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Sample records for agrilife research center

  1. EPA recognizes Texas AandM Agrilife

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Oct. 13, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently recognized Texas A&M Agrilife Research Extension Center at Dallas during the 2015 WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition in Las Vegas, Nev. The center rec

  2. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  3. Mars mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA to broaden the nation's engineering capability to meet the critical needs of the civilian space program. It has the goal of focusing on research and training technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines: (1) composite materials and fabrication, (2) light weight structures and controls, and (3) hypersonic aerodynamics and propulsion in a cross disciplined program directed towards the development of the space transportation system for planetary travel.

  4. MARS Mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center (M2RC) is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in June 1988. It is a cooperative effort between NCSU and A&T in Greensboro. The goal of the Center is to focus on research and educational technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines Mission Analysis and Design, Hypersonic Aerodynamics and Propulsion, Structures and Controls, Composite Materials, and Fabrication Methods in a cross-disciplined program directed towards the development of space transportation systems for lunar and planetary travel. The activities of the students and faculty in the M2RC for the period 1 Jul. 1990 to 30 Jun. 1991 are described.

  5. Meeting a Growing Demand: Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service's Early Childhood Educator Online Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Demand for professional development training in the early childhood field has grown substantially in recent years. To meet the demand, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service's Family Development and Resource Management unit developed the Early Childhood Educator Online Training Program, a professional development system that currently offers…

  6. Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, Christopher Barry

    2007-01-01

    As part of a session at the 2007 Thermal & Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), an overview of the operations at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was given. Mission support at this site includes the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD); Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), Science - ER-2; Science - G3 UAVSAR; Science - Ikhana and Space Operations. In addition, the presentation describes TFAWS related work at Dryden.

  7. Ocean Pollution Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Ocean Pollution Research Center (OPRC) is a University of Miami center based at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) and with significant involvement by the College of Engineering. It was formed in 1992 out of concerns for potential oil spills placing at risk the fragile ecosystems of the Florida Keys. OPRC's scope also includes the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and the South Atlantic Bight. Focus is on the physical transport of oil spills and information management for response operations. Studies of the fates and effects of oil spills are also undertaken.

  8. American Overseas Research Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

  9. Concurrent engineering research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The projects undertaken by The Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) at West Virginia University are reported and summarized. CERC's participation in the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Project relating to technology needed to improve the product development process is described, particularly in the area of advanced weapon systems. The efforts committed to improving collaboration among the diverse and distributed health care providers are reported, along with the research activities for NASA in Independent Software Verification and Validation. CERC also takes part in the electronic respirator certification initiated by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, as well as in the efforts to find a solution to the problem of producing environment-friendly end-products for product developers worldwide. The 3M Fiber Metal Matrix Composite Model Factory Program is discussed. CERC technologies, facilities,and personnel-related issues are described, along with its library and technical services and recent publications.

  10. Industry Invests in Research Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Margie

    1983-01-01

    Universities and industry are forging new relationships to support academic research and industrial research and development, including the establishment of university/cooperative research centers. Discusses various cooperative projects at these research centers. Includes a list of representative R&D centers in biotechnology, building…

  11. RIKEN BNL Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samios, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    Since its inception in 1997, the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) has been a major force in the realms of Spin Physics, Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics, large scale Computing Physics and the training of a new generation of extremely talented physicists. This has been accomplished through the recruitment of an outstanding non-permanent staff of Fellows and Research associates in theory and experiment. RBRC is now a mature organization that has reached a steady level in the size of scientific and support staff while at the same time retaining its vibrant youth. A brief history of the scientific accomplishments and contributions of the RBRC physicists will be presented as well as a discussion of the unique RBRC management structure.

  12. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  13. NASA Ames Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The topics include: 1) First Century of Flight, 1903-2003; 2) NACA Research Centers; 3) 65 Years of Innovation; 4) Ames Projects; 5) NASA Ames Research Center Today-founded; 6) Astrobiology; 7) SOFIA; 8) To Explore the Universe and Search for Life: Kepler: The Search for Habitable Planets; 9) Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle; 10) Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); 11) Thermal Protection Materials and Arc-Jet Facility; 12) Information Science & Technology; 13) Project Columbia Integration and Installation; 14) Air Traffic Management/Air Traffic Control; and 15) New Models-UARC.

  14. MIT Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at MIT, started in Jul. 1988, has completed two years of research. The Center is approaching the operational phase of its first testbed, is midway through the construction of a second testbed, and is in the design phase of a third. We presently have seven participating faculty, four participating staff members, ten graduate students, and numerous undergraduates. This report reviews the testbed programs, individual graduate research, other SERC activities not funded by the Center, interaction with non-MIT organizations, and SERC milestones. Published papers made possible by SERC funding are included at the end of the report.

  15. NRH Neuroscience Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Project E3: Neuropsychology Conference The Principal Investigator (Dr. Garmoe) attended fMRI workshops at the National Academy of Neuropsychology...annual conference in 2003. In addition, he met with Dr. Frank Hillary, an experienced fMRI researcher (who at the time was at Kessler), to discuss...feasibility of fMRI designs. Dr. Hillary affirmed the feasibility of fMRI protocols to investigate self-awareness, and possible collaboration was

  16. Ames Research Center Publications-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.

    1978-01-01

    Bibliography of the publications of Ames Research Center authors and contractors, which appeared in formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports. Covers 1976.

  17. Ames research center publications, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B. R. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography cites 851 documents by Ames Research Center personnel and contractors which appeared in formal NASA publications, journals, books, patents, and contractor reports in 1975, or not included in previous annual bibliographies. An author index is provided.

  18. Glenn Research Center Human Research Program: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA-Glenn Research Centers Human Research Program office supports a wide range of technology development efforts aimed at enabling extended human presence in space. This presentation provides a brief overview of the historical successes, current 2013 activities and future projects of NASA-GRCs Human Research Program.

  19. Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFries, J. C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Results obtained from the center's six research projects are reviewed, including research on psychometric assessment of twins with reading disabilities, reading and language processes, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and executive functions, linkage analysis and physical mapping, computer-based remediation of reading disabilities, and…

  20. Research and technology, 1991. Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights are given of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology (R&T) activities at NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  1. Research and technology, 1989: Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that were made during the past year are presented. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology activities at NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  2. Sleep and Performance Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    upon the placement of the work period with respect to the circadian rhythm. Additional studies were published by SPRC care factually during the...Research Center (SPRC) conducts human and animal studies in laboratory and field settings in support of basic and applied sleep research at Washington...Program of Research Field Studies in Humans In a field study of serving police officers, Charles, et al. (2011) found that perceived shorter

  3. Center for Aerosol Research (AEROCENTER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleidman, Richard; Kaufman, Yoram; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The newly established Center for Aerosol Research (AEROCENTER) located at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt MD is dedicated to fostering interdisciplinary research in all aspects of aerosol science. AEROCENTER will be an incubator for innovative new analysis of existing data and ideas for new space missions. The plan is to tap and harvest ideas from a broad international and interdisciplinary science community and to incorporate these ideas into NASA's aerosol research effort for understanding and predicting the aerosol effect on climate and the environment. In order to achieve this goal the center aims to host several established and developing scientists for a period of 3-6 months each year. AEROCENTER will also develop a new technical infrastructure that will integrate the present aerosol research activities and data resources of GSFC/Greenbelt and GSFC/GISS, increase efficiency in the use of NASA remote sensing data, and increase the involvement of a larger national and international scientific community. The center aims to institutionalize and extend the present knowledge base within NASA into a national resource for the education and research communities.

  4. Ames Research Center cryogenics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs describe the Ames Research Center's cryogenics program. Diagrams are given of a fluid management system, a centrifugal pump, a flow meter, a liquid helium test facility, an extra-vehicular activity coupler concept, a dewar support with passive orbital disconnect, a pulse tube refrigerator, a dilution refrigerator, and an adiabatic demagnetization cooler.

  5. Rocket Propulsion Research at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Virginia P.

    1992-01-01

    A small contingent of engineers at NASA Lewis Research Center pioneered in basic research on liquid propellants for rockets shortly after World War II. Carried on through the 1950s, this work influenced the important early decisions made by Abe Silverstein when he took charge of the Office of Space Flight Programs for NASA. He strongly supported the development of liquid hydrogen as a propulsion fuel in the face of resistance from Wernher von Braun. Members of the Lewis staff played an important role in bringing liquid hydrogen technology to the point of reliability through their management of the Centaur Program. This paper demonstrates how the personality and engineering intuition of Abe Silverstein shaped the Centaur program and left a lasting imprint on the laboratory research tradition. Many of the current leaders of Lewis Research Center received their first hands-on engineering experience when they worked on the Centaur program in the 1960s.

  6. Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2009-01-01

    The Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC) conducts integrated research to fulfill the Department of the Interior's responsibilities to the Nation's natural resources. Located on 600 acres along the James River Valley near Jamestown, North Dakota, the NPWRC develops and disseminates scientific information needed to understand, conserve, and wisely manage the Nation's biological resources. Research emphasis is primarily on midcontinental plant and animal species and ecosystems of the United States. During the center's 40-year history, its scientists have earned an international reputation for leadership and expertise on the biology of waterfowl and grassland birds, wetland ecology and classification, mammalian behavior and ecology, grassland ecosystems, and application of statistics and geographic information systems. To address current science challenges, NPWRC scientists collaborate with researchers from other U.S. Geological Survey centers and disciplines (Biology, Geography, Geology, and Water) and with biologists and managers in the Department of the Interior (DOI), other Federal agencies, State agencies, universities, and nongovernmental organizations. Expanding upon its scientific expertise and leadership, the NPWRC is moving in new directions, including invasive plant species, restoration of native habitats, carbon sequestration and marketing, and ungulate management on DOI lands.

  7. Aerothermodynamics research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity in the aerothermodynamics branch at the NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed. Advanced concepts and mission studies relating to the next generation aerospace transportation systems are summarized and directions for continued research identified. Theoretical and computational studies directed at determining flow fields and radiative and convective heating loads in real gases are described. Included are Navier-Stokes codes for equilibrium and thermochemical nonequilibrium air. Experimental studies in the 3.5-ft hypersonic wind tunnel, the ballistic ranges, and the electric arc driven shock tube are described. Tested configurations include generic hypersonic aerospace plane configurations, aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle shapes and Galileo probe models.

  8. Research and technology, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's research and technology accomplishments for fiscal year 1985 are summarized. The report is organized into five major sections covering aeronautics, aerospace technology, spaceflight systems, space station systems, and computational technology support. This organization of the report roughly parallels the organization of the Center into directorates. Where appropriate, subheadings are used to identify special topics under the major headings. Results of all research and technology work performed during the fiscal year are contained in Lewis-published technical reports and presentations prepared either by Lewis scientists and engineers or by contractor personnel. In addition, significant results are presented by university faculty or graduate students in technical sessions and in journals of the technical societies. For the reader who desires more information about a particular subject, the Lewis contact will provide that information or references. In 1985, five Lewis products were selected by Research and Development Magazine for IR-100 awards. All are described and identified. In addition, the Lewis Distinguished Paper for 1984 to 1985, which was selected by the Chief Scientist and a research advisory board, is included and so identified.

  9. NASA Airline Operations Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    This is a PowerPoint presentation NASA airline operations center (AOC) research. It includes information on using IBM Watson in the AOC. It also reviews a dispatcher decision support tool call the Flight Awareness Collaboration Tool (FACT). FACT gathers information about winter weather onto one screen and includes predictive abilities. It should prove to be useful for airline dispatchers and airport personnel when they manage winter storms and their effect on air traffic. This material is very similar to other previously approved presentations with the same title.

  10. The Research Role of a National Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    The functional role of a national center for vocational education depends on the people doing the work; consequently, the center sets its own agenda when it makes personal decisions. A center's role should include two elements: in setting its own research agenda, a center should take a broad perspective on vocational education; and a center should…

  11. Research and Technology 1990, Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The mission of NASA-Langley is to increase the knowledge and capability of the U.S. in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be executed by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other U.S. government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights are presented of the major accomplishments and applications that were made during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology activitives at NASA-Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  12. Ames Research Center Publications: A Continuing Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Ames Research Center Publications: A Continuing Bibliography contains the research output of the Center indexed during 1981 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR), Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (LSTAR), International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA), and Computer Program Abstracts (CPA). This bibliography is published annually in an attempt to effect greater awareness and distribution of the Center's research output.

  13. Institutional Challenges of Interdisciplinary Research Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glied, Sherry; Bakken, Suzanne; Formicola, Allan; Gebbie, Kristine; Larson, Elaine L.

    2007-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity has become the model of scholarly inquiry generally espoused by many who seek federal research funding. Interdisciplinary research centers pose challenges to academic settings and to investigators. In a conference of directors of diverse research centers at a single research university we found that the challenges facing…

  14. Model for a patient-centered comparative effectiveness research center.

    PubMed

    Costlow, Monica R; Landsittel, Douglas P; James, A Everette; Kahn, Jeremy M; Morton, Sally C

    2015-04-01

    This special report describes the systematic approach the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) undertook in creating an infrastructure for comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research resources. We specifically highlight the administrative structure, communication and training opportunities, stakeholder engagement resources, and support services offered.

  15. NASA's engineering research centers and interdisciplinary education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Gordon I.

    1990-01-01

    A new program of interactive education between NASA and the academic community aims to improve research and education, provide long-term, stable funding, and support cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary research. The mission of NASA's Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) is discussed and it is pointed out that the OAET conducts about 10 percent of its total R&D program at U.S. universities. Other NASA university-based programs are listed including the Office of Commercial Programs Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) and the National Space Grant program. The importance of university space engineering centers and the selection of the nine current centers are discussed. A detailed composite description is provided of the University Space Engineering Research Centers. Other specialized centers are described such as the Center for Space Construction, the Mars Mission Research Center, and the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration. Approaches to educational outreach are discussed.

  16. National Center on Sleep Disorders Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Updates The National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR) Located within the National Heart, Lung, and ... key functions: research, training, technology transfer, and coordination. Research Sleep disorders span many medical fields, requiring multidisciplinary ...

  17. Research Laboratories and Centers Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Office of Research and Development is the research arm of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It has three national laboratories and four national centers located in 14 facilities across the country.

  18. Remote Science Operation Center research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Progress in the following areas is discussed: the design, planning and operation of a remote science payload operations control center; design and planning of a data link via satellite; and the design and prototyping of an advanced workstation environment for multi-media (3-D computer aided design/computer aided engineering, voice, video, text) communications and operations.

  19. Establishing a Center to Support Faculty Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Laura; Kozleski, Elizabeth; Muth, Rodney; Rhodes, Lynn K.; White, Kim Kennedy

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the establishment in fall 2002 of a School of Education Research Center designed to support faculty in increasing productivity and quality in research. Details are provided about center goals, services, staffing, space, resources, and logistics during the first year of operation. In addition, data are shared about faculty…

  20. Process Control Research, Training Center for Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee have established a measurement and controls research center and a master's-level academic engineering program. A description of this university/industry cooperative research center is provided. Indicates that a doctoral program is planned when the master's program is well…

  1. Center for Prostate Disease Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers CPDR Celebrates 25 Years of innovative basic science and clinical research to develop promising detection techniques and treatments for prostate cancer Basic Science Research Program Two of the major activities of ...

  2. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    The Center Master Plan for NASA Glenn Research Center is a comprehensive survey of NASA Glenn's current facility assets and a vision of how we see the facilities will change over the next 20 years in order to support the changing NASA Mission. This Center Master Plan is a vital management tool used by all organizations for making near term decisions and in future planning. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Joseph Morris, the Chief Architect in the Facilities Division, on beginning this Center Master Planning Process. The previous Master Plan was completed by the Center in 1985 and contained general information on the background of the facility as well as maps detailing environmental and historic records, land use, utilities, etc. The new Master Plan is required for the Center by NASA headquarters and will include similar types of information as used in the past. The new study will provide additional features including showing how individual buildings are linked to the programs and missions that they serve. The Master Plan will show practical future options for the facility s assets with a twenty year look ahead. The Plan will be electronically retrievable so that it becomes a communications tool for Center personnel. A Center Master Plan, although required, is very beneficial to NASA Glenn Research Center in aiding management with the future direction of the campus. Keeping up-to-date information and future plans readily available to all of NASA Glenn will insure that future real property development efficiently and effectively supports the missions camed out and supported by the Center. A Center Master Plan will also facilitate coordination with Center supported programs, stakeholders, and customers. In addition, it will provide a basis for cooperative planning with local and other governmental organizations and ultimately ensure that future budgets include the Center program needs described in the plan. This will ensure that development plans are safe

  3. Center for Computing Research Summer Research Proceedings 2015.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Andrew Michael; Parks, Michael L.

    2015-12-18

    The Center for Computing Research (CCR) at Sandia National Laboratories organizes a summer student program each summer, in coordination with the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) and Cyber Engineering Research Institute (CERI).

  4. Research and technology at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on the Center's research and technology program. In addition to strengthening those areas of engineering and operations technology that contribute to safer, more efficient, and more economical execution of current mission, the technical tools are developed needed to execute Center's mission relative to future programs. The Engineering Development Directorate encompasses most of the laboratories and other Center resources that are key elements of research and technology program implementation and is responsible for implementation of the majority of the projects in this Kennedy Space Center 1989 Annual Report.

  5. Lewis Research Center: Commercialization Success Stories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a portfolio of research and technology capabilities and facilities that afford opportunities for productive partnerships with industry in a broad range of industry sectors. In response to the President's agenda in the area of technology for economic growth (Clinton/Gore 1993), the National Performance Review (1993), NASA's Agenda for Change (1994), and the needs of its customers, NASA Lewis Research Center has sought and achieved significant successes in technology transfer and commercialization. This paper discusses a sampling of Lewis Research Center's successes in this area, and lessons learned that Lewis Research Center is applying in pursuit of continuous improvement and excellence in technology transfer and commercialization.

  6. DOE - BES Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, Cathy Jo

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a powerpoint shown to guests during tours of Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It shows the five DOE-BES nanoscale science research centers (NSRCs), which are located at different national laboratories throughout the country. Then it goes into detail specifically about the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at LANL, including statistics on its user community and CINT's New Mexico industrial users.

  7. Composites research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Duffy, Stephen; Vary, Alex; Nathal, Michael V.; Miner, Robert V.; Arnold, Steven M.; Castelli, Michael G.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Meador, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Composites research at NASA Lewis is focused on their applications in aircraft propulsion, space propulsion, and space power, with the first being predominant. Research on polymer-, metal-, and ceramic-matrix composites is being carried out from an integrated materials and structures viewpoint. This paper outlines some of the topics being pursued from the standpoint of key technical issues, current status, and future directions.

  8. Research Centers: Ecstasies & Agonies [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These four papers are from a symposium facilitated by Gene Roth on research centers at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) conference. "Research: The Thin Blue Line between Rigor and Reality" (Michael Leimbach) discusses the need for HRD research to increase its speed and rigor and help organizations focus on capability…

  9. Ames Research Center Research and Technology 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report highlights the challenging work accomplished during fiscal year 2000 by Ames research scientists,engineers, and technologists. It discusses research and technologies that enable the Information Age, that expand the frontiers of knowledge for aeronautics and space, and that help to maintain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research and technology development. The accomplishments are grouped into four categories based on four of NASA's Strategic Enterprises: Aerospace Technology, Space Science, Biological and Physical Research, and Earth Science. The primary purpose of this report is to communicate knowledge-to inform our stakeholders, customer, and partners, and the people of the United States about the scope and diversity of Ames' mission,the nature of Ames' research and technolog) activities,and the stimulating challenges ahead. The accomplishments cited illustrate the contributions that Ames is willing to improve the quality of life for our citizens and the economic position of the United States in the world marketplace.

  10. National Center on Sleep Disorders Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Register for Updates The National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR) Located within the National Heart, ... health concern. About 70 million Americans suffer from sleep problems; among them, nearly 60 percent have a ...

  11. Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR)

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) Program at The Johns Hopkins University provides high-quality next generation sequencing and genotyping services to investigators working to discover genes that contribute to common diseases.

  12. Telerobotic research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, Nancy E.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of Automation Technology Branch facilities and research is presented. Manipulator research includes dual-arm coordination studies, space manipulator dynamics, end-effector controller development, automatic space structure assembly, and the development of a dual-arm master-slave telerobotic manipulator system. Sensor research includes gravity-compensated force control, real-time monovision techniques, and laser ranging. Artificial intelligence techniques are being explored for supervisory task control, collision avoidance, and connectionist system architectures. A high-fidelity dynamic simulation of robotic systems, ROBSIM, is being supported and extended. Cooperative efforts with Oak Ridge National Laboratory have verified the ability of teleoperators to perform complex structural assembly tasks, and have resulted in the definition of a new dual-arm master-slave telerobotic manipulator. A bibliography of research results and a list of technical contacts are included.

  13. Reuse research plans at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Susan J.; Walker, Carrie

    1989-01-01

    The reuse activities at Langley have centered on the development of the Eli System by SPS. The development of a computer systems design environment at Langley was described as a target application for the future Eli system. This environment combines software development tools with an architecture design and analysis tool. Specifically, a Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) system, under development at Charles Stark Draper Laboratory for Langley, is being used to generate Ada code for use in architecture functional simulations using the Architecture Design and Assessment System (ADAS). The Eli system will be included in this tool set and will be used to organize and promote reuse of the functional simulation code modules.

  14. Ames Research Center C-130

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koozer, Mark A.

    1991-01-01

    The C130 Earth Resources Aircraft provides a platform for a variety of sensors that collect data in support of terrestrial and atmospheric projects sponsored by NASA in coordination with Federal, state, university, and industry investigators. This data is applied to research in the areas of forestry, agriculture, land use and land cover analysis, hydrology, geology, photogrammetry, oceanography, meteorology, and other earth science disciplines. The C130 is a platform aircraft flying up to 25,000 feet above sea level at speeds between 150 and 330 knots True Air Speed. The aircraft is capable of precise flight line navigation by means of an optical borescope from which line guidance is provided to the pilots.

  15. Center of Excellence in Theoretical Geoplasma Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tom

    1993-08-01

    The Center for Theoretical Geoplasma Physics was established at MIT in 1986 through an AFOSR University Research Initiative grant. The goal of the Center since its inception has been to develop and maintain a program of excellence in interdisciplinary geoplasma research involving the mutual interaction of ionospheric scientists, aeronomists, plasma physicists, and numerical analysts. During the past six years, members of the center have made germinal contributions to a number of definitive research findings in the fundamental understanding of ionospheric turbulence, particle acceleration, and the phenomenon of coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Some of the results of these research activities have already found practical applications toward the mission of the Air Force by scientists at the Geophysics Directorate of the Phillips Laboratory, particularly those affiliated with the research group headed by Dr. J.R. Jasperse of the Ionospheric Effects Branch. Theoretical geoplasma physics, URI Program.

  16. Research and technology, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Aeronautics, space, and terrestrial energy research is covered. Energy conversion processes and systems for propulsion in the atmosphere, in space, and on the ground are reviewed. Electric energy generation and storage for both terrestrial and space applications and materials and structures for such systems are also reviewed.

  17. Research and technology of the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Descriptions of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center are given. Topics include laser development, aircraft design, aircraft engines, aerodynamics, remote sensing, space transportation systems, and composite materials.

  18. Rocket propulsion research at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Virginia P.

    1992-01-01

    A small contingent of engineers at NASA LeRC pioneered the basic research on liquid propellants for rockets shortly after World War 2. Carried on through the 1950s, this work influenced the important early decisions made by Abe Silverstein when he took charge of the Office of Space Flight Programs for NASA. He strongly supported the development of liquid hydrogen as a propulsion fuel in the face of resistance from Wernher von Braun. Members of the LeRC staff played an important role in bringing liquid hydrogen technology to the point of reliability through their management of the Centaur Program. This paper demonstrates how the personality and engineering intuition of Abe Silverstein shaped the Centaur program and left a lasting imprint on the laboratory research tradition. Many of the current leaders of LeRC received their first hands-on engineering experience when they worked on the Centaur program in the 1960s.

  19. New England Instructional Television Research Center (NETREC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Bernard Z.; Wetstone, Harriet S.

    Projects of the New England Instructional Television Research Center (NITREC) are summarized in a collection of papers. Objectives, rationale, and program of NETREC are defined, along with methods of formative evaluation during production. Seven videotest research projects cover methods of evaluating communicative effectiveness of primary-grade…

  20. Engineering Research Centers: A Partnership for Competitiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA.

    This publication consists of colorful data sheets on the National Science Foundation's Engineering Research Centers (ERC) Program, a program designed to strengthen the competitiveness of U.S. industries by bringing new approaches and goals to academic engineering research and education. The main elements of the ERC mission are cross-disciplinary…

  1. MIT Space Engineering Research Center testbed programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at M.I.T., started in July 1988, has completed two and one-half years of research. This Semi-Annual Report presents annotated viewgraph material presented at the January 1991 Steering Committee and Technical Representative Review. The objective of the Space Engineering Research Center is to develop and disseminate a unified technology of controlled structures. There has been continued evolution of the concept of intelligent structures (including in this past year the first successful embedding of a microelectronic component into a structural element).

  2. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Over the past year, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center at The Pennsylvania State University continued its progress toward meeting the goals of NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers (USERC) program. The USERC program was initiated in 1988 by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology to provide an invigorating force to drive technology advancements in the U.S. space industry. The Propulsion Center's role in this effort is to provide a fundamental basis from which the technology advances in propulsion can be derived. To fulfill this role, an integrated program was developed that focuses research efforts on key technical areas, provides students with a broad education in traditional propulsion-related science and engineering disciplines, and provides minority and other under-represented students with opportunities to take their first step toward professional careers in propulsion engineering. The program is made efficient by incorporating government propulsion laboratories and the U.S. propulsion industry into the program through extensive interactions and research involvement. The Center is comprised of faculty, professional staff, and graduate and undergraduate students working on a broad spectrum of research issues related to propulsion. The Center's research focus encompasses both current and advanced propulsion concepts for space transportation, with a research emphasis on liquid propellant rocket engines. The liquid rocket engine research includes programs in combustion and turbomachinery. Other space transportation modes that are being addressed include anti-matter, electric, nuclear, and solid propellant propulsion. Outside funding supports a significant fraction of Center research, with the major portion of the basic USERC grant being used for graduate student support and recruitment. The remainder of the USERC funds are used to support programs to increase minority student enrollment in engineering, to maintain Center

  3. Research Plan for the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This research plan describes a framework for defining and developing the field of rehabilitation sciences and research opportunities for the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) and other agencies funding medical rehabilitation research. The plan addresses the needs of both persons who are involved in habilitation and in…

  4. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    On 8-9 Sep. 1993, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center (PERC) at The Pennsylvania State University held its Fifth Annual Symposium. PERC was initiated in 1988 by a grant from the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology as a part of the University Space Engineering Research Center (USERC) program; the purpose of the USERC program is to replenish and enhance the capabilities of our Nation's engineering community to meet its future space technology needs. The Centers are designed to advance the state-of-the-art in key space-related engineering disciplines and to promote and support engineering education for the next generation of engineers for the national space program and related commercial space endeavors. Research on the following areas was initiated: liquid, solid, and hybrid chemical propulsion, nuclear propulsion, electrical propulsion, and advanced propulsion concepts.

  5. Gear and Transmission Research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is a review of some of the research work of the NASA Lewis Research Center Mechanical Components Branch. It includes a brief review of the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Mechanical Components Branch. The research topics discussed are crack propagation of gear teeth, gear noise of spiral bevel and other gears, design optimization methods, methods we have investigated for transmission diagnostics, the analytical and experimental study of gear thermal conditions, the analytical and experimental study of split torque systems, the evaluation of several new advanced gear steels and transmission lubricants and the evaluation of various aircraft transmissions. The area of research needs for gearing and transmissions is also discussed.

  6. Role Strain in University Research Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Craig; Bozeman, Barry

    2007-01-01

    One way in which university faculty members' professional lives have become more complex with the advent of contemporary university research centers is that many faculty have taken on additional roles. The authors' concern in this article is to determine the extent to which role strain is experienced by university faculty members who are…

  7. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume in the 1994 annual report for the NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center's Sixth Annual Symposium. This conference covered: (1) Combustors and Nozzles; (2) Turbomachinery Aero- and Hydro-dynamics; (3) On-board Propulsion systems; (4) Advanced Propulsion Applications; (5) Vaporization and Combustion; (6) Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics; and (7) Atomization and Sprays.

  8. Lewis Research Center R and D Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs. The work of the Center is directed toward new propulsion, power, and communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space, so that U.S. leadership in these areas is ensured. The end product is knowledge, usually in a report, that is made fully available to potential users--the aircraft engine industry, the energy industry, the automotive industry, the space industry, and other NASA centers. In addition to offices and laboratories for almost every kind of physical research in such fields as fluid mechanics, physics, materials, fuels, combustion, thermodynamics, lubrication, heat transfer, and electronics, LeRC has a variety of engineering test cells for experiments with components such as compressors, pumps, conductors, turbines, nozzles, and controls. A number of large facilities can simulate the operating environment for a complete system: altitude chambers for aircraft engines; large supersonic wind tunnels for advanced airframes and propulsion systems; space simulation chambers for electric rockets or spacecraft; and a 420-foot-deep zero-gravity facility for microgravity experiments. Some problems are amenable to detection and solution only in the complete system and at essentially full scale. By combining basic research in pertinent disciplines and generic technologies with applied research on components and complete systems, LeRC has become one of the most productive centers in its field in the world. This brochure describes a number of the facilities that provide LeRC with its exceptional capabilities.

  9. Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Kerr Center, situated on 16 acres three miles south of Ada, Oklahoma, houses the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD) of the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL). The division develops strategies and technologies to protect and restore grou...

  10. Research and Infrastructure Development Center for Nanomaterials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    1 ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Research and Infrastructure Development Center for Nanomaterials Research FINAL REPORT 15 AUG 2003... Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per...including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson

  11. Structural mechanics research at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    The contributions of NASA's Langley Research Center in areas of structural mechanics were traced from its NACA origins in 1917 to the present. The developments in structural mechanics technology since 1940 were emphasized. A brief review of some current research topics were discussed as well as anticipated near-term research projects.

  12. Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlino, M. R.; Mayernik, M. S.; Kelly, K.; Allard, S.; Tenopir, C.; Palmer, C.; Varvel, V. E., Jr.

    2012-12-01

    Digital data both enable and constrain scientific research. Scientists are enabled by digital data to develop new research methods, utilize new data sources, and investigate new topics, but they also face new data collection, management, and preservation burdens. The current data workforce consists primarily of scientists who receive little formal training in data management and data managers who are typically educated through on-the-job training. The Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC) program is investigating a new model for educating data professionals to contribute to scientific research. DCERC is a collaboration between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Graduate School of Library and Information Science, the University of Tennessee School of Information Sciences, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The program is organized around a foundations course in data curation and provides field experiences in research and data centers for both master's and doctoral students. This presentation will outline the aims and the structure of the DCERC program and discuss results and lessons learned from the first set of summer internships in 2012. Four masters students participated and worked with both data mentors and science mentors, gaining first hand experiences in the issues, methods, and challenges of scientific data curation. They engaged in a diverse set of topics, including climate model metadata, observational data management workflows, and data cleaning, documentation, and ingest processes within a data archive. The students learned current data management practices and challenges while developing expertise and conducting research. They also made important contributions to NCAR data and science teams by evaluating data management workflows and processes, preparing data sets to be archived, and developing recommendations for particular data management activities. The master's student interns will return in summer of 2013

  13. Summer Research Internships at Biosphere 2 Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Through the support of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, Biosphere 2 Center hosted 10 research interns for a 10 week period during the summer of 1998. In addition, we were able to offer scholarships to 10 students for Columbia University summer field courses. Students participating in these programs were involved in numerous earth systems activities, collecting data in the field and conducting analyses in the laboratory. Students enrolled in the field program were expected to design independent research projects as part of their coursework. In addition to laboratory and field research, students participated in weekly research seminars by resident and visiting scientists. Field school students were involved in field trips exposing them to the geology and ecology of the region including Arizona Sonora Desert Museum, Mount Lemmon, Aravaipa Canyon and the Gulf of California. Interns participated in laboratory-based research. All students were expected to complete oral and written presentations of their work during the summer.

  14. Research and technology report of the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Highlights of major accomplishments and applications made during the past year at the Langley Research Center are reported. The activities and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are also discussed. Accomplishments in the fields of aeronautics and space technology, space science and applications and space transportation systems are discussed.

  15. Research and technology highlights of the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Highlights of research accomplishments of the Lewis Research Center for fiscal year 1984 are presented. The report is divided into four major sections covering aeronautics, space communications, space technology, and materials and structures. Six articles on energy are included in the space technology section.

  16. Research Bulletin, Hispanic Research Center, Volume 5, Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogler, Lloyd H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This set of articles draws from a conceptual model for Hispanic mental health research developed by the Hispanic Research Center of Fordham University and describes the development and use of "Tell-Me-a-Story" (TEMAS), a new thematic apperception test for the assessment of personality functioning in ethnic minority children. An…

  17. Antarctica Research in the Polar Research Center of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Cole-Dai, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Polar Research Center of China (PRCC) was established in the early 1990s (formerly Polar Research Institute of China) to serve as the leading national organization for Antarctica-related research in China. Current research areas of center staff scientists include glaciology and paleoclimatology, upper atmospheric physics, polar and marine biology, and oceanagrphy. In addition to its own active research, PRCC on behalf of the China Antarctic and Arctic Administration coordinates and provides logistical support to Antarctica research activities by all Chinese scientists. The center organizes and manages the annual Chinese Research Expedition to Antarctica with participation from many other national and academic institutions. In its first decade of existence, PRCC has accumulated valuable experience in conducting and facilitating research in Antarctica, particularly in the areas of logistic support for field programs, staffing and managing the two permanent stations in Antarctica (Great Wall and Zhongshan). The successful operation of the Chinese Antarctica research program has benefitted from generous assistance from several more established national (for example, Australia, Japan and the United States) Antarctica programs and from frequent contact with international colleagues working on Antarctica research. Among the many issues and problems frequently encountered in the last decade are: (1) The scale of research activities is often seriously constrained by logistic capabilities and funding; (2) Limited computer network and library resources hamper speedy and timely access to relevant international scientific literature; (3) Acquisition of high quality scientific (field and laboratory) equipment and special supplies can be limited by funding and access to suppliers.

  18. Parallel software tools at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Stuti; Tennille, Geoffrey M.; Lakeotes, Christopher D.; Randall, Donald P.; Arthur, Jarvis J.; Hammond, Dana P.; Mall, Gerald H.

    1993-01-01

    This document gives a brief overview of parallel software tools available on the Intel iPSC/860 parallel computer at Langley Research Center. It is intended to provide a source of information that is somewhat more concise than vendor-supplied material on the purpose and use of various tools. Each of the chapters on tools is organized in a similar manner covering an overview of the functionality, access information, how to effectively use the tool, observations about the tool and how it compares to similar software, known problems or shortfalls with the software, and reference documentation. It is primarily intended for users of the iPSC/860 at Langley Research Center and is appropriate for both the experienced and novice user.

  19. Molecular Science Research Center 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Molecular Science Research Center is a designated national user facility, available to scientists from universities, industry, and other national laboratories. After an opening section, which includes conferences hosted, appointments, and projects, this document presents progress in the following fields: chemical structure and dynamics; environmental dynamics and simulation; macromolecular structure and dynamics; materials and interfaces; theory, modeling, and simulation; and computing and information sciences. Appendices are included: MSRC staff and associates, 1992 publications and presentations, activities, and acronyms and abbreviations.

  20. RCOP: Research Center for Optical Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabibi, Bagher M. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    During the five years since its inception, Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) has excelled in the goals stated in the original proposal: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, there have been 16 Bachelors degrees and 9 Masters degrees awarded to African American students working in RCOP during the last five years. RCOP has also provided research experience to undergraduate and high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been instrumental in the development of the Ph.D. program in physics which is in its fourth year at Hampton. There are currently over 40 graduate students in the program and 9 African American graduate students, working in RCOP, that have satisfied all of the requirements for Ph.D. candidancy and are working on their dissertation research. At least three of these students will be awarded their doctoral degrees during 1997. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. During the first five years of existence, RCOP researchers have generated well over $3 M in research funding that directly supports the Center. Close ties with NASA Langley and NASA Lewis have been established, and collaborations with NASA scientists, URC's and other universities as well as with industry have been developed. This success is evidenced by the rate of publishing research results in refereed journals, which now exceeds that of the goals in the original proposal (approx. 2 publications per faculty per year). Also, two patents have been awarded to RCOP scientists.

  1. [Research activities in Kobe-Indonesia Collaborative Research Centers].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Hotta, Hak

    2013-01-01

    Kobe-Indonesia Collaborative Research Center was established in Institute of Tropical Disease (ITD), Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia in 2007 under the program of ''Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases'' supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, and then it has been under the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) since 2010. Japanese researchers have been stationed at ITD, conducting joint researches on influenza, viral hepatitis, dengue and infectious diarrhea. Also, another Japanese researcher has been stationed at Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, carrying out joint researches on'' Identification of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) substances and development of HCV and dengue vaccines'' in collaboration with University of Indonesia and Airlangga University through the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) since 2009. In this article, we briefly introduce the background history of Kobe University Research Center in Indonesia, and discuss the research themes and outcomes of J-GRID and SATREPS activities.

  2. Research Participant-Centered Outcomes at NIH-Supported Clinical Research Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Rhonda G.; Lee, Laura N.; Yessis, Jennifer M.; Wesley, Robert; Alfano, Sandra; Alexander, Steven R.; Kassis, Sylvia Baedorf; Cola, Phil; Dozier, Ann; Ford, Dan E.; Harris, Paul; Kim, Emmelyn; Lee, Simon Craddock; O’Riordan, Gerri; Roth, Mary-Tara; Schuff, Kathryn; Wasser, June; Henderson, David K.; Coller, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although research participation is essential for clinical investigation, few quantitative outcome measures exist to assess participants’ experiences. To address this, we developed and deployed a survey at 15 NIH-supported clinical research centers to assess participant-centered outcomes; we report responses from 4,961 participants. Methods Survey questions addressed core aspects of the research participants’ experience, including their overall rating, motivation, trust, and informed consent. We describe participant characteristics, responses to individual questions, and correlations among responses. Results Respondents broadly represented the research population in sex, race, and ethnicity. Seventy-three percent awarded top ratings to their overall research experience and 94% reported no pressure to enroll. Top ratings correlated with feeling treated with respect, listened to, and having access to the research team (R2=0.80 - 0.96). White participants trusted researchers (88%) than did non-white participants collectively (80%) (p<0.0001). Many participants felt fully prepared by the informed consent process (67%) and wanted to receive research results (72%). Conclusions Our survey demonstrates that a majority of participants at NIH-supported clinical research centers rate their research experience very positively and that participant-centered outcome measures identify actionable items for improvement of participant’s experiences, research protections, and the conduct of clinical investigation. PMID:24842076

  3. 70 Years of Aeropropulsion Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Dhanireddy R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of air-breathing propulsion research conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) over the past 70 years. It includes a historical perspective of the center and its various stages of propulsion research in response to the countrys different periods of crises and growth opportunities. GRCs research and technology development covered a broad spectrum, from a short-term focus on improving the energy efficiency of aircraft engines to advancing the frontier technologies of high-speed aviation in the supersonic and hypersonic speed regimes. This paper highlights major research programs, showing their impact on industry and aircraft propulsion, and briefly discusses current research programs and future aeropropulsion technology trends in related areas

  4. Summer Research Internships at Biosphere 2 Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Colodner, Debra; Griffin, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    Through the support of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, Biosphere 2 Center hosted 11 research interns for 6 to 8 weeks each during the summer of 1997. In addition, we were able to offer scholarships to 14 students for Columbia University summer field courses. These two types of programs engaged students in much of the range of activity of practicing Earth Scientists, with an emphasis on the collection and analysis of data in both the field and the laboratory. Research interns and students in the field courses also played an important part in the design and evolution of their research projects. In addition to laboratory and field research, students participated in weekly research seminars by resident and visiting scientists. Research interns were exposed to the geology and ecology of the region via short field trips to the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum, Mount Lemmon, Aravaipa Canyon and the Gulf of California, while field course students were exposed to laboratory-based research via intern-led hands-on demonstrations of their work. All students made oral and written presentations of their work during the summer, and two of the research interns have applied to present their results at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research in Maryland in April, 1998.

  5. Center for Applied Radiation Research (CARR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Thomas N.

    1997-01-01

    Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU) Center for Applied Radiation Research (CARR) was established in 1995 to address the tasks, missions and technological needs of NASA. CARR is built on a tradition of radiation research at Prairie View A&M started in 1984 with NASA funding. This continuing program has lead to: (1) A more fundamental and practical understanding of radiation effects on electronics and materials; (2) A dialog between space, military and commercial electronics manufacturers; (3) Innovative electronic circuit designs; (4) Development of state-of-the-art research facilities at PVAMU; (5) Expanded faculty and staff to mentor student research; and (6) Most importantly, increased flow in the pipeline leading to expanded participation of African-Americans and other minorities in science and technological fields of interest to NASA.

  6. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  7. NASA Glenn Research Center's Hypersonic Propulsion Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), as NASA's lead center for aeropropulsion, is responding to the challenge of reducing the cost of space transportation through the integration of air-breathing propulsion into launch vehicles. Air- breathing launch vehicle (ABLV) propulsion requires a marked departure from traditional propulsion applications. and stretches the technology of both rocket and air-breathing propulsion. In addition, the demands of the space launch mission require an unprecedented level of integration of propulsion and vehicle systems. GRC is responding with a program with rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) propulsion technology as its main focus. RBCC offers the potential for simplicity, robustness, and performance that may enable low-cost single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) transportation. Other technologies, notably turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion, offer benefits such as increased robustness and greater mission flexibility, and are being advanced, at a slower pace, as part of GRC's program in hypersonics.

  8. The National Student Research Center: The Student Research Center Approach to Instruction Program Development Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swang, John I.

    The National Student Research Center (NSRC) is dedicated to promoting student research and the use of the scientific method in all subject areas across the curriculum, especially science and mathematics. The NSRC facilitates the implementation of a nationally recognized, innovative, and highly effective approach to instruction called the Student…

  9. NASA Johnson Space Center Biomedical Research Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    Johnson Space Center (JSC) medical sciences laboratories constitute a national resource for support of medical operations and life sciences research enabling a human presence in space. They play a critical role in evaluating, defining, and mitigation the untoward effect of human adaption to space flight. Over the years they have developed the unique facilities and expertise required to perform: biomedical sample analysis and physiological performance tests supporting medical evaluations of space flight crew members and scientific investigations of the operationally relevant medical, physiological, cellular, and biochemical issues associated with human space flight. A general overview of these laboratories is presented in viewgraph form.

  10. NASA Lewis Research Center Futuring Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boroush, Mark; Stover, John; Thomas, Charles

    1987-01-01

    On October 21 and 22, 1986, the Futures Group ran a two-day Futuring Workshop on the premises of NASA Lewis Research Center. The workshop had four main goals: to acquaint participants with the general history of technology forecasting; to familiarize participants with the range of forecasting methodologies; to acquaint participants with the range of applicability, strengths, and limitations of each method; and to offer participants some hands-on experience by working through both judgmental and quantitative case studies. Among the topics addressed during this workshop were: information sources; judgmental techniques; quantitative techniques; merger of judgment with quantitative measurement; data collection methods; and dealing with uncertainty.

  11. NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Thomas L.; Storey, Richard W.; Youngbluth, Otto

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon system operations are covered in this report for the period of 1979 through 1983. Meteorological data, ozone concentrations, and other data were obtained from in situ measurements. The large tethered balloon had a lifting capability of 30 kilograms to 2500 meters. The report includes descriptions of the various components of the balloon systems such as the balloons, the sensors, the electronics, and the hardware. Several photographs of the system are included as well as a list of projects including the types of data gathered.

  12. Annual research briefs, 1993. [Center for Turbulence Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 annual progress reports of the Research Fellow and students of the Center for Turbulence Research are included. The first group of reports are directed towards the theory and application of active control in turbulent flows including the development of a systematic mathematical procedure based on the Navier Stokes equations for flow control. The second group of reports are concerned with the prediction of turbulent flows. The remaining articles are devoted to turbulent reacting flows, turbulence physics, experiments, and simulations.

  13. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center C-17 Research Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris

    2007-01-01

    A general overview of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's C-17 Aircraft is presented. The topics include: 1) 2006 Activities PHM Instrumentation Refurbishment; 2) Acoustic and Vibration Sensors; 3) Gas Path Sensors; 4) NASA Instrumentation System Racks; 5) NASA C-17 Simulator; 6) Current Activities; 7) Future Work; 8) Lawn Dart ; 9) Weight Tub; and 10) Parachute Test Vehicle.

  14. Dryden Flight Research Center Chemical Pharmacy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bette

    1997-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) Chemical Pharmacy "Crib" is a chemical sharing system which loans chemicals to users, rather than issuing them or having each individual organization or group purchasing the chemicals. This cooperative system of sharing chemicals eliminates multiple ownership of the same chemicals and also eliminates stockpiles. Chemical management duties are eliminated for each of the participating organizations. The chemical storage issues, hazards and responsibilities are eliminated. The system also ensures safe storage of chemicals and proper disposal practices. The purpose of this program is to reduce the total releases and transfers of toxic chemicals. The initial cost of the program to DFRC was $585,000. A savings of $69,000 per year has been estimated for the Center. This savings includes the reduced costs in purchasing, disposal and chemical inventory/storage responsibilities. DFRC has chemicals stored in 47 buildings and at 289 locations. When the program is fully implemented throughout the Center, there will be three chemical locations at this facility. The benefits of this program are the elimination of chemical management duties; elimination of the hazard associated with chemical storage; elimination of stockpiles; assurance of safe storage; assurance of proper disposal practices; assurance of a safer workplace; and more accurate emissions reports.

  15. Transmission diagnostic research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Lewicki, D. G.; Decker, H. J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory are involved in a joint research program to advance the technology of aerospace transmissions. Within the last six years, a transmission diagnostics research team was formed to address current and future technology barriers in transmission diagnostics. The diagnostics team conducted a survey to determine critical needs of the diagnostics community. Survey results indicated that experimental verification of gear and bearing fault detection methods and damage magnitude assessment were considered the two most critical research areas of a highly reliable health and usage monitoring system. A plan was implemented by the diagnostics team to address these key research areas, by in-house research and university grants. A variety of transmission fault detection methods were applied to experimentally obtained fatigue data. Failure modes of the fatigue tests include a variety of gear pitting failures, tooth wear, tooth fracture, and bearing spalling failures. Accomplishments to date include verification of several specific gear diagnostic methods, verification of a new pattern recognition method to determine failure, and development of a new method to model gear tooth damage. This paper presents the results of these accomplishments in transmission diagnostics research at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  16. Transmission diagnostic research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Lewicki, D. G.; Decker, H. J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1995-05-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory are involved in a joint research program to advance the technology of aerospace transmissions. Within the last six years, a transmission diagnostics research team was formed to address current and future technology barriers in transmission diagnostics. The diagnostics team conducted a survey to determine critical needs of the diagnostics community. Survey results indicated that experimental verification of gear and bearing fault detection methods and damage magnitude assessment were considered the two most critical research areas of a highly reliable health and usage monitoring system. A plan was implemented by the diagnostics team to address these key research areas, by in-house research and university grants. A variety of transmission fault detection methods were applied to experimentally obtained fatigue data. Failure modes of the fatigue tests include a variety of gear pitting failures, tooth wear, tooth fracture, and bearing spalling failures. Accomplishments to date include verification of several specific gear diagnostic methods, verification of a new pattern recognition method to determine failure, and development of a new method to model gear tooth damage. This paper presents the results of these accomplishments in transmission diagnostics research at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  17. Mars Mission Research Center: Research in 3-D braiding

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; El-Shiekh, A.

    1995-06-01

    Textile reinforcements are a growing area in the field of composite materials. At the Mars Mission Research Center`s 3-D braiding laboratory researchers are investigating methods of machine automation and new structural geometries. Advances in machine automation are leading to increased production rates and higher quality products. The development of the 6-step process creates a fabric that incorporates the x-y-z structure within a 4-step braid. Physical testing of braided composites includes traditional static test methods as well as bearing, thread strength, and damage tolerance. With the recent acquisition of a 288 carrier 2-D braider, researchers are conducting more comparison studies between composites reinforced with 3-D structures and those made of 2-D fabrics (uniaxial, woven, and 2-D braids).

  18. Planning and scheduling research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Planning and scheduling is the area of artificial intelligence research that focuses on the determination of a series of operations to achieve some set of (possibly) interacting goals and the placement of those operations in a timeline that allows them to be accomplished given available resources. Work in this area at the NASA Ames Research Center ranging from basic research in constrain-based reasoning and machine learning, to the development of efficient scheduling tools, to the application of such tools to complex agency problems is described.

  19. Research Center Renaming Will Honor Senator Domenici

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    New Mexico Tech and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will rename the observatory's research center on the New Mexico Tech campus to honor retiring U.S. Senator Pete V. Domenici in a ceremony on May 30. The building that serves as the scientific, technical, and administrative center for the Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescopes will be named the "Pete V. Domenici Science Operations Center." The building previously was known simply as the "Array Operations Center." Sen. Pete V. Domenici Sen. Pete V. Domenici "The new name recognizes the strong and effective support for science that has been a hallmark of Senator Domenici's long career in public service," said Dr. Fred Lo, NRAO Director. New Mexico Tech President Daniel H. Lopez said Sen. Domenici has always been a supporter of science and research in Socorro and throughout the state. "He's been a statesman for New Mexico, the nation -- and without exaggeration -- for the world," Lopez said. "Anyone with that track record deserves this recognition." Van Romero, Tech vice president of research and economic development, has served as the university's main lobbyist in Washington, D.C., for more than a decade. He said Sen. Domenici has always been receptive to new ideas and willing to take risks. "Over the years, Sen. Domenici has always had time to listen to our needs and goals," Romero said. "He has served as a champion of New Mexico Tech's causes and we owe him a debt of gratitude for all his efforts over the decades." Originally dedicated in 1988, the center houses offices and laboratories that support VLA and VLBA operations. The center also supports work on the VLA modernization project and on the international Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) project. Work on ALMA at the Socorro center and at the ALMA Test Facility at the VLA site west of Socorro has focused on developing and testing equipment to be deployed at the ALMA site in Chile's Atacama

  20. The Writing Center as Site for Cross-Language Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severino, Carol

    1994-01-01

    Proposes that writing centers form relationships with Applied Linguistics/ESL to research cross-cultural and cross-linguistic questions, thus fostering research grounded in the everyday work of the center, but with large cultural and theoretical implications. (SR)

  1. The Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, D. A.

    1998-09-01

    The Antarctic Plateau is the coldest, driest place on earth. Instruments deployed there enjoy unique advantages for observations requiring (1) the lowest possible thermal background emission, (2) the high transparency and extreme stablity of the Antarctic atmosphere at wavelengths sensitive to water vapor absorption, or (3) continuous access to the polar sky. The Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (CARA) was formed in 1991 to establish observatory at the South Pole and to pursue a set of research projects which can exploit the unique advantages of the site. The projects are knit together by overlapping scientific questions being approached with instruments sensitive to wavelengths from one micron to one millimeter; by the logistical aspects of running a common observatory at a remote site; and by a common type of experiment which places emphasis on large scale, uniform, high sensitivity observations. Center projects study the spatial structure of the cosmic microwave background, star and planet formation, galaxy structure and evolution, and the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium. During the past seven years, CARA has established a year-round observatory at the South Pole; confirmed the transparency, darkness, and stability of the Antarctic sky; installed four major telescope facilities, and used them to conduct scientific investigations. Now, with facilities in place, with established methods of operating equipment in the antarctic environment, with a knowledge of the site characteristics in hand, and with a major modernization program underway at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, the potential of the South Pole site for astrophysical research is only beginning to be realized. Future instruments of exceptional resolution and sensitivity are possible and would provide a valuable complement to airborne and space-based telescopes which will be deployed during the first decades of the new century.

  2. Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

    2011-11-11

    SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR

  3. Propulsion Research at the Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John; Rodgers, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is engaged in research activities aimed at providing the bases for fundamental advancement of a range of space propulsion technologies. There are four broad research themes. Advanced chemical propulsion studies focus on the detailed chemistry and transport processes for high-pressure combustion, and on the understanding and control of combustion stability. New high-energy propellant research ranges from theoretical prediction of new propellant properties through experimental characterization propellant performance, material interactions, aging properties, and ignition behavior. Another research area involves advanced nuclear electric propulsion with new robust and lightweight materials and with designs for advanced fuels. Nuclear electric propulsion systems are characterized using simulated nuclear systems, where the non-nuclear power source has the form and power input of a nuclear reactor. This permits detailed testing of nuclear propulsion systems in a non-nuclear environment. In-space propulsion research is focused primarily on high power plasma thruster work. New methods for achieving higher thrust in these devices are being studied theoretically and experimentally. Solar thermal propulsion research is also underway for in-space applications. The fourth of these research areas is advanced energetics. Specific research here includes the containment of ion clouds for extended periods. This is aimed at proving the concept of antimatter trapping and storage for use ultimately in propulsion applications. Another activity in this involves research into lightweight magnetic technology for space propulsion applications.

  4. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pido, Kelle; Davis, Henry L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    As the principle center for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) leads NASA's development of human spacecraft, human support systems, and human spacecraft operations. To implement this mission, JSC has focused on developing the infrastructure and partnerships that enable the technology development for future NASA programs. In our efforts to develop key technologies, we have found that collaborative relationships with private industry and academia strengthen our capabilities, infuse innovative ideas, and provide alternative applications for our development projects. The American public has entrusted NASA with the responsibility for space--technology development, and JSC is committed to the transfer of the technologies that we develop to the private sector for further development and application. It is our belief that commercialization of NASA technologies benefits both American industry and NASA through technology innovation and continued partnering. To this end, we present the 1998-1999 JSC Research and Technology Report. As your guide to the current JSC technologies, this report showcases the projects in work at JSC that may be of interest to U.S. industry, academia, and other government agencies (federal, state, and local). For each project, potential alternative uses and commercial applications are described.

  5. Admin interface of Optoelectronics Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolae, Popescu R.; Schiopu, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The scope of the Optoelectronics Research Center website is to provide useful information about the center such as: member's cv, projects, conferences, as well as many other related information's. Based upon a worldwide study a visitor pay attention to a website for about 50-60 seconds, in this time he(she) is searching the website pages for the desired information, if the information it's found in this period the visitor will be pleased, if not he will look the information on other websites. For the CCO website a user-friendly environment has been designed, this interface has been severely tested, the results matching the 50-60 seconds time. In more than 80% of the cases the webmasters are not the same with the webdesigners; this is the point where the problems frequently occur. The content of a website has to be updated in order for visitors to get the proper information's, and not to be misled. To overcome this problem an administrator interface has been constructed. Using the admin interface the webmaster will easily update the whole website with only few clicks of a button, without need to know anything about programming or webdesign.

  6. Microprocessor user support at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of microprocessors pose significant problems including: (1) a long learning process for proficient use of microprocessors; (2) the requirement for extensive support in both hardware and software; and (3) the need for coordination and sharing of the creative effort to avoid unnecessary duplication. To address these problems, Langley Research Center has established a microprocessor users committee to provide an advisory interface for management and users, and is training microprocessor users. A newsletter is published to disseminate information among microprocessor users. Both cross software on the central computer complex and microprocessor development systems are used to support the design of microprocessor based systems. Each of these activities is reviewed with special emphasis given to the microprocessor support available from the central computer complex. The effectiveness of the approach being taken at Langley is assessed and specific hardware and software development efforts that are targeted toward enhancing the existing microprocessing support are discussed.

  7. Molecular Science Research Center, 1991 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1992-03-01

    During 1991, the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) experienced solid growth and accomplishment and the Environmental, and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) construction project moved forward. We began with strong programs in chemical structure and dynamics and theory, modeling, and simulation, and both these programs continued to thrive. We also made significant advances in the development of programs in materials and interfaces and macromolecular structure and dynamics, largely as a result of the key staff recruited to lead these efforts. If there was one pervasive activity for the past year, however, it was to strengthen the role of the EMSL in the overall environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) mission at Hanford. These extended activities involved not only MSRC and EMSL staff but all PNL scientific and technical staff engaged in ER/WM programs.

  8. Suborbital Science Program: Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelFrate, John

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the suborbital science program at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Program Objectives are given in various areas: (1) Satellite Calibration and Validation (Cal/val)--Provide methods to perform the cal/val requirements for Earth Observing System satellites; (2) New Sensor Development -- Provide methods to reduce risk for new sensor concepts and algorithm development prior to committing sensors to operations; (3) Process Studies -- Facilitate the acquisition of high spatial/temporal resolution focused measurements that are required to understand small atmospheric and surface structures which generate powerful Earth system effects; and (4) Airborne Networking -- Develop disruption-tolerant networking to enable integrated multiple scale measurements of critical environmental features. Dryden supports the NASA Airborne Science Program and the nation in several elements: ER-2, G-3, DC-8, Ikhana (Predator B) & Global Hawk and Reveal. These are reviewed in detail in the presentation.

  9. Superconducting Microwave Electronics at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Leonard, Regis F.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last three years, NASA Lewis Research Center has investigated the application of newly discovered high temperature superconductors to microwave electronics. Using thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-delta and Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3Ox deposited on a variety of substrates, including strontium titanate, lanthanum gallate, lanthanum aluminate and magnesium oxide, a number of microwave circuits have been fabricated and evaluated. These include a cavity resonator at 60 GHz, microstrip resonators at 35 GHz, a superconducting antenna array at 35 GHz, a dielectric resonator at 9 GHz, and a microstrip filter at 5 GHz. Performance of some of these circuits as well as suggestions for other applications are reported.

  10. Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, L.P.

    1992-12-31

    An unregulated conventional power station based on the Rankine Cycle typically bums pulverized coal in a boiler that exports steam for expansion through a steam turbine which ultimately drives an electric generator. The flue gases are normally cleaned of particulates by an electrostatic precipitator or bag house. A basic cycle such as this will have an efficiency of approximately 35% with 10% of the energy released through the stack and 55% to cooling water. Advanced gas turbine based combustion systems have the potential to be environmentally and commercially superior to existing conventional technology. however, to date, industry, academic, and government groups have not coordinated their effort to commercialize these technologies. The Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research will provide the medium to support effective commercialization of this technology. Several cycles or concepts for advanced gas turbine systems that could be fired on natural gas or could be adapted into coal based systems have been proposed (for examples, see Figures 4, 5, 6, and 7) (2) all with vary degrees of complexity, research needs, and system potential. Natural gas fired power systems are now available with 52% efficiency ratings; however, with a focused base technology program, it is expected that the efficiency levels can be increased to the 60% level and beyond. This increase in efficiency will significantly reduce the environmental burden and reduce the cost of power generation.

  11. Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    An unregulated conventional power station based on the Rankine Cycle typically bums pulverized coal in a boiler that exports steam for expansion through a steam turbine which ultimately drives an electric generator. The flue gases are normally cleaned of particulates by an electrostatic precipitator or bag house. A basic cycle such as this will have an efficiency of approximately 35% with 10% of the energy released through the stack and 55% to cooling water. Advanced gas turbine based combustion systems have the potential to be environmentally and commercially superior to existing conventional technology. however, to date, industry, academic, and government groups have not coordinated their effort to commercialize these technologies. The Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research will provide the medium to support effective commercialization of this technology. Several cycles or concepts for advanced gas turbine systems that could be fired on natural gas or could be adapted into coal based systems have been proposed (for examples, see Figures 4, 5, 6, and 7) (2) all with vary degrees of complexity, research needs, and system potential. Natural gas fired power systems are now available with 52% efficiency ratings; however, with a focused base technology program, it is expected that the efficiency levels can be increased to the 60% level and beyond. This increase in efficiency will significantly reduce the environmental burden and reduce the cost of power generation.

  12. Langley Research Center Strategic Plan for Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Sandra B.

    1994-01-01

    Research assignment centered on the preparation of final draft of the NASA Langley Strategic Plan for Education. Primary research activity consisted of data collection, through interviews with LaRC Office of Education and NASA Headquarters staff, university administrators and faculty, and school administrators / teachers; and documentary analysis. Pre-college and university programs were critically reviewed to assure effectiveness, support of NASA and Langley's mission and goals; National Education Goals; and educational reform strategies. In addition to these mandates, pre-college programs were reviewed to address present and future LaRC activities for teacher enhancement and preparation. University programs were reviewed with emphasis on student support and recruitment; faculty development and enhancement; and LaRC's role in promoting the utilization of educational technologies and distance learning. The LaRC Strategic Plan for Education will enable the Office of Education to provide a focused and well planned continuum of education programs for students, teachers and faculty. It will serve to direct and focus present activities and programs while simultaneously offering the flexibility to address new and emerging directions based on changing national, state, and agency trends.

  13. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, Roberto J.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI) Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  14. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  15. Overview of Stirling Technology Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Williams, Zachary D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.

    2015-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are under development to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove using less than a quarter of the plutonium the currently available RPS uses to produce about the same power. Glenn Research Center's (GRC's) newly formulated Stirling Cycle Technology Development Project (SCTDP) continues development of Stirling-based systems and subsystems, which include a flight-like generator and related housing assembly, controller, and convertors. The project also develops less mature technologies under Stirling Technology Research, with a focus on demonstration in representative environments to increase the technology readiness level (TRL). Matured technologies are evaluated for selection in future generator designs. Stirling Technology Research tasks focus on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, reducing generator mass and/or size, improving reliability or system fault tolerance, and developing alternative designs. The task objectives and status are summarized.

  16. Overview of Stirling Technology Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Williams, Zachary D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) are under development to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, fly by, land, or rove using less than a quarter of the plutonium the currently available RPS uses to produce about the same power. NASA Glenn Research Center's newly formulated Stirling Cycle Technology Development Project (SCTDP) continues development of Stirling-based systems and subsystems, which include a flight-like generator and related housing assembly, controller, and convertors. The project also develops less mature technologies under Stirling Technology Research, with a focus on demonstration in representative environments to increase the technology readiness level (TRL). Matured technologies are evaluated for selection in future generator designs. Stirling Technology Research tasks focus on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, reducing generator mass and/or size, improving reliability and system fault tolerance, and developing alternative designs. The task objectives and status are summarized.

  17. An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center is presented. The following subject areas are covered: research objectives and long term perspective of the Center; current status and operational philosophy; and brief description of Center projects (combustion, fluid mechanics and heat transfer, materials compatibility, turbomachinery, and advanced propulsion concepts).

  18. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) AERIAL VIEW OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL IN FOREGROUND. NOTE COOLING TOWER AT LEFT CENTER. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  19. University Research Centers: Heuristic Categories, Issues, and Administrative Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    University-based research centers can bring prestige and revenue to the institutions of higher education with which they are affiliated. Collaborating with corporations, units of government, and foundations, centers provide services to organizational leaders, policy makers, and communities. University research centers continue to increase in…

  20. Center for Research for Mothers and Children. 1988 Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD. Center for Research for Mothers and Children.

    The 1988 Progress Report covers research activities of the five branches of the Center for Research for Mothers and Children of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. An introductory section briefly describes the Center, notes staff activities and Center sponsored conferences and workshops, and identifies highlights of…

  1. Wing Classification in the Virtual Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William H.

    1999-01-01

    The Virtual Research Center (VRC) is a Web site that hosts a database of documents organized to allow teams of scientists and engineers to store and maintain documents. A number of other workgroup-related capabilities are provided. My tasks as a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellow included developing a scheme for classifying the workgroups using the VRC using the various Divisions within NASA Enterprises. To this end I developed a plan to use several CGI Perl scripts to gather classification information from the leaders of the workgroups, and to display all the workgroups within a specified classification. I designed, implemented, and partially tested scripts which can be used to do the classification. I was also asked to consider directions for future development of the VRC. I think that the VRC can use XML to advantage. XML is a markup language with designer tags that can be used to build meaning into documents. An investigation as to how CORBA, an object-oriented object request broker included with JDK 1.2, might be used also seems justified.

  2. ISDN at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakes, Catherine Murphy; Goldberg, Fredric; Eubanks, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    An expository investigation of the potential impact of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. To properly frame the subject, the paper contains a detailed survey of the components of Narrowband ISDN. The principles and objectives are presented as decreed by the Consultative Committee for International Telephone and Telegraph (CCITT). The various channel types are delineated and their associated service combinations are described. The subscriber-access network functions are explained pictorially via the ISDN reference configuration. A section on switching techniques is presented to enable the reader to understand the emergence of the concept of fast packet switching. This new technology is designed to operate over the high bandwidth, low error rate transmission media that characterizes the LeRC environment. A brief introduction to the next generation of networks is covered with sections on Broadband ISDM (B-ISDN), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and Synchronous Optical Networks (SONET). Applications at LeRC are presented, first in terms of targets of opportunity, then in light of compatibility constraints. In-place pilot projects and testing are described that demonstrate actual usage at LeRC.

  3. [X-33 Research By NASA Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works has compiled an Annual Performance Report of the X-33/RLV Program. This report consists of individual reports from all industry team members, as well as NASA team centers. This portion of the report is comprised of overviews of each NASA Center's contribution to the program during the period 1 Apr. 1998 - 31 Mar. 1999.

  4. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance, and affordability, as well as the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA Aeronautics Research Mission programs. The rest of the paper provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges, and the key progress to date are summarized.

  5. Review of recent thermophotovoltaic (TPV) research at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Wilt, David M.; Lowe, Roland A.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Hoffman, Richard H.; Scheiman, David

    1996-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) research at NASA Lewis Research Center that began in the late 1980's is reviewed. This work has been concentrated on low bandgap indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) PV cells and rare earth yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) thin film selective emitters, as well as, TPV system studies. An emittance theory has been developed for the thin film emitters. Experimental spectral emittance results for erbium Er-YAG and holmium Ho-YAG show excellent emittance (greater than or equal to .7) within the emission bands. The .75 eV InGaAs PV cells fabricated at Lewis have excellent quantum efficiency. An efficiency of 13% has been measured for this cell coupled to an Er-YAG selective emitter and a short pass IR filter.

  6. Review of Recent Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) Research at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Wilt, David M.; Lowe, Roland A.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Hoffman, Richard H.; Scheiman, David

    1995-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) research at NASA Lewis Research Center that began in the late 1980's is reviewed. This work has been concentrated on low bandgap indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) PV calls and rare earth - yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) thin film selective emitters, as well as, TPV system studies. An emittance theory has been developed for the thin film emitters. Experimental spectral emittance results for erbium Er-YAG and holmium Ho-YAG show excellent emittance (greater than or equal to 0.7) within the emission bands. The 0.75 eV InGaAs PV cells fabricated at Lewis have excellent quantum efficiency. An efficiency of 130% has been measured for this cell coupled to an Er-YAG selective emitter and a short pass IR filter.

  7. Center for Neutron Research Project. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Copeland, G.L.; Difilippo, F.C.; Griess, J.C.; Gambill, W.R.; Moon, R.M.; Siman-Tov, I.I.

    1986-09-01

    The Center for Neutron Research (CNR) will provide the world's best facilities for the study of neutron scattering. The CNR will contain a very high flux reactor that will achieve an extremely high power density (between 4 and 8 MW/L). The reactor is to be fueled with uranium silicide and cooled, moderated, and reflected by D/sub 2/O. Initial reactor physics calculations indicate that a power level of 270 MW with a reactor core volume of 35 L will achieve a peak thermal flux in the reflector of 10/sup 20/ neutrons x m/sup -2/ x s/sup -1/. The reactor fuel will be contained in thin (1.3-mm) plates, similar to those employed in the very successful High-Flux Isotope Reactor, and will be graded in the axial and radial directions. Coolant velocity is to be 27 m/s, and core inlet pressure is to be 5.6 MPa. Maximum fuel centerline temperature will be approx.350/sup 0/C. Initial thermal-hydraulic studies indicate that some method of preventing the formation of aluminum oxide on the fuel clad is required if the highest performance is to be achieved. Tests to confirm these calculations are planned. One of the experimental facilities is to be a cold (10-MeV) neutron source. Calculations to determine the size of the source have been initiated, but additional cross-section data are needed. An abbreviated version of a tentative program plan for fiscal year 1987 and beyond is described. Total program expenditures are expected to be $40 million over 5 years.

  8. 34 CFR 413.1 - What is the National Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Vocational Education (National Center) in the areas of— (a) Applied research and development; and (b... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the National Center or Centers for Research in... RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION General § 413.1 What is the National Center or Centers for Research...

  9. 34 CFR 413.1 - What is the National Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Vocational Education (National Center) in the areas of— (a) Applied research and development; and (b... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the National Center or Centers for Research in... RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION General § 413.1 What is the National Center or Centers for Research...

  10. Research and Technology, 1987, Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerny, Gene (Editor); Moe, Karen (Editor); Paddack, Steven (Editor); Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Ballard, Jan (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Research at Goddard Space Flight Center during 1987 is summarized. Topics addressed include space and earth sciences, technology, flight projects and mission definition studies, and institutional technology.

  11. NHRC (Naval Health Research Center) Report 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    is located on Point Loma in San Diego and occupies, in tenant status, six of the Naval Ocean Systems Center’s "barracks" buildings , and spaces at the...9. Public Works Center provides maintenance and public works functions, transportation and building custodial services on a reimbursable basis. % 10...working conditions or materials and advises the CO on command safety matters. f. ADP Committee Reviews requests for ADP hardware and software. Evaluates the

  12. Research Questions Teachers Ask: A Report from the National Reading Research Center School Research Consortium. Reading Research Report No. 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.; And Others

    This paper reports on the creation, growth, and continual development of a teacher-researcher community formed in conjunction with the University of Georgia site of the National Reading Research Center (NRRC). The National Reading Research Center School Research Consortium (SRC) is a teacher-researcher community that includes approximately 35…

  13. Wave Energy Research, Testing and Demonstration Center

    SciTech Connect

    Batten, Belinda

    2014-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to build upon the research, development and testing experience of the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to establish a non-grid connected open-ocean testing facility for wave energy converters (WECs) off the coast of Newport, Oregon. The test facility would serve as the first facility of its kind in the continental US with a fully energetic wave resource where WEC technologies could be proven for west coast US markets. The test facility would provide the opportunity for self-contained WEC testing or WEC testing connected via an umbilical cable to a mobile ocean test berth (MOTB). The MOTB would act as a “grid surrogate” measuring energy produced by the WEC and the environmental conditions under which the energy was produced. In order to realize this vision, the ocean site would need to be identified through outreach to community stakeholders, and then regulatory and permitting processes would be undertaken. Part of those processes would require environmental baseline studies and site analysis, including benthic, acoustic and wave resource characterization. The MOTB and its myriad systems would need to be designed and constructed.The first WEC test at the facility with the MOTB was completed within this project with the WET-NZ device in summer 2012. In summer 2013, the MOTB was deployed with load cells on its mooring lines to characterize forces on mooring systems in a variety of sea states. Throughout both testing seasons, studies were done to analyze environmental effects during testing operations. Test protocols and best management practices for open ocean operations were developed. As a result of this project, the non-grid connected fully energetic WEC test facility is operational, and the MOTB system developed provides a portable concept for WEC testing. The permitting process used provides a model for other wave energy projects, especially those in the Pacific Northwest that have similar

  14. PSP Testing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. H.; Hand, L. A.; Schairer, E. T.; Mehta, R. D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paints (PSPs) are now used routinely for measuring surface pressures on wind tunnel models at transonic and supersonic Mach numbers. The method utilizes a surface coating containing fluorescent or phosphorescent materials, the brightness of which varies with the local air pressure on the surface. The present paper will summarize PSP activities (in progress and planned) at the NASA Ames Research Center. One of the main accomplishments at NASA Ames has been the development of a PSP measurement system that is production testing capable. This system has been integrated successfully into the large-scale wind tunnel facilities at Ames. There are several problems related to PSP testing which are unique to large-scale wind tunnel testing. The hardware is often difficult to set-up and must operate under harsh conditions (e.g. high pressures and low temperatures). The data acquisition and reduction times need to be kept to a minimum so that the overall wind tunnel productivity is not compromised. The pressure sensitive paints needs to be very robust; the paints must readily adhere to different surfaces with varying geometries and remain functional for long running times. The paint must have well understood, and preferably minimal, temperature sensitivity since fine control of the tunnel temperature is not easily achievable in the larger wind tunnels. In an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the PSP technique, we are currently evaluating some referenced pressure sensitive paints which contain a pressure- independent luminophor in addition to the one which is affected by the surface pressure. The two luminophors are chosen so that their emission wavelengths are somewhat different. Then by taking two 'wind-on' images with either two cameras (with different filters) or one camera with a rotating filter system, the need for 'wind-off' images can be eliminated. The ratio of the two wind-on images accounts for nonuniform lighting and model motion problems

  15. Armstrong Flight Research Center Research Technology and Engineering Report 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David F.

    2016-01-01

    I am honored to endorse the 2015 Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center’s Research, Technology, and Engineering Report. The talented researchers, engineers, and scientists at Armstrong are continuing a long, rich legacy of creating innovative approaches to solving some of the difficult problems and challenges facing NASA and the aerospace community.Projects at NASA Armstrong advance technologies that will improve aerodynamic efficiency, increase fuel economy, reduce emissions and aircraft noise, and enable the integration of unmanned aircraft into the national airspace. The work represented in this report highlights the Center’s agility to develop technologies supporting each of NASA’s core missions and, more importantly, technologies that are preparing us for the future of aviation and space exploration.We are excited about our role in NASA’s mission to develop transformative aviation capabilities and open new markets for industry. One of our key strengths is the ability to rapidly move emerging techniques and technologies into flight evaluation so that we can quickly identify their strengths, shortcomings, and potential applications.This report presents a brief summary of the technology work of the Center. It also contains contact information for the associated technologists responsible for the work. Don’t hesitate to contact them for more information or for collaboration ideas.

  16. Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. Also the propulsion systems required to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Vision for Space Exploration in an affordable manner will need to have high reliability, safety and autonomous operation capability. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges through the concept of Intelligent Propulsion Systems. This paper describes the current activities of the CDB under the NASA Aeronautics Research and Exploration Systems Missions. The programmatic structure of the CDB activities is described along with a brief overview of each of the CDB tasks including research objectives, technical challenges, and recent accomplishments. These tasks include active control of propulsion system components, intelligent propulsion diagnostics and control for reliable fault identification and accommodation, distributed engine control, and investigations into unsteady propulsion systems.

  17. Annual Research Briefs - 2000: Center for Turbulence Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report contains the 2000 annual progress reports of the postdoctoral Fellows and visiting scholars of the Center for Turbulence Research (CTR). It summarizes the research efforts undertaken under the core CTR program. Last year, CTR sponsored sixteen resident Postdoctoral Fellows, nine Research Associates, and two Senior Research Fellows, hosted seven short term visitors, and supported four doctoral students. The Research Associates are supported by the Departments of Defense and Energy. The reports in this volume are divided into five groups. The first group largely consists of the new areas of interest at CTR. It includes efficient algorithms for molecular dynamics, stability in protoplanetary disks, and experimental and numerical applications of evolutionary optimization algorithms for jet flow control. The next group of reports is in experimental, theoretical, and numerical modeling efforts in turbulent combustion. As more challenging computations are attempted, the need for additional theoretical and experimental studies in combustion has emerged. A pacing item for computation of nonpremixed combustion is the prediction of extinction and re-ignition phenomena, which is currently being addressed at CTR. The third group of reports is in the development of accurate and efficient numerical methods, which has always been an important part of CTR's work. This is the tool development part of the program which supports our high fidelity numerical simulations in such areas as turbulence in complex geometries, hypersonics, and acoustics. The final two groups of reports are concerned with LES and RANS prediction methods. There has been significant progress in wall modeling for LES of high Reynolds number turbulence and in validation of the v(exp 2) - f model for industrial applications.

  18. Annual Research Briefs, 2004: Center for Turbulence Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2004-01-01

    This report contains the 2004 annual progress reports of the Research Fellows and students of the Center for Turbulence Research in its eighteenth year of operation. Since its inception in 1987, the objective of the CTR has been to advance the physical understanding of turbulent flows and development of physics based predictive tools for engineering analysis and turbulence control. Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature and in engineering devices. The studies at CTR have been motivated by applications where turbulence effects are significant; these include a broad range of technical areas such as planetary boundary layers, formation of planets, solar convection, magnetohydrodynamics, environmental and eco systems, aerodynamic noise, propulsion systems and high speed transportation. Numerical simulation has been the predominant research tool at CTR which has required a critical mass of researchers in numerical analysis and computer science in addition to core disciplines such as applied mathematics, chemical kinetics and fluid mechanics. Maintaining and promoting this interdisciplinary culture has been a hallmark of CTR and has been responsible for the realization of the results of its basic research in applications. The first group of reports in this volume are directed towards development, analysis and application of novel numerical methods for ow simulations. Development of methods for large eddy simulation of complex flows has been a central theme in this group. The second group is concerned with turbulent combustion, scalar transport and multi-phase ows. The nal group is devoted to geophysical turbulence where the problem of solar convection has been a new focus of considerable attention recently at CTR.

  19. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  20. PMARC - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel methods are moderate cost tools for solving a wide range of engineering problems. PMARC (Panel Method Ames Research Center) is a potential flow panel code that numerically predicts flow fields around complex three-dimensional geometries. PMARC's predecessor was a panel code named VSAERO which was developed for NASA by Analytical Methods, Inc. PMARC is a new program with many additional subroutines and a well-documented code suitable for powered-lift aerodynamic predictions. The program's open architecture facilitates modifications or additions of new features. Another improvement is the adjustable size code which allows for an optimum match between the computer hardware available to the user and the size of the problem being solved. PMARC can be resized (the maximum number of panels can be changed) in a matter of minutes. Several other state-of-the-art PMARC features include internal flow modeling for ducts and wind tunnel test sections, simple jet plume modeling essential for the analysis and design of powered-lift aircraft, and a time-stepping wake model which allows the study of both steady and unsteady motions. PMARC is a low-order panel method, which means the singularities are distributed with constant strength over each panel. In many cases low-order methods can provide nearly the same accuracy as higher order methods (where the singularities are allowed to vary linearly or quadratically over each panel). Low-order methods have the advantage of a shorter computation time and do not require exact matching between panels. The flow problem is solved by assuming that the body is at rest in a moving flow field. The body is modeled as a closed surface which divides space into two regions -- one region contains the flow field of interest and the other contains a fictitious flow. External flow problems, such as a wing in a uniform stream, have the external region as the flow field of interest and the internal flow as the fictitious flow. This arrangement is

  1. PMARC - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel methods are moderate cost tools for solving a wide range of engineering problems. PMARC (Panel Method Ames Research Center) is a potential flow panel code that numerically predicts flow fields around complex three-dimensional geometries. PMARC's predecessor was a panel code named VSAERO which was developed for NASA by Analytical Methods, Inc. PMARC is a new program with many additional subroutines and a well-documented code suitable for powered-lift aerodynamic predictions. The program's open architecture facilitates modifications or additions of new features. Another improvement is the adjustable size code which allows for an optimum match between the computer hardware available to the user and the size of the problem being solved. PMARC can be resized (the maximum number of panels can be changed) in a matter of minutes. Several other state-of-the-art PMARC features include internal flow modeling for ducts and wind tunnel test sections, simple jet plume modeling essential for the analysis and design of powered-lift aircraft, and a time-stepping wake model which allows the study of both steady and unsteady motions. PMARC is a low-order panel method, which means the singularities are distributed with constant strength over each panel. In many cases low-order methods can provide nearly the same accuracy as higher order methods (where the singularities are allowed to vary linearly or quadratically over each panel). Low-order methods have the advantage of a shorter computation time and do not require exact matching between panels. The flow problem is solved by assuming that the body is at rest in a moving flow field. The body is modeled as a closed surface which divides space into two regions -- one region contains the flow field of interest and the other contains a fictitious flow. External flow problems, such as a wing in a uniform stream, have the external region as the flow field of interest and the internal flow as the fictitious flow. This arrangement is

  2. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  3. A national data infrastructure for patient-centered outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Dymek, Christine; Gingold, Janelle; Shanbhag, Avinash; Fridsma, Doug; Yong, Pierre L

    2015-01-01

    Concerted efforts are underway to improve healthcare decision-making through patient-centered outcomes research. These efforts are supported by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund, which was established within the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. This article focuses on describing national data infrastructure efforts that support patient-centered outcomes research. A national data infrastructure has the potential to decrease research costs and improve research throughput. We describe early and current efforts that demonstrated this potential, how the national effort is utilizing the lessons learned from these predecessor efforts and remaining challenges.

  4. ORNL Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-12

    This video highlights the Vehicle Research Laboratory's capabilities at the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC). FEERC is a Department of Energy user facility located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. ORNL Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video highlights the Vehicle Research Laboratory's capabilities at the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC). FEERC is a Department of Energy user facility located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  6. Re-Centering the Research Computing Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRobbie, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The insatiable institutional demands for computing cycles, network bandwidth, and storage clearly demonstrate that IT is a mission-critical function in nearly all areas of higher education. Not too long ago, the important issue for the central data center was physical size and floor space. As IT leaders struggle to meet relentlessly increasing…

  7. Center for Clinical Services Research, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Foster

    2001-01-01

    Highlights Stanford University's 220,000 square-foot Center for Clinical Sciences, the design of which represents a high-quality architectural departure from the old building styles and creates an elegant, solar-protected gathering place for scientists. Includes photographs, sectional drawing, and site plan. (GR)

  8. Crozer-Chester Medical Center Burn Research Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    dermatotoxidt:y following treatment for diabetic nephropathy . Although other members of the dihydropyridine c.’llcium channel blockers have been reported to... Treatment Center has been under contract with the U.S. Army Institute for Surgical Research in conjunction with the Army Burn Center since 2007 to...research in civilian populations to combat populations. The Nathan Speare Regional Burn Treatment Center was under contract with the U. S. Army

  9. 17. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L79-7343) AERIAL VIEW OF THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, 1979. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  10. 18. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L83-8341) VIEW OF FANS IN FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, c. 1960s. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  11. 19. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L5925) LOENING SCL-1 SEAPLANE IN THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, OCTOBER 1931. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  12. 15. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L4933) VIEW NORTHWEST OF THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, c. 1932. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  13. 12. Photocopy of photograph (original in Langley Research Center Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (original in Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L4496) AERIAL VIEW OF FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION; c. 1930. NOTE SEAPLANE TOWING CHANNEL STRUCTURE IN BACKGROUND. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  14. 21. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L-9850) ANNUAL AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING CONFERENCE IN FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL; GROUP PHOTOGRAPH OF PARTICIPANTS, mAY 23, 1934. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  15. 16. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L89-07075) AERIAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL, 1989. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  16. 22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L27056) LOCKHEED YP-38 IN THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL; THIS WAS THE PROTOTYPE OF THE P-38 (LOCKHEED LIGHTNING); c. 1941. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  17. 20. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L15337) DRAG-CLEANUP STUDIES OF THE BREWSTER BUFFALO IN THE FULL SCALE WIND TUNNEL, 1938. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  18. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (NACA 4655) VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  19. 14. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L4776) VIEW SOUTH THROUGH ENTRANCE CONE OF FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION, SEPTEMBER 12, 1930. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  20. 22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L6415) STUFFED SEAGULL ON CARRIAGE OF TOWING TANK - 1932; EXPERIMENT TO DETERMINE AERODYNAMIC QUALITIES OF BIRDS. - NASA Langley Research Center, Seaplane Towing Channel, 108 Andrews Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  1. 18. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L86-10235) INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING TURNING VANES IN 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  2. 23. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L73-5028) MODEL OF SUPERSONIC TRANSPORT IN FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  3. 16. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (LAL-12470) ELEVATION OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  4. 24. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L75-734) MODEL OF SUPERSONIC TRANSPORT IN FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL FROM ENTRANCE CONE. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  5. 21. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (NACA 16900) DETAIL VIEW OF CONTROL/MONITORING STATION IN 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL, c. 1930s. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  6. 17. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L86-10,257) DETAIL VIEW OF EXTERIOR OF COOLING TOWER FOR 8- FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  7. 20. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING TURNING VANES AND PERSONNEL IN THE 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  8. 22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L64110) DIVING SUIT REQUIRED FOR WORKING IN 8- FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL; ROY H. WRIGHT, DESIGNER OF THE INNOVATIVE SLOTTED SECTION OF TUNNEL IS IN THE SUIT. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  9. 19. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L79758) INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING TURNING VANES AND PERSONNEL IN THE 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  10. 15. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L12000.1) ELEVATION OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL, c. 1935. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  11. 25. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L81-7333) RUTAN'S VARI-EZE ADVANCED CONCEPTS AIRCRAFT IN THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  12. 26. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L64792) ALBACORE SUBMARINE DRAG TESTS IN THE FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  13. Research and technology, 1984: Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorehead, T. W. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center conducts research programs in space sciences, materials processing in space, and atmospheric sciences, as well as technology programs in such areas as propulsion, materials, processes, and space power. This Marshall Space Flight Center 1984 Annual Report on Research and Technology contains summaries of the more significant scientific and technical results obtained during FY-84.

  14. The Social Work Research Center at Colorado State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winokur, Marc A.; Valentine, Deborah P.; Drendel, James M.

    2009-01-01

    The Social Work Research Center is an innovative university-community partnership within the School of Social Work in the College of Applied Human Sciences at Colorado State University. The center is focused on working with county and state child welfare agencies to generate applied research that translates into evidence-based practice for serving…

  15. 14. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of photograph (original in the Langley Research Center Archives, Hampton, VA LaRC) (L-90-2684) AERIAL VIEW OF THE 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED TUNNEL (FOREGROUND) AND THE 8-FOOT TRANSONIC PRESSURE TUNNEL (REAR). - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  16. The Educational Research Center, Riyadh University: Objectives and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Halim, Ahmed El-Mahdi

    Objectives, challenges, and needs of an educational research and development center at Biyadh University, Saudi Arabia are discussed. Major objectives of the center are to cooperate with the ministry of education and other agencies in conducting projects, to foster research projects of qualified individuals, and to exchange information and…

  17. Earth Radiation Budget Research at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Gary G.

    2014-01-01

    In the 1970s research studies concentrating on satellite measurements of Earth's radiation budget started at the NASA Langley Research Center. Since that beginning, considerable effort has been devoted to developing measurement techniques, data analysis methods, and time-space sampling strategies to meet the radiation budget science requirements for climate studies. Implementation and success of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) was due to the remarkable teamwork of many engineers, scientists, and data analysts. Data from ERBE have provided a new understanding of the effects of clouds, aerosols, and El Nino/La Nina oscillation on the Earth's radiation. CERES spacecraft instruments have extended the time coverage with high quality climate data records for over a decade. Using ERBE and CERES measurements these teams have created information about radiation at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and throughout the atmosphere for a better understanding of our climate. They have also generated surface radiation products for designers of solar power plants and buildings and numerous other applications

  18. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Katharine

    2005-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA Ames researchers have been investigating ways to improve the air transportation system through the development of decision support automation. These software advances, such as the Center-TRACON Automation System (eTAS) have been developed with teams of engineers, software developers, human factors experts, and air traffic controllers; some ASA Ames decision support tools are currently operational in Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) facilities and some are in use by the airlines. These tools have provided air traffic controllers and traffic managers the capabilities to help reduce overall delays and holding, and provide significant cost savings to the airlines as well as more manageable workload levels for air traffic service providers. NASA is continuing to collaborate with the FAA, as well as other government agencies, to plan and develop the next generation of decision support tools that will support anticipated changes in the air transportation system, including a projected increase to three times today's air-traffic levels by 2025. The presentation will review some of NASA Ames' recent achievements in air traffic management research, and discuss future tool developments and concepts currently under consideration.

  19. Center for Electro Optics & Plasma Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) i- of L Arn. o n o 6i 7 4 6a.NAM OFPERORMNGORGNIZTIOD 6JFFCESYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION...is snowplowed toward the center with momentum, p, given by p = m(r) dr(t) The mass m(r) swept by the collapsing cylinder is m(r) = p n (r r- r2(t)) h...Thesp results are combined to give the equation of motion for the system go 12(t) = p d (rgr- dr(t) 4 n r(t) = dct dt 5 or 4 ( p i2(t) = (rg - r2(t

  20. Earthquake Engineering Research Center: 25th anniversry edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    The Earthquake Engineering Research Center exists to conduct research and develop technical information in all areas pertaining to earthquake engineering, including strong ground motion and ground failure, response of natural and manmade structures to earthquakes, design of structures to resist earthquakes, development of new systems for earthquake protection, and development of architectural and public policy aspects of earthquake engineering. The annual report for 1992-93 presents information on: Current Research Programs; Contracts and Grants; Public Service Program; National Information Service for Earthquake Engineering; Core Administration; Committees of the Earthquake Engineering Research Center; Research Participants - Faculty; and Research Participants - Students.

  1. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Research Data Archive: a Data Education Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G. S.; Schuster, D.

    2015-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Research Data Archive (RDA), rda.ucar.edu, is not just another data center or data archive. It is a data education center. We not only serve data, we TEACH data. Weather and climate data is the original "Big Data" dataset and lessons learned while playing with weather data are applicable to a wide range of data investigations. Erroneous data assumptions are the Achilles heel of Big Data. It doesn't matter how much data you crunch if the data is not what you think it is. Each dataset archived at the RDA is assigned to a data specialist (DS) who curates the data. If a user has a question not answered in the dataset information web pages, they can call or email a skilled DS for further clarification. The RDA's diverse staff—with academic training in meteorology, oceanography, engineering (electrical, civil, ocean and database), mathematics, physics, chemistry and information science—means we likely have someone who "speaks your language." Data discovery is another difficult Big Data problem; one can only solve problems with data if one can find the right data. Metadata, both machine and human-generated, underpin the RDA data search tools. Users can quickly find datasets by name or dataset ID number. They can also perform a faceted search that successively narrows the options by user requirements or simply kick off an indexed search with a few words. Weather data formats can be difficult to read for non-expert users; it's usually packed in binary formats requiring specialized software and parameter names use specialized vocabularies. DSs create detailed information pages for each dataset and maintain lists of helpful software, documentation and links of information around the web. We further grow the level of sophistication of the users with tips, tutorials and data stories on the RDA Blog, http://ncarrda.blogspot.com/. How-to video tutorials are also posted on the NCAR Computational and Information Systems

  2. AHPCRC - Army High Performance Computing Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    materials “from the atoms up” or to model biological systems at the molecular level. The speed and capacity of massively parallel computers are key...Streamlined, massively parallel high performance computing structural codes allow researchers to examine many relevant physical factors simultaneously...expenditure of energy, so that the drones can carry their load of sensors, communications devices, and fuel. AHPCRC researchers are using massively

  3. High temperature corrosion research at the Albany Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Matthes, Steven A.; Chinn, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility (SECERF) at the Albany Research Center is operational. SECERF consists of 6 modules that share the availability of up to 10 different gases to produce environments for high temperature corrosion and erosion research. Projects to be conducted in the modules include: corrosion sensors for fossil energy systems, thermal gradient effects on high temperature corrosion, the development of sulfidation resistant alloys, determination of the effects of ash on the corrosion of metals and alloys in coal and waste combustion and coal gasification environments, high temperature erosion-corrosion of metals, and molten slag effects on refractories. Results from two areas, the effect of ash deposits on alloy corrosion and thermal gradient effects on the corrosion of metals, will be highlighted. Ash produced in coal gasifiers, coal combustors, and waste combustors, when deposited on metal surfaces, provides sites for corrosion attack and contributes chemical species that participate in the corrosion reaction. Results are presented for the corrosion of 304L stainless steel, that was either uncoated or coated with ash or with ash containing NaCl or Na2SO4, in air-water vapor mixtures at 600 C. The presence of high heat fluxes and temperature gradients in many fossil energy systems creates the need for an understanding of their effects on corrosion and oxidation. Such information would be useful for both improved alloy design and for better translation of isothermal laboratory results to field use. Temperature gradients in a solid oxide result in two changes that modify diffusion within the oxide. The first is when a gradient in point defect concentration is created within the oxide, for example, where more vacancies are expected at a higher temperature. The second change is when the presence of a temperature gradient biases the diffusion jump of an atom. Results of tests are presented for cobalt with metal surface

  4. Research Directory of the Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers. Fiscal Year 1980. 10th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Edwin W.; And Others

    This tenth edition of the Research Directory of the Rehabilitation Research and Training (RT) Centers reports the FY 1980 research activities of twenty-one RT Centers (11 medical, 3 vocational, 3 mental retardation, 2 deafness, 1 blindness, and 1 mental health). The 266 abstracts are organized under the RT Centers located at these institutions:…

  5. Lost Dollars Threaten Research in Public Academic Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Henry R; Vermillion, Eric B

    2017-03-01

    The decrease of federal and state support threatens long-term sustainability of research in publicly supported academic health centers. In weathering these financial threats, research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), has undergone 3 substantial changes: institutional salary support goes preferentially to senior faculty, whereas the young increasingly depend on grants; private and government support for research grows apace in clinical departments but declines in basic science departments; and research is judged more on its quantity (numbers of investigators and federal and private dollars) than on its goals, achievements, or scientific quality. We propose specific measures to alleviate these problems. Other large public academic health centers probably confront similar issues, but-except for UCSF-such centers have not been subjected to detailed public analysis.-Bourne, H. R., Vermillion, E. B. Lost dollars threaten research in public academic health centers.

  6. Proton Therapy Research and Treatment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Goodnight, J.E. Jr. . Cancer Center); Alonso, J.R. )

    1992-05-01

    This Grant proposal outlines the steps that will be undertaken to bring the UC Davis Proton Therapy Research and Treatment, known locally as the Proton Therapy Facility (PTF), through its design and construction phases. This application concentrates on the design phase of the PTF project.

  7. Research and Action: The Role of an Educational Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flugman, Bert

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the Center for Advanced Study in Education (CASE) in Manhattan as a representative research and development center in a collaborative role with the New York City Schools. Presents its role as educational problem solver for immediate solutions rather than for interesting findings. Provides examples of three on-going problem solving…

  8. Learner Centered Teaching: Putting the Research on Learning into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the research-based case that Learner Centered Teaching (LCT) offers the best means to optimize student learning in college, and offers examples and ideas for putting it into practice, as well the underlying rationale. It also starts from the premise that many faculty are much closer to being learner centered teachers than they…

  9. Intersatellite communications optoelectronics research at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A review is presented of current optoelectronics research and development at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for high-power, high-bandwidth laser transmitters; high-bandwidth, high-sensitivity optical receivers; pointing, acquisition, and tracking components; and experimental and theoretical system modeling at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Program hardware and space flight opportunities are presented.

  10. Intra-Preneurship: Center for Applied Student Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol, David F.

    The model of experiential learning at Warren Wilson College (North Carolina) is described, with attention to the triad of work, service, and academic study and The Center for Applied Student Research (The Center). Student are required to work 15 hours per week on one of 76 work crews; they assume adult responsibility for their work products and…

  11. Establishing a University-Based Mars Mission Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines one university's process of planning and preparing a successful proposal for a space research center which focused on a broad, cross-disciplinary study. States that as a result of the center, four new graduate courses were offered and a higher than average enrollment was attracted to the school. (RT)

  12. 34 CFR 403.207 - What are the State's responsibilities to the National Center or Centers for Research in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for each new research, curriculum development, or personnel development project it supports, and the... Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education? 403.207 Section 403.207 Education Regulations of... the State's responsibilities to the National Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education?...

  13. NASA Lewis Research Center combustion MHD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. M.

    The MHD power generation experiments were conducted in a high field strength cryomagnet which was adapted from an existing facility. In its original construction, it consisted of 12 high purity aluminum coils pool cooled in a bath of liquid neon. In this configuration, a peak field of 15 tesla was produced. For the present experiments, the center four coils were removed and a 23 cm diameter transverse warm bore tube was inserted to allow the placement of the MHD experiment between the remaining eight coils. In this configuration, a peak field of 6 tesla should be obtainable. The time duration of the experiment is limited by the neon supply which allows on the order of 1 minute of total operating time followed by an 18-hour reliquefaction period. As a result, the experiments are run in a pulsed mode. The run duration for the data presented here was 5 sec. The magnetic field profile along the MHD duct is shown. Since the working fluid is in essence superheated steam, it is easily water quenched at the exit of the diffuser and the components are designed vacuum tight so that the exhaust pipe and demister an be pumped down to simulate the vacuum of outer space.

  14. Community Engagement and the Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sood, Johanna R.; Stahl, Sidney M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute on Aging created the Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMARs) to address infrastructure development intended to reduce health disparities among older adults. The overall goals of the RCMARs are to (a) increase the size of the cadre of researchers conducting research on issues related to minority aging; (b)…

  15. Computational mechanics and physics at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, Jerry C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is given of computational mechanics and physics at NASA Langley Research Center. Computational analysis is a major component and tool in many of Langley's diverse research disciplines, as well as in the interdisciplinary research. Examples are given for algorithm development and advanced applications in aerodynamics, transition to turbulence and turbulence simulation, hypersonics, structures, and interdisciplinary optimization.

  16. The creation and role of the USDA biomass research centers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Five USDA Biomass Research Centers were created to facilitate coordinated research to enhance the establishment of a sustainable feedstock production for bio-based renewable energy in the United States. Scientists and staff of the Agriculture Research Service (ARS) and Forest Service (FS) withi...

  17. Activities in Aeroelasticity at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recently-completed research and presents status reports of current research being performed within the Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Within the paper this research is classified as experimental, analytical, and theoretical aeroelastic research. The paper also describes the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, its features, capabilities, a new open-architecture data acquisition system, ongoing facility modifications, and the subsequent calibration of the facility.

  18. Applying User Centered Design to Research Work

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Love, Oriana J.; Pike, William A.; Bruce, Joseph R.; Kim, Dee DH; McBain, Arthur S.

    2014-07-01

    The SuperIdentity (SID) research project is a collaboration between six universities in the UK (Bath, Dundee, Kent, Leicester, Oxford, and Southampton) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). SID offers an innovative and exciting new approach to the concept of identity. The assumption underlying our hypothesis is that while there may be many dimensions to an identity - some more stable than others - all should ultimately reference back to a single core identity or a 'SuperIdentity.' The obvious consequence is that identification is improved by the combination of measures. Our work at PNNL has focused on the developing use cases to use in developing a model of identity and in developing visualizations for both researchers to explore the model and in the future for end users to use in determining various paths that may be possible to obtain various identity attributes from a set that is already known.

  19. Microgravity science at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, Archibald L.; Debnam, William J., Jr.; Woodell, Glenn A.; Clark, Ivan O.; Crouch, Roger K.; Carlson, Frederick M.; Simchick, Richard T.

    1988-01-01

    Although space research is still in an embryonic state, a combination of Earth based and space flight experiments are being coupled to yield a better understanding of the complex interaction of heat and fluid flow on the dynamics of crystal growth. Continued efforts on the ground as well as additional flight opportunities are needed to continue the drive to fully understand the advantages, both scientifically and economically, of microgravity crystal growth.

  20. National Rehabilitation Hospital Assistive Technology Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    psychotherapy, physical therapy ). There are two Year 2 goals: to replicate the pilot study using a sample size of 15 concussion patients and 15 control...and overseeing the research projects. ATRC staff consulted with other allied health professionals, e.g., physicians, physical and occupational...virtual reality is about and to stimulate thinking about possible therapeutic applications. As a result, several VR-based therapy routines were

  1. Green Infrastructure Research and Demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will review the need for storm water control practices and will present a portion of the green infrastructure research and demonstration being performed at the Edison Environmental Center.

  2. Ames Research Center Publications, July 1971 through December 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography of the publications of Ames Research Center authors and contractors which appeared as formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports is presented. Years covered are July 1971 through December 1973.

  3. Technology transfer needs and experiences: The NASA Research Center perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer needs and experiences - the NASA Research Center perspective are provided. Topics covered include: functions of NASA, incentives and benefits, technology transfer mechanisms, economics of technology commercialization, examples, and conclusions.

  4. Photonic processing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Ellen; Reid, Max

    1990-01-01

    The Photonic Processing group is engaged in applied research on optical processors in support of the Ames vision to lead the development of autonomous intelligent systems. Optical processors, in conjunction with numeric and symbolic processors, are needed to provide the powerful processing capability that is required for many future agency missions. The research program emphasizes application of analog optical processing, where free-space propagation between components allows natural implementations of algorithms requiring a large degree of parallel computation. Special consideration is given in the Ames program to the integration of optical processors into larger, heterogeneous computational systems. Demonstration of the effective integration of optical processors within a broader knowledge-based system is essential to evaluate their potential for dependable operation in an autonomous environment such as space. The Ames Photonics program is currently addressing several areas of interest. One of the efforts is to develop an optical correlator system with two programmable spatial light modulators (SLMs) to perform distortion invariant pattern recognition. Another area of research is optical neural networks, also for use in distortion-invariant pattern recognition.

  5. Future Models for Federally Funded Research and Development Center Contracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-20

    Future Models for Federally Funded Research and Development Center Contracts Approved by the DBB 20 October 2016 Presentation on: Task Group... Development Center (FFRDC) contracts. Specifically, the DBB should;  Review existing governance models, compare management activities to those of the...USAF Establish DBB Task Group to ecommend an appropriate futur model and focus for DoD sponsor d Federally Funded Research and Development

  6. The 1991 Marshall Space Flight Center research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A compilation of 194 articles addressing research and technology activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is given. Activities are divided into three major areas: advanced studies addressing transportation systems, space systems, and space science activities conducted primarily in the Program Development Directorate; research tasks carried out in the Space Science Laboratory; and technology programs hosted by a wide array of organizations at the Center. The theme for this year's report is 'Building for the Future'.

  7. Center for Cell Research, Pennsylvania State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, Mike

    1991-01-01

    A brief review of Genentech, Inc., is presented. Additionally, the Physiological Systems Experiment (PSE-01) is discussed in terms of its development history. The PSE-01 was developed to investigate the bone wasting, muscle wasting, and immune cell dysfunction that occur in microgravity conditions. Specifically, a number of human disorders are associated with maladaptive changes in bone, muscle, and immune function. The physiological adjustments that the body makes in response to space flight can be monitored and may aid in the discovery of new protein forms and patterns. This research may also provide strategies for protecting the health of flight crews enduring prolonged space flight. Results are discussed.

  8. Research & Technology Report Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald A. (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Maran, Stephen (Editor); Walter, Lou (Editor); Brown, Mitch (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The main theme of this edition of the annual Research and Technology Report is Mission Operations and Data Systems. Shifting from centralized to distributed mission operations, and from human interactive operations to highly automated operations is reported. The following aspects are addressed: Mission planning and operations; TDRSS, Positioning Systems, and orbit determination; hardware and software associated with Ground System and Networks; data processing and analysis; and World Wide Web. Flight projects are described along with the achievements in space sciences and earth sciences. Spacecraft subsystems, cryogenic developments, and new tools and capabilities are also discussed.

  9. Revitalization of the NASA Langley Research Center's Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Mastaler, Michael D.; Craft, Stephen J.; Kegelman, Jerome T.; Hope, Drew J.; Mangum, Cathy H.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (Langley) was founded in 1917 as the nation's first civilian aeronautical research facility and NASA's first field center. For nearly 100 years, Langley has made significant contributions to the Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Earth Science missions through research, technology, and engineering core competencies in aerosciences, materials, structures, the characterization of earth and planetary atmospheres and, more recently, in technologies associated with entry, descent, and landing. An unfortunate but inevitable outcome of this rich history is an aging infrastructure where the longest serving building is close to 80 years old and the average building age is 44 years old. In the current environment, the continued operation and maintenance of this aging and often inefficient infrastructure presents a real challenge to Center leadership in the trade space of sustaining infrastructure versus not investing in future capabilities. To address this issue, the Center has developed a forward looking revitalization strategy that ties future core competencies and technical capabilities to the Center Master Facility Plan to maintain a viable Center well into the future. This paper documents Langley's revitalization strategy which integrates the Center's missions, the Langley 2050 vision, the Center Master Facility Plan, and the New Town repair-by-replacement program through the leadership of the Vibrant Transformation to Advance Langley (ViTAL) Team.

  10. Molecular Science Research Center annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics group is studying chemical kinetics and reactions dynamics of terrestrial and atmospheric processes as well as the chemistry of complex waste forms and waste storage media. Staff are using new laser systems and surface-mapping techniques in combination with molecular clusters that mimic adsorbate/surface interactions. The Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics group is determining biomolecular structure/function relationships for processes the control the biological transformation of contaminants and the health effects of toxic substances. The Materials and Interfaces program is generating information needed to design and synthesize advanced materials for the analysis and separation of mixed chemical waste, the long-term storage of concentrated hazardous materials, and the development of chemical sensors for environmental monitoring of various organic and inorganic species. The Theory, Modeling, and Simulation group is developing detailed molecular-level descriptions of the chemical, physical, and biological processes in natural and contaminated systems. Researchers are using the full spectrum of computational techniques. The Computer and Information Sciences group is developing new approaches to handle vast amounts of data and to perform calculations for complex natural systems. The EMSL will contain a high-performance computing facility, ancillary computing laboratories, and high-speed data acquisition systems for all major research instruments.

  11. Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Environmental Impact Statement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This is an institutional environmental impact statement relating to the overall operation of the NASA, Flight Research Center. The Center is located in Kern County, California, approximately 100 miles northeast of Los Angeles. Flight activities relate primarily to areas in the vicinity of Los Angeles, Kern, Inyo and San Bernardino counties in Southern California; and to areas in Southern Nevada (principally Nye and Clark counties. Operations of the Flight Research Center have a very neglibible impact on the environment; and they are planned and controlled to eliminate or minimize effects on water, air and noise.

  12. Electronic photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Jack M.

    1994-01-01

    The field of photography began a metamorphosis several years ago which promises to fundamentally change how images are captured, transmitted, and output. At this time the metamorphosis is still in the early stages, but already new processes, hardware, and software are allowing many individuals and organizations to explore the entry of imaging into the information revolution. Exploration at this time is prerequisite to leading expertise in the future, and a number of branches at LaRC have ventured into electronic and digital imaging. Their progress until recently has been limited by two factors: the lack of an integrated approach and the lack of an electronic photographic capability. The purpose of the research conducted was to address these two items. In some respects, the lack of electronic photographs has prevented application of an integrated imaging approach. Since everything could not be electronic, the tendency was to work with hard copy. Over the summer, the Photographics Section has set up an Electronic Photography Laboratory. This laboratory now has the capability to scan film images, process the images, and output the images in a variety of forms. Future plans also include electronic capture capability. The current forms of image processing available include sharpening, noise reduction, dust removal, tone correction, color balancing, image editing, cropping, electronic separations, and halftoning. Output choices include customer specified electronic file formats which can be output on magnetic or optical disks or over the network, 4400 line photographic quality prints and transparencies to 8.5 by 11 inches, and 8000 line film negatives and transparencies to 4 by 5 inches. The problem of integrated imaging involves a number of branches at LaRC including Visual Imaging, Research Printing and Publishing, Data Visualization and Animation, Advanced Computing, and various research groups. These units must work together to develop common approaches to image

  13. Ames Research Center life sciences payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. X.; Tremor, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    In response to a recognized need for an in-flight animal housing facility to support Spacelab life sciences investigators, a rack and system compatible Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) has been developed. A series of ground tests is planned to insure its satisfactory performance under certain simulated conditions of flight exposure and use. However, even under the best conditions of simulation, confidence gained in ground testing will not approach that resulting from actual spaceflight operation. The Spacelab Mission 3 provides an opportunity to perform an inflight Verification Test (VT) of the RAHF. Lessons learned from the RAHF-VT and baseline performance data will be invaluable in preparation for subsequent dedicated life sciences missions.

  14. idaho Accelerator Center Advanced Fuel Cycle Research

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Douglas; Dale, Dan

    2011-10-20

    The technical effort has been in two parts called; Materials Science and Instrumentation Development. The Materials Science technical program has been based on a series of research and development achievements in Positron-Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) for defect detection in structural materials. This work is of particular importance in nuclear power and its supporting systems as the work included detection of defects introduced by mechanical and thermal phenomena as well as those caused by irradiation damage. The second part of the program has focused on instrumentation development using active interrogation techniques supporting proliferation resistant recycling methodologies and nuclear material safeguards. This effort has also lead to basic physics studies of various phenomena relating to photo-fission. Highlights of accomplishments and facility improvement legacies in these areas over the program period include

  15. The DOE Bioenergy Research Centers: History, Operations, and Scientific Output

    DOE PAGES

    Slater, Steven C.; Simmons, Blake A.; Rogers, Tamara S.; ...

    2015-08-20

    Over the past 7 years, the US Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research has funded three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs). These centers have developed complementary and collaborative research portfolios that address the key technical and economic challenges in biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. All three centers have established a close, productive relationship with DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). This special issue of Bioenergy Research samples the breadth of basic science and engineering work required to underpin a diverse, sustainable, and robust biofuel industry. In this report, which was collaboratively produced by all three BRCs, we discuss themore » BRC contributions over their first 7 years to the development of renewable transportation fuels. In additon, we also highlight the BRC research published in the current issue and discuss technical challenges in light of recent progress.« less

  16. The Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Holzemer, William L; Méndez, Marta Rivero; Portillo, Carmen; Padilla, Geraldine; Cuca, Yvette; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the partnership between the schools of nursing at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Puerto Rico to address the need for nursing research on HIV/AIDS health disparities. The partnership led to the creation of the Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities with funding from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research. We provide background information on the disproportionate impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on racial and ethnic minorities, describe the major predictors of health disparities in persons at risk for or diagnosed with HIV/AIDS using the Outcomes Model for Health Care Research, and outline the major components of the Nursing Research Center. The center's goal is to improve health outcomes for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS by enhancing the knowledge base for HIV/AIDS care.

  17. The DOE Bioenergy Research Centers: History, Operations, and Scientific Output

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Steven C.; Simmons, Blake A.; Rogers, Tamara S.; Phillips, Margaret F.; Nordahl, Kristy; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-08-20

    Over the past 7 years, the US Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research has funded three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs). These centers have developed complementary and collaborative research portfolios that address the key technical and economic challenges in biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. All three centers have established a close, productive relationship with DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). This special issue of Bioenergy Research samples the breadth of basic science and engineering work required to underpin a diverse, sustainable, and robust biofuel industry. In this report, which was collaboratively produced by all three BRCs, we discuss the BRC contributions over their first 7 years to the development of renewable transportation fuels. In additon, we also highlight the BRC research published in the current issue and discuss technical challenges in light of recent progress.

  18. Opportunities for Patient-centered Outcomes Research in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Zygmont, Matthew E; Lam, Diana L; Nowitzki, Kristina M; Burton, Kirsteen R; Lenchik, Leon; McArthur, Tatum A; Sekhar, Aarti K; Itri, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Recently created in 2010, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) supports patient-centered comparative effectiveness research with a focus on prioritizing high-impact studies and improving trial design methodology. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on patient-centered outcomes research in Radiology aims to review recently funded imaging-centric projects that adhere to the methodologies established by PCORI. We provide an overview of the successful application of PCORI standards to radiology topics, highlight how these methodologies differ from other forms of radiology research, and identify opportunities for new projects as well as potential barriers for involvement. Our hope is that review of specific case examples in radiology will clarify the use and value of PCORI methods mandated and supported nationally by the Affordable Care Act.

  19. Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamill, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, one of the world's most spectacular gorges, is a premier U.S. National Park and a World Heritage Site. The canyon supports a diverse array of distinctive plants and animals and contains cultural resources significant to the region's Native Americans. About 15 miles upstream of Grand Canyon National Park sits Glen Canyon Dam, completed in 1963, which created Lake Powell. The dam provides hydroelectric power for 200 wholesale customers in six western States, but it has also altered the Colorado River's flow, temperature, and sediment-carrying capacity. Over time this has resulted in beach erosion, invasion and expansion of nonnative species, and losses of native fish. Public concern about the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations prompted the passage of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992, which directs the Secretary of the Interior to operate the dam 'to protect, mitigate adverse impacts to, and improve values for which Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area were established...' This legislation also required the creation of a long-term monitoring and research program to provide information that could inform decisions related to dam operations and protection of downstream resources.

  20. Publications on acoustics research at the Langley Research Center, January 1987 - September 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Linda W. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This report is a compilation of publications from acoustics research at the Langley Research Center. The reports listed are in chronological order and summarize the research output of the Acoustics Division for the period January 1987 - September 1992.

  1. National Center on Accessibility: Putting Research into Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowerman, Jennifer; Robb, Gary

    2001-01-01

    A collaborative program of Indiana University and the National Park Service, the National Center on Accessibility provides research, training, and technical assistance to link the needs and preferences of people with disabilities to practitioners designing facilities and planning programs in parks and recreation. Research and recommendations…

  2. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1991. All the publications were announced in the 1991 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  3. Moving from Damage-Centered Research through Unsettling Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderon, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    The author revisits autoethnographic work in order to examine how she unwittingly incorporated damage-centered (Tuck 2009) research approaches that reproduce settler colonial understandings of marginalized communities. The paper examines the reproduction of settler colonial knowledge in ethnographic research by unearthing the inherent surveillance…

  4. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 800 technical publications that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1983. Announced in the 1983 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts), the documents cited include research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  5. Expert Panel Reviews of Research Centers: The Site Visit Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrenz, Frances; Thao, Mao; Johnson, Kelli

    2012-01-01

    Site visits are used extensively in a variety of settings within the evaluation community. They are especially common in making summative value decisions about the quality and worth of research programs/centers. However, there has been little empirical research and guidance about how to appropriately conduct evaluative site visits of research…

  6. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 780 research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses resulting from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1980. All the publications were announced in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports and/or International Aerospace Abstracts.

  7. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1982 is described. All the publications were announced in the 1982 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  8. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This annual review reports the center's activities and findings on very large scale integration (VLSI) systems design for 1990, including project status, financial support, publications, the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) Symposium on VLSI Design, research results, and outreach programs. Processor chips completed or under development are listed. Research results summarized include a design technique to harden complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) memory circuits against single event upset (SEU); improved circuit design procedures; and advances in computer aided design (CAD), communications, computer architectures, and reliability design. Also described is a high school teacher program that exposes teachers to the fundamentals of digital logic design.

  9. The Syracuse University Center for Training and Research in Hypersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John; Blankson, Isaiah (Technical Monitor); Robinson, Stephen K. (Technical Monitor); Walsh, Michael J. (Technical Monitor); Anderson, Griffin Y. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In Fall 1993, NASA Headquarters established Centers for Hypersonics at the University of Maryland, the University of Texas-Arlington, and Syracuse University. These centers are dedicated to research and education in hypersonic technologies and have the objective of educating the next generation of engineers in this critical field. At the Syracuse University Center for Hypersonics this goal is being realized by focusing resources to: Provide an environment in which promising undergraduate students can learn the fundamental engineering principles of hypersonics so that they may make a seamless transition to graduate study and research in this field; Provide graduate students with advanced training in hypersonics and an opportunity to interact with leading authorities in the field in both research and instructional capacities; and Perform fundamental research in areas that will impact hypersonic vehicle design and development.

  10. Qualitative Methods in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.

    PubMed

    Vandermause, Roxanne; Barg, Frances K; Esmail, Laura; Edmundson, Lauren; Girard, Samantha; Perfetti, A Ross

    2016-09-14

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), created to fund research guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, offers a new research venue. Many (41 of 50) first funded projects involved qualitative research methods. This study was completed to examine the current state of the science of qualitative methodologies used in PCORI-funded research. Principle investigators participated in phenomenological interviews to learn (a) how do researchers using qualitative methods experience seeking funding for, implementing and disseminating their work; and (b) how may qualitative methods advance the quality and relevance of evidence for patients? Results showed the experience of doing qualitative research in the current research climate as "Being a bona fide qualitative researcher: Staying true to research aims while negotiating challenges," with overlapping patterns: (a) researching the elemental, (b) expecting surprise, and (c) pushing boundaries. The nature of qualitative work today was explicitly described and is rendered in this article.

  11. Spaceflight revolution: NASA Langley Research Center from Sputnik to Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James R.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the transition to the broad research scope of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) starting in the late 1950's, the Langley Research Center underwent many changes in program content, organization and management, and areas of personnel expertise. This book describes and evaluates the evolution and activities of the Langley Research Center during the seventeen-year period from 1958 to 1975. The book was based on the analysis of hundreds of written records, both published and unpublished, as well as numerous personal interviews with many of the key individuals involved in the transition of Langley. Some of the projects and research areas covered include Project Echo, magnetoplasmadynamics research, Scout Rocket Program, lunar-orbit rendezvous research, manned space laboratory development, and Apollo and the Lunar Orbiter Project.

  12. Final environmental impact statement for Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The NASA-Ames Research Center is described. together with the nature of its activities, from which it can be seen that the center is basically not a major pollution source. Geographical, and climatic characteristics of the site are described. inasmuch as they influence both the choice of disposal methods and the environmental effects of the pollutants. The known or probable pollution sources at the center are described. Where the intensities of these sources might exceed the recommended guidelines, the corrective actions that have been taken are described.

  13. Advancing Mental Health Research: Washington University's Center for Mental Health Services Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.; McMillen, Curtis; Haywood, Sally; Dore, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Research centers have become a key component of the research infrastructure in schools of social work, including the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University. In 1993, that school's Center for Mental Health Services Research (CMHSR) received funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) as a Social Work…

  14. Ames Research Center SR&T program and earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G.

    1972-01-01

    An overview is presented of the research activities in earth observations at Ames Research Center. Most of the tasks involve the use of research aircraft platforms. The program is also directed toward the use of the Illiac 4 computer for statistical analysis. Most tasks are weighted toward Pacific coast and Pacific basin problems with emphasis on water applications, air applications, animal migration studies, and geophysics.

  15. Decline of clinical research in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J

    2015-09-29

    Marked changes in US medical school funding began in the 1960s with progressively increasing revenues from clinical services. The growth of clinical revenues slowed in the mid-1990s, creating a funding crisis for US academic health care centers, who responded by having their faculty increase their clinical duties at the expense of research activities. Surveys document the resultant stresses on the academic clinician researcher. The NIH provides greater funding for basic and translational research than for clinical research, and the new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is inadequately funded to address the scope of needed clinical research. An increasing portion of clinical research is funded by industry, which leaves many important clinical issues unaddressed. There is an inadequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a lack of external support for clinical research. The impact on the academic environment in university medical centers is especially severe on young faculty, who have a shrinking potential to achieve successful academic careers. National health care research funding policies should encourage the right balance of life-science investigations. Medical universities need to improve and highlight education on clinical research for students, residents, fellows, and young faculty. Medical universities also need to provide appropriate incentives for clinical research. Without training to ensure an adequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a method to adequately fund clinical research, discoveries from basic and translational research cannot be clinically tested and affect patient care. Thus, many clinical problems will continue to be evaluated and treated with inadequate or even absent evidence-based knowledge.

  16. Second Annual Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, Frank (Editor); Temple, Doyle (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) held its Second Annual Forum on September 23-24, 1994. The forum consisted of two days of technical sessions with invited talks, submitted talks, and a student poster session. Participants in the technical sessions included students and researchers from CCNY/CUNY, Fisk University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Hampton University, University of Maryland, the Univeristy of Michigan, NASA Langley Research Center, North Caroline A and T University, Steven's Institute of Technology, and NAWC-Warminster. Topics included chaotic lasers, pumped optical filters, nonlinear responses in polythiophene and thiophene based thin films, crystal growth and spectroscopy, laser-induced photochromic centers, raman scattering in phorphyrin, superradiance, doped fluoride crystals, luminescence of terbium in silicate glass, and radiative and nonradiative transitions in rare-earth ions.

  17. Phosphor Technology Center of Excellence: research, education, industrial interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Christopher J.

    1994-04-01

    A review is given of the participants and the research, education and industrial mission of the center. The Phosphor Technology Center of Excellence is established at the Georgia Institute of Technology with the University of Georgia, University of Florida, Pennsylvania State University, David Sarnoff Research Center and the American Display Consortium being charter members. The research mission addresses short, medium and long term needs in five technological areas; cathode ray tube, electroluminescence, field emission devices, plasma display panels and active-matrix liquid crystal display back-light phosphors through interactive university/industry technology groups. Outreach activities include the establishment of a phosphor database, industry analysis and short courses in addition to the conventional university education role. Specific science and technology programs are briefly described.

  18. Transmission research activities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    A joint research program, to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions, consists of analytical and experimental efforts to achieve the overall goals of reducing transmission weight and noise, while increasing life and reliability. Recent activities in the areas of transmission and related component research are highlighted. Current areas include specific technologies in support of military rotary wing aviation, gearing technology, transmission noise reduction studies, a recent interest in gearbox diagnostics, and advanced transmission system studies. Results of recent activities are presented along with near term research plans.

  19. 76 FR 4330 - American Overseas Research Centers (AORC) Program; Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... American Overseas Research Centers (AORC) Program; Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; American Overseas Research Centers (AORC) Program; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal... Program: The American Overseas Research Centers (AORC) Program makes awards to any American...

  20. Research and technology at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1983 are highlighted. Included are research funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology; Advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight; and Solar System Explorations, Life Sciences, and Earth Sciences and Applications research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by one-page descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  1. Research and technology of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1987 are highlighted. Included are research projects funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, Solar System Exploration and Life Sciences research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications, and advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  2. Research and technology, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1984 are highlighted. Included are research funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology; Advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight; and Solar System Exploration and Life Sciences research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by one page descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  3. American Alligator Research on the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowers, Russell H.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the research conducted at the Kennedy Space Center on the American Alligator. The objectives of the research were to establish life history baseline at the Kennedy Space Center and at the Merit Island National Wildlife Reserve (MINWR). Some of the factors that were examined are: nesting success, movement patterns, and population structure. Another objective was to determine the overall health of the alligator population, by analyzing blood and tissue chemistry, and urine analysis. A third objective was to compare alligators at KSC/MINWR to the statewide population. Some of the results are shown in charts and graphs.

  4. Center for modeling of turbulence and transition: Research briefs, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This research brief contains the progress reports of the research staff of the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT) from June 1992 to July 1993. It is also an annual report to the Institute for Computational Mechanics in Propulsion located at Ohio Aerospace Institute and NASA Lewis Research Center. The main objectives of the research activities at CMOTT are to develop, validate, and implement turbulence and transition models for flows of interest in propulsion systems. Currently, our research covers eddy viscosity one- and two-equation models, Reynolds-stress algebraic equation models, Reynolds-stress transport equation models, nonequilibrium multiple-scale models, bypass transition models, joint scalar probability density function models, and Renormalization Group Theory and Direct Interaction Approximation methods. Some numerical simulations (LES and DNS) have also been carried out to support the development of turbulence modeling. Last year was CMOTT's third year in operation. During this period, in addition to the above mentioned research, CMOTT has also hosted the following programs: an eighteen-hour short course on 'Turbulence--Fundamentals and Computational Modeling (Part I)' given by CMOTT at the NASA Lewis Research Center; a productive summer visitor research program that has generated many encouraging results; collaborative programs with industry customers to help improve their turbulent flow calculations for propulsion system designs; a biweekly CMOTT seminar series with speakers from within and without the NASA Lewis Research Center including foreign speakers. In addition, CMOTT members have been actively involved in the national and international turbulence research activities. The current CMOTT roster and organization are listed in Appendix A. Listed in Appendix B are the abstracts of the biweekly CMOTT seminar. Appendix C lists the papers contributed by CMOTT members.

  5. Federally Funded Research Centers: Agency Reviews of Employee Compensation and Center Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Apr . 30, 2016 Apr . 30, 2017 Savannah River National Laboratory (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC) 1951 Jan. 10, 2008 Sept. 30, 2016 July 31...Facility (Jefferson Science Associates, LLC) 1985 Apr . 14, 2006 May 31, 2016 May 31, 2025 Department of Defense Aerospace Federally Funded Research...research and development centers (FFRDC) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and National Science Foundation

  6. The NASA Lewis Research Center: An Economic Impact Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), established in 1941, is one of ten NASA research centers in the country. It is situated on 350 acres of land in Cuyahoga County and occupies more than 140 buildings and over 500 specialized research and test facilities. Most of LeRC's facilities are located in the City of Cleveland; some are located within the boundaries of the cities of Fairview Park and Brookpark. LeRC is a lead center for NASA's research, technology, and development in the areas of aeropropulsion and selected space applications. It is a center of excellence for turbomachinery, microgravity fluid and combustion research, and commercial communication. The base research and technology disciplines which serve both aeronautics and space areas include materials and structures, instrumentation and controls, fluid physics, electronics, and computational fluid dynamics. This study investigates LeRC's economic impact on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures LeRC's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they 'ripple' throughout the economy. To fully explain LeRC's overall impact on the region, its contributions in the areas of technology transfer and education are also examined. The study uses a highly credible and widely accepted research methodology. First, regional economic multipliers based on input-output models were used to estimate the effect of LERC spending on the Northeast Ohio economy. Second, the economic models were complemented by interviews with industrial, civic, and university leaders to qualitatively assess LeRC's impact in the areas of technology transfer and education.

  7. Reduced Crew Operations Research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel

    2017-01-01

    In 2012, NASA began exploring the feasibility of single pilot reduced crew operations (SPORCO) in the context of scheduled passenger air carrier operations (i.e., Parts 121 and 135). This research was spurred by two trends in aviation research: the trend toward reducing costs and a shortage of pilots. A series of simulations were conducted to develop tools and a concept of operations to support RCO. This slide deck is a summary of the NASA Ames RCO research prepared for an R T team at Airbus. Airbus is considering moving forward with reducing crew during the cruise phase of flight with long-haul flights and is interested in the work we have completed.

  8. New York can be our nation's center for Alzheimer's research.

    PubMed

    Vann, Allan S

    2014-09-01

    More than 5 million people in this country have Alzheimer's disease, and more than 300,000 of those with Alzheimer's live in New York. By 2025, it is estimated that there will be 350,000 residents living with Alzheimer's in New York. Congressman Steve Israel and New York Assemblyman Charles Lavine issued a joint proposal in June, 2013 suggesting that New York become this country's center for Alzheimer's research. Obviously, they would both like to see increased federal funding, but they also know that we cannot count on that happening. So Israel and Lavine have proposed a $3 billion state bonding initiative to secure sufficient funding to tackle this disease. It would be similar to the bonding initiatives that have made California and Texas this nation's centers for stem cell and cancer research. The bond would provide a dedicated funding stream to support research to find effective means to treat, cure, and eventually prevent Alzheimer's, and fund programs to help people currently dealing with Alzheimer's and their caregivers. New York already has some of the major "ingredients" to make an Alzheimer's bond initiative a success, including 3 of our nation's 29 Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers and some of the finest research facilities in the nation for genetic and neuroscience research. One can only imagine the synergy of having these world class institutions working on cooperative grants and projects with sufficient funding to attract even more world class researchers and scientists to New York to find ways to prevent, treat, and cure Alzheimer's.

  9. Fiscal Year 1986 program report (Massachusetts Water Resources Research Center)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    The FY86 Water Resources Research Center program focused on state and regional research priorities: acid-deposition impacts and drinking-water quality. Water Resources Institute Program (WRIP) support was supplemented by the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, and the University of Massachusetts. Four WRIP projects were completed: studies of natural mitigation of acid deposition via sulfate reduction in lakes, the effect of ozone and acid deposition on tree seedlings, corrosion impacts on water quality, and creation of potentially hazardous chlorinated organics by drinking-water treatment. The state Cooperative Aquatic Research Program funded 5 projects. An Aquatic Toxicology Program addressed research, training, and information transfer for the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. Other information transfer included a monthly water resources center newsletter, a quarterly Acid Rain Monitoring Project newsletter, and acid-rain reports to the media and general public.

  10. Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition: Research Briefs, 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This research brief contains the progress reports of the research staff of the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT) from July 1993 to July 1995. It also constitutes a progress report to the Institute of Computational Mechanics in Propulsion located at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the Lewis Research Center. CMOTT has been in existence for about four years. In the first three years, its main activities were to develop and validate turbulence and combustion models for propulsion systems, in an effort to remove the deficiencies of existing models. Three workshops on computational turbulence modeling were held at LeRC (1991, 1993, 1994). At present, CMOTT is integrating the CMOTT developed/improved models into CFD tools which can be used by the propulsion systems community. This activity has resulted in an increased collaboration with the Lewis CFD researchers.

  11. Future Directions in Rotorcraft Technology at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, Edwin W.; Ormiston, Robert A; Young, Larry A.

    2000-01-01

    Members of the NASA and Army rotorcraft research community at Ames Research Center have developed a vision for 'Vertical Flight 2025'. This paper describes the development of that vision and the steps being taken to implement it. In an effort to realize the vision, consistent with both NASA and Army Aviation strategic plans, two specific technology development projects have been identified: (1) one focused on a personal transportation system capable of vertical flight (the 'Roto-Mobile') and (2) the other on small autonomous rotorcraft (which is inclusive of vehicles which range in grams of gross weight for 'MicroRotorcraft' to thousands of kilograms for rotorcraft uninhabited aerial vehicles). The paper provides a status report on these projects as well as a summary of other revolutionary research thrusts being planned and executed at Ames Research Center.

  12. Automatic speech recognition research at NASA-Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coler, Clayton R.; Plummer, Robert P.; Huff, Edward M.; Hitchcock, Myron H.

    1977-01-01

    A trainable acoustic pattern recognizer manufactured by Scope Electronics is presented. The voice command system VCS encodes speech by sampling 16 bandpass filters with center frequencies in the range from 200 to 5000 Hz. Variations in speaking rate are compensated for by a compression algorithm that subdivides each utterance into eight subintervals in such a way that the amount of spectral change within each subinterval is the same. The recorded filter values within each subinterval are then reduced to a 15-bit representation, giving a 120-bit encoding for each utterance. The VCS incorporates a simple recognition algorithm that utilizes five training samples of each word in a vocabulary of up to 24 words. The recognition rate of approximately 85 percent correct for untrained speakers and 94 percent correct for trained speakers was not considered adequate for flight systems use. Therefore, the built-in recognition algorithm was disabled, and the VCS was modified to transmit 120-bit encodings to an external computer for recognition.

  13. Research into language concepts for the mission control center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellenback, Steven W.; Barton, Timothy J.; Ratner, Jeremiah M.

    1990-01-01

    A final report is given on research into language concepts for the Mission Control Center (MCC). The Specification Driven Language research is described. The state of the image processing field and how image processing techniques could be applied toward automating the generation of the language known as COmputation Development Environment (CODE or Comp Builder) are discussed. Also described is the development of a flight certified compiler for Comps.

  14. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1981 are indexed and abstracted. All the publications were announced in the 1981 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patent applications, and theses. A total of 384 technical publications is listed.

  15. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1993. All the publications were announced in the 1993 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  16. SBIR Success Stories at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Bitler, Dean W.; Prok, George M.; Metzger, Marie E.; Dreibelbis, Cindy L.; Howe, Meghan R.; Novak, George D.

    1999-01-01

    This booklet of success stories summarizes the NASA Glenn Research Center's accomplishments and successes by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. These success stories are the results of selecting projects that best support NASA missions and also have commercialization potential. Each success story describes the innovation accomplished, commercialization of the technology, and further applications and usages. The company name and the NASA contact person are identified to encourage further interest and communication to occur.

  17. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1984. All the publications were announced in the 1984 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  18. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1987. All the publications were announced in the 1987 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  19. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1990. All the publications were announced in the 1990 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  20. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1989. All the publications were announced in the 1989 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  1. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1992. All the publications were announced in the 1992 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  2. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 780 technical reports resulting from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1977. All the publications were announced in the 1977 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Documents cited include research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  3. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1986. All the publications were announced in the 1986 issues of Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) and/or International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  4. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latanision, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    An annual report of the research activities of the Materials Processing Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is given. Research on dielectrophoresis in the microgravity environment, phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids, transport properties of droplet clusters in gravity-free fields, probes and monitors for the study of solidification of molten semiconductors, fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth, and heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification are discussed.

  5. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts of the technical reports that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1988. Subject, author, and corporate source indexes are also included. All the publications were announced in the 1988 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  6. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This compilation of over 1100 abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1979. All the publications were announced in the 1979 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses are included. Subject, author, corporate source, contract number, and report number indexes are provided.

  7. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  8. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1985. All the publications were announced in the 1985 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  9. Does Every Research Library Need a Digital Humanities Center?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Jennifer; Erway, Ricky

    2014-01-01

    The digital humanities (DH) are attracting considerable attention and funding at the same time that this nascent field is striving for an identity. Some research libraries are making significant investments by creating digital humanities centers. However, questions about whether such investments are warranted persist across the cultural heritage…

  10. The Western Aeronautical Test Range of NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is presented in this paper. The three WATR facilities are discussed, and three WATR elements - mission control centerns, communications systems, real-time processing and display systems, and tracking systems -are reviewed. The relationships within the NASA WATR, with respect to the NASA aeronautics program, are also discussed.

  11. ADVANCED COMPOSITES TECHNOLOGY CASE STUDY AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes work conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) in Hampton, VA, under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Support for...

  12. Wind-Tunnel Capability at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Presley, L. L.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes $700 million wind-tunnel complex at Ames Research Center, including auxiliary support systems, test instrumentation, and special test rigs. Planned near-term facility improvement aimed at providing new test capabilities and increased productivity, as well as some potential longer-term improvements, also discussed. Aerodynamic test facilities range from subsonic wind tunnels to highenthalpy arc jets.

  13. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - USDA BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed during the spring of 1991 which identified areas for waste reduction at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), Beltsville, Maryland. he areas selected for this joint E...

  14. Biosurveillance at the United States Meat Animal Research Center

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mission of the 50 scientists and 165 support staff at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) is to develop new technologies to increase the efficiency of livestock production and improve meat safety, quality, and animal health to benefit consumers worldwide. The facilities include 35,000 ...

  15. The 1994 Ames Research Center publications: A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarich, Shelley J. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that Ames Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1994. Included are citations for formal reports, high-number conference publications, high-number technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles, meeting presentation, tech briefs, patents, and translations.

  16. Aerospace Communications at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    The Communications Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland Ohio has as its charter to provide NASA and the Nation with our expertise and services in innovative communications technologies that address future missions in Aerospace Technology, Spaceflight, Space Science, Earth Science, Life Science and Exploration.

  17. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center produced during the calendar year 1983 is compiled. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  18. Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) Technology Focus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-02

    Unclassified Unclassified 1 Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) Technology Focus Report Documentation Page Form...ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for...burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington

  19. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  20. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    IHSCR) Center for Survey Research ( CSR ) at Shaw University in Raleigh, NC. Because there was a two-year delay in getting the grant transferred from Shaw...project goals and objectives are met. As with The Fathers Study, the Sons survey will be conducted at CSR which is now located at Johns Hopkins

  1. Applied imaging at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Howard A.; Owens, Jay C.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio has just completed the celebration of its 50th anniversary. `During the past 50 years, Lewis helped win World War II, made jet aircraft safer and more efficient, helped Americans land on the Moon ... and engaged in the type of fundamental research that benefits all of us in our daily lives.' As part of the center's long history, the Photographic and Printing Branch has continued to develop and meet the center's research imaging requirements. As imaging systems continue to advance and researchers more clearly understand the power of imaging, investigators are relying more and more on imaging systems to meet program objectives. Today, the Photographic and Printing Branch supports a research community of over 5,000 including advocacy for NASA Headquarters and other government agencies. Complete classified and unclassified imaging services include high- speed image acquisition, technical film and video documentaries, still imaging, and conventional and unconventional photofinishing operations. These are the foundation of the branch's modern support function. This paper provides an overview of the varied applied imaging programs managed by the Photographic and Printing Branch. Emphasis is placed on recent imaging projects including icing research, space experiments, and an on-line image archive.

  2. Composite fuselage shell structures research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Fuselage structures for transport aircraft represent a significant percentage of both the weight and the cost of these aircraft primary structures. Composite materials offer the potential for reducing both the weight and the cost of transport fuselage structures, but only limited studies of the response and failure of composite fuselage structures have been conducted for transport aircraft. The behavior of these important primary structures must be understood, and the structural mechanics methodology for analyzing and designing these complex stiffened shell structures must be validated in the laboratory. The effects of local gradients and discontinuities on fuselage shell behavior and the effects of local damage on pressure containment must be thoroughly understood before composite fuselage structures can be used for commercial aircraft. This paper describes the research being conducted and planned at NASA LaRC to help understand the critical behavior or composite fuselage structures and to validate the structural mechanics methodology being developed for stiffened composite fuselage shell structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads. Stiffened shell and curved stiffened panel designs are currently being developed and analyzed, and these designs will be fabricated and then tested at Langley to study critical fuselage shell behavior and to validate structural analysis and design methodology. The research includes studies of the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads on nonlinear stiffened panel and shell behavior, the effects of cutouts and other gradient-producing discontinuities on composite shell response, and the effects of local damage on pressure containment and residual strength. Scaling laws are being developed that relate full-scale and subscale behavior of composite fuselage shells. Failure mechanisms are being identified and advanced designs will be developed based on what is learned from early results from

  3. Double Star Research: A Student-Centered Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jolyon

    2016-06-01

    Project and team-based pedagogies are increasingly augmenting lecture-style science classrooms. Occasionally, university professors will invite students to tangentially partcipate in their research. Since 2006, Dr. Russ Genet has led an astronomy research seminar for community college and high school students that allows participants to work closely with a melange of professional and advanced amatuer researchers. The vast majority of topics have centered on measuring the position angles and searations of double stars which can be readily published in the Journal of Double Star Observations. In the intervening years, a collaborative community of practice (Wenger, 1998) formed with the students as lead researchers on their projects with the guidance of experienced astronomers and educators. The students who join the research seminar are often well prepared for further STEM education in college and career. Today, the research seminar involves multile schools in multiple states with a volunteer educator acting as an assistant instructor at each location. These assistant instructors interface with remote observatories, ensure progress is made, and recruit students. The key deliverables from each student team include a published research paper and a public presentation online or in-person. Citing a published paper on scholarship and college applications gives students' educational carreers a boost. Recently the Journal of Double Star Observations published its first special issue of exlusively student-centered research.

  4. Accomplishments at NASA Langley Research Center in rotorcraft aerodynamics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the development of aerodynamic technology for rotorcraft has continued successfully at NASA LaRC. Though the NASA Langley Research Center is not the lead NASA center in this area, the activity was continued due to facilities and individual capabilities which are recognized as contributing to helicopter research needs of industry and government. Noteworthy accomplishments which contribute to advancing the state of rotorcraft technology in the areas of rotor design, airfoil research, rotor aerodynamics, and rotor/fuselage interaction aerodynamics are described. Rotor designs were defined for current helicopters and evaluated in wind tunnel testing. These designs have incorporated advanced airfoils defined analytically and also proven in wind tunnel tests. A laser velocimetry system has become a productive tool for experimental definition of rotor inflow/wake and is providing data for rotorcraft aerodynamic code validation.

  5. Large space antenna communications systems: Integrated Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory development activities. 2: Langley Research Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, T. G.; Bailey, M. C.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1983-01-01

    The electromagnetic analysis activities at the Langley Research Center are resulting in efficient and accurate analytical methods for predicting both far- and near-field radiation characteristics of large offset multiple-beam multiple-aperture mesh reflector antennas. The utilization of aperture integration augmented with Geometrical Theory of Diffraction in analyzing the large reflector antenna system is emphasized.

  6. Cultivating Data Expertise and Roles at a National Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    As research becomes more computation and data-intensive, it brings new demands for staff that can manage complex data, design user services, and facilitate open access. Responding to these new demands, universities and research institutions are developing data services to support their scientists and scholarly communities. As more organizations extend their operations to research data, a better understanding of the staff roles and expertise required to support data-intensive research services is needed. What is data expertise - knowledge, skills, and roles? This study addresses this question through a case study of an exemplar research center, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, CO. The NCAR case study results were supplemented and validated with a set of interviews of managers at additional geoscience data centers. To date, 11 interviews with NCAR staff and 19 interviews with managers at supplementary data centers have been completed. Selected preliminary results from the qualitative analysis will be reported in the poster: Data professionals have cultivated expertise in areas such as managing scientific data and products, understanding use and users, harnessing technology for data solutions, and standardizing metadata and data sets. Staff roles and responsibilities have evolved over the years to create new roles for data scientists, data managers/curators, data engineers, and senior managers of data teams, embedding data expertise into each NCAR lab. Explicit career paths and ladders for data professionals are limited but starting to emerge. NCAR has supported organization-wide efforts for data management, leveraging knowledge and best practices across all the labs and their staff. Based on preliminary results, NCAR provides a model for how organizations can build expertise and roles into their data service models. Data collection for this study is ongoing. The author anticipates that the results will help answer questions on what are

  7. Invited lectures related to patient-centered outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Hache, Manon; Kazim, Robert

    2012-10-01

    The third PANDA symposium on Anesthesia and Neurodevelopment in Children included a session on Patient Centered Outcomes Research. Three speakers were invited to discuss SmartTots, a private-public partnership between IARS and FDA, Wake Up Safe, a patient safety organization and lastly, NICHD/NIH funding for training in research. The session provided information related to ongoing efforts to improve outcome and safety of anesthesia care in children and introduced potential sources and mechanisms of federal and non-federal funding for research related to anesthetic neurotoxicity in the developing brain.

  8. Research briefs of the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center

    SciTech Connect

    Vook, F.L.; Smith, W.L.

    1993-12-31

    As Sandia National Laboratories and the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center develop an increasingly diverse set of customers, research partners, and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA`s) with industry, there is a need for providing more concise information describing their technical achievements and capabilities. This publication, Research Briefs, is designed to inform the present and potential partners in research and technology advancement. Their research emphasizes semiconductor physics, electronic materials, surface physics and chemistry, plasma and chemical processing sciences, lasers and optics, vision science, ion-solid interactions and defect physics, and advanced materials physics. The specific programs they pursue are driven by the research goals which are greatly influenced by interactions with the government and industrial customers.

  9. NASA Lewis Research Center/university graduate research program on engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center established a graduate research program in support of the Engine Structures Research activities. This graduate research program focuses mainly on structural and dynamics analyses, computational mechanics, mechanics of composites and structural optimization. The broad objectives of the program, the specific program, the participating universities and the program status are briefly described.

  10. NASA Lewis Research Center/University Graduate Research Program on Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center established a graduate research program in support of the Engine Structures Research activities. This graduate research program focuses mainly on structural and dynamics analyses, computational mechanics, mechanics of composites and structural optimization. The broad objectives of the program, the specific program, the participating universities and the program status are briefly described.

  11. New Research Center Will Free Chemistry from Earth's Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    A new research center combining the tools of chemistry and astronomy will use the unique laboratory of interstellar space to free the study of basic chemistry from the restrictive bonds of Earth. The Center for Chemistry of the Universe will allow scientists to explore new types of chemical reactions that occur under the extreme conditions of space. The center will combine laboratory experiments, theoretical studies, and radio-telescope observations to dramatically expand our understanding of the processes that build molecules that may "seed" young planets with the building blocks of life. Astrochemistry Graphic CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF The Center forges a unique research collaboration among leading scientists in the field of astrochemistry from the University of Arizona, The Ohio State University, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, and a group of chemists and physicists at the University of Virginia engaged in research to understand the fundamentals of chemical reactions. "We hope to answer some very basic questions, such as just how did the molecules that ultimately became us get their start?" said Brooks Pate, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Virginia (UVa) and leader of the team that will form the new center. The team received an initial grant of 1.5 million from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to form the center during the next two years. If the NSF then fully approves the initiative, the foundation will provide funding of 4 million per year for up to ten years. The new center will bring together laboratory researchers, theoreticians, and observers using radio telescopes of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The group of chemists participating in the center have discovered more than half of the new interstellar molecules identified worldwide in the past 18 months. The NRAO

  12. 2003 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, Joseph M.; Heyward, An O.; Kankam, Mark D.

    2003-01-01

    The Office of Education at NASA Headquarters provides overall policy and direction for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP). The American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) have joined in partnership to recruit participants, accept applications from a broad range of participants, and provide overall evaluation of the NFFP. The NASA Centers, through their University Affairs Officers, develop and operate the experiential part of the program. In concert with co-directing universities and the Centers, Fellows are selected and provided the actual research experiences. This report summarizes the 2003 session conducted at the Glenn Research Center (GRC).Research topics covered a variety of areas including, but not limited to, biological sensors, modeling of biological fluid systems, electronic circuits, ceramics and coatings, unsteady probablistic analysis and aerodynamics, gas turbines, environmental monitoring systems for water quality, air quality, gaseous and particulate emissions, bearings for flywheel energy storage, shape memory alloys,photonic interrogation and nanoprocesses,carbon nanotubes, polymer synthesis for fuel cells, aviation communications, algorithm development and RESPlan Database.

  13. Patient-centered outcomes research to improve asthma outcomes.

    PubMed

    Anise, Ayodola; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2016-12-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is funding 8 comparative effectiveness research projects to improve patient-centered outcomes for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients with uncontrolled asthma. These projects aim to compare multilevel interventions with known efficacy at the community, home, and health system levels to enhance patient and clinician uptake of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines and improve outcomes. The National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines provide clinicians with a range of acceptable approaches for the diagnosis and management of asthma and define general practices that meet the needs of most patients. Yet disparities in asthma care and outcomes remain pervasive for African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute AsthmaNet consortium has identified several top research priorities for pediatric and adult populations, including a recommendation to examine tailored approaches based on race/ethnicity. In addition, the guidelines emphasize the need for studies that focus on multicomponent interventions recognizing that single interventions are generally ineffective. This article will describe the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded asthma projects and how they are individually and collectively addressing evidence gaps in asthma care by focusing on multicomponent and tailored approaches for improving outcomes and reducing disparities for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients.

  14. Publications on acoustics research at the Langley Research Center during 1980-1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Linda W. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    This report is a compilation of publications from acoustics research at the Langley Research Center. The reports are listed in chronological order and summarize the written output of the Acoustics Division and its predecessor, The Acoustics and Noise Reduction Division, for the period 1980 through 1986. The information assembled has been extracted from the 1980 through 1986 issues for the Technical Memorandum entitled, Scientific and Technical Information Output of the Langley Research Center for the Calendar Year.

  15. Community engagement and the resource centers for minority aging research.

    PubMed

    Sood, Johanna R; Stahl, Sidney M

    2011-06-01

    The National Institute on Aging created the Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMARs) to address infrastructure development intended to reduce health disparities among older adults. The overall goals of the RCMARs are to (a) increase the size of the cadre of researchers conducting research on issues related to minority aging; (b) increase the diversity of researchers conducting research on minority aging; (c) create and test reliable measures for use in older diverse populations; and (d) conduct research on recruitment and retention of community-dwelling older adults for research addressing behavioral, social, and medical issues. Along with this latter goal, the RCMARs developed and maintain academic-community partnerships. To accomplish the recruitment and retention goal, the RCMARs established Community Liaison Working Groups using a collaborative approach to scientific inquiry; this special issue will identify research priorities for moving the science of recruitment and retention forward. In addition, sustainable and efficient methods for fostering long-term partnerships will be identified between community and academia. Evidence-based approaches to the recruitment and retention of diverse elders are explored. We expect this supplement to serve as a catalyst for researchers interested in engaging diverse community-dwelling elders in health-related research. In addition, this supplement should serve as a source of the most contemporary evidence-based approaches to the recruitment and retention of diverse older populations for participation in social, behavioral, and clinical research.

  16. 34 CFR 350.34 - Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.34 Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conducting...

  17. Actions Needed to Ensure Scientific and Technical Information is Adequately Reviewed at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This audit was initiated in response to a hotline complaint regarding the review, approval, and release of scientific and technical information (STI) at Johnson Space Center. The complainant alleged that Johnson personnel conducting export control reviews of STI were not fully qualified to conduct those reviews and that the reviews often did not occur until after the STI had been publicly released. NASA guidance requires that STI, defined as the results of basic and applied scientific, technical, and related engineering research and development, undergo certain reviews prior to being released outside of NASA or to audiences that include foreign nationals. The process includes technical, national security, export control, copyright, and trade secret (e.g., proprietary data) reviews. The review process was designed to preclude the inappropriate dissemination of sensitive information while ensuring that NASA complies with a requirement of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the Space Act)1 to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information resulting from NASA research activities. We focused our audit on evaluating the STI review process: specifically, determining whether the roles and responsibilities for the review, approval, and release of STI were adequately defined and documented in NASA and Center-level guidance and whether that guidance was effectively implemented at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnson was included in the review because it was the source of the initial complaint, and Goddard, Langley, and Marshall were included because those Centers consistently produce significant amounts of STI.

  18. The NIH-NIAID Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Michelle L.; Griffiths, Kathryn G.; Williams, Steven A.; Kaplan, Ray M.; Moorhead, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Filarial worms cause a variety of tropical diseases in humans; however, they are difficult to study because they have complex life cycles that require arthropod intermediate hosts and mammalian definitive hosts. Research efforts in industrialized countries are further complicated by the fact that some filarial nematodes that cause disease in humans are restricted in host specificity to humans alone. This potentially makes the commitment to research difficult, expensive, and restrictive. Over 40 years ago, the United States National Institutes of Health–National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH-NIAID) established a resource from which investigators could obtain various filarial parasite species and life cycle stages without having to expend the effort and funds necessary to maintain the entire life cycles in their own laboratories. This centralized resource (The Filariasis Research Reagent Resource Center, or FR3) translated into cost savings to both NIH-NIAID and to principal investigators by freeing up personnel costs on grants and allowing investigators to divert more funds to targeted research goals. Many investigators, especially those new to the field of tropical medicine, are unaware of the scope of materials and support provided by the FR3. This review is intended to provide a short history of the contract, brief descriptions of the fiilarial species and molecular resources provided, and an estimate of the impact the resource has had on the research community, and describes some new additions and potential benefits the resource center might have for the ever-changing research interests of investigators. PMID:22140585

  19. Center for Behavioral Neuroscience: a prototype multi-institutional collaborative research center

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Kelly R; Albers, H Elliott

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Behavioral Neuroscience was launched in the fall of 1999 with support from the National Science Foundation, the Georgia Research Alliance, and our eight participating institutions (Georgia State University, Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Clark-Atlanta University, Spelman College, Morehouse College, Morris Brown College). The CBN provides the resources to foster innovative research in behavioral neuroscience, with a specific focus on the neurobiology of social behavior. Center faculty working in collaboratories use diverse model systems from invertebrates to humans to investigate fear, aggression, affiliation, and reproductive behaviors. The addition of new research foci in reward and reinforcement, memory and cognition, and sex differences has expanded the potential for collaborations among Center investigators. Technology core laboratories develop the molecular, cellular, systems, behavioral, and imaging tools essential for investigating how the brain influences complex social behavior and, in turn, how social experience influences brain function. In addition to scientific discovery, a major goal of the CBN is to train the next generation of behavioral neuroscientists and to increase the number of women and under-represented minorities in neuroscience. Educational programs are offered for K-12 students to spark an interest in science. Undergraduate and graduate initiatives encourage students to participate in interdisciplinary and inter-institutional programs, while postdoctoral programs provide a bridge between laboratories and allow the interdisciplinary research and educational ventures to flourish. Finally, the CBN is committed to knowledge transfer, partnering with community organizations to bring neuroscience to the public. This multifaceted approach through research, education, and knowledge transfer will have a major impact on how we study interactions between the brain and behavior, as well

  20. Chemical Inventory Management at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Shirley S.; Homan, Joseph R.; Bajorek, Michael J.; Dominguez, Manuel B.; Smith, Vanessa L.

    1997-01-01

    The Chemical Management System (CMS) is a client/server application developed with Power Builder and Sybase for the Lewis Research Center (LeRC). Power Builder is a client-server application development tool, Sybase is a Relational Database Management System. The entire LeRC community can access the CMS from any desktop environment. The multiple functions and benefits of the CMS are addressed.

  1. Reaction Rate Measurements at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredeweg, T. A.; Bounds, J. A.; Brooks, G. H., Jr.; Favorite, J. A.; Goda, J. M.; Hayes, D. K.; Jackman, K. R.; Little, R. C.; Macinnes, M. R.; Myers, W. L.; Oldham, W. J.; Rundberg, R. S.; Sanchez, R. G.; Schake, A. R.; White, M. C.; Wilkerson, C. W., Jr.

    2014-09-01

    With the resumption of regular operations of the Los Alamos Critical Assemblies at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC), located at the Nevada National Security Site, we have embarked upon a series of campaigns to restore the capability to perform integral reaction rate and fission product yield measurements using historical radiochemical methods. This talk will present an overview of the current and future experimental plans, including results from our experimental campaigns on the Comet/Zeus and Flattop assemblies.

  2. Ion Thruster Development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent ion propulsion technology efforts at NASA's Lewis Research Center including development of kW-class xenon ion thrusters, high power xenon and krypton ion thrusters, and power processors are reviewed. Thruster physical characteristics, performance data, life projections, and power processor component technology are summarized. The ion propulsion technology program is structured to address a broad set of mission applications from satellite stationkeeping and repositioning to primary propulsion using solar or nuclear power systems.

  3. NASA Space Engineering Research Center Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) is proud to offer, at its second symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories and the electronics industry. These featured speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design. Questions of reliability in the space environment along with new directions in CAD and design are addressed by the featured speakers.

  4. Research, CME, media relations boost diabetes center's profile.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2002-01-01

    For Boston's Joslin Diabetes Center, media relations rather than formal advertising is the key to a high-profile image. The communications office targets newspaper, magazine and TV reporters and editors with public service announcements and news about research and clinical care advances. Other successful tools include a high-end quarterly magazine, a fact-filled information kit, disease-specific support programs and a catalog of educational materials.

  5. Ames Research Center publications: A continuing bibliography, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This bibliography lists formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, contractor reports, and computer programs that were issued by Ames Research Center and indexed by Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, International Aerospace Abstracts, and Computer Program Abstracts in 1980. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication, and NASA accession numbers. Subject, personal author, corporate source, contract number, and report/accession number indexes are provided.

  6. NDE Software Developed at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Donald J.; Martin, Richard E.; Rauser, Richard W.; Nichols, Charles; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has developed several important Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) related software packages for different projects in the last 10 years. Three of the software packages have been created with commercial-grade user interfaces and are available to United States entities for download on the NASA Technology Transfer and Partnership Office server (https://sr.grc.nasa.gov/). This article provides brief overviews of the software packages.

  7. Ames Research Center publications: A continuing bibliography, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography lists formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents and contractor reports issued by Ames Research Center which were indexed by Scientific and Technical Aerospace Abstracts, Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Abstracts, and International Aerospace Abstracts in 1978. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication and NASA accession numbers. Subject, personal author, corporate source, contract number, and report/accession number indexes are provided.

  8. The 1979 Ames Research Center Publications: A continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography lists formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports issued by Ames Research Center which were indexed by Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, and International Aerospace Abstracts in 1979. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication, and NASA accession numbers. Subject, Personal Author, Corporate Source, Contract Number, and Report/Accession Number Indexes are provided.

  9. Redesign of Glenn Research Center D1 Flywheel Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Ralph H.; Wagner, Robert C.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Hervol, David S.; Storozuk, Ronald J.; Dever, Timothy P.; Anzalone, Salvatore M.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Konno, Kevin E.; Kenny, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Glenn Research Center has completed the redesign of the D1 flywheel module. The redesign includes a new rotor with a composite rim, motor/generator, touchdown bearings, sensors, and a magnetic actuator. The purpose of the relatively low cost module upgrade is to enable it to continuously operate throughout its speed range of 0 to 60,000 RPM. The module will be used as part of a combined attitude control and bus regulation experiment.

  10. Ecological genetics at the USGS National Wetlands Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Travis, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The Ecological Genetics Program at the USGS National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC) employs state-of-the-art DNA fingerprinting technologies in characterizing critical management aspects of the population biology of species of concern (fig. 1). The overarching themes of this program have been (1) the critical role that genetic diversity plays in maintaining population viability and (2) how management strategies might incorporate genetic information in preventing the decline of desirable species or in controlling the spread of invasive species.

  11. Future Directions in Rotorcraft Technology at Ames Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    being pursued within the Army/NASA Rotorcraft Division. High Lift Airfoils and the Stall Free Rotor Unlike fixed wing aircraft, helicopter rotors have...pitch angle control inputs, a revolutionary new concept will become a reality - the Stall- Free Rotor. The implications for rotorcraft, beyond the...Rotorcraft Algorithm Development and Integrated Control Laws ( RADICL ) program, the U.S. Army, Sikorsky, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, and NASA Ames Research Center

  12. Lewis Research Center space station electric power system test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Martin, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center facilities were developed to support testing of the Space Station Electric Power System. The capabilities and plans for these facilities are described. The three facilities which are required in the Phase C/D testing, the Power Systems Facility, the Space Power Facility, and the EPS Simulation Lab, are described in detail. The responsibilities of NASA Lewis and outside groups in conducting tests are also discussed.

  13. Experimental Data from the Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology

    DOE Data Explorer

    Smith, Richard D.

    The possible roles and importance of proteomics are rapidly growing across essentially all areas of biological research. The precise and comprehensive measurement of levels of expressed proteins and their modified forms can provide new insights into the molecular nature of cell-signaling pathways and networks, the cell cycle, cellular differentiation, and other processes relevant to understanding human health and the progression of various disease states. The ability to characterize protein complexes complements this capability, allowing hypotheses to be tested and the biological system operation to be defined. The Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology is a national user facility established and funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences component of the National Institutes of Health. This Center has been established to serve the biomedical research community by developing and integrating new proteomic technologies for collaborative and service studies, disseminating the new technologies, and training scientists in their use. The Center is housed in DOE’s William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  14. Research and operational applications in multi-center ensemble forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Toth, Z.

    2009-05-01

    The North American Ensemble Forecast System (NAEFS) was built up in 2004 by the Meteorological Service of Canada (MSC), the National Meteorological Service of Mexico (NMSM), and the US National Weather Service (NWS) as an operational multi-center ensemble forecast system. Currently it combines the 20-member MSC and NWS ensembles to form a joint ensemble of 40 members twice a day. The joint ensemble forecast, after bias correction and statistical downscaling, is used to generate a suite of products for CONUS, North America and for other regions of the globe. The THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble (TIGGE) project has been established a few years ago to collect operational global ensemble forecasts from world centers, and distribute to the scientific community, to encourage research leading to the acceleration of improvements in the skill and utility of high impact weather forecasts. TIGGE research is expected to advise the development of the operational NAEFS system and eventually the two projects are expected to converge into a single operational system, the Global Interactive Forecast System (GIFS). This presentation will review recent developments, the current status, and plans related to the TIGGE research and NAEFS operational multi-center ensemble projects.

  15. Concept for the Intermountain Center for Mining Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-06-01

    The Intermountain Center for Mining Research and Development (ICMRD) was established with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as the cornerstone, and with regional universities, mining schools, and the Western mining industry as full members. In aggregate, the members provide the strong mining research and development capabilities and knowledge that are essential to the success of such a research center. The ICMRD is an organization that identifies technical needs, partially funds, and provides project management for research projects. The ICMRD will primarily serve the nine Intermountain States, but will not restrict other regions, research organizations, or academic institutions from membership. The ICMRD's nine primary states are: Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, Alaska, and New Mexico. The business and project management functions of the ICMRD will be located at INL. Research projects may be performed by INL, one of the member research organizations, academic institutions, mining companies/suppliers, or preferably, by a partnership of several of these institutions. Teaming among members will be essential in providing quality R&D. The ICMRD will accomplish its research goals by creating partnerships between the research organizations, federal and state agencies, and the mining industry. The ICMRD will provide project management, technical and financial support, and technology transfer opportunities. The ICMRD, through its associated academic partners, will provide a base for development and testing of mining, metallurgical, and environmental technologies in the laboratory through pilot-scale environments. Through these partnerships, the ICMRD will provide a vehicle to achieve its objectives of developing innovative mining technologies, enhancing the capabilities of the regional mining schools and universities, and improving the global competitiveness of the U.S. mining industry.

  16. Space Chemical Propulsion Test Facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especially encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. An overview of the Lewis test facilities is presented.

  17. The 1991 research and technology report, Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Montgomery, Harry (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Boyle, Charles (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The 1991 Research and Technology Report for Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. Research covered areas such as (1) earth sciences including upper atmosphere, lower atmosphere, oceans, hydrology, and global studies; (2) space sciences including solar studies, planetary studies, Astro-1, gamma ray investigations, and astrophysics; (3) flight projects; (4) engineering including robotics, mechanical engineering, electronics, imaging and optics, thermal and cryogenic studies, and balloons; and (5) ground systems, networks, and communications including data and networks, TDRSS, mission planning and scheduling, and software development and test.

  18. NASA Glenn Research Center Experience with LENR Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1989 NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has performed some small-scale limited experiments that show evidence of effects claimed by some to be evidence of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR). The research at GRC has involved observations and work on measurement techniques for observing the temperature effects in reactions of isotopes of hydrogen with palladium hydrides. The various experiments performed involved loading Pd with gaseous H2 and D2, and exposing Pd thin films to multi-bubble sonoluminescence in regular and deuterated water. An overview of these experiments and their results will be presented.

  19. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology 1993 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Johnson Space Center research and technology accomplishments during fiscal year 1993 are described and principle researchers and technologists are identified as contacts for further information. Each of the four sections gives a summary of overall progress in a major discipline, followed by detailed, illustrated descriptions of significant tasks. The four disciplines are Life Sciences, Human Support Technology, Solar Systems Sciences, and Space Systems Technology. The report is intended for technical and management audiences throughout the NASA and worldwide aerospace community. An index lists project titles, funding codes, and principal investigators.

  20. NASA Glenn Research Center Experience with "LENR Phenomenon"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1989 NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has performed some small-scale limited experiments that show evidence of effects claimed by some to be evidence of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR). The research at GRC has involved observations and work on measurement techniques for observing the temperature effects in reactions of isotopes of hydrogen with palladium hydrides. The various experiments performed involved loading Pd with gaseous H2 and D2, and exposing Pd thin films to multi-bubble sonoluminescence in regular and deuterated water. An overview of these experiments and their results will be presented.

  1. NASA Space Weather Center Services: Potential for Space Weather Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Masha; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Space Weather Center's primary objective is to provide the latest space weather information and forecasting for NASA's robotic missions and its partners and to bring space weather knowledge to the public. At the same time, the tools and services it possesses can be invaluable for research purposes. Here we show how our archive and real-time modeling of space weather events can aid research in a variety of ways, with different classification criteria. We will list and discuss major CME events, major geomagnetic storms, and major SEP events that occurred during the years 2010 - 2012. Highlights of major tools/resources will be provided.

  2. Flight researh at NASA Ames Research Center: A test pilot's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1987-01-01

    In 1976 NASA elected to assign responsibility for each of the various flight regimes to individual research centers. The NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California was designated lead center for vertical and short takeoff and landing, V/STOL research. The three most recent flight research airplanes being flown at the center are discussed from the test pilot's perspective: the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft; the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft; and the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft.

  3. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC) Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.B.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Field Research Center (FRC) to support the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the DOE Headquarters Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Office of Science.

  4. The evaluation of the individual impact factor of researchers and research centers using the RC algorithm.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Villafáfila, Amelia; Ramos-Brieva, Jesus A

    2015-01-01

    The RC algorithm quantitatively evaluates the personal impact factor of the scientific production of isolated researchers. The authors propose an adaptation of RC to evaluate the personal impact factor of research centers, hospitals and other research groups. Thus, these could be classified according to the accredited impact of the results of their scientific work between researchers of the same scientific area. This could be useful for channelling budgets and grants for research.

  5. Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, Betty Kay; Alton, Anita Jean; Andrews, Shirley H; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn; Casey, Denise; Martin, Sheryl A; Mills, Marissa; Nylander, Kim; Wyrick, Judy M; Drell, Dr. Daniel; Weatherwax, Sharlene; Carruthers, Julie

    2006-08-01

    In his Advanced Energy Initiative announced in January 2006, President George W. Bush committed the nation to new efforts to develop alternative sources of energy to replace imported oil and fossil fuels. Developing cost-effective and energy-efficient methods of producing renewable alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass and solar-derived biofuels will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy production methods will not suffice. The Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers will be dedicated to fundamental research on microbe and plant systems with the goal of developing knowledge that will advance biotechnology-based strategies for biofuels production. The aim is to spur substantial progress toward cost-effective production of biologically based renewable energy sources. This document describes the rationale for the establishment of the centers and their objectives in light of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission and goals. Developing energy-efficient and cost-effective methods of producing alternative fuels such as cellulosic ethanol from biomass will require transformational breakthroughs in science and technology. Incremental improvements in current bioenergy-production methods will not suffice. The focus on microbes (for cellular mechanisms) and plants (for source biomass) fundamentally exploits capabilities well known to exist in the microbial world. Thus 'proof of concept' is not required, but considerable basic research into these capabilities remains an urgent priority. Several developments have converged in recent years to suggest that systems biology research into microbes and plants promises solutions that will overcome critical roadblocks on the path to cost-effective, large-scale production of cellulosic ethanol and other renewable energy from biomass. The ability to rapidly sequence the DNA of any organism is a critical part of these new capabilities, but it is

  6. City of Faith Medical and Research Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The gold towers of the City of Faith command the viewer's attention as they soar into the Tulsa sky. Built by Evangelist Oral Roberts, the City of Faith combines a 60-story clinic and diagnostic center, a 30-story full-service hospital and a 20-story research center on one 80-acre site adjacent to the Oral Roberts University campus. Due in part to their futuristic architectural features, the campus and the City of Faith are one of the top tourist attractions in Oklahoma. Construction began in early 1978. The clinic, first opened in June 1981 with nine physicians, is now staffed with more than 80, all with faculty appointments to the Oral Roberts School of Medicine. The hospital accepted its first patient in November, 1981 and is currently certified for 294 beds (final plans call for a total of 777). The research center began operations last June and focuses on cancer, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes and geriatrics. Built entirely through contributions from followers of the Oral Roberts Ministries, the debt-free City of Faith is expected to cost more than $500 million when completed in 1988.

  7. 77 FR 40590 - Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects; Burn Model Systems Centers; Correction AGENCY: Office of Special... Information: National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability...

  8. 76 FR 37090 - Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... research, demonstration projects, training, and related activities, including international activities; to... Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program AGENCY: Office of... for two Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs). SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary...

  9. 76 FR 12717 - Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Field Initiated (FI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Field Initiated (FI) Projects; Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers...

  10. Promoting one health: the University of Missouri Research Center for Human/Animal Interaction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    The University of Missouri's College of Veterinary Medicine is home to the Research Center for Human-Animal Interaction. This center uniquely addresses a growing area of research that focuses on how the human-animal bond impacts health in people and animals. This article highlights the One Health basis for the center, several research projects, and future goals for the center.

  11. A Survey of Research Performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Impact Dynamics Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K. E.; Fasanella, E. L.

    2003-01-01

    The Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) is a 240-ft-high gantry structure located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The facility was originally built in 1963 as a lunar landing simulator, allowing the Apollo astronauts to practice lunar landings under realistic conditions. The IDRF was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985 based on its significant contributions to the Apollo Program. In 1972, the facility was converted to a full-scale crash test facility for light aircraft and rotorcraft. Since that time, the IDRF has been used to perform a wide variety of impact tests on full-scale aircraft and structural components in support of the General Aviation (GA) aircraft industry, the US Department of Defense, the rotorcraft industry, and NASA in-house aeronautics and space research programs. The objective of this paper is to describe most of the major full-scale crash test programs that were performed at this unique, world-class facility since 1974. The past research is divided into six sub-topics: the civil GA aircraft test program, transport aircraft test program, military test programs, space test programs, basic research, and crash modeling and simulation.

  12. The Wetland and Aquatic Research Center strategic science plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2017-02-02

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Wetland and Aquatic Research Center (WARC) has two primary locations (Gainesville, Florida, and Lafayette, Louisiana) and field stations throughout the southeastern United States and Caribbean. WARC’s roots are in U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and National Park Service research units that were brought into the USGS as the Biological Research Division in 1996. Founded in 2015, WARC was created from the merger of two long-standing USGS biology science Centers—the Southeast Ecological Science Center and the National Wetlands Research Center—to bring together expertise in biology, ecology, landscape science, geospatial applications, and decision support in order to address issues nationally and internationally. WARC scientists apply their expertise to a variety of wetland and aquatic research and monitoring issues that require coordinated, integrated efforts to better understand natural environments. By increasing basic understanding of the biology of important species and broader ecological and physiological processes, this research provides information to policymakers and aids managers in their stewardship of natural resources and in regulatory functions.This strategic science plan (SSP) was developed to guide WARC research during the next 5–10 years in support of Department of the Interior (DOI) partnering bureaus such as the USFWS, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, as well as other Federal, State, and local natural resource management agencies. The SSP demonstrates the alignment of the WARC goals with the USGS mission areas, associated programs, and other DOI initiatives. The SSP is necessary for workforce planning and, as such, will be used as a guide for future needs for personnel. The SSP also will be instrumental in developing internal funding priorities and in promoting WARC’s capabilities to both external cooperators and other groups within the USGS.

  13. Chemistry in the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization. An Energy Frontier Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Golisz, Suzanne R.; Gunnoe, T. Brent; Goddard, William A.; Groves, John T.; Periana, Roy A.

    2010-12-02

    Selective catalysts that activate small molecules such as hydrocarbons, dioxygen, water, carbon dioxide and dihydrogen are central to new technologies for the use of alternative energy sources. For example, controlled hydrocarbon functionalization can lead to high impact technologies, but such catalysts require a level of molecular control beyond current means. The Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization facilitates collaborations among research groups in catalysis, materials, electrochemistry, bioinorganic chemistry and quantum mechanics to develop, validate and optimize new methods to rearrange the bonds of hydrocarbons, activate and transform water and carbon dioxide, implement enzymatic strategies into synthetic systems and design optimal environments for catalysis.

  14. Bureau of the Census Center for International Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, Nina Pane

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the organization and activities of the Center for International Research at the Bureau of the Census. There is a formal publication exchange program with other government's statistical programs. This has resulted in the Center's collection being one of the world's largest in the area of international census and demographic information. Foreign statistical publications are in three libraries, one being dedicated to the former Soviet Union and one to the Peoples Republic of China. In addition to the libraries there are two computerized data bases. The International data base is a source of demographic and socio-economic statistics for all countries of the world. The second data base is the HIV/AIDS Surveillance Data Base which contains information related to the publication and dissemination of the results of seroprevalence surveys.

  15. Overview of research in progress at the Center of Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, Brian A.

    1993-01-01

    The Center of Excellence (COE) was created nine years ago to facilitate active collaboration between the scientists at Ames Research Center and the Stanford Psychology Department. Significant interchange of ideas and personnel continues between Stanford and participating groups at NASA-Ames; the COE serves its function well. This progress report is organized into sections divided by project. Each section contains a list of investigators, a background statement, progress report, and a proposal for work during the coming year. The projects are: Algorithms for development and calibration of visual systems, Visually optimized image compression, Evaluation of advanced piloting displays, Spectral representations of color, Perception of motion in man and machine, Automation and decision making, and Motion information used for navigation and control.

  16. The Center for Aerospace Research: A NASA Center of Excellence at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and outcomes of our research and educational programs at NASA-CORE in NCA&TSU. The goal of the center was to establish a quality aerospace research base and to develop an educational program to increase the participation of minority faculty and students in the areas of aerospace engineering. The major accomplishments of this center in the first year are summarized in terms of three different areas, namely, the center's research programs area, the center's educational programs area, and the center's management area. In the center's research programs area, we focus on developing capabilities needed to support the development of the aerospace plane and high speed civil transportation system technologies. In the educational programs area, we developed an aerospace engineering option program ready for university approval.

  17. Space technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Rodrigues, Annette T.

    1990-01-01

    The major space research and technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center are divided into five categories: General Purpose, Life Support, Computer-Based Simulation, High Energy, and the Space Exploraton Test Facilities. The paper discusses selected facilities within each of the five categories and discusses some of the major programs in which these facilities have been involved. Special attention is given to the 20-G Man-Rated Centrifuge, the Human Research Facility, the Plant Crop Growth Facility, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, the Arc-Jet Complex and Hypersonic Test Facility, the Infrared Detector and Cryogenic Test Facility, and the Mars Wind Tunnel. Each facility is described along with its objectives, test parameter ranges, and major current programs and applications.

  18. NASA Lewis Research Center Workshop on Forced Response in Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, George L. (Compiler); Murthy, Durbha V. (Compiler); Morel, Michael (Compiler); Hoyniak, Dan (Compiler); Gauntner, Jim W. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    A summary of the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Workshop on Forced Response in Turbomachinery in August, 1993 is presented. It was sponsored by the following NASA organizations: Structures, Space Propulsion Technology, and Propulsion Systems Divisions of NASA LeRC and the Aeronautics and Advanced Concepts & Technology Offices of NASA Headquarters. In addition, the workshop was held in conjunction with the GUIde (Government/Industry/Universities) Consortium on Forced Response. The workshop was specifically designed to receive suggestions and comments from industry on current research at NASA LeRC in the area of forced vibratory response of turbomachinery blades which includes both computational and experimental approaches. There were eight presentations and a code demonstration. Major areas of research included aeroelastic response, steady and unsteady fluid dynamics, mistuning, and corresponding experimental work.

  19. Development and Testing of the Glenn Research Center Visitor's Center Grid-Tied Photovoltaic Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed, installed, and tested a 12 kW DC grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) power system at the GRC Visitor s Center. This system utilizes a unique ballast type roof mount for installing the photovoltaic panels on the roof of the Visitor s Center with no alterations or penetrations to the roof. The PV system has generated in excess of 15000 kWh since operation commenced in August 2008. The PV system is providing power to the GRC grid for use by all. Operation of the GRC Visitor s Center PV system has been completely trouble free. A grid-tied PV power system is connected directly to the utility distribution grid. Facility power can be obtained from the utility system as normal. The PV system is synchronized with the utility system to provide power for the facility, and excess power is provided to the utility. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via nontraditional partners. GRC personnel glean valuable experience with PV power systems that are directly applicable to various space power systems, and provides valuable space program test data. PV power systems help to reduce harmful emissions and reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels. Power generated by the PV system reduces the GRC utility demand, and the surplus power aids the community. Present global energy concerns reinforce the need for the development of alternative energy systems. Modern PV panels are readily available, reliable, efficient, and economical with a life expectancy of at least 25 years. Modern electronics has been the enabling technology behind grid-tied power systems, making them safe, reliable, efficient, and economical with a life expectancy of at least 25 years. Based upon the success of the GRC Visitor s Center PV system, additional PV power system expansion at GRC is under consideration. The GRC Visitor s Center grid-tied PV power system was successfully designed and developed which served to validate the basic principles

  20. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2013-06-14

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Universal Interfaces and Information Technology Access under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  1. NASA Lewis Research Center's Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemets, Steve A.; Ehlers, Robert C.; Parrott, Edith

    1995-01-01

    The Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility (PCMTF) in the Engine Research Building (ERB) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is one of two unique combustor facilities that provide a nonvitiated air supply to two test stands, where the air can be used for research combustor testing and high-temperature materials testing. Stand A is used as a research combustor stand, whereas stand B is used for cyclic and survivability tests of aerospace materials at high temperatures. Both stands can accommodate in-house and private industry research programs. The PCMTF is capable of providing up to 30 lb/s (pps) of nonvitiated, 450 psig combustion air at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1150 g F. A 5000 gal tank located outdoors adjacent to the test facility can provide jet fuel at a pressure of 900 psig and a flow rate of 11 gal/min (gpm). Gaseous hydrogen from a 70,000 cu ft (CF) tuber is also available as a fuel. Approximately 500 gpm of cooling water cools the research hardware and exhaust gases. Such cooling is necessary because the air stream reaches temperatures as high as 3000 deg F. The PCMTF provides industry and Government with a facility for studying the combustion process and for obtaining valuable test information on advanced materials. This report describes the facility's support systems and unique capabilities.

  2. Surface modification and characterization Collaborative Research Center at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Surface Modification and Characterization Collaborative Research Center (SMAC/CRC) is a unique facility for the alteration and characterization of the near-surface properties of materials. The SMAC/CRC facility is equipped with particle accelerators and high-powered lasers which can be used to improve the physical, electrical, and/or chemical properties of solids and to create unique new materials not possible to obtain with conventional ''equilibrium'' processing techniques. Surface modification is achieved using such techniques as ion implantation doping, ion beam mixing, laser mixing, ion deposition, and laser annealing.

  3. Langley Research Center Metrology Program status for fiscal year 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    The status of the Langley Research Center's metrology program for fiscal year 1987 is presented. The NASA Metrology Information System, which was operational for the entire year, provided the majority of performance data describing work analysis, turnaround time, out-of-tolerance instrument data, and other instrument service data. Calibration system development, equipment replacing and updating, status of last year's planned objectives, and Reference Standard certification requirements are described. The status of the LaRC voltage and resistance measurement assurance program and the agency-wide resistance program are reviewed. Progress on fiscal year 1987 objectives is discussed and fiscal year 1988 objectives are stated.

  4. Application of CFD in aeronautics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksymiuk, Catherine M.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Vandalsem, William R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Ames Research Center has expanded to address a broad range of aeronautical problems, including wind tunnel support, flight test support, design, and analysis. Balancing the requirements of each new problem against the available resources - software, hardware, time, and expertise - is critical to the effective use of CFD. Several case studies of recent applications highlight the depth of CFD capability at Ames, the tradeoffs involved in various approaches, and lessons learned in the use of CFD as an engineering tool.

  5. Telecommuting (Work-At-Home) at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinidhi, Saragur M.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents a study in evaluating the viability of providing a work-at-home (telecommuting) program for Lewis Research Center's corporate employees using Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN). Case studies have been presented for a range of applications from casual data access to interactive access. The network performance of telemedia applications were studied against future requirements for such level of remote connectivity. Many of the popular ISDN devices were characterized for network and service functionality. A set of recommendations to develop a telecommuting policy have been proposed.

  6. Cancer Research Institute, Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) DOE/EA-0975, evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the Cancer Research Institute (CRI) at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) on its campus in Loma Linda, California. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This document describes alternatives, the affected environment and environmental consequences of the proposed action.

  7. Infrared Detector Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Sulima, O. V.; Amzajerdian, F.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared detector development and characterization at NASA Langley Research Center will be reviewed. These detectors were intended for ground, airborne, and space borne remote sensing applications. Discussion will be focused on recently developed single-element infrared detector and future development of near-infrared focal plane arrays (FPA). The FPA will be applied to next generation space-based instruments. These activities are based on phototransistor and avalanche photodiode technologies, which offer high internal gain and relatively low noise-equivalent-power. These novel devices will improve the sensitivity of active remote sensing instruments while eliminating the need for a high power laser transmitter.

  8. Hypersonic engine seal development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is developing advanced seal concepts and sealing technology for advanced combined cycle ramjet/scramjet engines being designed for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). Technologies are being developed for both the dynamic seals that seal the sliding interfaces between articulating engine panels and sidewalls, and for the static seals that seal the heat exchanger to back-up structure interfaces. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the candidate engine seal concepts, seal material assessments, and unique test facilities used to assess the leakage and thermal performance of the seal concepts.

  9. The new FIRE cloud lidar at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Jose M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Vaughn, M. A.; Kent, G.; Hunt, W. H.; Fuller, W. H.; Rouse, B. R.; Dubinsky, R.

    1990-01-01

    Using the Langley Aircraft Lidar for cirrus cloud observations at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia is overkill both in terms of the actual lidar and the people required to run the system. A small lidar system to be used specifically for cloud probing was designed and constructed at Langley in 1987. This lidar is presently being used to collect the FIRE ETO (Extended Time Observation) data at Langley. A description of the new FIRE Cloud Lidar System is presented. The data collected by this lidar is discussed as well as some of the cloud statistics emerging from the data. A brief synopsis of system performance is also given.

  10. Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  11. 77 FR 34359 - Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Brain Injury Model Systems Centers AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services... and Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRPs)-- Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers (TBIMS... Brain Injury Model Systems Centers priority is from the notice of final priority for this...

  12. 76 FR 32971 - Proposed Priority for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... and Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP)--Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and... notice proposes a priority for a center on knowledge translation for disability and rehabilitation... This notice contains one proposed priority. Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability...

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Program at NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed and discussed. The technical elements of the CFD Program are listed and briefly discussed. These elements include algorithm research, research and pilot code development, scientific visualization, advanced surface representation, volume grid generation, and numerical optimization. Next, the discipline of CFD is briefly discussed and related to other areas of research at NASA Ames including experimental fluid dynamics, computer science research, computational chemistry, and numerical aerodynamic simulation. These areas combine with CFD to form a larger area of research, which might collectively be called computational technology. The ultimate goal of computational technology research at NASA Ames is to increase the physical understanding of the world in which we live, solve problems of national importance, and increase the technical capabilities of the aerospace community. Next, the major programs at NASA Ames that either use CFD technology or perform research in CFD are listed and discussed. Briefly, this list includes turbulent/transition physics and modeling, high-speed real gas flows, interdisciplinary research, turbomachinery demonstration computations, complete aircraft aerodynamics, rotorcraft applications, powered lift flows, high alpha flows, multiple body aerodynamics, and incompressible flow applications. Some of the individual problems actively being worked in each of these areas is listed to help define the breadth or extent of CFD involvement in each of these major programs. State-of-the-art examples of various CFD applications are presented to highlight most of these areas. The main emphasis of this portion of the presentation is on examples which will not otherwise be treated at this conference by the individual presentations. Finally, a list of principal current limitations and expected future directions is given.

  14. Aging research and education centers in the United States: a compendium.

    PubMed

    Steinecke, A; Ciok, A E

    1997-10-01

    U.S. centers and institutes for research and education devoted to aging are listed. These lists can serve as a starting point for building a more comprehensive reference resource. The first list, U.S. Aging Centers and Institutes, is a general guide to centers or institutes that combine research and education. Subsequent lists are of centers that share missions and funding sources: Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers (GRECCs); Exploratory Centers for Research on Health Promotion in Older Minority Populations; Centers on the Demography of Aging (CDAs); Alzheimer's Disease Centers (ADCs); Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Centers (OAICs); Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in Basic Biology of Aging; and Roybal Centers for Research on Applied Gerontology. It is hoped that those who work in geriatrics and gerontology in academic medicine will develop a comprehensive system for collecting, updating, and disseminating complete information about the work being done on aging.

  15. Recent Cycle Time Reduction at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegelman, Jerome T.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has been engaged in an effort to reduce wind tunnel test cycle time in support of Agency goals and to satisfy the wind tunnel testing needs of the commercial and military aerospace communities. LaRC has established the Wind Tunnel Enterprise (WTE), with goals of reducing wind tunnel test cycle time by an order of magnitude by 2002, and by two orders of magnitude by 2010. The WTE also plans to meet customer expectations for schedule integrity, as well as data accuracy and quality assurance. The WTE has made progress towards these goals over the last year with a focused effort on technological developments balanced by attention to process improvements. This paper presents a summary of several of the WTE activities over the last year that are related to test cycle time reductions at the Center. Reducing wind tunnel test cycle time, defined here as the time between the freezing of loft lines and delivery of test data, requires that the relationship between high productivity and data quality assurance be considered. The efforts have focused on all of the drivers for test cycle time reduction, including process centered improvements, facility upgrades, technological improvements to enhance facility readiness and productivity, as well as advanced measurement techniques. The application of internet tools and computer modeling of facilities to allow a virtual presence of the customer team is also presented.

  16. Collaborative Mission Design at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, Kerry M.; Allen, B. Danette; Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed and tested two facilities dedicated to increasing efficiency in key mission design processes, including payload design, mission planning, and implementation plan development, among others. The Integrated Design Center (IDC) is a state-of-the-art concurrent design facility which allows scientists and spaceflight engineers to produce project designs and mission plans in a real-time collaborative environment, using industry-standard physics-based development tools and the latest communication technology. The Mission Simulation Lab (MiSL), a virtual reality (VR) facility focused on payload and project design, permits engineers to quickly translate their design and modeling output into enhanced three-dimensional models and then examine them in a realistic full-scale virtual environment. The authors were responsible for envisioning both facilities and turning those visions into fully operational mission design resources at LaRC with multiple advanced capabilities and applications. In addition, the authors have created a synergistic interface between these two facilities. This combined functionality is the Interactive Design and Simulation Center (IDSC), a meta-facility which offers project teams a powerful array of highly advanced tools, permitting them to rapidly produce project designs while maintaining the integrity of the input from every discipline expert on the project. The concept-to-flight mission support provided by IDSC has shown improved inter- and intra-team communication and a reduction in the resources required for proposal development, requirements definition, and design effort.

  17. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a)...

  18. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a)...

  19. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a)...

  20. Research & Development 100 (R&D 100) NASA Glenn Research Center, Makel Engineering, Inc,

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Research & Development 100 (R&D 100) NASA Glenn Research Center, Makel Engineering, Inc, Case Western Reserve Univ, Ohio State Univ. for the development of Multi-Parameter, MicroSensor-Based Low False Alarm Fire Detection System (MMFDS) Award Plaque

  1. Computers in aeronautics and space research at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This brochure presents a general discussion of the role of computers in aerospace research at NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC). Four particular areas of computer applications are addressed: computer modeling and simulation, computer assisted engineering, data acquisition and analysis, and computer controlled testing.

  2. Head Start Evaluation and Research Center, Boston University. Report of Research, September, 1966-August, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfunkel, Frank; And Others

    This document is a report of research conducted from September 1966 to August 1967 by the Head Start Evaluation and Research Center of Boston University. Eleven studies and projects are reported, many of them in preliminary or incomplete form because either they are ongoing studies or the data analysis is not finished. The 11 studies contain six…

  3. The Role of Computers in Research and Development at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieseman, Carol D. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document is a compilation of presentations given at a workshop on the role cf computers in research and development at the Langley Research Center. The objectives of the workshop were to inform the Langley Research Center community of the current software systems and software practices in use at Langley. The workshop was organized in 10 sessions: Software Engineering; Software Engineering Standards, methods, and CASE tools; Solutions of Equations; Automatic Differentiation; Mosaic and the World Wide Web; Graphics and Image Processing; System Design Integration; CAE Tools; Languages; and Advanced Topics.

  4. Deliberative Engagement Methods for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.

    PubMed

    Morain, Stephanie R; Whicher, Danielle M; Kass, Nancy E; Faden, Ruth R

    2017-04-03

    There is growing emphasis on eliciting and incorporating stakeholder perspectives into health research and public policy development. The deliberative engagement session (DES) method provides one approach to elicit informed preferences from patients and other stakeholders on policy issues. DES involves day-long interaction with participants, including short plenary presentations followed by small group discussion. While interest in DES methods is expanding, practical guidance for researchers on this method remains limited. In this paper, we describe the DES method and its contemporary relevance for health policy research, illustrate how to conduct a DES using an example of a recent patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) study with which we were involved, and discuss strengths and challenges of using this approach. DES methods generate rich data, reduce the risk of eliciting uniformed preferences or non-attitudes, and increase the likelihood of eliciting informed, reflective preferences. However, they are resource-intensive, and thus generally require trading away a larger, more representative sample. Despite these limitations, the DES method, when carefully designed, is well-suited for engaging stakeholders in research on complex health policy issues.

  5. A Student-Centered Astronomical Research Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell; Johnson, Jolyon; Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady; Buchheim, obert; Harshaw, Richard; Kenney, John; Collins, Dwight; Rowe, David; Brewer, Mark; Estrada, Reed; Estrada, Chris; Gillette, Sean; Ridgely, John; McNab, Christine; Freed, Rachel; Wallen, Vera

    2016-05-01

    For over a decade, students from Cuesta College and number of high schools have engaged in astronomical research during one-term seminars. A community of practice - consisting of students, educators, and astronomers - has formed that is centered on supporting the students' astronomical research. The seminar has recently adopted distance education technology and automated telescopes in a hybrid form of on-line and inperson collaborations between students, educators, and astronomers. This hybridization is not only resulting in new areas of growth and opportunity, but has created a number of challenges. For example, as more schools joined this seminar, standardized teaching materials such as a textbook and self-paced, online learning units had to be developed. Automated telescopes devoted to expanding student research opportunities within this community of practice are being brought on line by Concordia University and the Boyce Research Initiatives and Educational Foundation. The Institute for Student Astronomical Research supports this growing community in many ways including maintaining a website and editing books of student papers published through the Collins Foundation Press.

  6. Assessment of Electromagnetic Fields at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficklen, Carter B.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of ElectroMagnetic Fields (EMF) completed at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars Program. This project was performed to determine levels of electromagnetic fields, determine the significance of the levels present, and determine a plan to reduce electromagnetic field exposure, if necessary. This report also describes the properties of electromagnetic fields and their interaction with humans. The results of three major occupational epidemiological studies is presented to determine risks posed to humans by EMF exposure. The data for this report came from peer-reviewed journal articles and government publications pertaining to the health effects of electromagnetic fields.

  7. Space chemical propulsion test facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especiallly encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. This paper presents an overview of the Lewis test facilities. These facilities are clustered into three test areas: the Rocket Engine Test Facilities (RETF), the Rocket Laboratory (RL), and the Cryogenic Components Laboratory (CCL).

  8. Life support systems research at the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The bioregenerative life support systems research at Johnson Space Center focuses on the use of lunar regolith as a plant growth medium. Current dissolution experiments are being conducted to ascertain the response of lunar regolith to various solvents and weathering environments. The transformation of lunar minerals into minerals such as zeolites which would be more conducive to plant growth is also investigated. A study is currently underway to examine the ability of zeolite/apatite mixtures to provide N, P, and K through dissolution and ion exchange. The development and characterization of simulated lunar regolith for preliminary experimentation are also discussed. The life support systems technology used on the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Shuttle missions is reviewed and current research on regenerative life support systems technology for potential use in Space Station Freedom is discussed.

  9. Helicopter transmission testing at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Coy, John J.

    1987-01-01

    The helicopter has evolved into a highly valuable air mobile vehicle for both military and civilian needs. The helicopter transmission requires advanced studies to develop a technology base for future rotorcraft advances. A joint helicopter transmission research program between the NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command has existed since 1970. Program goals are to reduce weight and noise and to increase life and reliability. The current experimental activities at Lewis consist of full-scale helicopter transmission testing, a base effort in gearing technology, and a future effort in noise reduction technology. The experimental facilities at Lewis for helicopter transmission testing are described. A description of each of the rigs is presented along with some significant results and near-term plans.

  10. The concept of externality: Implications for TVA Environmental Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, T.H.

    1994-06-01

    Pollution of the environment is a result of the economic activities of production and consumption. And although the market system is touted as the superior method of organizing and operating an economic system, society frequently is dissatisfied with some of the side effects. In these cases of market failure, a cry for intervention often is raised to obtain more socially-desirable solutions. Environmental pollution is one symptom of market failure. If the TVA Environmental Research Center is to focus on defining solutions to environmental problems and designing policy options for implementing such solutions, its efforts should benefit from an understanding of why the market fails and how it may be adjusted to produce more socially-desirable results. The purposes of this report are to: (1) promote an appreciation for and understanding of the concept of externality; (2) demonstrate the utility of the concept in the design and packaging of policy and technology for improved environmental performance; (3) provide a brief summary of the externality valuation issue currently being debated by the electric power industry; and (4) identify environmental research and development agenda opportunities or strategic considerations suggested for the Center by this review.

  11. Activities of the Structures Division, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Lewis Research Center, Structures Division's 1990 Annual Report is to give a brief, but comprehensive, review of the technical accomplishments of the Division during the past calendar year. The report is organized topically to match the Center's Strategic Plan. Over the years, the Structures Division has developed the technology base necessary for improving the future of aeronautical and space propulsion systems. In the future, propulsion systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance. Achieving these goals is complex and challenging. Our approach has been to work cooperatively with both industry and universities to develop the technology necessary for state-of-the-art advancement in aeronautical and space propulsion systems. The Structures Division consists of four branches: Structural Mechanics, Fatigue and Fracture, Structural Dynamics, and Structural Integrity. This publication describes the work of the four branches by three topic areas of Research: (1) Basic Discipline; (2) Aeropropulsion; and (3) Space Propulsion. Each topic area is further divided into the following: (1) Materials; (2) Structural Mechanics; (3) Life Prediction; (4) Instruments, Controls, and Testing Techniques; and (5) Mechanisms. The publication covers 78 separate topics with a bibliography containing 159 citations. We hope you will find the publication interesting as well as useful.

  12. Challenges and Lessons Learned From a Prevention Research Center Partnership.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Lesley; Northrup, Karen; Wittberg, Richard

    2017-03-01

    For more than a decade, the West Virginia Prevention Research Center, Mid-Ohio Valley Health Department, and the Wood County Schools have built and sustained a partnership to reduce health disparities and promote population health. Specifically, this partnership has contributed significantly to the peer-reviewed literature on children's physical activity, fitness, and academic achievement, as well as identifying possible areas for physical activity interventions (within the school and community settings) that would improve health and academic outcomes. This case study describes the partnership among a University Prevention Research Center, a local health department, and a local school system. In the description of the partnership, this paper sequentially explores characteristics of the partnership that were advantageous or challenging over time. It details the interface among state and local partner interest, resources, and goals all directed toward enhancing children's physical activity, fitness, cardiovascular risk, and academic improvement. The paper concludes with lessons learned that may contribute to the science and practice of multilevel collaborations in child health.

  13. The Rise of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers

    SciTech Connect

    DALE,BRUCE C.; MOY,TIMOTHY D.

    2000-09-01

    Federally funded research and development centers (FFRDCS) area unique class of research and development (R and D) facilities that share aspects of private and public ownership. Some FFRDCS have been praised as national treasures, but FFRDCS have also been the focus of much criticism through the years. This paper traces the history of FFRDCS through four periods: (1) the World War II era, which saw the birth of federal R and D centers that would eventually become FFRDCS; (2) the early Cold War period, which exhibited a proliferation of FFRDCS despite their unclear legislative status and growing tension with an increasingly capable and assertive defense industry, (3) there-evaluation and retrenchment of FFRDCS in the 1960s and early 1970s, which resulted in a dramatic decline in the number of FFRDCS; and (4) the definition and codification of the FFRDC entity in the late 1970s and 1980s, when Congress and the executive branch worked together to formalize regulations to control FFRDCS. The paper concludes with observations on the status of FFRDCS at the end of the twentieth century.

  14. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  15. Dryden Flight Research Center Critical Chain Project Management Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Dennis O.

    2012-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 2011 Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) implemented a new project management system called Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM). Recent NASA audits have found that the Dryden workforce is strained under increasing project demand and that multi-tasking has been carried to a whole new level at Dryden. It is very common to have an individual work on 10 different projects during a single pay period. Employee surveys taken at Dryden have identified work/life balance as the number one issue concerning employees. Further feedback from the employees indicated that project planning is the area needing the most improvement. In addition, employees have been encouraged to become more innovative, improve job skills, and seek ways to improve overall job efficiency. In order to deal with these challenges, DFRC management decided to adopt the CCPM system that is specifically designed to operate in a resource constrained multi-project environment. This paper will discuss in detail the rationale behind the selection of CCPM and the goals that will be achieved through this implementation. The paper will show how DFRC is tailoring the CCPM system to the flight research environment as well as laying out the implementation strategy. Results of the ongoing implementation will be discussed as well as change management challenges and organizational cultural changes. Finally this paper will present some recommendations on how this system could be used by selected NASA projects or centers.

  16. Plasma Propulsion Research at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehy, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is pursuing a range of research efforts aimed at identifying and developing new technologies for primary spacecraft propulsion. Efficient high-power electric propulsion (Ep) thrusters are a particular area of emphasis; these would enable the relatively rapid transit of large payloads about the solar system for unmanned or manned science and exploration. Such a mission would make heavy demands on the propulsion system, which may be required to run reliably for several years at a specific impulse approaching 10,OOO s with an efficiency of turning electrical power into jet power of at least 70%. The transit time to a destination scales approximately inversely with the cube root of the specific power, which is the ratio of jet power to power-plant mass. Consequently, reducing a trip time by half requires roughly an eight-fold increase in specific power. Given a renewed NASA commitment to space nuclear power, developing efficient EP thrusters with high jet power (> 100 kW) would seem to provide the most direct means of significantly increasing the specific power and hence reducing trip times. In particular, electromagnetic devices, with their high inherent thrust densities, should be better suited to high power applications than thrusters which depend exclusively on electrostatic forces for propellant acceleration.

  17. Research and technology, fiscal year 1986, Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is continuing its vigorous efforts in space-related research and technology. Extensive activities in advanced studies have led to the approval of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle as a new start. Significant progress was made in definition studies of liquid rocket engine systems for future space transportation needs and the conceptualization of advanced laucnch vehicles. The space systems definition studies have brought the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Gravity Probe-B to a high degree of maturity. Both are ready for project implementation. Also discussed include significant advances in low gravity sciences, solar terrestrial physics, high energy astrophysics, atmospheric sciences, propulsion systems, and on the critical element of the Space Shuttle Main Engine in particular. The goals of improving the productivity of high-cost repetitive operations on reusable transportation systems, and extending the useful life of such systems are examined. The research and technology highlighted provides a foundation for progress on the Hubble Space Telescope, the Space Station, all elements of the Space Transportation System, and the many other projects assigned to this Center.

  18. Langley Research Center - Soluble Imide (LaRC-SI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stang, David

    1995-01-01

    This report is about experimenting and developing uses for the new thermal plastic developed by Dr. Robert Bryant called the 'Langley Research Center - Soluble Imide' (LaRC-SI). The three developments are: the use of the LaRC-SI as a dielectric for thin film sensors, as an adhesive to place diamonds on surfaces to increase thermal conductivity, and as an intermediate layer to allow the placement of metal on aluminum nitride. The LaRC-SI was developed by Dr. Robert G. Bryant, a chemical engineer at NASA Langley Research Center. The unique properties of this material is that it is an amorphous thermoplastic. This means that it can be reformed at elevated temperature and pressures. It can be applied in the form of a spray, spin, dip coating, paint, or spread with a doctors blade. The LaRC-SI has excellent adhesive and dielectric properties. It can also be recycled. Potential applications for this material are resin for mechanical parts such as gears, bearings and valves, advanced composites like carbon fiber, high strength adhesives, thin film circuits, and as a dielectric film for placing electrical components on conductive materials.

  19. 70 FR 11245 - Limited Competition for Supplemental Grants for Centers for Education and Research (CERTs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-03-08

    ... regarding therapeutics, refined research methodologies, and developed collaborative research resources. They... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Limited Competition for Supplemental Grants for Centers for Education and Research (CERTs) AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,...

  20. UAS Related Activities at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center is completing its refurbishment and initial flights of one the pre-production Global Hawk aircraft it received from the U.S. Air Force. NASA Dryden has an agreement with the Global Hawk s manufacturer, Northrop Grumman, to partner in the refurbishment and flight operations of the vehicles. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has also partnered on the project and is assisting NASA with project management and pilot responsibilities for the aircraft. NASA and NOAA will be using the Global Hawks to conduct earth science research. The earth science community is increasing utilizing UAS of all sizes and capabilities to collect important data on a variety of issues including important global climate change issues. To pursue the data collection needs of the science community there is a growing demand for international collaboration with respect to operating UAS in global airspace. Operations of NASA s Ikhana aircraft continued this past year. The Ikhana is a modified Predator B UAS. A UAS dedicated to research at NASA Dryden is the X-48B blended wing body research aircraft. Flight tests with the 500- pound, remotely piloted test vehicle are now in a block 4 phase involving parameter identification and maneuvers to research the limits of the engine in stall situations. NASA s participation in the blended wing body research effort is focused on fundamental, advanced flight dynamics and structural design concepts within the Subsonic Fixed Wing project, part of the Fundamental Aeronautics program managed through NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. Potential benefits of the aircraft include increased volume for carrying capacity, efficient aerodynamics for reduced fuel burn and possibly significant reductions in noise due to propulsion integration options. NASA Dryden continues to support the UAS industry by facilitating access to three specially designated test areas on Edwards Air Force Base for the

  1. [Researches on virology at the Tohoku University Research Center in the Philippines].

    PubMed

    Oshitani, Hitoshi; Saito, Mariko; Okamoto, Michiko; Tamaki, Raita; Kamigaki, Taro; Suzuki, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine has established the Tohoku-RITM Collaborative Research Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Diseases at Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) in the Philippines in 2008. Our aim of the center is to conduct operational researches, which can contribute to control of infectious diseases in the Philippines. Therefore most of our researches in the Philippines are being conducted in the fields. Main research themes include severe acute respiratory infections in children, influenza disease burden study, molecular epidemiology of rabies, and viral etiology of acute diarrhea. The study on severe acute respiratory infections in children in Leyte Island has recruited hospitalized cases with severe pneumonia. We showed that enterovirus 68 was one of important causative agents in severe pneumonia cases. We also conducted other analyses including molecular epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and pathogenesis of human rhinoviruses (HRV). Based on these studies, we initiated more comprehensive researches in the Philippines since 2010.

  2. Integration of data systems and technology improves research and collaboration for a superfund research center.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, Kevin A; Peterson, Elena S; Barton, Michael L; Waters, Katrina M; Anderson, Kim A

    2012-08-01

    Large collaborative centers are a common model for accomplishing integrated environmental health research. These centers often include various types of scientific domains (e.g., chemistry, biology, bioinformatics) that are integrated to solve some of the nation's key economic or public health concerns. The Superfund Research Center (SRP) at Oregon State University (OSU) is one such center established in 2008 to study the emerging health risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons while using new technologies both in the field and laboratory. With outside collaboration at remote institutions, success for the center as a whole depends on the ability to effectively integrate data across all research projects and support cores. Therefore, the OSU SRP center developed a system that integrates environmental monitoring data with analytical chemistry data and downstream bioinformatics and statistics to enable complete "source-to-outcome" data modeling and information management. This article describes the development of this integrated information management system that includes commercial software for operational laboratory management and sample management in addition to open-source custom-built software for bioinformatics and experimental data management.

  3. Integration of Data Systems and Technology Improves Research and Collaboration for a Superfund Research Center

    PubMed Central

    Hobbie, Kevin A.; Peterson, Elena S.; Barton, Michael L.; Waters, Katrina M.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    Large collaborative centers are a common model for accomplishing integrated environmental health research. These centers often include various types of scientific domains (e.g. chemistry, biology, bioinformatics) that are integrated to solve some of the nation’s key economic or public health concerns. The Superfund Research Center (SRP) at Oregon State University (OSU) is one such center established in 2008 to study the emerging health risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons while utilizing new technologies both in the field and laboratory. With outside collaboration at remote institutions, success for the center as a whole depends on the ability to effectively integrate data across all research projects and support cores. Therefore, the OSU SRP center developed a system that integrates environmental monitoring data with analytical chemistry data and downstream bioinformatics and statistics to enable complete ‘source to outcome’ data modeling and information management. This article describes the development of this integrated information management system that includes commercial software for operational laboratory management and sample management in addition to open source custom built software for bioinformatics and experimental data management. PMID:22651935

  4. Computational Nanotechnology at NASA Ames Research Center, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Bailey, David; Langhoff, Steve; Pohorille, Andrew; Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Some forms of nanotechnology appear to have enormous potential to improve aerospace and computer systems; computational nanotechnology, the design and simulation of programmable molecular machines, is crucial to progress. NASA Ames Research Center has begun a computational nanotechnology program including in-house work, external research grants, and grants of supercomputer time. Four goals have been established: (1) Simulate a hypothetical programmable molecular machine replicating itself and building other products. (2) Develop molecular manufacturing CAD (computer aided design) software and use it to design molecular manufacturing systems and products of aerospace interest, including computer components. (3) Characterize nanotechnologically accessible materials of aerospace interest. Such materials may have excellent strength and thermal properties. (4) Collaborate with experimentalists. Current in-house activities include: (1) Development of NanoDesign, software to design and simulate a nanotechnology based on functionalized fullerenes. Early work focuses on gears. (2) A design for high density atomically precise memory. (3) Design of nanotechnology systems based on biology. (4) Characterization of diamonoid mechanosynthetic pathways. (5) Studies of the laplacian of the electronic charge density to understand molecular structure and reactivity. (6) Studies of entropic effects during self-assembly. Characterization of properties of matter for clusters up to sizes exhibiting bulk properties. In addition, the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) supercomputer division sponsored a workshop on computational molecular nanotechnology on March 4-5, 1996 held at NASA Ames Research Center. Finally, collaborations with Bill Goddard at CalTech, Ralph Merkle at Xerox Parc, Don Brenner at NCSU (North Carolina State University), Tom McKendree at Hughes, and Todd Wipke at UCSC are underway.

  5. Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R. Allen, Director

    2011-04-01

    The Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, has funded the INL as one of the Energy Frontier Research Centers in the area of material science of nuclear fuels. This document is the required annual report to the Office of Science that outlines the accomplishments for the period of May 2010 through April 2011. The aim of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) is to establish the foundation for predictive understanding of the effects of irradiation-induced defects on thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. The science driver of the center’s investigation is to understand how complex defect and microstructures affect phonon mediated thermal transport in UO2, and achieve this understanding for the particular case of irradiation-induced defects and microstructures. The center’s research thus includes modeling and measurement of thermal transport in oxide fuels with different levels of impurities, lattice disorder and irradiation-induced microstructure, as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of the evolution of disorder, stoichiometry and microstructure in nuclear fuel under irradiation. With the premise that thermal transport in irradiated UO2 is a phonon-mediated energy transport process in a crystalline material with defects and microstructure, a step-by-step approach will be utilized to understand the effects of types of defects and microstructures on the collective phonon dynamics in irradiated UO2. Our efforts under the thermal transport thrust involved both measurement of diffusive phonon transport (an approach that integrates over the entire phonon spectrum) and spectroscopic measurements of phonon attenuation/lifetime and phonon dispersion. Our distinct experimental efforts dovetail with our modeling effort involving atomistic simulation of phonon transport and prediction of lattice thermal conductivity using the Boltzmann transport framework.

  6. Multi-Vehicle Cooperative Control Research at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, 2000-2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt

    2014-01-01

    A brief introductory overview of multi-vehicle cooperative control research conducted at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center from 2000 - 2014. Both flight research projects and paper studies are included. Since 2000, AFRC has been almost continuously pursuing research in the areas of formation flight for drag reduction and automated cooperative trajectories. An overview of results is given, including flight experiments done on the FA-18 and with the C-17. Other multi-vehicle cooperative research is discussed, including small UAV swarming projects and automated aerial refueling.

  7. Operating The Central Process Systems At Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, Carly P.

    2004-01-01

    As a research facility, the Glenn Research Center (GRC) trusts and expects all the systems, controlling their facilities to run properly and efficiently in order for their research and operations to occur proficiently and on time. While there are many systems necessary for the operations at GRC, one of those most vital systems is the Central Process Systems (CPS). The CPS controls operations used by GRC's wind tunnels, propulsion systems lab, engine components research lab, and compressor, turbine and combustor test cells. Used widely throughout the lab, it operates equipment such as exhausters, chillers, cooling towers, compressors, dehydrators, and other such equipment. Through parameters such as pressure, temperature, speed, flow, etc., it performs its primary operations on the major systems of Electrical Dispatch (ED), Central Air Dispatch (CAD), Central Air Equipment Building (CAEB), and Engine Research Building (ERB). In order for the CPS to continue its operations at Glenn, a new contract must be awarded. Consequently, one of my primary responsibilities was assisting the Source Evaluation Board (SEB) with the process of awarding the recertification contract of the CPS. The job of the SEB was to evaluate the proposals of the contract bidders and then to present their findings to the Source Selecting Official (SSO). Before the evaluations began, the Center Director established the level of the competition. For this contract, the competition was limited to those companies classified as a small, disadvantaged business. After an industry briefing that explained to qualified companies the CPS and type of work required, each of the interested companies then submitted proposals addressing three components: Mission Suitability, Cost, and Past Performance. These proposals were based off the Statement of Work (SOW) written by the SEB. After companies submitted their proposals, the SEB reviewed all three components and then presented their results to the SSO. While the

  8. 76 FR 40384 - National Center for Research Resources; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... of Committee: National Center for Research Resources Special Emphasis Panel, NCRR Animal Resource... Person: Lee Warren Slice, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Review, National Center for Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Research Resources; Notice of...

  9. 34 CFR 350.30 - What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Research Center meet? 350.30 Section 350.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.30 What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering...

  10. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must...

  11. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.33 What cooperation requirements must...

  12. 34 CFR 350.30 - What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Research Center meet? 350.30 Section 350.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.30 What requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering...

  13. 34 CFR 350.21 - What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center engage in?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Research and... Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.21 What collaboration must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center engage in? A Rehabilitation Research and Training Center must be operated by or in...

  14. Langley Research Center Utility Risk from Future Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Young, Russell J.; Ganoe, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The successful operation of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) depends on services provided by several public utility companies. These include Newport News Waterworks, Dominion Virginia Power, Virginia Natural Gas and Hampton Roads Sanitation District. LaRC's plan to respond to future climate change should take into account how these companies plan to avoid interruption of services while minimizing cost to the customers. This report summarizes our findings from publicly available documents on how each company plans to respond. This will form the basis for future planning for the Center. Our preliminary findings show that flooding and severe storms could interrupt service from the Waterworks and Sanitation District but the potential is low due to plans in place to address climate change on their system. Virginia Natural Gas supplies energy to produce steam but most current steam comes from the Hampton trash burning plant, thus interruption risk is low. Dominion Virginia Power does not address climate change impacts on their system in their public reports. The potential interruption risk is considered to be medium. The Hampton Roads Sanitation District is projecting a major upgrade of their system to mitigate clean water inflow and infiltration. This will reduce infiltration and avoid overloading the pump stations and treatment plants.

  15. Building Research Infrastructure in Community Health Centers: A Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN) Report

    PubMed Central

    Likumahuwa, Sonja; Song, Hui; Singal, Robbie; Weir, Rosy Chang; Crane, Heidi; Muench, John; Sim, Shao-Chee; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN), a practice-based research network of community health centers (CHCs). Established by the Health Resources and Services Administration in 2010, CHARN is a network of 4 community research nodes, each with multiple affiliated CHCs and an academic center. The four nodes (18 individual CHCs and 4 academic partners in 9 states) are supported by a data coordinating center. Here we provide case studies detailing how CHARN is building research infrastructure and capacity in CHCs, with a particular focus on how community practice-academic partnerships were facilitated by the CHARN structure. The examples provided by the CHARN nodes include many of the building blocks of research capacity: communication capacity and “matchmaking” between providers and researchers; technology transfer; research methods tailored to community practice settings; and community institutional review board infrastructure to enable community oversight. We draw lessons learned from these case studies that we hope will serve as examples for other networks, with special relevance for community-based networks seeking to build research infrastructure in primary care settings. PMID:24004710

  16. Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) Coral Reef Research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, D.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Coral reefs provide important ecosystem services such as shoreline protection and the support of lucrative industries including fisheries and tourism. Such ecosystem services are being compromised as reefs decline due to coral disease, climate change, overfishing, and pollution. There is a need for focused, integrated science to understand the complex ecological interactions and effects of these many stressors and to provide information that will effectively guide policies and best management practices to preserve and restore these important resources. The U.S. Geological Survey Florida Integrated Science Center (USGS-FISC) is conducting a coordinated Coral Reef Research Project beginning in 2009. Specific research topics are aimed at addressing priorities identified in the 'Strategic Science for Coral Ecosystems 2007-2011' document (U.S. Geological Survey, 2007). Planned research will include a blend of historical, monitoring, and process studies aimed at improving our understanding of the development, current status and function, and likely future changes in coral ecosystems. Topics such as habitat characterization and distribution, coral disease, and trends in biogenic calcification are major themes of understanding reef structure, ecological integrity, and responses to global change.

  17. Nuclear Industry Support Services by the Buffalo Materials Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, L.G. )

    1993-01-01

    The Buffalo Materials Research Center (BMRC) is located on the campus of the State University of New York at Buffalo, Principal facilities within BMRC include a 2-MW PULSTAR, low-enrichment reactor, an electron accelerator, and irradiated materials remote testing facilities. The reactor and the materials testing facilities have been utilized extensively in support of the power reactor community since 1961. This paper briefly highlights the nature and scope of this service. The BMRC is operated for the university by Buffalo Materials Research, Inc., a private for-profit company, which is a subsidiary of Materials Engineering Associates, Inc. (MEA), a Maryland-based materials testing company. A primary mission of MEA has been research on the effects of neutron irradiation on reactor structural materials, including those used for pressure vessel and piping systems. The combined resources of MEA and BMRC have played a pivotal role in the assessment of reactor pressure vessel safety both in the United States and abroad and in the development of new radiation-resistant steels.

  18. Advances in Materials Research: An Internship at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrios, Elizabeth A.; Roberson, Luke B.

    2011-01-01

    My time at Kennedy Space Center. was spent immersing myself in research performed in the Materials Science Division of the Engineering Directorate. My Chemical Engineering background provided me the ability to assist in many different projects ranging from tensile testing of composite materials to making tape via an extrusion process. However, I spent the majority of my time on the following three projects: (1) testing three different materials to determine antimicrobial properties; (2) fabricating and analyzing hydrogen sensing tapes that were placed at the launch pad for STS-133 launch; and (3) researching molten regolith electrolysis at KSC to prepare me for my summer internship at MSFC on a closely related topic. This paper aims to explain, in detail, what I have learned about these three main projects. It will explain why this research is happening and what we are currently doing to resolve the issues. This paper will also explain how the hard work and experiences that I have gained as an intern have provided me with the next big step towards my career at NASA.

  19. Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials, an Energy Frontier Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Ozolins, Vidvuds

    2016-09-28

    Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials (MEEM) was established as an interdisciplinary cutting-edge UCLA-based research center uniquely equipped to attack the challenge of rationally designing, synthesizing and testing revolutionary new energy materials. Our mission was to achieve transformational improvements in the performance of materials via controlling the nano-and mesoscale structure using selectively designed, earth-abundant, inexpensive molecular building blocks. MEEM has focused on materials that are inherently abundant, can be easily assembled from intelligently designed building blocks (molecules, nanoparticles), and have the potential to deliver transformative economic benefits in comparison with the current crystalline-and polycrystalline-based energy technologies. MEEM addressed basic science issues related to the fundamental mechanisms of carrier generation, energy conversion, as well as transport and storage of charge and mass in tunable, architectonically complex materials. Fundamental understanding of these processes will enable rational design, efficient synthesis and effective deployment of novel three-dimensional material architectures for energy applications. Three interrelated research directions were initially identified where these novel architectures hold great promise for high-reward research: solar energy generation, electrochemical energy storage, and materials for CO2 capture. Of these, the first two remained throughout the project performance period, while carbon capture was been phased out in consultation and with approval from BES program manager.

  20. 34 CFR 403.207 - What are the State's responsibilities to the National Center or Centers for Research in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education? 403.207 Section 403.207 Education Regulations of..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Are the Administrative Responsibilities of a State Under the State Vocational and Applied Technology Education Program? § 403.207 What...

  1. 34 CFR 403.207 - What are the State's responsibilities to the National Center or Centers for Research in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Center or Centers for Research in Vocational Education? 403.207 Section 403.207 Education Regulations of..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Are the Administrative Responsibilities of a State Under the State Vocational and Applied Technology Education Program? § 403.207 What...

  2. 2003 research briefs : Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2003-08-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems and Materials Modeling and Computational Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  3. The NASA Glen Research Center's Hypersonic Tunnel Facility. Chapter 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.; Willis, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center's Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, freejet wind tunnel that provides true enthalpy flight conditions for Mach numbers of 5, 6, and 7. The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility is unique due to its large scale and use of non-vitiated (clean air) flow. A 3MW graphite core storage heater is used to heat the test medium of gaseous nitrogen to the high stagnation temperatures required to produce true enthalpy conditions. Gaseous oxygen is mixed into the heated test flow to generate the true air simulation. The freejet test section is 1.07m (42 in.) in diameter and 4.3m (14 ft) in length. The facility is well suited for the testing of large scale airbreathing propulsion systems. In this chapter, a brief history and detailed description of the facility are presented along with a discussion of the facility's application towards hypersonic airbreathing propulsion testing.

  4. The NASA Lewis Research Center Water Tunnel Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    A water tunnel facility specifically designed to investigate internal fluid duct flows has been built at the NASA Research Center. It is built in a modular fashion so that a variety of internal flow test hardware can be installed in the facility with minimal facility reconfiguration. The facility and test hardware interfaces are discussed along with design constraints for future test hardware. The inlet chamber flow conditioning approach is also detailed. Instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities are discussed. The incoming flow quality has been documented for about one quarter of the current facility operating range. At that range, there is some scatter in the data in the turbulent boundary layer which approaches 10 percent of the duct radius leading to a uniform core.

  5. 2004 research briefs :Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  6. 2005 Research Briefs : Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2005-05-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  7. Vibro-Acoustics Modal Testing at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes on-going modal testing activities at the NASA Langley Research Center for two aircraft fuselage structures: a generic "aluminum testbed cylinder" (ATC) and a Beechcraft Starship fuselage (BSF). Subsequent acoustic tests will measure the interior noise field created by exterior mechanical and acoustic sources. These test results will provide validation databases for interior noise prediction codes on realistic aircraft fuselage structures. The ATC is a 12-ft-long, all-aluminum, scale model assembly. The BSF is a 40-ft-long, all-composite, complete aircraft fuselage. To date, two of seven test configurations of the ATC and all three test configurations of the BSF have been completed. The paper briefly describes the various test configurations, testing procedure, and typical results for frequencies up to 250 Hz.

  8. Matrix resin development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    The polymer program at NASA Langley Research Center involves exploratory studies in polymer science. These include the synthesis of novel polymers and their characterization. Polymer synthesis programs involve the development of novel thermoplastics, pseudothermoplastics, and thermosets. Recent investigations have led to the development of more easily processable polyimides, solvent-resistant polysulfones and polyphenylquinoxalines, and tougher high and intermediate-temperature polymers. Characterization efforts have included high-pressure liquid chromatography methodology, the development of toughness tests for fiber-reinforced composites, a study of electrical properties of metal-ion-filled polyimides, and a study of the mutagenicity of aromatic diamines. Also the mechanism of cure/degradation of experimental polymers has been studied by rheology, mechanical behavior, separation techniques and spectroscopy. Some of these programs have involved the degradation crosslinking of alkyl-containing polyimides, the separation and identification of crosslinked phenylquinoxalines, the rheological behavior of hot-melt polyimides, and the elucidation of the cure of norbornene endcapped imides.

  9. Distance Learning With NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project (LTP) has responded to requests from local school district technology coordinators to provide content for videoconferencing workshops. Over the past year we have offered three teacher professional development workshops that showcase NASA Lewis-developed educational products and NASA educational Internet sites. In order to determine the direction of our involvement with distance learning, the LTP staff conducted a survey of 500 U.S. schools. We received responses from 72 schools that either currently use distance learning or will be using distance learning in 98-99 school year. The results of the survey are summarized in the article. In addition, the article provides information on distance learners, distance learning technologies, and the NASA Lewis LTP videoconferencing workshops. The LTP staff will continue to offer teacher development workshops through videoconferencing during the 98-99 school year. We hope to add workshops on new educational products as they are developed at NASA Lewis.

  10. Extended Operation of Stirling Convertors at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Research Center (GRC) is supporting life and reliability database for free-piston Stirilng conversion via extended convertor operation Ongoing convertor operation: 18 convertors (4 TDCs from Infinia, 14 ASCs from Sunpower). 350,000 total convertor hours of operation. 218,000 on Infinia units and 132,000 on Sunpower units. Demonstrating steady convertor performance requires precise maintenance of operating conditions. Sources of disruption : Investigative tests: Varying operating frequency, hot-end temp, cold-end temp. Hot end control method: Constant heat input mode requires more user-adjustment than constant temperature mode. Long-term transients in hot end insulation were observed. Support facility: Open-bath circulator fluid concentration drifting. Nuisance shutdowns (instrumentation failure, EMI, power outages). Ambient temperature fluctuations due to room HVAC.

  11. Regenerative Fuel Cell Test Rig at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Bents, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell development effort at Glenn Research Center (GRC) involves the integration of a dedicated fuel cell and electrolyzer into an energy storage system test rig. The test rig consists of a fuel cell stack, an electrolysis stack, cooling pumps, a water transfer pump, gas recirculation pumps, phase separators, storage tanks for oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2), heat exchangers, isolation valves, pressure regulators, interconnecting tubing, nitrogen purge provisions, and instrumentation for control and monitoring purposes. The regenerative fuel cell (RFC) thus formed is a completely closed system which is capable of autonomous cyclic operation. The test rig provides direct current (DC) load and DC power supply to simulate power consumption and solar power input. In addition, chillers are used as the heat sink to dissipate the waste heat from the electrochemical stack operation. Various vents and nitrogen (N2) sources are included in case inert purging is necessary to safe the RFC test rig.

  12. Langley Research Center Standard for the Evaluation of Socket Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, R. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A specification utilized for the nondestructive evaluation of socket type pipe joints at Langley Research Center (LaRC) is discussed. The scope of hardware shall include, but is not limited to, all common pipe fittings: tees, elbows, couplings, caps, and so forth, socket type flanges, unions, and valves. In addition, the exterior weld of slip on flanges shall be inspected using this specification. At the discretion of the design engineer, standard practice engineer, Fracture Mechanics Engineering Section, Pressure Systems Committee, or other authority, four nondestructive evaluation techniques may be utilized exclusively, or in combination, to inspect socket type welds. These techniques are visual, radiographic, magnetic particle, and dye penetrant. Under special circumstances, other techniques (such as eddy current or ultrasonics) may be required and their application shall be guided by the appropriate sections of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (B&PVC).

  13. National Criticality Experiments Research Center: Capability and Status

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, David K.; Myers, William L.

    2012-07-12

    After seven years, the former Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF), or Pajarito Site, has reopened for business as the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Four critical assembly machines (Comet, Planet, Flat-Top, and Godiva-IV) made the journey from Los Alamos to the NNSS. All four machines received safety system upgrades along with new digital control systems. Between these machines, systems ranging from the thermal through the intermediate to the fast spectrum may be assembled. Steady-State, transient, and super-prompt critical conditions may be explored. NCERC is the sole remaining facility in the United States capable of conducting general-purpose nuclear materials handling including the construction and operation of high-multiplication assemblies, delayed critical assemblies, and prompt critical assemblies. Reconstitution of the unique capabilities at NCERC ensures the viability of (1) The Nuclear Renaissance, (2) Stockpile Stewardship, and (3) and the next generation of criticality experimentalists.

  14. Nasa Langley Research Center seventy-fifth anniversary publications, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The following are presented: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Charter; Exploring NASA's Roots, the History of NASA Langley Research Center; NASA Langley's National Historic Landmarks; The Mustang Story: Recollections of the XP-51; Testing the First Supersonic Aircraft: Memoirs of NACA Pilot Bob Champine; NASA Langley's Contributions to Spaceflight; The Rendezvous that was Almost Missed: Lunar Orbit Rendezvous and the Apollo Program; NASA Langley's Contributions to the Apollo Program; Scout Launch Vehicle Program; NASA Langley's Contributions to the Space Shuttle; 69 Months in Space: A History of the First LDEF; NACA TR No. 460: The Characteristics of 78 Related Airfoil Sections from Tests in the Variable-Density Wind Tunnel; NACA TR No. 755: Requirements for Satisfactory Flying Qualities of Airplanes; 'Happy Birthday Langley' NASA Magazine Summer 1992 Issue.

  15. Research and development of optical measurement techniques for aerospace propulsion research: A NASA Lewis Research Center perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, Daniel J.

    1991-01-01

    The applied research effort required to develop new nonintrusive measurement techniques capable of obtaining the data required by aerospace propulsion researchers and of operating in the harsh environments encountered in research and test facilities is discussed and illustrated through several ongoing projects at NASA's Lewis Research Center. Factors including length of development time, funding levels, and collaborative support from fluid-thermal researchers are cited. Progress in developing new instrumentation via a multi-path approach, including NASA research, grant, and government-sponsored research through mechanisms like the Small Business Innovative Research program, is also described.

  16. Mars Pathfinder Rover-Lewis Research Center Technology Experiments Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Mars Pathfinder Program is given and the development and role of three technology experiments from NASA's Lewis Research Center and carried on the Mars Pathfinder rover is described. Two recent missions to Mars were developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and launched late last year: Mars Global Surveyor in November 1996 and Mars Pathfinder in December 1996. Mars Global Surveyor is an orbiter which will survey the planet with a number of different instruments, and will arrive in September 1997, and Mars Pathfinder which consists of a lander and a small rover, landing on Mars July 4, 1997. These are the first two missions of the Mars Exploration Program consisting of a ten year series of small robotic martian probes to be launched every 26 months. The Pathfinder rover will perform a number of technology and operational experiments which will provide the engineering information necessary to design and operate more complex, scientifically oriented surface missions involving roving vehicles and other machinery operating in the martian environment. Because of its expertise in space power systems and technologies, space mechanisms and tribology, Lewis Research Center was asked by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is heading the Mars Pathfinder Program, to contribute three experiments concerning the effects of the martian environment on surface solar power systems and the abrasive qualities of the Mars surface material. In addition, rover static charging was investigated and a static discharge system of several fine Tungsten points was developed and fixed to the rover. These experiments and current findings are described herein.

  17. NASA/Ames Research Center's science and applications aircraft program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Ames Research Center operates a fleet of seven Science and Applications Aircraft, namely the C-141/Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), DC-8, C-130, Lear Jet, and three ER-2s. These aircraft are used to satisfy two major objectives, each of equal importance. The first is to acquire remote and in-situ scientific data in astronomy, astrophysics, earth sciences, ocean processes, atmospheric physics, meteorology, materials processing and life sciences. The second major objective is to expedite the development of sensors and their attendant algorithms for ultimate use in space and to simulate from an aircraft, the data to be acquired from spaceborne sensors. NASA-Ames Science and Applications Aircraft are recognized as national and international facilities. They have performed and will continue to perform, operational missions from bases in the United States and worldwide. Historically, twice as many investigators have requested flight time than could be accommodated. This situation remains true today and is expected to increase in the years ahead. A major advantage of the existing fleet of aircraft is their ability to cover a large expanse of the earth's ecosystem from the surface to the lower stratosphere over large distances and time aloft. Their large payload capability allows a number of scientists to use multi-investigator sensor suites to permit simultaneous and complementary data gathering. In-flight changes to the sensors or data systems have greatly reduced the time required to optimize the development of new instruments. It is doubtful that spaceborne systems will ever totally replace the need for airborne science aircraft. The operations philosophy and capabilities exist at NASA-Ames Research Center.

  18. Mars Pathfinder Rover-Lewis Research Center Technology Experiments Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Steven M.

    1997-07-01

    An overview of NASA's Mars Pathfinder Program is given and the development and role of three technology experiments from NASA's Lewis Research Center and carried on the Mars Pathfinder rover is described. Two recent missions to Mars were developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and launched late last year: Mars Global Surveyor in November 1996 and Mars Pathfinder in December 1996. Mars Global Surveyor is an orbiter which will survey the planet with a number of different instruments, and will arrive in September 1997, and Mars Pathfinder which consists of a lander and a small rover, landing on Mars July 4, 1997. These are the first two missions of the Mars Exploration Program consisting of a ten year series of small robotic martian probes to be launched every 26 months. The Pathfinder rover will perform a number of technology and operational experiments which will provide the engineering information necessary to design and operate more complex, scientifically oriented surface missions involving roving vehicles and other machinery operating in the martian environment. Because of its expertise in space power systems and technologies, space mechanisms and tribology, Lewis Research Center was asked by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is heading the Mars Pathfinder Program, to contribute three experiments concerning the effects of the martian environment on surface solar power systems and the abrasive qualities of the Mars surface material. In addition, rover static charging was investigated and a static discharge system of several fine Tungsten points was developed and fixed to the rover. These experiments and current findings are described herein.

  19. Electric Power Research Institute: environmental Control Technology Center.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-04

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved continued investigations into the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process for the production of Anhydrous Calcium Sulfate (Anhydrite). The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. From May 3-18, the NYSEG Kintigh Station and the ECTC were off-line for a two-week scheduled Station outage. During the ECTC outage, the major systems of the Center were inspected, and several preventive maintenance activities were completed. A listing of the major O&M outage activities completed during this period is presented in the Pilot/Mini-Pilot section of this report. In May 1997, an extension to the Anhydrite Production test block was started following the NYSEG outage. The extension to the Anhydrite Production test block is being funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) after promising results from the original test program. Both EPRI and the Department of Energy (DOE) funded the original test program as part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high- efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. While the pilot portion of the Anhydrite project was conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) in Barker, New York, the extension mainly used the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot wet FGD unit to reduce operating costs. The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process that produces a useable byproduct, anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate). The original CLS/Anhydrite process included three steps: chloride removal, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite production. The final step in the process involved

  20. Research Problems in Data Curation: Outcomes from the Data Curation Education in Research Centers Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, C. L.; Mayernik, M. S.; Weber, N.; Baker, K. S.; Kelly, K.; Marlino, M. R.; Thompson, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The need for data curation is being recognized in numerous institutional settings as national research funding agencies extend data archiving mandates to cover more types of research grants. Data curation, however, is not only a practical challenge. It presents many conceptual and theoretical challenges that must be investigated to design appropriate technical systems, social practices and institutions, policies, and services. This presentation reports on outcomes from an investigation of research problems in data curation conducted as part of the Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC) program. DCERC is developing a new model for educating data professionals to contribute to scientific research. The program is organized around foundational courses and field experiences in research and data centers for both master's and doctoral students. The initiative is led by the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in collaboration with the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee, and library and data professionals at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). At the doctoral level DCERC is educating future faculty and researchers in data curation and establishing a research agenda to advance the field. The doctoral seminar, Research Problems in Data Curation, was developed and taught in 2012 by the DCERC principal investigator and two doctoral fellows at the University of Illinois. It was designed to define the problem space of data curation, examine relevant concepts and theories related to both technical and social perspectives, and articulate research questions that are either unexplored or under theorized in the current literature. There was a particular emphasis on the Earth and environmental sciences, with guest speakers brought in from NCAR, National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Through the assignments, students

  1. The Center for Research on Chronic Health Conditions: a strategy for enhancing rural nursing research.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Clarann; Lotts, Kelly C; Winters, Charlene A

    2004-01-01

    Conducting nursing research with rural populations is influenced by the multidimensional characteristics of rural dwellers, the rural environment, the paucity of nurse scientists prepared and supported to conduct rural research, and institutional constraints common to academic institutions serving rural communities. Collaboration across rural academic settings is therefore integral to the success of rural nursing science. The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of the Center for Research on Chronic Health Conditions in Rural Dwellers as a strategy for overcoming the challenges of conducting rural nursing research in the rural western mountain region of the United States.

  2. Assessment team report on flight-critical systems research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewiorek, Daniel P. (Compiler); Dunham, Janet R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The quality, coverage, and distribution of effort of the flight-critical systems research program at NASA Langley Research Center was assessed. Within the scope of the Assessment Team's review, the research program was found to be very sound. All tasks under the current research program were at least partially addressing the industry needs. General recommendations made were to expand the program resources to provide additional coverage of high priority industry needs, including operations and maintenance, and to focus the program on an actual hardware and software system that is under development.

  3. Innovation in Flight: Research of the NASA Langley Research Center on Revolutionary Advanced Concepts for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Joseph R.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this publication is to provide an overview of the topic of revolutionary research in aeronautics at Langley, including many examples of research efforts that offer significant potential benefits, but have not yet been applied. The discussion also includes an overview of how innovation and creativity is stimulated within the Center, and a perspective on the future of innovation. The documentation of this topic, especially the scope and experiences of the example research activities covered, is intended to provide background information for future researchers.

  4. An Overview of Aerospace Propulsion Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research center is the recognized leader in aerospace propulsion research, advanced technology development and revolutionary system concepts committed to meeting the increasing demand for low noise, low emission, high performance, and light weight propulsion systems for affordable and safe aviation and space transportation needs. The technologies span a broad range of areas including air breathing, as well as rocket propulsion systems, for commercial and military aerospace applications and for space launch, as well as in-space propulsion applications. The scope of work includes fundamentals, components, processes, and system interactions. Technologies developed use both experimental and analytical approaches. The presentation provides an overview of the current research and technology development activities at NASA Glenn Research Center .

  5. Facilitating transdisciplinary research: the experience of the transdisciplinary tobacco use research centers.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Glen D; Kobus, Kimberly; Gerlach, Karen K; Neighbors, Charles; Lerman, Caryn; Abrams, David B; Rimer, Barbara K

    2003-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and morbidity in the United States. Heightened recognition of this public health concern has led researchers from multiple and varied disciplines to address this complex and multidimensional behavior. The need for an alternative research paradigm, focusing on a transdisciplinary approach that integrates work across disciplines in order to advance the field most quickly, has been identified. This recognized need led to the development of the Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Centers (TTURC) initiative, funded jointly by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. This paper discusses the formation and early implementation stages of the initiative, including meetings that led to the development of the TTURCs, funders' and research centers' perspectives on implementation, and early observations about the products of the initiative.

  6. Applied high-speed imaging for the icing research program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard; Owens, Jay; Shin, Jaiwon

    1991-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center provides scientists a scaled, controlled environment to simulate natural icing events. The closed-loop, low speed, refrigerated wind tunnel offers the experimental capability to test for icing certification requirements, analytical model validation and calibration techniques, cloud physics instrumentation refinement, advanced ice protection systems, and rotorcraft icing methodology development. The test procedures for these objectives all require a high degree of visual documentation, both in real-time data acquisition and post-test image processing. Information is provided to scientific, technical, and industrial imaging specialists as well as to research personnel about the high-speed and conventional imaging systems will be on the recent ice protection technology program. Various imaging examples for some of the tests are presented. Additional imaging examples are available from the NASA Lewis Research Center's Photographic and Printing Branch.

  7. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2014-07-09

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Improving the Accessibility, Usability, and Performance of Technology for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on an area of national need. We intend the priority to contribute to improving the accessibility, usability, and performance of technology for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  8. Applied high-speed imaging for the icing research program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Howard; Owens, Jay; Shin, Jaiwon

    1992-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center provides scientists a scaled, controlled environment to simulate natural icing events. The closed-loop, low speed, refrigerated wind tunnel offers the experimental capability to test for icing certification requirements, analytical model validation and calibration techniques, cloud physics instrumentation refinement, advanced ice protection systems, and rotorcraft icing methodology development. The test procedures for these objectives all require a high degree of visual documentation, both in real-time data acquisition and post-test image processing. Information is provided to scientific, technical, and industrial imaging specialists as well as to research personnel about the high-speed and conventional imaging systems will be on the recent ice protection technology program. Various imaging examples for some of the tests are presented. Additional imaging examples are available from the NASA Lewis Research Center's Photographic and Printing Branch.

  9. Applied high-speed imaging for the icing research program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Howard; Owens, Jay; Shin, Jaiwon

    The Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center provides scientists a scaled, controlled environment to simulate natural icing events. The closed-loop, low speed, refrigerated wind tunnel offers the experimental capability to test for icing certification requirements, analytical model validation and calibration techniques, cloud physics instrumentation refinement, advanced ice protection systems, and rotorcraft icing methodology development. The test procedures for these objectives all require a high degree of visual documentation, both in real-time data acquisition and post-test image processing. Information is provided to scientific, technical, and industrial imaging specialists as well as to research personnel about the high-speed and conventional imaging systems will be on the recent ice protection technology program. Various imaging examples for some of the tests are presented. Additional imaging examples are available from the NASA Lewis Research Center's Photographic and Printing Branch.

  10. Translating social and behavioral science research to the AIDS epidemic: a center for AIDS research perspective.

    PubMed

    Curran, James W; Hoxie, James A

    2013-06-01

    Integration of innovative social and behavioral science with public health approaches for HIV prevention and treatment is of critical importance for slowing the global HIV epidemic. Strengthening and focusing social and behavioral research linking testing and treatment strategies to populations at greatest risk for HIV is crucial. The Social and Behavioral Science Research Network(SBSRN), originated in 2006, involves twenty NIH-funded CFAR Centers and is responding to this challenge.

  11. Engine structures: A bibliography of Lewis Research Center's research for 1980-1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Structures Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center from 1980 through 1987. All the publications were announced in the l980 to 1987 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  12. An historical perspective on hypersonic aerodynamic research at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick J.; Sawyer, Wallace C.

    1988-01-01

    The 40-year history of hypersonic technology is reviewed from a technical perspective. A broad overview is first given of the major accomplishments of hypersonic flight projects and systems studies that have been conducted over the last 40-odd years. Then, the history of major supersonic and hypersonic ground facilities at the NASA Langley and Ames Research Centers is traced, and some of the research conducted in them over the past 40 years is reviewed.

  13. Sixty years of aeronautical research, 1917-1977. [Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The history of Langley Research Center and its contributions to solving problems related to flight over the past six decades is recounted. Technical innovations described include those related to air craft construction materials, jet and rocket propulsion, flight testing and simulation, wind tunnel tests, noise reduction, supersonic flight, air traffic control, structural analysis, computational aerodynamics, and fuel efficiency.

  14. Six Decades of Flight Research: Dryden Flight Research Center, 1946 - 2006 [DVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Parcel, Steve

    2007-01-01

    This DVD contains an introduction by Center Director Kevin Peterson, two videos on the history of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and a bibliography of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center publications from 1946 through 2006. The NASA Dryden 60th Anniversary Summary Documentary video is narrated by Michael Dorn and give a brief history of Dryden. The Six Decades of Flight Research at NASA Dryden lasts approximately 75 minutes and is broken up in six decades: 1. The Early X-Plane Era; 2. The X-15 Era; 3. The Lifting Body Era; 4. The Space Shuttle Era; 5. The High Alpha and Thrust Vectoring Era; and 6. The technology Demonstration Era. The bibliography provides citations for NASA Technical Reports and Conference Papers, Tech Briefs, Contractor Reports, UCLA Flight Systems Research Center publications and Dryden videos. Finally, a link is provided to the NASA Dryden Gallery that features video clips and photos of the many unique aircraft flown at NASA Dryden and its predecessor organizations.

  15. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Bowen, H. K.; Kenney, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The goals and activities of the center are discussed. The center activities encompass all engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, composites, superconductors, and thin films. Processes include crystallization, solidification, nucleation, and polymer synthesis.

  16. Overview of Active Flow Control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, L. G.; Joslin, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper summarizes Active Flow Control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state-of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R&D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry. Keywords: active flow control, separation control, MEMS, review

  17. Upgrades at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paryz, Roman W.

    2012-01-01

    Several projects have been completed or are nearing completion at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) National Transonic Facility (NTF). The addition of a Model Flow-Control/Propulsion Simulation test capability to the NTF provides a unique, transonic, high-Reynolds number test capability that is well suited for research in propulsion airframe integration studies, circulation control high-lift concepts, powered lift, and cruise separation flow control. A 1992 vintage Facility Automation System (FAS) that performs the control functions for tunnel pressure, temperature, Mach number, model position, safety interlock and supervisory controls was replaced using current, commercially available components. This FAS upgrade also involved a design study for the replacement of the facility Mach measurement system and the development of a software-based simulation model of NTF processes and control systems. The FAS upgrades were validated by a post upgrade verification wind tunnel test. The data acquisition system (DAS) upgrade project involves the design, purchase, build, integration, installation and verification of a new DAS by replacing several early 1990's vintage computer systems with state of the art hardware/software. This paper provides an update on the progress made in these efforts. See reference 1.

  18. Final priorities; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priorities.

    PubMed

    2013-06-11

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces priorities under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce priorities for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Rehabilitation Strategies, Techniques, and Interventions (Priority 1), Information and Communication Technologies Access (Priority 2), Individual Mobility and Manipulation (Priority 3), and Physical Access and Transportation (Priority 4). The Assistant Secretary may use one or more of these priorities for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend these priorities to improve community living and participation, health and function, and employment outcomes of individuals with disabilities.

  19. Social Network Analysis to Evaluate an Interdisciplinary Research Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboelela, Sally W.; Merrill, Jacqueline A.; Carley, Kathleen M.; Larson, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    We sought to examine the growth of an interdisciplinary center using social network analysis techniques. Specific aims were to examine the patterns of growth and interdisciplinary connectedness of the Center and to identify the social network characteristics of its productive members. The setting for this study was The Center for Interdisciplinary…

  20. Fostering Social Determinants of Health Transdisciplinary Research: The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Amy J; White Hat, Emily R; Angal, Jyoti; Grey Owl, Victoria; Puumala, Susan E; Baete Kenyon, DenYelle

    2015-12-22

    The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH) was established in September 2012 as a unifying structure to bring together tribal communities and health researchers across South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota to address American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health disparities. CRCAIH is based on the core values of transdisciplinary research, sustainability and tribal sovereignty. All CRCAIH resources and activities revolve around the central aim of assisting tribes with establishing and advancing their own research infrastructures and agendas, as well as increasing AI/AN health research. CRCAIH is comprised of three divisions (administrative; community engagement and innovation; research projects), three technical cores (culture, science and bioethics; regulatory knowledge; and methodology), six tribal partners and supports numerous multi-year and one-year pilot research projects. Under the ultimate goal of improving health for AI/AN, this paper describes the overarching vision and structure of CRCAIH, highlighting lessons learned in the first three years.

  1. Fostering Social Determinants of Health Transdisciplinary Research: The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Amy J.; White Hat, Emily R.; Angal, Jyoti; Grey Owl, Victoria; Puumala, Susan E.; Baete Kenyon, DenYelle

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH) was established in September 2012 as a unifying structure to bring together tribal communities and health researchers across South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota to address American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health disparities. CRCAIH is based on the core values of transdisciplinary research, sustainability and tribal sovereignty. All CRCAIH resources and activities revolve around the central aim of assisting tribes with establishing and advancing their own research infrastructures and agendas, as well as increasing AI/AN health research. CRCAIH is comprised of three divisions (administrative; community engagement and innovation; research projects), three technical cores (culture, science and bioethics; regulatory knowledge; and methodology), six tribal partners and supports numerous multi-year and one-year pilot research projects. Under the ultimate goal of improving health for AI/AN, this paper describes the overarching vision and structure of CRCAIH, highlighting lessons learned in the first three years. PMID:26703683

  2. The National Extreme Events Data and Research Center (NEED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulledge, J.; Kaiser, D. P.; Wilbanks, T. J.; Boden, T.; Devarakonda, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is establishing the National Extreme Events Data and Research Center (NEED), with the goal of transforming how the United States studies and prepares for extreme weather events in the context of a changing climate. NEED will encourage the myriad, distributed extreme events research communities to move toward the adoption of common practices and will develop a new database compiling global historical data on weather- and climate-related extreme events (e.g., heat waves, droughts, hurricanes, etc.) and related information about impacts, costs, recovery, and available research. Currently, extreme event information is not easy to access and is largely incompatible and inconsistent across web sites. NEED's database development will take into account differences in time frames, spatial scales, treatments of uncertainty, and other parameters and variables, and leverage informatics tools developed at ORNL (i.e., the Metadata Editor [1] and Mercury [2]) to generate standardized, robust documentation for each database along with a web-searchable catalog. In addition, NEED will facilitate convergence on commonly accepted definitions and standards for extreme events data and will enable integrated analyses of coupled threats, such as hurricanes/sea-level rise/flooding and droughts/wildfires. Our goal and vision is that NEED will become the premiere integrated resource for the general study of extreme events. References: [1] Devarakonda, Ranjeet, et al. "OME: Tool for generating and managing metadata to handle BigData." Big Data (Big Data), 2014 IEEE International Conference on. IEEE, 2014. [2] Devarakonda, Ranjeet, et al. "Mercury: reusable metadata management, data discovery and access system." Earth Science Informatics 3.1-2 (2010): 87-94.

  3. Trace Research and Development Center: Report of Progress, 1987-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Trace Center.

    This report documents activities and projects from 1987 to 1994 of the Trace Research and Development Center (Wisconsin), which addresses the communication needs of nonvocal severely disabled children and adults. During this period the Center also served as a national Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on the topic of Access to Computers…

  4. The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Research Center for Families and Children at Tulane University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Katie Lauve; Buttell, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Center for Families and Children is a community-based research center within the School of Social Work at the Tulane University. The Wisner Center primarily supports research projects that examine the causes and consequences of intimate partner violence, promote the development of new frameworks for…

  5. The Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education at Case Western Reserve University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Daniel J.; Singer, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Established in the year 2000, the Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education is a multidisciplinary center located at a school of social work that engages in collaborative, community-based research and evaluation that spans multiple systems and disciplines. The Center currently occupies 4,200 sq. ft. with multiple offices and…

  6. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  7. Low-Reynolds number aerodynamics research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.

    1986-01-01

    The present status of various types of low-Reynolds number aerodynamics research being conducted at the Fluid Dynamics Branch of NASA Langley Research Center is reviewed. The facilities, testing techniques, airfoil design, and experimental verification are addressed, and ongoing studies of laminar separation bubbles, boundary layer stability and transition control, and low-Reynolds number juncture flow are discussed. The possibility of improving vehicle characteristics at low Reynolds numbers and the general trends of the most promising research in these areas are examined.

  8. Solar photovoltaics: Stand alone applications. [NASA Lewis Research Center research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyo, J. N.

    1980-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center involvement in space photovoltaic research and development and in using photovoltaics for terrestrial applications is described with emphasis on applications in which the normal source of power may be a diesel generator, batteries, or other types of power not connected to a utility grid. Once an application is processed, technology is developed and demonstrated with a user who participates in the cost and furnishes the site. Projects completed related to instruments, communication, refrigeration, and highways, are described as well as warning systems, weather stations, fire lookouts, and village power systems. A commercially available photovoltaic powered electric fence charger is the result of Lewis research and development.

  9. Program of Research in Flight Dynamics, The George Washington University at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C. (Technical Monitor); Klein, Vladislav

    2005-01-01

    The program objectives are fully defined in the original proposal entitled Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in GW at NASA Langley Research Center, which was originated March 20, 1975, and in the renewals of the research program from January 1, 2003 to September 30, 2005. The program in its present form includes three major topics: 1. the improvement of existing methods and development of new methods for wind tunnel and flight data analysis, 2. the application of these methods to wind tunnel and flight test data obtained from advanced airplanes, 3. the correlation of flight results with wind tunnel measurements, and theoretical predictions.

  10. The joint center for energy storage research: A new paradigm for battery research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, George

    2015-03-30

    The Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) seeks transformational change in transportation and the electricity grid driven by next generation high performance, low cost electricity storage. To pursue this transformative vision JCESR introduces a new paradigm for battery research: integrating discovery science, battery design, research prototyping and manufacturing collaboration in a single highly interactive organization. This new paradigm will accelerate the pace of discovery and innovation and reduce the time from conceptualization to commercialization. JCESR applies its new paradigm exclusively to beyond-lithium-ion batteries, a vast, rich and largely unexplored frontier. This review presents JCESR's motivation, vision, mission, intended outcomes or legacies and first year accomplishments.

  11. Developing a center for nursing research: an influence on nursing education and research through mentorship.

    PubMed

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A; Sarcone, Annaruth; Samms, Kimika; Boyd, Zakiya N

    2013-03-01

    Nursing research, education, and mentoring are effective strategies to enhance and generate nursing knowledge. In order to explore new opportunities using an international and interdisciplinary approach, a Center for Nursing Research (CNR) was developed at Kean University a public institution for higher education in the United States. At the CNR, nursing professionals and students collaborate in all aspects of nursing education and the research process from a global perspective and across disciplines. The advancement of knowledge and understanding is of absolute importance to the field of nursing and other collaborative fields. The CNR functions to educate nursing faculty and students through scholarly activities with an ongoing commitment to nursing education and research. Mentorship in nursing education and research fosters professional, scholarly, and personal growth for both the mentor and mentee. The CNR serves as a model vehicle of applied, functional mentoring strategies and provides the venue to allow the mentor and mentee to collaborate in all aspects of nursing education and research.

  12. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  13. Microgravity noncontact temperature requirements at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G.

    1989-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is currently supporting 66 microgravity science and applications projects. The 66 projects are separated into 23 flight projects and 43 ground-based projects. The part of the NASA Lewis program dealing with flight experiments is divided into six areas: Combustion Science, Materials Science, Fluid Physics, Instrumentation/Equipment, Advanced Technology Development, and Space Station Multi-User Facility studies. The part of the NASA Lewis program dealing with ground-based experiments is coincidentally also divided into six areas: Electronic Materials, Combustion Science, Fluid Dynamics and Transport Phenomena, Metals and Alloys, Glasses and Ceramics, and Physics and Chemistry Experiments. Several purposes exist for ground-based experimenting. Preliminary information is necessary before a decision can be made for flight status, the short low gravity durations available in ground facilities are adequate for a particular study, or extensive ground-based research must be conducted to define and support the microgravity science endeavors contemplated for space. Not all of the 66 microgravity science and application projects at NASA Lewis have temperature requirements, but most do. Since space allocation does not permit a review of all the pertinent projects, a decision was made to restrict the coverage to the science flight projects, flight projects minus the advanced technology development, and multiuser facility efforts. Very little is lost by this decision as the types of temperature requirements for science flight projects can be considered representative of those for the ground-based projects. The noncontact temperature needs at NASA Lewis, as represented by the science flight projects are discussed by describing briefly the experiments themselves, by displaying an illustration of each experimental setup, and by specifying their temperature requisites.

  14. Advanced Stirling Convertor Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.; Blaze, Gina M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS), Sunpower Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system on space science and exploration missions. This generator will make use of the free-piston Stirling convertors to achieve higher conversion efficiency than currently available alternatives. The ASRG will utilize two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC) to convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source to electricity. NASA GRC has initiated several experiments to demonstrate the functionality of the ASC, including: in-air extended operation, thermal vacuum extended operation, and ASRG simulation for mobile applications. The in-air and thermal vacuum test articles are intended to provide convertor performance data over an extended operating time. These test articles mimic some features of the ASRG without the requirement of low system mass. Operation in thermal vacuum adds the element of simulating deep space. This test article is being used to gather convertor performance and thermal data in a relevant environment. The ASRG simulator was designed to incorporate a minimum amount of support equipment, allowing integration onto devices powered directly by the convertors, such as a rover. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, and implementation of these experiments.

  15. Extended Operation of Stirling Convertors at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting development of free-piston Stirling conversion technology for spaceflight electrical power generation since 1999. GRC has also been supporting the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) since 2006. A key element of the ASRG project is providing life, reliability, and performance data for the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The Thermal Energy Conversion branch at GRC is conducting extended operation of several free-piston Stirling convertors. The goal of this effort is to generate long-term performance data (tens of thousands of hours) on multiple units to build a life and reliability database. Currently, GRC is operating 18 convertors. This hardware set includes Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDCs) from Infinia Corporation, of which one pair (TDCs #13 and #14) has accumulated over 60,000 hr (6.8 years) of operation. Also under test are various Sunpower, Inc. convertors that were fabricated during the ASC development activity, including ASC-0, ASC-E (including those in the ASRG engineering unit), and ASC-E2. The ASC-E2s also completed, or are in progress of completing workmanship vibration testing, performance mapping, and extended operation. Two ASC-E2 units will also be used for durability testing, during which components will be stressed to levels above nominal mission usage. Extended operation data analyses from these tests are covered in this paper.

  16. NASA Glenn Research Center Support of the ASRG Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    A high efficiency radioisotope power system is being developed for long-duration NASA space science missions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managed a flight contract with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) to build Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs), with support from NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Sunpower Inc. held two parallel contracts to produce Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), one with DOELockheed Martin to produce ASC-F flight units, and one with GRC for the production of ASC-E3 engineering unit pathfinders that are built to the flight design. In support of those contracts, GRC provided testing, materials expertise, government furnished equipment, inspections, and related data products to DOELockheed Martin and Sunpower. The technical support includes material evaluations, component tests, convertor characterization, and technology transfer. Material evaluations and component tests have been performed on various ASC components in order to assess potential life-limiting mechanisms and provide data for reliability models. Convertor level tests have been used to characterize performance under operating conditions that are representative of various mission conditions. Technology transfers enhanced contractor capabilities for specialized production processes and tests. Despite termination of flight ASRG contract, NASA continues to develop the high efficiency ASC conversion technology under the ASC-E3 contract. This paper describes key government furnished services performed for ASRG and future tests used to provide data for ongoing reliability assessments.

  17. NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory: Five year retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Akers, James C.; Passe, Paul J.

    2005-09-01

    In the five years since the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) opened its doors in September, 2000, it has developed a comprehensive array of services and products that support hearing conservation goals within NASA and industry. The ATL provides acoustic emission testing and noise control engineering services for a variety of specialized customers, particularly developers of equipment and science experiments manifested for NASA's manned space missions. The ATL aggressively supports the vision of a low-noise on-orbit environment, which facilitates mission success as well as crew health, safety, and comfort. In concert with these goals, the ATL also produces and distributes free educational resources and low-noise advocacy tools for hearing conservation education and awareness. Among these are two compact discs of auditory demonstrations (of phenomena in acoustics, hearing conservation, and communication), and presentations, software packages, and other educational materials for use by engineers, audiologists, and other hearing conservation stakeholders. This presentation will highlight ATL's construction, history, technical capabilities, and current projects and will feature demonstrations of some of the unique educational resource materials that are distributed by the ATL.

  18. NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW Power Supply Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, Yuen Ching; Ilinets, Boris V.; Miller, Ted; Nagel, Kirsten (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW DC Power Supply was built in 1974 to provide controlled DC power for the Thermophysics Facility Arc Jet Laboratory. The Power Supply has gradually losing reliability due to outdated technology and component life limitation. NASA has decided to upgrade the existing rectifier modules with contemporary high-power electronics and control equipment. NASA plans to complete this project in 2001. This project includes a complete replacement of obsolete thyristor stacks in all six rectifier modules and rectifier bridge control system. High power water-cooled thyristors and freewheeling diodes will be used. The rating of each of the six modules will be 4000 A at 5500 V. The control firing angle signal will be sent from the Facility Control System to six modules via fiberoptic cable. The Power Supply control and monitoring system will include a Master PLC in the Facility building and a Slave PLC in each rectifier module. This system will also monitor each thyristor level in each stack and the auxiliary equipment.

  19. Liquid droplet radiator program at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presler, A. F.; Coles, C. E.; Diem-Kirsop, P. S.; White, K. A., III

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) are jointly engaged in a program for technical assessment of the Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) concept as an advanced high performance heat ejection component for future space missions. NASA Lewis has responsibility for the technology needed for the droplet generator, for working fluid qualification, and for investigating the physics of droplets in space; NASA Lewis is also conducting systems/mission analyses for potential LDR applications with candidate space power systems. For the droplet generator technology task, both micro-orifice fabrication techniques and droplet stream formation processes have been experimentally investigated. High quality micro-orifices (to 50 micron diameter) are routinely fabricated with automated equipment. Droplet formation studies have established operating boundaries for the generation of controlled and uniform droplet streams. A test rig is currently being installed for the experimental verification, under simulated space conditions, of droplet radiation heat transfer performance analyses and the determination of the effect radiative emissivity of multiple droplet streams. Initial testing has begun in the NASA Lewis Zero-Gravity Facility for investigating droplet stream behavior in microgravity conditions. This includes the effect of orifice wetting on jet dynamics and droplet formation. Results for both Brayton and Stirling power cycles have identified favorable mass and size comparisons of the LDR with conventional radiator concepts.

  20. Advanced Stirling Technology Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been developing advanced energy-conversion technologies for use with both radioisotope power systems and fission surface power systems for many decades. Under NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Science Theme, Technology Program, Glenn is developing the next generation of advanced Stirling convertors (ASCs) for use in the Department of Energy/Lockheed Martin Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The next-generation power-conversion technologies require high efficiency and high specific power (watts electric per kilogram) to meet future mission requirements to use less of the Department of Energy's plutonium-fueled general-purpose heat source modules and reduce system mass. Important goals include long-life (greater than 14-yr) reliability and scalability so that these systems can be considered for a variety of future applications and missions including outer-planet missions and continual operation on the surface of Mars. This paper provides an update of the history and status of the ASC being developed for Glenn by Sunpower Inc. of Athens, Ohio.

  1. Fuel Cell Activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, Lisa L.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fuel cells have a long history in space applications and may have potential application in aeronautics as well. A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that directly transforms the chemical energy of a fuel and oxidant into electrical energy. Alkaline fuel cells have been the mainstay of the U.S. space program, providing power for the Apollo missions and the Space Shuttle. However, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer potential benefits over alkaline systems and are currently under development for the next generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Furthermore, primary and regenerative systems utilizing PEM technology are also being considered for future space applications such as surface power and planetary aircraft. In addition to these applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently studying the feasibility of the use of both PEM and solid oxide fuel cells for low- or zero-emission electric aircraft propulsion. These types of systems have potential applications for high altitude environmental aircraft, general aviation and commercial aircraft, and high attitude airships. NASA Glenn has a unique set of capabilities and expertise essential to the successful development of advanced fuel cell power systems for space and aeronautics applications. NASA Glenn's role in past fuel cell development programs as well as current activities to meet these new challenges will be presented

  2. Neurolab: Final Report for the Ames Research Center Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maese, A. Christopher (Editor); Ostrach, Louis H. (Editor); Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Neurolab, the final Spacelab mission, launched on STS-90 on April 17, 1998, was dedicated to studying the nervous system. NASA cooperated with domestic and international partners to conduct the mission. ARC's (Ames Research Center's) Payload included 15 experiments designed to study the adaptation and development of the nervous system in microgravity. The payload had the largest number of Principal and Co-Investigators, largest complement of habitats and experiment unique equipment flown to date, and most diverse distribution of live specimens ever undertaken by ARC, including rodents, toadfish, swordtail fish, water snails, hornweed and crickets To facilitate tissue sharing and optimization of science objectives, investigators were grouped into four science discipline teams: Neuronal Plasticity, Mammalian Development, Aquatic, and Neurobiology. Several payload development challenges were experienced and required an extraordinary effort, by all involved, to meet the launch schedule. With respect to hardware and the total amount of recovered science, Neurolab was regarded as an overall success. However, a high mortality rate in one rodent group and several hardware anomalies occurred inflight that warranted postflight investigations. Hardware, science, and operations lessons were learned that should be taken into consideration by payload teams developing payloads for future Shuttle missions and the International Space Station.

  3. The mobilize center: an NIH big data to knowledge center to advance human movement research and improve mobility.

    PubMed

    Ku, Joy P; Hicks, Jennifer L; Hastie, Trevor; Leskovec, Jure; Ré, Christopher; Delp, Scott L

    2015-11-01

    Regular physical activity helps prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic diseases, yet a broad range of conditions impair mobility at great personal and societal cost. Vast amounts of data characterizing human movement are available from research labs, clinics, and millions of smartphones and wearable sensors, but integration and analysis of this large quantity of mobility data are extremely challenging. The authors have established the Mobilize Center (http://mobilize.stanford.edu) to harness these data to improve human mobility and help lay the foundation for using data science methods in biomedicine. The Center is organized around 4 data science research cores: biomechanical modeling, statistical learning, behavioral and social modeling, and integrative modeling. Important biomedical applications, such as osteoarthritis and weight management, will focus the development of new data science methods. By developing these new approaches, sharing data and validated software tools, and training thousands of researchers, the Mobilize Center will transform human movement research.

  4. The mobilize center: an NIH big data to knowledge center to advance human movement research and improve mobility

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Joy P; Hicks, Jennifer L; Hastie, Trevor; Leskovec, Jure; Ré, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity helps prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic diseases, yet a broad range of conditions impair mobility at great personal and societal cost. Vast amounts of data characterizing human movement are available from research labs, clinics, and millions of smartphones and wearable sensors, but integration and analysis of this large quantity of mobility data are extremely challenging. The authors have established the Mobilize Center (http://mobilize.stanford.edu) to harness these data to improve human mobility and help lay the foundation for using data science methods in biomedicine. The Center is organized around 4 data science research cores: biomechanical modeling, statistical learning, behavioral and social modeling, and integrative modeling. Important biomedical applications, such as osteoarthritis and weight management, will focus the development of new data science methods. By developing these new approaches, sharing data and validated software tools, and training thousands of researchers, the Mobilize Center will transform human movement research. PMID:26272077

  5. Center for Defect Physics - Energy Frontier Research Center (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G. Malcolm; CDP Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Center for Defect Physics - Energy Frontier Research Center' was submitted by the Center for Defect Physics (CDP) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CDP is directed by G. Malcolm Stocks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and is a partnership of scientists from nine institutions: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (lead); Ames Laboratory; Brown University; University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon University; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Ohio State University; and University of Tennessee. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  6. ESTABLISHMENT OF A GROUNDWATER RESEARCH DATA CENTER FOR VALIDATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Ground Water Modeling Center has established a Groundwater Research Data Center that provides information on datasets resulting from publicly funded field experiments and related bench studies in soil and groundwater pollution and distributes datasets for tes...

  7. The National Osteopathic Research Center at the University of North Texas Health Science Center: inception, growth, and future.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Scott T; McCormick, Justin; Degenhardt, Brian F; Hahn, Marc B

    2009-06-01

    The osteopathic profession has long recognized the need to carry out research in order to improve clinical care. Osteopathic physicians have a particular obligation to carry out research in areas, such as osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM), that are unique to osteopathic medicine. OMM is similar to manual therapy that is performed by other types of practitioners, but it has some distinctive characteristics. Osteopathic doctors also use OMM to treat infectious disease-not just musculoskeletal disorders.In 2001, several osteopathic professional organizations agreed to jointly fund a national osteopathic research center at one of the osteopathic medical colleges. Five osteopathic colleges submitted research proposals in response to a request for applications. The University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) was chosen to be the site for the Osteopathic Research Center (ORC) and was funded for four years with $1.1M. Between 2002 and 2007, the ORC received an additional $11M in research support from multiple sources including federal funds. With this support, it has made substantive contributions to science. These include oversight of the recently completed four-year, $1.5M multicenter study on the efficacy of OMM as a treatment for pneumonia in the elderly and a three-year, $1.9M National Institutes of Health-funded developmental research center to perform mechanistic studies of some OMM actions.The authors discuss the long-term costs, benefits, and sustainability of the national ORC at UNTHSC in the contexts of research accomplished, the training of new medical osteopathic researchers, and an effort to develop other successful regional osteopathic research centers.

  8. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workwhop on RHIC spin

    SciTech Connect

    SOFFER,J.

    1999-10-06

    This RHIC Spin Workshop is the 1999 annual meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration, and the second to be hosted at Brookhaven and sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center. The previous meetings were at Brookhaven (1998), Marseille (1996), MIT in 1995, Argonne 1994, Tucson in 1991, and the Polarized Collider Workshop at Penn State in 1990. As noted last year, the Center provides a home for combined work on spin by theorists, experimenters, and accelerator physicists. This proceedings, as last year, is a compilation of 1 page summaries and 5 selected transparencies for each speaker. It is designed to be available soon after the workshop is completed. Speakers are welcome to include web or other references for additional material. The RHIC spin program and RHIC are rapidly becoming reality. RHIC has completed its first commissioning run, as described here by Steve Peggs. The first Siberian Snake for spin has been completed and is being installed in RHIC. A new polarized source from KEK and Triumf with over 1 milliampere of polarized H{sup minus} is being installed, described by Anatoli Zelenski. They have had a successful test of a new polarimeter for RHIC, described by Kazu Kurita and Haixin Huang. Spin commissioning is expected next spring (2000), and the first physics run for spin is anticipated for spring 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to get everyone together about once per year and discuss goals of the spin program, progress, problems, and new ideas. They also have many separate regular forums on spin. There are spin discussion sessions every Tuesday, now organized by Naohito Saito and Werner Vogelsang. The spin discussion schedule and copies of presentations are posted on http://riksg01.rhic.bnl.gov/rsc. Speakers and other spinners are encouraged to come to BNL and to lead a discussion on your favorite idea. They also have regular polarimeter and snake meetings on alternate Thursdays, led by Bill McGahern, the lead engineer for the accelerator spin

  9. 77 FR 40596 - Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects; Employment of Individuals With Disabilities AGENCY: Office of... Information National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)-- Disability...

  10. Viewgraph description of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center: Activity highlights and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented that describe the progress and status of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center. The Center was established in Jul. 1988 by a grant from NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers Program. After two and one-half years of operation, some 16 faculty are participating, and the Center is supporting 39 graduate students plus 18 undergraduates. In reviewing the Center's status, long-term plans and goals are reviewed and then the present status of the Center and the highlights and accomplishments of the past year are summarized. An overview of plans for the upcoming year are presented.

  11. Federally Sponsored Multidisciplinary Research Centers: Learning, Evaluation, and Vicious Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youtie, Jan; Corley, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increasing investment in multi-year federally funded science and technology centers in universities, there are few studies of how these centers engage in learning and change based on information submitted from various agents in the oversight and evaluation process. One challenge is how to manage and respond to this evaluative…

  12. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  13. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  14. Applied analytical combustion/emissions research at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, J. M.; Kundu, K. P.; Nguyen, H. L.

    1992-07-01

    Emissions of pollutants from future commercial transports are a significant concern. As a result, the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is investigating various low emission combustor technologies. As part of this effort, a combustor analysis code development program was pursued to guide the combustor design process, to identify concepts having the greatest promise, and to optimize them at the lowest cost in the minimum time.

  15. Applied analytical combustion/emissions research at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deur, J. M.; Kundu, K. P.; Nguyen, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    Emissions of pollutants from future commercial transports are a significant concern. As a result, the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is investigating various low emission combustor technologies. As part of this effort, a combustor analysis code development program was pursued to guide the combustor design process, to identify concepts having the greatest promise, and to optimize them at the lowest cost in the minimum time.

  16. Selected Research and Development Topics on Aerospace Communications at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation discusses some of the efforts on communications RD that have been performed or are currently underway at NASA Glenn Research Center. The primary purpose of this presentation is to outline some RD topics to serve as talking points for a Technical Interchange Meeting with the Ohio State University. The meeting is scheduled to take place at The ElectroScience Laboratory of the Ohio State University on February 24, 2014.

  17. Small Radioisotope Power System Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugala, Gina; Bell, Mark; Oriti, Salvatore; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David; Duven, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    In April 2009, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) formed an integrated product team (IPT) to develop a Small Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) utilizing a single Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) with passive balancer. A single ASC produces approximately 80 We making this system advantageous for small distributed lunar science stations. The IPT consists of Sunpower, Inc., to provide the single ASC with a passive balancer, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL) to design an engineering model Single Convertor Controller (SCC) for an ASC with a passive balancer, and NASA GRC to provide technical support to these tasks and to develop a simulated lunar lander test stand. The single ASC with a passive balancer, simulated lunar lander test stand, and SCC were delivered to GRC and were tested as a system. The testing sequence at GRC included SCC fault tolerance, integration, electromagnetic interference (EMI), vibration, and extended operation testing. The SCC fault tolerance test characterized the SCCs ability to handle various fault conditions, including high or low bus power consumption, total open load or short circuit, and replacing a failed SCC card while the backup maintains control of the ASC. The integrated test characterized the behavior of the system across a range of operating conditions, including variations in cold-end temperature and piston amplitude, including the emitted vibration to both the sensors on the lunar lander and the lunar surface. The EMI test characterized the AC and DC magnetic and electric fields emitted by the SCC and single ASC. The vibration test confirms the SCCs ability to control the single ASC during launch. The extended operation test allows data to be collected over a period of thousands of hours to obtain long term performance data of the ASC with a passive balancer and the SCC. This paper will discuss the results of each of these tests.

  18. Summary of Stirling Convertor Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been testing free-piston Stirling convertors for potential use in radioisotope power systems. These convertors tend to be in the 35 to 80 W electric power output range. Tests at GRC have accumulated over 80,000 hr of operation. Test articles have been received from Infinia Corporation of Kennewick, Washington and from Sunpower of Athens, Ohio. Infinia designed and built the developmental Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDC) in addition to the more advanced Test Bed and Engineering Unit convertors. GRC has eight of the TDC's under test including two that operate in a thermal vacuum environment. Sunpower designed and developed the EE-35 and the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). GRC has six of the EE- 35 s and is preparing for testing multiple ASC s. Free-piston Stirling convertors for radioisotope power systems make use of non-contacting operation that eliminates wear and is suited for long-term operation. Space missions with radioisotope power systems are often considered that extend from three to 14 years. One of the key capabilities of the GRC test facility is the ability to support continuous, unattended operation. Hardware, software, and procedures for preparing the test articles were developed to support these tests. These included the processing of the convertors for minimizing the contaminants in the working fluid, developing a helium charging system for filling and for gas sample analysis, and the development of new control software and a high-speed protection circuit to insure safe, round-the-clock operation. Performance data of Stirling convertors over time is required to demonstrate that a radioisotope power system is capable of providing reliable power for multi-year missions. This paper will discuss the status of Stirling convertor testing at GRC.

  19. HEASARC - The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smale, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is NASA's archive for high-energy astrophysics and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, supporting the broad science goals of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos theme. It provides vital scientific infrastructure to the community by standardizing science data formats and analysis programs, providing open access to NASA resources, and implementing powerful archive interfaces. Over the next five years the HEASARC will ingest observations from up to 12 operating missions, while serving data from these and over 30 archival missions to the community. The HEASARC archive presently contains over 37 TB of data, and will contain over 60 TB by the end of 2014. The HEASARC continues to secure major cost savings for NASA missions, providing a reusable mission-independent framework for reducing, analyzing, and archiving data. This approach was recognized in the NRC Portals to the Universe report (2007) as one of the HEASARC's great strengths. This poster describes the past and current activities of the HEASARC and our anticipated developments in coming years. These include preparations to support upcoming high energy missions (NuSTAR, Astro-H, GEMS) and ground-based and sub-orbital CMB experiments, as well as continued support of missions currently operating (Chandra, Fermi, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL). In 2012 the HEASARC (which now includes LAMBDA) will support the final nine-year WMAP data release. The HEASARC is also upgrading its archive querying and retrieval software with the new Xamin system in early release - and building on opportunities afforded by the growth of the Virtual Observatory and recent developments in virtual environments and cloud computing.

  20. Small Radioisotope Power System at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugala, Gina M.; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David P.; Duven, Dennis; Shamkovich, Andrei; Ambrose, Hollis; Meer, David W.

    2012-01-01

    In April 2009, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) formed an integrated product team (IPT) to develop a Small Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) utilizing a single Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) with passive balancer for possible use by the International Lunar Network (ILN) program. The ILN program is studying the feasibility of implementing a multiple node seismometer network to investigate the internal lunar structure. A single ASC produces approximately 80 W(sub e) and could potentially supply sufficient power for that application. The IPT consists of Sunpower, Inc., to provide the single ASC with balancer, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to design an engineering model Single Convertor Controller (SCC) for an ASC with balancer, and NASA GRC to provide technical support to these tasks and to develop a simulated lunar lander test stand. A controller maintains stable operation of an ASC. It regulates the alternating current produced by the linear alternator of the convertor, provides a specified output voltage, and maintains operation at a steady piston amplitude and hot end temperature. JHU/APL also designed an ASC dynamic engine/alternator simulator to aid in the testing and troubleshooting of the SCC. This paper describes the requirements, design, and development of the SCC, including some of the key challenges and the solutions chosen to overcome those issues. In addition, it describes the plans to analyze the effectiveness of a passive balancer to minimize vibration from the ASC, characterize the effect of ASC vibration on a lunar lander, characterize the performance of the SCC, and integrate the single ASC, SCC, and lunar lander test stand to characterize performance of the overall system.

  1. Electronic Photography at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Jack; Judge, Nancianne

    1995-01-01

    An electronic photography facility has been established in the Imaging & Photographic Technology Section, Visual Imaging Branch, at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The purpose of this facility is to provide the LaRC community with access to digital imaging technology. In particular, capabilities have been established for image scanning, direct image capture, optimized image processing for storage, image enhancement, and optimized device dependent image processing for output. Unique approaches include: evaluation and extraction of the entire film information content through scanning; standardization of image file tone reproduction characteristics for optimal bit utilization and viewing; education of digital imaging personnel on the effects of sampling and quantization to minimize image processing related information loss; investigation of the use of small kernel optimal filters for image restoration; characterization of a large array of output devices and development of image processing protocols for standardized output. Currently, the laboratory has a large collection of digital image files which contain essentially all the information present on the original films. These files are stored at 8-bits per color, but the initial image processing was done at higher bit depths and/or resolutions so that the full 8-bits are used in the stored files. The tone reproduction of these files has also been optimized so the available levels are distributed according to visual perceptibility. Look up tables are available which modify these files for standardized output on various devices, although color reproduction has been allowed to float to some extent to allow for full utilization of output device gamut.

  2. Advanced Stirling Convertor Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Poriti, Sal

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been testing high-efficiency free-piston Stirling convertors for potential use in radioisotope power systems (RPSs) since 1999. The current effort is in support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Sunpower, Inc., and the NASA GRC. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) to convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As reliability is paramount to a RPS capable of providing spacecraft power for potential multi-year missions, GRC provides direct technology support to the ASRG flight project in the areas of reliability, convertor and generator testing, high-temperature materials, structures, modeling and analysis, organics, structural dynamics, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and permanent magnets to reduce risk and enhance reliability of the convertor as this technology transitions toward flight status. Convertor and generator testing is carried out in short- and long-duration tests designed to characterize convertor performance when subjected to environments intended to simulate launch and space conditions. Long duration testing is intended to baseline performance and observe any performance degradation over the life of the test. Testing involves developing support hardware that enables 24/7 unattended operation and data collection. GRC currently has 14 Stirling convertors under unattended extended operation testing, including two operating in the ASRG Engineering Unit (ASRG-EU). Test data and high-temperature support hardware are discussed for ongoing and future ASC tests with emphasis on the ASC-E and ASC-E2.

  3. Institutional Memory Preservation at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, J.; Moreman, Douglas; Dyer, J.; Hemminger, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    In this era of downsizing and deficit reduction, the preservation of institutional memory is a widespread concern for U.S. companies and governmental agencies. The National Aeronautical and Space Administration faces the pending retirement of many of the agency's long-term, senior engineers. NASA has a marvelous long-term history of success, but the agency faces a recurring problem caused by the loss of these engineers' unique knowledge and perspectives on NASA's role in aeronautics and space exploration. The current work describes a knowledge elicitation effort aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of preserving the more personal, heuristic knowledge accumulated over the years by NASA engineers, as contrasted with the "textbook" knowledge of launch vehicles. Work on this project was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center and elsewhere, and focused on launch vehicle systems integration. The initial effort was directed toward an historic view of the Centaur upper stage which is powered by two RL-10 engines. Various experts were consulted, employing a variety of knowledge elicitation techniques, regarding the Centaur and RL-10. Their knowledge is represented in searchable Web-based multimedia presentations. This paper discusses the various approaches to knowledge elicitation and knowledge representation employed, and assesses successes and challenges in trying to perform large-scale knowledge preservation of institutional memory. It is anticipated that strategies for knowledge elicitation and representation that have been developed in this grant will be utilized to elicit knowledge in a variety of domains including the complex heuristics that underly use of simulation software packages such as that being explored in the Expert System Architecture for Rocket Engine Numerical Simulators.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics research and applications at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, Jerry C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Information on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research and applications carried out at the NASA Langley Research Center is given in viewgraph form. The Langley CFD strategy, the five-year plan in CFD and flow physics, 3-block grid topology, the effect of a patching algorithm, F-18 surface flow, entropy and vorticity effects that improve accuracy of unsteady transonic small disturbance theory, and the effects of reduced frequency on first harmonic components of unsteady pressures due to airfoil pitching are among the topics covered.

  5. Global Biology: An Interdisciplinary Scientific Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, James G.; Colin, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  6. Global biology - An interdisciplinary scientific research program at NASA, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Colin, L.

    1983-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  7. A Survey of Knowledge Management Research & Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This chapter catalogs knowledge management research and development activities at NASA Ames Research Center as of April 2002. A general categorization scheme for knowledge management systems is first introduced. This categorization scheme divides knowledge management capabilities into five broad categories: knowledge capture, knowledge preservation, knowledge augmentation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge infrastructure. Each of nearly 30 knowledge management systems developed at Ames is then classified according to this system. Finally, a capsule description of each system is presented along with information on deployment status, funding sources, contact information, and both published and internet-based references.

  8. A historical overview of tiltrotor aeroelastic research at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    The Bell/Boeing V-22 Osprey which is being developed for the U.S. Military is a tiltrotor aircraft combining the versatility of a helicopter with the range and speed of a turboprop airplane. The V-22 represents a tiltrotor lineage which goes back over forty years, during which time contributions to the technology base needed for its development were made by both government and industry. NASA Langley Research Center has made substantial contributions to tiltrotor technology in several areas, in particular in the area of aeroelasticity. The purpose of this talk is to present a summary of the tiltrotor aeroelastic research conducted at Langley which has contributed to that technology.

  9. Successes of Small Business Innovation Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Bitler, Dean W.; Prok, George M.; Metzger, Marie E.; Dreibelbis, Cindy L.; Ganss, Meghan

    2002-01-01

    This booklet of success stories highlights the NASA Glenn Research Center's accomplishments and successes by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs. These success stories are the results of selecting projects that support NASA missions and also have high commercialization potential. Each success story describes the innovation accomplished, commercialization of the technology, and further applications and usages. This booklet emphasizes the integration and incorporation of technologies into NASA missions and other government projects. The company name and the NASA contact person are identified to encourage further usage and application of the SBIR developed technologies and also to promote further commercialization of these products.

  10. Federally sponsored multidisciplinary research centers: Learning, evaluation, and vicious circles.

    PubMed

    Youtie, Jan; Corley, Elizabeth A

    2011-02-01

    Despite the increasing investment in multi-year federally funded science and technology centers in universities, there are few studies of how these centers engage in learning and change based on information submitted from various agents in the oversight and evaluation process. One challenge is how to manage and respond to this evaluative information, especially when it is conflicting. Although the center can learn and adapt in response to this information, it can also become subject to a vicious circle of continuous restructuring and production of documentation to address various and potentially inconsistent recommendations. In this paper we illustrate the effects of such a dynamic based on our experiences as external evaluators of the $25 million NSF-funded Learning in Informal and Formal Environments (LIFE) Center. The case study presents an analysis of annual reports and strategic planning documents along with other sources of evidence to illustrate the evolution of center organizational approaches in response to evaluations by external review panels, center evaluators, program managers, and other external stakeholders. We conclude with suggestions for how evaluators may help centers ease the cost of learning and reduce the likelihood of a vicious circle.

  11. Teams and teamwork at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The recent reorganization and shift to managing total quality at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has placed an increasing emphasis on teams and teamwork in accomplishing day-to-day work activities and long-term projects. The purpose of this research was to review the nature of teams and teamwork at LaRC. Models of team performance and teamwork guided the gathering of information. Current and former team members served as participants; their collective experience reflected membership in over 200 teams at LaRC. The participants responded to a survey of open-ended questions which assessed various aspects of teams and teamwork. The participants also met in a workshop to clarify and elaborate on their responses. The work accomplished by the teams ranged from high-level managerial decision making (e.g., developing plans for LaRC reorganization) to creating scientific proposals (e.g., describing spaceflight projects to be designed, sold, and built). Teams typically had nine members who remained together for six months. Member turnover was around 20 percent; this turnover was attributed to heavy loads of other work assignments and little formal recognition and reward for team membership. Team members usually shared a common and valued goal, but there was not a clear standard (except delivery of a document) for knowing when the goal was achieved. However, members viewed their teams as successful. A major factor in team success was the setting of explicit a priori rules for communication. Task interdependencies between members were not complex (e.g., sharing of meeting notes and ideas about issues), except between members of scientific teams (i.e., reliance on the expertise of others). Thus, coordination of activities usually involved scheduling and attendance of team meetings. The team leader was designated by the team's sponsor. This leader usually shared power and responsibilities with other members, such that team members established their own operating

  12. "Backlash" or The Dialogic Interanimation between Theory and Research in the Writing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolbright, Meg

    For instructors in college writing centers, doing research is crucial, both for understanding what they do and authorizing who they are. A dialogic relationship between the research undertaken and current theory is particularly crucial. The goal of this research needs to be understanding the relationship between the writing center and the larger…

  13. 34 CFR 350.1 - What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. (Authority: Sec. 204; 29 U.S.C. 762) ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM General § 350.1 What is the...

  14. 34 CFR 350.1 - What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. (Authority: Sec. 204; 29 U.S.C. 762) ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM General § 350.1 What is the...

  15. 34 CFR 350.1 - What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. (Authority: Sec. 204; 29 U.S.C. 762) ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM General § 350.1 What is the...

  16. NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER AND THE TIDEWATER INTERAGENCY POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Langley Research Center (LaRC) is an 807-acre research center devoted to aeronautics and space research. aRC has initiated a broad-based pollution prevention program guided by a Pollution Prevention Program Plan and implement...

  17. 79 FR 62621 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI); Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-10-20

    ... OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI); Nominations... appointing not more than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the...

  18. 79 FR 14514 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-03-14

    ... OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) AGENCY... than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Institutes...

  19. 34 CFR 350.32 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rehabilitation technology; and (ii) Other scientific research to assist in meeting the employment and independent... Research Center conduct? 350.32 Section 350.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering...

  20. 34 CFR 350.32 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rehabilitation technology; and (ii) Other scientific research to assist in meeting the employment and independent... Research Center conduct? 350.32 Section 350.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering...