space and time; however, we currently lack a general analytical framework that can adequately capture such spatio-temporal variability. We extend previous approaches for estimating edge effects to a non-linear mixed modeling framework that captures such spatio-temporal heterogeneity and apply it to understand how agricultural land-uses alter wildlife communities. We trapped small mammals along a conservation-agriculture land-use interface extending 375 m into sugarcane plantations and conservation land-uses at three sites during dry and wet seasons in Swaziland, Africa. Sugarcane plantations had significant reductions in species richness and heterogeneity, and showed an increase in community similarity, suggesting a more homogenized small mammal community. Furthermore, our modeling framework identified strong variation in edge effects on communities across sites and seasons. Using small mammals as an indicator, intensive agricultural practices appear to create high-density communities of generalist species while isolating interior species in less than 225 m. These results illustrate how agricultural land-use can reduce diversity across the landscape and that effects can be masked or magnified, depending on local conditions. Taken together, our results emphasize the need to create or retain natural habitat features in agricultural mosaics. PMID:24040269

  8. Successes and challenges in a novel doctoral program in systems agriculture: a case example.

    PubMed

    Lust, D; Topliff, D; Deotte, R

    2010-01-01

    A doctoral program in Systems Agriculture was initiated at West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX, in September, 2003. The stated objective of the program was "..to prepare leaders for the agricultural industry that are trained in a multidisciplinary, research-based curriculum that emphasizes a systems approach to problem solving". The program offers a single doctoral degree in Agriculture and accepts qualified students with a master's or professional degree in agricultural or related disciplines. Courses related to systems methodologies, leadership, agricultural economics, plant and soil science, and animal science are required. Additional program requirements include a systems research project and dissertation, leadership training, and written and oral exams. The program has exceeded enrollment and graduation targets, suggesting interest in this approach to a doctoral degree. Students have entered the program with M.S. backgrounds in education, traditional agricultural disciplines, veterinary medicine, business, and physics. Graduates have gained employment in industry, university teaching and research, government research/administration, and extension. Doctoral student projects in systems agriculture contributed to curriculum changes and to the conceptual framework adopted by a multi-state research group. Designing and teaching courses for students with diverse backgrounds has been challenging. Development of a common understanding of systems agriculture was identified by a third-party program review as an issue for faculty. Development and maintenance of program standards and administrative procedures posed additional challenges. Leadership, administrative support, and timely and continuing program assessment are suggested as necessary components for a nontraditional doctoral program.

  9. Source Units Developed as Part of an Internship Program in Agriculture/Agribusiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannebach, Alfred J., Ed.

    This guide includes 12 source units of instruction developed by teachers of vocational agriculture who participated in an internship program in agriculture/agribusiness, which was designed to up-date the knowledge and skills of teachers of vocational agriculture in their areas of teaching specialization and to develop source units of instruction…

  10. 75 FR 54591 - Notice of Agricultural Management Assistance Organic Certification Cost-Share Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Notice of Agricultural Management Assistance Organic Certification Cost-Share... Applications for the Agricultural Management Assistance Organic Certification Cost-Share Program. SUMMARY: This... Organic Certification Cost-Share Funds. The AMS has allocated $1.495 million for this...

  11. An Analysis of Diversity Inclusion in North Carolina Secondary Agricultural Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Chastity K.; Alston, Antoine J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gauge the perceptions of North Carolina secondary agricultural educators regarding the benefits and barriers to diversity inclusion in North Carolina secondary agricultural education programs. Additionally, the perceived solutions to increasing diversity inclusion in North Carolina secondary agricultural education…

  12. Core II Materials for Rural Agricultural Programs. Units A-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This curriculum guide includes teaching packets for 21 problem areas to be included in a core curriculum for 10th-grade students enrolled in a rural agricultural program. Covered in the four units included in this volume are orientation to agricultural occupations (orientation to vocational agricultural course and developing effective study…

  13. Minnesota Department of Education Agricultural Education Program Descriptions 01.0000-01.9095

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document provides a brief compilation of descriptions of agricultural education programs linked to Career and Technical Education (CTE) initiative in Minnesota. Agriculture Exploration courses focus on the animal sciences, plant sciences, natural resource sciences, agricultural business and marketing, and leadership development. Agribusiness…

  14. Research Experiences in Community College Science Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauregard, A.

    2011-12-01

    research with my community college students by partnering with a research oceanographer. Through this partnership, students have had access to an active oceanographic researcher through classroom visits, use of data in curriculum, and research/cruise progress updates. With very little research activity currently going on at the community college, this "window" into scientific research is invaluable. Another important aspect of this project is the development of a summer internship program that has allowed four community college students to work directly with an oceanographer in her lab for ten weeks. This connection of community college students with world-class scientists in the field promotes better understanding of research and potentially may encourage more students to major in the sciences. In either approach, the interaction with scientists at different stages of their careers, from undergraduate and graduate students at universities to post docs and research scientists, also provides community college students with the opportunity to gain insight into possible career pathways. For both majors and non-majors, a key outcome of such experiences will be gaining experience in using inquiry and reasoning through the scientific method and becoming comfortable with data and technology.

  15. 12 CFR 952.5 - Community Investment Cash Advance Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Community Investment Cash Advance Programs. 952.5 Section 952.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ASSETS AND OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS COMMUNITY INVESTMENT CASH ADVANCE PROGRAMS § 952.5 Community Investment...

  16. 12 CFR 944.6 - Bank community support programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bank community support programs. 944.6 Section 944.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK MISSION COMMUNITY SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS § 944.6 Bank community support programs. (a) Requirement. Consistent with the safe and...

  17. Roles of extension officers to promote social capital in Japanese agricultural communities.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Kosuke; Uchida, Yukiko; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2014-01-01

    Social capital has been found to be correlated with community welfare, but it is not easy to build and maintain it. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the role of professional coordinators of social relationships to create and maintain social capital in a community. We focused on extension officers in Japanese agricultural communities, who help farmers in both technical and social matters. A large nation-wide survey of extension officers as well as two supplementary surveys were conducted. We found that (1) social capital-related activities (e.g., assistance for building organizations among farmers) were particularly effective for solving problems; (2) social capital (trust relationships) among community residents increased their life quality; (3) social capital in local communities was correlated with extension officers' own communication skills and harmonious relationships among their colleagues. In sum, social capital in local communities is maintained by coordinators with professional social skills.

  18. Roles of Extension Officers to Promote Social Capital in Japanese Agricultural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Kosuke; Uchida, Yukiko; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2014-01-01

    Social capital has been found to be correlated with community welfare, but it is not easy to build and maintain it. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the role of professional coordinators of social relationships to create and maintain social capital in a community. We focused on extension officers in Japanese agricultural communities, who help farmers in both technical and social matters. A large nation-wide survey of extension officers as well as two supplementary surveys were conducted. We found that (1) social capital-related activities (e.g., assistance for building organizations among farmers) were particularly effective for solving problems; (2) social capital (trust relationships) among community residents increased their life quality; (3) social capital in local communities was correlated with extension officers' own communication skills and harmonious relationships among their colleagues. In sum, social capital in local communities is maintained by coordinators with professional social skills. PMID:24642575

  19. Marketing Agricultural Products. Curriculum Guide Developed for Secondary and Post Secondary Agriculture Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, W. Wade; And Others

    This curriculum guide can be used by secondary and postsecondary agriculture instructors for a semester course in marketing agricultural products or individual units can be incorporated in other courses. The curriculum guide consists of six units of study made up of two to eight lessons each. The units cover the following topics: (1) marketing…

  20. Exploring the Paradox of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs in Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Elizabeth B.; Moore, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    Agricultural teachers in North Carolina were surveyed to assess their attitudes toward Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) and to identify barriers to implementation of SAE in their schools. The teachers gave the politically correct answers about why SAE was important. The teachers indicated that SAE was important (8.46 on a 10 point scale)…

  1. Theme: The Role of the Teacher in Conducting Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Contains 13 theme articles on the role of teachers in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs that offer suggestions, ideas, and practices to advance the implementation of SAE programs. (JOW)

  2. A Development Center Through the Community Based Programming Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichard, Donald L.; Wood, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Outlines the development of a leadership-training center at James Sprunt Community College. A community-based programming (CBP) model was followed to encourage community input, support, and participation in the process. CBP is recommended as a way for other colleges to collaborate with their communities on issue definition and resolution. (VWC)

  3. Household food security is associated with agricultural livelihoods and diet quality in a marginalized community of rural Bedouins in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Hala; Barbour, Jessica M; Nord, Mark; Zurayk, Rami; Sahyoun, Nadine R

    2013-10-01

    In the context of recent increases in international food prices, it is hypothesized that in rural communities retaining food production practices is important for protection against food insecurity at both the household and community levels, as well as for protection against the development of poor nutritional outcomes. To investigate this hypothesis, a cross-sectional study of household food security and nutritional status was carried out in a rural community of settled Bedouins in Lebanon comprising 84 households with 474 individuals; this tribe's recent history of settlement in 2 locations that differ by access to land and food production practices provides the context for this study. Food insecurity was found to be highly prevalent (49%) in this Bedouin community and was negatively associated with household food production (P < 0.05) and the consumption of fruits, chicken, meat, and fish (P < 0.05) and positively associated with consumption of cereal products (P < 0.01). This study shows that in small rural communities in a transitional country, sustaining food production may protect from food insecurity. Agricultural livelihood support programs that promote continued involvement in food production at the household and community level, in conjunction with other income-generating activities, may build resilience against food insecurity and improve dietary diversity. PMID:23946340

  4. Household food security is associated with agricultural livelihoods and diet quality in a marginalized community of rural Bedouins in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Hala; Barbour, Jessica M; Nord, Mark; Zurayk, Rami; Sahyoun, Nadine R

    2013-10-01

    In the context of recent increases in international food prices, it is hypothesized that in rural communities retaining food production practices is important for protection against food insecurity at both the household and community levels, as well as for protection against the development of poor nutritional outcomes. To investigate this hypothesis, a cross-sectional study of household food security and nutritional status was carried out in a rural community of settled Bedouins in Lebanon comprising 84 households with 474 individuals; this tribe's recent history of settlement in 2 locations that differ by access to land and food production practices provides the context for this study. Food insecurity was found to be highly prevalent (49%) in this Bedouin community and was negatively associated with household food production (P < 0.05) and the consumption of fruits, chicken, meat, and fish (P < 0.05) and positively associated with consumption of cereal products (P < 0.01). This study shows that in small rural communities in a transitional country, sustaining food production may protect from food insecurity. Agricultural livelihood support programs that promote continued involvement in food production at the household and community level, in conjunction with other income-generating activities, may build resilience against food insecurity and improve dietary diversity.

  5. Effects of agricultural practices of three crops on the soil communities under Mediterranean conditions: field evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Sara; José Cerejeira, Maria; Abreu, Manuela; Sousa, José Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable agricultural production relies on soil communities as the main actors in key soil processes necessary to maintain sustainable soil functioning. Soil biodiversity influences soil physical and chemical characteristics and thus the sustainability of crop and agro-ecosystems functioning. Agricultural practices (e.g.: soil tillage, pesticides and fertilizer applications, irrigation) may affects negatively or positively soil biodiversity and abundances by modifying the relationships between organisms in the soil ecosystem. The present study aimed to study the influence of agricultural practices of three crops (potato, onion and maize) under Mediterranean climate conditions on soil macro- and mesofauna during their entire crop cycles. Effects on soil communities were assessed at a higher tier of environmental risk assessment comprising field testing of indigenous edaphic communities in a selected study-site located in a major agriculture region of Central Portugal, Ribatejo e Oeste, neighbouring protected wetlands. A reference site near the agricultural field site was selected as a Control site to compare the terrestrial communities' composition and variation along the crop cycle. The field soil and Control site soil are sandy loam soils. Crops irrigation was performed by center-pivot (automated sprinkler that rotates in a half a circle area) and by sprinklers. Soil macro- and mesofauna were collected at both sites (field and Control) using two methodologies through pitfall trapping and soil sampling. The community of soil macro- and mesofauna of the three crops field varied versus control site along the crops cycles. Main differences were due to arachnids, coleopterans, ants and adult Diptera presence and abundance. The feeding activity of soil fauna between control site and crop areas varied only for potato and onion crops vs. control site but not among crops. Concentration of pesticides residues in soil did not cause apparent negative effects on the soil

  6. University-Based Community College Leadership Programs: Where Future Community College Leaders Are Prepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Janice Nahra

    2010-01-01

    Community college leadership programs may take a variety of forms, among them university-based programs, leadership institutes, community college-based "grow your own" programs, professional organization-based institutes, or a combination of these. University-based doctorate leadership programs are the principal providers of these leaders. Seventy…

  7. How agricultural management shapes soil microbial communities: patterns emerging from genetic and genomic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Amanda; Grandy, A. Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Agriculture is a predominant land use and thus a large influence on global carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) balances, climate, and human health. If we are to produce food, fiber, and fuel sustainably we must maximize agricultural yield while minimizing negative environmental consequences, goals towards which we have made great strides through agronomic advances. However, most agronomic strategies have been designed with a view of soil as a black box, largely ignoring the way management is mediated by soil biota. Because soil microbes play a central role in many of the processes that deliver nutrients to crops and support their health and productivity, agricultural management strategies targeted to exploit or support microbial activity should deliver additional benefits. To do this we must determine how microbial community structure and function are shaped by agricultural practices, but until recently our characterizations of soil microbial communities in agricultural soils have been largely limited to broad taxonomic classes due to methodological constraints. With advances in high-throughput genetic and genomic sequencing techniques, better taxonomic resolution now enables us to determine how agricultural management affects specific microbes and, in turn, nutrient cycling outcomes. Here we unite findings from published research that includes genetic or genomic data about microbial community structure (e.g. 454, Illumina, clone libraries, qPCR) in soils under agricultural management regimes that differ in type and extent of tillage, cropping selections and rotations, inclusion of cover crops, organic amendments, and/or synthetic fertilizer application. We delineate patterns linking agricultural management to microbial diversity, biomass, C- and N-content, and abundance of microbial taxa; furthermore, where available, we compare patterns in microbial communities to patterns in soil extracellular enzyme activities, catabolic profiles, inorganic nitrogen pools, and nitrogen

  8. Teaching Diversified Organic Crop Production Using the Community Supported Agriculture Farming System Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Constance L.; Pao, Pauline; Cramer, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    An organic garden operated as a community supported agriculture (CSA) venture on the New Mexico State University (NMSU) main campus was begun in January 2002. Students enroll in an organic vegetable production class during spring and fall semesters to help manage and work on the project. The CSA model of farming involves the sale of shares to…

  9. Community Change and the Farm Sector: Impacts of Rural Development on Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Lionel J.; Molnar, Joseph J.

    Findings from current literature form the basis for this examination of five critical elements of change and development within the local community setting which impact on agriculture: population, employment, land, water, and environment. Renewed rural population growth during the 1970's has reversed small farm trends but placed strains on local…

  10. Animating Community Supported Agriculture in North East England: Striving for a "Caring Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Liz

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on a case study of a new Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) scheme in the north of England to draw attention to some of the ethical issues encountered when using a participatory action research approach to animating CSA. Both CSA and participatory action research have been associated with the concept of "caring practice" and an…

  11. Agriculture, Communities, and New Social Movements: East European Ruralities in the Process of Restructuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorlach, Krzysztof; Lostak, Michal; Mooney, Patrick H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the usefulness of the new social movements (NSMs) paradigm in the changing context of East European post-communist societies and their agricultural systems and rural communities. Starting with statements formulated in Western sociology in the context of Western democratic societies about NSMs as a protest against modernity, the…

  12. Agricultural Land Use Determines the Trait Composition of Ground Beetle Communities.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Helena I; Palmu, Erkki; Birkhofer, Klaus; Smith, Henrik G; Hedlund, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve biological control of agricultural pests, it is fundamental to understand which factors influence the composition of natural enemies in agricultural landscapes. In this study, we aimed to understand how agricultural land use affects a number of different traits in ground beetle communities to better predict potential consequences of land-use change for ecosystem functioning. We studied ground beetles in fields with different agricultural land use ranging from frequently managed sugar beet fields, winter wheat fields to less intensively managed grasslands. The ground beetles were collected in emergence tents that catch individuals overwintering locally in different life stages and with pitfall traps that catch individuals that could have a local origin or may have dispersed into the field. Community weighted mean values for ground beetle traits such as body size, flight ability and feeding preference were estimated for each land-use type and sampling method. In fields with high land-use intensity the average body length of emerging ground beetle communities was lower than in the grasslands while the average body length of actively moving communities did not differ between the land-use types. The proportion of ground beetles with good flight ability or a carnivorous diet was higher in the crop fields as compared to the grasslands. Our study highlights that increasing management intensity reduces the average body size of emerging ground beetles and the proportion of mixed feeders. Our results also suggest that the dispersal ability of ground beetles enables them to compensate for local management intensities.

  13. Across the Divide (?): Reconciling Farm and Town Views of Agriculture-Community Linkages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithers, John; Joseph, Alun E.; Armstrong, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    In North America and elsewhere it is frequently asserted that changes in rural society have led to an economic and social "decoupling" of agriculture from the wider rural community. Casual analysis of contemporary media reporting and popular discourse would suggest that interactions between the two spheres are as often characterized by neglect or…

  14. How Agricultural Science Trumps Rural Community in the Discourse of Selected U.S. History Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Marged; Howley, Aimee; Eppley, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Using narrative from 6 high school American history textbooks published between 1956 and 2009, this study investigated changes in how textbook authors presented the topics of agricultural science, farming, and community. Although some critical discourse analyses have examined textbooks' treatment of different population groups (e.g., African…

  15. Sponsors of Agricultural Literacies: Intersections of Institutional and Local Knowledge in a Farming Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbreath, Marcy L.

    2015-01-01

    Many of the agricultural literacies engendering twentieth-century farming practices and shaping contemporary concepts of food and nutrition in the United States arose through scientific research at land-grant colleges. This article examines how those literacies reached and interacted with local communities through institutional entities such as…

  16. Economic and Social Factors in Mate Selection: An Ethnographic Analysis of an Agricultural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Brown, Karen; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined the impact of a variety of causal factors--economic, social, familial, and dyadic--on ethnoreligious marriages over 50 years in an Illinois agricultural community. Indicated that economic and social factors were more powerful influences in mate selection than is evident in much of the current research on premarital relationships.…

  17. Beyond the Farmgate: Factors Related to Agricultural Performance in Two Dairy Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruise, James; Lyson, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    In two marginal dairy communities with similar physical environment, ethnic composition, and farm structure, a significant difference in productivity (milk yield per cow) was related to differences in educational attainment of farmers, proximity to an urban area, and availability of marketing outlets and agricultural information sources. Contains…

  18. Farm to Work: Development of a Modified Community-Supported Agriculture Model at Worksites, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Karissa D.; Loyo, Jennifer; Jowers, Esbelle M.; Rodgers, Lindsay Faith; Smiley, Andrew W.; Leversen, Eric; Hoelscher, Deanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Farm to Work program is a modified community-supported agriculture model at worksites in Texas. Community Context The objective of the Farm to Work program is to increase fruit and vegetable intake among employees and their households by decreasing cost, improving convenience, and increasing access while also creating a new market for local farmers at worksites. The objectives of this article were to describe the development, implementation, and outcome of a 5-year participation trend analysis and to describe the community relationships that were formed to enable the successful implementation of the program. Methods The Farm to Work program began in November 2007 as a collaborative effort between the nonprofit Sustainable Food Center, the Texas Department of State Health Services, the Web development company WebChronic Consulting LLC, and Naegelin Farm. The program provides a weekly or biweekly opportunity for employees to order a basket of produce online to be delivered to the worksite by a local farmer. A 5-year participation trend analysis, including seasonal variation and sales trends, was conducted using sales data from November 2007 through December 2012. Outcome The total number of baskets delivered from November 2007 through December 2012 was 38,343; of these, 37,466 were sold and 877 were complimentary. The total value of sold and complimentary baskets was $851,035 and $21,925, respectively. Participation in the program increased over time and was highest in 2012. Interpretation The Farm to Work program increased access to locally grown fruits and vegetables for employees and created a new market for farmers. Increased program participation indicates that Farm to Work can increase employees’ fruit and vegetable consumption and thus help prevent chronic diseases in this population PMID:26491816

  19. Measuring the Impact on Farmers of Agricultural Radio and Television Programs in Southwest Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahaya, Mohammed Kuta; Badiru, Olabode Idris

    2002-01-01

    A survey examined the effectiveness of two long-running Nigerian agricultural programs on television and radio as perceived by 198 farmers. Results indicate a positive assessment of their value for improving agricultural production. Although more listen to the radio, the television program also received high marks. (Contains 17 references.) (JOW)

  20. Program and Curriculum Guide for Vocational Agriculture/Agribusiness in South Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota State Univ., Brookings. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    The guide is designed for use by agricultural instructors, administrators, supervisors, school boards, and others who are involved in planning instructional programs for vocational agriculture/agribusiness education in high schools and adult education. Part 1 details information pertaining to the administrative aspects of program development,…

  1. Curricular Needs of Students with Specific Learning Disabilities in Illinois Secondary Agricultural Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pense, Seburn L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive census survey of secondary agricultural education teachers was to describe the curricular and classroom needs of students with specific learning disabilities (SLD) in their programs. The study found students with SLD make up 23% of the students enrolled in Illinois secondary agricultural education programs.…

  2. Multi-Scale Associations between Vegetation Cover and Woodland Bird Communities across a Large Agricultural Region

    PubMed Central

    Ikin, Karen; Barton, Philip S.; Stirnemann, Ingrid A.; Stein, John R.; Michael, Damian; Crane, Mason; Okada, Sachiko; Lindenmayer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Improving biodiversity conservation in fragmented agricultural landscapes has become an important global issue. Vegetation at the patch and landscape-scale is important for species occupancy and diversity, yet few previous studies have explored multi-scale associations between vegetation and community assemblages. Here, we investigated how patch and landscape-scale vegetation cover structure woodland bird communities. We asked: (1) How is the bird community associated with the vegetation structure of woodland patches and the amount of vegetation cover in the surrounding landscape? (2) Do species of conservation concern respond to woodland vegetation structure and surrounding vegetation cover differently to other species in the community? And (3) Can the relationships between the bird community and the woodland vegetation structure and surrounding vegetation cover be explained by the ecological traits of the species comprising the bird community? We studied 103 woodland patches (0.5 - 53.8 ha) over two time periods across a large (6,800 km2) agricultural region in southeastern Australia. We found that both patch vegetation and surrounding woody vegetation cover were important for structuring the bird community, and that these relationships were consistent over time. In particular, the occurrence of mistletoe within the patches and high values of woody vegetation cover within 1,000 ha and 10,000 ha were important, especially for bird species of conservation concern. We found that the majority of these species displayed similar, positive responses to patch and landscape vegetation attributes. We also found that these relationships were related to the foraging and nesting traits of the bird community. Our findings suggest that management strategies to increase both remnant vegetation quality and the cover of surrounding woody vegetation in fragmented agricultural landscapes may lead to improved conservation of bird communities. PMID:24830684

  3. Multi-scale associations between vegetation cover and woodland bird communities across a large agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Ikin, Karen; Barton, Philip S; Stirnemann, Ingrid A; Stein, John R; Michael, Damian; Crane, Mason; Okada, Sachiko; Lindenmayer, David B

    2014-01-01

    Improving biodiversity conservation in fragmented agricultural landscapes has become an important global issue. Vegetation at the patch and landscape-scale is important for species occupancy and diversity, yet few previous studies have explored multi-scale associations between vegetation and community assemblages. Here, we investigated how patch and landscape-scale vegetation cover structure woodland bird communities. We asked: (1) How is the bird community associated with the vegetation structure of woodland patches and the amount of vegetation cover in the surrounding landscape? (2) Do species of conservation concern respond to woodland vegetation structure and surrounding vegetation cover differently to other species in the community? And (3) Can the relationships between the bird community and the woodland vegetation structure and surrounding vegetation cover be explained by the ecological traits of the species comprising the bird community? We studied 103 woodland patches (0.5 - 53.8 ha) over two time periods across a large (6,800 km(2)) agricultural region in southeastern Australia. We found that both patch vegetation and surrounding woody vegetation cover were important for structuring the bird community, and that these relationships were consistent over time. In particular, the occurrence of mistletoe within the patches and high values of woody vegetation cover within 1,000 ha and 10,000 ha were important, especially for bird species of conservation concern. We found that the majority of these species displayed similar, positive responses to patch and landscape vegetation attributes. We also found that these relationships were related to the foraging and nesting traits of the bird community. Our findings suggest that management strategies to increase both remnant vegetation quality and the cover of surrounding woody vegetation in fragmented agricultural landscapes may lead to improved conservation of bird communities.

  4. Agricultural Communities: The Interrelationship of Agriculture, Business, Industry, and Government in the Rural Economy. A Symposium (Washington, DC. May 19-20, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Congressional Research Service.

    Experts from government, academia, and interest groups met to discuss and explore the impact of changes in agriculture, industry, and government in shaping events in rural agricultural communities. Texts of 15 of the 18 papers are reproduced in the proceedings, along with the letter of submittal, overview, an agenda, and a list of presenters and…

  5. A Needs Assessment to Develop Community Partnerships: Initial Steps Working with a Major Agricultural Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Ashley; Bezyak, Jill; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Trice, April

    2011-01-01

    Background: "Healthy People 2010" identified community partnership as one of the most effective strategies in eliminating health disparities and considered it a critical element in improving an individual's quality of life. To be effective at engaging communities in partnerships, an initial community based needs assessment is recommended. Purpose:…

  6. Laubach Literacy Program of Dysart Community Center, El Mirage, Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dysart Community Center, El Mirage, AZ.

    This program, included in "Effective Reading Programs...," serves predominantly Spanish-speaking and low-income people in a small Mexican-American community of about 3500. Begun in 1968, the program is designed to teach English as a second language along with concomitant values of better home and community life, as well as health and consumer…

  7. National Archives and Records Administration Community College Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC.

    Information is provided on the U.S. National Archives' Community College Program (CCP). First, a program announcement is provided, which indicates that the CCP provides reproductions of primary sources to community, technical and junior college instructors teaching occupational and transfer degree programs. This announcement lists the kinds of…

  8. Building for the Future: Community College Leadership Development Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresso, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive study examines and evaluates an internal, grow-your-own, community college leadership development program. Participants in a community college leadership development program self-reported their leadership knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) before, during, and after participation in the program. Study…

  9. An Investigation of Selected Community College Programs for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dib, Elias L.

    The special needs of older adults in relation to community colleges were studied with the intent to (1) identify Southern California community colleges which have a special program for older adults, (2) identify and report the characteristics of selected programs, and (3) delineate the effect of Proposition 13 and under-financing for programs. Of…

  10. Leadership, Education and Agricultural Development Programs in Colombia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dale W.

    1968-01-01

    The lack of qualified leadership to direct, plan, and do research in agricultural agencies is an important restraint on rural development in countries like Colombia. An increase in the number of students attending institutions for agricultural education has been often viewed as the solution to this problem. It is argued here that an increase in…

  11. Core IV Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul; And Others

    This core curriculum guide consists of materials for use in presenting a 13-unit vocational agriculture course geared toward high school students living in metropolitan areas. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: employment in agricultural occupations, supervised occupational experience, leadership in…

  12. 76 FR 69114 - Agricultural Career and Employment Grants Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... request for comments. SUMMARY: Section 14204 of the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Farm... from agricultural jobs. The Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration and Related... instruction, including ways of safeguarding the food supply of the United States; and Other such services...

  13. An Evaluation of Georgia's Agriculture in the Classroom Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herren, Ray V.; Oakley, Pam

    1995-01-01

    In Georgia 16 classes of second graders and 12 of fourth graders were divided into 2 groups. The treatment group was taught the Agriculture in the Classroom curriculum. Compared to controls' test scores, the experimental group effectively learned agriculture concepts regardless of whether they were in rural or urban areas, grouped randomly or by…

  14. 76 FR 69146 - Agricultural Career and Employment Grants Program; Withdrawal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... proposed rule published October 27, 2011, at 76 FR 66656, is withdrawn. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... Office of Advocacy and Outreach 7 CFR Part 2502 RIN 0503-AA49 Agricultural Career and Employment Grants... withdrawing its proposed rule of October 27, 2011, entitled ``Agricultural Career and Employment...

  15. Organophosphate Pesticide Residues in Drinking Water from Artesian Wells and Health Risk Assessment of Agricultural Communities, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jaipieam, S; Visuthismajarn, P; Sutheravut, P; Siriwong, W; Thoumsang, S; Borjan, M; Robson, M

    2009-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticide (OPPs) concentrations in artesian wells located in Thai agricultural and non-agricultural communities were studied during both wet and dry seasons. A total of 100 water samples were collected and subjects were asked to complete a survey. Gas chromatography flame photometric detector was used for OPP analysis. The average OPP concentration in the agricultural communities (0.085 and 0.418 microg/l in dry and wet season) was higher than in the non-agricultural communities (0.004 microg/l in both seasons). Ingestion of OPPs in contaminated water in the agricultural communities were estimated to be 0.187 and 0.919 microg/day during the dry and wet seasons, respectively, and 0.008 microg/day during both seasons in the non-agricultural communities. Agricultural communities were exposed to pesticide residues under the oral chronic reference dose. This study suggests that people in agricultural communities may be exposed to significantly greater levels of pesticides than non-agricultural populations during the dry and wet seasons (p < .001, .001).

  16. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  17. Interdependencies of Agriculture and Rural Communities in the Twenty-First Century: The North Central Region. Conference Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korsching, Peter F., Ed.; Gildner, Judith E., Ed.

    Texts of 12 research papers are presented in this proceedings of a 1985 conference specifically focusing on the interdependence of agriculture and rural communities. Titles of Session I papers providing information on the current situation and trends in agriculture and rural communities are "An Overview of the Nonmetro Economy and the Role of…

  18. Soil Enzyme Activities, Microbial Communities and Carbon and Nitrogen Availability in Organic Agroecosystems Across an Intensively-Managed Agricultural Landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variability in the activity and composition of soil microbial communities may have important implications for the suite of microbially-derived ecosystem functions upon which agricultural systems rely, particularly organic agriculture. An on-farm approach was used to investigate microbial communitie...

  19. Macroinvertebrate Community Structure Along the Longitudinal Gradient of an Agriculturally Impacted Stream

    PubMed

    Delong; Brusven

    1998-05-01

    / Lapwai Creek, an agriculturally impacted stream in northern Idaho, was sampled seasonally over a two-year period to determine if macroinvertebrate community composition changed along the longitudinal gradient and if changes followed predictions of the river continuum concept. Possible relationships between changes in food resource availability and community structure were also examined. Benthic invertebrates were collected at eight locations along the longitudinal gradient of Lapwai Creek using a Hess sampler. Random skewer analysis suggested there was no longitudinal gradient for either number of individuals or functional feeding group composition. Cluster analysis revealed that all locations, excluding a site receiving outflow from a small, eutrophic reservoir, had a similar community structure, further suggesting that invertebrate community composition remained consistent along the longitudinal gradient of the stream. The community was dominated at all sites, excluding the site below the reservoir, by functionalgrazers. Shredders were rare throughout Lapwai Creek, even in areas where healthy riparian vegetation still remained. Studies of other streams within the drainage basin show that many species found in the upper reaches of these streams, where agricultural impacts are low, were absent throughout the length of Lapwai Creek. Data collected concurrently with macroinvertebrates indicated that the input, storage, and transport of particulate organic matter was low throughout the stream, whereas periphyton abundance was high. The absence of longitudinal changes, despite flowing through three distinct geomorphological regions, and the grouping of all sites except one by cluster analysis for both dominant taxa and functional feeding groups suggest that agricultural alteration has influenced community structure of Lapwai Creek, resulting in a relatively homogeneous assemblage of macroinvertebrates capable of tolerating agricultural nonpoint source pollution

  20. Bossier Parish Community College and Delgado Community College Collaborative Pharmacy Technician Program Distance Education Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossier Parish Community Coll., Bossier City, LA.

    Two Louisiana community colleges--Bossier Parish Community College (BPCC) and Delgado Community College (DCC)--proposed, developed, and implemented a collaborative Pharmacy Technician program for delivery through the use of two-way interactive video. The new program was inspired by new certification requirements instituted by the state of…

  1. Colleges & Communities. Partners in Urban Revitalization. A Report on the Community Outreach Partnership Centers Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Systems Corp., Rockville, MD.

    This annual report describes the activities of the Community Outreach Partnership Centers (COPC) program during its first four funding rounds (1994-97). This federal program supports university-community partnerships in urban communities. Part 1 examines the federal role in such partnerships, primarily as a catalyst for adding key financial,…

  2. Developing Programs of Supervised Agricultural Experience. Developing an SAE Program Using the Missouri Agricultural Record Book for Secondary Students. Analyzing the SAE Program Using the Missouri Farm Business Record Book. Instructor's Guide. Volume 21, Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Admire, Myron

    This curriculum guide to the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) program contains four units of insturctor's materials as follows: Unit 1: Developing an SAE Program; Unit 2: Using the Missouri Agricultural Record Book for Secondary Students; Unit 3: Analyzing the SAE Program; and Unit 4: Using the Missouri Farm Business Record Book. The…

  3. Changes in soil fungal communities across a landscape of agricultural soil land-uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthrong, S. T.; Buckley, D. H.; Drinkwater, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Agricultural management is a major driver of changes in soils and their resident microbial communities, but we do not yet have a clear picture of how agriculture affects soil fungi. This is an important gap in our knowledge since fungi play an important role in many soil processes. Previous research has suggested that organic management practices can lead to an increase in soil fungal community diversity, which could have impacts on soil processes and alter the long term trajectory of soil quality in agricultural systems. Also, the relationship between management effects, biogeography, and soil fungi is not clear. The biogeography of macroscopic species is well described by taxa-area relationships and distance decay models, and recent research has suggested that certain subsets of fungi (e.g. AMF, litter sapotrophs) demonstrate similar patterns. However there is little information on how soil fungi as a whole are distributed across a landscape with soils under different managements. The goal of this project was to examine how different management practices alter soil fungal communities across a landscape of agricultural fields in upstate NY. We asked several specific questions: 1) Do different types of agricultural land-uses lead to divergent or convergent communities of soil fungi? 2) If soil type is held constant, do soil fungal communities diverge with geographic distance? 3) What are the major fungal groups that change in response to soil management, and are they cosmopolitan or endemic across the landscape? We studied these questions across agricultural fields in upstate NY that ranged from conventional corn, organic grains/corn, and long-term pasture. We sampled four fields (conventional, 10 and 20 year organic, and pasture) that had identical soils types and ranged from 100 m to 4 km apart. We utilized a multiplexed pyrosequencing approach on genomic DNA to analyze the structure of the soils' fungal communities. This approach allowed us to study soil fungi

  4. Agricultural approach on family planning: means to promote community health. A case from Glintang village, Sambi subdistrict, Boyolali regency.

    PubMed

    Widodo, A

    1994-04-01

    Glintang Village served from early 1989 through the end of 1991 as a test site for the Agricultural Approach on Family Planning communication support material. The program was a joint venture between the International Institute for Rural Reconstruction (IIRR)-Philippines and Yayasan Indonesia Sejahtera (YIS)-Indonesia to develop a model of communication support material allowing the target community to better understand the concept of family planning through an analogous agricultural approach. The materials were designed as a practical guide for rural populations in the form of largely pictorial flip-charts representing the experiences of target audiences. The concept and process of the approach are described. Health status improved markedly in the village over the period, both absolutely and compared with other villages which did not apply the approach. The contributions to improved health status of the local government-run Integrated Health Family Planning Services Post, the YIS-run Integrated Community Health Development Program, and the high motivation of local development actors are also noted.

  5. Standards Set for Quality Programs in Vocational Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Harold R.

    1977-01-01

    Reports the progress of a project which completed a model designed to validate categories of standards for quality agricultural/agribusiness education. The development of the model and its implementation and dissemination procedures are described. (BM)

  6. Agricultural legacies in forest environments: tree communities, soil properties, and light availability.

    PubMed

    Flinn, Kathryn M; Marks, P L

    2007-03-01

    Temperate deciduous forests across much of Europe and eastern North America reflect legacies of past land use, particularly in the diversity and composition of plant communities. Intense disturbances, such as clearing forests for agriculture, may cause persistent environmental changes that continue to shape vegetation patterns as landscapes recover. We assessed the long-term consequences of agriculture for environmental conditions in central New York forests, including tree community structure and composition, soil physical and chemical properties, and light availability. To isolate the effects of agriculture, we compared 20 adjacent pairs of forests that were never cleared for agriculture (primary forests) and forests that established 85-100 years ago on plowed fields (secondary forests). Tree communities in primary and secondary forests had similar stem density, though secondary forests had 14% greater basal area. Species composition differed dramatically between the two forest types, with primary forests dominated by Acer saccharum and Fagus grandifolia and secondary forests by Acer rubrum and Pinus strobus. Primary and secondary forests showed no consistent differences in soil physical properties or in the principal gradient of soil fertility associated with soil pH. Within stands, however, soil water content and pH were more variable in primary forests. Secondary forest soils had 15% less organic matter, 16% less total carbon, and 29% less extractable phosphorus in the top 10 cm than adjacent primary stands, though the ranges of the forest types mostly overlapped. Understory light availability in primary and secondary forests was similar. These results suggest that, within 100 years, post-agricultural stands have recovered conditions comparable to less disturbed forests in many attributes, including tree size and number, soil physical properties, soil chemical properties associated with pH, and understory light availability. The principal legacies of

  7. Preventing Agricultural Chemical Exposure: A Safety Program Manual. Participatory Education with Farmworkers in Pesticide Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC. Dept. of Family and Community Medicine.

    Preventing Agricultural Chemical Exposure among North Carolina Farmworkers (PACE) is a project designed to describe farmworker pesticide exposure and to develop an educational intervention to reduce farmworker pesticide exposure. The PACE project used a community participation framework to ensure that the community played a significant role in…

  8. Developing a health promotion program for faith-based communities.

    PubMed

    Kotecki, Catherine Nuss

    2002-04-01

    The article describes the partnership formed between community outreach programs, a school of nursing, and hospitals to implement Healthy People 2010 goals in urban, faith-based communities. To date this program has provided health promotion programs to 125 people from more than 18 congregations in the context of their faith setting. The program has allowed congregants to develop ministry strategies to meet health care needs within the congregation and community. The article provides overall program goals, specific lesson plans, and evaluation strategies. Outcome measures include an increase in health promotion knowledge, participant satisfaction, and improved health in congregations. PMID:11913228

  9. The Response of Farmland Bird Communities to Agricultural Intensity as Influenced by Its Spatial Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Teillard, Félix; Jiguet, Frédéric; Tichit, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    The shape of the relationship between biodiversity and agricultural intensity determines the range of intensities that should be targeted by conservation policies to obtain the greatest environmental benefits. Although preliminary evidence of this relationship exists, the influence of the spatial arrangement of intensity on biodiversity remains untested. We conducted a nationwide study linking agricultural intensity and its spatial arrangement to a farmland bird community of 22 species. Intensity was described with a continuous indicator based on Input Cost per hectare, which was relevant for both livestock and crop production. We used the French Breeding Bird Survey to compute several descriptors of the farmland bird community along the intensity gradient and tested for the significance of an interaction effect between intensity and its spatial aggregation on these descriptors. We found that the bird community was comprised of both winner and loser species with regard to intensity. The community composition descriptors (trophic level, specialisation, and specialisation for grassland indices) displayed non-linear relationships to intensity, with steeper slopes in the lower intensity range. We found a significant interaction effect between intensity and its spatial aggregation on the grassland specialisation index of the bird community; the effect of agricultural intensity was strengthened by its spatial aggregation. We suggest that an opportunity to improve the effectiveness of conservation policies exists by targeting measures in areas where intensity is moderate to low and aggregated. The effect of the aggregation of agricultural intensity on biodiversity should be considered in other scales and taxa when developing optimal policy targeting and intensity allocation strategies. PMID:25799552

  10. Climate warming and agricultural stressors interact to determine stream macroinvertebrate community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Jeremy J; Townsend, Colin R; Matthaei, Christoph D

    2015-05-01

    Global climate change is likely to modify the ecological consequences of currently acting stressors, but potentially important interactions between climate warming and land-use related stressors remain largely unknown. Agriculture affects streams and rivers worldwide, including via nutrient enrichment and increased fine sediment input. We manipulated nutrients (simulating agricultural run-off) and deposited fine sediment (simulating agricultural erosion) (two levels each) and water temperature (eight levels, 0-6°C above ambient) simultaneously in 128 streamside mesocosms to determine the individual and combined effects of the three stressors on macroinvertebrate community dynamics (community composition and body size structure of benthic, drift and insect emergence assemblages). All three stressors had pervasive individual effects, but in combination often produced additive or antagonistic outcomes. Changes in benthic community composition showed a complex interplay among habitat quality (with or without sediment), resource availability (with or without nutrient enrichment) and the behavioural/physiological tendency to drift or emerge as temperature rose. The presence of sediment and raised temperature both resulted in a community of smaller organisms. Deposited fine sediment strongly increased the propensity to drift. Stressor effects were most prominent in the benthic assemblage, frequently reflected by opposite patterns in individuals quitting the benthos (in terms of their propensity to drift or emerge). Of particular importance is that community measures of stream health routinely used around the world (taxon richness, EPT richness and diversity) all showed complex three-way interactions, with either a consistently stronger temperature response or a reversal of its direction when one or both agricultural stressors were also in operation. The negative effects of added fine sediment, which were often stronger at raised temperatures, suggest that streams already

  11. Assessing Youth Perceptions and Knowledge of Agriculture: The Impact of Participating in an AgVenture Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckey, Alisa Nicole; Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Cummins, Richard L.; Edwards, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural education programs such as AgVenture have been established to educate youth about the importance of agriculture. The study reported here examined the direct impact that one agricultural education program, specifically AgVenture, had on youth perceptions and knowledge of agriculture. Youth's perceptions and knowledge of…

  12. Non-Credit Community Arts Programs: A Comparative Case Study of Three Programs within Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Toro, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of "Non-credit community arts programs: A comparative case study of three programs within research universities" is to examine the perceptions of the various stakeholders of non-credit community arts programs to determine the perceived benefits received by all stakeholders from the non-credit program, the university, and its…

  13. 77 FR 31362 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From the Community Health Accreditation Program for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... the Community Health Accreditation Program for Continued Approval of Its Hospice Accreditation Program... conditions. A national accrediting organization applying for approval of its accreditation program under part... for continued approval of its accreditation program every 6 years or as we determine. Community...

  14. Relationship of Supervised Agricultural Experience Program Participation and Student Achievement in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Data from 537 high school students demonstrated the positive effect of participation in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) and Future Farmers of America (FFA) on agriscience achievement. FFA involvement and the scope of SAE were highly correlated. Student interest, socioeconomic status, and years of agriscience were related to achievement…

  15. Linking community programs in environment to programs in population: towards sustainable communities that sustain sanctuaries.

    PubMed

    Cincotta, R P

    1994-01-01

    This article briefly reviews several nongovernmental organization (NGO) programs that address environmental and population issues. A framework is constructed that identifies how linked programs are supposed to work. The potential for sustainable communities is explored. It is concluded that sanctuaries in developing countries will not survive unless population in surrounding communities is stabilized and the economic and ecological relationships between the community and the sanctuary ecosystem are sustainable. In developed countries resource needs must be identified in regional planning in order for environmental protection to occur. The author finds that NGOs can be instrumental in securing community participation in environmental protection. NGOs operating in Chiapas, Mexico, provide management assistance and public health and family planning awareness to displaced indigenous farmers and conservative professionals. Another NGO outside the Ranthambhore National Park in Rajasthan, India, works to promote alternative fuel and grazing sources among local farmers. Near Chautara, in Nepal, farmers are aided by NGOs in laying sanitary water pipes, which reduces the amount of women's time required for fetching water and increases the amount of time women can spend gardening or getting involved in environmental projects. NGO efforts that reduce women's time absorbed by domestic burdens help women fulfill family planning desires and allow for greater investment in the education of children. Environmental sustainability will be dependent on family planning and other population-related processes and on the awareness that public health is an environmental issue. Opposition to integrated environment and population programs stems from donor opposition, opposition to investment in low-density areas, and a priority on biodiversity issues over development of public health services near sanctuaries. This paper was presented at an international forum at the George Washington

  16. A Program in Community Relations: Face-to-Face Confrontations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Philip G.; O'Connell, Walter E.

    One of the sources of conflict in our urban centers today is the distrust that exists between the community and the police. In an effort to improve relations between community members and the police, so that both groups might work together more effectively in solving community problems, the Houston Cooperative Crime Prevention Program was…

  17. Creating a New University-Based Community College Leadership Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Juanita Gamez

    2013-01-01

    The author describes the process for developing a new Community College Leadership (CCL) curriculum for a certificate, master's, and doctoral degree in adult and higher education. The article details the research strategy in learning about Oklahoma's community colleges, existing national community college leadership programs, relevant courses…

  18. Urban Senegal and Rural Gambia: Computer and Community Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, Alicia I.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two educational programs in West Africa: a (LOGO) computer education program in Senegal, and a "self-improvement" community education program in The Gambia. While these two programs are diverse in geographic location, population, and curriculum materials, both are action-oriented, learner controlled, and consider the learner's broader…

  19. Diné (Navajo) parents' and community leaders' perceptions of agriculture-related injury risk to youth: a social narrative.

    PubMed

    Shumway, K; Pate, M L; McNeal, L G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a formative needs assessment of Diné (Navajo) parents for the prevention of childhood injuries resulting from livestock and horses. The research objectives were to identify parents' perceived livestock and horse related injury risks to Diné children and describe Diné community stakeholder input on prevention interventions for reducing injury risks to children associated with livestock and horse related activities on farms or ranches. The assessment used a survey constructed of closed and open-response questions to gauge Diné farmers' and ranchers' perceptions of injury risks to children who live or work on agricultural operations. Additional questions were asked to gauge Diné acceptance of an online training program as a prevention intervention to reduce livestock and horse related injuries to children. A total of 96 individuals agreed to participate in the survey and provided usable responses. A total of 53.2% (f = 50) of participants were female. Sixty-three percent of participants (f = 58) perceived that youth who work with intact male livestock were at high risk for injury. A total of 25 individuals perceived that youth who ride horses without equestrian helmets were at high risk for injury. Approximately 96% (f = 89) of those surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that they would use an online training program to promote agricultural health and safety for Diné youth. When participants were asked if there were safety issues associated with having youth working on a farm or ranch, a very large portion felt that the biggest issue was a lack of education and instruction from elders. A recommendation for an injury prevention practice included developing a user-friendly online network, giving parents and community leaders access to resources to assist in educating youth in local agricultural traditions integrated with safety training. PMID:24804462

  20. An Evaluation of the Community Education Program. The Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Malcolm B.; And Others

    Part of the Educational Amendments of 1974, the Community Schools Act was enacted to provide grants to local education agencies (LEAs) and state education agencies (SEAs) for developing and expanding local community programs and to institutions of higher education (IHEs) for training leaders for these programs. To evaluate the effectiveness of…

  1. Community College Faculty Development Program and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Aaron M.; McShannon, Judy; Hynes, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Community college administrators look for strategies to help students. GRASP (Gaining Retention and Achievement for Students Program) is a semester-long faculty development program that coaches community college instructors about simple, effective teaching strategies that promote student academic achievement. GRASP is founded on the belief that…

  2. Outlines Useful for Providing Technical Assistance to Community Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvir, Howard P.

    This document contains three sets of rough notes designed to help community education programs. These ideas are rough notes that are intended to spell out some of the problems and issues that confront any researcher tackling the new problem of community education programs. These ideas are addressed to State Educational Agencies (SEA) interested in…

  3. Strategic Planning and Program Evaluation in the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, William R.

    While program evaluations at most community colleges provide decision-makers with tactical data relating to past or current budget and enrollment statistics, there is an increased need to evaluate programs on the basis of long-term strategic information relating to projected market forces such as the future economic health of the community or…

  4. Community Building at Honors Programs in Continental Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkel, Nico; van Rees, Floris; Ruis, Margit; Sloots, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Many universities in the United States and Europe offer honors programs to meet the demands of gifted and intelligent students. One of the standard goals of these programs is to build an intellectual learning community. Establishing a community can be difficult because it requires that students show an active attitude and initiative. Many…

  5. Directory of Community Crime Prevention Programs: National and State Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, James L.; And Others

    Hundreds of community crime prevention programs are currently operating at the national, state and local levels. Many of these are staffed by citizens and local civic-action groups. Others are operated by government agencies. This directory of national and state community crime prevention programs includes organization name and title, address and…

  6. Exploring Sense of Community in a University Common Book Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristen; Brown, Natalya; Piper, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Many post-secondary common book programs purport to increase a sense of community on campus. This study explored whether a common book program at a Canadian university was able to create a sense of community among students. Results indicate that in-class discussions about the book, liking the Facebook page, attending the author lecture, and…

  7. Variations in Bacterial Community in a Temperate Lake Associated with an Agricultural Watershed.

    PubMed

    Song, Liyan; Li, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Terrestrially derived carbon and nutrients are washed into lakes, providing nutritional drivers for both microbial heterotrophy and phototrophy. Changes in the quantity and diversity of carbon and nutrients exported from watersheds in response to alterations in long-term land use have led to a need for evaluation of the linkage between watershed-exported carbon and nutrients and bacterial community structure in watershed associated lakes. To learn more about these interactions, we investigated Muskrat Lake in Michigan, which has a well-defined moderately sized watershed dominated by agriculture. We measured the water chemistry, characterized the dissolved organic carbon, and determined the structure of the bacterial communities at the inlet and center of this lake (five depths per site) over the summer and fall of 2008. The lake had temporal and rain event-based fluctuations in water chemistry, as well as temporal and rain event-dependent shifts in bacterial communities as measured by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Agricultural watershed inputs were observed in the lake during and after rain events. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial communities indicated that there were differences over time and that the dominant phylotypes shifted between summer and late fall. Some populations (e.g., Polynucleobacter and Mycobacterium) increased during fall, while others (e.g., Gemmatimonas) diminished. Redundancy and partitioning analyses showed that water chemistry is highly correlated with variations in the bacterial community of the lake, which explained 34 % of the variations in the bacterial community. Dissolved organic carbon had the greatest effects on variations in the Muskrat Lake bacterial community (2 %). The results of this study provide information that will enable a better understanding of the interaction between the bacterial community of lakes and changes in chemical properties as a

  8. Variations in Bacterial Community in a Temperate Lake Associated with an Agricultural Watershed.

    PubMed

    Song, Liyan; Li, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Terrestrially derived carbon and nutrients are washed into lakes, providing nutritional drivers for both microbial heterotrophy and phototrophy. Changes in the quantity and diversity of carbon and nutrients exported from watersheds in response to alterations in long-term land use have led to a need for evaluation of the linkage between watershed-exported carbon and nutrients and bacterial community structure in watershed associated lakes. To learn more about these interactions, we investigated Muskrat Lake in Michigan, which has a well-defined moderately sized watershed dominated by agriculture. We measured the water chemistry, characterized the dissolved organic carbon, and determined the structure of the bacterial communities at the inlet and center of this lake (five depths per site) over the summer and fall of 2008. The lake had temporal and rain event-based fluctuations in water chemistry, as well as temporal and rain event-dependent shifts in bacterial communities as measured by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Agricultural watershed inputs were observed in the lake during and after rain events. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial communities indicated that there were differences over time and that the dominant phylotypes shifted between summer and late fall. Some populations (e.g., Polynucleobacter and Mycobacterium) increased during fall, while others (e.g., Gemmatimonas) diminished. Redundancy and partitioning analyses showed that water chemistry is highly correlated with variations in the bacterial community of the lake, which explained 34 % of the variations in the bacterial community. Dissolved organic carbon had the greatest effects on variations in the Muskrat Lake bacterial community (2 %). The results of this study provide information that will enable a better understanding of the interaction between the bacterial community of lakes and changes in chemical properties as a

  9. Changes in soil oribatid communities associated with conversion from conventional to organic agriculture.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed A; Al-Assiuty, Abdel-Naieem I M; van Straalen, Nico M; Al-Assiuty, Basma A

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the effects of switching from conventional management to organic management on the abundance and community composition of soil-living oribatid mites in clover fields in an experimental agricultural station at Al-Fayoum, Egypt. The site had two adjacent fields with identical vegetation cover but different management. Fifteen random soil samples were collected monthly from each of three plots per field, from October to March. We characterized the soils with respect to various physicochemical variables as well as fungal community composition, and estimated mite densities through core sampling. Organic fields had a significantly more abundant oribatid community than did conventional fields. Also the abundance of soil fungi was greater in the organically managed field. Organic management promoted common oribatid mite species with a wide ecological amplitude that already had a high abundance where such common species are more responsive to changes in agricultural management. However, some species of mite responded indifferent or negative to the switch from conventional to organic management. Overall, the differences between the two ecological systems were mainly quantitative. Species diversities of both mite and fungal communities did not differ much between the two management systems. Diversity (H0) and equitability (E) of soil oribatid communities were higher in conventional plots than in the organic plots during the first 2 months but indistinguishable thereafter. Our study confirmed that organic management stimulates soilorganic matter build-up, with positive effects on both fungal and oribatid mite abundance and possible long-term effects on soil function.

  10. Community perceptions of human excreta as fertilizer in peri-urban agriculture in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mariwah, Simon; Drangert, Jan-Olof

    2011-08-01

    Although human excreta contain the necessary nutrients for plant growth, local authorities in Ghana spend huge sums of money to dispose them as waste. Reusing excreta for agricultural purposes saves expenditure for chemical fertilizers, improves soil fertility, reduces poverty and ensures food security. People's attitudes and perceptions about excreta vary between cultures and even within specific cultures. This study aimed to explore attitudes and perceptions among a peri-urban agricultural community towards sanitized human excreta and its use. The study adopted an exploratory design and collected data from 154 randomly selected households using questionnaires and focus group discussions. It was found that there is a general negative attitude to fresh excreta and the handling of it. However, the residents accept that excreta can be used as fertilizer, but they are not willing to use it on their own crops or consume crops fertilized with excreta. The study recommends open discussions in the community for a successful implementation of ecological sanitation.

  11. Building on Our Rich Heritage in Agriculture Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougan, James E.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the past and future of vocational agriculture education in the United States. Discusses aspects of the program relating to social and economic change, community-based programs, teacher education, supervision, core curriculum approach, and vocational agriculture teachers. (LRA)

  12. An Exploratory Analysis of Student-Community Interactions in Urban Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Julie; Sherard, Maximilian; Prohn, Seb M.; Bradley, Lucy; Goodell, L. Suzanne; Andrew, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Urban agriculture initiatives are on the rise, providing healthy food while teaching a land ethic to youth. In parallel, increasing numbers of university graduates are obtaining Extension work requiring the effective communication of science in a diverse, urban, low-income setting. This study evaluates a pilot service-learning program, the…

  13. Pharmacy assistance programs in a community health center setting.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Maxsimo C.; Herman, Debra; Montano, Seferino; Love, Leah

    2002-01-01

    Prescription drug costs represent the fastest growing item in health care and are a driving force in rapidly increasing health care costs. Community health centers serve an indigent population with limited access to pharmaceuticals. Pharmaceutical companies sponsor patient assistance programs. These pharmacy assistance programs can be developed to facilitate the provision of needed pharmaceuticals to this vulnerable population. La Casa de Buena Salud is a rural community health center in eastern New Mexico, which has provided access to a substantial amount of pharmaceuticals to indigent patients through patient assistance programs. Cost savings potential are considerable for a community health center and for patients when a pharmacy assistance program is organized efficiently and employed systematically. Secondary benefits are derived from the entire medical community. While some community health centers currently make effective use of pharmaceutical company-sponsored pharmacy assistance programs, a comprehensive, long-term approach at a national level may be required. PMID:12510707

  14. Agricultural Land Use Determines the Trait Composition of Ground Beetle Communities

    PubMed Central

    Birkhofer, Klaus; Smith, Henrik G.; Hedlund, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve biological control of agricultural pests, it is fundamental to understand which factors influence the composition of natural enemies in agricultural landscapes. In this study, we aimed to understand how agricultural land use affects a number of different traits in ground beetle communities to better predict potential consequences of land-use change for ecosystem functioning. We studied ground beetles in fields with different agricultural land use ranging from frequently managed sugar beet fields, winter wheat fields to less intensively managed grasslands. The ground beetles were collected in emergence tents that catch individuals overwintering locally in different life stages and with pitfall traps that catch individuals that could have a local origin or may have dispersed into the field. Community weighted mean values for ground beetle traits such as body size, flight ability and feeding preference were estimated for each land-use type and sampling method. In fields with high land-use intensity the average body length of emerging ground beetle communities was lower than in the grasslands while the average body length of actively moving communities did not differ between the land-use types. The proportion of ground beetles with good flight ability or a carnivorous diet was higher in the crop fields as compared to the grasslands. Our study highlights that increasing management intensity reduces the average body size of emerging ground beetles and the proportion of mixed feeders. Our results also suggest that the dispersal ability of ground beetles enables them to compensate for local management intensities. PMID:26730734

  15. Profiling Nematode Communities in Unmanaged Flowerbed and Agricultural Field Soils in Japan by DNA Barcode Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Morise, Hisashi; Miyazaki, Erika; Yoshimitsu, Shoko; Eki, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Soil nematodes play crucial roles in the soil food web and are a suitable indicator for assessing soil environments and ecosystems. Previous nematode community analyses based on nematode morphology classification have been shown to be useful for assessing various soil environments. Here we have conducted DNA barcode analysis for soil nematode community analyses in Japanese soils. We isolated nematodes from two different environmental soils of an unmanaged flowerbed and an agricultural field using the improved flotation-sieving method. Small subunit (SSU) rDNA fragments were directly amplified from each of 68 (flowerbed samples) and 48 (field samples) isolated nematodes to determine the nucleotide sequence. Sixteen and thirteen operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained by multiple sequence alignment from the flowerbed and agricultural field nematodes, respectively. All 29 SSU rDNA-derived OTUs (rOTUs) were further mapped onto a phylogenetic tree with 107 known nematode species. Interestingly, the two nematode communities examined were clearly distinct from each other in terms of trophic groups: Animal predators and plant feeders were markedly abundant in the flowerbed soils, in contrast, bacterial feeders were dominantly observed in the agricultural field soils. The data from the flowerbed nematodes suggests a possible food web among two different trophic nematode groups and plants (weeds) in the closed soil environment. Finally, DNA sequences derived from the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 (COI) gene were determined as a DNA barcode from 43 agricultural field soil nematodes. These nematodes were assigned to 13 rDNA-derived OTUs, but in the COI gene analysis were assigned to 23 COI gene-derived OTUs (cOTUs), indicating that COI gene-based barcoding may provide higher taxonomic resolution than conventional SSU rDNA-barcoding in soil nematode community analysis. PMID:23284767

  16. Agricultural Land Use Determines the Trait Composition of Ground Beetle Communities.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Helena I; Palmu, Erkki; Birkhofer, Klaus; Smith, Henrik G; Hedlund, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve biological control of agricultural pests, it is fundamental to understand which factors influence the composition of natural enemies in agricultural landscapes. In this study, we aimed to understand how agricultural land use affects a number of different traits in ground beetle communities to better predict potential consequences of land-use change for ecosystem functioning. We studied ground beetles in fields with different agricultural land use ranging from frequently managed sugar beet fields, winter wheat fields to less intensively managed grasslands. The ground beetles were collected in emergence tents that catch individuals overwintering locally in different life stages and with pitfall traps that catch individuals that could have a local origin or may have dispersed into the field. Community weighted mean values for ground beetle traits such as body size, flight ability and feeding preference were estimated for each land-use type and sampling method. In fields with high land-use intensity the average body length of emerging ground beetle communities was lower than in the grasslands while the average body length of actively moving communities did not differ between the land-use types. The proportion of ground beetles with good flight ability or a carnivorous diet was higher in the crop fields as compared to the grasslands. Our study highlights that increasing management intensity reduces the average body size of emerging ground beetles and the proportion of mixed feeders. Our results also suggest that the dispersal ability of ground beetles enables them to compensate for local management intensities. PMID:26730734

  17. Profiling nematode communities in unmanaged flowerbed and agricultural field soils in Japan by DNA barcode sequencing.

    PubMed

    Morise, Hisashi; Miyazaki, Erika; Yoshimitsu, Shoko; Eki, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Soil nematodes play crucial roles in the soil food web and are a suitable indicator for assessing soil environments and ecosystems. Previous nematode community analyses based on nematode morphology classification have been shown to be useful for assessing various soil environments. Here we have conducted DNA barcode analysis for soil nematode community analyses in Japanese soils. We isolated nematodes from two different environmental soils of an unmanaged flowerbed and an agricultural field using the improved flotation-sieving method. Small subunit (SSU) rDNA fragments were directly amplified from each of 68 (flowerbed samples) and 48 (field samples) isolated nematodes to determine the nucleotide sequence. Sixteen and thirteen operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained by multiple sequence alignment from the flowerbed and agricultural field nematodes, respectively. All 29 SSU rDNA-derived OTUs (rOTUs) were further mapped onto a phylogenetic tree with 107 known nematode species. Interestingly, the two nematode communities examined were clearly distinct from each other in terms of trophic groups: Animal predators and plant feeders were markedly abundant in the flowerbed soils, in contrast, bacterial feeders were dominantly observed in the agricultural field soils. The data from the flowerbed nematodes suggests a possible food web among two different trophic nematode groups and plants (weeds) in the closed soil environment. Finally, DNA sequences derived from the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 (COI) gene were determined as a DNA barcode from 43 agricultural field soil nematodes. These nematodes were assigned to 13 rDNA-derived OTUs, but in the COI gene analysis were assigned to 23 COI gene-derived OTUs (cOTUs), indicating that COI gene-based barcoding may provide higher taxonomic resolution than conventional SSU rDNA-barcoding in soil nematode community analysis.

  18. Total Program Efficacy: A Comparison of Traditionally and Alternatively Certified Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Dennis W.; Ricketts, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine agriculture teachers' perceived levels of efficacy as they relate to managing the total program of agricultural education, both for traditionally and alternatively certified teachers. The constructs used in this study were technical content, FFA/leadership development/SAE, teaching and learning, and…

  19. Examining the Instructional Planning Process Taught in Agricultural Education Teacher Preparation Programs: Perspectives of University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiman, Bradley C.; Bedtke, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    Instructional planning is a curricular topic in teacher preparation programs, but limited research in agricultural education has been conducted in this area. The purpose of this study was to examine aspects of the instructional planning process that are taught to agricultural education preservice teachers. Survey research and content analysis of…

  20. Core III Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs. Units A-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This first volume of a two-volume curriculum guide contains 11 problem areas selected for study to be included in a core curriculum for 11th-grade or third-year students enrolled in a metropolitan agricultural program. The 11 problem areas are divided into eight units: Orientation to Agricultural Occupations (Gaining Employment), Supervised…

  1. Staffing Patterns for Programs in Adult Agricultural Education; A Study in Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persons, Edgar A.; Leske, Gary

    The study defines the relationships between agriculture teachers and other persons with whom they work in providing adult agricultural education; specifically, it identifies with whom the instructor cooperated in providing a program, identifies the functions performed by those who cooperated, and identifies the success of the cooperative…

  2. Enhancing Professionalism in Academic Agricultural Communications Programs: The Role of Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Mark; Whaley, Sherrie R.; Whiting, Larry; Agunga, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of the accreditation process as it relates to academic agricultural communications programs. Reports results of an electronic mail survey regarding the perceptions of 16 agricultural communications faculty as to the need for accreditation. Discusses the merits of national accreditation standards. (Contains 20 references.) (JOW)

  3. Metropolitan Programs in Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations; A Need and Attitude Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hollie B.; And Others

    To establish the feasibility of implementing applied biological and agricultural occupations programs in the metropolitan area of Chicago, four populations were surveyed by means of mailed questionnaires or interest inventories to determine: (1) the employment opportunities in the applied biological and agricultural industries, (2) the interests…

  4. Assessment of teachers' ability to integrate science concepts into secondary agriculture programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scales, Jason A.

    For the past two decades, the idea of integrating more science concepts into the agricultural education curriculum has been gaining support. The purposes of this study were two fold: (1) To assess the knowledge base and interest levels among agriculture instructors in teaching concepts related to science; (2) To assess how such a change in the curriculum would impact current agricultural education programs. The sample was derived from the population of agriculture instructors teaching in Missouri secondary schools. For this descriptive correlational research, an instrument was developed to assess the instructors' perceived level of competence to teach selected science grade level expectations (GLE) and their relationship to the agricultural education curriculum and programs. A second instrument, solicited from the American Board for Certification in Teacher Excellence, was used to assess the general biological science knowledge of the teachers. Agriculture instructors perceive that they are competent to teach and integrate science GLEs into the agriculture curriculum. However, their scores on the examination of knowledge of biological science brings into question their competence to teach this subject matter. Teachers believe integrating science into the agriculture curriculum will benefit their program and their students; however, they unsure if their classes should count for science credit or if FFA programs and activities are a good match for a more science-based curriculum.

  5. The Psychometric Properties of the Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Order Certification Training Program Written Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Brian F.; Breidenbach, Daniel H.; Field, William E.; Tormoehlen, Roger

    2007-01-01

    The written certification exam that accompanies the Gearing Up for Safety-Agricultural Production Safety Training for Youth curriculum was designed to partially meet the testing requirements of the Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Order (AgHOs) Certification Training Program. This curriculum and accompanying assessment tools are available for…

  6. Projecting Agricultural Education Programs for the 21st Century Using a Modified Delphi Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Maynard J.

    A modified three-step Delphi procedure was used to conduct a series of national studies of futurists regarded by their peers as top experts in agricultural education. The primary objective was to project enrollments in agricultural education programs for the 21st century. Other study objectives were to ascertain whether the Delphi technique could…

  7. Youth Leadership Development: Perceptions and Preferences of Urban Students Enrolled in a Comprehensive Agriculture Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James C., II; Kim, Eunyoung

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive study explores the perceptions of and preferences for leadership development by students enrolled in a comprehensive urban agriculture program. A total of 284 students from the Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences participated in the study. The results of the study showed that the average respondent was involved in a…

  8. Vocational Agriculture Training Program: Safe Tractor and Farm Machinery Operation. Special Paper No. 8. Second Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbitt, Frank; Doss, Howard

    The publication was prepared for the United States Office of Education for use by teachers who direct agricultural training programs in safe tractor operation and safe farm machinery operation that comply with the United States Department of Labor regulations on hazardous occupations in agriculture. Upon successful completion of these training…

  9. Utilizing Natural Cognitive Tendencies to Enhance Agricultural Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Alexa J.; Rhodes, Emily B.; Irani, Tracy A.; Roberts, T. Grady; Snyder, Lori J. Unruh; Brendemuhl, Joel

    2011-01-01

    The influences of cognitive styles have been the focus of research on problems in education for quite some time (Witkin, Moore, Goodenough, & Cox, 1977). In fact, agricultural educators are rapidly increasing the amount of research and education focused on understanding and utilizing cognitive function in an attempt to improve educational…

  10. How California Educators and CE Directors View "Agricultural Literacy" Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Marc T.; Rilla, Ellen L.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed county superintendents, Cooperative Extension county directors, and district superintendents to determine their views on agricultural literacy education. Respondents favored addressing the topic in the middle grades (4-9), through science and social studies. Critical topics identified included toxins in food and the environment, water…

  11. Supervision of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs: A Synthesis of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, James E.; Williams, David L.

    1997-01-01

    A review of literature from 1964 to 1993 found that supervised agricultural experience (SAE) teachers, students, parents, and employers value the teachers' supervisory role. Implementation practices vary widely and there are no cumulative data to guide policies and standards for SAE supervision. (SK)

  12. Teaching Agricultural Outdoor Programs in an Urban Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, Charles J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Agricultural education can make a substantial contribution to the quality of the facilities and activities available for outdoor recreation. A teacher relates the course content, objectives, and learning activities of the soils portion of the curriculum of an urban nature center utilized as an outdoor laboratory. (Author/AJ)

  13. Teacher Educators in the Federally Supported Programs of Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, G.F., Comp.

    This historical record of the organizational background and activities of ." American Association of Teacher Educators in Agriculture (AATEA) was an outgrowth of an action taken by the executive committee in 1957. Part I contains information relating to the history of the parent organizations: (1) Ten-year Teacher Trainers, 1929-1950, and (2)…

  14. 76 FR 70639 - Agricultural Career and Employment Grants Program; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ..., at 76 FR 69114, is November 15, 2011, and is applicable beginning November 8, 2011. Comments on the....chavez@osec.usda.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Need for Correction On November 8, 2011 (76 FR 69114... Office of Advocacy and Outreach 7 CFR Part 2502 RIN 0503-AA49 Agricultural Career and Employment...

  15. Evaluation of the passive solar for agriculture program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this program is to stimulate the use of passive and hybrid solar energy for farm homes. Redirection of DOE emphasis limited the FY '81 program to information transfer on the topic to requesting groups and individuals.

  16. Relationship of Length of Vocational Agriculture Teacher Contract to Supervised Occupational Experience Program Scope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Larry R.; McCracken, J. David

    1983-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to ascertain if the extent to which vocational agriculture teachers are employed on a 12-month basis is related to the scope of supervised occupational experience programs conducted by students. (SSH)

  17. Alternative scenarios of bioenergy crop production in an agricultural landscape and implications for bird communities.

    PubMed

    Blank, Peter J; Williams, Carol L; Sample, David W; Meehan, Timothy D; Turner, Monica G

    2016-01-01

    Increased demand and government mandates for bioenergy crops in the United States could require a large allocation of agricultural land to bioenergy feedstock production and substantially alter current landscape patterns. Incorporating bioenergy landscape design into land-use decision making could help maximize benefits and minimize trade-offs among alternative land uses. We developed spatially explicit landscape scenarios of increased bioenergy crop production in an 80-km radius agricultural landscape centered on a potential biomass-processing energy facility and evaluated the consequences of each scenario for bird communities. Our scenarios included conversion of existing annual row crops to perennial bioenergy grasslands and conversion of existing grasslands to annual bioenergy row crops. The scenarios explored combinations of four biomass crop types (three potential grassland crops along a gradient of plant diversity and one annual row crop [corn]), three land conversion percentages to bioenergy crops (10%, 20%, or 30% of row crops or grasslands), and three spatial configurations of biomass crop fields (random, clustered near similar field types, or centered on the processing plant), yielding 36 scenarios. For each scenario, we predicted the impact on four bird community metrics: species richness, total bird density, species of greatest conservation need (SGCN) density, and SGCN hotspots (SGCN birds/ha ≥ 2). Bird community metrics consistently increased with conversion of row crops to bioenergy grasslands and consistently decreased with conversion of grasslands to bioenergy row crops. Spatial arrangement of bioenergy fields had strong effects on the bird community and in some cases was more influential than the amount converted to bioenergy crops. Clustering grasslands had a stronger positive influence on the bird community than locating grasslands near the central plant or at random. Expansion of bioenergy grasslands onto marginal agricultural lands will

  18. Alternative scenarios of bioenergy crop production in an agricultural landscape and implications for bird communities.

    PubMed

    Blank, Peter J; Williams, Carol L; Sample, David W; Meehan, Timothy D; Turner, Monica G

    2016-01-01

    Increased demand and government mandates for bioenergy crops in the United States could require a large allocation of agricultural land to bioenergy feedstock production and substantially alter current landscape patterns. Incorporating bioenergy landscape design into land-use decision making could help maximize benefits and minimize trade-offs among alternative land uses. We developed spatially explicit landscape scenarios of increased bioenergy crop production in an 80-km radius agricultural landscape centered on a potential biomass-processing energy facility and evaluated the consequences of each scenario for bird communities. Our scenarios included conversion of existing annual row crops to perennial bioenergy grasslands and conversion of existing grasslands to annual bioenergy row crops. The scenarios explored combinations of four biomass crop types (three potential grassland crops along a gradient of plant diversity and one annual row crop [corn]), three land conversion percentages to bioenergy crops (10%, 20%, or 30% of row crops or grasslands), and three spatial configurations of biomass crop fields (random, clustered near similar field types, or centered on the processing plant), yielding 36 scenarios. For each scenario, we predicted the impact on four bird community metrics: species richness, total bird density, species of greatest conservation need (SGCN) density, and SGCN hotspots (SGCN birds/ha ≥ 2). Bird community metrics consistently increased with conversion of row crops to bioenergy grasslands and consistently decreased with conversion of grasslands to bioenergy row crops. Spatial arrangement of bioenergy fields had strong effects on the bird community and in some cases was more influential than the amount converted to bioenergy crops. Clustering grasslands had a stronger positive influence on the bird community than locating grasslands near the central plant or at random. Expansion of bioenergy grasslands onto marginal agricultural lands will

  19. The community leaders institute: an innovative program to train community leaders in health research.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Lori E; Parr, William; Smith, Teresa; Mitchell, Monica J

    2013-03-01

    An emerging best practice of addressing health and improving health disparities in communities is ensuring that academic health centers (AHCs) are engaged with area schools, primary care practices, and community advocates as equal partners in research, services, and programs. The literature documents the importance of ensuring that academic-community collaboration is based on equity, trust, and respect and that there is capacity (time and resources) and a shared culture (language, skills, and applied knowledge) for accomplishing mutual goals in academic-community research partnerships. It is also essential that an academic-community collaboration result in tangible and measurable goals and outcomes for both the target community and the AHC. Currently, the models for implementing best practices in community health partnerships, especially training programs, are limited.This article summarizes the goals and outcomes for the Community Leaders Institute (CLI), a six-week innovative leadership development training program designed to enhance academic-community research, integrate the interests of community leaders and AHC researchers, and build research capacity and competencies within the community. On the basis of two years of outcome data, the CLI is achieving its intended goals of engaging faculty as trainer-scholars while promoting academic-community partnerships that align with community and AHC priorities. The training and collaborative research paradigm used by the CLI has served to accelerate AHC-community engagement and integration efforts, as CLI graduates are now serving on AHC steering, bioethics, and other committees.

  20. Soil microbial community response to land use change in an agricultural landscape of western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bossio, D A; Girvan, M S; Verchot, L; Bullimore, J; Borelli, T; Albrecht, A; Scow, K M; Ball, A S; Pretty, J N; Osborn, A M

    2005-01-01

    Tropical agroecosystems are subject to degradation processes such as losses in soil carbon, nutrient depletion, and reduced water holding capacity that occur rapidly resulting in a reduction in soil fertility that can be difficult to reverse. In this research, a polyphasic methodology has been used to investigate changes in microbial community structure and function in a series of tropical soils in western Kenya. These soils have different land usage with both wooded and agricultural soils at Kakamega and Ochinga, whereas at Ochinga, Leuro, Teso, and Ugunja a replicated field experiment compared traditional continuous maize cropping against an improved N-fixing fallow system. For all sites, principal component analysis of 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles revealed that soil type was the key determinant of total bacterial community structure, with secondary variation found between wooded and agricultural soils. Similarly, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis also separated wooded from agricultural soils, primarily on the basis of higher abundance of monounsaturated fatty acids, anteiso- and iso-branched fatty acids, and methyl-branched fatty acids in the wooded soils. At Kakamega and Ochinga wooded soils had between five 5 and 10-fold higher levels of soil carbon and microbial biomass carbon than agricultural soils from the same location, whereas total enzyme activities were also lower in the agricultural sites. Soils with woody vegetation had a lower percentage of phosphatase activity and higher cellulase and chitinase activities than the agricultural soils. BIOLOG analysis showed woodland soils to have the greatest substrate diversity. Throughout the study the two functional indicators (enzyme activity and BIOLOG), however, showed lower specificity with respect to soil type and land usage than did the compositional indicators (DGGE and PLFA). In the field experiment comparing two types of maize cropping, both the maize yields

  1. Agricultural Technology Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Board of Education, Raleigh. Agricultural Technology Education Section.

    Agricultural education programs available through North Carolina's newly created system of industrial education center, technical institutes, and community colleges are described. The information is for use by administrators, and teachers of adult agricultural courses and counselors of high school dropouts and graduates. It describes the need for…

  2. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP National Program: Summer 2010 Florida Agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, Zachary C.; Billiot, Amanda; Lee, Lucas; McKee, Jake

    2010-01-01

    The main agricultural areas in South Florida are located within the fertile land surrounding Lake Okeechobee. The Atlantic Watershed monthly rainfall anomalies showed a weak but statistically significant correlation to the Oceanic Nino Index (ONI). No other watershed s anomalies showed significant correlations with ONI or the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). During La Nina months, less sea breeze days and more disturbed days were found to occur compared to El Nino and neutral months. The increase in disturbed days can likely by attributed to the synoptic pattern during La Nina, which is known to be favorable for tropical systems to follow paths that affect South Florida. Overall, neither sea breeze rainfall patterns nor total rainfall patterns in South Florida s main agricultural areas were found to be strongly influenced by the El Nino Southern Oscillation during our study time.

  3. Comparative Collective Community-Based Learning: The "Possibilities for Change in American Communities" Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, David; Kingma-Kiekhofer, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces an approach to service learning based on students' collective engagement with a range of community organizations. We explore the particular benefits of this comparative collective community-based (CCC) learning model through a discussion of the "Possibilities for Change in American Communities" program, which was begun by…

  4. Teaching and Learning in Nanjing: Community, Communities, and Politics in an Overseas Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auger, Vincent A.; Overby, L. Marvin

    2005-01-01

    One of the environments in which political science faculty most directly face issues of community, communities, and politics is when they find themselves teaching in programs abroad. The rigors of international teaching force faculty to confront issues of community identity, assumptions about political orientation, and presumptions about how…

  5. Community Modeling Program for Space Weather: A CCMC Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A community modeling program, which provides a forum for exchange and integration between modelers, has excellent potential for furthering our Space Weather modeling and forecasting capabilities. The design of such a program is of great importance to its success. In this presentation, we will argue that the most effective community modeling program should be focused on Space Weather-related objectives, and that it should be open and inclusive. The tremendous successes of prior community research activities further suggest that the most effective implementation of a new community modeling program should be based on community leadership, rather than on domination by individual institutions or centers. This presentation will provide an experience-based justification for these conclusions.

  6. Increasing Research Literacy: The Community Research Fellows Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Coats, Jacquelyn V.; Stafford, Jewel D.; Thompson, Vetta Sanders; Javois, Bethany Johnson; Goodman, Melody S.

    2015-01-01

    The Community Research Fellows Training (CRFT) Program promotes the role of underserved populations in research by enhancing the capacity for community-based participatory research (CBPR). CRFT consists of 12 didactic training sessions and 3 experiential workshops intended to train community members in research methods and evidence-based public health. The training (a) promotes partnerships between community members and academic researchers, (b) enhances community knowledge of public health research, and (c) trains community members to become critical consumers of research. Fifty community members participated in training sessions taught by multidisciplinary faculty. Forty-five (90%) participants completed the program. Findings demonstrate that the training increased awareness of health disparities, research knowledge, and the capacity to use CBPR as a tool to address disparities. PMID:25742661

  7. Increasing research literacy: the community research fellows training program.

    PubMed

    Coats, Jacquelyn V; Stafford, Jewel D; Sanders Thompson, Vetta; Johnson Javois, Bethany; Goodman, Melody S

    2015-02-01

    The Community Research Fellows Training (CRFT) Program promotes the role of underserved populations in research by enhancing the capacity for community-based participatory research (CBPR). CRFT consists of 12 didactic training sessions and 3 experiential workshops intended to train community members in research methods and evidence-based public health. The training (a) promotes partnerships between community members and academic researchers, (b) enhances community knowledge of public health research, and (c) trains community members to become critical consumers of research. Fifty community members participated in training sessions taught by multidisciplinary faculty. Forty-five (90%) participants completed the program. Findings demonstrate that the training increased awareness of health disparities, research knowledge, and the capacity to use CBPR as a tool to address disparities.

  8. Relationship of wooded riparian zones and runoff potential to fish community composition in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stauffer, J.C.; Goldstein, R.M.; Newman, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    The relationship of fish community composition to riparian cover and runoff potential was investigated in 20 streams in the agricultural Minnesota River Basin during the summer of 1997. Analysis of variance indicated significant differences in fish community composition due to both riparian cover (wooded versus open) and runoff potential (high or low). Streams with wooded riparian zones had higher index of biological integrity (IBI) scores, species richness, diversity, and percentages of benthic insectivores and herbivores than streams with open riparian zones. Streams with low runoff potential had higher IBI scores and species richness than streams with high runoff potential. The riparian cover and runoff potential interaction was marginally significant with respect to IBI scores and species richness, suggesting a weak interaction between the two factors. Although both factors were important, riparian cover influenced fish community composition more than runoff potential in these streams, indicating that local factors (close to the stream) dominated landscape- or basin-level factors.

  9. J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Narrative Report: Urban Community College Transfer Opportunities Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    J. Sargeant Reynolds Community Coll., Richmond, VA.

    An overview is provided of the activities and accomplishments of J. Sargeant Reynold Community College's (JSRCC) Urban Community Colleges Transfer Opportunities Program, which was designed to increase the number of minority students transferring to senior institutions. Introductory material highlights the means used to attain the program's…

  10. Intersecting Communities of Practice in Distance Education: The Program Team and the Online Course Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Ana-Paula; Davis, Niki

    2008-01-01

    This article is a case study that aimed at understanding the dynamics of two complementary communities involved in a distance education graduate program: one community of practice formed by the instructors and instructional developers, who designed and developed the program, and another created by the students and instructor in one of the online…

  11. Agriculture and Community Development Interface. Joint Meeting of the Southern Region State Leaders for Agriculture and Natural Resources and Community Resource Development Proceedings (October 8-11, 1989, Williamsburg, Virginia).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Paul D., Ed.; Campbell, Raymond, Ed.

    This document is a summary of remarks presented at a joint meeting of Agriculture and Natural Resources and Community Resource Development state leaders in 1989. The focus of the meeting was economic viability, rural extension and education, water quality, waste management, biotechnology, low-input sustainable agriculture (LISA), and rural…

  12. A Community-Based Recruitment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCosmo, Richard D.; Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    1979-01-01

    Analyses community-based recruitment techniques initiated by Moraine Valley Community College, Illinois, to stabilize enrollment, expand participation of the under-served, and increase the pool of college attendees. Delineates the eight goals of recruitment and the plan implemented at Moraine Valley. Discusses major activities and results. (CAM)

  13. Maryland Community Colleges 1985 Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Community Colleges, Annapolis.

    As part of an annual statewide evaluation process, quantitative information on community college education is reviewed by the Maryland State Board for Community Colleges. Subsequently, in particular cases, a qualitative assessment is conducted by individual colleges in response to specific questions raised by the Board. This report provides the…

  14. Ethnic Variations in Use of Community Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhee, David; Fritz, Janet J.; Schubert, Marcia Ohmert

    Minority families are less likely than Anglos to seek services from community agencies. Two studies were conducted with 178 Hispanic, 309 American Indian (Ute and Navajo), and 363 Anglo parents using the Social Network Questionnaire, Self-Perceptions of the Parental Role scale, checklists of community resources, and the Marin acculturation…

  15. Seasonal Patterns in Microbial Community Composition in Denitrifying Bioreactors Treating Subsurface Agricultural Drainage.

    PubMed

    Porter, Matthew D; Andrus, J Malia; Bartolerio, Nicholas A; Rodriguez, Luis F; Zhang, Yuanhui; Zilles, Julie L; Kent, Angela D

    2015-10-01

    Denitrifying bioreactors, consisting of water flow control structures and a woodchip-filled trench, are a promising approach for removing nitrate from agricultural subsurface or tile drainage systems. To better understand the seasonal dynamics and the ecological drivers of the microbial communities responsible for denitrification in these bioreactors, we employed microbial community "fingerprinting" techniques in a time-series examination of three denitrifying bioreactors over 2 years, looking at bacteria, fungi, and the denitrifier functional group responsible for the final step of complete denitrification. Our analysis revealed that microbial community composition responds to depth and seasonal variation in moisture content and inundation of the bioreactor media, as well as temperature. Using a geostatistical analysis approach, we observed recurring temporal patterns in bacterial and denitrifying bacterial community composition in these bioreactors, consistent with annual cycling. The fungal communities were more stable, having longer temporal autocorrelations, and did not show significant annual cycling. These results suggest a recurring seasonal cycle in the denitrifying bioreactor microbial community, likely due to seasonal variation in moisture content.

  16. Extended Day Enrichment Program. Community Education. Operations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orange County Public Schools, Orlando, FL.

    The Extended Day Enrichment Program in Orlando, Florida, is designed to enrich elementary school children's lives educationally, socially, culturally, emotionally, and physically, and to provide them with a safe and familiar setting after school. The program is a fee-supported community education program operated by Orange County (Florida) Public…

  17. Florida Keys Community College's College Reach-Out Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Deborah

    Because of its Reach-Out Program, Florida Keys Community College (FKCC) has been successful in recruiting black high school students to achieve its highest proportion of racial parity in first-time-in-college enrollments (i.e., 5.2%). Through its Eighth Grade Visitation Program, High School Recruitment Program, and other components, the Reach-Out…

  18. Report on Community College Program Review, Fiscal Year 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    In 1983, the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) established a systemwide program review process calling for the evaluation of instructional programs and student and academic support services on a 5-year cycle. This report describes the 1993 program review process and its results, and provides examples of how specific colleges use the review…

  19. Community College Exemplary Instructional Programs, Volume VI, 1994-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazer, Gerry, Ed.

    Describing entries in the National Council of Instructional Administrators' (NCIA's) Annual Exemplary Instructional Program Awards for 1994-95, this volume presents descriptions of community college programs in the five categories in which they were submitted. The first section focuses on programs in the category of best use of technology for…

  20. Idaho Community Rehabilitation Program Plan for Fiscal Year 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasenoehrl, Dale J.; Ireton, Kent

    This program plan for 1993 covers all Idaho community rehabilitation programs served by the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) and the Idaho Commission for the Blind (ICB), and attempts to assess client and rehabilitation service provider needs, to plan for program development, to identify needed changes, and to evaluate the…

  1. A Guide to Microcomputer Programs in the California Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimsdale, Jeffrey M., Ed.

    Designed to assist faculty in California community colleges in sharing microcomputer programs they have written, this guide provides abstracts for 89 teacher-developed microcomputer programs that can be obtained for non-commercial use. Each entry contains information on the title and author of the program, the institution of the author, the…

  2. Using Community Access Cable in an Extension Parenting Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Steve A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Utah State Extension collaborated with community groups and local cable providers to broadcast programs for parents on teen sexuality and substance abuse. A survey of cable subscribers yielded 638 responses (4.5%). Of the 103 who watched programs, most were positive, but better ways to advertise the programs were needed. (SK)

  3. GUIDELINES TO THE AFL-CIO COMMUNITY SERVICES PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEIRNE, JOSEPH A.

    BACKGROUND MATERIALS ON THE AFL-CIO PROGRAM OF COMMUNITY SERVICES OUTLINE THE ORIGINS AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE PROGRAM, PARTICULARLY SINCE THE FORMATION OF THE AFL-CIO IN 1955. IN ADDITION TO LISTING KEY POLICY AND POSITION STATEMENTS STIPULATING THE SCOPE AND THE ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION OF THE PROGRAM, THIS OUTLINE DESCRIBES SUCH MAJOR…

  4. Evaluation of a Community-Based Aging Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Hui-Chuan; Wang, Chun-Hou; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chang, Ming-Chen; Wang, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the outcome and process of a community-based aging intervention program for the elderly in Taiwan. The program included education on nutrition and dietary behavior and on physical activities. Outcome and process evaluations were conducted. The program may have had some effects on decreasing some dietary behavioral problems and…

  5. Report on High Technology Programs in Illinois Public Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    Survey results are presented from a study of the steps being taken by the 52 Illinois public community colleges to develop and provide programs in high technology fields. First, high technology programs are defined as those occupational programs that educate and train individuals to operate, maintain, and/or repair micro-electronic or computerized…

  6. NASA's Agricultural Program: A USDA/Grower Partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKellip, Rodney; Thomas, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Ag20/20 is a partnership between USDA, NASA, and four national commodity associations. It is driven by the information needs of U.S. farmers. Ag20/20 is focused on utilization of earth science and remote sensing for decision-making and oriented toward economically viable operational solutions. Its purpose is to accelerate the use of remote sensing and other geospatial technologies on the farm to: 1) Increase the production efficiency of the American farmer; 2) Reduce crop production risks; 3) Improve environmental stewardship tools for agricultural production.

  7. Molecular marker database for efficient use in agricultural breeding programs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Kug; Lee, Gang-Seob; Mo, Ji-Su; Bae, Seon-Hwa; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The National Agricultural Biotechnology Information Center (NABIC) constructed a web-based molecular marker database to provide information about 7,847 sequence-tagged site (STS) markers identified in the 11 species using a next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. The database consists of three major functional categories: keyword search, detailed viewer and download function. The molecular marker annotation table provides detailed information such as ownership information, basic information, and STS-related characterization information. Availability The database is available for free at http://nabic.rda.go.kr/Molecularmarker PMID:26527854

  8. Soil biota community structure and abundance under agricultural intensification and extensification.

    PubMed

    Postma-Blaauw, Maria B; de Goede, Ron G M; Bloem, Jaap; Faber, Jack H; Brussaard, Lijbert

    2010-02-01

    Understanding the impacts of agricultural intensification and extensification on soil biota communities is useful in order to preserve and restore biological diversity in agricultural soils and enhance the role of soil biota in agroecosystem functioning. Over four consecutive years, we investigated the effects of agricultural intensification and extensification (including conversion of grassland to arable land and vice versa, increased and decreased levels of mineral fertilization, and monoculture compared to crop rotation) on major soil biota group abundances and functional diversity. We integrated and compared effects across taxonomic levels to identify sensitive species groups. Conversion of grassland to arable land negatively affected both abundances and functional diversity of soil biota. Further intensification of the cropping system by increased fertilization and reduced crop diversity exerted smaller and differential effects on different soil biota groups. Agricultural intensification affected abundances of taxonomic groups with larger body size (earthworms, enchytraeids, microarthropods, and nematodes) more negatively than smaller-sized taxonomic groups (protozoans, bacteria, and fungi). Also functional group diversity and composition were more negatively affected in larger-sized soil biota (earthworms, predatory mites) than in smaller-sized soil biota (nematodes). Furthermore, larger soil biota appeared to be primarily affected by short-term consequences of conversion (disturbance, loss of habitat), whereas smaller soil biota were predominantly affected by long-term consequences (probably loss of organic matter). Reestablishment of grassland resulted in increased abundances of soil biota groups, but since not all groups increased in the same measure, the community structure was not completely restored. We concluded that larger-sized soil biota are more sensitive to agricultural intensification than smaller-sized soil biota. Furthermore, since larger

  9. Successful Community College Fund-Raising Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Spencer

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a study whose primary purposes were to determine the characteristics of an effective fund-raising program, the marketing practices that contribute to the success of a fund-raising program, and factors of the development system's influence on a fund-raising program. This study utilized a Delphi research instrument. Initially,…

  10. 77 FR 6619 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ...'') (76 FR 9626). The CA Pilot Program was introduced to increase SBA-guaranteed loans to small businesses... financings that are approved by SBA. (76 FR 56262) In response to comments received on the CA Pilot Program... entrepreneurs in underserved markets, SBA is issuing this Notice to revise certain program...

  11. Isotopic evidence for residential mobility of farming communities during the transition to agriculture in Britain.

    PubMed

    Neil, Samantha; Evans, Jane; Montgomery, Janet; Scarre, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Development of agriculture is often assumed to be accompanied by a decline in residential mobility, and sedentism is frequently proposed to provide the basis for economic intensification, population growth and increasing social complexity. In Britain, however, the nature of the agricultural transition (ca 4000 BC) and its effect on residence patterns has been intensely debated. Some authors attribute the transition to the arrival of populations who practised a system of sedentary intensive mixed farming similar to that of the very earliest agricultural regimes in central Europe, ca 5500 BC, with cultivation of crops in fixed plots and livestock keeping close to permanently occupied farmsteads. Others argue that local hunter-gatherers within Britain adopted selected elements of a farming economy and retained a mobile way of life. We use strontium and oxygen isotope analysis of tooth enamel from an Early Neolithic burial population in Gloucestershire, England, to evaluate the residence patterns of early farmers. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that early farming communities in Britain were residentially mobile and were not fully sedentary. Results highlight the diverse nature of settlement strategies associated with early farming in Europe and are of wider significance to understanding the effect of the transition to agriculture on residence patterns.

  12. Isotopic evidence for residential mobility of farming communities during the transition to agriculture in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Neil, Samantha; Evans, Jane; Montgomery, Janet; Scarre, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Development of agriculture is often assumed to be accompanied by a decline in residential mobility, and sedentism is frequently proposed to provide the basis for economic intensification, population growth and increasing social complexity. In Britain, however, the nature of the agricultural transition (ca 4000 BC) and its effect on residence patterns has been intensely debated. Some authors attribute the transition to the arrival of populations who practised a system of sedentary intensive mixed farming similar to that of the very earliest agricultural regimes in central Europe, ca 5500 BC, with cultivation of crops in fixed plots and livestock keeping close to permanently occupied farmsteads. Others argue that local hunter–gatherers within Britain adopted selected elements of a farming economy and retained a mobile way of life. We use strontium and oxygen isotope analysis of tooth enamel from an Early Neolithic burial population in Gloucestershire, England, to evaluate the residence patterns of early farmers. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that early farming communities in Britain were residentially mobile and were not fully sedentary. Results highlight the diverse nature of settlement strategies associated with early farming in Europe and are of wider significance to understanding the effect of the transition to agriculture on residence patterns. PMID:26909177

  13. Determinants of Organophosphorus Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels in Young Children Living in an Agricultural Community

    PubMed Central

    Bradman, Asa; Castorina, Rosemary; Barr, Dana Boyd; Chevrier, Jonathan; Harnly, Martha E.; Eisen, Ellen A.; McKone, Thomas E.; Harley, Kim; Holland, Nina; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are used in agriculture and several are registered for home use. As young children age they may experience different pesticide exposures due to varying diet, behavior, and other factors. We measured six OP dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites (three dimethyl alkylphosphates (DMAP) and three diethyl alkylphosphates (DEAP)) in urine samples collected from ∼400 children living in an agricultural community when they were 6, 12, and 24 months old. We examined bivariate associations between DAP metabolite levels and determinants such as age, diet, season, and parent occupation. To evaluate independent impacts, we then used generalized linear mixed multivariable models including interaction terms with age. The final models indicated that DMAP metabolite levels increased with age. DMAP levels were also positively associated with daily servings of produce at 6- and 24-months. Among the 6-month olds, DMAP metabolite levels were higher when samples were collected during the summer/spring versus the winter/fall months. Among the 12-month olds, DMAP and DEAP metabolites were higher when children lived ≤60 meters from an agricultural field. Among the 24-month-olds, DEAP metabolite levels were higher during the summer/spring months. Our findings suggest that there are multiple determinants of OP pesticide exposures, notably dietary intake and temporal and spatial proximity to agricultural use. The impact of these determinants varied by age and class of DAP metabolite. PMID:21695029

  14. Seasonal fluctuations of bacterial community diversity in agricultural soil and experimental validation by laboratory disturbance experiments.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph; Wehrli, Bernhard; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2008-08-01

    Natural fluctuations in soil microbial communities are poorly documented because of the inherent difficulty to perform a simultaneous analysis of the relative abundances of multiple populations over a long time period. Yet, it is important to understand the magnitudes of community composition variability as a function of natural influences (e.g., temperature, plant growth, or rainfall) because this forms the reference or baseline against which external disturbances (e.g., anthropogenic emissions) can be judged. Second, definition of baseline fluctuations in complex microbial communities may help to understand at which point the systems become unbalanced and cannot return to their original composition. In this paper, we examined the seasonal fluctuations in the bacterial community of an agricultural soil used for regular plant crop production by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling (T-RFLP) of the amplified 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene diversity. Cluster and statistical analysis of T-RFLP data showed that soil bacterial communities fluctuated very little during the seasons (similarity indices between 0.835 and 0.997) with insignificant variations in 16S rRNA gene richness and diversity indices. Despite overall insignificant fluctuations, between 8 and 30% of all terminal restriction fragments changed their relative intensity in a significant manner among consecutive time samples. To determine the magnitude of community variations induced by external factors, soil samples were subjected to either inoculation with a pure bacterial culture, addition of the herbicide mecoprop, or addition of nutrients. All treatments resulted in statistically measurable changes of T-RFLP profiles of the communities. Addition of nutrients or bacteria plus mecoprop resulted in bacteria composition, which did not return to the original profile within 14 days. We propose that at less than 70% similarity in T-RFLP, the bacterial communities risk to

  15. Phosphorus Chemistry and Bacterial Community Composition Interact in Brackish Sediments Receiving Agricultural Discharges

    PubMed Central

    Sinkko, Hanna; Sihvonen, Leila M.; Sivonen, Kaarina; Leivuori, Mirja; Rantanen, Matias; Paulin, Lars; Lyra, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Background External nutrient discharges have caused eutrophication in many estuaries and coastal seas such as the Baltic Sea. The sedimented nutrients can affect bacterial communities which, in turn, are widely believed to contribute to release of nutrients such as phosphorus from the sediment. Methods We investigated relationships between bacterial communities and chemical forms of phosphorus as well as elements involved in its cycling in brackish sediments using up-to-date multivariate statistical methods. Bacterial community composition was determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and cloning of the 16S rRNA gene. Results and Conclusions The bacterial community composition differed along gradients of nutrients, especially of different phosphorus forms, from the estuary receiving agricultural phosphorus loading to the open sea. This suggests that the chemical composition of sediment phosphorus, which has been affected by riverine phosphorus loading, influenced on bacterial communities. Chemical and spatial parameters explained 25% and 11% of the variation in bacterial communities. Deltaproteobacteria, presumptively sulphate and sulphur/iron reducing, were strongly associated to chemical parameters, also when spatial autocorrelation was taken into account. Sulphate reducers correlated positively with labile organic phosphorus and total nitrogen in the open sea sediments. Sulphur/iron reducers and sulphate reducers linked to iron reduction correlated positively with aluminium- and iron-bound phosphorus, and total iron in the estuary. The sulphate and sulphur/iron reducing bacteria can thus have an important role both in the mineralization and mobilization of nutrients from sediment. Significance Novelty in our study is that relationships between bacterial community composition and different phosphorus forms, instead of total phosphorus, were investigated. Total phosphorus does not necessarily bring out interactions between bacteria and

  16. Temporal dynamics influenced by global change: bee community phenology in urban, agricultural, and natural landscapes.

    PubMed

    Leong, Misha; Ponisio, Lauren C; Kremen, Claire; Thorp, Robbin W; Roderick, George K

    2016-03-01

    Urbanization and agricultural intensification of landscapes are important drivers of global change, which in turn have direct impacts on local ecological communities leading to shifts in species distributions and interactions. Here, we illustrate how human-altered landscapes, with novel ornamental and crop plant communities, result not only in changes to local community diversity of floral-dependent species, but also in shifts in seasonal abundance of bee pollinators. Three years of data on the spatio-temporal distributions of 91 bee species show that seasonal patterns of abundance and species richness in human-altered landscapes varied significantly less compared to natural habitats in which floral resources are relatively scarce in the dry summer months. These findings demonstrate that anthropogenic environmental changes in urban and agricultural systems, here mediated through changes in plant resources and water inputs, can alter the temporal dynamics of pollinators that depend on them. Changes in phenology of interactions can be an important, though frequently overlooked, mechanism of global change.

  17. Bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of Vitis vinifera L. cultivated under distinct agricultural practices in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Vega-Avila, A D; Gumiere, T; Andrade, P A M; Lima-Perim, J E; Durrer, A; Baigori, M; Vazquez, F; Andreote, F D

    2015-02-01

    Plants interact with a myriad of microbial cells in the rhizosphere, an environment that is considered to be important for plant development. However, the differential structuring of rhizosphere microbial communities due to plant cultivation under differential agricultural practices remains to be described for most plant species. Here we describe the rhizosphere microbiome of grapevine cultivated under conventional and organic practices, using a combination of cultivation-independent approaches. The quantification of bacterial 16S rRNA and nifH genes, by quantitative PCR (qPCR), revealed similar amounts of these genes in the rhizosphere in both vineyards. PCR-DGGE was used to detect differences in the structure of bacterial communities, including both the complete whole communities and specific fractions, such as Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and those harboring the nitrogen-fixing related gene nifH. When analyzed by a multivariate approach (redundancy analysis), the shifts observed in the bacterial communities were poorly explained by variations in the physical and chemical characteristics of the rhizosphere. These approaches were complemented by high-throughput sequencing (67,830 sequences) based on the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene, identifying the major bacterial groups present in the rhizosphere of grapevines: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Acidobacteria, Cloroflexi, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes, which occur in distinct proportions in the rhizosphere from each vineyard. The differences might be related to the selection of plant metabolism upon distinct reservoirs of microbial cells found in each vineyard. The results fill a gap in the knowledge of the rhizosphere of grapevines and also show distinctions in these bacterial communities due to agricultural practices. PMID:25527391

  18. Pyrosequencing Reveals Changes in Soil Bacterial Communities after Conversion of Yungas Forests to Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Montecchia, Marcela S.; Tosi, Micaela; Soria, Marcelo A.; Vogrig, Jimena A.; Sydorenko, Oksana; Correa, Olga S.

    2015-01-01

    The Southern Andean Yungas in Northwest Argentina constitute one of the main biodiversity hotspots in the world. Considerable changes in land use have taken place in this ecoregion, predominantly related to forest conversion to croplands, inducing losses in above-ground biodiversity and with potential impact on soil microbial communities. In this study, we used high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene to assess whether land-use change and time under agriculture affect the composition and diversity of soil bacterial communities. We selected two areas dedicated to sugarcane and soybean production, comprising both short- and long-term agricultural sites, and used the adjacent native forest soils as a reference. Land-use change altered the composition of bacterial communities, with differences between productive areas despite the similarities between both forests. At the phylum level, only Verrucomicrobia and Firmicutes changed in abundance after deforestation for sugarcane and soybean cropping, respectively. In cultivated soils, Verrucomicrobia decreased sharply (~80%), while Firmicutes were more abundant. Despite the fact that local diversity was increased in sugarcane systems and was not altered by soybean cropping, phylogenetic beta diversity declined along both chronosequences, evidencing a homogenization of soil bacterial communities over time. In spite of the detected alteration in composition and diversity, we found a core microbiome resistant to the disturbances caused by the conversion of forests to cultivated lands and few or none exclusive OTUs for each land-use type. The overall changes in the relative abundance of copiotrophic and oligotrophic taxa may have an impact in soil ecosystem functionality. However, communities with many taxa in common may also share many functional attributes, allowing to maintain at least some soil ecosystem services after forest conversion to croplands. PMID:25793893

  19. Pyrosequencing reveals changes in soil bacterial communities after conversion of Yungas forests to agriculture.

    PubMed

    Montecchia, Marcela S; Tosi, Micaela; Soria, Marcelo A; Vogrig, Jimena A; Sydorenko, Oksana; Correa, Olga S

    2015-01-01

    The Southern Andean Yungas in Northwest Argentina constitute one of the main biodiversity hotspots in the world. Considerable changes in land use have taken place in this ecoregion, predominantly related to forest conversion to croplands, inducing losses in above-ground biodiversity and with potential impact on soil microbial communities. In this study, we used high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene to assess whether land-use change and time under agriculture affect the composition and diversity of soil bacterial communities. We selected two areas dedicated to sugarcane and soybean production, comprising both short- and long-term agricultural sites, and used the adjacent native forest soils as a reference. Land-use change altered the composition of bacterial communities, with differences between productive areas despite the similarities between both forests. At the phylum level, only Verrucomicrobia and Firmicutes changed in abundance after deforestation for sugarcane and soybean cropping, respectively. In cultivated soils, Verrucomicrobia decreased sharply (~80%), while Firmicutes were more abundant. Despite the fact that local diversity was increased in sugarcane systems and was not altered by soybean cropping, phylogenetic beta diversity declined along both chronosequences, evidencing a homogenization of soil bacterial communities over time. In spite of the detected alteration in composition and diversity, we found a core microbiome resistant to the disturbances caused by the conversion of forests to cultivated lands and few or none exclusive OTUs for each land-use type. The overall changes in the relative abundance of copiotrophic and oligotrophic taxa may have an impact in soil ecosystem functionality. However, communities with many taxa in common may also share many functional attributes, allowing to maintain at least some soil ecosystem services after forest conversion to croplands.

  20. Pediatric obesity community programs: barriers & facilitators toward sustainability.

    PubMed

    Po'e, Eli K; Gesell, Sabina B; Lynne Caples, T; Escarfuller, Juan; Barkin, Shari L

    2010-08-01

    Our current generation of young people could become the first generation to live shorter lives than their parents. Families need resources in their community to address this issue. Identifying barriers and facilitators of community organizations to offer obesity-related services is a first step in understanding sustainable community programs. The objective of this study is to identify common barriers and facilitators in community organizational programs designed to prevent or reduce pediatric obesity. We conducted an exploratory qualitative research study based on grounded theory. Thirty-six community organizations were identified based on self-descriptions of goals involving pediatric obesity. Semi-structured, systematic, face-to-face interviews among program directors (n = 24) were recorded, transcribed, and coded for recurrent themes. Relevant themes were abstracted from interviews by a standardized iterative process by two independent reviewers between December 2007 and November 2008. Theme discordance was reconciled by a third reviewer. Seventy percent of organizations indicated that obesity prevention/treatment was their explicit goal with remaining groups indicating healthy lifestyles as a more general goal. Facilitators to provision of these programs included: programmatic enhancements such as improved curriculums (73%), community involvement such as volunteers (62.5%), and partnerships with other programs (54.2%). Barriers that threatened sustainability included lack of consistent funding (43.8%), lack of consistent participation from the target population (41.7%) and lack of support staff (20.8%). New approaches in fostering partnerships between organizations need to be developed. Building coalitions and engaging community members in developing community based programs may be a helpful strategy to strengthen community-based programs to address the pediatric obesity epidemic.

  1. A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE NEED AND TYPE OF TRAINING PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNICIANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    THE OBJECTIVE WAS TO STUDY AGRICULTURAL PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNICIANS IN THE STATE TO DETERMINE (1) THE NUMBER EMPLOYED BY FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL AGENCIES, (2) EXISTING SHORTAGES, (3) THE TYPE OF TRAINING NEEDED, (4) DESIRABILITY OF TRAINING PROGRAM AT MT. SAN ANTONIO COLLEGE, (5) EQUIPMENT AND PROGRAMS NEEDED, AND (6) EQUIPMENT NEEDED IN A…

  2. Guidelines and Procedures: Directed Work-Experience Programs in Vocational Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Harold R.; And Others

    The growing demand for increased diversification of programs and greater specialization in work experience for students of vocational agriculture has created a need for sound teacher guidelines for initiating, establishing, and administering a vocational education program that combines the benefits of school instruction, on-the-job training, and…

  3. Community Colleges Build Programs that Fit Immigrants' Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Westchester Community College, which teaches English to about 4,000 non-native speakers each year, has one of the most comprehensive English as a Second Language programs in the country. It's also leading the charge to transform immigrant education and make it a national priority. In 2008, the college started the Community College Consortium for…

  4. The Emergence of Community in a Preservice Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumsion, Jennifer; Patterson, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    This paper traces the unexpected emergence of community in a recently reconceptualized Teachers as Researchers unit in a preservice teacher education program. Drawing on data collected from 145 of the 292 students who completed the unit, we chronicle and theorize about key events, tensions, and dynamics in the evolution of the community, and…

  5. Islamic Community Worker Training Program for the Management of Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Tina

    2002-01-01

    To prepare Islamic background bilingual community workers to provide culture and gender appropriate support to women with depression, an education program was developed in consultation with Islamic community leaders. Participants indicated that they were able to apply the new knowledge and skills to provide appropriate support to women with…

  6. Setting New Priorities: Enhancing the School-Community Relations Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Meter, Eddy J.

    1993-01-01

    Presents a one-day workshop format for initiating a solid community relations program. During the workshop, teachers and administrators work together to prioritize new and existing community-relations options and select adhoc committees to develop implementation plans. Typical options include school-business partnerships, teacher home visitation,…

  7. Implementing Quality Service-Learning Programs in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaknin, Lauren Weiner; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2013-01-01

    This cross-case comparative study at Western Community College and the University of the Coast explored through a constructive lens the characteristics that lead to sustainable, high quality service-learning programs and how they are implemented at institutions of higher education. The researchers determined that both Western Community College and…

  8. Politics, Programs, and Local Governments: The Case of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy Haffron

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on two aspects of governance and policy: the electoral process by which community college trustees are selected and the responsiveness of colleges to their communities as manifested by their programs. Available from Journal of Politics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. (Author/IRT)

  9. EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM FOR MOBILIZING COLLEGE STUDENT VOLUNTEER SERVICES TO COMMUNITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ESSER, GEORGE H., JR.

    AN EXPERIMENT WAS CONDUCTED IN MOBILIZING COLLEGE STUDENTS FOR SUMMER ASSISTANCE IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND POVERTY PROGRAMS. APPROXIMATELY 100 STUDENT VOLUNTEERS WERE CHOSEN TO PARTICIPATE ON THE BASES OF THEIR STABILITY, MATURITY, ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE, AND DEDICATION. THEY WERE PLACED IN SIX AREAS WHERE COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY ACTION…

  10. A small grants program to involve communities in research.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Beti; Ondelacy, Stephanie; Godina, Ruby; Coronado, Gloria D

    2010-06-01

    A key tenet of community-based participatory research is that communities be involved in all facets of research, from defining the problem to identifying solutions, to assisting in the research, and to participating in the publication of results. In this study, we instituted a small grants program for community participation. A Request for Applications (RFA) was developed and circulated widely throughout the Valley. The RFA sought proposals to address health disparities in cancer education, prevention, and treatment among Hispanics living in the Valley. Funds available were $2,500.00-3,500.00 for 1 year's worth of work. To help evaluate the progress of the RFA community projects according to the perspectives of the Community Advisory Board (CAB), an open-ended, semi-structured interview was created and administered by a former staff member to CAB members. In 4 years, ten small grants proposed by community members were funded. Funds allocated totaled approximately $25,000. Interviews with CAB members indicated that the RFA program was perceived positively, but there were concerns about sustainability. Our community grants program resulted in the implementation of several novel cancer prevention programs conducted by a variety of community organizations in the Lower Yakima Valley.

  11. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  12. A Small Grants Program to Involve Communities in Research

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Beti; Ondelacy, Stephanie; Godina, Ruby; Coronado, Gloria D.

    2010-01-01

    A key tenet of community-based participatory research is that communities be involved in all facets of research, from defining the problem to identifying solutions, to assisting in the research, and to participating in the publication of results. In this study, we instituted a small grants program for community participation. A Request for Applications (RFA) was developed and circulated widely throughout the Valley. The RFA sought proposals to address health disparities in cancer education, prevention, and treatment among Hispanics living in the Valley. Funds available were $2,500.00–3,500.00 for 1 year’s worth of work. To help evaluate the progress of the RFA community projects according to the perspectives of the Community Advisory Board (CAB), an open-ended, semi-structured interview was created and administered by a former staff member to CAB members. In 4 years, ten small grants proposed by community members were funded. Funds allocated totaled approximately $25,000. Interviews with CAB members indicated that the RFA program was perceived positively, but there were concerns about sustainability. Our community grants program resulted in the implementation of several novel cancer prevention programs conducted by a variety of community organizations in the Lower Yakima Valley. PMID:20146091

  13. The Senior Community Service Employment Program: The First 25 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Karen, Ed.

    The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) provides subsidized, part-time employment to low-income persons age 55 and older. Participants work an average of 20 hours a week and are employed in a wide variety of community service activities and facilities, including home health care, adult day care, and nutritional services. The 11…

  14. The Effects of Structured Transfer Programs in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Many community college students begin with the intention of transferring to a four-year school but relatively few actually do. One hypothesis for the low rates of successful two-to-four year transfers is that academic program choices in community colleges are too numerous and too complex. In this paper, the author will address a longer term…

  15. Community Service and Continuing Education. Program Abstracts. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lorna M., Ed.

    This comprehensive volume of innovative continuing education programs contains complete descriptions of some 750 cross-indexed projects in four general areas--human resource development, natural resource development, economic development, and community development--directed at community problems that can benefit from adult education. It brings…

  16. Rural Community Development: A Program, Policy, and Research Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Stephen J.; Freedman, Abby J.

    The study documents what happened in 10 rural communities when a federal educational funding program (Experimental Schools) in 1972 provided 5-year grants for demonstration projects designed both to improve the school system and, through the schools, to address a variety of community needs. The study employs two strategies to document the ways in…

  17. Family, School, and Community Partnerships: Practical Strategies for Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn-Stevenson, Matia

    2014-01-01

    Much attention is given today to the importance of forging family, school, and community partnerships. Growing numbers of schools, many of them with afterschool programs, are dedicating resources to support and sustain relationships with families and community-based organizations. And, among government agencies and the philanthropic sector, there…

  18. Environmental Filtering of Microbial Communities in Agricultural Soil Shifts with Crop Growth.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Sarah K; Williams, Ryan J; Hofmockel, Kirsten S

    2015-01-01

    Plant and soil properties cooperatively structure soil microbial communities, with implications for ecosystem functioning. However, the extent to which each factor contributes to community structuring is not fully understood. To quantify the influence of plants and soil properties on microbial diversity and composition in an agricultural context, we conducted an experiment within a corn-based annual cropping system and a perennial switchgrass cropping system across three topographic positions. We sequenced barcoded 16S ribosomal RNA genes from whole soil three times throughout a single growing season and across two years in July. To target the belowground effects of plants, we also sampled rhizosphere soil in July. We hypothesized that microbial community α-diversity and composition (β-diversity) would be more sensitive to cropping system effects (annual vs. perennial inputs) than edaphic differences among topographic positions, with greater differences occurring in the rhizosphere compared to whole soil. We found that microbial community composition consistently varied with topographic position, and cropping system and the rhizosphere influenced α-diversity. In July, cropping system and rhizosphere structured a small but specific group of microbes implying a subset of microbial taxa, rather than broad shifts in community composition, may explain previously observed differences in resource cycling between treatments. Using rank abundance analysis, we detected enrichment of Saprospirales and Actinomycetales, including cellulose and chitin degraders, in the rhizosphere soil and enrichment of Nitrospirales, Syntrophobacterales, and MND1 in the whole soil. Overall, these findings support environmental filtering for the soil microbial community first by soil and second by the rhizosphere. Across cropping systems, plants selected for a general rhizosphere community with evidence for plant-specific effects related to time of sampling.

  19. A Hearing Conservation Program for Wisconsin Youth Working in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knobloch, Mary Jo; Broste, Steven K.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the effects of a multicomponent, four-year hearing-conservation program for farm youth. Researchers conducted pre- and postintervention hearing tests in control and intervention students. Surveys examined family hearing loss, farm work, noise exposure, and hearing-protection device (HPD) utilization. Significantly more intervention…

  20. Impacts of agriculture on the parasite communities of northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) in southern Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    King, K C; McLaughlin, J D; Gendron, A D; Pauli, B D; Giroux, I; Rondeau, B; Boily, M; Juneau, P; Marcogliese, D J

    2007-12-01

    Given that numerous amphibians are suffering population declines, it is becoming increasingly important to examine the relationship between disease and environmental disturbance. Indeed, while many studies relate anthropogenic activity to changes in the parasitism of snails and fishes, little is known of the impact on the parasites of amphibians, particularly from agriculture. For 2 years, the parasite communities of metamorphic northern leopard frogs from 7 agricultural wetlands were compared with those from 2 reference wetlands to study differences in parasite community diversity and abundance of various species under pristine conditions and 3 categories of disturbance: only agricultural landscape, only pesticides, and agricultural landscape with pesticides. Agricultural (and urban) area was negatively related to species richness, and associated with the near absence of adult parasites and species that infect birds or mammals. We suggest that agriculture and urbanization may hinder parasite transmission to frogs by limiting access of other vertebrate hosts of their parasites to wetlands. The only parasite found at all localities was an unidentified echinostome infecting the kidneys. This parasite dominated communities in localities surrounded by the most agricultural land, suggesting generalist parasites may persist in disrupted habitats. Community composition was associated with dissolved organic carbon and conductivity, but few links were found with pesticides. Pollution effects may be masked by a strong impact of land use on parasite transmission. PMID:17672926

  1. Impacts of agriculture on the parasite communities of northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) in southern Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    King, K C; McLaughlin, J D; Gendron, A D; Pauli, B D; Giroux, I; Rondeau, B; Boily, M; Juneau, P; Marcogliese, D J

    2007-12-01

    Given that numerous amphibians are suffering population declines, it is becoming increasingly important to examine the relationship between disease and environmental disturbance. Indeed, while many studies relate anthropogenic activity to changes in the parasitism of snails and fishes, little is known of the impact on the parasites of amphibians, particularly from agriculture. For 2 years, the parasite communities of metamorphic northern leopard frogs from 7 agricultural wetlands were compared with those from 2 reference wetlands to study differences in parasite community diversity and abundance of various species under pristine conditions and 3 categories of disturbance: only agricultural landscape, only pesticides, and agricultural landscape with pesticides. Agricultural (and urban) area was negatively related to species richness, and associated with the near absence of adult parasites and species that infect birds or mammals. We suggest that agriculture and urbanization may hinder parasite transmission to frogs by limiting access of other vertebrate hosts of their parasites to wetlands. The only parasite found at all localities was an unidentified echinostome infecting the kidneys. This parasite dominated communities in localities surrounded by the most agricultural land, suggesting generalist parasites may persist in disrupted habitats. Community composition was associated with dissolved organic carbon and conductivity, but few links were found with pesticides. Pollution effects may be masked by a strong impact of land use on parasite transmission.

  2. Effects of Triclosan and biosolids on microbial community composition in an agricultural soil

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyoku, Temitope A.; Young, Thomas M.; Scow, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a widely used antimicrobial agent found at high concentrations in biosolids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. The effect of adding TCS, in the presence or absence of biosolids, on the composition of an agricultural soil microbial community was measured using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). Most changes observed in microbial community composition were attributable to addition of biosolids or passage of time, with smaller changes due to TCS exposure, regardless of the biosolids presence. TCS slightly reduced the relative abundance of Gram positive and negative bacteria and fungi, both with or without biosolids. Bacteria were more sensitive than eukaryotes, consistent with the mode of action of TCS, which selectively targets fatty acid synthesis and disrupts cell membranes of bacteria. TCS slightly increased biomarkers of microbial stress, but stress biomarkers were lower in all biosolid treated soils, presumably due to increased availability of nutrients mitigating potential TCS toxicity. PMID:24597039

  3. Effects of triclosan and biosolids on microbial community composition in an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Park, Inmyoung; Zhang, Nannan; Ogunyoku, Temitope A; Young, Thomas M; Scow, Kate M

    2013-12-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a widely used antimicrobial agent found at high concentrations in biosolids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. The effect of adding TCS, in the presence or absence of biosolids, on the composition of an agricultural soil microbial community was measured using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). Most changes observed in microbial community composition were attributable to the addition of biosolids or to the passage of time, with smaller changes due to TCS exposure, regardless of the presence of biosolids. TCS slightly reduced the relative abundance of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi, with or without biosolids. Bacteria were more sensitive than eukaryotes, consistent with the mode of action of TCS, which selectively targets fatty acid synthesis and disrupts cell membranes of bacteria. TCS slightly increased biomarkers of microbial stress, but stress biomarkers were lower in all biosolid treated soils, presumably due to increased availability of nutrients mitigating potential TCS toxicity.

  4. Community-Based Native Teacher Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimbecker, Connie; Minner, Sam; Prater, Greg

    This paper describes two exemplary school-based Native teacher education programs offered by Northern Arizona University (NAU) to serve Navajo students and by Lakehead University (Ontario) to serve members of the Nishnabe Nation of northern Ontario. The Reaching American Indian Special/Elementary Educators (RAISE) program is located in Kayenta,…

  5. Produce Your Own: A Community Gardening Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, JoLynn; Arnold, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Many County Extension offices offer an adult Master Gardener Program, which includes advanced gardening training, short courses, newsletters, and conferences. However, with the comprehensive training provided comes a large time commitment. The Produce Your Own program was created to introduce adults to gardening in a similar manner, but with…

  6. Citrus Community College District Mentor Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, Diane; Sprague, Caroline

    The Citrus College faculty and staff addressed the problem of lower career aspirations among women by establishing a support group, Citrus Women in Higher Education (CWHE). In addition to group meetings and special programs of interest, the CWHE has developed a mentor program to address the problem of blocked careers faced by women. The goals of…

  7. The Windana Therapeutic Community's Action Adventure Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Richard; DeBever, Marijke

    The Windana Society is a drug and alcohol agency in Victoria (Australia) that operates, among other things, a residential drug rehabilitation program in a rural setting. The program utilizes a holistic approach that addresses health and physical fitness; education; vocational and re-integration support; and psychological, emotional, spiritual, and…

  8. Evaluating Academic Programs in California's Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Andrew M.; Leigh, Duane E.

    2004-01-01

    Community colleges have traditionally received funding based on student enrollment, which is usually considered an input in the educational process. Recently, however, legislation enacted at the federal and state levels specifies that funding is to hinge, as least in part, on student performance--an output measure. Performance standards improve…

  9. Program Handbook: Community-College Forums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution, Washington, DC.

    More than 200 years after its founding, the U.S. government continues to thrive on argument, dispute, and debate. For citizens to be fully engaged in the political process, they must continue to participate in the tradition of public discourse exemplified by the ratification debate of 1787-88. College-Community Forums are designed to further…

  10. Marketing Strategy for Community College Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffee, Linda; Miller, Bob W.

    1980-01-01

    Traces the expansion of marketing in postsecondary education. Enumerates the goals of Prince George's Community College's marketing task force. Defines marketing and suggests strategies for targeting marketing efforts toward high school students, business and industry, the general public, and students within the college. (AYC)

  11. Designing Therapeutic Recreation Programs in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Marcia Jean; And Others

    This publication is designed to assist in the development of therapeutic recreation services in the community and may also be used in the preparation of procedural manuals or risk management plans. Therapeutic recreation is defined as the process of assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation, applied through a helping relationship to…

  12. Effect of agricultural management on nematode communities in a mediterranean agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Lavian, I; Steinberger, Y

    2001-12-01

    The effects of agricultural management on the soil nematode community were investigated in a field study at depths of 0 to 10 cm and 10 to 20 cm during a peanut (Arachis hypogaea) growing season in Israel. Nineteen nematode families and 23 genera were observed. Rhabditidae, Cephalobus, Eucephalobus, Aphelenchus, Aphelenchoides, Tetylenchus, Tylenchus, Dorylaimus, and Discolaimus were the dominant family and genera. Ecological measures of soil nematode community structure, diversity, and maturity indices were assessed and compared between the managed (by fertilization, irrigation, and pesticide application) and unmanaged fields. The total number of nematodes at a 10-cm depth during peanut-sowing, mid-season, and harvest periods was higher in the treated (managed) plot than in the control (unmanaged) plot. Bacterivores and fungivores were the most abundant trophic groups in both plots and both depths. The relative abundance of each group averaged 60.8 to 67.3% and 11.5 to 19.6% of the nematode community, respectively. Plant parasites and omnivores-predators at the 0 to 10-cm depth were much less abundant than any other two groups in our experimental plots. During the growing season, except the harvest period, populations of plant parasites and omnivores-predators at the 10 to 20-cm depth were lower in the treated plot than in the control plot. Maturity index (MI), plant-parasite index (PPI), and ratio of fungivores and bacterivores to plant parasites (WI) were found to be more sensitive indicators than other ecological indices for assessing the response of nematode communities to agricultural management in an Israeli agroecosystem.

  13. Program To Address Sociocultural Barriers to Health Care in Hispanic Communities. National Program Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mike; Heroux, Janet

    Many members of the Hispanic community are separated from the larger community by language barriers and different cultures and belief systems. These factors can affect Hispanic Americans' ability to seek and gain access to the health care system. The Program To Address Sociocultural Barriers to Health Care in the Hispanic Community, known as…

  14. 75 FR 52960 - Medicare Program; Rural Community Hospital Demonstration Program: Solicitation of Additional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... the June 2, 2010 Federal Register (75 FR 30918)). B. Participation in the Demonstration To participate... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Rural Community Hospital... hospitals to participate in the Rural Community Hospital Demonstration program for a 5-year period....

  15. 75 FR 67751 - Medicare Program: Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program: Community-Based Care... about the upcoming Community-based Care Transitions Program. The meeting is open to the public, but... will be posted on the CMS Care Transitions Web site at...

  16. Agricultural and recreational impacts of the conservation reserve program in rural North Dakota, USA.

    PubMed

    Bangsund, Dean A; Hodur, Nancy M; Leistritz, F Larry

    2004-07-01

    The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), created in 1985, provides conservation benefits and agricultural supply control through voluntary, long-term retirement of crop land. While the effects of the CRP on the agricultural sector are well understood, the implications of its conservation benefits for rural economies remain largely undocumented. To quantify the effects on rural economies, this study addressed the net economic effects of decreased agricultural activity and increased recreational activity associated with the CRP in six rural areas of North Dakota from 1996 to 2000. Based on the level of economic activity that would have occurred in the absence of the program, net revenues from CRP land if returned to agricultural production in the six study areas were estimated at $50.2 million annually or $37 per acre of land currently enrolled in the CRP. Recreational (hunting) revenues as a result of the CRP in the study areas were estimated at $12.8 million annually or $9.45 per CRP-acre. The net economic effect of the CRP (lost agricultural revenues and gains in recreational expenditures) indicated that several areas of the state are not as economically burdened by the CRP as previous research has suggested. In addition, the net economic effects of the program would appear more favourable if revenues from all CRP-based recreation were included. The degree that recreational revenues offset agricultural losses might be further enhanced by enterprises that capitalize on the economic opportunities associated with expanded recreational activities on CRP lands.

  17. 7 CFR 1940.591 - Community Program Guaranteed loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... allocations. See § 1940.552(a) of this subpart. (b) Basic formula criteria, data source and weight. See § 1940.552(b) of this subpart. (1) The criteria used in the basic formula are: (i) State's percentage of... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Methodology and Formulas for Allocation...

  18. The Sonagachi Project: a sustainable community intervention program.

    PubMed

    Jana, Smarajit; Basu, Ishika; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Newman, Peter A

    2004-10-01

    High rates of HIV infection among sex workers in India indicate the importance of understanding the process of establishing a sustainable community intervention program. The Sonagachi Project, based in Calcutta, India, has been associated with lower HIV rates among sex workers as compared to other urban centers in India. The program defined HIV as an occupational health problem and included multifaceted, multilevel interventions addressing community (having a high-status advocate; addressing environmental barriers and resources), group (changing social relationships), and individual factors (improving skills and competencies related to HIV prevention and treatment). The Sonagachi Project's core concepts and strategies evolved as community needs were expressed and defined. In particular, the program was not initially conceptualized as a community empowerment project but emerged over time, allowing for project sustainability. Project components appear to be replicable across settings within India and worldwide.

  19. 7 CFR 1709.107 - Eligible communities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible communities. 1709.107 Section 1709.107... AGRICULTURE ASSISTANCE TO HIGH ENERGY COST COMMUNITIES RUS High Energy Cost Grant Program § 1709.107 Eligible communities. (a) An eligible community under this program is one in which the average home energy costs...

  20. Fish community dynamics following dam removal in a fragmented agricultural stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kornis, Matthew; Weidel, Brian C.; Powers, Stephens; Diebel, Matthew W.; Cline, Timpthy; Fox, Justin; Kitchell, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation impedes dispersal of aquatic fauna, and barrier removal is increasingly used to increase stream network connectivity and facilitate fish dispersal. Improved understanding of fish community response to barrier removal is needed, especially in fragmented agricultural streams where numerous antiquated dams are likely destined for removal. We examined post-removal responses in two distinct fish communities formerly separated by a small aging mill dam. The dam was removed midway through the 6 year study, enabling passage for downstream fishes affiliated with a connected reservoir into previously inaccessible habitat, thus creating the potential for taxonomic homogenization between upstream and downstream communities. Both communities changed substantially post-removal. Two previously excluded species (white sucker, yellow perch) established substantial populations upstream of the former dam, contributing to a doubling of total fish biomass. Meanwhile, numerical density of pre-existing upstream fishes declined. Downstream, largemouth bass density was inversely correlated with prey fish density throughout the study, while post-removal declines in bluegill density coincided with cooler water temperature and increased suspended and benthic fine sediment. Upstream and downstream fish communities became more similar post-removal, represented by a shift in Bray-Curtis index from 14 to 41 % similarity. Our findings emphasize that barrier removal in highly fragmented stream networks can facilitate the unintended and possibly undesirable spread of species into headwater streams, including dispersal of species from remaining reservoirs. We suggest that knowledge of dispersal patterns for key piscivore and competitor species in both the target system and neighboring systems may help predict community outcomes following barrier removal.

  1. Program Evaluation of a High School Science Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLelland-Crawley, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Teachers may benefit more from a professional learning community (PLC) than from professional development initiatives presented in single day workshops. The purpose of this program evaluation study was to identify characteristics of an effective PLC and to determine how the members of the PLC have benefitted from the program. Fullan's educational…

  2. Personal and Family Financial Planning: Perspectives on Community College Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leo, Robert J.; And Others

    After a brief summary of the findings of a 1979 study of Personal and Family Financial Planning (PFFP) programs at member institutions of the League for Innovation in the Community College (LICC), this two-part monograph provides information on selected PFFP programs. Part I presents in-depth descriptions of the implementation, subject coverage,…

  3. Cultural Relevance as Program-to-Community Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mistry, Jayanthi; Jacobs, Francine; Jacobs, Leah

    2009-01-01

    Calls for cultural sensitivity in the design and implementation of human services programs have become a standard response to the increasing diversity among the families and communities being served. In this article, we take a critical look at the construct, using data from a multi-year evaluation of a statewide family support program. We examine…

  4. Connect: An Effective Community-Based Youth Suicide Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Gretchen; Baber, Kristine M.

    2011-01-01

    Youth suicide prevention is an important public health issue. However, few prevention programs are theory driven or systematically evaluated. This study evaluated Connect, a community-based youth suicide prevention program. Analysis of pre and posttraining questionnaires from 648 adults and 204 high school students revealed significant changes in…

  5. Santa Fe Community College Staff Development Programs, Policies and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Fe Community Coll., NM.

    This collection of materials describes various aspects of Santa Fe Community College's (SFCC's) faculty and staff development program. Part 1 explains the philosophy that underpins staff development at SFCC; the planning, programming, information dissemination, and evaluation phases of staff development; and the use of professional development…

  6. California Community Colleges State and Federal Legislative Programs, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Board of Governors.

    A major component of the legislative function of the Board of Governors (BOG) of the California Community Colleges (CCC), as mandated in Assembly Bill 1725, is the adoption of an annual state and federal legislative program. This program formalizes the legislative thrust of the BOG and is intended to set forth systematic legislative and budgetary…

  7. Successful Community Nutrition Programming: Lessons from Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannotti, Lora; Gillespie, Stuart

    This report on the key findings from a series of assessments of successful community nutrition programming conducted in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda between 1999 and 2000. The aim of the assessments was to identify key lessons learned from the successful processes and outcomes in these programs. The report is divided into eight chapters: (1)…

  8. Exemplary Academic Programs at the Community College. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazer, Gerald, Ed.

    Brief descriptions are provided of 54 community college programs identified as outstanding by the National Council of Instructional Administrators. Organized alphabetically by program title, the descriptions include the name of the college president, the name of a contact person, and the name, address, and telephone number of the college. The…

  9. Independence Community College Property Appraisal/Assessment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swender, Herbert J.

    This report to the Kansas State Department of Education supports Independence Community College's (ICC's) request for approval of a new vocational education program in Property Appraisal/Assessment. The report begins with two letters of support and the application for new program approval. Next, a project narrative provides background information…

  10. Learning Communities in Teacher Education Programs: Four Success Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Barbara, Ed.

    This report describes a program implemented by the Tomas Rivera Center (Claremont, California) to increase the number of well-prepared Latino teachers. Based on the concept of learning communities, the program aims to reduce the isolation experienced by minority students, offer support services that help nontraditional students satisfy academic…

  11. An Evaluation of Two Visiting Programs for Elderly Community Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogat, G. Anne; Jason, Leonard A.

    1983-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of two visiting programs designed to increase social participation and psychological well-being in a group of 35 older adults. Results showed the network-building program, which encouraged community involvement, showed higher means on most variables, but few significant differences were found. (JAC)

  12. Community College Exemplary Instructional Programs, 1988-1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fideler, Elizabeth F., Ed.; Bazer, Gerald, Ed.

    Second in an annual series, this volume presents brief descriptions of a number of outstanding community college instructional programs identified by the National Council of Instructional Administrators (NCIA). Each description includes the address and telephone number of the college in which the program operates, and the names of the college…

  13. A Report of the California Community College Learning Disabled Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostertag, Bruce A.; Baker, Ronald E.

    In spring 1982, a study was conducted of the programs and services for learning disabled average (LDA) students offered by California community colleges. The study sought to ascertain program characteristics, the means by which colleges identified adult students with specific learning disabilities, and the assessment tools used. Questionnaires…

  14. An Innovative Community College Program and Partnership in Information Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Barbara C; Morneau, Keith A.

    This report describes an innovative network security program initiated by Northern Virginia Community College and funded with a grant from the Northern Virginia Regional Partnership. The program educates and trains students in the instillation, configuration, and troubleshooting of the hardware and software infrastructure of information security.…

  15. A Community College Program Serving Female Displaced Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Ruth

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the Bunker Hill Community College program designed to draw on the experience of female dislocated workers. Discusses the types of women this program serves. Provides an example of each type of woman. Discusses the enormous employment problems of dislocated female workers and how education might help them overcome these difficulties. (JS)

  16. State Department Program Pairs Foreign Students with Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Educational exchanges and fellowships are not new; the best known, the Fulbright Program, is more than 60 years old. But the Community College Summit Initiative Program, as this fledgling effort is known, reflects a growing recognition among American government officials that the United States must do a better job in its public-diplomacy outreach…

  17. Sustaining Community-Based Programs for Families: Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancini, Jay A.; Marek, Lydia I.

    2004-01-01

    A conceptual model for evaluating community-based program sustainability is presented, along with a 53-item Program Sustainability Index (PSI). Structural equation modeling (SEM) and principal axis factor analysis indicate strong support for each of the seven elements of the PSI. When considered as an overall model, six of the seven framework…

  18. An Evaluation of a Community College Workforce-Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duru-Nnebue, Thomisha M.

    2012-01-01

    This project study is an evaluation of a job-training program designed to serve unemployed adult learners at a community college. The program lacked empirical data about participants finding employment. The rationale for selecting the problem is the need to provide skill development and vocational training in response to high unemployment rates.…

  19. Gender roles and perceptions of malaria risk in agricultural communities of Mwea Division in Central Kenya.

    PubMed

    Woldu, Dawit Okubatsion; Haile, Zelalem Teka

    2015-01-01

    We examined gender differences in the perception of high malaria risk in women and factors associated with a high number of malaria episodes in the Mwea Division of Central Kenya. Ethnographic and successive free listing interviews (an open-ended data collection technique used to show the relation of items in a given domain) with 53 key informants and structured interviews conducted from June to October 2010 with 250 respondents who represented the socioeconomic and geographical diversity of the area were analyzed. Qualitative text analysis and inferential statistics were employed. While a greater proportion of men (51.6%) attributed women's high malaria risk to their "biological weakness," most women believed that their high malaria risk was related to their role in the agricultural fields (43.6%) and to their household responsibilities (23.1%). Compared to men, women were more likely to work in wet aspects of agricultural activities (χ(2) (2, N = 153) = 13.47, p < .01). Women were nearly twice as likely as men to report high episodes of malaria (adjusted odds ratio: 2.54; 95% confidence interval: 1.05-6.15). Culturally prescribed gender roles in agricultural communities in Mwea may play an important role in explaining disparity in reported malaria incidence. While identification of ecological and economic determinants of malaria is important, gender-based research can make a significant contribution to the development of effective and sustainable malaria reduction strategies.

  20. Intimate partner violence prevention program in an Asian immigrant community: integrating theories, data, and community.

    PubMed

    Yoshihama, Mieko; Ramakrishnan, Aparna; Hammock, Amy C; Khaliq, Mahmooda

    2012-07-01

    To fill an existing gap in research and practice on intimate partner violence (IPV) in immigrant communities, the authors developed an IPV prevention program, called the Shanti Project, in an Asian Indian community in the Midwest. Building on the notion of shanti (harmony/peace), a cherished value and strength of the community, we created a communications campaign that combined social marketing and community-based participatory approaches. Recognizing the interactive influences of multiple levels of social ecology, campaign activities were designed to bring about changes at the individual, relationship/family, organization, and community levels. This article presents the development of this theoretically, empirically, and community-based IPV prevention program. PMID:22865356

  1. Habitat loss drives threshold response of benthic invertebrate communities to deposited sediment in agricultural streams.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Francis J; McIntosh, Angus R; Harding, Jon S

    2013-07-01

    Agricultural land uses can impact stream ecosystems by reducing suitable habitat, altering flows, and increasing inputs of diffuse pollutants including fine inorganic sediment (< 2 mm). These changes have been linked to altered community composition and declines in biodiversity. Determining the mechanisms driving stream biotic responses, particularly threshold impacts, has, however, proved elusive. To investigate a sediment threshold response by benthic invertebrates, an intensive survey of 30 agricultural streams was conducted along gradients of deposited sediment and dissolved nutrients. Partial redundancy analysis showed that invertebrate community composition changed significantly along the gradient of deposited fine sediment, whereas the effect of dissolved nitrate was weak. Pollution-sensitive invertebrates (%EPT, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera) demonstrated a strong nonlinear response to sediment, and change-point analysis indicated marked declines beyond a threshold of -20% fine sediment covering the streambed. Structural equation modeling indicated that decreased habitat availability (i.e., coarse substrate and associated interstices) was the key driver affecting pollution-sensitive invertebrates, with degraded riparian condition controlling resources through direct (e.g., inputs) and indirect (e.g., flow-mediated) effects on deposited sediment. The identification of specific effects thresholds and the underlying mechanisms (e.g., loss of habitat) driving these changes will assist managers in setting sediment criteria and standards to better guide stream monitoring and rehabilitation. PMID:23967573

  2. Habitat loss drives threshold response of benthic invertebrate communities to deposited sediment in agricultural streams.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Francis J; McIntosh, Angus R; Harding, Jon S

    2013-07-01

    Agricultural land uses can impact stream ecosystems by reducing suitable habitat, altering flows, and increasing inputs of diffuse pollutants including fine inorganic sediment (< 2 mm). These changes have been linked to altered community composition and declines in biodiversity. Determining the mechanisms driving stream biotic responses, particularly threshold impacts, has, however, proved elusive. To investigate a sediment threshold response by benthic invertebrates, an intensive survey of 30 agricultural streams was conducted along gradients of deposited sediment and dissolved nutrients. Partial redundancy analysis showed that invertebrate community composition changed significantly along the gradient of deposited fine sediment, whereas the effect of dissolved nitrate was weak. Pollution-sensitive invertebrates (%EPT, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera) demonstrated a strong nonlinear response to sediment, and change-point analysis indicated marked declines beyond a threshold of -20% fine sediment covering the streambed. Structural equation modeling indicated that decreased habitat availability (i.e., coarse substrate and associated interstices) was the key driver affecting pollution-sensitive invertebrates, with degraded riparian condition controlling resources through direct (e.g., inputs) and indirect (e.g., flow-mediated) effects on deposited sediment. The identification of specific effects thresholds and the underlying mechanisms (e.g., loss of habitat) driving these changes will assist managers in setting sediment criteria and standards to better guide stream monitoring and rehabilitation.

  3. School-Community Partnerships and Community-Based Education: A Case Study of a Novice Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Anna Gahl

    2010-01-01

    This case study examines the struggles and successes of teachers and students collaborating with community organizations on the Second Tuesday Project, a community-based research and service program at an urban high school. Using qualitative methods, the study includes data from interviews, participant-observations, and focus groups to describe…

  4. Community Schools: The Bruner Foundation's Evaluation of the New York State Community Schools Program. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruner Foundation, Inc., New York, NY.

    A 3-year evaluation was conducted of the New York State Community Schools Program (CSP) in New York City Public Schools. The goals of the CSP include better, more developmental, challenging, and enriched curricula and more time on task, leading to improved academic outcomes for children in Community Schools. The goals also include school-site…

  5. Agricultural policy and social returns to eradication programs: the case of Aujeszky's disease in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Andersson, H; Lexmon, A; Robertsson, J A; Lundeheim, N; Wierup, M

    1997-02-01

    Economic-welfare analysis of animal disease prevention programs frequently ignore the constraints of the agricultural policy environment. Prevention programs affect producers, consumers and the government. The policy environment to a large extent determines the magnitude as well as the distribution of benefits of the program among these groups. The Swedish hog industry has been exposed to three major policy changes during the 1990-1995 period. These scenarios involve various degrees of government intervention in the agricultural sector including internal market deregulation and EU-membership. Aujeszky's disease is a virus disease with swine as the natural infection reservoir. Piglets are the most fragile and an outbreak of the disease results in symptoms such as shaking, cramps and convulsions with an increase in the mortality rate. Slaughter hogs suffer from coughing, fever and reduce their feed consumption. During the last 20-25 years the incidence of Aujeszky's disease (AD) has been increasing in Sweden. In 1989 an eradication program was undertaken. A model is developed to analyze social benefits of an eradication program given variations in agricultural policy. The model refers to the specifics of the AD-program implemented in Sweden. The expected benefits of the program are evaluated using a welfare-economic analysis applying cost-benefit analysis. Total benefits of the program are evaluated across herd and size categories and different regions. Data concerning the frequency of the virus among various categories of herds prior to enacting the program were used (Wahlström et al., 1990). In addition, data from an agricultural insurance company were used to estimate the conditional probability of an outbreak given that the herd is infected. Biological and technical parameter values were collected from a variety of sources. The results of the analysis indicate that the program is economically viable given a social rate of discount in the range of 3-5% without

  6. Agricultural policy and social returns to eradication programs: the case of Aujeszky's disease in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Andersson, H; Lexmon, A; Robertsson, J A; Lundeheim, N; Wierup, M

    1997-02-01

    Economic-welfare analysis of animal disease prevention programs frequently ignore the constraints of the agricultural policy environment. Prevention programs affect producers, consumers and the government. The policy environment to a large extent determines the magnitude as well as the distribution of benefits of the program among these groups. The Swedish hog industry has been exposed to three major policy changes during the 1990-1995 period. These scenarios involve various degrees of government intervention in the agricultural sector including internal market deregulation and EU-membership. Aujeszky's disease is a virus disease with swine as the natural infection reservoir. Piglets are the most fragile and an outbreak of the disease results in symptoms such as shaking, cramps and convulsions with an increase in the mortality rate. Slaughter hogs suffer from coughing, fever and reduce their feed consumption. During the last 20-25 years the incidence of Aujeszky's disease (AD) has been increasing in Sweden. In 1989 an eradication program was undertaken. A model is developed to analyze social benefits of an eradication program given variations in agricultural policy. The model refers to the specifics of the AD-program implemented in Sweden. The expected benefits of the program are evaluated using a welfare-economic analysis applying cost-benefit analysis. Total benefits of the program are evaluated across herd and size categories and different regions. Data concerning the frequency of the virus among various categories of herds prior to enacting the program were used (Wahlström et al., 1990). In addition, data from an agricultural insurance company were used to estimate the conditional probability of an outbreak given that the herd is infected. Biological and technical parameter values were collected from a variety of sources. The results of the analysis indicate that the program is economically viable given a social rate of discount in the range of 3-5% without

  7. Community Maintenance Programs for Sexual Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youssef, Carollyne

    2013-01-01

    While optimism regarding the treatment of sexual offenders has increased over the past couple of decades, research into the factors that assist offenders in maintaining therapeutic changes remains in the dark. Maintenance programs for offenders, while theoretically appearing to have a solid place in offender rehabilitation, surprisingly have not…

  8. Summer Programming in Rural Communities: Unique Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Ruthellen; Harper, Stacey; Gamble, Susan

    2007-01-01

    During the past several decades, child poverty rates have been higher in rural than in urban areas, and now 2.5 million children live in deep poverty in rural America. Studies indicate that poor children are most affected by the typical "summer slide." Summer programming has the ability to address the issues of academic loss, nutritional loss, and…

  9. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES PROVIDED BY COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PINNOCK, THEODORE J.

    INFORMAL EDUCATION PRIMARILY INCLUDES EDUCATION FOR EVERYDAY EFFECTIVE LIVING AND DOES NOT NECESSARILY HAVE TO INCLUDE COURSES FOR CREDIT AT THE HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE LEVELS. MILLIONS OF POVERTY STRICKEN PEOPLE CAN BENEFIT FROM THE TYPE OF INFORMAL EDUCATION PROVIDED THROUGH THE OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY (OEO) IN SUCH PROGRAMS AS--(1) THE…

  10. Effectiveness of a Hospice Community Bereavement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longman, Alice J.

    1993-01-01

    Assessed extent of unresolved grief in bereaved individuals attending two programs, their spiritual perspectives, and the relationship between them. Fifty-six individuals completed questionnaires, and 42 completed same questionnaires 3 months later. Results indicated that individuals manifested initial reactions to death, and these reactions were…

  11. 75 FR 16082 - Smaller Learning Communities Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Rulemaking Record: On request we will provide an appropriate accommodation or auxiliary aid to an individual... auxiliary aid, please contact the person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Purpose of Program... April 28, 2005 (70 FR 22233) (the 2005 SLC NFP). (c) The notice of final priority, requirements,...

  12. Community-Operated Environmental Surveillance Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the environmental surveillance activities with which citizens living near the Hanford Site have been participating. Local teachers have been managing and operating three special radiological air sampling stations located in Richland, Basin City, and Franklin County, Washington. Other expansion efforts of this program are also described.

  13. Integrating Ethics in Community Colleges' Accounting Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Clifton

    1990-01-01

    Argues that two-year college business programs need to provide moral guidance and leadership to students to help stem the proliferation of fraudulent and questionable financial reporting practices. Reviews amoral and moral unity theories of business ethics. Discusses barriers to ethical instruction in business curricula, and ways to overcome them.…

  14. Spanish Teacher Education Programs and Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jovanovi, Ana; Filipovi, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Theories of situated knowledge support that knowledge involves experience of practices rather than just accumulated information. While an important segment of foreign language teacher education programs focuses on the theoretical component of second/foreign language acquisition theories and relevant methodological concerns, it is mainly through…

  15. Community Planning for Intergenerational Programming. Volume VIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura-Merkel, Catherine; Lidoff, Lorraine

    Designed as an effort to gather, package, and disseminate useful programmatic information on aging education, this publication is divided into seven substantive sections. Following a preface and acknowledgements, an introduction presents a model of intergenerational programming, a definition of an intergenerational activities committe, purposes of…

  16. Education resources in remote Australian Indigenous community dog health programs: a comparison of community and extra-community-produced resources.

    PubMed

    Constable, Sophie Elizabeth; Dixon, Roselyn May; Dixon, Robert John

    2013-09-01

    Commercial dog health programs in Australian Indigenous communities are a relatively recent occurrence. Health promotion for these programs is an even more recent development, and lacks data on effective practices. This paper analyses 38 resources created by veterinary-community partnerships in Indigenous communities, to 71 resources available through local veterinary service providers. On average, community-produced resources used significantly more of the resource area as image, more imagery as communicative rather than decorative images, larger fonts and smaller segments of text and used images of people with a range of skin tones. As well as informal registers of Standard Australian English, community-produced resources used Aboriginal English and/or Creole languages in their text, while extra-community (EC)-produced resources did not. The text of EC resources had Flesh-Kincaid reading grade levels that excluded a large proportion of community recipients. Also, they did not cover some topics of importance in communities, used academic, formal and technical language, and did not depict people of a representative range of skin tones. As such, community-produced resources were more relevant to the unique situations in remote communities, while EC resources were often inappropriate and in some cases could even distance recipients by using inappropriate language, formats and imagery.

  17. Soil microbial communities as suitable bioindicators of trace metal pollution in agricultural volcanic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parelho, Carolina; dos Santos Rodrigues, Armindo; do Carmo Barreto, Maria; Gonçalo Ferreira, Nuno; Garcia, Patrícia

    2015-04-01

    Summary: The biological, chemical and physical properties of soil confer unique characteristics that enhance or influence its overall biodiversity. The adaptive character of soil microbial communities (SMCs) to metal pollution allows discriminating soil health, since changes in microbial populations and activities may function as excellent indicators of soil pollutants. Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals (TM). In our previous works, we identified priority TM affecting agricultural Andosols under different agricultural land uses. Within this particular context, the objectives of this study were to (i) assess the effect of soil TM pollution in different agricultural systems (conventional, traditional and organic) on the following soil properties: microbial biomass carbon, basal soil respiration, metabolic quotient, enzymatic activities (β-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and dehydrogenase) and RNA to DNA ratio; and (ii) evaluate the impact of TM in the soil ecosystem using the integrated biomarker response (IBR) based on a set of biochemical responses of SMCs. This multi-biomarker approach will support the development of the "Trace Metal Footprint" for different agricultural land uses in volcanic soils. Methods: The study was conducted in S. Miguel Island (Azores, Portugal). Microbial biomass carbon was measured by chloroform-fumigation-incubation-assay (Vance et al., 1987). Basal respiration was determined by the Jenkinson & Powlson (1976) technique. Metabolic quotient was calculated as the ratio of basal respiration to microbial biomass C (Sparkling & West, 1988). The enzymatic activities of β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase were determined by the Dick et al. (1996) method and dehydrogenase activity by the Rossel et al. (1997) method. The RNA and DNA were co-extracted from the same

  18. Teacher Induction Programs in Agricultural Education: Description of the Role of AAAE Higher Education Teacher Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Edward A.; Molina, Quintin F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report findings from a survey of AAAE-member colleges and universities' involvement in professional induction activities of agricultural education teachers. The basis for this research comes from five teacher induction program goals proposed by Johnston and Kay (1987) that serve as a context for presenting the data.…

  19. Program Assessment Using Newly Developed Program Standards for Agricultural Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Richard Lee; Oades, John

    1980-01-01

    The assessment of the agricultural education department at Oregon State University utilized outside assessment team members and the Iowa State University assessment instrument. Among the concern areas identified in the four-day assessment were (1) hands-on technical agriculture course work, (2) humanities and social science courses, and (3)…

  20. Mapping and determinism of soil microbial community distribution across an agricultural landscape

    PubMed Central

    Constancias, Florentin; Terrat, Sébastien; Saby, Nicolas P A; Horrigue, Walid; Villerd, Jean; Guillemin, Jean-Philippe; Biju-Duval, Luc; Nowak, Virginie; Dequiedt, Samuel; Ranjard, Lionel; Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the relevance of landscape, regarding the spatial patterning of microbial communities and the relative influence of environmental parameters versus human activities, few investigations have been conducted at this scale. Here, we used a systematic grid to characterize the distribution of soil microbial communities at 278 sites across a monitored agricultural landscape of 13 km². Molecular microbial biomass was estimated by soil DNA recovery and bacterial diversity by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Geostatistics provided the first maps of microbial community at this scale and revealed a heterogeneous but spatially structured distribution of microbial biomass and diversity with patches of several hundreds of meters. Variance partitioning revealed that both microbial abundance and bacterial diversity distribution were highly dependent of soil properties and land use (total variance explained ranged between 55% and 78%). Microbial biomass and bacterial richness distributions were mainly explained by soil pH and texture whereas bacterial evenness distribution was mainly related to land management. Bacterial diversity (richness, evenness, and Shannon index) was positively influenced by cropping intensity and especially by soil tillage, resulting in spots of low microbial diversity in soils under forest management. Spatial descriptors also explained a small but significant portion of the microbial distribution suggesting that landscape configuration also shapes microbial biomass and bacterial diversity. PMID:25833770

  1. Factors influencing perceived sustainability of Dutch community health programs.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, A J M; Van Assema, P; Hesdahl, B; Harting, J; De Vries, N K

    2015-09-01

    We assessed the perceived sustainability of community health programs organized by local intersectoral coalitions, as well as the factors that collaborating partners think might influence sustainability. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 31 collaborating partners of 5 community health programs in deprived neighborhoods in the southern part of the Netherlands. The interview guide was based on a conceptual framework that includes factors related to the context, the leading organization, leadership, the coalition, collaborating partners, interventions and outcomes. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and content analyzed using NVivo 8.0. Participants in each of the programs varied in their perceptions of the sustainability of the program, but those people collaborating in pre-existing neighborhood structures expressed relatively high faith in their continuation. The participating citizens in particular believed that these structures would continue to address the health of the community in the future. We found factors from all categories of the conceptual framework that were perceived to influence sustainability. The program leaders appeared to be crucial to the programs, as they were frequently mentioned in close interaction with other factors. Program leaders should use a motivating and supportive leadership style and should act as 'program champions'.

  2. "Something good can grow here": chicago urban agriculture food projects.

    PubMed

    Hatchett, Lena; Brown, Loretta; Hopkins, Joan; Larsen, Kelly; Fournier, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Food security is a challenge facing many African-American low-income communities nationally. Community and university partners have established urban agriculture programs to improve access to high quality affordable fruits and vegetables by growing, distributing, and selling food in urban neighborhoods. While the challenge of food security is within communities of color, few studies have described these urban agriculture programs and documented their impact on the crew members who work in the programs and live in the low-income communities. More information is needed on the program impact for crew and community health promotion. Using a survey and focus group discussion from the crew and staff we describe the program and activities of four Chicago Urban Agriculture programs. We summarized the impact these programs have on crew members' perception of urban agriculture, health habits, community engagement, and community health promotion in low-income African-American neighborhoods.

  3. "Something good can grow here": chicago urban agriculture food projects.

    PubMed

    Hatchett, Lena; Brown, Loretta; Hopkins, Joan; Larsen, Kelly; Fournier, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Food security is a challenge facing many African-American low-income communities nationally. Community and university partners have established urban agriculture programs to improve access to high quality affordable fruits and vegetables by growing, distributing, and selling food in urban neighborhoods. While the challenge of food security is within communities of color, few studies have described these urban agriculture programs and documented their impact on the crew members who work in the programs and live in the low-income communities. More information is needed on the program impact for crew and community health promotion. Using a survey and focus group discussion from the crew and staff we describe the program and activities of four Chicago Urban Agriculture programs. We summarized the impact these programs have on crew members' perception of urban agriculture, health habits, community engagement, and community health promotion in low-income African-American neighborhoods. PMID:25898220

  4. 34 CFR 636.1 - What is the Urban Community Service Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the Urban Community Service Program? 636.1... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION URBAN COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM General § 636.1 What is the Urban Community Service Program? The Urban Community Service Program provides grants to urban...

  5. 34 CFR 636.1 - What is the Urban Community Service Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Urban Community Service Program? 636.1... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION URBAN COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM General § 636.1 What is the Urban Community Service Program? The Urban Community Service Program provides grants to urban...

  6. Exploring the conceptualization of program theories in Dutch community programs: a multiple case study.

    PubMed

    Harting, Janneke; van Assema, Patricia

    2011-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether the limited effectiveness of most community programs intended to prevent disease and promote health should be attributed to the quality of the conceptualization of their program theories. In a retrospective multiple case study we assessed the program theories of 16 community programs (cases) in the Netherlands (1990-2004). Methods were a document analysis, supplemented with member checks (insider information from representatives). We developed a community approach reference framework to guide us in reconstructing and evaluating the program theories. On the whole, programs did not clearly spell out the process theories (enabling the implementation of effective interventions), the program components (interventions) and/or the impact theories (describing pathways from interventions to ultimate effects). Program theories usually turned out to be neither specific nor entirely plausible (complete and valid). The limited effectiveness of most community programs should most probably be attributed to the limited conceptualization of program theories to begin with. Such a failure generally also precludes a thorough examination of the effectiveness of the community approach as such.

  7. The Houston Community College Eligible Legalized Alien Program. Evaluation Program. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, Don F.; Cuellar, Sylvia

    The Houston Community College (Texas) program (TOTAL ACCESS) designed in response to the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, is described and evaluated. The program offers classes to eligible aliens (97% Hispanic Americans from Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala) wishing to pursue the educational program required for legalization. Program…

  8. Program Evaluation of a Community College Adult Program for Underprepared Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watta, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a program evaluation of a community college adult program for underprepared learners in the eastern lower peninsula of Michigan. The purpose of the program is to make postsecondary education more accessible to those adults who typically would not consider postsecondary education an option. Guided by Cross's adult learning…

  9. Core II Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs. Units G-L.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This second volume of a 2-volume curriculum guide contains 12 problem areas selected as suggested areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for 10th-grade or second-year students enrolled in a metropolitan agriculture program. The 12 problem areas are divided into 5 units: Growing and Managing Horticultural Crops (4 problem areas),…

  10. Core I Materials for Rural Agricultural Programs. Units D-E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethridge, Jim; And Others

    These units of instructional materials and teaching aids are part of a series of eight designed for use in rural agriculture programs for students in grades 9 and 10. Covered in the unit on livestock science are understanding the livestock industry, identifying breeds of livestock and poultry, selecting livestock, and feeding livestock.…

  11. Core III Materials for Rural Agriculture Programs. Units A-G.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courson, Roger L.; And Others

    This curriculum guide includes teaching packets for 12 areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for 11th-grade or third-year students enrolled in rural agricultural programs in Illinois. Each problem area includes some or all of the following components: suggestions to the teacher, teacher guide, competency inventory, information sheet,…

  12. Core I Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs. Units G-J.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethridge, Jim; And Others

    These units of instructional materials and teaching aids are the final four of a series of 10 designed for use in metropolitan agriculture/horticulture programs for students in grades 9 and 10. Covered in the unit on growing and managing horticultural crops are watering plants; pruning, pinching, and planting plants; using plant production…

  13. Developing a Model for Supervised Agricultural Experience Program Quality: A Synthesis of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, James E.; Osborne, Edward W.

    1996-01-01

    A literature review revealed the following: (1) there are no standard criteria to measure the quality of supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs; (2) teacher attitudes and past SAE experiences strongly influence quality; (3) the number of teachers with SAE experience is declining; and (4) school laboratory facilities are essential for…

  14. Model for Evaluation of Secondary School Programs of Vocational Education in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, A. H.

    This research project focused on the development of instruments and procedures which a local secondary school evaluating group may use for conducting its own evaluation of the local program of vocational education in agriculture. The report covers Phase I of a four-phase project and presents the development and trial of instruments and procedures…

  15. Core II Materials for Rural Agriculture Programs. Units E-H.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This curriculum guide includes teaching packets for 21 problem areas to be included in a core curriculum for 10th grade students enrolled in a rural agricultural program. Covered in the four units included in this volume are crop science (harvesting farm crops and growing small grains); soil science and conservation of natural resources…

  16. Core III Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs. Units J-M.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This second volume of a two-volume curriculum guide contains 11 problem areas selected for study to be included in a core curriculum for 11th grade or third-year students enrolled in a metropolitan agricultural program. The 11 problem areas are divided into four units: Soil Science and Conservation of Natural Resources (Understanding Soils,…

  17. A GUIDE FOR SELF-EVALUATION OF STATE SUPERVISORY PROGRAMS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LINSON, MARVIN G.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DEVELOP A GUIDE FOR THE SELF-EVALUATION OF STATE SUPERVISORY PROGRAMS OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE AND TO DESIGN AN INSTRUMENT TO ASSIST IN THIS EVALUATION. TWO NATIONAL JURIES OF EXPERTS IN EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION ASSISTED IN REFINING A SET OF STATEMENTS, DEVELOPED TO SERVE AS INDICATORS OF SUCCESSFUL…

  18. The community environmental monitoring program: a historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, L.H.; Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Giles, K.

    2007-07-01

    With the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) entering its 26. year of monitoring the offsite areas around the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a look back on the history and the hows and whys of its formation is in order. In March of 1979, the accident at Three-Mile Island Nuclear Power Generating Plant near Middletown, Pennsylvania occurred, and Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV), along with other governmental agencies such as the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was requested to provide monitoring personnel. Public concerns over the accident were high, especially for those living around the power plant. It was found that involving the local community in the sample collection process helped to ease some of the concerns, and the Citizens Monitoring Program (CMP) was instituted. This idea was brought back to Las Vegas and in 1981, the NTS Community Monitoring Program was started to involve the communities surrounding and downwind of the NTS, who were experiencing many of the same concerns, in the monitoring of the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program. By reviewing the history of the CEMP, one can see what the concerns of the local communities were, how they were addressed, and the effect this has had on them. From the standpoint of stakeholders, getting information on radiation safety issues from an informed local citizen rather than from a government agency official living elsewhere can only have a positive effect on how the public views the reliability of the monitoring data. (authors)

  19. Evaluating agricultural nonpoint-source pollution programs in two Lake Erie tributaries.

    PubMed

    Forster, D Lynn; Rausch, Jonathan N

    2002-01-01

    During the past three decades, numerous government programs have encouraged Lake Erie basin farmers to adopt practices that reduce water pollution. The first section of this paper summarizes these state and federal government agricultural pollution abatement programs in watersheds of two prominent Lake Erie tributaries, the Maumee River and Sandusky River. Expenditures are summarized for each program, total expenditures in each county are estimated, and cost effectiveness of program expenditures (i.e., cost per metric ton of soil saved) are analyzed. Farmers received nearly $143 million as incentive payments to implement agricultural nonpoint source pollution abatement programs in the Maumee and Sandusky River watersheds from 1987 to 1997. About 95% of these funds was from federal sources. On average, these payments totaled about $7000 per farm or about $30 per farm acre (annualized equivalent of $2 per acre) within the watersheds. Our analysis raises questions about how efficiently these incentive payments were allocated. The majority of Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) funds appear to have been spent on less cost-effective practices. Also, geographic areas with relatively low (high) soil erosion rates received relatively large (small) funding.

  20. Community energy auditing: experience with the comprehensive community energy management program

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.L.; Berger, D.A.; Rubin, C.B.; Hutchinson, P.A. Sr.; Griggs, H.M.

    1980-09-01

    The report provides local officials and staff with information on lessons from the audit, projection, and general planning experiences of the Comprehensive Community Energy Management Program (CCEMP) communities and provides ANL and US DOE with information useful to the further development of local energy management planning methods. In keeping with the objectives, the report is organized into the following sections: Section II presents the evaluation issues and key findings based on the communities' experiences from Spring of 1979 to approximately March of 1980; Section III gives an organized review of experience of communities in applying the detailed audit methodology for estimating current community energy consumption and projecting future consumption and supply; Section IV provides a preliminary assessment of how audit information is being used in other CCEMP tasks; Section V presents an organized review of preliminary lessons from development of the community planning processes; and Section VI provides preliminary conclusions on the audit and planning methodology. (MCW)

  1. Capacity Building in NASA Remote Sensing Data for Meteorological and Agricultural Communities in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, S. L.; Andreadis, K.; Das, N. N.; Macharia, D.

    2015-12-01

    Across the globe, planners and decision makers are hampered by a lack of historic data and scant in situ observations on which to base policy and action plans. Data is often sorely lacking in poorly developed regions such as East Africa where people are vulnerable to a changing climate, extreme weather events, and economies and food security are tied directly to rain fed agriculture or pastoral cultures. NASA global remote sensing observations and research are promising in this regard, as they have great potential to inform policy- and decision-making at global, regional and even local scales the world over, However that potential is not realized as often as it should for a variety of reasons: the data stores are often impenetrable requiring special expertise to "crack the code", sustainability of observations remains a concern, and research and data are not focused on applications, thus results don't "fit" in existing tools or are developed for a short-term science objective without long-term use in mind. Although there are good examples of the use of NASA Earth Science research and observations for applications, capacity is lacking and must be built to advance the use of remote sensing for applications and to ease transition of research to the stakeholder. Capacity building is a critical component to transition Earth science research results to stakeholder communities, and is more than traditional training,, it has been described as…."the process of developing and strengthening the skills, instincts, abilities, processes and resources that organizations and communities need to survive, adapt, and thrive in the fast-changing world. Best practices and lessons learned from recent capacity building efforts for Agricultural and Environmental Ministires in East African in support of a NASA-SERVIR Applied Science Project to provide estimates of hydrologic extremes tied to crop yield are described.

  2. Assessing the effect of agricultural land abandonment on bird communities in southern-eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Zakkak, Sylvia; Radovic, Andreja; Nikolov, Stoyan C; Shumka, Spase; Kakalis, Lefteris; Kati, Vassiliki

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural land abandonment is recognized as a major environmental threat in Europe, being particularly pronounced in south-eastern Europe, where knowledge on its effects is limited. Taking the Balkan Peninsula as a case study, we investigated agricultural abandonment impact on passerine communities at regional level. We set up a standard methodology for site selection (70 sites) and data collection, along a well-defined forest-encroachment gradient that reflects land abandonment in four countries: Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia and Greece. Regardless the different socio-economic and political histories in the Balkans that led to diverse land abandonment patterns in space and time, rural abandonment had a consistent negative effect on bird communities, while regional-level analysis revealed patterns that were hidden at local level. The general trends were an increase of forest-dwelling bird species at the expense of farmland birds, the decline of overall bird species richness, as well as the decline of Species of European Conservation Concern (SPECs) richness and abundance. Many farmland bird species declined with land abandonment, whereas few forest species benefited from the process. In conclusion, our results support CAP towards hampering rural land abandonment and preserving semi-open rural mosaics in remote upland areas, using a suite of management measures carefully tailored to local needs. The maintenance of traditional rural landscapes should be prioritized in the Balkans, through the timely identification of HNV farmland that is most prone to abandonment. We also suggest that coordinated transnational research is needed, for a better assessment of conservation options in remote rural landscapes at European scale, including the enhancement of wild grazers' populations as an alternative in areas where traditional land management is rather unlikely to be re-established. PMID:26379254

  3. Regional PM2.5 and Asthma Morbidity in an Agricultural Community: A panel study

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Christine; Yost, Michael; Sampson, Paul; Arias, Griselda; Torres, Elizabeth; Vasquez, Victoria Breckwich; Bhatti, Parveen; Karr, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated pediatric asthma morbidity has been observed in rural US communities, but the role of the ambient environment in exacerbating rural asthma is poorly understood. Objectives To investigate associations between particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) and pediatric asthma exacerbations in an agricultural community of Washington State. Methods School-aged children with asthma (n=58) were followed for up to 25 months with repeated measures of respiratory health. Asthma symptoms and quick-relief medication use were assessed biweekly through phone administered surveys (n=2023 interviews). In addition, subjects used home peak flow meters on a daily basis to measure forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (n=7830 measurements). Regional PM2.5 was measured at a single air monitor located centrally in the study region. To assess relationships between PM2.5 and these outcomes we used linear regression with generalized estimating equations, adjusting for meteorological and temporal confounders. Effect modification by atopy was explored as well. Results An interquartile increase (IQR) in weekly PM2.5 of 6.7 μg/m3 was associated with an increase in reported asthma symptoms. Specific symptoms including wheezing, limitation of activities, and nighttime waking displayed the strongest associations. FEV1 as a percent of predicted decreased by 0.9% (95%CI: −1.8, 0.0) for an IQR increase in PM2.5 one day prior, and by 1.4% (95%CI: −2.7, −0.2) when restricted to children with atopic asthma. Conclusions This study provides evidence that PM2.5 in an agricultural setting contributes to elevated asthma morbidity. Further work on identifying and mitigating sources of PM2.5 in the area is warranted. PMID:25460673

  4. Assessing the effect of agricultural land abandonment on bird communities in southern-eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Zakkak, Sylvia; Radovic, Andreja; Nikolov, Stoyan C; Shumka, Spase; Kakalis, Lefteris; Kati, Vassiliki

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural land abandonment is recognized as a major environmental threat in Europe, being particularly pronounced in south-eastern Europe, where knowledge on its effects is limited. Taking the Balkan Peninsula as a case study, we investigated agricultural abandonment impact on passerine communities at regional level. We set up a standard methodology for site selection (70 sites) and data collection, along a well-defined forest-encroachment gradient that reflects land abandonment in four countries: Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia and Greece. Regardless the different socio-economic and political histories in the Balkans that led to diverse land abandonment patterns in space and time, rural abandonment had a consistent negative effect on bird communities, while regional-level analysis revealed patterns that were hidden at local level. The general trends were an increase of forest-dwelling bird species at the expense of farmland birds, the decline of overall bird species richness, as well as the decline of Species of European Conservation Concern (SPECs) richness and abundance. Many farmland bird species declined with land abandonment, whereas few forest species benefited from the process. In conclusion, our results support CAP towards hampering rural land abandonment and preserving semi-open rural mosaics in remote upland areas, using a suite of management measures carefully tailored to local needs. The maintenance of traditional rural landscapes should be prioritized in the Balkans, through the timely identification of HNV farmland that is most prone to abandonment. We also suggest that coordinated transnational research is needed, for a better assessment of conservation options in remote rural landscapes at European scale, including the enhancement of wild grazers' populations as an alternative in areas where traditional land management is rather unlikely to be re-established.

  5. Enhanced method for microbial community DNA extraction and purification from agricultural yellow loess soil.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Gim, Geun Ho; Ryu, Jaewon; Kim, Pyung Il; Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Si Wouk

    2015-11-01

    In this study, novel DNA extraction and purification methods were developed to obtain high-quantity and reliable quality DNA from the microbial community of agricultural yellow loess soil samples. The efficiencies of five different soil DNAextraction protocols were evaluated on the basis of DNA yield, quality and DNA shearing. Our suggested extraction method, which used CTAB, EDTA and cell membrane lytic enzymes in the extraction followed by DNA precipitation using isopropanol, yielded a maximum DNA content of 42.28 ± 5.59 µg/g soil. In addition, among the five different purification protocols, the acid-treated polyvinyl polypyrrolidone (PVPP) spin column purification method yielded high-quality DNA and recovered 91% of DNA from the crude DNA. Spectrophotometry revealed that the ultraviolet A 260/A 230 and A 260/A 280 absorbance ratios of the purified DNA were 1.82 ± 0.03 and 1.94 ± 0.05, respectively. PCR-based 16S rRNA amplification showed clear bands at ~1.5 kb with acid-treated PVPP-purified DNA templates. In conclusion, our suggested extraction and purification protocols can be used to recover high concentration, high purity, and high-molecular-weight DNA from clay and silica-rich agricultural soil samples.

  6. Scenario development as a basis for formulating a research program on future agriculture: a methodological approach.

    PubMed

    Oborn, Ingrid; Bengtsson, Jan; Hedenus, Fredrik; Rydhmer, Lotta; Stenström, Maria; Vrede, Katarina; Westin, Charles; Magnusson, Ulf

    2013-11-01

    To increase the awareness of society to the challenges of global food security, we developed five contrasting global and European scenarios for 2050 and used these to identify important issues for future agricultural research. Using a scenario development method known as morphological analysis, scenarios were constructed that took economic, political, technical, and environmental factors into account. With the scenarios as a starting point future challenges were discussed and research issues and questions were identified in an interactive process with stakeholders and researchers. Based on the outcome of this process, six socioeconomic and biophysical overarching challenges for future agricultural were formulated and related research issues identified. The outcome was compared with research priorities generated in five other research programs. In comparison, our research questions focus more on societal values and the role of consumers in influencing agricultural production, as well as on policy formulation and resolving conflicting goals, areas that are presently under-represented in agricultural research. The partly new and more interdisciplinary research priorities identified in Future Agriculture compared to other programs analyzed are likely a result of the methodological approach used, combining scenarios and interaction between stakeholders and researchers.

  7. Water governance, agricultural development and community-level resilience to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T.; Cox, M.; McCord, P.; Caylor, K. K.; Washington-Ottombre, C.; Soderberg, K.; Sadri, S.

    2012-12-01

    Climate and other physical drivers of environmental systems are modifying the global availability of water for irrigation. At the same time population growth is placing an increased demand on water resources as local municipalities promote agricultural production as a mechanism to support human welfare and development. Substantial research focuses on agricultural decision-making and practices to assess current and future demand for water based on crop types and irrigation practices. Equally important is the role of environmental governance as expressed through institutions which, in case the case of water systems, are the rules implemented to allocate water resources across different user groups. In water-limited environments, institutions play a critical role in addressing the challenges posed by water demand exceeding water supply. A pressing global concern is whether institutions that evolved over the last several decades are well suited to meet potential future water demands in the context of climate change and increasing rates of water abstraction. A related question is whether social and cultural conditions enable adaptive governance that can modify institutions to different water availability scenarios. In order to assess cross-scale resilience of households and communities reliant on irrigated agriculture to climate change, methodological tools are needed to characterize these issues of "institutional fit" and institutional change. We have developed a framework for characterizing institutional dynamics as a platform for the cross-site analysis of human-water governance. To demonstrate the utility of this framework we present a coding process applying this framework to irrigation schemes in Kenya. We present findings from research on rural agriculturalists in Kenya investigating irrigation practices and institutions designed to allocate water across communities. Initial indications are that current institutional regimes are suitable for current hydrological

  8. Aligning Needs, Expectations, and Learning Outcomes to Sustain Self-Efficacy through Transfer Learning Community Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leptien, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter addresses strengths and difficulties encountered in implementing transfer learning community models and how efficacy is supported through transfer learning community programming. Transfer programming best practices and recommendations for program improvements are presented.

  9. Effect of Crotalaria juncea Amendment on Nematode Communities in Soil with Different Agricultural Histories

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K.-H.; McSorley, R.; Gallaher, R. N.

    2003-01-01

    Effect of sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) hay amendment on nematode community structure in the soil surrounding roots of yellow squash (Cucurbita pepo) infected with root-knot nematodes was examined in two greenhouse experiments. Soils were from field plots treated long-term (LT) with yard-waste compost or no yard-waste compost in LT experiment, and from a short-term (ST) agricultural site in ST experiment. Soils collected were either amended or not amended with C. juncea hay. Nematode communities were examined 2 months after squash was inoculated with Meloidogyne incognita. Amendment increased (P < 0.05) omnivorous nematodes in both experiments but increased only bacterivorous nematodes in ST experiment (P < 0.05), where the soil had relatively low organic matter (<2%). This effect of C. juncea amendment did not occur in LT experiment, in which bacterivores were already abundant. Fungivorous nematodes were not increased by C. juncea amendment in either experiment, but predatory nematodes were increased when present. Although most nematode faunal indices, including enrichment index, structure index, and channel index, were not affected by C. juncea amendment, structure index values were affected by previous soil organic matter content. Results illustrate the importance of considering soil history (organic matter, nutrient level, free-living nematode number) in anticipating changes following amendment with C. juncea hay. PMID:19262764

  10. Toward comprehensive obesity prevention programs in Native American communities.

    PubMed

    Broussard, B A; Sugarman, J R; Bachman-Carter, K; Booth, K; Stephenson, L; Strauss, K; Gohdes, D

    1995-09-01

    Obesity is a particularly important challenge to the health status of Native Americans. This challenge is manifest in the increasing rates of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus among Native Americans. Most studies of Native American infants, preschool children, schoolchildren, and adults have confirmed a high prevalence of overweight. Historical studies suggest that for many Native American communities the high rates of obesity are a relatively recent phenomenon. The specific reasons for the increase in obesity among Native Americans have not been determined, although it has been hypothesized that Native Americans have a genetic predisposition to overweight in a "westernized" environment of abundant food and decreased energy expenditure. Few detailed studies of diet or of physical activity levels of contemporary Native Americans have been published. Community-based interventions to modify diet and activity levels to prevent obesity in Native American communities are needed. Preliminary evidence from two formative school-based programs in the Southwest suggest that Native American communities are receptive to school-based interventions, and that such programs may be able to slow the rate of excess weight gain and to improve fitness in school children. Because of the cultural diversity among Native Americans, future studies should focus on collecting community- and region-specific data, and should emphasize the need for obesity prevention through culturally appropriate community- and school-based behavioral interventions. PMID:8581789

  11. The Role of Sandwich In-Service Program in Developing Agricultural Science Teachers in Delta State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeoji, Canice N.; Agwubike, Christian C.; Ideh, Victor

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the role of the sandwich in-service educational program of Delta State University, Abraka in developing agricultural science teachers in the state. Data were collected from 895 agricultural science teachers who completed the program between 1989-2004. However, response to the questionnaire was by 391 in-service agricultural…

  12. Maintaining Relevancy in Programs of Agriculture. Proceedings: Southern Regional Meeting, Land Grant College and University Presidents and Administrators of Agriculture (Atlanta, Georgia, April 20-21, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA. Inst. for Higher Educational Opportunity.

    Recommendations for maintaining relevant programs which resulted from this meeting of college and university presidents and administrators are applicable to all colleges and universities offering programs of agriculture in the region. Given in this report are two major presentations entitled "The Integration of Knowledge in a Specialized Society"…

  13. Quality Indicators for California Community College Job Placement Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    Designed to help California community colleges in assessing their job placement services, identifying strengths and needs for improvement, and establishing priorities for the future, this color-coded guide lists specific tasks and responsibilities within the four essential functional areas of job placement programs and includes quality indicators…

  14. Evaluation of Community College Handicapped Student Services Programs: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Richard F.; And Others

    General information and operational suggestions are provided for the planning and implementation of uniform and continual systems for the evaluation of community college handicapped student programs and services (HSPS). After introductory material describing requirements for quantitative and qualitative data, the handbook discusses the goals…

  15. The Learning Edge: Advanced Technological Education Programs at Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, James R., Ed.; Barnett, Lynn, Ed.

    This book is one of several supported by a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to the American Association of Community Colleges. It reviews the first seven years of the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program by showcasing activities, partners, and achievements at 13 colleges. When Congress enacted legislation in 1993 establishing the…

  16. The Minnesota Heart Health Program Community Quit and Win Contests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lando, Harry A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The Minnesota Heart Health Program's Quit and Win smoking cessation contests occurred between 1982 and 1989. The contests used large prizes to encourage smokers to quit smoking. Evaluations indicated that the contests succeeded in recruiting relatively large proportions of smokers in entire communities, and abstinence outcomes were encouraging.…

  17. Effective Programming to Meet Community Needs: A Practitioner's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Donna

    1996-01-01

    Examples of creative programming to meet community needs in State College, Pennsylvania, are described: summer arts and crafts for K-6, intensive English courses for Russian refugees, brown-bag parent education seminars for employees of a local business, and a summer reading initiative. (SK)

  18. Old and New Ways for Developing Community Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In these challenging times of cutbacks in public funding for social services programs, parents and grass roots organizations continue to make a difference in their communities with innovative initiatives that are enhancing the lives of people with developmental and physical disabilities. In New York, a track team of speedsters with disabilities is…

  19. 75 FR 53785 - Senior Community Service Employment Program; Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) resulting from the 2006 Amendments to title V of the Older... (IFR) implementing changes in the SCSEP performance accountability regulations. We issued a notice of... required regulations that address performance measures by July 1, 2007. To meet this deadline,...

  20. Evaluating Adult Literacy Programs at the Community Provider Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benseman, John; Sutton, Alison

    1999-01-01

    Details the design and implementation of a rolling review process for community-based adult literacy programs. Describes four steps: documentation to become "review ready," collection of feedback from participants and key informants, site visit by reviewers, and use of the evaluation report as a planning tool. (SK)

  1. Report on Community College Industrial Production Technology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the Industrial Production Technology Programs in Illinois, which, according to Illinois Community College Board policy, must be reviewed at least once every five years. The disciplines included in this report are: industrial manufacturing technology, corrosion technology, plastics technology, and…

  2. School-Community Program in Early Childhood Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Frances B.; Olswang, Lesley B.

    Described is the Program in Early Childhood Development (PECD), a school-community project initially funded under Title III to provide identification, diagnostic, and intervention services for 3-to 5-year-old children in Evanston, Illinois prior to kindergarten entry. Two major sections deal with screening procedures (in such areas as…

  3. Student Development among Community College Participants in Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drexler, Devi S.; Campbell, Dale F.

    2011-01-01

    For decades, institutions of higher education have provided study abroad opportunities for college students wishing to increase and expand their intellectual and social skills. While many universities around the country have supported successful international exchange and study abroad programs, there is little research on community college study…

  4. 76 FR 10735 - Medicaid Program; Community First Choice Option

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... reflects personal preferences and choices and assures health and welfare. The individual identifies... 42 CFR Part 441 Medicaid Program; Community First Choice Option; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... First Choice Option AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Proposed...

  5. Freshmen and Sophomores Abroad: Community Colleges and Overseas Academic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Gerhard

    The mechanics of establishing and maintaining overseas academic programs are examined in this monograph with respect to the community college level. Chapter 1 provides a history of internationalism in institutions of higher learning from ancient times in India, China, Persia, Greece, Rome, and Western Europe. Chapter 2 presents a rationale for the…

  6. Feasibility Study for Aviation Programs at Hudson Valley Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Edward P.

    This is a report on a survey to determine the feasibility of establishing aviation training programs at a New York community college. It examines existing sources, and present and future needs for commercial pilots, aviation mechanics, and airline stewardesses. Among the conclusions are the discovery that the aviation industry is on the threshold…

  7. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  8. Chattanooga State Community College: U Do the Math Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    U Do the Math provides an innovative alternative to developmental math, replacing traditional course lectures with a student-centered approach to active learning and subject mastery. Chattanooga State used its grant funding from Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) to establish and scale the U Do the Math program. The community college,…

  9. A Community of Practice Approach to Learning Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Gwo-Dong; Li, Liang-Yi; Wang, Chin-Yea

    2012-01-01

    In programming courses, teaching students who have varied levels of knowledge and skills the requisite competencies to perform in real-world software development teams is indeed difficult. To address this problem, this paper proposes a community of practice (CoP) approach and provides some guidelines to simulate a real-world CoP in a blended…

  10. Title V Community Prevention Grants Program. 2000 Report to Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliber Associates, Fairfax, VA.

    This seventh annual report describes activities and accomplishments of grant activities funded under Title V, the Community Prevention Grants Program; procedures for disseminating grant products and research findings; activities conducted to develop policy and coordinate federal agency and interagency efforts related to delinquency prevention; and…

  11. Bilingual Crosscultural Programs: A Plan for Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Allan; Cepeda, Rita

    This report presents the California Community Colleges (CCC) Plan for Bilingual Crosscultural Programs and explains the background and context of the plan's development. First, the report provides a summary of the history of the proposed plan; an overview of relevant federal and state legislation concerned with bilingual education; and the…

  12. Handbook for a Parent-School-Community Involvement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

    This handbook, the production of which was funded under the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, offers techniques and suggestions for developing a well organized parental involvement program with emphasis on the migrant Mexican American parent. The team approach, which includes the principal, teacher, parent, visiting, community aide,…

  13. The FCEOC Library: A Community Action Program. Operations Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, R. E.

    The Fresno County (California) Economic Opportunities Commission (FCEOC) library produced this policy, procedures, and use manual as a guide for community action programs. The manual includes information on structure and use of the card catalog, organization of materials, use and organization of the vertical file, organization of grant research…

  14. The School, Family, and Community Partnership Program: Initial Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treder, David; Kutash, Krista; Duchnowski, Albert J.; Rudo, Zena; Sumi, W. Carl; Harris, Karen M.; Nelson, Steven L.

    The School, Family, and Community Partnership Program is an integrated, school-based intervention for improving the outcomes of students served in classrooms for children who have emotional and behavioral disabilities. This report briefly describes the intervention, the characteristics of the children, and initial results of measuring fidelity to…

  15. Community Awareness Program Evaluation Report: 1971-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milwaukee Public Schools, WI.

    The goal of the Community Awareness Program was to widen the horizons for low-income inner-city Educable Mentally Retarded (EMR) black and white pupils. ESEA Title VI provided pilot funds Cluster III B classes to explore the city on field trips related to school work. Eighteen teachers and 270 pupils (primary through high school) could plan a trip…

  16. Developing a Program for the Utilization of Community Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marleen

    The document serves as a step-by-step guide for career education administrators, consultants, and directors in preparing a program for the utilization of community resources in schools. Two methods of utilizing resources are the operation of a service which keeps a file of persons willing to serve as resources in the classroom, and the publication…

  17. Key Resources for Community College Student Success Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carales, Vincent D.; Garcia, Crystal E.; Mardock-Uman, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of organizations and other entities focused on assisting community college staff, faculty, and administrators in developing and promoting student success outcomes. We provide a listing of relevant web resources related to programming and conclude with a summary of suggested readings.

  18. Present Status of Theatre Programs in the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Cyril J.

    Forty-two community colleges and one four-year college responded to a survey requesting information about theatre programs. The colleges ranged in size from a low of 395 students to a high of 30,000. The results of the survey indicated that theatre courses were required of communication majors at only one college, and were electives at the…

  19. Student Volunteer Service Programs: Los Angeles Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dash, Roger

    This study investigated the extent and diversity of student volunteer programs in the Los Angeles Community College District (California) to determine the amount of college support and acceptance accorded them. The junior colleges should take advantage of the great student potential for positive social action and realize that, in the area of…

  20. Lessons from Community College Programs Targeting Welfare Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melendez, Edwin; Falcon, Luis M.; de Montrichard, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    Many community colleges have pursued aggressive initiatives to serve students on welfare, creating new academic programs or expanding existing ones. This chapter highlights case studies of best practices that illustrate how institutional initiatives targeting welfare students have resulted in an expanded capacity to educate and serve mainstream…

  1. Diabetic Education Program in the Mohawk Community of Kahnawake, Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Ann C.

    1988-01-01

    The Mohawk community of Kahnawake, Quebec, has a high prevalence rate of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. This article outlines the development and implementation of an extensive diabetic education program that is offered to all diabetics. It describes the benefits gained by the diabetic patients. PMID:21253033

  2. Non-target impact of fungicide tetraconazole on microbial communities in soils with different agricultural management.

    PubMed

    Sułowicz, Sławomir; Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-08-01

    Effect of the fungicide tetraconazole on microbial community in silt loam soils from orchard with long history of triazole application and from grassland with no known history of fungicide usage was investigated. Triazole tetraconazole that had never been used on these soils before was applied at the field rate and at tenfold the FR. Response of microbial communities to tetraconazole was investigated during 28-day laboratory experiment by determination of changes in their biomass and structure (phospholipid fatty acids method-PLFA), activity (fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis-FDA) as well as changes in genetic (DGGE) and functional (Biolog) diversity. Obtained results indicated that the response of soil microorganisms to tetraconazole depended on the management of the soils. DGGE patterns revealed that both dosages of fungicide affected the structure of bacterial community and the impact on genetic diversity and richness was more prominent in orchard soil. Values of stress indices-the saturated/monounsaturated PLFAs ratio and the cyclo/monounsaturated precursors ratio, were almost twice as high and the Gram-negative/Gram-positive ratio was significantly lower in the orchard soil compared with the grassland soil. Results of principal component analysis of PLFA and Biolog profiles revealed significant impact of tetraconazole in orchard soil on day 28, whereas changes in these profiles obtained for grassland soil were insignificant or transient. Obtained results indicated that orchards soil seems to be more vulnerable to tetraconazole application compared to grassland soil. History of pesticide application and agricultural management should be taken into account in assessing of environmental impact of studied pesticides.

  3. Non-target impact of fungicide tetraconazole on microbial communities in soils with different agricultural management.

    PubMed

    Sułowicz, Sławomir; Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-08-01

    Effect of the fungicide tetraconazole on microbial community in silt loam soils from orchard with long history of triazole application and from grassland with no known history of fungicide usage was investigated. Triazole tetraconazole that had never been used on these soils before was applied at the field rate and at tenfold the FR. Response of microbial communities to tetraconazole was investigated during 28-day laboratory experiment by determination of changes in their biomass and structure (phospholipid fatty acids method-PLFA), activity (fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis-FDA) as well as changes in genetic (DGGE) and functional (Biolog) diversity. Obtained results indicated that the response of soil microorganisms to tetraconazole depended on the management of the soils. DGGE patterns revealed that both dosages of fungicide affected the structure of bacterial community and the impact on genetic diversity and richness was more prominent in orchard soil. Values of stress indices-the saturated/monounsaturated PLFAs ratio and the cyclo/monounsaturated precursors ratio, were almost twice as high and the Gram-negative/Gram-positive ratio was significantly lower in the orchard soil compared with the grassland soil. Results of principal component analysis of PLFA and Biolog profiles revealed significant impact of tetraconazole in orchard soil on day 28, whereas changes in these profiles obtained for grassland soil were insignificant or transient. Obtained results indicated that orchards soil seems to be more vulnerable to tetraconazole application compared to grassland soil. History of pesticide application and agricultural management should be taken into account in assessing of environmental impact of studied pesticides. PMID:27106012

  4. Reconsidering the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program as community development.

    PubMed

    Chrisinger, Benjamin W

    2015-01-01

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) protects households from severe food insecurity or extreme poverty, buffers against certain adverse health effects, and exhibits a multiplier effect on the nation's economy. Nonetheless, SNAP remains contentious and benefit reductions are currently being debated. One new direction is to reconceptualize people-based SNAP allocations within place-based community development. Programs such as the federal Healthy Food Financing Initiative encourage retailer development in underserved neighborhoods, creating healthy options and opportunities to reinvest SNAP dollars locally. By exploring relationships between these programs, researchers and practitioners can better understand how to enhance their impact on individuals and neighborhoods.

  5. Community based prevention programs targeting all injuries for children

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, A; Turner, C; McClure, R; Nixon, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Community based models for injury prevention have become an accepted part of the overall injury control strategy. This systematic review of the scientific literature examines the evidence for their effectiveness in reducing all-cause injury in children 0–14 years of age. Methods: A comprehensive search of the literature was performed using the following study selection criteria: community based intervention study; children under 14 years; outcome measure was injury rates; and either a community control or an historical control was used in the design. Quality assessment and data abstraction were guided by a standardized procedure and performed independently by two authors. Data synthesis was in tabular and text form with meta-analysis not being possible due to the discrepancy in methods and measures between the studies. Results: Thorough electronic and library search techniques yielded only nine formally evaluated community based all-cause child injury prevention programs that have reported actual injury outcomes. Of these nine studies, seven provided high level evidence where contemporary control communities were used for comparison; the remaining two used a pre and post-design or time trend analysis where historical data from the community were used as the comparison. Only three of the seven studies with contemporary control communities found significant effect of the intervention; the two studies without controls noted significant reductions in injury rates after the intervention period. Conclusion: There is a paucity of research from which evidence regarding the effectiveness of community based childhood injury prevention programs can be obtained and hence a clear need to increase the effort on developing this evidence base. PMID:15178676

  6. Overview of Mosquito Research Programs at the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical, Agricultural & Veterinary Entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE), a U.S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research Service laboratory, was established in World War II to produce products to protect military personnel against insect vector of disease. Currently the mission of CMAVE is ...

  7. Theme: Trends and Issues Affecting the Future of Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Articles discuss trends and issues in agricultural education, community and technical colleges, career/technical studies, Australian agriculture, agricultural science and technology programs in urban areas, genetic engineering, the impact of changing technologies on agricultural education, volunteers, and performance-based assessment. (JOW)

  8. Novel prevention program for trichinellosis in inuit communities.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Jean-François; MacLean, J Dick; Gyorkos, Theresa W; Leclair, Daniel; Richter, Anne-Katrin; Serhir, Bouchra; Forbes, Lorry; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2002-06-01

    Repeated outbreaks of trichinellosis caused by the consumption of Trichinella-infected walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) meat, which have sometimes led to serious morbidity, have stimulated Inuit communities in Nunavik (northern Quebec), Canada, to develop an innovative trichinellosis prevention program. The program involves preconsumption testing of meat samples from harvested walrus at a regional laboratory and the rapid dissemination of the results of such testing to communities. Local health authorities in Inukjuak conducted an epidemiological investigation after testing identified Trichinella-positive walrus meat in September 1997. This report describes the events that occurred before, during, and after the trichinellosis outbreak and also documents how the prevention program contributed to successful resolution of the outbreak.

  9. Microbial Community-Level Physiological Profiles (CLPP) and herbicide mineralization potential in groundwater affected by agricultural land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janniche, Gry Sander; Spliid, Henrik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2012-10-01

    Diffuse groundwater pollution from agricultural land use may impact the microbial groundwater community, which was investigated as Community-Level Physiological Profiles (CLPP) using EcoPlate™. Water was sampled from seven piezometers and a spring in a small agricultural catchment with diffuse herbicide and nitrate pollution. Based on the Shannon-Wiener and Simpson's diversity indices the diversity in the microbial communities was high. The response from the EcoPlates™ showed which substrates support groundwater bacteria, and all 31 carbon sources were utilized by organisms from at least one water sample. However, only nine carbon sources were utilized by all water samples: D-Mannitol, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, putrescine, D-galacturonic acid, itaconic acid, 4-hydroxy benzoic acid, tween 40, tween 80, and L-asparagine. In all water samples the microorganisms preferred D-mannitol, D-galacturonic acid, tween 40, and 4-hydroxy benzoic acid as substrates, whereas none preferred 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, α-D-lactose, D,L-α-glycerol phosphate, α-ketobutyric acid, L-threonine and glycyl-L-glutamic acid. Principal Component Analysis of the CLPP's clustered the most agriculturally affected groundwater samples, indicating that the agricultural land use affects the groundwater microbial communities. Furthermore, the ability to mineralize atrazine and isoproturon, which have been used in the catchment, was also associated with this cluster.

  10. Climate change and Australian agriculture: a review of the threats facing rural communities and the health policy landscape.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Elizabeth G; Bell, Erica; King, Debra; Woodruff, Rosalie

    2011-03-01

    Population health is a function of social and environmental health determinants. Climate change is predicted to bring significant alterations to ecological systems on which human health and livelihoods depend; the air, water, plant, and animal health. Agricultural systems are intrinsically linked with environmental conditions, which are already under threat in much of southern Australian because of rising heat and protracted drying. The direct impact of increasing heat waves on human physiology and survival has recently been well studied. More diffusely, increasing drought periods may challenge the viability of agriculture in some regions, and hence those communities that depend on primary production. A worst case scenario may herald the collapse of some communities. Human health impacts arising from such transition would be profound. This article summarizes existing rural health challenges and presents the current evidence plus future predictions of climate change impacts on Australian agriculture to argue the need for significant augmentation of public health and existing health policy frameworks. The article concludes by suggesting that adaptation to climate change requires planning for worst case scenario outcomes to avert catastrophic impacts on rural communities. This will involve national policy planning as much as regional-level leadership for rapid development of adaptive strategies in agriculture and other key areas of rural communities.

  11. Camp Programs Provide Community Opportunities: Camp Henry Helps Community with Youth Diversion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Kooi, Gregory; Astle, Judy Hughes; Jacobs, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    A Michigan program gives juvenile first-offenders in alcohol, drug, or tobacco crimes the option of completing a youth diversion program at a local camp as an alternative to traditional juvenile justice. Considerations for the camp included board support, compatibility with camp philosophy, and staff competence. The program has lower recidivism…

  12. Honolulu Community College Program Health Indicators: 2000-2001 Program Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Honolulu Community Coll.

    This report presents an overall health summation of 21 programs offered at Honolulu Community College (Hawaii) during 2000-2001. The programs profiled are: (1) Auto Body Repair and Painting; (2) Aeronautics Maintenance Technology; (3) Administration of Justice; (4) Automotive Mechanics Technology; (5) Boat Maintenance Repair; (6) Carpentry; (7)…

  13. Adapting the Community of Inquiry Survey for an Online Graduate Program: Implications for Online Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Swapna; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    A cohort-based online professional doctorate program that consisted of both online coursework and research activities was designed using Garrison et al's community of inquiry (CoI) framework. The evaluation of the program proved a challenge because all existing CoI assessment methods in the past have dealt with online courses, not with online…

  14. The influence of Community Access to Child Health (CATCH) program on community pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Soares, Neelkamal S; Hobson, Wendy L; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Finneran, Maureen; Varrasso, Denia A; Keller, David

    2014-01-01

    The CATCH (Community Access to Child Health) Program, which supports pediatricians who engage with the community to improve child health, increase access to health care, and promote advocacy through small seed grants, was last evaluated in 1998. The objective was to describe the characteristics of CATCH grant recipients and projects and assess the community impact of funded projects. Prospective data was collected from CATCH applications (grantee characteristics, topic area and target population for projects funded from 2006-2012) and post-project 2-year follow-up survey (project outcomes, sustainability, and impact for projects funded from 2008 through 2010). From 2006 through 2012, the CATCH Program awarded 401 projects to grantees working mostly in general pediatrics. Eighty-five percent of projects targeted children covered by Medicaid, 33% targeted uninsured children, and 75% involved a Latino population. Main topic areas addressed were nutrition, access to health care, and medical home. Sixty-nine percent of grantees from 2008 to 2010 responded to the follow-up survey. Ninety percent reported completing their projects, and 86% of those projects continued to exist in some form. Grantees reported the development of community partnerships (77%) and enhanced recognition of child health issues in the community (73%) as the most frequent changes due to the projects. The CATCH Program funds community-based projects led by pediatricians that address the medical home and access to care. A majority of these projects and community partnerships are sustained beyond their original CATCH funding and, in many cases, are leveraged into additional financial or other community support.

  15. Changes in soil microbial community structure influenced by agricultural management practices in a mediterranean agro-ecosystem.

    PubMed

    García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Zornoza, Raul; Cerdà, Artemi; Scow, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural practices have proven to be unsuitable in many cases, causing considerable reductions in soil quality. Land management practices can provide solutions to this problem and contribute to get a sustainable agriculture model. The main objective of this work was to assess the effect of different agricultural management practices on soil microbial community structure (evaluated as abundance of phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA). Five different treatments were selected, based on the most common practices used by farmers in the study area (eastern Spain): residual herbicides, tillage, tillage with oats and oats straw mulching; these agricultural practices were evaluated against an abandoned land after farming and an adjacent long term wild forest coverage. The results showed a substantial level of differentiation in the microbial community structure, in terms of management practices, which was highly associated with soil organic matter content. Addition of oats straw led to a microbial community structure closer to wild forest coverage soil, associated with increases in organic carbon, microbial biomass and fungal abundances. The microbial community composition of the abandoned agricultural soil was characterised by increases in both fungal abundances and the metabolic quotient (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), suggesting an increase in the stability of organic carbon. The ratio of bacteria:fungi was higher in wild forest coverage and land abandoned systems, as well as in the soil treated with oat straw. The most intensively managed soils showed higher abundances of bacteria and actinobacteria. Thus, the application of organic matter, such as oats straw, appears to be a sustainable management practice that enhances organic carbon, microbial biomass and activity and fungal abundances, thereby changing the microbial community structure to one more similar to those observed in soils under wild forest coverage.

  16. Changes in Soil Microbial Community Structure Influenced by Agricultural Management Practices in a Mediterranean Agro-Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Zornoza, Raul; Scow, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural practices have proven to be unsuitable in many cases, causing considerable reductions in soil quality. Land management practices can provide solutions to this problem and contribute to get a sustainable agriculture model. The main objective of this work was to assess the effect of different agricultural management practices on soil microbial community structure (evaluated as abundance of phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA). Five different treatments were selected, based on the most common practices used by farmers in the study area (eastern Spain): residual herbicides, tillage, tillage with oats and oats straw mulching; these agricultural practices were evaluated against an abandoned land after farming and an adjacent long term wild forest coverage. The results showed a substantial level of differentiation in the microbial community structure, in terms of management practices, which was highly associated with soil organic matter content. Addition of oats straw led to a microbial community structure closer to wild forest coverage soil, associated with increases in organic carbon, microbial biomass and fungal abundances. The microbial community composition of the abandoned agricultural soil was characterised by increases in both fungal abundances and the metabolic quotient (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), suggesting an increase in the stability of organic carbon. The ratio of bacteria:fungi was higher in wild forest coverage and land abandoned systems, as well as in the soil treated with oat straw. The most intensively managed soils showed higher abundances of bacteria and actinobacteria. Thus, the application of organic matter, such as oats straw, appears to be a sustainable management practice that enhances organic carbon, microbial biomass and activity and fungal abundances, thereby changing the microbial community structure to one more similar to those observed in soils under wild forest coverage. PMID:24260409

  17. Ethnography of a Sustainable Agriculture Program: A Case Study of a Social Movement's Inception and Growth on a University Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triana, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This ethnography documents how the message of sustainability was interpreted and communicated through a sustainable agricultural (SAG) program at an American higher education institution. The ethnography documents the evolution of the program as the program tackled obstacles and accomplished its goals during the initial phases of the program's…

  18. A community-oriented program for training and using volunteers.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, J; Flater, L

    1975-01-01

    Eleven women volunteers from the Arvada, Colorado, community were provided intensive training in communication and other variables related to effective functioning in a community mental health center. Volunteers were then provided various placements within the center. Results indicated that the volunteers' communication effectiveness levels increased significantly from pretest to posttest and as compared to a control group of students going through a mental health program. Volunteers also received favorable evaluation rating from their practicum supervisors. The paper will discuss the procedures, benefits, and considerations involved in developing and utilizing volunteers. PMID:1132223

  19. Industry's voluntary program: Community Awareness and Emergency Response Program and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper describes the chemical industry's Community Awareness and Emergency Response (CAER) Program, and voluntary and mandatory actions by the chemical industry to comply with the major environmental legislation. The chemical industry started the voluntary CAER Program soon after the Bhopal Disaster in 1984; it is coordinated through the Chemical Manufacturer's Association. This program, which began in March 1985, is a long-term industry commitment to develop a community outreach program and to improve local emergency response planning. The Congress of the United States began, in 1985, to consider proposals for mandatory programs. This led to enactment of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, known as SARA. A portion of this Act, entitled Title III is also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. Although this legislation has many mandatory requirements, it should be emphasized that a significant degree of voluntary industrial participation is needed if the purposes of the statute are to be achieved. Title III has created an intricate and still evolving system that ties together the EPA, industrial plant managers, state emergency response commissions, local emergency planning committees and fire departments with jurisdiction over the facility. Each of these groups has a different role and responsibilities but must work cooperatively with other participants. Because of the intricate network of participants, the magnitude of the information flow, and the continuing evolution of the system, unique public relations problems exist in order to comply with Title III.

  20. Developing a Comprehensive Learning Community Program: Implementing a Learning Community Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Jamie L.; Redington, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    This is the second of a three-part series which will share information about how a mid-size, comprehensive university developed a learning community program, including a residential curriculum. Through intentional collaboration and partnerships, the team, comprised of faculty and staff throughout the university, developed a "multi-year plan…