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Sample records for agrin-induced achr clustering

  1. Common molecular mechanisms in field- and agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor clustering.

    PubMed

    Sabrina, F; Stollberg, J

    1997-04-01

    1. The aggregation of acetylcholine receptors at the developing neuromuscular junction is critical to the development and function of this synapse. In vitro studies have shown that receptor aggregation can be induced by the finding of agrin to the muscle cell surface and by the electric field-induced concentration of a (nonreceptor) molecule at the cathodal cell pole. 2. We report here on the interaction between agrin binding and electric fields with respect to the distribution of receptors and agrin binding sites. 3. (a) Pretreatment of cells with agrin completely blocks the development of field-induced receptor clusters. (b) Field-induced aggregation of receptors precedes the field-induced aggregation of agrin binding sites by approximately 30 min. (c) Electric fields prevent agrin-induced receptor clustering despite the presence of agrin binding sites and freely diffusing receptors. 4. These results indicate that another membrane component-but not the agrin binding site and not the receptor-is required for agrin-induced receptor clustering. They also suggest that electric fields and agrin cause receptor clustering via common molecular mechanisms.

  2. Caffeine and nicotine decrease acetylcholine receptor clustering in C2C12 myotube culture.

    PubMed

    Kordosky-Herrera, Kaia; Grow, Wade A

    2009-02-01

    As motor neurons approach skeletal muscle during development, agrin is released and induces acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Our laboratory investigates the effect of environmental agents on skeletal muscle development by using C2C12 cell culture. For the current project, we investigated both short-term and long-term exposure to caffeine, nicotine, or both, at physiologically relevant concentrations. Short-term exposure was limited to the last 48 h of myotube formation, whereas a long-term exposure of 2 weeks allowed for several generations of myoblast proliferation followed by myotube formation. Both agrin-induced and spontaneous AChR clustering frequencies were assessed. For agrin-induced AChR clustering, agrin was added for the last 16 h of myotube formation. Caffeine, nicotine, or both significantly decreased agrin-induced AChR clustering during short-term and long-term exposure. Furthermore, caffeine, nicotine, or both significantly decreased spontaneous AChR clustering during long-term, but not short-term exposure. Surprisingly, caffeine and nicotine in combination did not decrease AChR clustering beyond the effect of either treatment alone. We conclude that physiologically relevant concentrations of caffeine or nicotine decrease AChR clustering. Moreover, we predict that fetuses exposed to caffeine or nicotine may be less likely to form appropriate neuromuscular synapses.

  3. Myasthenia Gravis and the Tops and Bottoms of AChRs Antigenic Structure of the MIR and Specific Immunosuppression of EAMG Using AChR Cytoplasmic Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Jon; Luo, Jie; Kuryatov, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The main immunogenic region (MIR), against which half or more of the autoantibodies to acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in myasthenia gravis (MG) or experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) are directed, is located at the extracellular end of α1 subunits. Rat monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the MIR efficiently compete with MG patient autoantibodies for binding to human muscle AChRs. Antibodies bound to the MIR do not interfere with cholinergic ligand binding or AChR function, but target complement and trigger antigenic modulation. Rat mAbs to the MIR also bind to human ganglionic AChR α3 subunits, but MG patient antibodies do not. By making chimeras of α1 subunits with α7 subunits or ACh binding protein, the structure of the MIR and its functional effects are being investigated. Many mAbs to the MIR bind only to the native conformation of α1 subunits because they bind to sequences that are adjacent only in the native structure. The MIR epitopes recognized by these mAbs are not recognized by most patient antibodies whose epitopes must be nearby. The presence of the MIR epitopes in α1/α7 chimeras greatly promotes AChR expression and sensitivity to activation. EAMG can be suppressed by treatment with denatured, bacterially expressed mixtures of extracellular and cytoplasmic domains of human α1, β1, γ, δ, and ε subunits. A mixture of only the cytoplasmic domains not only avoids the potential liability of provoking formation antibodies to pathologically significant epitopes on the extracellular surface, but also potently suppresses the development of EAMG. PMID:18567851

  4. Cooperation between the products of different nuclei in hybrid myotubes produces localized acetylcholine receptor clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, H; Ralston, E; Hall, Z W

    1992-01-01

    Cultured myotubes form clusters of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) spontaneously and at sites of nerve-muscle contact. To investigate the cellular mechanisms by which spontaneous clusters are formed, we have made hybrid myotubes between a mouse muscle cell variant, S27, that does not cluster AChRs, and one that does not make AChRs. We have also made hybrid myotubes using S27 and quail muscle cells. In both cases, clusters of AChRs were found near the non-S27 nuclei; in the case of the interspecific hybrids, mouse AChRs were associated with extracellular matrix components contributed by the quail nuclei. Our results suggest that AChRs made by one nucleus can be clustered by localized extracellular matrix produced by a different nucleus and provide an example of nuclear cooperation between the products of different nuclei within multinucleated muscle fibers. Images PMID:1631161

  5. Enzymatic Activity of the Scaffold Protein Rapsyn for Synapse Formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Cao, Yu; Wu, Haitao; Ye, Xinchun; Zhu, Zhihui; Xing, Guanglin; Shen, Chengyong; Barik, Arnab; Zhang, Bin; Xie, Xiaoling; Zhi, Wenbo; Gan, Lin; Su, Huabo; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2016-12-07

    Neurotransmission is ensured by a high concentration of neurotransmitter receptors at the postsynaptic membrane. This is mediated by scaffold proteins that bridge the receptors with cytoskeleton. One such protein is rapsyn (receptor-associated protein at synapse), which is essential for acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering and NMJ (neuromuscular junction) formation. We show that the RING domain of rapsyn contains E3 ligase activity. Mutation of the RING domain that abolishes the enzyme activity inhibits rapsyn- as well as agrin-induced AChR clustering in heterologous and muscle cells. Further biological and genetic studies support a working model where rapsyn, a classic scaffold protein, serves as an E3 ligase to induce AChR clustering and NMJ formation, possibly by regulation of AChR neddylation. This study identifies a previously unappreciated enzymatic function of rapsyn and a role of neddylation in synapse formation, and reveals a potential target of therapeutic intervention for relevant neurological disorders.

  6. Disruption and reformation of the acetylcholine receptor clusters of cultured rat myotubes occur in two distinct stages.

    PubMed

    Pumplin, D W; Bloch, R J

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the redistribution of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) intramembrane particles (IMPs) when AChR clusters of cultured rat myotubes are experimentally disrupted and allowed to reform. In control myotubes, the AChR IMPs are evenly distributed within the AChR domains of cluster membrane. Shortly after addition of azide to disrupt clusters, IMPs become unevenly scattered, with some microaggregation. After longer treatment, IMPs are depleted from AChR domains with no further change in IMP distribution. Contact domains of clusters are relatively poor in IMPs both before and after cluster dispersal. Upon visualization with fluorescent alpha-bungarotoxin, some AChR in azide-treated samples appear as small, bright spots. These spots do not correspond to microaggregates seen in freeze-fracture replicas, and probably represent receptors that have been internalized. The internalization rate is insufficient to account completely for the loss of IMPs from clusters, however. During reformation of AChR clusters upon removal of azide, IMP concentration in receptor domains increases. At early stages of reformation, IMPs appear in small groups containing compact microaggregates. At later times, AChR domains enlarge and IMPs within them assume the evenly spaced distribution characteristic of control clusters. These observations suggest that the disruption of clusters is accompanied by mobilization of AChR from a fixed array, allowing AChR IMPs to diffuse away from the clusters, to form microaggregates, and to become internalized. Cluster reformation appears to be the reverse of this process. Our results are thus consistent with a two-step model for AChR clustering, in which the concentration of IMPs into a small membrane region precedes their rearrangement into evenly spaced sites.

  7. Myopathic changes detected by quantitative electromyography in patients with MuSK and AChR positive myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ana; Basta, Ivana; Stojanovic, Vidosava Rakocevic; Stevic, Zorica; Peric, Stojan; Lavrnic, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    Myopathic changes are frequent a electrophysiological finding in patients with muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) positive myasthenia gravis (MG). The aim of this study was to explore the importance of quantitative electromyography (EMG) in the detection of myopathic changes in MuSK MG patients. Classical and quantitative EMG were performed in 31 MuSK and 28 acetylcholine receptor (AChR) positive MG patients, matched by sex, age, disease duration and severity. Classical EMG revealed the presence of myopathic changes more frequently in MuSK MG compared to AChR MG patients, especially in the facial muscles. Quantitative EMG registered myopathic lesions more frequently than classical EMG, but the frequency was similar between MuSK and AChR MG patients. Quantitative EMG revealed myopathic changes in the majority of both MuSK and AChR positive MG patients. This examination is sensitive, but it cannot be used to differentiate between MG patients belonging to the different disease groups. It should not be used in isolation. Rather, it should complement classical EMG in the detection of myopathic changes.

  8. Increased ratio of rapsyn to ACh receptor stabilizes postsynaptic receptors at the mouse neuromuscular synapse

    PubMed Central

    Gervásio, Othon L; Phillips, William D

    2005-01-01

    The metabolic turnover of nicotinic ACh receptors (AChR) at the neuromuscular synapse is regulated over a tenfold range by innervation status, muscle electrical activity and neural agrin, but the downstream effector of such changes has not been defined. The AChR-associated protein rapsyn is essential for forming AChR clusters during development. Here, rapsyn was tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to begin to probe its influence at the adult synapse. In C2 myotubes, rapsyn–EGFP participated with AChR in agrin-induced AChR cluster formation. When electroporated into the tibialis anterior muscle of young adult mice, rapsyn–EGFP accumulated in discrete subcellular structures, many of which colocalized with Golgi markers, consistent with the idea that rapsyn assembles with AChR in the exocytic pathway. Rapsyn–EGFP also targeted directly to the postsynaptic membrane where it occupied previously vacant rapsyn binding sites, thereby increasing the rapsyn to AChR ratio. At endplates displaying rapsyn–EGFP, the metabolic turnover of AChR (labelled with rhodamine-α-bungarotoxin) was slowed. Thus, the metabolic half-life of receptors at the synapse may be modulated by local changes in the subsynaptic ratio of rapsyn to AChR. PMID:15550459

  9. Dispersal and reformation of acetylcholine receptor clusters of cultured rat myotubes treated with inhibitors of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bloch, R J

    1979-09-01

    The effects of energy metabolism inhibitors on the distribution of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in the surface membranes of non-innervated, cultured rat myotubes were studied by visualizing the AChRs with monotetramethylrhodamine-alpha-bungarotoxin. Incubation of myotubes with inhibitors of energy metabolism causes a large decrease in the fraction of myotubes displaying clusters of AChR. This decrease is reversible, and is dependent on temperature, the concentration of inhibitor, and the duration of treatment. Cluster dispersal is probably not the result of secondary effects on Ca++ or cyclic nucleotide metabolism, membrane potential, cytoskeletal elements, or protein synthesis. Sequential observations of identified cells treated with sodium azide showed that clusters appear to disperse by movements of receptors within the sarcolemma without accompanying changes in cell shape. AChR clusters dispersed by pretreating cells with sodium azide rapidly reform upon removal of the inhibitor. Reclustering involves the formation of small aggregates of AChR, which act as foci for further aggregation and which appear to be precursors of large AChR clusters. Small AChR aggregates also appear to be precursors of clusters which form on myotubes never exposed to azide. Reclustering after azide treatment does not necessarily occur at the same sites occupied by clusters before dispersal, nor does it employ only receptors which had previously been in clusters. Cluster reformation can be blocked by cycloheximide, colchicine, and drugs which alter the intracellular cation composition.

  10. Antibody-Induced Acetylcholine Receptor Clusters Inhabit Liquid-Ordered and Liquid-Disordered Domains

    PubMed Central

    Kamerbeek, Constanza B.; Borroni, Virginia; Pediconi, María F.; Sato, Satoshi B.; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clusters at the cell membrane was studied in CHO-K1/A5 cells using fluorescence microscopy. Di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a fluorescent probe that differentiates between liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases in model membranes, was used in combination with monoclonal anti-AChR antibody labeling of live cells, which induces AChR clustering. The so-called generalized polarization (GP) of di-4-ANEPPDHQ was measured in regions of the cell-surface membrane associated with or devoid of antibody-induced AChR clusters, respectively. AChR clusters were almost equally distributed between Lo and Ld domains, independently of receptor surface levels and agonist (carbamoylcholine and nicotine) or antagonist (α-bungarotoxin) binding. Cholesterol depletion diminished the cell membrane mean di-4-ANEPPDHQ GP and the number of AChR clusters associated with Ld membrane domains increased concomitantly. Depolymerization of the filamentous actin cytoskeleton by Latrunculin A had the opposite effect, with more AChR clusters associated with Lo domains. AChR internalized via small vesicles having lower GP and lower cholesterol content than the surface membrane. Upon cholesterol depletion, only 12% of the AChR-containing vesicles costained with the fluorescent cholesterol analog fPEG-cholesterol, i.e., AChR endocytosis was essentially dissociated from that of cholesterol. In conclusion, the distribution of AChR submicron-sized clusters at the cell membrane appears to be regulated by cholesterol content and cytoskeleton integrity. PMID:24094401

  11. Efficient Expression of Functional (α6β2)2β3 AChRs in Xenopus Oocytes from Free Subunits Using Slightly Modified α6 Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Carson Kai-Kwong; Kuryatov, Alexander; Wang, Jingyi; Lindstrom, Jon Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human (α6β2)(α4β2)β3 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are essential for addiction to nicotine and a target for drug development for smoking cessation. Expressing this complex AChR is difficult, but has been achieved using subunit concatamers. In order to determine what limits expression of α6* AChRs and to efficiently express α6* AChRs using free subunits, we investigated expression of the simpler (α6β2)2β3 AChR. The concatameric form of this AChR assembles well, but is transported to the cell surface inefficiently. Various chimeras of α6 with the closely related α3 subunit increased expression efficiency with free subunits and produced pharmacologically equivalent functional AChRs. A chimera in which the large cytoplasmic domain of α6 was replaced with that of α3 increased assembly with β2 subunits and transport of AChRs to the oocyte surface. Another chimera replacing the unique methionine 211 of α6 with leucine found at this position in transmembrane domain 1 of α3 and other α subunits increased assembly of mature subunits containing β3 subunits within oocytes. Combining both α3 sequences in an α6 chimera increased expression of functional (α6β2)2β3 AChRs to 12-fold more than with concatamers. This is pragmatically useful, and provides insights on features of α6 subunit structure that limit its expression in transfected cells. PMID:25068303

  12. Efficient expression of functional (α6β2)2β3 AChRs in Xenopus oocytes from free subunits using slightly modified α6 subunits.

    PubMed

    Ley, Carson Kai-Kwong; Kuryatov, Alexander; Wang, Jingyi; Lindstrom, Jon Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human (α6β2)(α4β2)β3 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are essential for addiction to nicotine and a target for drug development for smoking cessation. Expressing this complex AChR is difficult, but has been achieved using subunit concatamers. In order to determine what limits expression of α6* AChRs and to efficiently express α6* AChRs using free subunits, we investigated expression of the simpler (α6β2)2β3 AChR. The concatameric form of this AChR assembles well, but is transported to the cell surface inefficiently. Various chimeras of α6 with the closely related α3 subunit increased expression efficiency with free subunits and produced pharmacologically equivalent functional AChRs. A chimera in which the large cytoplasmic domain of α6 was replaced with that of α3 increased assembly with β2 subunits and transport of AChRs to the oocyte surface. Another chimera replacing the unique methionine 211 of α6 with leucine found at this position in transmembrane domain 1 of α3 and other α subunits increased assembly of mature subunits containing β3 subunits within oocytes. Combining both α3 sequences in an α6 chimera increased expression of functional (α6β2)2β3 AChRs to 12-fold more than with concatamers. This is pragmatically useful, and provides insights on features of α6 subunit structure that limit its expression in transfected cells.

  13. Acetylcholine receptor clustering and nuclear movement in muscle fibers in culture

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the formation of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clusters and the behavior of myonuclei in rat and chick skeletal muscle cells grown in cell culture. These cells were treated with a factor derived from Torpedo electric extracellular matrix, which causes a large increase in their number of AChR clusters. We found that these clusters were located preferentially in membrane regions above myonuclei. This cluster-nucleus colocalization is explained by our finding that most of the nuclei near clusters remain relatively stationary, while most of those away from clusters are able to translocate throughout the myotube. In some cases, clusters clearly formed first, then nuclei migrated underneath and became immobilized. If clustered AChRs later dispersed, their associated nuclei resumed moving. These results suggest that AChR clustering initiates an extensive cytoskeletal rearrangement that causes the subcluster localization of organelles, potentially providing a stable source of newly synthesized AChRs for insertion into the cluster. PMID:3793762

  14. ARIA/HRG regulates AChR epsilon subunit gene expression at the neuromuscular synapse via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Ras/MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    AChR-inducing activity (ARIA)/heregulin, a ligand for erbB receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), is likely to be one nerve-supplied signal that induces expression of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) genes at the developing neuromuscular junction. Since some RTKs act through Ras and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), we investigated the role of these pathways in ARIA signaling. Expression of activated Ras or Raf mimicked ARIA-induction of AChR epsilon subunit genes in muscle cells; whereas dominant negative Ras or Raf blocked the effect of ARIA. ARIA rapidly activated erk1 and erk2 and inhibition of both erks also abolished the effect of ARIA. ARIA stimulated association of PI3K with erbB3, expression of an activated PI3K led to ARIA-independent AChR epsilon subunit expression, and inhibition of PI3K abolished the action of ARIA. Thus, synaptic induction of AChR genes requires activation of both Ras/MAPK and PI3K signal transduction pathways. PMID:8707830

  15. Failure of lysosome clustering and positioning in the juxtanuclear region in cells deficient in rapsyn

    PubMed Central

    Aittaleb, Mohamed; Chen, Po-Ju; Akaaboune, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rapsyn, a scaffold protein, is required for the clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at contacts between motor neurons and differentiating muscle cells. Rapsyn is also expressed in cells that do not express AChRs. However, its function in these cells remains unknown. Here, we show that rapsyn plays an AChR-independent role in organizing the distribution and mobility of lysosomes. In cells devoid of AChRs, rapsyn selectively induces the clustering of lysosomes at high density in the juxtanuclear region without affecting the distribution of other intracellular organelles. However, when the same cells overexpress AChRs, rapsyn is recruited away from lysosomes to colocalize with AChR clusters on the cell surface. In rapsyn-deficient (Rapsn−/−) myoblasts or cells overexpressing rapsyn mutants, lysosomes are scattered within the cell and highly dynamic. The increased mobility of lysosomes in Rapsn−/− cells is associated with a significant increase in lysosomal exocytosis, as evidenced by increased release of lysosomal enzymes and plasma membrane damage when cells were challenged with the bacterial pore-forming toxin streptolysin-O. These findings uncover a new link between rapsyn, lysosome positioning, exocytosis and plasma membrane integrity. PMID:26330529

  16. Neuregulin/ErbB regulate neuromuscular junction development by phosphorylation of α-dystrobrevin

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Nadine; Gajendran, Nadesan; Martinez-Pena y Valenzuela, Isabel; Wakefield, Sarah; Thurnheer, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Neuregulin (NRG)/ErbB signaling is involved in numerous developmental processes in the nervous system, including synapse formation and function in the central nervous system. Although intensively investigated, its role at the neuromuscular synapse has remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that loss of neuromuscular NRG/ErbB signaling destabilized anchoring of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in the postsynaptic muscle membrane and that this effect was caused by dephosphorylation of α-dystrobrevin1, a component of the postsynaptic scaffold. Specifically, in mice in which NRG signaling to muscle was genetically or pharmacologically abolished, postsynaptic AChRs moved rapidly from the synaptic to the perisynaptic membrane, and the subsynaptic scaffold that anchors the AChRs was impaired. These defects combined compromised synaptic transmission. We further show that blockade of NRG/ErbB signaling abolished tyrosine phosphorylation of α-dystrobrevin1, which reduced the stability of receptors in agrin-induced AChR clusters in cultured myotubes. Our data indicate that NRG/ErbB signaling maintains high efficacy of synaptic transmission by stabilizing the postsynaptic apparatus via phosphorylation of α-dystrobrevin1. PMID:22184199

  17. Achieving Acetylcholine Receptor Clustering in Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Constructs In vitro through a Materials-Directed Agrin Delivery Approach

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John B.; Ward, Catherine L.; Corona, Benjamin T.; Deschenes, Michael R.; Harrison, Benjamin S.; Saul, Justin M.; Christ, George J.

    2017-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) can result from trauma, infection, congenital anomalies, or surgery, and produce permanent functional and cosmetic deficits. There are no effective treatment options for VML injuries, and recent advances toward development of muscle constructs lack the ability to achieve innervation necessary for long-term function. We sought to develop a proof-of-concept biomaterial construct that could achieve acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering on muscle-derived cells (MDCs) in vitro. The approach consisted of the presentation of neural (Z+) agrin from the surface of microspheres embedded with a fibrin hydrogel to muscle cells (C2C12 cell line or primary rat MDCs). AChR clustering was spatially restricted to areas of cell (C2C12)-microsphere contact when the microspheres were delivered in suspension or when they were incorporated into a thin (2D) fibrin hydrogel. AChR clusters were observed from 16 to 72 h after treatment when Z+ agrin was adsorbed to the microspheres, and for greater than 120 h when agrin was covalently coupled to the microspheres. Little to no AChR clustering was observed when agrin-coated microspheres were delivered from specially designed 3D fibrin constructs. However, cyclic stretch in combination with agrin-presenting microspheres led to dramatic enhancement of AChR clustering in cells cultured on these 3D fibrin constructs, suggesting a synergistic effect between mechanical strain and agrin stimulation of AChR clustering in vitro. These studies highlight a strategy for maintaining a physiological phenotype characterized by motor endplates of muscle cells used in tissue engineering strategies for muscle regeneration. As such, these observations may provide an important first step toward improving function of tissue-engineered constructs for treatment of VML injuries. PMID:28123368

  18. Achieving Acetylcholine Receptor Clustering in Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Constructs In vitro through a Materials-Directed Agrin Delivery Approach.

    PubMed

    Scott, John B; Ward, Catherine L; Corona, Benjamin T; Deschenes, Michael R; Harrison, Benjamin S; Saul, Justin M; Christ, George J

    2016-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) can result from trauma, infection, congenital anomalies, or surgery, and produce permanent functional and cosmetic deficits. There are no effective treatment options for VML injuries, and recent advances toward development of muscle constructs lack the ability to achieve innervation necessary for long-term function. We sought to develop a proof-of-concept biomaterial construct that could achieve acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering on muscle-derived cells (MDCs) in vitro. The approach consisted of the presentation of neural (Z+) agrin from the surface of microspheres embedded with a fibrin hydrogel to muscle cells (C2C12 cell line or primary rat MDCs). AChR clustering was spatially restricted to areas of cell (C2C12)-microsphere contact when the microspheres were delivered in suspension or when they were incorporated into a thin (2D) fibrin hydrogel. AChR clusters were observed from 16 to 72 h after treatment when Z+ agrin was adsorbed to the microspheres, and for greater than 120 h when agrin was covalently coupled to the microspheres. Little to no AChR clustering was observed when agrin-coated microspheres were delivered from specially designed 3D fibrin constructs. However, cyclic stretch in combination with agrin-presenting microspheres led to dramatic enhancement of AChR clustering in cells cultured on these 3D fibrin constructs, suggesting a synergistic effect between mechanical strain and agrin stimulation of AChR clustering in vitro. These studies highlight a strategy for maintaining a physiological phenotype characterized by motor endplates of muscle cells used in tissue engineering strategies for muscle regeneration. As such, these observations may provide an important first step toward improving function of tissue-engineered constructs for treatment of VML injuries.

  19. miR-434-3p and DNA hypomethylation co-regulate eIF5A1 to increase AChRs and to improve plasticity in SCT rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Fei-Fei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Liu, Wei; Xia, Lei; Qian, Bao-Jiang; You, Ling; He, Mu; Yang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) serve as connections between motor neurons and skeletal muscle and are essential for recovery from spinal cord transection (SCT). Recently, microRNAs have emerged as important potential biotherapeutics for several diseases; however, whether miRNAs operate in the modulation of AChRs remains unknown. We found increased AChRs numbers and function scores in rats with SCT; these increases were reduced following the injection of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) shRNA lentivirus into the hindlimb muscle. Then, high-throughput screening for microRNAs targeting eIF5A1 was performed, and miR-434-3p was found to be robustly depleted in SCT rat skeletal muscle. Furthermore, a highly conserved miR-434-3p binding site was identified within the mRNA encoding eIF5A1 through bioinformatics analysis and dual-luciferase assay. Overexpression or knockdown of miR-434-3p in vivo demonstrated it was a negative post-transcriptional regulator of eIF5A1 expression and influenced AChRs expression. The microarray-enriched Gene Ontology (GO) terms regulated by miR-434-3p were muscle development terms. Using a lentivirus, one functional gene (map2k6) was confirmed to have a similar function to that of miR-434-3p in GO terms. Finally, HRM and MeDIP-PCR analyses revealed that DNA demethylation also up-regulated eIF5A1 after SCT. Consequently, miR-434-3p/eIF5A1 in muscle is a promising potential biotherapy for SCI repair. PMID:26964899

  20. Schwann cells and myasthenia gravis. Preferential uptake of soluble and membrane-bound AChR by normal and immortalized Schwann cells, and immunogenic presentation to AChR-specific T line lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. P.; Porter, S.; Wekerle, H.

    1990-01-01

    The normal neuromuscular synapse is formed by the intimate association of nerve endings, postsynaptic end-plate foldings in the muscle fiber, and nonmyelinating Schwann cells (SC) sealing the synaptic ramifications. Because SC have been recognized recently to have an immunogenic potential inducible to present protein autoantigens to autoimmune T lymphocytes, and considering their close proximity to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-bearing postsynaptic membranes, presentation of soluble and membrane vesicle-bound AChR to appropriate T cells was investigated. Short-term monolayer cultures of SC isolated from neonatal rat sciatic nerves, as well as cells of an immortalized SC line of similar origin, were fully able to present the relevant molecular epitopes to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) compatible AChR-specific T line lymphocytes immunogenically. Presentation of AChR was restricted by RT1.B (I-A) MHC class II products. Both types of cultured rat SC were inducible to expression of MHC class I and II products, and they were able to phagocytose AChR-enriched membrane vesicles preferentially. In contrast, phagocytosis of latex particles by SC was negligible. These data qualify perisynaptic SC as potential presenter cells of autoimmunogenic AChR in myasthenia gravis. Thus, SC may play a critical and as-yet unpredicted regulatory role in the cellular pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. Images Figure 5 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:1688688

  1. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  2. APP interacts with LRP4 and agrin to coordinate the development of the neuromuscular junction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hong Y; Liu, Yun; Tennert, Christian; Sugiura, Yoshie; Karakatsani, Andromachi; Kröger, Stephan; Johnson, Eric B; Hammer, Robert E; Lin, Weichun; Herz, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    ApoE, ApoE receptors and APP cooperate in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Intriguingly, the ApoE receptor LRP4 and APP are also required for normal formation and function of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In this study, we show that APP interacts with LRP4, an obligate co-receptor for muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Agrin, a ligand for LRP4, also binds to APP and co-operatively enhances the interaction of APP with LRP4. In cultured myotubes, APP synergistically increases agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Deletion of the transmembrane domain of LRP4 (LRP4 ECD) results in growth retardation of the NMJ, and these defects are markedly enhanced in APP−/−;LRP4ECD/ECD mice. Double mutant NMJs are significantly reduced in size and number, resulting in perinatal lethality. Our findings reveal novel roles for APP in regulating neuromuscular synapse formation through hetero-oligomeric interaction with LRP4 and agrin and thereby provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern NMJ formation and maintenance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00220.001 PMID:23986861

  3. Structural basis of agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zong, Yinong; Zhang, Bin; Gu, Shenyan; Lee, Kwangkook; Zhou, Jie; Yao, Guorui; Figueiredo, Dwight; Perry, Kay; Mei, Lin; Jin, Rongsheng

    2012-06-27

    Synapses are the fundamental units of neural circuits that enable complex behaviors. The neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a synapse formed between a motoneuron and a muscle fiber, has contributed greatly to understanding of the general principles of synaptogenesis as well as of neuromuscular disorders. NMJ formation requires neural agrin, a motoneuron-derived protein, which interacts with LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4) to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle-specific kinase). However, little is known of how signals are transduced from agrin to MuSK. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an agrin-LRP4 complex, consisting of two agrin-LRP4 heterodimers. Formation of the initial binary complex requires the z8 loop that is specifically present in neuronal, but not muscle, agrin and that promotes the synergistic formation of the tetramer through two additional interfaces. We show that the tetrameric complex is essential for neuronal agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Collectively, these results provide new insight into the agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling cascade and NMJ formation and represent a novel mechanism for activation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

  4. Induced formation and maturation of acetylcholine receptor clusters in a defined 3D bio-artificial muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Shansky, Janet; Vandenburgh, Herman

    2013-12-01

    Dysfunction of the neuromuscular junction is involved in a wide range of muscular diseases. The development of neuromuscular junction through which skeletal muscle is innervated requires the functional modulation of acetylcholine receptor (AchR) clustering on myofibers. However, studies on AchR clustering in vitro are mostly done on monolayer muscle cell culture, which lacks a three-dimensional (3D) structure, a prominent limitation of the two-dimensional (2D) system. To enable a better understanding on the structure-function correlation underlying skeletal muscle innervation, a muscle system with a well-defined geometry mimicking the in vivo muscular setting is needed. Here, we report a 3D bio-artificial muscle (BAM) bioengineered from green fluorescent protein-transduced C3H murine myoblasts as a novel in vitro tissue-based model for muscle innervation studies. Our cell biological and molecular analysis showed that this BAM is structurally similar to in vivo muscle tissue and can reach the perinatal differentiation stage, higher than does 2D culture. Effective clustering and morphological maturation of AchRs on BAMs induced by agrin and laminin indicate the functional activity and plasticity of this BAM system toward innervation. Taken together, our results show that the BAM provides a favorable 3D environment that at least partially recapitulates real physiological skeletal muscle with regard to innervation. With a convenience of fabrication and manipulation, this 3D in vitro system offers a novel model for studying mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle innervation and testing therapeutic strategies for relevant nervous and muscular diseases.

  5. Cluster Headache

    MedlinePlus

    Cluster headache Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cluster headaches, which occur in cyclical patterns or clusters, are one of the most painful types of headache. A cluster headache commonly awakens you ...

  6. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  7. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  8. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  9. IgG4 autoantibodies against muscle-specific kinase undergo Fab-arm exchange in myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Koneczny, Inga; Stevens, Jo A A; De Rosa, Anna; Huda, Saif; Huijbers, Maartje G; Saxena, Abhishek; Maestri, Michelangelo; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzartos, Socrates; Verschuuren, Jan; van der Maarel, Silvère M; van Damme, Philip; De Baets, Marc H; Molenaar, Peter C; Vincent, Angela; Ricciardi, Roberta; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Losen, Mario

    2017-02-01

    Autoimmunity mediated by IgG4 subclass autoantibodies is an expanding field of research. Due to their structural characteristics a key feature of IgG4 antibodies is the ability to exchange Fab-arms with other, unrelated, IgG4 molecules, making the IgG4 molecule potentially monovalent for the specific antigen. However, whether those disease-associated antigen-specific IgG4 are mono- or divalent for their antigens is unknown. Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies to muscle specific kinase (MuSK-MG) is a well-recognized disease in which the predominant pathogenic IgG4 antibody binds to extracellular epitopes on MuSK at the neuromuscular junction; this inhibits a pathway that clusters the acetylcholine (neurotransmitter) receptors and leads to failure of neuromuscular transmission. In vitro Fab-arm exchange-inducing conditions were applied to MuSK antibodies in sera, purified IgG4 and IgG1-3 sub-fractions. Solid-phase cross-linking assays were established to determine the extent of pre-existing and inducible Fab-arm exchange. Functional effects of the resulting populations of IgG4 antibodies were determined by measuring inhibition of agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. To confirm the results, κ/κ, λ/λ and hybrid κ/λ IgG4s were isolated and tested for MuSK antibodies. At least fifty percent of patients had IgG4, but not IgG1-3, MuSK antibodies that could undergo Fab-arm exchange in vitro under reducing conditions. Also MuSK antibodies were found in vivo that were divalent (monospecific for MuSK). Fab-arm exchange with normal human IgG4 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of serum derived MuSK antibodies on AChR clustering in C2C12 mouse myotubes. The results suggest that a considerable proportion of MuSK IgG4 could already be Fab-arm exchanged in vivo. This was confirmed by isolating endogenous IgG4 MuSK antibodies containing both κ and λ light chains, i.e. hybrid IgG4 molecules. These new findings demonstrate that Fab-arm exchanged antibodies

  10. About the Clusters Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  11. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  12. Sorbs1 and -2 Interact with CrkL and Are Required for Acetylcholine Receptor Cluster Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hallock, Peter T.; Chin, Sherry; Blais, Steven; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Crk and CrkL are noncatalytic adaptor proteins necessary for the formation of neuromuscular synapses which function downstream of muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in skeletal muscle, and the MuSK binding protein Dok-7. How Crk/CrkL regulate neuromuscular endplate formation is not known. To better understand the roles of Crk/CrkL, we identified CrkL binding proteins using mass spectrometry and have identified Sorbs1 and Sorbs2 as two functionally redundant proteins that associate with the initiating MuSK/Dok-7/Crk/CrkL complex, regulate acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering in vitro, and are localized at synapses in vivo. PMID:26527617

  13. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  14. Spitzer Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  15. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  16. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  17. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  18. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  19. Cluster bulleticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. Constraints on the properties of dark matter, such as its interaction cross-section, are therefore restricted by uncertainties in the individual systems' impact velocity, impact parameter and orientation with respect to the line of sight. Here we develop a complementary, statistical measurement in which every piece of substructure falling into every massive cluster is treated as a bullet. We define 'bulleticity' as the mean separation between dark matter and ordinary matter, and we measure the signal in hydrodynamical simulations. The phase space of substructure orbits also exhibits symmetries that provide an equivalent control test. Any detection of bulleticity in real data would indicate a difference in the interaction cross-sections of baryonic and dark matter that may rule out hypotheses of non-particulate dark matter that are otherwise able to model individual systems. A subsequent measurement of bulleticity could constrain the dark matter cross-section. Even with conservative estimates, the existing Hubble Space Telescope archive should yield an independent constraint tighter than that from the bullet cluster. This technique is then trivially extendable to and benefits enormously from larger, future surveys.

  20. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke) and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms) has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments) and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments). Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the hypothalamus and

  1. Formation of Cluster Complexes by Cluster-Cluster-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihashi, Masahiko; Odaka, Hideho

    2015-03-01

    Multi-element clusters are interested in their chemical and physical properties, and it is expected that they are utilized as catalysts, for example. Their properties critically depend on the size, composition and atomic ordering, and it should be important to adjust the above parameters for their functionality. One of the ways to form a multi-element cluster is to employ a low-energy collision between clusters. Here, we show characteristic results obtained in the collision between a neutral Ar cluster and a size-selected Co cluster ion. Low-energy collision experiment was accomplished by using a newly developed merging-beam apparatus. Cobalt cluster ions were produced by laser ablation, and mass-selected. On the other hand, argon clusters were prepared by the supersonic expansion of Ar gas. Both cluster beams were merged together in an ion guide, and ionic cluster complexes were mass-analyzed. In the collision of Co2+ and ArN, Co2Arn+ (n = 1 - 30) were observed, and the total intensity of Co2Arn+ (n >= 1) is inversely proportional to the relative velocity between Co2+ and ArN. This suggests that the charge-induced dipole interaction between Co2+ and a neutral Ar cluster is dominant in the formation of the cluster complex, Co2+Arn.

  2. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  3. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor

    Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard ΛCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant (Λ) and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM), structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging. Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang, hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics. The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions: the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulence are developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thus our review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clusters is to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses. New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopes will come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities, we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  4. Gold-bismuth clusters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana

    2014-08-07

    Metal clusters have interesting characteristics, such as the relationship between properties and size of the cluster. This is not always apparent, so theoretical studies can provide relevant information. In this report, optimized structures and electron donor-acceptor properties of AunBim clusters are reported (n + m = 2-7, 20). Density functional theory calculations were performed to obtain optimized structures. The ground states of gold clusters formed with up to seven atoms are planar. The presence of Bi modifies the structure, and the clusters become 3-D. Several optimized geometries have at least one Bi atom bonded to gold or bismuth atoms and form structures similar to NH3. This fragment is also present in clusters with 20 atoms, where the formation of Au3Bi stabilizes the structures. Bismuth clusters are better electron donors and worse electron acceptors than gold clusters. Mixed clusters fall in between these two extremes. The presence of Bi atoms in gold clusters modifies the electron donor-acceptor properties of the clusters, but there is no correlation between the number of Bi atoms present in the cluster and the capacity for donating electrons. The effect of planarity in Au19Bi clusters is the same as that in Au20 clusters. The properties of pure gold clusters are certainly interesting, but clusters formed by Bi and Au are more important because the introduction of different atoms modifies the geometry, the stability, and consequently the physical and chemical properties. Apparently, the presence of Bi may increase the reactivity of gold clusters, but further studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis.

  5. Nuclear Clusters in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  6. Matlab Cluster Ensemble Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Sapio, Vincent De; Kegelmeyer, Philip

    2009-04-27

    This is a Matlab toolbox for investigating the application of cluster ensembles to data classification, with the objective of improving the accuracy and/or speed of clustering. The toolbox divides the cluster ensemble problem into four areas, providing functionality for each. These include, (1) synthetic data generation, (2) clustering to generate individual data partitions and similarity matrices, (3) consensus function generation and final clustering to generate ensemble data partitioning, and (4) implementation of accuracy metrics. With regard to data generation, Gaussian data of arbitrary dimension can be generated. The kcenters algorithm can then be used to generate individual data partitions by either, (a) subsampling the data and clustering each subsample, or by (b) randomly initializing the algorithm and generating a clustering for each initialization. In either case an overall similarity matrix can be computed using a consensus function operating on the individual similarity matrices. A final clustering can be performed and performance metrics are provided for evaluation purposes.

  7. [Pathophysiology of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Donnet, Anne

    2015-11-01

    The aetiology of cluster headache is partially unknown. Three areas are involved in the pathogenesis of cluster headache: the trigeminal nociceptive pathways, the autonomic system and the hypothalamus. The cluster headache attack involves activation of the trigeminal autonomic reflex. A dysfunction located in posterior hypothalamic gray matter is probably pivotal in the process. There is a probable association between smoke exposure, a possible genetic predisposition and the development of cluster headache.

  8. Clustering algorithm studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2001-07-01

    An object-oriented framework for undertaking clustering algorithm studies has been developed. We present here the definitions for the abstract Cells and Clusters as well as the interface for the algorithm. We intend to use this framework to investigate the interplay between various clustering algorithms and the resulting jet reconstruction efficiency and energy resolutions to assist in the design of the calorimeter detector.

  9. A new clustering strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-xin; Tang, Jia-fu; Wang, Guang-xing

    2007-04-01

    On the basis of the analysis of clustering algorithm that had been proposed for MANET, a novel clustering strategy was proposed in this paper. With the trust defined by statistical hypothesis in probability theory and the cluster head selected by node trust and node mobility, this strategy can realize the function of the malicious nodes detection which was neglected by other clustering algorithms and overcome the deficiency of being incapable of implementing the relative mobility metric of corresponding nodes in the MOBIC algorithm caused by the fact that the receiving power of two consecutive HELLO packet cannot be measured. It's an effective solution to cluster MANET securely.

  10. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  11. Unconventional methods for clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Cluster analysis or clustering is a task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense or another) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). It is the main task of exploratory data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. The topic of this paper is one of the modern methods of clustering namely SOM (Self Organising Map). The paper describes the theory needed to understand the principle of clustering and descriptions of algorithm used with clustering in our experiments.

  12. Fuzzy Subspace Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgelt, Christian

    In clustering we often face the situation that only a subset of the available attributes is relevant for forming clusters, even though this may not be known beforehand. In such cases it is desirable to have a clustering algorithm that automatically weights attributes or even selects a proper subset. In this paper I study such an approach for fuzzy clustering, which is based on the idea to transfer an alternative to the fuzzifier (Klawonn and Höppner, What is fuzzy about fuzzy clustering? Understanding and improving the concept of the fuzzifier, In: Proc. 5th Int. Symp. on Intelligent Data Analysis, 254-264, Springer, Berlin, 2003) to attribute weighting fuzzy clustering (Keller and Klawonn, Int J Uncertain Fuzziness Knowl Based Syst 8:735-746, 2000). In addition, by reformulating Gustafson-Kessel fuzzy clustering, a scheme for weighting and selecting principal axes can be obtained. While in Borgelt (Feature weighting and feature selection in fuzzy clustering, In: Proc. 17th IEEE Int. Conf. on Fuzzy Systems, IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ, 2008) I already presented such an approach for a global selection of attributes and principal axes, this paper extends it to a cluster-specific selection, thus arriving at a fuzzy subspace clustering algorithm (Parsons, Haque, and Liu, 2004).

  13. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  14. Information-based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Slonim, Noam; Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2005-01-01

    In an age of increasingly large data sets, investigators in many different disciplines have turned to clustering as a tool for data analysis and exploration. Existing clustering methods, however, typically depend on several nontrivial assumptions about the structure of data. Here, we reformulate the clustering problem from an information theoretic perspective that avoids many of these assumptions. In particular, our formulation obviates the need for defining a cluster “prototype,” does not require an a priori similarity metric, is invariant to changes in the representation of the data, and naturally captures nonlinear relations. We apply this approach to different domains and find that it consistently produces clusters that are more coherent than those extracted by existing algorithms. Finally, our approach provides a way of clustering based on collective notions of similarity rather than the traditional pairwise measures. PMID:16352721

  15. Clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhlinin, A. A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Markevich, M. L.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Churazov, E. M.

    2014-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are formed via nonlinear growth of primordial density fluctuations and are the most massive gravitationally bound objects in the present Universe. Their number density at different epochs and their properties depend strongly on the properties of dark matter and dark energy, making clusters a powerful tool for observational cosmology. Observations of the hot gas filling the gravitational potential well of a cluster allows studying gasdynamic and plasma effects and the effect of supermassive black holes on the heating and cooling of gas on cluster scales. The work of Yakov Borisovich Zeldovich has had a profound impact on virtually all cosmological and astrophysical studies of galaxy clusters, introducing concepts such as the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum, the Zeldovich approximation, baryon acoustic peaks, and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Here, we review the most basic properties of clusters and their role in modern astrophysics and cosmology.

  16. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DME )nCH3OCH 2 +). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. One likely candidate is...the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME , within the bulk cluster to form a trimethyloxonlum cation intermediate. This...the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to the same products, should involve the same mechanism found to

  17. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    and ( DME ).CH 3OCH2+). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. A likely candidate...is the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME within the bulk cluster, to form a trimethyloxonium cation intermediate...a trimethyloxonium intermediate as the common intermediate for the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to

  18. Cluster State Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    nearest neighbor cluster state has been shown to be a universal resource for MBQC thus we can say our quantum computer is universal. We note that...CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION FEBRUARY 2014 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED STINFO COPY AIR FORCE...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62788F 6

  19. Chemical Reactions in Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-04

    NH 3)n, n _> 4, clusters has been attributed to the (solvated) naphtholate anion.3a A single picosecond decay measurement has been reported which...vibrational energy in the cluster Sl state. The data are summarized in Table I. A model to explain these decay results can be constructed based on a proton...11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Chemical Reactions in Clusters 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Elliot R. Bernstein 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED

  20. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  1. Melting of nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, I.L.; Jellinek, J.

    1991-12-31

    The meltinglike phenomenon in Ni{sub n}, n = 19,20,55, clusters is studied using microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction between the atoms in the clusters is modelled by a size-dependent Gupta-like potential that incorporates many-body effects. The clusters display the ``usual`` stages in their meltinglike transition, which characterize also Lennard-Jones (e.g., noble gas) and ionic clusters. In addition, Ni{sub 20} passes through a so-called premelting stage found earlier also for Ni{sub 14}. 11 ref., 3 figs.

  2. Melting of nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, I.L. . Inst. de Fisica); Jellinek, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The meltinglike phenomenon in Ni{sub n}, n = 19,20,55, clusters is studied using microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction between the atoms in the clusters is modelled by a size-dependent Gupta-like potential that incorporates many-body effects. The clusters display the usual'' stages in their meltinglike transition, which characterize also Lennard-Jones (e.g., noble gas) and ionic clusters. In addition, Ni{sub 20} passes through a so-called premelting stage found earlier also for Ni{sub 14}. 11 ref., 3 figs.

  3. Mini-clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinellato, J. A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Bellandifilho, J.; Lattes, C. M. G.; Menon, M. J.; Navia, C. E.; Pamilaju, A.; Sawayanagi, K.; Shibuya, E. H.; Turtelli, A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of mini-clusters observed in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber no.19 are summarized. The study was made on 54 single core shower upper and 91 shower clusters of E(gamma) 10 TeV from 30 families which are visible energy greater than 80 TeV and penetrate through both upper and lower detectors of the two-story chamber. The association of hadrons in mini-cluster is made clear from their penetrative nature and microscopic observation of shower continuation in lower chamber. Small P sub t (gamma) of hadrons in mini-clusters remained in puzzle.

  4. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-15

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems.

  5. A nonparametric clustering technique which estimates the number of clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    In applications of cluster analysis, one usually needs to determine the number of clusters, K, and the assignment of observations to each cluster. A clustering technique based on recursive application of a multivariate test of bimodality which automatically estimates both K and the cluster assignments is presented.

  6. Photoionization of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, R. P.; Calo, J. M.

    1981-12-01

    An experimental apparatus consisting of a novel multiple expansion cluster source coupled with a molecular beam system and photoionization mass spectrometer has been designed and constructed. This apparatus has been thoroughly tested and preliminary measurements of the growth kinetics of water clusters and the photoionization cross section of the water dimer have been carried out.

  7. Probability and Cancer Clusters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton-Keene, Rachael; Lenard, Christoper T.; Mills, Terry M.

    2009-01-01

    Recently there have been several news items about possible cancer clusters in the Australian media. The term "cancer cluster" is used when an unusually large number of people in one geographic area, often a workplace, are diagnosed with cancer in a short space of time. In this paper the authors explore this important health issue using…

  8. Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  9. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  10. Cluster Guide. Accounting Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverton School District 48, OR.

    Based on a recent task inventory of key occupations in the accounting cluster taken in the Portland, Oregon, area, this curriculum guide is intended to assist administrators and teachers in the design and implementation of high school accounting cluster programs. The guide is divided into four major sections: program organization and…

  11. Marketing Occupations. Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This cluster guide, which is designed to show teachers what specific knowledge and skills qualify high school students for entry-level employment (or postsecondary training) in marketing occupations, is organized into three sections: (1) cluster organization and implementation, (2) instructional emphasis areas, and (3) assessment. The first…

  12. Ultrametric Hierarchical Clustering Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Glenn W.

    1979-01-01

    Johnson has shown that the single linkage and complete linkage hierarchical clustering algorithms induce a metric on the data known as the ultrametric. Johnson's proof is extended to four other common clustering algorithms. Two additional methods also produce hierarchical structures which can violate the ultrametric inequality. (Author/CTM)

  13. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  14. Targeting Clusters, Achieving Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Stuart; Jacobs, Jim; Liston, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that groups, or clusters, of industries form partnerships with community colleges in order to positively impact economic development. Asserts that a cluster-oriented community college system requires innovation, specialized resources and expertise, knowledge of trends, and links to industry. Offers suggestions for developing such a…

  15. Multiple frame cluster tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadaleta, Sabino; Klusman, Mike; Poore, Aubrey; Slocumb, Benjamin J.

    2002-08-01

    Tracking large number of closely spaced objects is a challenging problem for any tracking system. In missile defense systems, countermeasures in the form of debris, chaff, spent fuel, and balloons can overwhelm tracking systems that track only individual objects. Thus, tracking these groups or clusters of objects followed by transitions to individual object tracking (if and when individual objects separate from the groups) is a necessary capability for a robust and real-time tracking system. The objectives of this paper are to describe the group tracking problem in the context of multiple frame target tracking and to formulate a general assignment problem for the multiple frame cluster/group tracking problem. The proposed approach forms multiple clustering hypotheses on each frame of data and base individual frame clustering decisions on the information from multiple frames of data in much the same way that MFA or MHT work for individual object tracking. The formulation of the assignment problem for resolved object tracking and candidate clustering methods for use in multiple frame cluster tracking are briefly reviewed. Then, three different formulations are presented for the combination of multiple clustering hypotheses on each frame of data and the multiple frame assignments of clusters between frames.

  16. Brightest Cluster Galaxy Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haarsma, D. B.; Sebald, D. A.; ACCEPT Team

    2011-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) play an important role in several fields of astronomical research. The literature includes many different methods and criteria for identifying the BCG in the cluster, such as choosing the brightest galaxy, the galaxy nearest the X-ray peak, or the galaxy with the most extended profile. Here we examine a sample of 75 clusters from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), measuring masked magnitudes and profiles for BCG candidates in each cluster. We first identified galaxies by hand; in 15% of clusters at least one team member selected a different galaxy than the others.We also applied 6 other identification methods to the ACCEPT sample; in 30% of clusters at least one of these methods selected a different galaxy than the other methods. We then developed an algorithm that weighs brightness, profile, and proximity to the X-ray peak and centroid. This algorithm incorporates the advantages of by-hand identification (weighing multiple properties) and automated selection (repeatable and consistent). The BCG population chosen by the algorithm is more uniform in its properties than populations selected by other methods, particularly in the relation between absolute magnitude (a proxy for galaxy mass) and average gas temperature (a proxy for cluster mass). This work supported by a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and a Sid Jansma Summer Research Fellowship.

  17. Hybridization schemes for clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    The concept of an optimum hybridization scheme for cluster compounds is developed with particular reference to electron counting. The prediction of electron counts for clusters and the interpretation of the bonding is shown to depend critically upon the presumed hybridization pattern of the cluster vertex atoms. This fact has not been properly appreciated in previous work, particularly in applications of Stone's tensor surface harmonic (TSH) theory, but is found to be a useful tool when dealt with directly. A quantitative definition is suggested for the optimum cluster hybridization pattern based directly upon the ease of interpretation of the molecular orbitals, and results are given for a range of species. The relationship of this scheme to the detailed cluster geometry is described using Löwdin's partitioned perturbation theory, and the success and range of application of TSH theory are discussed.

  18. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Varganov, Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2005-01-01

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms to

  19. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Plionis, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing, and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exist, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude, and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z ≲ 0.1 with member galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR10 spectroscopic data base. After excluding a number of substructured clusters, which could provide erroneous indications of rotation, and taking into account the expected fraction of misidentified coherent substructure velocities for rotation, provided by our Monte Carlo simulation analysis, we find that ∼23 per cent of our clusters are rotating under a set of strict criteria. Loosening the strictness of the criteria, on the expense of introducing spurious rotation indications, we find this fraction increasing to ∼28 per cent. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation within 1.5 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc that the significance of their rotation is related to the dynamically younger phases of cluster formation but after the initial anisotropic accretion and merging has been completed. Finally, finding rotational modes in galaxy clusters could lead to the necessity of correcting the dynamical cluster mass calculations.

  20. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Sanfilippo, Antonio; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  1. Evolution Properties of Clusters and AXAF Contributions to understanding Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine

    1998-01-01

    Our ROSAT survey for distant clusters of galaxies contains the largest solid angle of all ROSAT pointed surveying and thus has sufficient area to test the previously reported cluster evolution. We find significant negative cluster evolution, i.e,, at high redshifts there are fewer luminous clusters than at present. We compare optical cluster properties for the most distant clusters in the ROSAT survey with those measured for nearby clusters. We also present AXAF capabilities and show how AXAF will significantly extend our understanding of cluster properties and their cosmological evolution.

  2. Studies in clustering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stell, George

    In recent years the properties of percolation models have been studied intensively. The purpose of our project was to develop a general theory of percolation and clustering between particles of arbitrary size and shape, with arbitrary correlations between them. The goal of such a theory includes the treatment of continuum percolation as well as a novel treatment of lattice percolation. We made substantial progress toward this goal. The quantities basic to a description of clustering, the mean cluster size, mean number of clusters, etc., were developed. Concise formulas were given for the terms in such series, and proved, at least for sufficiently low densities, that the series are absolutely convergent. These series can now be used to construct Pade approximants that will allow one to probe the percolation transition. A scaled-particle theory of percolation was developed which gives analytic approximants for the mean number of clusters in a large class of two and three dimensional percolation models. Although this quantity is essential in many applications, e.g., explaining colligative properties, and interpreting low-angle light-scattering data, no systematic studies of it have been done before this work. Recently carried out detailed computer simulations show that the mean number of clusters is given to high accuracy by several of there approximations. Extensions of this work will allow calculation of the complete cluster size distribution.

  3. Nuclear Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumayer, Nadine

    2017-03-01

    The centers of galaxies host two distinct, compact components: massive black holes and nuclear star clusters. Nuclear star clusters are the densest stellar systems in the universe, with masses of ~ 107M⊙ and sizes of ~ 5pc. They are almost ubiquitous at the centres of nearby galaxies with masses similar to, or lower than the Milky Way. Their occurrence both in spirals and dwarf elliptical galaxies appears to be a strong function of total galaxy light or mass. Nucleation fractions are up to 100% for total galaxy magnitudes of M B = -19mag or total galaxy luminosities of about L B = 1010 L ⊙ and falling nucleation fractions for both smaller and higher galaxy masses. Although nuclear star clusters are so common, their formation mechanisms are still under debate. The two main formation scenarios proposed are the infall and subsequent merging of star clusters and the in-situ formation of stars at the center of a galaxy. Here, I review the state-of-the-art of nuclear star cluster observations concerning their structure, stellar populations and kinematics. These observations are used to constrain the proposed formation scenarios for nuclear star clusters. Constraints from observations show, that likely both cluster infall and in-situ star formation are at work. The relative importance of these two mechanisms is still subject of investigation.

  4. Allodynia in Cluster Headache.

    PubMed

    Wilbrink, Leopoldine A; Louter, Mark A; Teernstra, Onno Pm; van Zwet, Erik W; Huygen, Frank Jpm; Haan, Joost; Ferrari, Michel D; Terwindt, Gisela M

    2017-03-04

    Cutaneous allodynia is an established marker for central sensitization in migraine. There is debate whether cutaneous allodynia may also occur in cluster headache, another episodic headache disorder. Here we examined the presence and severity of allodynia in a large well-defined nation-wide population of people with cluster headache.Using validated questionnaires we assessed, cross-sectionally, ictal allodynia and comorbid depression and migraine in the nation-wide "Leiden University Cluster headache neuro-Analysis" (LUCA) study. Participants with cluster headache were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. Multivariate regression models were used, with correction for demographic factors and cluster headache subtype (chronic vs. episodic; recent attacks < 1 month vs. no recent attacks).In total 606/798 (75.9%) participants with cluster headache responded of whom 218/606 (36%) had allodynia during attacks. Female gender (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.28-3.29), low age at onset (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96- 0.99), lifetime depression (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.06-2.50), comorbid migraine (OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.02-3.79), and having recent attacks (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.13-2.86), but not duration of attacks and chronic cluster headache, were independent risk factors for allodynia.The high prevalence of cutaneous allodynia with similar risk factors for allodynia as found for migraine suggests that central sensitization, like in migraine, also occurs in cluster headache. In clinical practice, awareness that people with cluster headache may suffer from allodynia can in the future be an important feature in treatment options.

  5. Extending Beowulf Clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinwand, Daniel R.; Maddox, Brian; Beckmann, Tim; Hamer, George

    2003-01-01

    Beowulf clusters can provide a cost-effective way to compute numerical models and process large amounts of remote sensing image data. Usually a Beowulf cluster is designed to accomplish a specific set of processing goals, and processing is very efficient when the problem remains inside the constraints of the original design. There are cases, however, when one might wish to compute a problem that is beyond the capacity of the local Beowulf system. In these cases, spreading the problem to multiple clusters or to other machines on the network may provide a cost-effective solution.

  6. Dwarfs in Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This false-color mosaic of the central region of the Coma cluster combines infrared and visible-light images to reveal thousands of faint objects (green). Follow-up observations showed that many of these objects, which appear here as faint green smudges, are dwarf galaxies belonging to the cluster. Two large elliptical galaxies, NGC 4889 and NGC 4874, dominate the cluster's center. The mosaic combines visible-light data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (color coded blue) with long- and short-wavelength infrared views (red and green, respectively) from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

  7. Magnetization of ferromagnetic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Naoki; Bertsch, G.; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    1995-02-01

    The magnetization and deflection profiles of magnetic clusters in a Stern-Gerlach magnet are calculated for conditions under which the magnetic moment is fixed in the intrinsic frame of the cluster, and the clusters enter the magnetic field adiabatically. The predicted magnetization is monotonic in the Langevin parameter, the ratio of magnetic energy {mu}{sub 0}B to thermal energy k{sub B}T. In low field the average magnetization is 2/3 of the Langevin function. The high-field moment approaches saturation asymptotically as B{sup {minus}1/2} instead of the B{sup {minus}1} dependence in the Langevin function.

  8. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  9. Atomic cluster collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  10. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  11. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Fabien; Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2016-08-01

    The abundance of clusters and the clustering of galaxies are two of the important cosmological probes for current and future large scale surveys of galaxies, such as the Dark Energy Survey. In order to combine them one has to account for the fact that they are not independent quantities, since they probe the same density field. It is important to develop a good understanding of their correlation in order to extract parameter constraints. We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. We employ the framework of the halo model complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD). We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions. Indeed, we show that the non-Gaussian covariance becomes dominant at small scales, low redshifts or high cluster masses. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias. We demonstrate that the SSC obeys mathematical inequalities and positivity. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeably better constraints, with improvements of order 20% on cosmological parameters compared to the best single probe, and even greater improvement on HOD parameters, with reduction of error bars by a factor 1.4-4.8. This happens in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales. We conclude that accounting for non-Gaussian effects is required for the joint analysis of these observables in galaxy surveys.

  12. How Clusters Work

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technology innovation clusters are geographic concentrations of interconnected companies, universities, and other organizations with a focus on environmental technology. They play a key role in addressing the nation’s pressing environmental problems.

  13. [Treatment of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Fabre, N

    2005-07-01

    Remarkable therapeutic improvements have come forward recently for trigemino-autonomic cephalalgias. Attack treatment in cluster headache is based on sumatriptan and oxygen. Non-vasoconstrictive treatments are opening a new post-triptan era but are not yet applicable. Prophylactic treatment of cluster headache is based on verapamil and lithium. The efficacy of anti-epileptic drugs in cluster headache remains to be demonstrated. Surgical treatment aimed at the parasympathetic pathways and at the trigeminal nerve demonstrates a high rate of recurrence and adverse events and questions about the relevance of a "peripheral" target in cluster headache. The efficacy of continuous hypothalamic stimulation in patients with intractable headache constitutes a breakthrough, but must be demonstrated at a larger scale and the benefice/risk ratio must be carefully evaluated. Indomethacin still remains the gold standard in paroxysmal hemicrania treatment. Until recently SUNCT was considered an intractable condition. However there are some reports of complete relief with lamotrigine, topiramate and gabapentin.

  14. Clustered frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Matsko, Andrey B; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Huang, Shu-Wei; Maleki, Lute

    2016-11-01

    We show theoretically that it is feasible to generate a spectrally broad Kerr frequency comb consisting of several spectral clusters phase matched due to interplay among second- and higher-order group velocity dispersion contributions. We validate the theoretical analysis experimentally by driving a magnesium fluoride resonator, characterized with 110 GHz free spectral range, with a continuous wave light at 1.55 μm and observing two comb clusters separated by nearly two-thirds of an octave.

  15. Cluster State Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    implementation of quantum computation,” Fortschr. Phys. 48, 771 (2000). [Dragoman01] D. Dragoman, “Proposal for a three-qubit teleportation experiment”, Phys...CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTING DECEMBER 2012 INTERIM TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION...From - To) NOV 2010 – OCT 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTING 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c

  16. Globular clusters with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Giuffrida, G.; Marinoni, S.

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of crowded fields in Gaia data will only be a reality in a few years from now. In particular, for globular clusters, only the end-of-mission data (public in 2022-2023) will have the necessary full crowding treatment and will reach sufficient quality for the faintest stars. As a consequence, the work on the deblending and decontamination pipelines is still ongoing. We describe the present status of the pipelines for different Gaia instruments, and we model the end-of-mission crowding errors on the basis of available information. We then apply the nominal post-launch Gaia performances, appropriately worsened by the estimated crowding errors, to a set of 18 simulated globular clusters with different concentration, distance, and field contamination. We conclude that there will be 103-104 stars with astrometric performances virtually untouched by crowding (contaminated by <1 mmag) in the majoritiy of clusters. The most limiting factor will be field crowding, not cluster crowding: the most contaminated clusters will only contain 10-100 clean stars. We also conclude that: (i) the systemic proper motions and parallaxes will be determined to 1% or better up to ≃15 kpc, and the nearby clusters will have radial velocities to a few km s-1 ; (ii) internal kinematics will be of unprecendented quality, cluster masses will be determined to ≃10% up to 15 kpc and beyond, and it will be possible to identify differences of a few km s-1 or less in the kinematics (if any) of cluster sub-populations up to 10 kpc and beyond; (iii) the brightest stars (V≃17 mag) will have space-quality, wide-field photometry (mmag errors), and all Gaia photometry will have 1-3% errors on the absolute photometric calibration.

  17. Chemistry within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME within the bulk cluster, to form a trimethyloxonium cation intermediate. Similar ion...trimethyloxonium intermediate as the common intermediate for the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to the same...1982, 20, 51, Ibid. Kinetics of Ion-Molecule Reactions ; Ausloos, P., Ed.; Plenum, New York, 1979; p. 69. (18) Ono, Y.; Ng, C. Y. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1982

  18. Wild Duck Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On April 7, 2005, the Deep Impact spacecraft's Impactor Target Sensor camera recorded this image of M11, the Wild Duck cluster, a galactic open cluster located 6 thousand light years away. The camera is located on the impactor spacecraft, which will image comet Tempel 1 beginning 22 hours before impact until about 2 seconds before impact. Impact with comet Tempel 1 is planned for July 4, 2005.

  19. Parallel Wolff Cluster Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Ko, S. H.; Coddington, P. D.

    The Wolff single-cluster algorithm is the most efficient method known for Monte Carlo simulation of many spin models. Due to the irregular size, shape and position of the Wolff clusters, this method does not easily lend itself to efficient parallel implementation, so that simulations using this method have thus far been confined to workstations and vector machines. Here we present two parallel implementations of this algorithm, and show that one gives fairly good performance on a MIMD parallel computer.

  20. Structural transitions in clusters.

    PubMed

    Hartke, Bernd

    2002-05-03

    If one adds more particles to a cluster, the energetically optimal structure is neither preserved nor does it change in a continuous fashion. Instead, one finds several cluster size regions where one structural principle dominates almost without exception, and rather narrow boundary regions in-between. The structure of the solid is usually reached only at relatively large sizes, after more than one structural transition. The occurrence of this general phenomenon of size-dependent structural transitions does not seem to depend on the nature of the particles, it is found for atomic, molecular, homogeneous, and heterogeneous clusters alike. Clearly, it is a collective many-body phenomenon which can in principle be calculated but not understood in a fully reductionistic manner. Actual calculations with sufficient accuracy are not feasible today, because of the enormous computational expense, even when unconventional evolutionary algorithms are employed for global geometry optimization. Therefore, simple rules for cluster structures are highly desirable. In fact, we are dealing here not just with the academic quest for linkages between cluster structure and features of the potential energy surface, but structural transitions in clusters are also of immediate relevance for many natural and industrial processes, ranging from crystal growth all the way to nanotechnology. This article provides an exemplary overview of research on this topic, from simple model systems where first qualitative explanations start to be successful, up to more realistic complex systems which are still beyond our understanding.

  1. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  2. Induction of phosphorylation and cell surface redistribution of acetylcholine receptors by phorbol ester and carbamylcholine in cultured chick muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms regulating the clustering of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) on the surface of cultured embryonic chick muscle cells. Treatment of these cells with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent activator of protein kinase C, was found to cause a rapid dispersal of AChR clusters, as monitored by fluorescence microscopy of cells labeled with tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated alpha-bungarotoxin. The loss of AChR clusters was not accompanied by an appreciable change in the amount of AChR on the surface of these cells, as measured by the specific binding of [125I]Bgt. Analysis of the phosphorylation pattern of immunoprecipitable AChR subunits showed that the gamma- and delta- subunits are phosphorylated by endogenous protein kinase activity in the intact muscle cells, and that the delta-subunit displays increased phosphorylation in response to TPA. Structural analogues of TPA which do not stimulate protein kinase C have no effect on AChR surface topography or phosphorylation. Exposure of chick myotubes to the cholinergic agonist carbamylcholine was found to cause a dispersal of AChR clusters with a time course similar to that of TPA. Like TPA, carbamylcholine enhances the phosphorylation of the delta-subunit of AChR. The carbamylcholine-induced redistribution and phosphorylation of AChR is blocked by the nicotinic AChR antagonist d-tubocurarine. TPA and carbamylcholine have no effect on cell morphology during the time- course of these experiments. These findings indicate that cell surface topography of AChR may be regulated by phosphorylation of its subunits and suggest a mechanism for dispersal of AChR clusters by agonist activation. PMID:3417778

  3. Behavioral Clustering of School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.; DiStefano, Christine; Kamphaus, Randy W.

    1997-01-01

    How a cluster analysis is conducted, validated, and interpreted is illustrated using a 14-scale behavioral assessment instrument and a national sample of 1,228 elementary school students. Method, cluster typology, validity, cluster structure, and prediction of cluster membership are discussed. (Author/SLD)

  4. Clustered data in sports research.

    PubMed

    Hayen, A

    2006-05-01

    Clustered, or dependent, data, arise commonly in sports medicine and sports science research, particularly in studies of sports injury and biomechanics, particularly in sports injury trials that are randomised at team or club level, in cross-sectional surveys in which groups of individuals are studied and in studies with repeated measures designs. Clustering, or positive correlation among responses, arises because responses and outcomes from the same cluster will usually be more similar than from different clusters. Study designs with clustering will usually required an increased sample size when compared to those without clustering. Ignoring clustering in statistical analyses can also lead to misleading conclusions, including incorrect confidence intervals and p-values. Appropriate statistical analyses for clustered data must be adopted. This paper gives some examples of clustered data and discusses the implications of clustering on the design and analysis of studies in sports medicine and sports science research.

  5. Dust in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polikarpova, O. L.; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2017-02-01

    The conditions for the destruction of dust in hot gas in galaxy clusters are investigated. It is argued that extinction measurements can be subject to selection effects, hindering their use in obtaining trustworthy estimates of dust masses in clusters. It is shown, in particular, that the ratio of the dust mass to the extinction M d / S d increases as dust grains are disrupted, due to the rapid destruction of small grains. Over long times, this ratio can asymptotically reach values a factor of three higher than the mean value in the interstellar medium in the Galaxy. This lowers dust-mass estimates based on measurements of extinction in galaxy clusters. The characteristic lifetime of dust in hot cluster gas is determined by its possible thermal isolation by the denser medium of gas fragments within which the dust is ejected from galaxies, and can reach 100-300 million years, depending on the kinematics and morphology of the fragments. As a result, the mass fraction of dust in hot cluster gas can reach 1-3% of the Galactic value. Over its lifetime, dust can also be manifest through its far-infrared emission. The emission characteristics of the dust change as it is disrupted, and the ratio of the fluxes at 350 and 850 μm can increase appreciably. This can potentially serve as an indicator of the state of the dust and ambient gas.

  6. Spatio-temporal clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisilevich, Slava; Mansmann, Florian; Nanni, Mirco; Rinzivillo, Salvatore

    Spatio-temporal clustering is a process of grouping objects based on their spatial and temporal similarity. It is relatively new subfield of data mining which gained high popularity especially in geographic information sciences due to the pervasiveness of all kinds of location-based or environmental devices that record position, time or/and environmental properties of an object or set of objects in real-time. As a consequence, different types and large amounts of spatio-temporal data became available that introduce new challenges to data analysis and require novel approaches to knowledge discovery. In this chapter we concentrate on the spatio-temporal clustering in geographic space. First, we provide a classification of different types of spatio-temporal data. Then, we focus on one type of spatio-temporal clustering - trajectory clustering, provide an overview of the state-of-the-art approaches and methods of spatio-temporal clustering and finally present several scenarios in different application domains such as movement, cellular networks and environmental studies.

  7. Clustering granulometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Marcel; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Barrera, Junior; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2002-05-01

    Granulometric features have been widely used for classification, segmentation and recently in estimation of parameters in shape models. In this paper we study the inference of clustering based on granulometric features for a collection of structuring probes in the context of random models. We use random Boolean models to represent grains of different shapes and structure. It is known that granulometric features are excellent descriptors of shape and structure of grains. Inference based on clustering these features helps to analyze the consistency of these features and clustering algorithms. This greatly aids in classifier design and feature selection. Features and the order of their addition play a role in reducing the inference errors. We study four different types of feature addition methods and the effect of replication in reducing the inference errors.

  8. Clustering cancer gene expression data by projective clustering ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xianxue; Yu, Guoxian

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression data analysis has paramount implications for gene treatments, cancer diagnosis and other domains. Clustering is an important and promising tool to analyze gene expression data. Gene expression data is often characterized by a large amount of genes but with limited samples, thus various projective clustering techniques and ensemble techniques have been suggested to combat with these challenges. However, it is rather challenging to synergy these two kinds of techniques together to avoid the curse of dimensionality problem and to boost the performance of gene expression data clustering. In this paper, we employ a projective clustering ensemble (PCE) to integrate the advantages of projective clustering and ensemble clustering, and to avoid the dilemma of combining multiple projective clusterings. Our experimental results on publicly available cancer gene expression data show PCE can improve the quality of clustering gene expression data by at least 4.5% (on average) than other related techniques, including dimensionality reduction based single clustering and ensemble approaches. The empirical study demonstrates that, to further boost the performance of clustering cancer gene expression data, it is necessary and promising to synergy projective clustering with ensemble clustering. PCE can serve as an effective alternative technique for clustering gene expression data. PMID:28234920

  9. Health Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walraven, Catherine; And Others

    These instructional materials consist of a series of curriculum worksheets that cover tasks to be mastered by students in health occupations cluster programs. Covered in the curriculum worksheets are diagnostic procedures; observing/recording/reporting/planning; safety; nutrition/elimination; hygiene/personal care/comfort;…

  10. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  11. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  12. Hydrodynamics of Merging Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David,Laurence; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    With the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we observed two clusters of galaxies that are undergoing major mergers . All of the analysis is complete and two papers have been accepted for publication. The abstracts of the two papers are presented in the report.

  13. PVM Support for Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, P.

    2000-01-01

    The latest version of PVM (3.4.3) now contains support for a PC cluster running Linux, also known as a Beowulf system. A PVM user of a computer outside the Beowulf system can add the Beowulf as a single machine.

  14. Nuclear Cluster Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, Masayasu

    2011-05-06

    Predictive power of theory needs good models and accurate calculation methods to solve the Schroedinger equations of the systems concerned. We present some examples of successful predictions based on the nuclear cluster models of light nuclei and hypernuclei and on the calculation methods that have been developed by Kyushu group.

  15. Cluster headaches simulating parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Isik, Ugur; D'Cruz, O 'Neill F

    2002-09-01

    Nocturnal episodes of agitated arousal in otherwise healthy young children are often related to nonrapid eye movement parasomnias (night terrors). However, in patients with acute onset or increased frequency of parasomnias, organic causes of discomfort must be excluded. We report four young children whose parasomnias were caused by nocturnal cluster headaches and who responded to indomethacin dramatically.

  16. Clustered for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brulles, Dina; Winebrenner, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Schools need to address the needs of their students with high ability. Not only does this raise achievement levels schoolwide, it also attracts students from surrounding districts and recaptures advanced learners who left the school because their needs weren't being met. One practical intervention--cluster grouping--provides an inclusive…

  17. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  18. Buckets, Clusters and Dienst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N. T.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe NCSTRL+, a unified, canonical digital library for scientific and technical information (STI). NCSTRL+ is based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL), a World Wide Web (WWW) accessible digital library (DL) that provides access to over 80 university departments and laboratories. NCSTRL+ implements two new technologies: cluster functionality and publishing "buckets." We have extended the Dienst protocol, the protocol underlying NCSTRL, to provide the ability to "cluster" independent collections into a logically centralized digital library based upon subject category classification, type of organization, and genres of material. The concept of "buckets" provides a mechanism for publishing and managing logically linked entities with multiple data formats. The NCSTRL+ prototype DL contains the holdings of NCSTRL and the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). The prototype demonstrates the feasibility of publishing into a multi-cluster DL, searching across clusters, and storing and presenting buckets of information. We show that the overhead for these additional capabilities is minimal to both the author and the user when compared to the equivalent process within NCSTRL.

  19. Universality of cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, Carson; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2010-12-01

    We have studied the kinetics of cluster formation for dynamical systems of dimensions up to n=8 interacting through elastic collisions or coalescence. These systems could serve as possible models for gas kinetics, polymerization, and self-assembly. In the case of elastic collisions, we found that the cluster size probability distribution undergoes a phase transition at a critical time which can be predicted from the average time between collisions. This enables forecasting of rare events based on limited statistical sampling of the collision dynamics over short time windows. The analysis was extended to Lp -normed spaces (p=1,…,∞) to allow for some amount of interpenetration or volume exclusion. The results for the elastic collisions are consistent with previously published low-dimensional results in that a power law is observed for the empirical cluster size distribution at the critical time. We found that the same power law also exists for all dimensions n=2,…,8 , two-dimensional Lp norms, and even for coalescing collisions in two dimensions. This broad universality in behavior may be indicative of a more fundamental process governing the growth of clusters.

  20. Curriculum Guide Construction Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Ken

    As part of a model construction cluster curriculum development project, this guide was developed and implemented in the Beaverton (Oregon) School District. The curriculum guide contains 16 units covering the following topics: introduction to construction jobs; safety and first aid; blueprint readings; basic mathematics; site work; framing; roofing…

  1. Hybrid cluster identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Herrero, J.

    2004-10-01

    I present a hybrid method for the labelling of clusters in two-dimensional lattices, which combines the recursive approach with iterative scanning to reduce the stack size required by the pure recursive technique, while keeping its benefits: single pass and straightforward cluster characterization and percolation detection parallel to the labelling. While the capacity to hold the entire lattice in memory is usually regarded as the major constraint for the applicability of the recursive technique, the required stack size is the real limiting factor. Resorting to recursion only for the transverse direction greatly reduces the recursion depth and therefore the required stack. It also enhances the overall performance of the recursive technique, as is shown by results on a set of uniform random binary lattices and on a set of samples of the Ising model. I also show how this technique may replace the recursive technique in Wolff's cluster algorithm, decreasing the risk of stack overflow and increasing its speed, and the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm in the Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithm, allowing effortless characterization during generation of the samples and increasing its speed.

  2. PDMS embedded Ag clusters: Coalescence and cluster-matrix interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roese, S.; Engemann, D.; Hoffmann, S.; Latussek, K.; Sternemann, C.; Hövel, H.

    2016-05-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has proven to be a suitable embedding medium for silver clusters to prevent aggregation. In order to investigate the influence of the PDMS on the electronic and local atomic structure of the clusters the measurement of x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra for different coverages of silver clusters in PDMS and calculations of corresponding XANES spectra have been performed. The coalescence process and the cluster-PDMS interaction were investigated with XANES.

  3. The Rotation of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovmassian, H. M.

    2015-09-01

    The method for detection of the galaxy cluster rotation based on the study of distribution of member galaxies with velocities lower and higher than the cluster mean velocity over the cluster image is proposed. The search for rotation is made for flat clusters with a/b > 1.8 and BMI type clusters which are expected to be rotating. For comparison there were studied also round clusters and clusters of NBMI type, the second by brightness galaxy, which does not differ significantly from the cluster cD galaxy. Seventeen out of studied 65 clusters are found to be rotating. It was found that the detection rate is sufficiently high for flat clusters, over 60%, and clusters of BMI type with dominant cD galaxy, ≈ 35% . The obtained results show that clusters were formed from the huge primordial gas clouds and preserved the rotation of the primordial clouds, unless they did not experience mergings with other clusters and groups of galaxies, as a result of which the rotation was prevented.

  4. Femtosecond dynamics of cluster expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaoming; Shim, Bonggu; Arefiev, Alexey; Tushentsov, Mikhail; Breizman, Boris; Downer, Mike

    2010-03-01

    Noble gas clusters irradiated by intense ultrafast laser expand quickly and become typical plasma in picosecond time scale. During the expansion, the clustered plasma demonstrates unique optical properties such as strong absorption and positive contribution to the refractive index. Here we studied cluster expansion dynamics by fs-time-resolved refractive index and absorption measurements in cluster gas jets after ionization and heating by an intense pump pulse. The refractive index measured by frequency domain interferometry (FDI) shows the transient positive peak of refractive index due to clustered plasma. By separating it from the negative contribution of the monomer plasma, we are able to determine the cluster fraction. The absorption measured by a delayed probe shows the contribution from clusters of various sizes. The plasma resonances in the cluster explain the enhancement of the absorption in our isothermal expanding cluster model. The cluster size distribution can be determined. A complete understanding of the femtosecond dynamics of cluster expansion is essential in the accurate interpretation and control of laser-cluster experiments such as phase-matched harmonic generation in cluster medium.

  5. Photoionization of rare gas clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaizhen

    This thesis concentrates on the study of photoionization of van der Waals clusters with different cluster sizes. The goal of the experimental investigation is to understand the electronic structure of van der Waals clusters and the electronic dynamics. These studies are fundamental to understand the interaction between UV-X rays and clusters. The experiments were performed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The experimental method employs angle-resolved time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometry, one of the most powerful methods for probing the electronic structure of atoms, molecules, clusters and solids. The van der Waals cluster photoionization studies are focused on probing the evolution of the photoelectron angular distribution parameter as a function of photon energy and cluster size. The angular distribution has been known to be a sensitive probe of the electronic structure in atoms and molecules. However, it has not been used in the case of van der Waals clusters. We carried out outer-valence levels, inner-valence levels and core-levels cluster photoionization experiments. Specifically, this work reports on the first quantitative measurements of the angular distribution parameters of rare gas clusters as a function of average cluster sizes. Our findings for xenon clusters is that the overall photon-energy-dependent behavior of the photoelectrons from the clusters is very similar to that of the corresponding free atoms. However, distinct differences in the angular distribution point at cluster-size-dependent effects were found. For krypton clusters, in the photon energy range where atomic photoelectrons have a high angular anisotropy, our measurements show considerably more isotropic angular distributions for the cluster photoelectrons, especially right above the 3d and 4p thresholds. For the valence electrons, a surprising difference between the two spin-orbit components was found. For argon clusters, we found that the

  6. Choosing the Number of Clusters in K-Means Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinley, Douglas; Brusco, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Steinley (2007) provided a lower bound for the sum-of-squares error criterion function used in K-means clustering. In this article, on the basis of the lower bound, the authors propose a method to distinguish between 1 cluster (i.e., a single distribution) versus more than 1 cluster. Additionally, conditional on indicating there are multiple…

  7. Animation of the Phoenix Cluster

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows how large numbers of stars form in the Phoenix Cluster. It begins by showing several galaxies in the cluster and hot gas (in red). This hot gas contains more normal matter than...

  8. Photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Pitts, Jonathan; Zheng, Chaowen; Knee, Joseph L.

    1995-09-01

    High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is applied to the study of molecular clusters. The primary species studied are fluorene-Arn complexes. Spectroscopy of the neutral S1 state has been performed on clusters as large as n equals 30. In order to study the photoelectron spectra of the clusters size selectively mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) is used which is a mass resolved version of the ZEKE technique. MATI spectroscopy has been applied to clusters up to n equals 5. The spectral shifts in the S1 origin and ion threshold are used as a measure of the relative stability of the different clusters. Using previous experimental and theoretical work on related clusters the structures of the clusters are inferred from the observed spectral shifts. In some cases multiple conformations of a particular cluster size are identified.

  9. Nuclear Cluster Aspects in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, Shigeru

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  10. Observations of Distant Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan

    2004-01-01

    The is the proceedings and papers supported by the LTSA grant: Homer, D. J.\\& Donahue, M. 2003, in "The Emergence of Cosmic Structure": 13'h Astrophysics Conference Proceedings, Vol. 666,3 1 1-3 14, (AIP). Baumgartner, W. H., Loewenstein, M., Horner, D. J., Mushotzky, R. F. 2003, HEAD- AAS, 35.3503. Homer, D. J. , Donahue, M., Voit G. M. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1309. Nowak, M. A., Smith, B., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1316. Scott, D., Borys, C., Chapman, S. C., Donahue, M., Fahlman, G. G., Halpem, M. Newbury, P. 2002, AAS, 128.01. Jones, L. R. et al. 2002, A new era in cosmology, ASP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 283, p. 223 Donahue, M., Daly, R. A., Homer, D. J. 2003, ApJ, 584, 643, Constraints on the Cluster Environments and Hotspot magnetic field strengths for radio sources 3280 and 3254. Donahue, M., et al. 2003, ApJ, 598, 190. The mass, baryonic fraction, and x-ray temperature of the luminous, high-redshift cluster of galaxies MS045 1.6-0305 Perlman, E. S. et al. 2002, ApJS, 140, 256. Smith, B. J., Nowak, M., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, AJ, 126, 1763. Chandra Observations of the Interacting NGC44 10 Group of Galaxies. Postman, M., Lauer, T. R., Oegerle, W., Donahue, M. 2002, ApJ, 579, 93. The KPNO/deep-range cluster survey I. The catalog and space density of intermediate-redshift clusters. Molnar, S. M., Hughes, J. P., Donahue, M., Joy, M. 2002, ApJ, 573, L91, Chandra Observations of Unresolved X-Ray Sources around Two Clusters of Galaxies. Donahue, M., Mack, J., 2002 NewAR, 46, 155, HST NIcmos and WFPC2 observations of molecular hydrogen and dust around cooling flows. Koekemoer, A. M. et al. 2002 NewAR, 46, 149, Interactions between the A2597 central radio source and dense gas host galaxy. Donahue, M. et al. 2002 ApJ, 569,689, Distant cluster hunting II.

  11. The Orion nebula star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Photography through filters which suppress nebular light reveal a clustering of faint red stars centered on the Trapezium, this evidences a distinct cluster within the larger OB1 association. Stars within about 20 ft of trapezium comprise the Orion Nebula star cluster are considered. Topics discussed re: (1) extinction by dust grains; (2) photometric peculiarities; (3) spectroscopic peculiarities; (4) young variables; (5) the distribution and motion of gas within the cluster.

  12. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    PubMed

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  13. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, James F.; Furuya, Frederic R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab').sub.2 fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Furuya, F.R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab')[sub 2] fragments are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy. 7 figs.

  15. Adaptive Clustering of Hypermedia Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Andrew; Fotouhi, Farshad

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of hypermedia systems focuses on a comparison of two types of adaptive algorithm (genetic algorithm and neural network) in clustering hypermedia documents. These clusters allow the user to index into the nodes to find needed information more quickly, since clustering is "personalized" based on the user's paths rather than…

  16. Connecting Remote Clusters with ATM

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, T.C.; Wyckoff, P.S.

    1998-10-01

    Sandia's entry into utilizing clusters of networked workstations is called Computational Plant or CPlant for short. The design of CPlant uses Ethernet to boot the individual nodes, Myrinet to communicate within a node cluster, and ATM to connect between remote clusters. This SAND document covers the work done to enable the use of ATM on the CPlant nodes in the Fall of 1997.

  17. Stellar populations in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Yuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Li-Cai

    2016-12-01

    Stellar populations contain the most important information about star cluster formation and evolution. Until several decades ago, star clusters were believed to be ideal laboratories for studies of simple stellar populations (SSPs). However, discoveries of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters have expanded our view on stellar populations in star clusters. They have simultaneously generated a number of controversies, particularly as to whether young star clusters may have the same origin as old globular clusters. In addition, extensive studies have revealed that the SSP scenario does not seem to hold for some intermediate-age and young star clusters either, thus making the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters even more complicated. Stellar population anomalies in numerous star clusters are well-documented, implying that the notion of star clusters as true SSPs faces serious challenges. In this review, we focus on stellar populations in massive clusters with different ages. We present the history and progress of research in this active field, as well as some of the most recent improvements, including observational results and scenarios that have been proposed to explain the observations. Although our current ability to determine the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters is unsatisfactory, we propose a number of promising projects that may contribute to a significantly improved understanding of this subject.

  18. Subspace K-means clustering.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Marieke E; Ceulemans, Eva; De Roover, Kim; Van Leeuwen, Karla

    2013-12-01

    To achieve an insightful clustering of multivariate data, we propose subspace K-means. Its central idea is to model the centroids and cluster residuals in reduced spaces, which allows for dealing with a wide range of cluster types and yields rich interpretations of the clusters. We review the existing related clustering methods, including deterministic, stochastic, and unsupervised learning approaches. To evaluate subspace K-means, we performed a comparative simulation study, in which we manipulated the overlap of subspaces, the between-cluster variance, and the error variance. The study shows that the subspace K-means algorithm is sensitive to local minima but that the problem can be reasonably dealt with by using partitions of various cluster procedures as a starting point for the algorithm. Subspace K-means performs very well in recovering the true clustering across all conditions considered and appears to be superior to its competitor methods: K-means, reduced K-means, factorial K-means, mixtures of factor analyzers (MFA), and MCLUST. The best competitor method, MFA, showed a performance similar to that of subspace K-means in easy conditions but deteriorated in more difficult ones. Using data from a study on parental behavior, we show that subspace K-means analysis provides a rich insight into the cluster characteristics, in terms of both the relative positions of the clusters (via the centroids) and the shape of the clusters (via the within-cluster residuals).

  19. Toward Parallel Document Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Mogill, Jace A.; Haglin, David J.

    2011-09-01

    A key challenge to automated clustering of documents in large text corpora is the high cost of comparing documents in a multimillion dimensional document space. The Anchors Hierarchy is a fast data structure and algorithm for localizing data based on a triangle inequality obeying distance metric, the algorithm strives to minimize the number of distance calculations needed to cluster the documents into “anchors” around reference documents called “pivots”. We extend the original algorithm to increase the amount of available parallelism and consider two implementations: a complex data structure which affords efficient searching, and a simple data structure which requires repeated sorting. The sorting implementation is integrated with a text corpora “Bag of Words” program and initial performance results of end-to-end a document processing workflow are reported.

  20. Fractal polyzirconosiloxane cluster coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1992-08-01

    Fractal polyzirconosiloxane (PZS) cluster films were prepared through the hydrolysis-polycondensation-pyrolysis synthesis of two-step HCl acid-NaOH base catalyzed sol precursors consisting of N-[3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl]-4,5-dihydroimidazole, Zr(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}, methanol, and water. When amorphous PZSs were applied to aluminum as protective coatings against NaCl-induced corrosion, the effective film was that derived from the sol having a pH near the isoelectric point in the positive zeta potential region. The following four factors played an important role in assembling the protective PZS coating films: (1) a proper rate of condensation, (2) a moderate ratio of Si-O-Si to Si-O-Zr linkages formed in the PZS network, (3) hydrophobic characteristics, and (4) a specific microstructural geometry, in which large fractal clusters were linked together.

  1. Fractal polyzirconosiloxane cluster coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1992-01-01

    Fractal polyzirconosiloxane (PZS) cluster films were prepared through the hydrolysis-polycondensation-pyrolysis synthesis of two-step HCl acid-NaOH base catalyzed sol precursors consisting of N-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole, Zr(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}, methanol, and water. When amorphous PZSs were applied to aluminum as protective coatings against NaCl-induced corrosion, the effective film was that derived from the sol having a pH near the isoelectric point in the positive zeta potential region. The following four factors played an important role in assembling the protective PZS coating films: (1) a proper rate of condensation, (2) a moderate ratio of Si-O-Si to Si-O-Zr linkages formed in the PZS network, (3) hydrophobic characteristics, and (4) a specific microstructural geometry, in which large fractal clusters were linked together.

  2. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  3. Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchtmeier, W. K.; Richter, O. G.; Materne, J.

    1981-09-01

    The large-scale structure of the universe is dominated by clustering. Most galaxies seem to be members of pairs, groups, clusters, and superclusters. To that degree we are able to recognize a hierarchical structure of the universe. Our local group of galaxies (LG) is centred on two large spiral galaxies: the Andromeda nebula and our own galaxy. Three sr:naller galaxies - like M 33 - and at least 23 dwarf galaxies (KraanKorteweg and Tammann, 1979, Astronomische Nachrichten, 300, 181) can be found in the evironment of these two large galaxies. Neighbouring groups have comparable sizes (about 1 Mpc in extent) and comparable numbers of bright members. Small dwarf galaxies cannot at present be observed at great distances.

  4. Binaries in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve; Goodman, Jeremy; Mateo, Mario; Phinney, E. S.; Pryor, Carlton; Richer, Harvey B.; Verbunt, Frank; Weinberg, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that globular clusters contain a substantial number of binaries most of which are believed to be primordial. We discuss different successful optical search techniques, based on radial-velocity variables, photometric variables, and the positions of stars in the color-magnitude diagram. In addition, we review searches in other wavelengths, which have turned up low-mass X-ray binaries and more recently a variety of radio pulsars. On the theoretical side, we give an overview of the different physical mechanisms through which individual binaries evolve. We discuss the various simulation techniques which recently have been employed to study the effects of a primordial binary population, and the fascinating interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics which drives globular-cluster evolution.

  5. CLUTO - A Clustering Toolkit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-23

    061W Y C R 062W spo0 spo30 spo2 spo5 spo7 spo9 spo11 cluster 0 E F B 1 Y A L004W S S A 1 M D M 10 C Y S 3 N T G 1 Y A L018C M A K 16 F U N 19 F U N 12...013C H S P 30 C R Y 1 A R E 1 P W P 2 Y C R 056W P W P 2 Y C R 061W Y C R 062W spo0 spo30 spo2 spo5 spo7 spo9 spo11 cluster 0 (b) (a) Figure 12

  6. Basic cluster compression algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    Feature extraction and data compression of LANDSAT data is accomplished by BCCA program which reduces costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting multispectral image data. Algorithm uses spatially local clustering to extract features from image data to describe spectral characteristics of data set. Approach requires only simple repetitive computations, and parallel processing can be used for very high data rates. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on SEL 32/55.

  7. Improved graph clustering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    optimization problem (2)–(3) is convex and can 1We adopt the convention that yii = 1 for any node i that belongs to a cluster. 2We assume aii = 1 for all i. 3The...relaxations: The formulation (2)–(3) is not the only way to relax the non - convex ML estimator. Instead of the nuclear norm regularizer, a hard constraint ...presented a convex optimization formulation, essentially a convexification of the maximum likelihood estimator. Our theoretic analysis shows that this

  8. Dial-A-Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Shawn; Quach, Tu-Toan

    2016-09-14

    Dial-A-Cluster is a web application that can be used to interactively analyze multi-variate time series data. It supports multiple users, DOE markings, and user authentication. It is designed to let the user adjust the influence of particular time series in the dataset, interact with the resulting dimension reduced visualization, interact with the time series themselves, and look for correlations of the data with any available meta-data.

  9. Cosmology, Clusters and Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2005-01-01

    I will review the current state of Cosmology with Clusters and discuss the application of microcalorimeter arrays to this field. With the launch of Astro-E2 this summer and a slew of new missions being developed, microcalorimeters are the next big thing in x-ray astronomy. I will cover the basics and not-so-basic concepts of microcalorimeter designs and look at the future to see where this technology will go.

  10. SBA Innovation Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-02

    Health Information Technology Cluster Health Information Technology 9 FL - Space Coast Clean Energy Jobs Accelerator Clean Energy 10 WI - Milwaukee...helping businesses that develop and commercialize clean energy technology • Helping Manufacturers and Businesses adopt Green Practices with DoC, DoE...serve energy businesses • Since 2010 : 173 Loans totaling $357M • Investments in Clean Energy Businesses – Impact Investment Initiative – Startup America

  11. Astrophysics of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettori, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    As the nodes of the cosmic web, clusters of galaxies trace the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are thus privileged sites in which to investigate the complex physics of structure formation. However, the complete story of how these structures grow, and how they dissipate the gravitational and non-thermal components of their energy budget over cosmic time, is still beyond our grasp. Most of the baryons gravitationally bound to the cluster's halo is in the form of a diffuse, hot, metal-enriched plasma that radiates primarily in the X-ray band. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such fundamental open questions as: How do hot diffuse baryons accrete and dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? How and when was the energy that we observe in the ICM generated and distributed? Where and when are heavy elements produced and how are they circulated? We will present the ongoing activities to define the strategy on how an X-ray observatory with large collecting area and an unprecedented combination of high spectral and angular resolution, such as Athena, can address these questions.

  12. Stormy weather in galaxy clusters

    PubMed

    Burns

    1998-04-17

    Recent x-ray, optical, and radio observations coupled with particle and gas dynamics numerical simulations reveal an unexpectedly complex environment within clusters of galaxies, driven by ongoing accretion of matter from large-scale supercluster filaments. Mergers between clusters and continuous infall of dark matter and baryons from the cluster periphery produce long-lived "stormy weather" within the gaseous cluster atmosphere-shocks, turbulence, and winds of more than 1000 kilometers per second. This weather may be responsible for shaping a rich variety of extended radio sources, which in turn act as "barometers" and "anemometers" of cluster weather.

  13. Stellar Snowflake Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Stellar Snowflake Cluster Combined Image [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Infrared Array CameraFigure 3 Multiband Imaging Photometer

    Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instruments.

    The newly revealed infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center of the combined image (fig. 1). The stars appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals along linear structures in a configuration that resembles the spokes of a wheel or the pattern of a snowflake. Hence, astronomers have nicknamed this the 'Snowflake' cluster.

    Star-forming clouds like this one are dynamic and evolving structures. Since the stars trace the straight line pattern of spokes of a wheel, scientists believe that these are newborn stars, or 'protostars.' At a mere 100,000 years old, these infant structures have yet to 'crawl' away from their location of birth. Over time, the natural drifting motions of each star will break this order, and the snowflake design will be no more.

    While most of the visible-light stars that give the Christmas Tree cluster its name and triangular shape do not shine brightly in Spitzer's infrared eyes, all of the stars forming from this dusty cloud are considered part of the cluster.

    Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing up to the newborn clusters, Spitzer also illuminates the optically dark and dense Cone nebula, the tip of which can be seen towards the bottom left corner of each image.

    This combined image shows the presence of organic molecules mixed with dust as wisps of green, which have been illuminated by nearby star formation. The larger yellowish dots neighboring the baby red stars in the Snowflake Cluster are massive stellar infants forming

  14. Convex Clustering: An Attractive Alternative to Hierarchical Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary K.; Chi, Eric C.; Ranola, John Michael O.; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal in cluster analysis is to discover natural groupings of objects. The field of cluster analysis is crowded with diverse methods that make special assumptions about data and address different scientific aims. Despite its shortcomings in accuracy, hierarchical clustering is the dominant clustering method in bioinformatics. Biologists find the trees constructed by hierarchical clustering visually appealing and in tune with their evolutionary perspective. Hierarchical clustering operates on multiple scales simultaneously. This is essential, for instance, in transcriptome data, where one may be interested in making qualitative inferences about how lower-order relationships like gene modules lead to higher-order relationships like pathways or biological processes. The recently developed method of convex clustering preserves the visual appeal of hierarchical clustering while ameliorating its propensity to make false inferences in the presence of outliers and noise. The solution paths generated by convex clustering reveal relationships between clusters that are hidden by static methods such as k-means clustering. The current paper derives and tests a novel proximal distance algorithm for minimizing the objective function of convex clustering. The algorithm separates parameters, accommodates missing data, and supports prior information on relationships. Our program CONVEXCLUSTER incorporating the algorithm is implemented on ATI and nVidia graphics processing units (GPUs) for maximal speed. Several biological examples illustrate the strengths of convex clustering and the ability of the proximal distance algorithm to handle high-dimensional problems. CONVEXCLUSTER can be freely downloaded from the UCLA Human Genetics web site at http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/software/ PMID:25965340

  15. Sketching Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jeremy

    The next time you plan a quiet evening under a salted sky, with hopes of bathing your eyes in the ancient light of a majestic star cluster, be sure that your sketching kit comes with you! A casual glance at these celestial marvels will not give you a decent appreciation for an object whose history and character are as unique as the fingerprints you should be pressing into the side of your trusty pencil. I can think of no better way to connect with these stellar ballets, to understand their intricacies, and to recall your view later than to spend time sketching the soft glow or blazing pinpricks you see through the eyepiece.

  16. Are Earthquake Magnitudes Clustered?

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsen, Joern; Green, Adam

    2011-03-11

    The question of earthquake predictability is a long-standing and important challenge. Recent results [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 098501 (2007); ibid.100, 038501 (2008)] have suggested that earthquake magnitudes are clustered, thus indicating that they are not independent in contrast to what is typically assumed. Here, we present evidence that the observed magnitude correlations are to a large extent, if not entirely, an artifact due to the incompleteness of earthquake catalogs and the well-known modified Omori law. The latter leads to variations in the frequency-magnitude distribution if the distribution is constrained to those earthquakes that are close in space and time to the directly following event.

  17. Clustering with shallow trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly-Bechet, M.; Bradde, S.; Braunstein, A.; Flaxman, A.; Foini, L.; Zecchina, R.

    2009-12-01

    We propose a new method for obtaining hierarchical clustering based on the optimization of a cost function over trees of limited depth, and we derive a message-passing method that allows one to use it efficiently. The method and the associated algorithm can be interpreted as a natural interpolation between two well-known approaches, namely that of single linkage and the recently presented affinity propagation. We analyse using this general scheme three biological/medical structured data sets (human population based on genetic information, proteins based on sequences and verbal autopsies) and show that the interpolation technique provides new insight.

  18. Circular rogue wave clusters.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, David J; Ankiewicz, Adrian; Akhmediev, Nail

    2011-11-01

    Using the Darboux transformation technique and numerical simulations, we study the hierarchy of rational solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that can be considered as higher order rogue waves in this model. This analysis reveals the existence of rogue wave clusters with a high level of symmetry in the (x,t) plane. These structures arise naturally when the shifts in the Darboux scheme are taken to be eigenvalue dependent. We have found single-shell structures where a central higher order rogue wave is surrounded by a ring of first order peaks on the (x,t) plane.

  19. The galactic globular cluster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Meylan, G.

    1994-01-01

    We explore correlations between various properties of Galactic globular clusters, using a database on 143 objects. Our goal is identify correlations and trends which can be used to test and constrain theoretical models of cluster formation and evolution. We use a set of 13 cluster parameters, 9 of which are independently measured. Several arguments suggest that the number of clusters still missing in the obscured regions of the Galaxy is of the order of 10, and thus the selection effects are probably not severe for our sample. Known clusters follow a power-law density distribution with a slope approximately -3.5 to -4, and an apparent core with a core radius approximately 1 kpc. Clusters show a large dynamical range in many of their properties, more so for the core parameters (which are presumably more affected by dynamical evolution) than for the half-light parameters. There are no good correlations with luminosity, although more luminous clusters tend to be more concentrated. When data are binned in luminosity, several trends emerge: more luminous clusters tend to have smaller and denser cores. We interpret this as a differential survival effect, with more massive clusters surviving longer and reaching more evolved dynamical states. Cluster core parameters and concentrations also correlate with the position in the Galaxy, with clusters closer to the Galactic center or plane being more concentrated and having smaller and denser cores. These trends are more pronounced for the fainter (less massive) clusters. This is in agreement with a picture where tidal shocks form disk or bulge passages accelerate dynamical evolution of clusters. Cluster metallicities do not correlate with any other parameter, including luminosity and velocity dispersion; the only detectable trend is with the position in the Galaxy, probably reflecting Zinn's disk-halo dichotomy. This suggests that globular clusters were not self-enriched systems. Velocity dispersions show excellent correlations

  20. PHAT Stellar Cluster Survey. II. Andromeda Project Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Wallace, Matthew L.; Simpson, Robert J.; Lintott, Chris J.; Kapadia, Amit; Skillman, Evan D.; Caldwell, Nelson; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Beerman, Lori C.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Sarajedini, Ata

    2015-04-01

    We construct a stellar cluster catalog for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey using image classifications collected from the Andromeda Project citizen science website. We identify 2753 clusters and 2270 background galaxies within ˜0.5 deg2 of PHAT imaging searched, or ˜400 kpc2 in deprojected area at the distance of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). These identifications result from 1.82 million classifications of ˜20,000 individual images (totaling ˜7 gigapixels) by tens of thousands of volunteers. We show that our crowd-sourced approach, which collects >80 classifications per image, provides a robust, repeatable method of cluster identification. The high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope images resolve individual stars in each cluster and are instrumental in the factor of ˜6 increase in the number of clusters known within the survey footprint. We measure integrated photometry in six filter passbands, ranging from the near-UV to the near-IR. PHAT clusters span a range of ˜8 magnitudes in F475W (g-band) luminosity, equivalent to ˜4 decades in cluster mass. We perform catalog completeness analysis using >3000 synthetic cluster simulations to determine robust detection limits and demonstrate that the catalog is 50% complete down to ˜500 {{M}⊙ } for ages <100 Myr. We include catalogs of clusters, background galaxies, remaining unselected candidates, and synthetic cluster simulations, making all information publicly available to the community. The catalog published here serves as the definitive base data product for PHAT cluster science, providing a census of star clusters in an {{L}\\star } spiral galaxy with unmatched sensitivity and quality.

  1. Tidal Stripping of Globular Clusters in a Simulated Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, F.; Coenda, V.; Muriel, H.; Abadi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Using a cosmological N-body numerical simulation of the formation of a galaxy-cluster-sized halo, we analyze the temporal evolution of its globular cluster population. We follow the dynamical evolution of 38 galactic dark matter halos orbiting in a galaxy cluster that at redshift z = 0 has a virial mass of 1.71 × 1014 M⊙ h-1. In order to mimic both “blue” and “red” populations of globular clusters, for each galactic halo we select two different sets of particles at high redshift (z ≈ 1), constrained by the condition that, at redshift z = 0, their average radial density profiles are similar to the observed profiles. As expected, the general galaxy cluster tidal field removes a significant fraction of the globular cluster populations to feed the intracluster population. On average, halos lost approximately 16% and 29% of their initial red and blue globular cluster populations, respectively. Our results suggest that these fractions strongly depend on the orbital trajectory of the galactic halo, specifically on the number of orbits and on the minimum pericentric distance to the galaxy cluster center that the halo has had. At a given time, these fractions also depend on the current clustercentric distance, just as observations show that the specific frequency of globular clusters SN depends on their clustercentric distance.

  2. TIDAL STRIPPING OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN A SIMULATED GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, F.; Coenda, V.; Muriel, H.; Abadi, M.

    2015-06-20

    Using a cosmological N-body numerical simulation of the formation of a galaxy-cluster-sized halo, we analyze the temporal evolution of its globular cluster population. We follow the dynamical evolution of 38 galactic dark matter halos orbiting in a galaxy cluster that at redshift z = 0 has a virial mass of 1.71 × 10{sup 14} M{sub ⊙} h{sup −1}. In order to mimic both “blue” and “red” populations of globular clusters, for each galactic halo we select two different sets of particles at high redshift (z ≈ 1), constrained by the condition that, at redshift z = 0, their average radial density profiles are similar to the observed profiles. As expected, the general galaxy cluster tidal field removes a significant fraction of the globular cluster populations to feed the intracluster population. On average, halos lost approximately 16% and 29% of their initial red and blue globular cluster populations, respectively. Our results suggest that these fractions strongly depend on the orbital trajectory of the galactic halo, specifically on the number of orbits and on the minimum pericentric distance to the galaxy cluster center that the halo has had. At a given time, these fractions also depend on the current clustercentric distance, just as observations show that the specific frequency of globular clusters S{sub N} depends on their clustercentric distance.

  3. Secondary Globular Cluster populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze-v. Alvensleben, U.

    2004-02-01

    This study is motivated by two facts: 1. The formation of populous star cluster systems is widely observed to accompany violent star formation episodes in gas-rich galaxies as e.g. those triggered by strong interactions or merging. 2. The Globular Cluster (GC) systems of most but not all early-type galaxies show bimodal optical color distributions with fairly universal blue peaks and somewhat variable red peak colors, yet their Luminosity Functions (LFs) look like simple Gaussians with apparently universal turn-over magnitudes that are used for distance measurements and the determination of Ho. Based on a new set of evolutionary synthesis models for Simple (= single burst) Stellar Populations (SSPs) of various metallicities using the latest Padova isochrones I study the color and luminosity evolution of GC populations over the wavelength range from U through K, providing an extensive grid of models for comparison with observations. I assume the intrinsic widths of the color distributions and LFs to be constant in time at the values observed today for the Milky Way or M 31 halo GC populations. Taking the color distributions and LFs of the Milky Way or M 31 halo GC population as a reference for old metal-poor GC populations in general, I study for which combinations of age and metallicity a secondary GC population formed in some violent star formation event in the history of its parent galaxy may or may not be detected in the observed GC color distributions. I also investigate the effect of these secondary GCs on the LFs of the total GC system. Significant differences are found among the diagnostic efficiencies in various wavelength regions. In particular, we predict the NIR to be able to reveal the presence of GC subpopulations with different age - metallicity combinations that may perfectly hide within one inconspicuous optical color peak. If the entire manifold of possible age - metallicity combinations is admitted for a secondary GC population, we find several

  4. Decaying neutrinos in galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Splinter, Randall J.; Persic, Massimo; Salucci, Paolo

    1994-01-01

    Davidsen et al. (1991) have argued that the failure to detect UV photons from the dark matter (DM) in cluster A665 excludes the decaying neutrino hypothesis. Sciama et al. (1993) argued that because of high central concentration the DM in that cluster must be baryonic. We study the DM profile in clusters of galaxies simulated using the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of density fluctuations, and an amplitude previously derived from numerical simulations (Melott 1984b; Anninos et al. 1991) and in agreement with microwave background fluctuations (Smoot et al. 1992). We find that with this amplitude normalization cluster neutrino DM densities are comparable to observed cluster DM values. We conclude that given this normalization, the cluster DM should be at least largely composed of neutrinos. The constraint of Davidsen et al. can be somewhat weakened by the presence of baryonic DM; but it cannot be eliminated given our assumptions.

  5. Clustered protocadherins and neuronal diversity.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Teruyoshi; Yagi, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal diversity is a fundamental requirement for complex neuronal networks and brain function. The clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) family possesses several characteristic features that are important for the molecular basis of neuronal diversity. Clustered Pcdhs are expressed predominantly in the central nervous system, in neurites, growth cones, and synapses. They consist of about 60 isoforms, and their expression is stochastically and combinatorially regulated in individual neurons. The multiple clustered Pcdhs expressed in individual neurons form heteromultimeric protein complexes that exhibit homophilic adhesion properties. Theoretically, the clustered Pcdhs could generate more than 3×10(10) possible variations in each neuron and 12,720 types of cis-tetramers per neuron. The clustered Pcdhs are important for normal neuronal development. The clustered Pcdh genes have also attracted attention as a target for epigenetic regulation.

  6. Light cluster production at NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, N.-U.; Batyuk, P.; Blaschke, D.; Danielewicz, P.; Ivanov, Yu. B.; Karpenko, Iu.; Röpke, G.; Rogachevsky, O.; Wolter, H. H.

    2016-08-01

    Light cluster production at the NICA accelerator complex offers unique possibilities to use these states as "rare probes" of in-medium characteristics such as phase space occupation and early flow. In order to explain this statement, in this contribution theoretical considerations from the nuclear statistical equilibrium model and from a quantum statistical model of cluster production are supplemented with a discussion of a transport model for light cluster formation and with results from hydrodynamic simulations combined with the coalescence model.

  7. The SMART CLUSTER METHOD - adaptive earthquake cluster analysis and declustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake declustering is an essential part of almost any statistical analysis of spatial and temporal properties of seismic activity with usual applications comprising of probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs) and earthquake prediction methods. The nature of earthquake clusters and subsequent declustering of earthquake catalogues plays a crucial role in determining the magnitude-dependent earthquake return period and its respective spatial variation. Various methods have been developed to address this issue from other researchers. These have differing ranges of complexity ranging from rather simple statistical window methods to complex epidemic models. This study introduces the smart cluster method (SCM), a new methodology to identify earthquake clusters, which uses an adaptive point process for spatio-temporal identification. Hereby, an adaptive search algorithm for data point clusters is adopted. It uses the earthquake density in the spatio-temporal neighbourhood of each event to adjust the search properties. The identified clusters are subsequently analysed to determine directional anisotropy, focussing on a strong correlation along the rupture plane and adjusts its search space with respect to directional properties. In the case of rapid subsequent ruptures like the 1992 Landers sequence or the 2010/2011 Darfield-Christchurch events, an adaptive classification procedure is applied to disassemble subsequent ruptures which may have been grouped into an individual cluster using near-field searches, support vector machines and temporal splitting. The steering parameters of the search behaviour are linked to local earthquake properties like magnitude of completeness, earthquake density and Gutenberg-Richter parameters. The method is capable of identifying and classifying earthquake clusters in space and time. It is tested and validated using earthquake data from California and New Zealand. As a result of the cluster identification process, each event in

  8. Solute clustering and interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, M. A.; Garside, John

    1986-07-01

    The effect of surface curvature on surface tension has been included in the theory of homogeneous nucleation to show that, under certain conditions, cluster formation results in a decrease in Gibb's free energy. This cluster formation is thus a spontaneous event and a quasi-equilibrium concentration of clusters of narrow size range may then exist in supersaturated solutions. Previous experimental work suggests the existence of solute clusters in a variety of aqueous solutions. The implications for crystal nucleation and growth theory are discussed.

  9. SIZES OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Sidney

    2012-02-20

    A study is made of deviations from the mean power-law relationship between the Galactocentric distances and the half-light radii of Galactic globular clusters. Surprisingly, deviations from the mean R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship do not appear to correlate with cluster luminosity, cluster metallicity, or horizontal-branch morphology. Differences in orbit shape are found to contribute to the scatter in the R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship of Galactic globular clusters.

  10. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  11. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  12. Adaptive cluster detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedenberg, David

    2010-10-01

    the rate of falsely detected active regions. Additionally we examine the more general field of clustering and develop a framework for clustering algorithms based around diffusion maps. Diffusion maps can be used to project high-dimensional data into a lower dimensional space while preserving much of the structure in the data. We demonstrate how diffusion maps can be used to solve clustering problems and examine the influence of tuning parameters on the results. We introduce two novel methods, the self-tuning diffusion map which replaces the global scaling parameter in the typical diffusion map framework with a local scaling parameter and an algorithm for automatically selecting tuning parameters based on a cross-validation style score called prediction strength. The methods are tested on several example datasets.

  13. Single-cluster dynamics for the random-cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Youjin; Qian, Xiaofeng; Blöte, Henk W. J.

    2009-09-01

    We formulate a single-cluster Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the random-cluster model. This algorithm is a generalization of the Wolff single-cluster method for the q -state Potts model to noninteger values q>1 . Its results for static quantities are in a satisfactory agreement with those of the existing Swendsen-Wang-Chayes-Machta (SWCM) algorithm, which involves a full-cluster decomposition of random-cluster configurations. We explore the critical dynamics of this algorithm for several two-dimensional Potts and random-cluster models. For integer q , the single-cluster algorithm can be reduced to the Wolff algorithm, for which case we find that the autocorrelation functions decay almost purely exponentially, with dynamic exponents zexp=0.07 (1), 0.521 (7), and 1.007 (9) for q=2 , 3, and 4, respectively. For noninteger q , the dynamical behavior of the single-cluster algorithm appears to be very dissimilar to that of the SWCM algorithm. For large critical systems, the autocorrelation function displays a range of power-law behavior as a function of time. The dynamic exponents are relatively large. We provide an explanation for this peculiar dynamic behavior.

  14. Single-cluster dynamics for the random-cluster model.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youjin; Qian, Xiaofeng; Blöte, Henk W J

    2009-09-01

    We formulate a single-cluster Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the random-cluster model. This algorithm is a generalization of the Wolff single-cluster method for the q-state Potts model to noninteger values q>1. Its results for static quantities are in a satisfactory agreement with those of the existing Swendsen-Wang-Chayes-Machta (SWCM) algorithm, which involves a full-cluster decomposition of random-cluster configurations. We explore the critical dynamics of this algorithm for several two-dimensional Potts and random-cluster models. For integer q, the single-cluster algorithm can be reduced to the Wolff algorithm, for which case we find that the autocorrelation functions decay almost purely exponentially, with dynamic exponents z(exp)=0.07 (1), 0.521 (7), and 1.007 (9) for q=2, 3, and 4, respectively. For noninteger q, the dynamical behavior of the single-cluster algorithm appears to be very dissimilar to that of the SWCM algorithm. For large critical systems, the autocorrelation function displays a range of power-law behavior as a function of time. The dynamic exponents are relatively large. We provide an explanation for this peculiar dynamic behavior.

  15. Clustered engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Kyle; Sager, Paul; Kusunoki, Sid; Porter, John; Campion, AL; Mouritzan, Gunnar; Glunt, George; Vegter, George; Koontz, Rob

    1993-01-01

    Several topics are presented in viewgraph form which together encompass the preliminary assessment of nuclear thermal rocket engine clustering. The study objectives, schedule, flow, and groundrules are covered. This is followed by the NASA groundrules mission and our interpretation of the associated operational scenario. The NASA reference vehicle is illustrated, then the four propulsion system options are examined. Each propulsion system's preliminary design, fluid systems, operating characteristics, thrust structure, dimensions, and mass properties are detailed as well as the associated key propulsion system/vehicle interfaces. A brief series of systems analysis is also covered including: thrust vector control requirements, engine out possibilities, propulsion system failure modes, surviving system requirements, and technology requirements. An assessment of vehicle/propulsion system impacts due to the lessons learned are presented.

  16. Analyzing geographic clustered response

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S.; Mohr, M.S.

    1991-08-01

    In the study of geographic disease clusters, an alternative to traditional methods based on rates is to analyze case locations on a transformed map in which population density is everywhere equal. Although the analyst's task is thereby simplified, the specification of the density equalizing map projection (DEMP) itself is not simple and continues to be the subject of considerable research. Here a new DEMP algorithm is described, which avoids some of the difficulties of earlier approaches. The new algorithm (a) avoids illegal overlapping of transformed polygons; (b) finds the unique solution that minimizes map distortion; (c) provides constant magnification over each map polygon; (d) defines a continuous transformation over the entire map domain; (e) defines an inverse transformation; (f) can accept optional constraints such as fixed boundaries; and (g) can use commercially supported minimization software. Work is continuing to improve computing efficiency and improve the algorithm. 21 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Astronomy from satellite clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, R.; Labeyrie, A.

    1984-03-01

    Attention is called to the accumulating evidence that giant space telescopes, comprising a number of separate mirrors on independent satellites, are a realistic prospect for providing research tools of extraordinary power. The ESA-sponsored group and its counterpart in the US have reached remarkably similar conclusions regarding the basic configuration of extremely large synthetic-aperture devices. Both share the basic view that a cluster of spacecraft is preferable to a single monolithic structure. The emphasis of the US group has been on a mission that sweeps across as many sources as possible in the minimum time; it is referred to as SAMSI (Spacecraft Array for Michelson Spatial Interferometry). The European group has placed more emphasis on obtaining two-dimensional images. Their system is referred to as TRIO because, at least initially, it involves three independent systems. Detailed descriptions are given of the two systems.

  18. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  19. Cross-Clustering: A Partial Clustering Algorithm with Automatic Estimation of the Number of Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Tellaroli, Paola; Bazzi, Marco; Donato, Michele; Brazzale, Alessandra R.; Drăghici, Sorin

    2016-01-01

    Four of the most common limitations of the many available clustering methods are: i) the lack of a proper strategy to deal with outliers; ii) the need for a good a priori estimate of the number of clusters to obtain reasonable results; iii) the lack of a method able to detect when partitioning of a specific data set is not appropriate; and iv) the dependence of the result on the initialization. Here we propose Cross-clustering (CC), a partial clustering algorithm that overcomes these four limitations by combining the principles of two well established hierarchical clustering algorithms: Ward’s minimum variance and Complete-linkage. We validated CC by comparing it with a number of existing clustering methods, including Ward’s and Complete-linkage. We show on both simulated and real datasets, that CC performs better than the other methods in terms of: the identification of the correct number of clusters, the identification of outliers, and the determination of real cluster memberships. We used CC to cluster samples in order to identify disease subtypes, and on gene profiles, in order to determine groups of genes with the same behavior. Results obtained on a non-biological dataset show that the method is general enough to be successfully used in such diverse applications. The algorithm has been implemented in the statistical language R and is freely available from the CRAN contributed packages repository. PMID:27015427

  20. Ensemble Clustering for Result Diversification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    different clustering methods for a par- ticular data source. He et al. [8] proposed a framework to combine clusters of external resources to...representations for result diversification. In Proceedings of SIGIR, 2012. [9] D. Hiemstra and C. Hauff. Mapreduce for information retrieval evaluation: ‘let’s

  1. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  2. Medicolegal issues in cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Loder, Elizabeth; Loder, John

    2004-04-01

    This paper identifies legal issues of relevance to the diagnosis and treatment of cluster headache, including areas of actual and potential malpractice liability. Legal topics that are relevant to cluster headache can be divided into five categories: diagnostic-related issues, risks inherent in the disease process, prescribing and treatment-related problems, research-related issues, and disability determination.

  3. Two generalizations of Kohonen clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezdek, James C.; Pal, Nikhil R.; Tsao, Eric C. K.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the sequential hard c-means (SHCM), learning vector quantization (LVQ), and fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithms is discussed. LVQ and SHCM suffer from several major problems. For example, they depend heavily on initialization. If the initial values of the cluster centers are outside the convex hull of the input data, such algorithms, even if they terminate, may not produce meaningful results in terms of prototypes for cluster representation. This is due in part to the fact that they update only the winning prototype for every input vector. The impact and interaction of these two families with Kohonen's self-organizing feature mapping (SOFM), which is not a clustering method, but which often leads ideas to clustering algorithms is discussed. Then two generalizations of LVQ that are explicitly designed as clustering algorithms are presented; these algorithms are referred to as generalized LVQ = GLVQ; and fuzzy LVQ = FLVQ. Learning rules are derived to optimize an objective function whose goal is to produce 'good clusters'. GLVQ/FLVQ (may) update every node in the clustering net for each input vector. Neither GLVQ nor FLVQ depends upon a choice for the update neighborhood or learning rate distribution - these are taken care of automatically. Segmentation of a gray tone image is used as a typical application of these algorithms to illustrate the performance of GLVQ/FLVQ.

  4. Active matter clusters at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development and flocks of birds. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit whose movement depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed clusters which exert forces but no active torques, encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds and clusters with active torques, they show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times, becoming trapped at the interface and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection of the low velocity clusters. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  5. On the History of Cluster Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E. W.

    1986-06-01

    The methods to produce and investigate cluster beams have been developed primarily with the use of permanent gases. A summary is given of related work carried out at Marburg and Karlsruhe. The report deals with the effect of carrier gases on cluster beam production; ionization, electrical acceleration and magnetic deflection of cluster beams; the retarding potential mass spectrometry of cluster beams; cluster size measurement by atomic beam attenuation; reflection of cluster beams at solid surfaces; scattering properties of4He and3He clusters; the application of cluster beams in plasma physics, and the reduction of space charge problems by acceleration of cluster ions.

  6. Theoretical Studies on Cluster Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhenyang

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The Thesis describes some theoretical studies on ligated and bare clusters. Chapter 1 gives a review of the two theoretical models, Tensor Surface Harmonic Theory (TSH) and Jellium Model, accounting for the electronic structures of ligated and bare clusters. The Polyhedral Skeletal Electron Pair Theory (PSEPT), which correlates the structures and electron counts (total number of valence electrons) of main group and transition metal ligated clusters, is briefly described. A structural jellium model is developed in Chapter 2 which accounts for the electronic structures of clusters using a crystal-field perturbation. The zero-order potential we derive is of central-field form, depends on the geometry of the cluster, and has a well-defined relationship to the full nuclear-electron potential. Qualitative arguments suggest that this potential produces different energy level orderings for clusters with a nucleus with large positive charge at the centre of the cluster. Analysis of the effects of the non-spherical perturbation on the spherical jellium shell structures leads to the conclusion that for a cluster with a closed shell electronic structure a high symmetry arrangement which is approximately or precisely close packed will be preferred. It also provides a basis for rationalising those structures of clusters with incomplete shell electronic configurations. In Chapter 3, the geometric conclusions derived in the structural jellium model are developed in more detail. The group theoretical consequences of the Tensor Surface Harmonic Theory are developed in Chapter 4 for (ML_2) _{rm n}, (ML_4) _{rm n} and (ML_5 ) _{rm n} clusters where either the xz and yz or x^2 -y^2 and xy components to L_sp{rm d}{pi } and L_sp{rm d} {delta} do not contribute equally to the bonding. The closed shell requirements for such clusters are defined and the orbital symmetry constraints pertaining to the

  7. Magnetic anisotropy in single clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamet, Matthieu; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Thirion, Christophe; Dupuis, Véronique; Mélinon, Patrice; Pérez, Alain; Mailly, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic measurements on single cobalt and iron nanoclusters containing almost 1000 atoms are presented. Particles are directly buried within the superconducting film of a micro-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) which leads to the required sensitivity. The angular dependence of the switching field in three dimensions turns out to be in good agreement with a uniform rotation of cluster magnetization. The Stoner and Wohlfarth model yields therefore an estimation of magnetic anisotropy in a single cluster. In particular, uniaxial, biaxial, and cubic contributions can be separated. Results are interpreted on the basis of a simple atomic model in which clusters are assimilated to “giant spins.” We present an extension of the Néel model to clusters in order to estimate surface anisotropy. In the case of cobalt, this last contribution dominates and numerical simulations allow us to get the morphology of the investigated clusters.

  8. The open cluster NGC 6716

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, N.A.; Dawson, D.W. Western Connecticut State Univ., Danbury, CT )

    1990-08-01

    NGC 6716 is a young open star cluster in Sagittarius. Lindoff (1971) obtained photoelectric photometry for 12 stars and photographic UBV photometry for 115 stars in the cluster field down to V = 13.8. This work has been expanded to include more photoelectric standards and IRIS photometry for 332 stars in the cluster field down to V = 16. A reddening E(B-V) = 0.17 mag, a distance modulus of 8.69 + or - 0.15 mag (d = 547 pc), and an age of around 100 million years for the cluster are derived. Of the stars studied, 75 were judged as likely cluster members, 63 as possible members, and 194 as probable nonmembers. 13 refs.

  9. SACS: Spitzer Archival Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Daniel

    Emerging from the cosmic web, galaxy clusters are the most massive gravitationally bound structures in the universe. Thought to have begun their assembly at z > 2, clusters provide insights into the growth of large-scale structure as well as the physics that drives galaxy evolution. Understanding how and when the most massive galaxies assemble their stellar mass, stop forming stars, and acquire their observed morphologies in these environments remain outstanding questions. The redshift range 1.3 < z < 2 is a key epoch in this respect: elliptical galaxies start to become the dominant population in cluster cores, and star formation in spiral galaxies is being quenched. Until recently, however, this redshift range was essentially unreachable with available instrumentation, with clusters at these redshifts exceedingly challenging to identify from either ground-based optical/nearinfrared imaging or from X-ray surveys. Mid-infrared (MIR) imaging with the IRAC camera on board of the Spitzer Space Telescope has changed the landscape. High-redshift clusters are easily identified in the MIR due to a combination of the unique colors of distant galaxies and a negative k-correction in the 3-5 μm range which makes such galaxies bright. Even 90-sec observations with Spitzer/IRAC, a depth which essentially all extragalactic observations in the archive achieve, is sufficient to robustly detect overdensities of L* galaxies out to z~2. Here we request funding to embark on a ambitious scientific program, the “SACS: Spitzer Archival Cluster Survey”, a comprehensive search for the most distant galaxy clusters in all Spitzer/IRAC extragalactic pointings available in the archive. With the SACS we aim to discover ~2000 of 1.3 < z < 2.5 clusters, thus provide the ultimate catalog for high-redshift MIR selected clusters: a lasting legacy for Spitzer. The study we propose will increase by more than a factor of 10 the number of high-redshift clusters discovered by all previous surveys

  10. Decaying neutrinos in galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Splinter, Randall J.; Persic, Massimo; Salucci, Paolo

    1993-01-01

    The DM profile in clusters of galaxies was studied and simulated using the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of density fluctuations, and an amplitude previously derived from numerical simulations and in agreement with microwave background fluctuations. Neutrino DM densities, with this amplitude normalization cluster, are comparable to observed cluster DM values. It was concluded that given this normalization, the cluster DM should be al least largely composed of neutrinos. The constraint of Davidson et al., who argued that the failure to detect uv photons from the dark matter (DM) in cluster A665 excludes the decaying neutrino hypothesis, could be somewhat weakened by the presence of baryonic DM; but it cannot be eliminated given our assumptions.

  11. Structure stability and spectroscopy of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Theory based on self-consistent field-linear combinations of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital theory was applied to clusters. Four areas were covered: electronic structure, equilibrium geometries, and stability of charged clusters, interaction of metal clusters with H and halogen atoms, thermal stability of isolated clusters, and stability and optical properties of hetero-atomic clusters. (DLC)

  12. A Linear Algebra Measure of Cluster Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Laura A.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of models for information retrieval focuses on an application of linear algebra to text clustering, namely, a metric for measuring cluster quality based on the theory that cluster quality is proportional to the number of terms that are disjoint across the clusters. Explains term-document matrices and clustering algorithms. (Author/LRW)

  13. Information Clustering Based on Fuzzy Multisets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyamoto, Sadaaki

    2003-01-01

    Proposes a fuzzy multiset model for information clustering with application to information retrieval on the World Wide Web. Highlights include search engines; term clustering; document clustering; algorithms for calculating cluster centers; theoretical properties concerning clustering algorithms; and examples to show how the algorithms work.…

  14. IONOSAT Ionospheric satellite cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, V.; Lizunov, G.; Fedorov, O.; Yampolsky, Yu.; Ivchenko, V.

    2008-11-01

    The IONOSAT project (from IONOspheric SATellites) is proposed by National Space Agency of Ukraine for First European Space Program as a part of Space Weather (SW) Program. As it is commonly accepted, Space Weather means the changes of the conditions on the Sun, in solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere which may affect the operation and reliability of on-board and ground technological systems and threaten human health. In this chain ionosphere is specific and integral part of SW formation. Moreover, namely in the ionosphere main part of the energy absorption of Sun-activated sporadic corpuscular and radiation fluxes takes places. The excitation of ionosphere by falling fluxes produces its "luminescence" in wide frequency band - from ULF waves till ultraviolet - and by this ionosphere works as an efficient "screen" or SW indicator. A goal of the proposed project is long-term spatial-temporal monitoring of main field and plasma parameters of ionosphere with aim to further develop fundamental conceptions of solar-terrestrial connections physics, nowcasting and forecast of SW, and diagnostics of natural and technogenic hazards with the help of scientific payload installed on-board a cluster of 3 low-Earth orbit (LEO) microsatellites (tentative launch date - 2012 year). The state of the project proposal and realization plans are discussed.

  15. Plug cluster module demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    The low pressure, film cooled rocket engine design concept developed during two previous ALRC programs was re-evaluated for application as a module for a plug cluster engine capable of performing space shuttle OTV missions. The nominal engine mixture ratio was 5.5 and the engine life requirements were 1200 thermal cycles and 10 hours total operating life. The program consisted of pretest analysis; engine tests, performed using residual components; and posttest analysis. The pretest analysis indicated that operation of the operation of the film cooled engine at O/F = 5.5 was feasible. During the engine tests, steady state wall temperature and performance measurement were obtained over a range of film cooling flow rates, and the durability of the engine was demonstrated by firing the test engine 1220 times at a nominal performance ranging from 430 - 432 seconds. The performance of the test engine was limited by film coolant sleeve damage which had occurred during previous testing. The post-test analyses indicated that the nominal performance level can be increased to 436 seconds.

  16. Cosmology with Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgani, Stefano

    I reviewed in my talk recent results on the cosmological constraints that can be obtained by following the evolution of the population of galaxy clusters. Using extended samples of X-ray selected clusters, I have shown how they can be used to trace this evolution out to redshift z ~ 1. This evolution can be compared to model predictions and, therefore, to constrain cosmological parameters, such as the density parameter Omega_m and the shape and amplitude of the power spectrum of density perturbations. I have emphasized that the robustness of such constraints is quite sensitive to the relation between cluster collapsed mass and X-ray luminosity and temperature. This demonstrates that our ability to place significant constraints on cosmology using clusters of galaxies relies on our capability to understand the physical processes, which determine the properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). In this context, I have discussed how numerical simulations of cluster formation in cosmological context can play an important role in uderstanding the ICM physics. I have presented results from a very large cosmological simulation, which also includes the hydrodynamical description of the cosmic baryons, the processes of star formation and feedback from the stellar populations. The results from this simulation represent a unique baseline to describe the processes of formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies.

  17. Clusterization and quadrupole deformation in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Algora, A.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Scheid, W.; Darai, J.; Hess, P. O.

    2006-04-26

    We study the interrelation of the clusterization and quadrupole deformation of atomic nuclei, by applying cluster models. Both the energetic stability and the exclusion principle is investigated. Special attention is paid to the relative orientations of deformed clusters.

  18. Properties of Solar Flare Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, Alan; DeRosa, Marc

    The continuous full disk observations provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) give an observer the impression that flare and filament eruptions are related. However, both detailed analysis of a number of events as well as a number of statistical studies have provided only rare examples of clear causal behavior. But the mechanisms of flare triggering are not well understood, so the lack of hard evidence is not surprising. Here we have examined the waiting-time statistics of GOES X-ray flares of magnitude C5 or greater during the last sunspot cycle with the aim of assessing the degree to which flares are clustered in time. Clusters are groups of flares in which all successive flares occur within a fixed separation time - the linking window. While many of the flares in a cluster may come from the same active region, the clusters that last more than a disk passage must result from flares in multiple active regions. The longest cluster of the last cycle lasted more than 42 days. None of the flares were separated by more than 36 hours. Since that cluster lasted more than three disk passages, it could not have been caused by a single region. We find that during the last maximum, eight clusters contributed 44% of all flares. All of these clusters spanned multiple disk passages, but occupied only 16.5% of the cycle duration. Two of the clusters provided 34% of the flares. We suggest that this behavior implies that a component of the observed coordinated behavior has its origin in the solar dynamo.

  19. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Soo-Chang

    2015-08-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  20. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong

    2014-12-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  1. THE EXTENDED VIRGO CLUSTER CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg{sup 2} or 60.1 Mpc{sup 2}. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s{sup –1}. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  2. Haplotyping Problem, A Clustering Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eslahchi, Changiz; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pezeshk, Hamid; Kargar, Mehdi; Poormohammadi, Hadi

    2007-09-06

    Construction of two haplotypes from a set of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) fragments is called haplotype reconstruction problem. One of the most popular computational model for this problem is Minimum Error Correction (MEC). Since MEC is an NP-hard problem, here we propose a novel heuristic algorithm based on clustering analysis in data mining for haplotype reconstruction problem. Based on hamming distance and similarity between two fragments, our iterative algorithm produces two clusters of fragments; then, in each iteration, the algorithm assigns a fragment to one of the clusters. Our results suggest that the algorithm has less reconstruction error rate in comparison with other algorithms.

  3. Haplotyping Problem, A Clustering Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslahchi, Changiz; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pezeshk, Hamid; Kargar, Mehdi; Poormohammadi, Hadi

    2007-09-01

    Construction of two haplotypes from a set of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) fragments is called haplotype reconstruction problem. One of the most popular computational model for this problem is Minimum Error Correction (MEC). Since MEC is an NP-hard problem, here we propose a novel heuristic algorithm based on clustering analysis in data mining for haplotype reconstruction problem. Based on hamming distance and similarity between two fragments, our iterative algorithm produces two clusters of fragments; then, in each iteration, the algorithm assigns a fragment to one of the clusters. Our results suggest that the algorithm has less reconstruction error rate in comparison with other algorithms.

  4. Monitoring computational clusters with OVIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, Ann C.; Brandt, James M.; Wong, M. H.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2006-12-01

    Traditional cluster monitoring approaches consider nodes in singleton, using manufacturer-specified extreme limits as thresholds for failure ''prediction''. We have developed a tool, OVIS, for monitoring and analysis of large computational platforms which, instead, uses a statistical approach to characterize single device behaviors from those of a large number of statistically similar devices. Baseline capabilities of OVIS include the visual display of deterministic information about state variables (e.g., temperature, CPU utilization, fan speed) and their aggregate statistics. Visual consideration of the cluster as a comparative ensemble, rather than as singleton nodes, is an easy and useful method for tuning cluster configuration and determining effects of real-time changes.

  5. Neurostimulation for chronic cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Kaube, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Neurostimulation techniques for the treatment of primary headache syndromes, particularly of chronic cluster headache, have received much interest in recent years. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) has yielded favourable clinical results and, despite the limited numbers of published cases, is becoming a routine treatment for refractory chronic cluster headache in specialized centres. Meanwhile, other promising techniques such as spinal cord stimulation (SCS) or sphenopalate ganglion stimulation have emerged. In this article the current state of clinical research for neurostimulation techniques for chronic cluster headache is reviewed. PMID:22590481

  6. Nonthermal Emission from Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Emma

    Galaxy clusters are the most massive gravitationally-bound objects in the universe. The bulk of the mass in a cluster is dark matter, while the dominant baryonic component is a thermal, X-ray emitting plasma. Radio observations of diffuse synchrotron emission indicate that galaxy clusters host a population of cosmic rays; however, the nature of this nonthermal component is not well-understood. In this dissertation, I investigate three sources of nonthermal emission in galaxy clusters. The first is star formation in galaxies, which is correlated to gamma-ray emission. I derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission for nearby clusters by considering the emission from star formation in cluster galaxies. These lower limits sit about an order of magnitude below current upper limits on gamma rays in clusters and will be an important contributor to gamma-ray emission as upper limits improve over time. Dark matter annihilation, which produces relativistic particles that can result in a broad spectrum of emission in cluster environments, is another source of nonthermal emission. I use nondetections and marginal detections of diffuse radio emission in clusters to constrain dark matter annihilation. I derive limits on the annihilation cross section that are competitive with limits from the nondetection of gamma rays in clusters and show that the best objects for study in the radio are different than those in gamma rays, indicating that dark matter searches in the radio can be complementary to searches in other energy bands. I also investigate the cosmic ray population in the merging cluster A2319, which hosts a previously detected radio halo. I present new observations which reveal a two-component radio halo: a 2 Mpc region that extends far past the observable X-ray emission, and an 800 kpc "core" that is bounded by the X-ray cold front. I speculate on the origins of this structure, and show that a hadronic origin for this radio halo is disfavored. Finally, I discuss current

  7. Soft Clustering Criterion Functions for Partitional Document Clustering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-26

    of the corresponding clusters. We represent the documents using the vector- space model [35]. In this model, each document d is considered to be a...vector in the space of the distinct terms present in the collection. We employ the tf-idf term-weighting scheme that represents each document d as the...produce balanced clusters. In this paper, due to space constraints, we focus on only four out of these seven criterion functions, which are referred to as

  8. AMOEBA clustering revisited. [cluster analysis, classification, and image display program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Jack

    1990-01-01

    A description of the clustering, classification, and image display program AMOEBA is presented. Using a difficult high resolution aircraft-acquired MSS image, the steps the program takes in forming clusters are traced. A number of new features are described here for the first time. Usage of the program is discussed. The theoretical foundation (the underlying mathematical model) is briefly presented. The program can handle images of any size and dimensionality.

  9. Brightest cluster galaxies in the extended GMRT radio halo cluster sample. Radio properties and cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Venturi, T.; Cassano, R.; Giacintucci, S.; Bardelli, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Zucca, E.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: First-ranked galaxies in clusters, usually referred to as brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. They are the most massive elliptical galaxies and show the highest probability to be radio loud. Moreover, their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment in shaping their radio properties. In the attempt to separate the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment on their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. Methods: We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS), which consists of 65 clusters in the redshift range 0.2-0.4, with X-ray luminosity LX ≥ 5 × 1044 erg s-1, and quantitative information on their dynamical state from high-quality Chandra imaging. We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which we divided into two classes, depending on whether the dynamical state of the host cluster was merging (M) or relaxed (R). Results: Of the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio loud and 31 are radio quiet. The radio-loud sources are favourably located in relaxed clusters (71%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, which are mostly located in merging systems (81%). The fractional radio luminosity function for the BCGs in merging and relaxed clusters is different, and it is considerably higher for BCGs in relaxed clusters, where the total fraction of radio loudness reaches almost 90%, to be compared to the ~30% in merging clusters. For relaxed clusters, we found a positive correlation between the radio power of the BCGs and the strength of the cool core, consistent with previous studies on local samples. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the radio loudness of the BCGs strongly depends on the cluster dynamics; their fraction is

  10. A Clustering Graph Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Winlaw, Manda; De Sterck, Hans; Sanders, Geoffrey

    2015-10-26

    In very simple terms a network can be de ned as a collection of points joined together by lines. Thus, networks can be used to represent connections between entities in a wide variety of elds including engi- neering, science, medicine, and sociology. Many large real-world networks share a surprising number of properties, leading to a strong interest in model development research and techniques for building synthetic networks have been developed, that capture these similarities and replicate real-world graphs. Modeling these real-world networks serves two purposes. First, building models that mimic the patterns and prop- erties of real networks helps to understand the implications of these patterns and helps determine which patterns are important. If we develop a generative process to synthesize real networks we can also examine which growth processes are plausible and which are not. Secondly, high-quality, large-scale network data is often not available, because of economic, legal, technological, or other obstacles [7]. Thus, there are many instances where the systems of interest cannot be represented by a single exemplar network. As one example, consider the eld of cybersecurity, where systems require testing across diverse threat scenarios and validation across diverse network structures. In these cases, where there is no single exemplar network, the systems must instead be modeled as a collection of networks in which the variation among them may be just as important as their common features. By developing processes to build synthetic models, so-called graph generators, we can build synthetic networks that capture both the essential features of a system and realistic variability. Then we can use such synthetic graphs to perform tasks such as simulations, analysis, and decision making. We can also use synthetic graphs to performance test graph analysis algorithms, including clustering algorithms and anomaly detection algorithms.

  11. Selenium clusters in zeolites -- theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkov, Alex; Sankey, Otto

    1997-03-01

    We investigate theoretically atomic geometries, energetics and electronic properties of Se clusters in cages and channels of the zeolites Linde A and cancrinite, and compare them with the properties of the bulk Se phases. Such regular 3D arrays of nanosize clusters supported by a host crystalline matrix are known as supralattices (A.A. Demkov, and O.F. Sankey, Chem. Mater. 8), 1793 (1996). Host zeolite frameworks are transparent, and the presence of Se gives rise to electronic cluster-like states in the energy gap region of the host material. We find that the encapsulation causes structural changes in the cluster geometry which alter its electronic structure, we call this a ``pressure'' effect. In addition, the quantum confinement further changes these states upon the encapsulation. We discuss the relative importance of these two effects, and compare our calculations with the recent experimental work ( Y. Nozue, et al.), J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 2, 5209 (1990).

  12. Virtual Cluster Management with Xen

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Nikhil; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2008-01-01

    Recently, virtualization of hardware resources to run multiple instances of independent virtual machines over physical hosts has gained popularity due to an industry-wide focus on the need to reduce the cost of operation of an enterprise computing infrastructure. Xen is an open source hypervisor that provides a virtual machine abstraction layer which is very similar to the underlying physical machine. Using multiple physical hosts, each hosting multiple virtual machines over a VMM like Xen, system administrators can setup a high-availability virtual cluster to meet the ever-increasing demands of their data centers. In such an environment, the Xen hypervisor enables live migration of individual virtual machine instances from one physical node to another without significantly affecting the performance of the applications running on a target virtual machine. This paper describes a scalable Virtual Cluster Manager that provides such application agnostic cluster management capabilities to the system administrators maintaining virtual clusters over Xen powered virtual nodes.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy of ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.M. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    This thesis describes new experiments wherein the infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of a number of mass-selected ionic cluster systems have been obtained and analyzed in the 2600 to 4000 cm{sup {minus}1} region. The species studied include: the hydrated hydronium ions, H{sub 3}O{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3 {minus}10}, ammoniated ammonium ions, NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 1 {minus}10} and cluster ions involving both water and ammonia around an ammonium ion core, (mixed clusters) NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} (n+m=4). In each case, the spectra reveal well resolved structures that can be assigned to transitions arising from the vibrational motions of both the ion core of the clusters and the surrounding neutral solvent molecules. 154 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Chemical evolution of star clusters.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Jacco Th

    2010-02-28

    I discuss the chemical evolution of star clusters, with emphasis on old Galactic globular clusters (GCs), in relation to their formation histories. GCs are clearly formed in a complex fashion, under markedly different conditions from any younger clusters presently known. Those special conditions must be linked to the early formation epoch of the Galaxy and must not have occurred since. While a link to the formation of GCs in dwarf galaxies has been suggested, present-day dwarf galaxies are not representative of the gravitational potential wells within which the GCs formed. Instead, a formation deep within the proto-Galaxy or within dark-matter mini-haloes might be favoured. Not all GCs may have formed and evolved similarly. In particular, we may need to distinguish Galactic Halo from Galactic Bulge clusters.

  15. Architecture of Eph receptor clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Himanen, Juha P.; Yermekbayeva, Laila; Janes, Peter W.; Walker, John R.; Xu, Kai; Atapattu, Lakmali; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Mensinga, Anneloes; Lackmann, Martin; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2010-10-04

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ephrin ligands regulate cell navigation during normal and oncogenic development. Signaling of Ephs is initiated in a multistep process leading to the assembly of higher-order signaling clusters that set off bidirectional signaling in interacting cells. However, the structural and mechanistic details of this assembly remained undefined. Here we present high-resolution structures of the complete EphA2 ectodomain and complexes with ephrin-A1 and A5 as the base unit of an Eph cluster. The structures reveal an elongated architecture with novel Eph/Eph interactions, both within and outside of the Eph ligand-binding domain, that suggest the molecular mechanism underlying Eph/ephrin clustering. Structure-function analysis, by using site-directed mutagenesis and cell-based signaling assays, confirms the importance of the identified oligomerization interfaces for Eph clustering.

  16. Investigating Exoplanets Within Stellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Joseph Paul; Reisinger, Tyler; Thornton, Jonathan; McMillan, Stephen L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent surveys exploring nearby open clusters have yielded noticeable differences in the planetary population from that seen in the Field. This is surprising, as it is widely accepted that a majority of stars form within clustered environments before dispersing throughout the galaxy. Though dynamical arguments have been used to explain this discrepancy in the past, previous surveys' observational statistics and detection biases can also be used to argue that the open cluster planet population is indistinguishable from the Field.Our group aims to explore the role of stellar close encounters and interplanetary interactions in producing the observed exoplanet populations for both open cluster stars and Field stars. We employ a variety of different computational techniques to investigate these effects, ranging from traditional Monte Carlo scattering experiments to multi-scale n-body simulations. We are interested in: the effects of stellar binaries; Hot Jupiter migrations; long-period ice giants; and the habitability history of terrestrial planets.

  17. Cluster headache: conventional pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2013-01-01

    Cluster headache pain is very intense, usually increases in intensity very rapidly from onset, and attacks are often frequent. These clinical features result in significant therapeutic challenges. The most effective pharmacological treatment options for acute cluster attack include subcutaneous sumatriptan, 100% oxygen, and intranasal zolmitriptan. Subcutaneous or intramuscular dihydroergotamine and intranasal sumatriptan are additional options. Transitional therapy is applicable mainly for patients with high-frequency (>2 attacks per day) episodic cluster headache, and options include short courses of high-dose oral corticosteroids, dihydroergotamine, and occipital nerve blocks with local anesthetic and steroids. Prophylactic therapy is important both for episodic and chronic cluster headache, and the main options are verapamil and lithium. Verapamil is drug of first choice but may cause cardiac arrhythmias, and periodic electrocardiograms (EKGs) during dose escalation are important. Many other drugs are also in current use, but there is an insufficient evidence base to recommend them.

  18. Cluster randomization and political philosophy.

    PubMed

    Chwang, Eric

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, I will argue that, while the ethical issues raised by cluster randomization can be challenging, they are not new. My thesis divides neatly into two parts. In the first, easier part I argue that many of the ethical challenges posed by cluster randomized human subjects research are clearly present in other types of human subjects research, and so are not novel. In the second, more difficult part I discuss the thorniest ethical challenge for cluster randomized research--cases where consent is genuinely impractical to obtain. I argue that once again these cases require no new analytic insight; instead, we should look to political philosophy for guidance. In other words, the most serious ethical problem that arises in cluster randomized research also arises in political philosophy.

  19. FIR Emission From Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Caroline

    1994-12-01

    Previous searches for far infrared (FIR) emission from dominant cluster galaxies using small, X-ray selected samples have found 20% to 50% of clusters to have significant FIR emission. In a new study, I have analyzed the 60microns and 100microns emission properties of cD galaxies in a complete sample of 163 Abell Clusters. For comparison, a control sample of 207 blank fields was analyzed to determine the distribution of spurious detections, which is greater than expected from Gaussian statistics. The contribution of Galactic cirrus at 60 microns and 100 microns to non-Gaussian noise is clearly demonstrated by the correspondence of a 98% confidence level to a signal to noise of 4 or 4.5 rather than to a signal to noise of 2 as expected from Gaussian statistics. After correcting for contaminated fields and spurious signals, I find that about 10% of cD galaxies in rich clusters are sources of FIR emission. Typical detected cDs have FIR luminosities of about 3 times 10(44) erg sec(-1) , which is comparable to the blue luminosities from these objects and an order of magnitude greater than the X-ray luminosities produced in the cores of clusters. Dust masses derived from the 60microns and 100 microns fluxes are ~ 10(7) M _sun. Because only about 10% of the clusters have high FIR luminosities, such strong emission is probably a transient state for an individual cluster. It has been suggested that this FIR emission is due to dust heated by electron collisions from the hot gas that dominates the intra-cluster medium. Study of the optical and X-ray properties of these clusters allows us to test models for the heating process of the dust, the origin of the dust, and its importance as a mechanism for cooling the hot gas. The central electron density and the temperature distribution for the hot gas are determined from analysis of ROSAT PSPC observations of four of these clusters. My program of UBVI imaging is designed to identify dust lanes and morphology that might indicate

  20. Deep RGS Observations of Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.; Mushotzky, R.; Loewenstein, M.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) observations of clusters. It includes charts detailing the resolution difference between the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and the RGS and a partial review of existing observations, in graphic format, and as a table. Other sources show up in the ROSAT observations. The presentation reviews possible results that could be achieved in the event that 300 ks of time were allocated for the observations of clusters.

  1. Hierarchical clustering in minimum spanning trees.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meichen; Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; Meier, Jil; van Dijk, Bob; Van Mieghem, Piet; Stam, Cornelis Jan

    2015-02-01

    The identification of clusters or communities in complex networks is a reappearing problem. The minimum spanning tree (MST), the tree connecting all nodes with minimum total weight, is regarded as an important transport backbone of the original weighted graph. We hypothesize that the clustering of the MST reveals insight in the hierarchical structure of weighted graphs. However, existing theories and algorithms have difficulties to define and identify clusters in trees. Here, we first define clustering in trees and then propose a tree agglomerative hierarchical clustering (TAHC) method for the detection of clusters in MSTs. We then demonstrate that the TAHC method can detect clusters in artificial trees, and also in MSTs of weighted social networks, for which the clusters are in agreement with the previously reported clusters of the original weighted networks. Our results therefore not only indicate that clusters can be found in MSTs, but also that the MSTs contain information about the underlying clusters of the original weighted network.

  2. Hierarchical clustering in minimum spanning trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meichen; Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; Meier, Jil; van Dijk, Bob; Van Mieghem, Piet; Stam, Cornelis Jan

    2015-02-01

    The identification of clusters or communities in complex networks is a reappearing problem. The minimum spanning tree (MST), the tree connecting all nodes with minimum total weight, is regarded as an important transport backbone of the original weighted graph. We hypothesize that the clustering of the MST reveals insight in the hierarchical structure of weighted graphs. However, existing theories and algorithms have difficulties to define and identify clusters in trees. Here, we first define clustering in trees and then propose a tree agglomerative hierarchical clustering (TAHC) method for the detection of clusters in MSTs. We then demonstrate that the TAHC method can detect clusters in artificial trees, and also in MSTs of weighted social networks, for which the clusters are in agreement with the previously reported clusters of the original weighted networks. Our results therefore not only indicate that clusters can be found in MSTs, but also that the MSTs contain information about the underlying clusters of the original weighted network.

  3. Understanding Galaxy Cluster MKW10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Tim; Henry, Swain; Coble, Kimberly A.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), we are studying the galaxy cluster MKW 10 (RA = 175.454, Dec = 10.306, z ~ 0.02), a poor cluster with a compact core in which tidal interactions have occurred. This cluster has been observed in HI and Hα. We used SDSS and NED to search for optical counterparts. By comparing data at multiple wavelengths, we hope to understand the structure, environment, and star formation history of this cluster. Following the techniques of others involved in the groups project and using the program TOPCAT to manipulate the data, we explored both the spatial and velocity distributions to determine cluster membership. We have determined that this cluster consists of 11 galaxies, mostly spiral in shape. Chicago State University is new the UAT and we began our work after taking part in the winter workshop at Arecibo.This work was supported by: Undergraduate ALFALFA Team NSF Grant AST-1211005 and the Illinois Space Grant Consortium.

  4. Collective thermoregulation in bee clusters.

    PubMed

    Ocko, Samuel A; Mahadevan, L

    2014-02-06

    Swarming is an essential part of honeybee behaviour, wherein thousands of bees cling onto each other to form a dense cluster that may be exposed to the environment for several days. This cluster has the ability to maintain its core temperature actively without a central controller. We suggest that the swarm cluster is akin to an active porous structure whose functional requirement is to adjust to outside conditions by varying its porosity to control its core temperature. Using a continuum model that takes the form of a set of advection-diffusion equations for heat transfer in a mobile porous medium, we show that the equalization of an effective 'behavioural pressure', which propagates information about the ambient temperature through variations in density, leads to effective thermoregulation. Our model extends and generalizes previous models by focusing the question of mechanism on the form and role of the behavioural pressure, and allows us to explain the vertical asymmetry of the cluster (as a consequence of buoyancy-driven flows), the ability of the cluster to overpack at low ambient temperatures without breaking up at high ambient temperatures, and the relative insensitivity to large variations in the ambient temperature. Our theory also makes testable hypotheses for the response of the cluster to external temperature inhomogeneities and suggests strategies for biomimetic thermoregulation.

  5. Ocean processes underlying surface clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Gregg A.; Huntley, Helga S.; Kirwan, A. D.; Lipphardt, Bruce L.; Campbell, Timothy; Smith, Travis; Edwards, Kacey; Bartels, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Ageostrophic ocean processes such as frontogenesis, submesoscale mixed-layer instabilities, shelf break fronts, and topographic interactions on the continental shelf produce surface-divergent flows that affect buoyant material over time. This study examines the ocean processes leading to clustering, i.e., the increase of material density over time, on the ocean surface. The time series of divergence along a material trajectory, the Lagrangian divergence (LD), is the flow property driving clustering. To understand the impacts of various ocean processes on LD, numerical ocean model simulations at different resolutions are analyzed. Although the relevant processes differ, patterns in clustering evolution from the deep ocean and the continental shelf bear similarities. Smaller-scale ocean features are associated with stronger surface divergence, and the surface material clustering is initially dominated by these features. Over time, the effect of these small-scale features becomes bounded, as material traverses small-scale regions of both positive and negative divergence. Lower-frequency flow phenomena, however, continue the clustering. As a result, clustering evolves from initial small-scale to larger-scale patterns.

  6. Clusters rich in red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio

    In the past few years, several clusters containing large numbers of red supergiants have been discovered. These clusters are amongst the most massive young clusters known in the Milky Way, with stellar masses reaching a few 104 M ⊙. They have provided us, for the first time, with large homogeneous samples of red supergiants of a given age. These large populations make them, despite heavy extinction along their sightlines, powerful laboratories to understand the evolutionary status of red supergiants. While some of the clusters, such as the eponymous RSGC1, are so obscured that their members are only observable in the near-IR, some of them are easily accessible, allowing for an excellent characterisation of cluster and stellar properties. The information gleaned so far from these clusters gives strong support to the idea that late-M type supergiants represent a separate class, characterised by very heavy mass loss. It also shows that the spectral-type distribution of red supergiants in the Milky Way is very strongly peaked towards M1, while suggesting a correlation between spectral type and evolutionary stage.

  7. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Benacquista, Matthew J; Downing, Jonathan M B

    2013-01-01

    Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10(4)-10(6) stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker-Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  8. Splitting Methods for Convex Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Lange, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Clustering is a fundamental problem in many scientific applications. Standard methods such as k-means, Gaussian mixture models, and hierarchical clustering, however, are beset by local minima, which are sometimes drastically suboptimal. Recently introduced convex relaxations of k-means and hierarchical clustering shrink cluster centroids toward one another and ensure a unique global minimizer. In this work we present two splitting methods for solving the convex clustering problem. The first is an instance of the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM); the second is an instance of the alternating minimization algorithm (AMA). In contrast to previously considered algorithms, our ADMM and AMA formulations provide simple and unified frameworks for solving the convex clustering problem under the previously studied norms and open the door to potentially novel norms. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm on both simulated and real data examples. While the differences between the two algorithms appear to be minor on the surface, complexity analysis and numerical experiments show AMA to be significantly more efficient. This article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:27087770

  9. Atomic clusters with addressable complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    2017-02-01

    A general formulation for constructing addressable atomic clusters is introduced, based on one or more reference structures. By modifying the well depths in a given interatomic potential in favour of nearest-neighbour interactions that are defined in the reference(s), the potential energy landscape can be biased to make a particular permutational isomer the global minimum. The magnitude of the bias changes the resulting potential energy landscape systematically, providing a framework to produce clusters that should self-organise efficiently into the target structure. These features are illustrated for small systems, where all the relevant local minima and transition states can be identified, and for the low-energy regions of the landscape for larger clusters. For a 55-particle cluster, it is possible to design a target structure from a transition state of the original potential and to retain this structure in a doubly addressable landscape. Disconnectivity graphs based on local minima that have no direct connections to a lower minimum provide a helpful way to visualise the larger databases. These minima correspond to the termini of monotonic sequences, which always proceed downhill in terms of potential energy, and we identify them as a class of biminimum. Multiple copies of the target cluster are treated by adding a repulsive term between particles with the same address to maintain distinguishable targets upon aggregation. By tuning the magnitude of this term, it is possible to create assemblies of the target cluster corresponding to a variety of structures, including rings and chains.

  10. Autophagy selectivity through receptor clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Brown, Aidan

    Substrate selectivity in autophagy requires an all-or-none cellular response. We focus on peroxisomes, for which autophagy receptor proteins NBR1 and p62 are well characterized. Using computational models, we explore the hypothesis that physical clustering of autophagy receptor proteins on the peroxisome surface provides an appropriate all-or-none response. We find that larger peroxisomes nucleate NBR1 clusters first, and lose them due to competitive coarsening last, resulting in significant size-selectivity. We then consider a secondary hypothesis that p62 inhibits NBR1 cluster formation. We find that p62 inhibition enhances size-selectivity enough that, even if there is no change of the pexophagy rate, the volume of remaining peroxisomes can significantly decrease. We find that enhanced ubiquitin levels suppress size-selectivity, and that this effect is more pronounced for individual peroxisomes. Sufficient ubiquitin allows receptor clusters to form on even the smallest peroxisomes. We conclude that NBR1 cluster formation provides a viable physical mechanism for all-or-none substrate selectivity in pexophagy. We predict that cluster formation is associated with significant size-selectivity. Now at Simon Fraser University.

  11. Asynchronous assembly of the acetylcholine receptor and of the 43-kD nu1 protein in the postsynaptic membrane of developing Torpedo marmorata electrocyte

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR) and the 43- kD protein (v1), the two major components of the post synaptic membrane of the electromotor synapse, was followed in Torpedo marmorata electrocyte during embryonic development by immunocytochemical methods. At the first developmental stage investigated (45-mm embryos), accumulation of AchR at the ventral pole of the newly formed electrocyte was observed within columns before innervation could be detected. No concomitant accumulation of 43-kD immunoreactivity in AchR- rich membrane domains was observed at this stage, but a transient asymmetric distribution of the extracellular protein, laminin, which paralleled that of the AchR, was noticed. At the subsequent stage studied (80-mm embryos), codistribution of the two proteins was noticed on the ventral face of the cell. Intracellular pools of AchR and 43-kD protein were followed at the EM level in 80-mm electrocytes. AchR immunoreactivity was detected within membrane compartments, which include the perinuclear cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane. On the other hand, 43-kD immunoreactivity was not found associated with the AchR in the intracellular compartments of the cell, but codistributed with the AchR at the level of the plasma membrane. The data reported in this study suggest that AchR clustering in vivo is not initially determined by the association of the AchR with the 43-kD protein, but rather relies on AchR interaction with extracellular components, for instance from the basement membrane, laid down in the tissue before the entry of the electromotor nerve endings. PMID:2642909

  12. A revised moving cluster distance to the Pleiades open cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Moraux, E.; Bouy, H.; Bouvier, J.; Olivares, J.; Teixeira, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The distance to the Pleiades open cluster has been extensively debated in the literature over several decades. Although different methods point to a discrepancy in the trigonometric parallaxes produced by the Hipparcos mission, the number of individual stars with known distances is still small compared to the number of cluster members to help solve this problem. Aims: We provide a new distance estimate for the Pleiades based on the moving cluster method, which will be useful to further discuss the so-called Pleiades distance controversy and compare it with the very precise parallaxes from the Gaia space mission. Methods: We apply a refurbished implementation of the convergent point search method to an updated census of Pleiades stars to calculate the convergent point position of the cluster from stellar proper motions. Then, we derive individual parallaxes for 64 cluster members using radial velocities compiled from the literature, and approximate parallaxes for another 1146 stars based on the spatial velocity of the cluster. This represents the largest sample of Pleiades stars with individual distances to date. Results: The parallaxes derived in this work are in good agreement with previous results obtained in different studies (excluding Hipparcos) for individual stars in the cluster. We report a mean parallax of 7.44 ± 0.08 mas and distance of pc that is consistent with the weighted mean of 135.0 ± 0.6 pc obtained from the non-Hipparcos results in the literature. Conclusions: Our result for the distance to the Pleiades open cluster is not consistent with the Hipparcos catalog, but favors the recent and more precise distance determination of 136.2 ± 1.2 pc obtained from Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations. It is also in good agreement with the mean distance of 133 ± 5 pc obtained from the first trigonometric parallaxes delivered by the Gaia satellite for the brightest cluster members in common with our sample. Full Table B.2 is only

  13. Nonlocalized clustering: a new concept in nuclear cluster structure physics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Funaki, Y; Horiuchi, H; Ren, Zhongzhou; Röpke, G; Schuck, P; Tohsaki, A; Xu, Chang; Yamada, T

    2013-06-28

    We investigate the α+^{16}O cluster structure in the inversion-doublet band (Kπ=0(1)±}) states of 20Ne with an angular-momentum-projected version of the Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke (THSR) wave function, which was successful "in its original form" for the description of, e.g., the famous Hoyle state. In contrast with the traditional view on clusters as localized objects, especially in inversion doublets, we find that these single THSR wave functions, which are based on the concept of nonlocalized clustering, can well describe the Kπ=0(1)- band and the Kπ=0(1)+ band. For instance, they have 99.98% and 99.87% squared overlaps for 1- and 3- states (99.29%, 98.79%, and 97.75% for 0+, 2+, and 4+ states), respectively, with the corresponding exact solution of the α+16O resonating group method. These astounding results shed a completely new light on the physics of low energy nuclear cluster states in nuclei: The clusters are nonlocalized and move around in the whole nuclear volume, only avoiding mutual overlap due to the Pauli blocking effect.

  14. Seminars on Occupational Clusters. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Research and Demonstration.

    The document on occupational clusters was developed from papers presented in staff seminars in the Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education and contains eight papers: Introduction to the World of Clustering, Sidney C. High; Cluster Curriculum Development, Elizabeth J. Simpson; the Cluster Concept, Development of Curricular Materials for the…

  15. Bayesian Decision Theoretical Framework for Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Mo

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we establish a novel probabilistic framework for the data clustering problem from the perspective of Bayesian decision theory. The Bayesian decision theory view justifies the important questions: what is a cluster and what a clustering algorithm should optimize. We prove that the spectral clustering (to be specific, the…

  16. Overview on techniques in cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Frades, Itziar; Matthiesen, Rune

    2010-01-01

    Clustering is the unsupervised, semisupervised, and supervised classification of patterns into groups. The clustering problem has been addressed in many contexts and disciplines. Cluster analysis encompasses different methods and algorithms for grouping objects of similar kinds into respective categories. In this chapter, we describe a number of methods and algorithms for cluster analysis in a stepwise framework. The steps of a typical clustering analysis process include sequentially pattern representation, the choice of the similarity measure, the choice of the clustering algorithm, the assessment of the output, and the representation of the clusters.

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  18. Large scale cluster computing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dane Skow; Alan Silverman

    2002-12-23

    Recent revolutions in computer hardware and software technologies have paved the way for the large-scale deployment of clusters of commodity computers to address problems heretofore the domain of tightly coupled SMP processors. Near term projects within High Energy Physics and other computing communities will deploy clusters of scale 1000s of processors and be used by 100s to 1000s of independent users. This will expand the reach in both dimensions by an order of magnitude from the current successful production facilities. The goals of this workshop were: (1) to determine what tools exist which can scale up to the cluster sizes foreseen for the next generation of HENP experiments (several thousand nodes) and by implication to identify areas where some investment of money or effort is likely to be needed. (2) To compare and record experimences gained with such tools. (3) To produce a practical guide to all stages of planning, installing, building and operating a large computing cluster in HENP. (4) To identify and connect groups with similar interest within HENP and the larger clustering community.

  19. IRAC imaging of GOGREEN clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, Sean; Balogh, Michael; Cooper, Michael; Gilbank, David; Lidman, Chris; Muzzin, Adam; Old, Lyndsay; Rudnick, Greg; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard

    2016-08-01

    We propose deep IRAC imaging of three galaxy clusters drawn from the GOGREEN survey of 21 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 1 < z < 1.5. This imaging will enable the accurate measurement of unprecedentedly low stellar masses at this redshift, leveraging our deep spectroscopy. This will give a first look at environmental effects on galaxy evolution at a time when galaxies are growing in a fundamentally different way from today. With this data, we will perform accurate SED modeling in order to classify galaxies as passive or star-forming and measure stellar masses, as well as compute cluster membership using accurate photometric redshifts. These data will be augmented by approved VLT, Subaru, Magellan and CFHT imaging and by an ongoing Gemini Large Programme, with which we are obtaining deep spectroscopy of > 1000 member and > 600 field galaxies. With these data and our own lower-redshift descendant data, we will measure 1) the evolution of the quenched fraction and its dependence on distance from the cluster center and 2) the relation between stellar and halo mass and its evolution. This will provide unique constraints to our in-house theoretical models at an epoch where there are currently almost none available. The imaging that we propose will ensure all 21 GOGREEN clusters have deep IRAC data, ensuring the lasting legacy of this benchmark sample.

  20. Improvements in Ionized Cluster-Beam Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.; Compton, L. E.; Pawlik, E. V.

    1986-01-01

    Lower temperatures result in higher purity and fewer equipment problems. In cluster-beam deposition, clusters of atoms formed by adiabatic expansion nozzle and with proper nozzle design, expanding vapor cools sufficiently to become supersaturated and form clusters of material deposited. Clusters are ionized and accelerated in electric field and then impacted on substrate where films form. Improved cluster-beam technique useful for deposition of refractory metals.

  1. Internal gettering by metal alloy clusters

    DOEpatents

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Pickett, Matthew D.; Marcus, Mathew A.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2010-07-27

    The present invention relates to the internal gettering of impurities in semiconductors by metal alloy clusters. In particular, intermetallic clusters are formed within silicon, such clusters containing two or more transition metal species. Such clusters have melting temperatures below that of the host material and are shown to be particularly effective in gettering impurities within the silicon and collecting them into isolated, less harmful locations. Novel compositions for some of the metal alloy clusters are also described.

  2. The ARCHES Integrated Cluster Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, A.; Schwope, A.

    2014-07-01

    We are developing a tool to search for galaxy clusters associated with X-ray sources from the 3XMM catalog within the ARCHES project (Astronomical Resource cross-matching for High-Energy Studies). We make use of the new cross-matching tool developed for ARCHES to select galaxies in different catalogs around X-ray positions and then try to find clusters by searching for overdensities in the multi-color space. Colors are related to redshifts using spectroscopic data for passively evolving galaxies from the BOSS and VIPERS catalogs. So far we are making use of SDSS, UKIDSS, WISE, and CFHTLS photometric catalogs, but the method can easily be expanded to other data as well (e.g. Pan-STARRS and DES). We present test results of our tool performed on reference samples from the XMM/SDSS cluster survey (Takey et al 2012) and the NORAS/REFLEX surveys.

  3. Stream Clustering of Growing Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Zaigham Faraz; Spiliopoulou, Myra

    We study incremental clustering of objects that grow and accumulate over time. The objects come from a multi-table stream e.g. streams of Customer and Transaction. As the Transactions stream accumulates, the Customers’ profiles grow. First, we use an incremental propositionalisation to convert the multi-table stream into a single-table stream upon which we apply clustering. For this purpose, we develop an online version of K-Means algorithm that can handle these swelling objects and any new objects that arrive. The algorithm also monitors the quality of the model and performs re-clustering when it deteriorates. We evaluate our method on the PKDD Challenge 1999 dataset.

  4. The KMOS Galaxy Clusters Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Roger L.; Beifiori, A.; Bender, R.; Cappellari, M.; Chan, J.; Houghton, R.; Mendel, T.; Saglia, R.; Sharples, R.; Stott, J.; Smith, R.; Wilman, D.

    2015-04-01

    KMOS is a cryogenic infrared spectrograph fed by twentyfour deployable integral field units that patrol a 7.2 arcminute diameter field of view at the Nasmyth focus of the ESO VLT. It is well suited to the study of galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 2 where the well understood features in the restframe V-band are shifted into the KMOS spectral bands. Coupled with HST imagining, KMOS offers a window on the critical epoch for galaxy evolution, 7-10 Gyrs ago, when the key properties of cluster galaxies were established. We aim to investigate the size, mass, morphology and star formation history of galaxies in the clusters. Here we describe the instrument, discuss the status of the observations and report some preliminary results.

  5. Cluster assembly of hierarchical nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    In the past few years, atom clusters with diameters in the range of 2--20 nm of a variety of materials, including both metals and ceramics, have been synthesized by evaporation and condensation in high-purity gases and subsequently consolidated in situ under ultrahigh vacuum conditions to create nanophase materials. These new utlrafine-grained materials have properties that are often significantly different and considerably improved relative to those of their coarser-grained counterparts owing to both their small grain-size scale and the large percentage of their atoms in grain boundary environments. Since their properties can be engineered during the synthesis and processing steps, cluster-assembled materials appear to have significant potential for the introduction of a hierarchy of both structure and properties. Some of the recent research on nanophase materials related to properties and scale are reviewed and some of the possibilities for synthesizing hierarchical nanostructures via cluster assembly are considered.

  6. Cluster membership probability: polarimetric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhi, Biman J.; Tamura, Motohide

    2013-04-01

    Interstellar polarimetric data of the six open clusters Hogg 15, NGC 6611, NGC 5606, NGC 6231, NGC 5749 and NGC 6250 have been used to estimate the membership probability for the stars within them. For proper-motion member stars, the membership probability estimated using the polarimetric data is in good agreement with the proper-motion cluster membership probability. However, for proper-motion non-member stars, the membership probability estimated by the polarimetric method is in total disagreement with the proper-motion cluster membership probability. The inconsistencies in the determined memberships may be because of the fundamental differences between the two methods of determination: one is based on stellar proper motion in space and the other is based on selective extinction of the stellar output by the asymmetric aligned dust grains present in the interstellar medium. The results and analysis suggest that the scatter of the Stokes vectors q (per cent) and u (per cent) for the proper-motion member stars depends on the interstellar and intracluster differential reddening in the open cluster. It is found that this method could be used to estimate the cluster membership probability if we have additional polarimetric and photometric information for a star to identify it as a probable member/non-member of a particular cluster, such as the maximum wavelength value (λmax), the unit weight error of the fit (σ1), the dispersion in the polarimetric position angles (overline{ɛ }), reddening (E(B - V)) or the differential intracluster reddening (ΔE(B - V)). This method could also be used to estimate the membership probability of known member stars having no membership probability as well as to resolve disagreements about membership among different proper-motion surveys.

  7. Collaborative Clustering for Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff. Loro :/; Green Jillian; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events, as well as faster responses such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if individual nodes can communicate directly with their neighbors. Previously, a method was developed by which machine learning classification algorithms could collaborate to achieve high performance autonomously (without requiring human intervention). This method worked for supervised learning algorithms, in which labeled data is used to train models. The learners collaborated by exchanging labels describing the data. The new advance enables clustering algorithms, which do not use labeled data, to also collaborate. This is achieved by defining a new language for collaboration that uses pair-wise constraints to encode useful information for other learners. These constraints specify that two items must, or cannot, be placed into the same cluster. Previous work has shown that clustering with these constraints (in isolation) already improves performance. In the problem formulation, each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. Each learner clusters its data and then selects a pair of items about which it is uncertain and uses them to query its neighbors. The resulting feedback (a must and cannot constraint from each neighbor) is combined by the learner into a consensus constraint, and it then reclusters its data while incorporating the new constraint. A strategy was also proposed for cleaning the resulting constraint sets, which may contain conflicting constraints; this improves performance significantly. This approach has been applied to collaborative

  8. Kinetic theory of cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Robert I. A.; Simonella, Sergio; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    In a Newtonian system with localized interactions the whole set of particles is naturally decomposed into dynamical clusters, defined as finite groups of particles having an influence on each other's trajectory during a given interval of time. For an ideal gas with short-range intermolecular force, we provide a description of the cluster size distribution in terms of the reduced Boltzmann density. In the simplified context of Maxwell molecules, we show that a macroscopic fraction of the gas forms a giant component in finite kinetic time. The critical index of this phase transition is in agreement with previous numerical results on the elastic billiard.

  9. Are random fractal clusters isotropic\\?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Vicsek, Tamás; Meakin, Paul

    1985-08-01

    We have studied the shape of large clusters in the lattice-animal, percolation, and growing-percolation models. By calculating the radius of gyration tensor we find that in these models the clusters have an anisotropic shape. The results suggest that the critical droplets in related isotropic equilibrium models, such as the Ising model, may also be anisotropic. We have also determined the leading nonanalytic correction-to-scaling exponent by analyzing the anisotropy data and find that for percolation in two dimensions e~=0.47. .AE

  10. Messier's nebulae and star clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. G.

    Charles Messier's Catalogue of nebulae and star clusters, published in 1784, marked the start of a new era of deep sky astronomy. Today, this tradition of observing galaxies and clusters is kept alive by serious amateur astronomers who study the objects of the deep sky. Nearly all the objects are visible in a small telescope. The author has revised his definitive version of Messier's Catalogue. His own observations and drawings, together with maps and diagrams, make this a valuable introduction to deep sky observing. Historical and astrophysical notes bring the science of these nebulae right up to date.

  11. Galaxy Cluster Smashes Distance Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    he most distant galaxy cluster yet has been discovered by combining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and optical and infrared telescopes. The cluster is located about 10.2 billion light years away, and is observed as it was when the Universe was only about a quarter of its present age. The galaxy cluster, known as JKCS041, beats the previous record holder by about a billion light years. Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the Universe. Finding such a large structure at this very early epoch can reveal important information about how the Universe evolved at this crucial stage. JKCS041 is found at the cusp of when scientists think galaxy clusters can exist in the early Universe based on how long it should take for them to assemble. Therefore, studying its characteristics - such as composition, mass, and temperature - will reveal more about how the Universe took shape. "This object is close to the distance limit expected for a galaxy cluster," said Stefano Andreon of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) in Milan, Italy. "We don't think gravity can work fast enough to make galaxy clusters much earlier." Distant galaxy clusters are often detected first with optical and infrared observations that reveal their component galaxies dominated by old, red stars. JKCS041 was originally detected in 2006 in a survey from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). The distance to the cluster was then determined from optical and infrared observations from UKIRT, the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope in Hawaii and NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Infrared observations are important because the optical light from the galaxies at large distances is shifted into infrared wavelengths because of the expansion of the universe. The Chandra data were the final - but crucial - piece of evidence as they showed that JKCS041 was, indeed, a genuine galaxy cluster. The extended X-ray emission seen by Chandra shows that hot gas has been detected

  12. Quantum Dynamics of Helium Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    helium clusters [10-12]. (10) DMC starts with the time - dependent Schr ~ dinger equation in imaginary time and has been employed most- The approximate...bound. (For example, the binding values may be computed by the Metropolis approach . energy of He 3 is five times greater than that of 1l1lie I We first...or four times for computational effort. If this is also the case with the the larger clusters) its original size. If the maximum en- DMC approach

  13. Cluster compression algorithm: A joint clustering/data compression concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Cluster Compression Algorithm (CCA), which was developed to reduce costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting LANDSAT multispectral image data is described. The CCA is a preprocessing algorithm that uses feature extraction and data compression to more efficiently represent the information in the image data. The format of the preprocessed data enables simply a look-up table decoding and direct use of the extracted features to reduce user computation for either image reconstruction, or computer interpretation of the image data. Basically, the CCA uses spatially local clustering to extract features from the image data to describe spectral characteristics of the data set. In addition, the features may be used to form a sequence of scalar numbers that define each picture element in terms of the cluster features. This sequence, called the feature map, is then efficiently represented by using source encoding concepts. Various forms of the CCA are defined and experimental results are presented to show trade-offs and characteristics of the various implementations. Examples are provided that demonstrate the application of the cluster compression concept to multi-spectral images from LANDSAT and other sources.

  14. Dynamic cluster scheduling for cluster-tree WSNs.

    PubMed

    Severino, Ricardo; Pereira, Nuno; Tovar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    While Cluster-Tree network topologies look promising for WSN applications with timeliness and energy-efficiency requirements, we are yet to witness its adoption in commercial and academic solutions. One of the arguments that hinder the use of these topologies concerns the lack of flexibility in adapting to changes in the network, such as in traffic flows. This paper presents a solution to enable these networks with the ability to self-adapt their clusters' duty-cycle and scheduling, to provide increased quality of service to multiple traffic flows. Importantly, our approach enables a network to change its cluster scheduling without requiring long inaccessibility times or the re-association of the nodes. We show how to apply our methodology to the case of IEEE 802.15.4/ZigBee cluster-tree WSNs without significant changes to the protocol. Finally, we analyze and demonstrate the validity of our methodology through a comprehensive simulation and experimental validation using commercially available technology on a Structural Health Monitoring application scenario.

  15. Low-dimensional clustering detects incipient dominant influenza strain clusters

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiankui; Deem, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza has been circulating in the human population and has caused three pandemics in the last century (1918 H1N1, 1957 H2N2 and 1968 H3N2). The 2009 A(H1N1) was classified by World Health Organization as the fourth pandemic. Influenza has a high evolution rate, which makes vaccine design challenging. We here consider an approach for early detection of new dominant strains. By clustering the 2009 A(H1N1) sequence data, we found two main clusters. We then define a metric to detect the emergence of dominant strains. We show on historical H3N2 data that this method is able to identify a cluster around an incipient dominant strain before it becomes dominant. For example, for H3N2 as of 30 March 2009, the method detects the cluster for the new A/British Columbia/RV1222/2009 strain. This strain detection tool would appear to be useful for annual influenza vaccine selection. PMID:21036781

  16. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies. III: Beyond Bimodality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.; Ciccone, Stephanie M.; Eadie, Gwendolyn M.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Geisler, Douglas; Rothberg, Barry; Bailin, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    We present new deep photometry of the rich globular cluster (GC) systems around the Brightest Cluster Galaxies UGC 9799 (Abell 2052) and UGC 10143 (Abell 2147), obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS and WFC3 cameras. For comparison, we also present new reductions of similar HST/ACS data for the Coma supergiants NGC 4874 and 4889. All four of these galaxies have huge cluster populations (to the radial limits of our data, comprising from 12,000 to 23,000 clusters per galaxy). The metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) of the GCs can still be matched by a bimodal-Gaussian form where the metal-rich and metal-poor modes are separated by ≃ 0.8 dex, but the internal dispersions of each mode are so large that the total MDF becomes very broad and nearly continuous from [Fe/H] ≃ ‑2.4 to solar. There are, however, significant differences between galaxies in the relative numbers of metal-rich clusters, suggesting that they underwent significantly different histories of mergers with massive gas-rich halos. Last, the proportion of metal-poor GCs rises especially rapidly outside projected radii R≳ 4 {R}{eff}, suggesting the importance of accreted dwarf satellites in the outer halo. Comprehensive models for the formation of GCs as part of the hierarchical formation of their parent galaxies will be needed to trace the systematic change in structure of the MDF with galaxy mass, from the distinctly bimodal form in smaller galaxies up to the broad continuum that we see in the very largest systems.

  17. Chaos theory perspective for industry clusters development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiying; Jiang, Minghui; Li, Chengzhang

    2016-03-01

    Industry clusters have outperformed in economic development in most developing countries. The contributions of industrial clusters have been recognized as promotion of regional business and the alleviation of economic and social costs. It is no doubt globalization is rendering clusters in accelerating the competitiveness of economic activities. In accordance, many ideas and concepts involve in illustrating evolution tendency, stimulating the clusters development, meanwhile, avoiding industrial clusters recession. The term chaos theory is introduced to explain inherent relationship of features within industry clusters. A preferred life cycle approach is proposed for industrial cluster recessive theory analysis. Lyapunov exponents and Wolf model are presented for chaotic identification and examination. A case study of Tianjin, China has verified the model effectiveness. The investigations indicate that the approaches outperform in explaining chaos properties in industrial clusters, which demonstrates industrial clusters evolution, solves empirical issues and generates corresponding strategies.

  18. DICON: interactive visual analysis of multidimensional clusters.

    PubMed

    Cao, Nan; Gotz, David; Sun, Jimeng; Qu, Huamin

    2011-12-01

    Clustering as a fundamental data analysis technique has been widely used in many analytic applications. However, it is often difficult for users to understand and evaluate multidimensional clustering results, especially the quality of clusters and their semantics. For large and complex data, high-level statistical information about the clusters is often needed for users to evaluate cluster quality while a detailed display of multidimensional attributes of the data is necessary to understand the meaning of clusters. In this paper, we introduce DICON, an icon-based cluster visualization that embeds statistical information into a multi-attribute display to facilitate cluster interpretation, evaluation, and comparison. We design a treemap-like icon to represent a multidimensional cluster, and the quality of the cluster can be conveniently evaluated with the embedded statistical information. We further develop a novel layout algorithm which can generate similar icons for similar clusters, making comparisons of clusters easier. User interaction and clutter reduction are integrated into the system to help users more effectively analyze and refine clustering results for large datasets. We demonstrate the power of DICON through a user study and a case study in the healthcare domain. Our evaluation shows the benefits of the technique, especially in support of complex multidimensional cluster analysis.

  19. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  20. Clustering Teachers' Motivations for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser-Wijnveen, Gerda J.; Stes, Ann; Van Petegem, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The motivation to teach is a powerful, yet neglected, force in teaching at institutes of higher education. A better understanding of academics' motivations for teaching is necessary. The aim of this mixed-method study was to identify groups with distinctively different motivations for teaching. Six clusters were identified: expertise, duty,…

  1. Symptom Clusters among Young Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knishkowsky, Barry; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines recurrent psychosomatic symptoms and symptom clusters among Israeli school children (n=259). Results of a questionnaire that asked about the frequency of 8 psychosomatic and 8 organic complaints indicated that girls had a higher prevalence than boys for 8 of the symptoms, and that abdominal pain and headache were each reported as an…

  2. Interactive Maximum Reliability Cluster Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Robert

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for clustering variables using the alpha coefficient of reliability is described. For batch operation, a rule for stopping the agglomerative precedure is available. The conversational version of the program allows the user to intervene in the process in order to test the final solution for sensitivity to changes. (Author/JKS)

  3. Industrial Mechanics Occupational Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Frank

    This guide, developed by the Oregon Department of Education, is intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in industrial mechanics. It suggests teaching ideas and is aimed at high school students, as well as those wishing to enter community college, university, or apprenticeship programs. The guide is…

  4. Construction Cluster Volume III [Plumbing].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is the third of a series, to be integrated with a G.E.D. program, containing instructional materials at the basic skills level for the construction cluster. The volume focuses on plumbing and consists of 20 instructional units which require a month of study. The units include: (1) importance of plumbing; (2) pipe and tubing…

  5. [Cluster analysis and its application].

    PubMed

    Půlpán, Zdenĕk

    2002-01-01

    The study exploits knowledge-oriented and context-based modification of well-known algorithms of (fuzzy) clustering. The role of fuzzy sets is inherently inclined towards coping with linguistic domain knowledge also. We try hard to obtain from rich diverse data and knowledge new information about enviroment that is being explored.

  6. Competency Index. [Health Technology Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This competency index lists the competencies included in the 62 units of the Tech Prep Competency Profiles within the Health Technologies Cluster. The unit topics are as follows: employability skills; professionalism; teamwork; computer literacy; documentation; infection control and risk management; medical terminology; anatomy, physiology, and…

  7. An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy; Hao, Jiangang; Evrard, August; Wechsler, Risa H.; Hansen, Sarah; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Becker, Matthew R.; Annis, James T.; Bleem, Lindsey; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-08-03

    Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

  8. Nonmetric Grouping: Clusters and Cliques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peay, Edmund R.

    1975-01-01

    A class of closely related hierarchical grouping methods are discussed and a procedure which implements them in an integrated fashion is presented. These methods avoid some theoretical anomalies inherent in clustering and provide a framework for viewing partitioning and nonpartitioning grouping. Significant relationships between these methods and…

  9. Mental Health & the Career Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Marty

    This supplement to ninth grade mental health units relates mental health to the following occupational clusters: agribusiness and natural resources, environment, health, marine science, communications and media, business and office, marketing and distribution, public service, transportation, personnel services, consumer and homemaking education,…

  10. Transportation: Grade 8. Cluster IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 8, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Transportation." It is divided into five units: surface transportation, interstate transportation, air transportation, water transportation, and subterranean transportation (the Metro). Each unit is introduced by a statement of the topic, the unit's…

  11. Boron Clusters Come of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Russell N.

    2004-01-01

    Boron is the only element other than carbon that can build molecules of unlimited size by covalently boding to itself, a property known as catenation. In contrast to the chains and rings favored by carbon, boron arguably adopts a cluster motif that is reflected in the various forms of the pure element and in the huge area of polyhedral borane…

  12. Cluster Inter-Spacecraft Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    2008-01-01

    A document describes a radio communication system being developed for exchanging data and sharing data-processing capabilities among spacecraft flying in formation. The system would establish a high-speed, low-latency, deterministic loop communication path connecting all the spacecraft in a cluster. The system would be a wireless version of a ring bus that complies with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standard 1393 (which pertains to a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus enhancement to the IEEE standard developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Every spacecraft in the cluster would be equipped with a ring-bus radio transceiver. The identity of a spacecraft would be established upon connection into the ring bus, and the spacecraft could be at any location in the ring communication sequence. In the event of failure of a spacecraft, the ring bus would reconfigure itself, bypassing a failed spacecraft. Similarly, the ring bus would reconfigure itself to accommodate a spacecraft newly added to the cluster or newly enabled or re-enabled. Thus, the ring bus would be scalable and robust. Reliability could be increased by launching, into the cluster, spare spacecraft to be activated in the event of failure of other spacecraft.

  13. Cluster Analysis of Adolescent Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chen, Feng-Yi; Peng, Ping-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Emerging web applications and networking systems such as blogs have become popular, and they offer unique opportunities and environments for learners, especially for adolescent learners. This study attempts to explore the writing styles and genres used by adolescents in their blogs by employing content, factor, and cluster analyses. Factor…

  14. Resonant nano-cluster devices.

    PubMed

    Haglmüller, J; Rauter, H; Bauer, G; Pittner, F; Schalkhammer, T

    2005-04-01

    The resonance-enhanced absorption (REA) by metal clusters on a surface is an effective technique on which to base bio-optical devices. A four-layer device consisting of a metal mirror, a polymer or glass-type distance layer, a biomolecule interaction layer and a sub-monolayer of biorecognitively bound metal nano-clusters is reported. Experiments indicate a strong influence of the resonator homogeneity on the absorption maximum. Layer stability plays an important role in the overall performance of the device. Techniques and optimised lab protocols to set up biochips that use the REA process in the detection are presented. The sensors show one to three narrow reflection minima in the visible and or infra-red (IR) part of the spectrum and therefore they do not suffer from the spectral limitations associated with spherical gold colloids. Metal clusters (synthesised by thermal step reduction) as well as metal- dielectric shell clusters (synthesised by various shell deposition processes) are used to precisely shift the readout of the device to any frequency in the visible and near IR range. Disposable single-step protein chips, DNA assays as well as complex biochip arrays are established that use various DNARNA, antigen-antibody and protein-protein interaction systems.

  15. Construction Cluster Volume 5 [Electrical].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is the fifth of a series, to be integrated with a G.E.D. program, containing instructional materials for the construction cluster. The volume focuses on electrical work and consists of 20 instructional units which require a month of study: (1) safety precautions and first aid for electrical workers; (2) planning a simple installation;…

  16. Exotic shapes and exotic clusterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Algora, A.

    2011-10-28

    The interrelation of the largely elongated nuclear shapes and clusterization is discussed by applying semimicroscopic methods. {sup 36}Ar is considered as a specific example, where recent experimental heavy-ion scattering data seem to justify the theoretical predictions on the hyperdeformed states. Alpha-emitting reactions are also suggested for its population.

  17. Magnetic properties of nanosize iron clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, E.L.; Wilcoxon, J.P.; Newcomer, P.P.

    1993-12-31

    Isolated, monodisperse {alpha}-Fe clusters between 1.4 and 15 nm in diameter were prepared inside inverse micelles using an oil-continuous, nonaqueous system. The magnetic properties of these clusters were studied in a SQUID magnetometer as a function of cluster size, temperature and applied magnetic field. The blocking temperature, coercive field and remanent moment of 12.5 nm Fe clusters in inverse micelles are significantly lower than those reported for clusters of similar {alpha}-Fe core size but with a surface oxide. The novel synthesis technique may yield metallic clusters with essentially intrinsic magnetic properties.

  18. Ionization of Water Clusters is Mediated by Exciton Energy Transfer from Argon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-25

    The exciton energy deposited in an argon cluster, (Arn ,< n=20>) using VUV radiation is transferred to softly ionize doped water clusters, ((H2O)n, n=1-9) leading to the formation of non-fragmented clusters. Following the initial excitation, electronic energy is channeled to ionize the doped water cluster while evaporating the Ar shell, allowing identification of fragmented and complete water cluster ions. Examination of the photoionization efficiency curve shows that cluster evaporation from excitons located above 12.6 eV are not enough to cool the energized water cluster ion, and leads to their dissociation to (H2O)n-2H+ (protonated) clusters.

  19. Spectroscopic Studies of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Michael Joseph

    The objectives of this work are to use spectroscopic techniques to accurately categorize galaxies as either HII region star forming galaxies or as Active Galactic Nuclei powered via a black hole, and to use radial velocities and projected positions of galaxies in clusters to obtain the total cluster mass and its distribution. The masses and distributions compare well to X-ray mass measurements. The commonly used Dressler, A., Thompson, I. & Shectman, S. 1985, ApJ, 288, 481 technique for discriminating between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies uses the measurement of the equivalent width of the emission lines (OII) 3727 A, H/beta, and (OIII) 5007 A. High quality spectra from 42 galaxies were taken and it is shown that their method is not capable of distinguishing between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. The emission line flux from H/beta, (OIII) 5007 A, (OI) 6300 A, Hα, (NII) 6583 A, and (SII) 6716+6731 A in combination with the method of Veilleux, S. & Osterbrock, D. E. 1987, ApJS, 63, 295 must be used to accurately distinguish between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. Galaxy radial velocities from spectroscopic data and their projected 2-D positions in clusters are used to obtain robust estimates of the total mass and mass distribution in two clusters. The total mass is calculated using the Virial theorem after removing substructure. The mass distribution is estimated via several robust statistical tests for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structure. It is shown that the derived mass estimates agree well with those found independently from hot X-ray gas emission in clusters.

  20. Trap-based Cluster Research and Cluster-based Investigations of Ion Storage at ClusterTrap

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikhard, Lutz; Breitenfeldt, Martin; Herlert, Alexander; Martinez, Franklin; Marx, Gerrit; Walsh, Noelle

    2006-10-18

    ClusterTrap is a setup devoted to the investigation of atomic clusters. The Penning trap allows various studies after preceding preparation steps. In particular, the clusters may be size selected and their charge state may be varied by electron impact ionization or electron attachment during storage. On the other hand the clusters can be used for extended studies of the properties of the Penning trap. Both aspects are described with recent examples.

  1. Participation in the Cluster Magnetometer Consortium for the Cluster Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, Margaret

    1997-01-01

    Prof. M. G. Kivelson (UCLA) and Dr. R. C. Elphic (LANL) are Co-investigators on the Cluster Magnetometer Consortium (CMC) that provided the fluxgate magnetometers and associated mission support for the Cluster Mission. The CMC designated UCLA as the site with primary responsibility for the inter-calibration of data from the four spacecraft and the production of fully corrected data critical to achieving the mission objectives. UCLA was also charged with distributing magnetometer data to the U.S. Co-investigators. UCLA also supported the Technical Management Team, which was responsible for the detailed design of the instrument and its interface. In this final progress report we detail the progress made by the UCLA team in achieving the mission objectives.

  2. Cluster Ions and Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    We investigate the properties and possible roles of naturally occurring ions under at- mospheric conditions. Among other things, the formation of stable charged molecular clusters represents the initial stages of aerosol nucleation [e.g., Keesee and Castle- man, 1982], while the conversion of vapor to aggregates is the first step in certain atmospheric phase transitions [e.g. Hamill and Turco, 2000]. We analyze the stability and size distributions of common ionic clusters by solving the differential equations describing their growth and loss. The necessary reaction rate coefficients are deter- mined using kinetic and thermodynamic data. The latter are derived from direct labo- ratory measurements of equilibrium constants, from the classical charged liquid drop model applied to large aggregates (i.e., the Thomson model [Thomson, 1906]), and from quantum mechanical calculations of the thermodynamic potentials associated with the cluster structures. This approach allows us to characterize molecular clusters across the entire size range from true molecular species to larger aggregates exhibiting macroscopic behavior [D'Auria, 2001]. Cluster systems discussed in this talk include the proton hydrates (PHs) and nitrate-water and nitrate-nitric acid series [D'Auria and Turco, 2001]. These ions have frequently been detected in the stratosphere and tropo- sphere [e.g., Arnold et al., 1977; Viggiano and Arnold, 1981]. We show how the pro- posed hybrid cluster model can be extended to a wide range of ion systems, including non-proton hydrates (NPHs), mixed-ligand clusters such as nitrate-water-nitric acid and sulfate-sulfuric acid-water, as well as more exotic species containing ammonia, pyridine and other organic compounds found on ions [e.g., Eisele, 1988; Tanner and Eisele, 1991]. References: Arnold, F., D. Krankowsky and K. H. Marien, First mass spectrometric measurements of posi- tive ions in the stratosphere, Nature, 267, 30-32, 1977. D'Auria, R., A study of ionic

  3. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey - XVI. A cluster inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. I.; Bianchi, S.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Clemens, M.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Fuller, C.; Pappalardo, C.; Hughes, T. M.; Madden, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.

    2014-03-01

    Herschel far-infrared (FIR) observations are used to construct Virgo cluster galaxy luminosity functions and to show that the cluster lacks the very bright and the numerous faint sources detected in field galaxy surveys. The FIR spectral energy distributions are fitted to obtain dust masses and temperatures and the dust mass function. The cluster is overdense in dust by about a factor of 100 compared to the field. The same emissivity (β)-temperature relation applies for different galaxies as that found for different regions of M31. We use optical and H I data to show that Virgo is overdense in stars and atomic gas by about a factor of 100 and 20, respectively. Metallicity values are used to measure the mass of metals in the gas phase. The mean metallicity is ˜0.7 solar, and ˜50 per cent of the metals are in the dust. For the cluster as a whole, the mass density of stars in galaxies is eight times that of the gas and the gas mass density is 130 times that of the metals. We use our data to consider the chemical evolution of the individual galaxies, inferring that the measured variations in the effective yield are due to galaxies having different ages, being affected to varying degrees by gas loss. Four galaxy scaling relations are considered: mass-metallicity, mass-velocity, mass-star formation rate and mass-radius - we suggest that initial galaxy mass is the prime driver of a galaxy's ultimate destiny. Finally, we use X-ray observations and galaxy dynamics to assess the dark and baryonic matter content compared to the cosmological model.

  4. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90 - III. Cluster parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Amparo; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    The open cluster Berkeley 90 is the home to one of the most massive binary systems in the Galaxy, LS III +46°11, formed by two identical, very massive stars (O3.5 If* + O3.5 If*), and a second early-O system (LS III +46°12 with an O4.5 IV((f)) component at least). Stars with spectral types earlier than O4 are very scarce in the Milky Way, with no more than 20 examples. The formation of such massive stars is still an open question today, and thus the study of the environments where the most massive stars are found can shed some light on this topic. To this aim, we determine the properties and characterize the population of Berkeley 90 using optical, near-infrared and WISE photometry and optical spectroscopy. This is the first determination of these parameters with accuracy. We find a distance of 3.5^{+0.5}_{-0.5} kpc and a maximum age of 3 Ma. The cluster mass is around 1000 M⊙ (perhaps reaching 1500 M⊙ if the surrounding population is added), and we do not detect candidate runaway stars in the area. There is a second population of young stars to the southeast of the cluster that may have formed at the same time or slightly later, with some evidence for low-activity ongoing star formation.

  5. Cluster--A Great Way to Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cropper, Rebecca J.; Merkowitz, Rose Fisher

    1998-01-01

    Extension faculty in Adams, Brown, and Highland Counties (Ohio) work as a cluster group to enhance interdisciplinary program delivery and develop specialized skills. Clustering also increases networking among clientele and enhances extension's public image. (SK)

  6. Ranking inter-relationships between clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tingting; Chen, Feng; Phoebe Chen, Yi-Ping

    2011-12-01

    The evaluation of the relationships between clusters is important to identify vital unknown information in many real-life applications, such as in the fields of crime detection, evolution trees, metallurgical industry and biology engraftment. This article proposes a method called 'mode pattern + mutual information' to rank the inter-relationship between clusters. The idea of the mode pattern is used to find outstanding objects from each cluster, and the mutual information criterion measures the close proximity of a pair of clusters. Our approach is different from the conventional algorithms of classifying and clustering, because our focus is not to classify objects into different clusters, but instead, we aim to rank the inter-relationship between clusters when the clusters are given. We conducted experiments on a wide range of real-life datasets, including image data and cancer diagnosis data. The experimental results show that our algorithm is effective and promising.

  7. Heterogeneous Clustering: Operational and User Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salm, Saita Wood

    1999-01-01

    Heterogeneous clustering can improve overall utilization of multiple hosts and can provide better turnaround to users by balancing workloads across hosts. Building a cluster requires both operational changes and revisions in user scripts.

  8. Active constrained clustering by examining spectral Eigenvectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; desJardins, Marie; Xu, Qianjun

    2005-01-01

    This work focuses on the active selection of pairwise constraints for spectral clustering. We develop and analyze a technique for Active Constrained Clustering by Examining Spectral eigenvectorS (ACCESS) derived from a similarity matrix.

  9. OBSERVED SCALING RELATIONS FOR STRONG LENSING CLUSTERS: CONSEQUENCES FOR COSMOLOGY AND CLUSTER ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Comerford, Julia M.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2010-05-20

    Scaling relations of observed galaxy cluster properties are useful tools for constraining cosmological parameters as well as cluster formation histories. One of the key cosmological parameters, {sigma}{sub 8}, is constrained using observed clusters of galaxies, although current estimates of {sigma}{sub 8} from the scaling relations of dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters are limited by the large scatter in the observed cluster mass-temperature (M-T) relation. With a sample of eight strong lensing clusters at 0.3 < z < 0.8, we find that the observed cluster concentration-mass relation can be used to reduce the M-T scatter by a factor of 6. Typically only relaxed clusters are used to estimate {sigma}{sub 8}, but combining the cluster concentration-mass relation with the M-T relation enables the inclusion of unrelaxed clusters as well. Thus, the resultant gains in the accuracy of {sigma}{sub 8} measurements from clusters are twofold: the errors on {sigma}{sub 8} are reduced and the cluster sample size is increased. Therefore, the statistics on {sigma}{sub 8} determination from clusters are greatly improved by the inclusion of unrelaxed clusters. Exploring cluster scaling relations further, we find that the correlation between brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) luminosity and cluster mass offers insight into the assembly histories of clusters. We find preliminary evidence for a steeper BCG luminosity-cluster mass relation for strong lensing clusters than the general cluster population, hinting that strong lensing clusters may have had more active merging histories.

  10. Prenatal nicotine alters vigilance states and AchR gene expression in the neonatal rat: implications for SIDS.

    PubMed

    Frank, M G; Srere, H; Ledezma, C; O'Hara, B; Heller, H C

    2001-04-01

    Maternal smoking is a major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke predisposes infants to SIDS are not known. We examined the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on sleep/wake ontogenesis and central cholinergic receptor gene expression in the neonatal rat. Prenatal nicotine exposure transiently increased sleep continuity and accelerated sleep/wake ontogeny in the neonatal rat. Prenatal nicotine also upregulated nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor mRNAs in brain regions involved in regulating vigilance states. These findings suggest that the nicotine contained in cigarette smoke may predispose human infants to SIDS by interfering with the normal maturation of sleep and wake.

  11. Sperm Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Mediates α7 Acetylcholine Receptor (AChR) Activation to Promote Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Jaldety, Yael; Glick, Yair; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ickowicz, Debby; Gerber, Doron; Breitbart, Haim

    2012-01-01

    To attain fertilization the spermatozoon binds to the egg zona pellucida (ZP) via sperm receptor(s) and undergoes an acrosome reaction (AR). Several sperm receptors have been described in the literature; however, the identity of this receptor is not yet certain. In this study, we suggest that the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) might be a sperm receptor activated by ZP to induce epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated AR. We found that isolated ZP or α7 agonists induced the AR in sperm from WT but not α7-null spermatozoa, and the induced AR was inhibited by α7 or EGFR antagonists. Moreover, α7-null sperm showed very little binding to the egg, and microfluidic affinity in vitro assay clearly showed that α7nAChR, as well as EGFR, interacted with ZP3. Induction of EGFR activation and the AR by an α7 agonist was inhibited by a Src family kinase (SFK) inhibitor. In conclusion we suggest that activation of α7 by ZP leads to SFK-dependent EGFR activation, Ca2+ influx, and the acrosome reaction. PMID:22577141

  12. Multitask spectral clustering by exploring intertask correlation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Zhigang; Yang, Yi; Nie, Feiping; Shen, Heng Tao

    2015-05-01

    Clustering, as one of the most classical research problems in pattern recognition and data mining, has been widely explored and applied to various applications. Due to the rapid evolution of data on the Web, more emerging challenges have been posed on traditional clustering techniques: 1) correlations among related clustering tasks and/or within individual task are not well captured; 2) the problem of clustering out-of-sample data is seldom considered; and 3) the discriminative property of cluster label matrix is not well explored. In this paper, we propose a novel clustering model, namely multitask spectral clustering (MTSC), to cope with the above challenges. Specifically, two types of correlations are well considered: 1) intertask clustering correlation, which refers the relations among different clustering tasks and 2) intratask learning correlation, which enables the processes of learning cluster labels and learning mapping function to reinforce each other. We incorporate a novel l2,p -norm regularizer to control the coherence of all the tasks based on an assumption that related tasks should share a common low-dimensional representation. Moreover, for each individual task, an explicit mapping function is simultaneously learnt for predicting cluster labels by mapping features to the cluster label matrix. Meanwhile, we show that the learning process can naturally incorporate discriminative information to further improve clustering performance. We explore and discuss the relationships between our proposed model and several representative clustering techniques, including spectral clustering, k -means and discriminative k -means. Extensive experiments on various real-world datasets illustrate the advantage of the proposed MTSC model compared to state-of-the-art clustering approaches.

  13. Clustering Millions of Faces by Identity.

    PubMed

    Otto, Charles; Wang, Dayong; Jain, Anil

    2017-03-07

    Given a large collection of unlabeled face images, we address the problem of clustering faces into an unknown number of identities. This problem is of interest in social media, law enforcement, and other applications, where the number of faces can be of the order of hundreds of million, while the number of identities (clusters) can range from a few thousand to millions. To address the challenges of run-time complexity and cluster quality, we present an approximate Rank-Order clustering algorithm that performs better than popular clustering algorithms (k-Means and Spectral). Our experiments include clustering up to 123 million face images into over 10 million clusters. Clustering results are analyzed in terms of external (known face labels) and internal (unknown face labels) quality measures, and run-time. Our algorithm achieves an F-measure of 0:87 on the LFW benchmark (13K faces of 5; 749 individuals), which drops to 0:27 on the largest dataset considered (13K faces in LFW + 123M distractor images). Additionally, we show that frames in the YouTube benchmark can be clustered with an F-measure of 0:71. An internal per-cluster quality measure is developed to rank individual clusters for manual exploration of high quality clusters that are compact and isolated.

  14. The Design of Cluster Randomized Crossover Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rietbergen, Charlotte; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2011-01-01

    The inefficiency induced by between-cluster variation in cluster randomized (CR) trials can be reduced by implementing a crossover (CO) design. In a simple CO trial, each subject receives each treatment in random order. A powerful characteristic of this design is that each subject serves as its own control. In a CR CO trial, clusters of subjects…

  15. Interdisciplinary Education in a Cluster College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butzek, James C.; Carr, Gene

    This paper provides a brief overview of Oakton Community College's (OCC) cluster organization, which is believed to foster offering of true interdisciplinary education. OCC is organized into four learning clusters, each of 30 full-time and 40 part-time faculty, 1,500 students, and headed by a dean. Each cluster is semi-autonomous; authority is…

  16. 7 CFR 51.913 - Clusters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clusters. 51.913 Section 51.913 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Definitions § 51.913 Clusters. Clusters as used in these standards in reference to the U.S. No....

  17. 5 CFR 9701.211 - Occupational clusters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Occupational clusters. 9701.211 Section... RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Classification Structure § 9701.211 Occupational clusters. For... clusters based on factors such as mission or function; nature of work; qualifications or...

  18. 7 CFR 51.913 - Clusters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clusters. 51.913 Section 51.913 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Definitions § 51.913 Clusters. Clusters as used in these standards in reference to the U.S. No....

  19. 5 CFR 9701.211 - Occupational clusters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Occupational clusters. 9701.211 Section... RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Classification Structure § 9701.211 Occupational clusters. For... clusters based on factors such as mission or function; nature of work; qualifications or...

  20. 5 CFR 9701.211 - Occupational clusters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Occupational clusters. 9701.211 Section... RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Classification Structure § 9701.211 Occupational clusters. For... clusters based on factors such as mission or function; nature of work; qualifications or...

  1. ISODATA: Thresholds for splitting clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, E. P. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The parameter AD (average distance) as used in the ISODATA program was critically examined. Thresholds of AD to decide on the splitting of clusters were obtained. For the univariate case, 0.84 was established as a sound choice, after examining several simple, as well as composite, distributions and also after investigating the probability of misclassification when points have to be reassigned to the newly identified clusters. For the multivariate case, the empirical threshold (N-0.16)/square root of N was extrapolated. A final criticism on AD was that AD would lose its effectiveness as a discriminative measure for the present purpose when N was large.

  2. Clustering fossils in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Akhshik, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    In solid inflation the single field non-Gaussianity consistency condition is violated. As a result, the long tenor perturbation induces observable clustering fossils in the form of quadrupole anisotropy in large scale structure power spectrum. In this work we revisit the bispectrum analysis for the scalar-scalar-scalar and tensor-scalar-scalar bispectrum for the general parameter space of solid. We consider the parameter space of the model in which the level of non-Gaussianity generated is consistent with the Planck constraints. Specializing to this allowed range of model parameter we calculate the quadrupole anisotropy induced from the long tensor perturbations on the power spectrum of the scalar perturbations. We argue that the imprints of clustering fossil from primordial gravitational waves on large scale structures can be detected from the future galaxy surveys.

  3. Progress on the Cluster Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, Margaret; Khurana, Krishan; Acuna, Mario (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Prof M. G. Kivelson and Dr. K. K. Khurana (UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles)) are co-investigators on the Cluster Magnetometer Consortium (CMC) that provided the fluxgate magnetometers and associated mission support for the Cluster Mission. The CMC designated UCLA as the site with primary responsibility for the inter-calibration of data from the four spacecraft and the production of fully corrected data critical to achieving the mission objectives. UCLA will also participate in the analysis and interpretation of the data. The UCLA group here reports its excellent progress in developing fully intra-calibrated data for large portions of the mission and an excellent start in developing inter-calibrated data for selected time intervals, especially extended intervals in August, 2001 on which a workshop held at ESTEC in March, 2002 focused. In addition, some scientific investigations were initiated and results were reported at meetings.

  4. Galaxy formation through hierarchical clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic methods for studying the formation of galaxies by gas condensation within massive dark halos are presented. The present scheme applies to cosmogonies where structure grows through hierarchical clustering of a mixture of gas and dissipationless dark matter. The simplest models consistent with the current understanding of N-body work on dissipationless clustering, and that of numerical and analytic work on gas evolution and cooling are adopted. Standard models for the evolution of the stellar population are also employed, and new models for the way star formation heats and enriches the surrounding gas are constructed. Detailed results are presented for a cold dark matter universe with Omega = 1 and H(0) = 50 km/s/Mpc, but the present methods are applicable to other models. The present luminosity functions contain significantly more faint galaxies than are observed.

  5. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  6. Planetary systems in star clusters .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Shu, Qi; Cai, Maxwell Xu; Spurzem, Rainer

    Thousands of confirmed and candidate exoplanets have been identified in recent years. Consequently, theoretical research on the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems has seen a boost, and the processes of planet-planet scattering, secular evolution, and interaction between planets and gas/debris disks have been well-studied. Almost all of this work has focused on the formation and evolution of isolated planetary systems, and neglect the effect of external influences, such as the gravitational interaction with neighbouring stars. Most stars, however, form in clustered environments that either quickly disperse, or evolve into open clusters. Under these conditions, young planetary systems experience frequent close encounters with other stars, at least during the first 106-107 years, which affects planets orbiting at any period range, as well as their debris structures.

  7. Using clustering for document reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukovich, Anna; Zacchigna, Alessandra; Ramponi, Giovanni; Schoier, Gabriella

    2006-02-01

    In the forensics and investigative science fields there may arise the need of reconstructing documents which have been destroyed by means of a shredder. In a computer-based reconstruction, the pieces are described by numerical features, which represent the visual content of the strips. Usually, the pieces of different pages have been mixed. We propose an approach for the reconstruction which performs a first clustering on the strips to ease the successive matching, be it manual (with the help of a computer) or automatic. A number of features, extracted by means of image processing algorithms, have been selected for this aim. The results show the effectiveness of the features and of the proposed clustering algorithm.

  8. Predicted halflives for cluster radioactivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Greiner, W.; Ivascu, M.

    1989-10-01

    The main results of the analytical superasymmetric fission model, describing in a unified manner cluster radioactivities, alpha-decay and cold fission processes, are briefly reviewed. Predicted halflives for 14C, 24, 25, 26Ne, 28, 30Mg and 32Si radioactivities in the range 10 11-10 26 s and the corresponding branching ratios relative to α-decay 10 -16 - 10 -9 have been experimentally confirmed within 1.5 orders of magnitude.

  9. Geometric Clustering and its Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-31

    limited theoretical treatment exists. As a by- product , we present the first R-tree based algorithm for Rfn. Our algorithms do not assume that either P...student, James McClain. On a related subject, we made progress on accurate localization of RFID tags in three dimensions [7]. 4 Clustering on Road...Hekimian-Williams, B. Grant, Xiuwen Liu, Zhenghao Zhang, and P. Kumar. Accurate localization of rfid tags using phase difference. In RFID , 2010 IEEE

  10. Applications of cluster analysis to the creation of perfectionism profiles: a comparison of two clustering approaches.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Jocelyn H; Edwards, Julianne M; Finch, W Holmes; Cassady, Jerrell C

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional clustering methods (e.g., K-means) have been shown to be useful in the social sciences it is often difficult for such methods to handle situations where clusters in the population overlap or are ambiguous. Fuzzy clustering, a method already recognized in many disciplines, provides a more flexible alternative to these traditional clustering methods. Fuzzy clustering differs from other traditional clustering methods in that it allows for a case to belong to multiple clusters simultaneously. Unfortunately, fuzzy clustering techniques remain relatively unused in the social and behavioral sciences. The purpose of this paper is to introduce fuzzy clustering to these audiences who are currently relatively unfamiliar with the technique. In order to demonstrate the advantages associated with this method, cluster solutions of a common perfectionism measure were created using both fuzzy clustering and K-means clustering, and the results compared. Results of these analyses reveal that different cluster solutions are found by the two methods, and the similarity between the different clustering solutions depends on the amount of cluster overlap allowed for in fuzzy clustering.

  11. A Test for Cluster Bias: Detecting Violations of Measurement Invariance across Clusters in Multilevel Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jak, Suzanne; Oort, Frans J.; Dolan, Conor V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a test for cluster bias, which can be used to detect violations of measurement invariance across clusters in 2-level data. We show how measurement invariance assumptions across clusters imply measurement invariance across levels in a 2-level factor model. Cluster bias is investigated by testing whether the within-level factor loadings…

  12. Galaxy Evolution in Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzkopf, U.; Hill, J. M.

    2000-12-01

    We present the first results of a study of the morphological and spectral evolution of galaxies within the dense cores of distant clusters at redshifts between z=0.4 and 1. The morphology, colors, concentration index, and asymmetry parameters of these cluster members are compared by using a combination of deep HST NICMOS and WFPC2 imaging, covering the rest-frame U and J bands. We also discuss the influence of dust obscuration on the derived measurements. Of particular interest is the morphology of galaxies at near-infrared wavelengths in rich clusters which show an excess of blue galaxies (Butcher-Oelmer effect), namely Abell 851 (z=0.4) and CL 1603+43 (z=0.92). We focus our study on optical/near-infrared measurements of galaxy asymmetry and central concentration, derived from a large number (>400) of objects detected within the core of Abell 851. The sensitivity and reliability of these parameters for galaxy classification and physical diagnostic purposes are tested. In conjunction with the use of recent source extraction software we are able to establish a fast, robust, and highly automated procedure of mapping the structural parameters of large galaxy samples. This work is supported by NASA, under contract NAS5-26555.

  13. RELICS: Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan A.; RELICS Team

    2017-01-01

    Hubble and Spitzer imaging programs observing galaxy cluster lenses have delivered some of the highest redshift galaxy candidates to date (z ~ 9 - 11, or 540 - 410 Myr after the Big Bang). These magnified galaxies are intrinsically faint, and thus more representative of the sources believed to be primarily responsible for reionization. Magnified galaxies are also observed brightly enough to be prime targets for detailed follow-up study with current and future observatories, including JWST. Building on the successes of CLASH and the Frontier Fields, we have begun RELICS, the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey. By observing 41 massive clusters for the first time at infrared wavelengths, RELICS will deliver more of the best and brightest high-redshift candidates to the community in time for the November 2017 JWST GO Cycle 1 call for proposals. I will present our early results. I will also discuss prospects for JWST to follow-up known candidates and discover new galaxies at even higher redshifts (z > 11). The discovery efficiency gains from lensing will be even more pronounced at z > 11 if luminosity function faint end slopes are steeper than alpha ~ -2, as suggested by current models and observational extrapolations.

  14. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.

    2015-06-07

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreover, pECCD yields sensible albeit inexact results even for attractive interactions where pCCD breaks down.

  15. Regioselectivity of H Cluster Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The H2-evolving potential of [FeFe] hydrogenases is severely limited by the oxygen sensitivity of this class of enzymes. Recent experimental studies on hydrogenase from C. reinhardtii point to O2-induced structural changes in the [Fe4S4] subsite of the H cluster. Here, we investigate the mechanistic basis of this observation by means of density functional theory. Unexpectedly, we find that the isolated H cluster shows a pathological catalytic activity for the formation of reactive oxygen species such as O2– and HO2–. After protonation of O2–, an OOH radical may coordinate to the Fe atoms of the cubane, whereas H2O2 specifically reacts with the S atoms of the cubane-coordinating cysteine residues. Both pathways are accompanied by significant structural distortions that compromise cluster integrity and thus catalytic activity. These results explain the experimental observation that O2-induced inhibition is accompanied by distortions of the [Fe4S4] moiety and account for the irreversibility of this process. PMID:22106822

  16. Metallic bonding and cluster structure

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Jose M.; Beltran, Marcela R.; Michaelian, Karo; Garzon, Ignacio L.; Ordejon, Pablo; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel

    2000-02-15

    Knowledge of the structure of clusters is essential to predict many of their physical and chemical properties. Using a many-body semiempirical Gupta potential (to perform global minimizations), and first-principles density functional calculations (to confirm the energy ordering of the local minima), we have recently found [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1600 (1998)] that there are many intermediate-size disordered gold nanoclusters with energy near or below the lowest-energy ordered structure. This is especially surprising because we studied ''magic'' cluster sizes, for which very compact-ordered structures exist. Here, we show how the analysis of the local stress can be used to understand the physical origin of this amorphization. We find that the compact ordered structures, which are very stable for pair potentials, are destabilized by the tendency of metallic bonds to contract at the surface, because of the decreased coordination. The amorphization is also favored by the relatively low energy associated to bondlength and coordination disorder in metals. Although these are very general properties of metallic bonding, we find that they are especially important in the case of gold, and we predict some general trends in the tendency of metallic clusters towards amorphous structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Spectral clustering with epidemic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Laura M.; Lerman, Kristina; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina; Percus, Allon G.; Ghosh, Rumi

    2013-10-01

    Spectral clustering is widely used to partition graphs into distinct modules or communities. Existing methods for spectral clustering use the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the graph Laplacian, an operator that is closely associated with random walks on graphs. We propose a spectral partitioning method that exploits the properties of epidemic diffusion. An epidemic is a dynamic process that, unlike the random walk, simultaneously transitions to all the neighbors of a given node. We show that the replicator, an operator describing epidemic diffusion, is equivalent to the symmetric normalized Laplacian of a reweighted graph with edges reweighted by the eigenvector centralities of their incident nodes. Thus, more weight is given to edges connecting more central nodes. We describe a method that partitions the nodes based on the componentwise ratio of the replicator's second eigenvector to the first and compare its performance to traditional spectral clustering techniques on synthetic graphs with known community structure. We demonstrate that the replicator gives preference to dense, clique-like structures, enabling it to more effectively discover communities that may be obscured by dense intercommunity linking.

  18. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  19. The UCD Population of the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Ferguson, Peter; Tully, R. Brent; Carter, David; Phillipps, Steven; Peng, Eric

    2015-08-01

    UCDs are super massive star clusters found largely in dense regions but have also been found around individual galaxies and in smaller groups. Their origin is still under debate but consensus is that they formed either during major galaxy mergers as mergers of super massive star clusters, are simply the high mass end of the globular cluster luminosity function and formed in the same way as globular clusters, or that they formed from the threshing of galaxies and are remnant nuclear star clusters, which themselves may have formed from the mergers of globular star clusters within galaxies.We are attempting to disentangle these competing formation scenarios with a large survey of UCDs in the Coma cluster. Using ACS two-passband imaging from the HST/ACS Coma Cluster Treasury Survey, we are using colors and sizes to identify the UCD cluster members. With a large size limited sample of the UCD population within the core region of the Coma cluster, we intend to use the population size, properties, and spatial distribution, and comparison with the Coma globular cluster and nuclear star cluster populations to discriminate between the threshing and globular cluster scenarios. In particular, previously we have found a possible correlation of UCD colors with host galaxy and a possible excess of UCDs around a non-central giant galaxy with an unusually large globular cluster population, both suggestive of a globular cluster origin. With a larger sample size and additional imaging fields that encompass the region around this giant galaxy, we are investigating whether the color correlation with host persists and whether the unusual giant galaxy hosts a similarly large UCD population consistent with, or in excess of, the bright end of the GCLF. We present initial results from the survey.

  20. Using Xenopus tissue cultures for the study of myasthenia gravis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hwee Li; Lim, Jorain Yu Ni; Fukami, Yuki; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Lee, Chi Wai

    2015-12-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG), the most common autoimmune disease of neuromuscular junction (NMJ), is heterogeneous in terms of pathophysiology, which is determined by the pathogenic antigen of autoantibodies targeting to synaptic proteins at the NMJs. Currently, patients suspected with MG are routinely screened for the presence of autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) or muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) using a cell-based assay (CBA) that involves the expression of target synaptic membrane protein in heterologous cell lines. However, some autoantibodies may only show reactivity for binding to densely clustered AChR in the physiological conformation, while AChR clustering is known to involve signaling events orchestrated by over a dozen of postsynaptic proteins. To improve the existing serological diagnosis of MG, this study explored the possibility of using the well-established Xenopus primary culture system as a novel CBA for MG. Here, by examining the pathogenic effects of four MG human plasma samples, we found that the samples from both seropositive and seronegative MG patients effectively induced the disassembly of aneural AChR clusters in cultured Xenopus muscle cells, as well as the nerve-induced AChR clusters in the nerve-muscle co-cultures. Importantly, the disassembly of AChR clusters was spatio-temporally correlated to the disappearance of actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin, an actin regulator involved in AChR trafficking and clustering. Taken together, this study develops a reliable CBA using Xenopus primary cultures for screening the pathogenicity of human MG plasma samples, and providing a platform for investigating the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the endocytic trafficking and degradation of AChRs at NMJs in MG patients.

  1. A GMBCG galaxy cluster catalog of 55,880 rich clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; /Fermilab /Michigan U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /UC, Santa Barbara /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Caltech /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  2. A GMBCG Galaxy Cluster Catalog of 55,424 Rich Clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; Gerdes, David; Johnston, David E.; Sheldon, Erin; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-22

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  3. Atomic scale dynamics of ultrasmall germanium clusters.

    PubMed

    Bals, S; Van Aert, S; Romero, C P; Lauwaet, K; Van Bael, M J; Schoeters, B; Partoens, B; Yücelen, E; Lievens, P; Van Tendeloo, G

    2012-06-12

    Starting from the gas phase, small clusters can be produced and deposited with huge flexibility with regard to composition, materials choice and cluster size. Despite many advances in experimental characterization, a detailed morphology of such clusters is still lacking. Here we present an atomic scale observation as well as the dynamical behaviour of ultrasmall germanium clusters. Using quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with ab initio calculations, we are able to characterize the transition between different equilibrium geometries of a germanium cluster consisting of less than 25 atoms. Seven-membered rings, trigonal prisms and some smaller subunits are identified as possible building blocks that stabilize the structure.

  4. Dynamic Clustering in Suspension of Motile Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hepeng; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Mingcheng

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena arising from interactions between individual cells. Here we investigate dynamic clusters of motile bacteria near an air-liquid interface. Cell in a cluster orient its flagella perpendicular to the interface and generate attractive radial fluid flow that leads to cluster formation. Rotating cell also creates tangential forces on neighbors that sets clusters into counter-clockwise rotation. We construct a numerical model of self-propelled particles that interact via pair-wise forces extracted from hydrodynamic calculations; such a model reproduces many properties of observed cluster dynamics.

  5. Study of Stellar Clusters Containing Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costado, Teresa; Alfaro, E. J.; Delgado, A. J.; Djupvik, A. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2013-06-01

    Most stars form in clusters, but the percentage of stars born in dense stellar systems is currently matter of controversy and depends very much on the own definition of cluster. The cluster definition and hence the morphologies of individual clusters appear to vary significantly from region to region, as well as with age, which suggests that either, star formation in clusters is not universal and may depend on the local environment, or that all clusters form with the same morphology but early dynamical evolution quickly modifies the structure of the phase space distribution. In addition, young populated clusters containing massive stars are excellent labs for the study of the formation of the massive stellar component of the Galactic disk. Three main scenarios have been proposed for the formation of high-mass stars (M > 7-8 M_{⊙}): a) monolithic collapse of proto-stellar nuclei; b) competitive accretion inside the proto-cluster molecular cloud; and c) coalescence of proto-stellar nuclei and low-mass stars in very dense atmospheres. Both scientific questions: a) cluster formation and b) formation of high mass stars in clusters are intimately connected via the structural description of the phase space distribution of cluster stars and their Mass Function (MF). Models of static clusters with different initial spatial and kinematic distributions show how the spatial distribution dynamically evolves with time, allowing a characterization of their dynamical state from snapshots of their spatial distribution. Four are the main variables (and their distribution with mass and position) needed for a reliable characterization of the cluster dynamical state: a) Mass segregation parameter; b) Mapping of surface density for different ranges of masses; c) Q morphological parameter based on the minimum spanning tree graph and its variation with mass and cluster age, and d) MF of the cluster members. Two years ago, the Stellar System Group of IAA has begun an observational

  6. Ultraviolet colors of old LMC clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, A. P.; Hartwick, F. D. A.

    1992-01-01

    New ultraviolet spectra for five red LMC globular clusters have been obtained with IUE. These have been supplemented with archival spectra for eleven old LMC clusters. These data strengthen and extend the UV-color versus age relation for clusters older than about 10 exp 9 yr, but do not offer much precision in age determination, presumably because the ultraviolet colors of the oldest clusters depend strongly on the horizontal-branch morphology. Comparison of LMC data with UV colors for the brightest M31 clusters suggests their ages might be only a few gigayears.

  7. MD simulation of cluster formation during sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramoto, T.; Okai, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Yorizane, K.; Yamamura, Y.

    2001-06-01

    The cluster ejection due to cluster impact on a solid surface is studied through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Simulations are performed for Cu cluster impacts on the Cu(1 1 1) surface for cluster energy 100 eV/atom, and for clusters of 6, 13, 28 and 55 atoms. Interatomic interactions are described by the AMLJ-EAM potential. The vibration energy spectrum is independent of the incident cluster size and energy. This comes from the fact that sputtered clusters become stable through the successive fragmentation of nascent large sputtered clusters. The vibration energy spectra for large sputtered clusters have a peak, whose energy corresponds to the melting temperature of Cu. The exponent of the power-law fit of the abundance distribution and the total sputtering yield for the cluster impacts are higher than that for the monatomic ion impacts with the same total energy, where the exponent δ is given by Yn∝ nδ and Yn is the yield of sputtered n-atom cluster. The exponent δ follows a unified function of the total sputtering yield, which is a monotonic increase function, and it is nearly equal to δ ˜ -3 for larger yield.

  8. A spatial scan statistic for multiple clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Zhou; Wang, Jin-Feng; Yang, Wei-Zhong; Li, Zhong-Jie; Lai, Sheng-Jie

    2011-10-01

    Spatial scan statistics are commonly used for geographical disease surveillance and cluster detection. While there are multiple clusters coexisting in the study area, they become difficult to detect because of clusters' shadowing effect to each other. The recently proposed sequential method showed its better power for detecting the second weaker cluster, but did not improve the ability of detecting the first stronger cluster which is more important than the second one. We propose a new extension of the spatial scan statistic which could be used to detect multiple clusters. Through constructing two or more clusters in the alternative hypothesis, our proposed method accounts for other coexisting clusters in the detecting and evaluating process. The performance of the proposed method is compared to the sequential method through an intensive simulation study, in which our proposed method shows better power in terms of both rejecting the null hypothesis and accurately detecting the coexisting clusters. In the real study of hand-foot-mouth disease data in Pingdu city, a true cluster town is successfully detected by our proposed method, which cannot be evaluated to be statistically significant by the standard method due to another cluster's shadowing effect.

  9. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies. II. NGC 6166

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.; Blakeslee, John P.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Geisler, Douglas; Rothberg, Barry

    2016-01-01

    We present new deep photometry of the globular cluster system (GCS) around NGC 6166, the central supergiant galaxy in Abell 2199. Hubble Space Telescope data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys and WFC3 cameras in F475W and F814W are used to determine the spatial distribution of the GCS, its metallicity distribution function (MDF), and the dependence of the MDF on galactocentric radius and on GC luminosity. The MDF is extremely broad, with the classic red and blue subpopulations heavily overlapped, but a double-Gaussian model can still formally match the MDF closely. The spatial distribution follows a Sérsic-like profile detectably to a projected radius of at least Rgc = 250 kpc. To that radius, the total number of clusters in the system is NGC = 39000 ± 2000, the global specific frequency is SN = 11.2 ± 0.6, and 57% of the total are blue, metal-poor clusters. The GCS may fade smoothly into the intracluster medium (ICM) of A2199; we see no clear transition from the core of the galaxy to the cD halo or the ICM. The radial distribution, projected ellipticity, and mean metallicity of the red (metal-richer) clusters match the halo light extremely well for {R}{gc}≳ 15 {{kpc}}, both of them varying as {σ }{MRGC}∼ {σ }{light}∼ {R}-1.8. By comparison, the blue (metal-poor) GC component has a much shallower falloff {σ }{MPGC}∼ {R}-1.0 and a more nearly spherical distribution. This strong difference in their density distributions produces a net metallicity gradient in the GCS as a whole that is primarily generated by the population gradient. With NGC 6166 we appear to be penetrating into a regime of high enough galaxy mass and rich enough environment that the bimodal two-phase description of GC formation is no longer as clear or effective as it has been in smaller galaxies.

  10. Characterizing galaxy clusters with gravitational potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Erwin Tin-Hay

    2010-11-01

    We propose a simple estimator for the gravitational potential of cluster-size halos using the temperature and density profiles of the intracluster gas based on the assumptions of hydro-static equilibrium and spherical symmetry. Using high resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters, we show that the scaling relation between this estimator and the gravitational potential has a small intrinsic scatter of ˜ 10%, and it is insensitive to baryon physics outside the cluster core. The slope and the normalization of the scaling relation vary weakly with redshift, and they are relatively independent of the choice of radial range used and the dynamical states of the clusters. The results presented here provide a way for using the cluster potential function as an alternative to the cluster mass function in constraining cosmology using galaxy clusters.

  11. Directional clustering in highest energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Haim; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2001-09-01

    An unexpected degree of small-scale clustering is observed in highest-energy cosmic ray events. Some directional clustering can be expected due to purely statistical fluctuations for sources distributed randomly in the sky. This creates a background for events originating in clustered sources. We derive analytic formulas to estimate the probability of random cluster configurations, and use these formulas to study the strong potential of the HiRes, Auger, Telescope Array and EUSO-OWL-AirWatch facilities for deciding whether any observed clustering is most likely due to nonrandom sources. For a detailed comparison to data, our analytical approach cannot compete with Monte Carlo simulations, including experimental systematics. However, our derived formulas do offer two advantages: (i) easy assessment of the significance of any observed clustering, and most importantly, (ii) an explicit dependence of cluster probabilities on the chosen angular bin size.

  12. A framework for feature selection in clustering

    PubMed Central

    Witten, Daniela M.; Tibshirani, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of clustering observations using a potentially large set of features. One might expect that the true underlying clusters present in the data differ only with respect to a small fraction of the features, and will be missed if one clusters the observations using the full set of features. We propose a novel framework for sparse clustering, in which one clusters the observations using an adaptively chosen subset of the features. The method uses a lasso-type penalty to select the features. We use this framework to develop simple methods for sparse K-means and sparse hierarchical clustering. A single criterion governs both the selection of the features and the resulting clusters. These approaches are demonstrated on simulated data and on genomic data sets. PMID:20811510

  13. Expulsion of Dust from Young Stellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbøl, P.; Dottori, H.

    2013-03-01

    Young stellar clusters were identified on deep near-infrared images of 6 nearby, grand-design spirals observed with HAWK-I/VLT. A 90% completeness was reached for cluster complexes with M K = -11.5m (corresponding to masses around 104 M⊙) while the linear resolution was around 40 pc. The distribution of clusters in the (H-K)-(J-H) diagrams revealed two groups of clusters. Comparing with Starburst99 model tracks, the groups could be interpreted as one old population of clusters with low extinction and one consisting of young clusters with visual extinction as high as AV = 7m. The clear separation between the two groups suggests a rapid expulsion of dust from the young clusters.

  14. XMM Newton Observations of Toothbrush Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Sinancan; Nihal Ercan, Enise; De Plaa, Jelle; Mernier, Francois

    2016-07-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally-bound objects in the universe. The member galaxies are embedded in a hot X-ray emitting Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) that has been enriched over time with metals produced by supernovae. In this presentation we show new results from XMM-Newton regarding the merging cluster 1RXSJ0603.3+4213. This cluster, also known as the Toothbrush cluster, shows a large toothbrush-shaped radio relic associated with a merger shock North of the cluster core. We show the distribution and the abundances of the metals in this merging cluster in relation to the merger shock. The results are derived from spatially resolved X-ray spectra from the EPIC instrument aboard XMM-Newton.

  15. Is network clustering detectable in transmission trees?

    PubMed

    Welch, David

    2011-06-01

    Networks are often used to model the contact processes that allow pathogens to spread between hosts but it remains unclear which models best describe these networks. One question is whether clustering in networks, roughly defined as the propensity for triangles to form, affects the dynamics of disease spread. We perform a simulation study to see if there is a signal in epidemic transmission trees of clustering. We simulate susceptible-exposed-infectious-removed (SEIR) epidemics (with no re-infection) over networks with fixed degree sequences but different levels of clustering and compare trees from networks with the same degree sequence and different clustering levels. We find that the variation of such trees simulated on networks with different levels of clustering is barely greater than those simulated on networks with the same level of clustering, suggesting that clustering can not be detected in transmission data when re-infection does not occur.

  16. POTASSIUM IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER STARS: COMPARING NORMAL CLUSTERS TO THE PECULIAR CLUSTER NGC 2419

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Sollima, A.; Gratton, R. G.; Lucatello, S.; D'Orazi, V.; Sneden, C. E-mail: angela.bragaglia@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: raffaele.gratton@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: valentina.dorazi@mq.edu.au

    2013-05-20

    Two independent studies recently uncovered two distinct populations among giants in the distant, massive globular cluster (GC) NGC 2419. One of these populations has normal magnesium (Mg) and potassium (K) abundances for halo stars: enhanced Mg and roughly solar K. The other population has extremely depleted Mg and very enhanced K. To better anchor the peculiar NGC 2419 chemical composition, we have investigated the behavior of K in a few red giant branch stars in NGC 6752, NGC 6121, NGC 1904, and {omega} Cen. To verify that the high K abundances are intrinsic and not due to some atmospheric features in giants, we also derived K abundances in less evolved turn-off and subgiant stars of clusters 47 Tuc, NGC 6752, NGC 6397, and NGC 7099. We normalized the K abundance as a function of the cluster metallicity using 21 field stars analyzed in a homogeneous manner. For all GCs of our sample, the stars lie in the K-Mg abundance plane on the same locus occupied by the Mg-normal population in NGC 2419 and by field stars. This holds for both giants and less-evolved stars. At present, NGC 2419 seems unique among GCs.

  17. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  18. Countdown for the Cluster quartet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Following the successful completion of the Cluster II Flight Readiness Review on 23 June, final launch preparations are progressing smoothly and combined operations with the Soyuz-Fregat launch vehicle are now under way. The dual launches, each involving two Cluster spacecraft built under the prime contractorship of Astrium (former Dornier Satellitensysteme GmbH, Germany), are currently scheduled for 15 July with a launch window opening at 14:40 CEST, 12:40 GMT and lasting 6 minutes, and 9 August from Baikonur Space Centre in Kazakhstan. A number of press events have been organised in various countries to coincide with both launches. The main press centre for the first launch will be located at ESA's European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) at Darmstadt in Germany. Local press centres are also being set up in the other ESA establishments: ESRIN (Italy), ESTEC (The Netherlands), and VILSPA (Spain). See attachment for more detailed information and reply form to register at the various sites. Details of the second launch press event, which will be held in London (UK), will be available at a later date. Cluster II Competition Attracts Record Entries. A highlight of the first launch event at ESOC will be the announcement of the overall winner of ESA's "Name the Cluster quartet" competition and the chosen names of the four Cluster II satellites. Last February, members of the public in all of ESA's 15 member states were asked to suggest the most suitable names for the Cluster II spacecraft. The satellites are currently known as flight models (FM) 5, 6, 7 and 8. Competitors were asked to propose a set of four names (places, people, or things from history, mythology, or fiction, but not living persons) and explain in a few sentences the reasons for their choice. After sifting through more than 5,000 entries from all over Europe and debating at length the merits of the various suggestions, the multinational jury eventually produced a list of 15 national prize winners - one

  19. Clustering means geometry in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krioukov, Dmitri

    Using maximum-likelihood estimation techniques, any real network data can be fit to essentially any network model, inferring the most likely values of the model parameters for the network. However there is one caveat. The results of such fitting are not spurious but meaningful and predictive, only if the network is a typical network in the unbiased ensemble of random graphs with the inferred values of model parameters. Therefore, given a particular combination of a real network and a model, the first question one has to answer is what structural properties of the network ensure that this network is a typical element in the ensemble of random graphs defined by the model. This question is usually highly intractable, explaining why it is almost never answered before the fitting/inference task is performed. Inspired by recent observations that random geometric graphs reproduce many structural and dynamical properties of a variety of real networks, we find the network structural properties that guarantee that networks that have these properties are in fact geometric, meaning that latent space network models are their true models. Specifically we prove that peculiar organization of clustering observed in real networks is one of the main such properties. In other words, maximum-entropy random graphs with specific clustering properties, which are quite different from the clustering properties of random graphs in the Strauss model, are actually soft random geometric graphs with a specific form of the connection probability function. Using this function we can then infer the coordinates of nodes in a latent space for any given network, and reliably check if the network is a typical network in the resulting ensemble of soft random geometric graphs. If it is, then the inferred coordinates are meaningful and real, and can be used for prediction tasks with proved guarantees that the results of such predictions are reliable and not just transient artifacts.

  20. Hot outflows in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.

    2015-10-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analysed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using Chandra X-ray Observatory observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the `iron radius') and jet power is found with the form R_Fe ∝ P_jet^{0.45}. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed 100 M⊙ yr- 1 in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10-20 per cent of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at regulating star formation and AGN activity in BCGs and presumably in giant elliptical galaxies. The metallicity distribution overall can be complex, perhaps due to metal-rich gas returning in circulation flows or being blown around in the hot atmospheres. Roughly 15 per cent of the work done by the cavities is expended lifting the metal-enriched gas, implying their nuclear black holes have increased in mass by at least ˜107-109 M⊙. Finally, we show that hot outflows can account for the broad, gas-phase metallicity distribution compared to the stellar light profiles of BCGs, and we consider a possible connection between hot outflows and cold molecular gas flows discovered in recent Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations.

  1. STAR cluster-finder ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Botlo, M.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    The STAR experiment reads out a TPC and an SVT (silicon vertex tracker), both of which require in-line pedestal subtraction, compression of ADC values from 10-bit to 8-bit, and location of time sequences representing responses to charged-particle tracks. The STAR cluster finder ASIC responds to all of these needs. Pedestal subtraction and compression are performed using lookup tables in attached RAM. We describe its design and implementation, as well as testing methodology and results of tests performed on foundry prototypes.

  2. Multi-viewpoint clustering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Mala; Wild, Chris

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we address the feasibility of partitioning rule-based systems into a number of meaningful units to enhance the comprehensibility, maintainability and reliability of expert systems software. Preliminary results have shown that no single structuring principle or abstraction hierarchy is sufficient to understand complex knowledge bases. We therefore propose the Multi View Point - Clustering Analysis (MVP-CA) methodology to provide multiple views of the same expert system. We present the results of using this approach to partition a deployed knowledge-based system that navigates the Space Shuttle's entry. We also discuss the impact of this approach on verification and validation of knowledge-based systems.

  3. Cluster synchronization induced by one-node clusters in networks with asymmetric negative couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianbao; Ma, Zhongjun; Zhang, Gang

    2013-12-15

    This paper deals with the problem of cluster synchronization in networks with asymmetric negative couplings. By decomposing the coupling matrix into three matrices, and employing Lyapunov function method, sufficient conditions are derived for cluster synchronization. The conditions show that the couplings of multi-node clusters from one-node clusters have beneficial effects on cluster synchronization. Based on the effects of the one-node clusters, an effective and universal control scheme is put forward for the first time. The obtained results may help us better understand the relation between cluster synchronization and cluster structures of the networks. The validity of the control scheme is confirmed through two numerical simulations, in a network with no cluster structure and in a scale-free network.

  4. Relative efficiency of unequal cluster sizes for variance component estimation in cluster randomized and multicentre trials.

    PubMed

    van Breukelen, Gerard Jp; Candel, Math Jjm; Berger, Martijn Pf

    2008-08-01

    Cluster randomized and multicentre trials evaluate the effect of a treatment on persons nested within clusters, for instance patients within clinics or pupils within schools. Although equal sample sizes per cluster are generally optimal for parameter estimation, they are rarely feasible. This paper addresses the relative efficiency (RE) of unequal versus equal cluster sizes for estimating variance components in cluster randomized trials and in multicentre trials with person randomization within centres, assuming a quantitative outcome. Starting from maximum likelihood estimation, the RE is investigated numerically for a range of cluster size distributions. An approximate formula is presented for computing the RE as a function of the mean and variance of cluster sizes and the intraclass correlation. The accuracy of this approximation is checked and found to be good. It is concluded that the loss of efficiency for variance component estimation due to variation of cluster sizes rarely exceeds 20% and can be compensated by sampling 25% more clusters.

  5. Star Cluster Mass Functions and Hierarchical Clustering: Learning from Koposov 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paust, Nathaniel; Wilson, Danielle; van Belle, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    We present photometry of two halo star clusters, Koposov 1 and 2. Found as over-densities in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, these clusters were intially believed to be heavily stripped globular clusters, given the small number of stars per cluster. In this work, we have used isochrone fitting to determine the age, distance, and metallicity of the clusters. These results confirm tha tthe clusters are in the halo but also reveal surprisingly young ages and high metallicities. Investigation of the cluster mass functions reveals a steep negatively-sloped present day mass function in contrast to the flatish positively-sloped mass functions seen in heavily stripped Galactic globular clusters. The mass function slope, proximity to the Sagittarius stream, and common metallicity with M54, which is related to the Sagittarius dwarf, leads to a very interesting conclusion: Koposov 1 and 2 are open clusters removed from the Sagittarius dwarf through tidal stripping.

  6. Molecular basis of the differential sensitivity of nematode and mammalian muscle to the anthelmintic agent levamisole.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Bartos, Mariana; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2004-08-27

    Levamisole is an anthelmintic agent that exerts its therapeutic effect by acting as a full agonist of the nicotinic receptor (AChR) of nematode muscle. Its action at the mammalian muscle AChR has not been elucidated to date despite its wide use as an anthelmintic in humans and cattle. By single channel and macroscopic current recordings, we investigated the interaction of levamisole with the mammalian muscle AChR. Levamisole activates mammalian AChRs. However, single channel openings are briefer than those activated by acetylcholine (ACh) and do not appear in clusters at high concentrations. The peak current induced by levamisole is about 3% that activated by ACh. Thus, the anthelmintic acts as a weak agonist of the mammalian AChR. Levamisole also produces open channel blockade of the AChR. The apparent affinity for block (190 microm at -70 mV) is similar to that of the nematode AChR, suggesting that differences in channel activation kinetics govern the different sensitivity of nematode and mammalian muscle to anthelmintics. To identify the structural basis of this different sensitivity, we performed mutagenesis targeting residues in the alpha subunit that differ between vertebrates and nematodes. The replacement of the conserved alphaGly-153 with the homologous glutamic acid of nematode AChR significantly increases the efficacy of levamisole to activate channels. Channel activity takes place in clusters having two different kinetic modes. The kinetics of the high open probability mode are almost identical when the agonist is ACh or levamisole. It is concluded that alphaGly-153 is involved in the low efficacy of levamisole to activate mammalian muscle AChRs.

  7. ConsensusCluster: a software tool for unsupervised cluster discovery in numerical data.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Michael; Huang, C Chris; Szalma, Sandor; Bhanot, Gyan

    2010-02-01

    We have created a stand-alone software tool, ConsensusCluster, for the analysis of high-dimensional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and gene expression microarray data. Our software implements the consensus clustering algorithm and principal component analysis to stratify the data into a given number of robust clusters. The robustness is achieved by combining clustering results from data and sample resampling as well as by averaging over various algorithms and parameter settings to achieve accurate, stable clustering results. We have implemented several different clustering algorithms in the software, including K-Means, Partition Around Medoids, Self-Organizing Map, and Hierarchical clustering methods. After clustering the data, ConsensusCluster generates a consensus matrix heatmap to give a useful visual representation of cluster membership, and automatically generates a log of selected features that distinguish each pair of clusters. ConsensusCluster gives more robust and more reliable clusters than common software packages and, therefore, is a powerful unsupervised learning tool that finds hidden patterns in data that might shed light on its biological interpretation. This software is free and available from http://code.google.com/p/consensus-cluster .

  8. Star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds - I. Parametrization and classification of 1072 clusters in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, P. K.; Subramaniam, A.; Choudhury, S.; Indu, G.; Sagar, Ram

    2016-12-01

    We have introduced a semi-automated quantitative method to estimate the age and reddening of 1072 star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment III survey data. This study brings out 308 newly parametrized clusters. In a first of its kind, the LMC clusters are classified into groups based on richness/mass as very poor, poor, moderate and rich clusters, similar to the classification scheme of open clusters in the Galaxy. A major cluster formation episode is found to happen at 125 ± 25 Myr in the inner LMC. The bar region of the LMC appears prominently in the age range 60-250 Myr and is found to have a relatively higher concentration of poor and moderate clusters. The eastern and the western ends of the bar are found to form clusters initially, which later propagates to the central part. We demonstrate that there is a significant difference in the distribution of clusters as a function of mass, using a movie based on the propagation (in space and time) of cluster formation in various groups. The importance of including the low-mass clusters in the cluster formation history is demonstrated. The catalogue with parameters, classification, and cleaned and isochrone fitted colour-magnitude diagrams of 1072 clusters, which are available as online material, can be further used to understand the hierarchical formation of clusters in selected regions of the LMC.

  9. Empirical power and sample size calculations for cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized crossover studies.

    PubMed

    Reich, Nicholas G; Myers, Jessica A; Obeng, Daniel; Milstone, Aaron M; Perl, Trish M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the number of studies using a cluster-randomized design has grown dramatically. In addition, the cluster-randomized crossover design has been touted as a methodological advance that can increase efficiency of cluster-randomized studies in certain situations. While the cluster-randomized crossover trial has become a popular tool, standards of design, analysis, reporting and implementation have not been established for this emergent design. We address one particular aspect of cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized crossover trial design: estimating statistical power. We present a general framework for estimating power via simulation in cluster-randomized studies with or without one or more crossover periods. We have implemented this framework in the clusterPower software package for R, freely available online from the Comprehensive R Archive Network. Our simulation framework is easy to implement and users may customize the methods used for data analysis. We give four examples of using the software in practice. The clusterPower package could play an important role in the design of future cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized crossover studies. This work is the first to establish a universal method for calculating power for both cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized clinical trials. More research is needed to develop standardized and recommended methodology for cluster-randomized crossover studies.

  10. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  11. Power Evaluation of Focused Cluster Tests.

    PubMed

    Puett, Rc; Lawson, Ab; Clark, Ab; Hebert, Jr; Kulldorff, M

    2010-09-01

    Many statistical tests have been developed to assess the significance of clusters of disease located around known sources of environmental contaminants, also known as focused disease clusters. The majority of focused-cluster tests were designed to detect a particular spatial pattern of clustering, one in which the disease cluster centers around the pollution source and declines in a radial fashion with distance. However, other spatial patterns of environmentally related disease clusters are likely given that the spatial dispersion patterns of environmental contaminants, and thus human exposure, depend on a number of factors (i.e., meteorology and topography). For this study, data were simulated with five different spatial patterns of disease clusters, reflecting potential pollutant dispersion scenarios: 1) a radial effect decreasing with increasing distance, 2) a radial effect with a defined peak and decreasing with distance, 3) a simple angular effect, 4) an angular effect decreasing with increasing distance and 5) an angular effect with a defined peak and decreasing with distance. The power to detect each type of spatially distributed disease cluster was evaluated using Stone's Maximum Likelihood Ratio Test, Tango's Focused Test, Bithell's Linear Risk Score Test, and variations of the Lawson-Waller Score Test. Study findings underscore the importance of considering environmental contaminant dispersion patterns, particularly directional effects, with respect to focused-cluster test selection in cluster investigations. The effect of extra variation in risk also is considered, although its effect is not substantial in terms of the power of tests.

  12. THE SIZE SCALE OF STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Madrid, Juan P.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Sippel, Anna C.

    2012-09-10

    Direct N-body simulations of star clusters in a realistic Milky-Way-like potential are carried out using the code NBODY6. Based on these simulations, a new relationship between scale size and galactocentric distance is derived: the scale size of star clusters is proportional to the hyperbolic tangent of the galactocentric distance. The half-mass radius of star clusters increases systematically with galactocentric distance but levels off when star clusters orbit the galaxy beyond {approx}40 kpc. These simulations show that the half-mass radius of individual star clusters varies significantly as they evolve over a Hubble time, more so for clusters with shorter relaxation times, and remains constant through several relaxation times only in certain situations when expansion driven by the internal dynamics of the star cluster and the influence of the host galaxy tidal field balance each other. Indeed, the radius of a star cluster evolving within the inner 20 kpc of a realistic galactic gravitational potential is severely truncated by tidal interactions and does not remain constant over a Hubble time. Furthermore, the half-mass radius of star clusters measured with present-day observations bears no memory of the original cluster size. Stellar evolution and tidal stripping are the two competing physical mechanisms that determine the present-day size of globular clusters. These simulations also show that extended star clusters can form at large galactocentric distances while remaining fully bound to the host galaxy. There is thus no need to invoke accretion from an external galaxy to explain the presence of extended clusters at large galactocentric distances in a Milky-Way-type galaxy.

  13. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-01-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  14. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrokni, Vahab; Andersen, Reid; Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  15. Understanding of multimetallic cluster growth.

    PubMed

    Mitzinger, Stefan; Broeckaert, Lies; Massa, Werner; Weigend, Florian; Dehnen, Stefanie

    2016-01-25

    The elucidation of formation mechanisms is mandatory for understanding and planning of synthetic routes. For (bio-)organic and organometallic compounds, this has long been realized even for very complicated molecules, whereas the formation of ligand-free inorganic molecules has widely remained a black box to date. This is due to poor structural relationships between reactants and products and the lack of structurally related intermediates--due to the comparably high coordination flexibility of involved atoms. Here we report on investigations of the stepwise formation of multimetallic clusters, based on a series of crystal structures and complementary quantum-chemical studies of (Ge2As2)(2-), (Ge7As2)(2-), [Ta@Ge6As4](3-), [Ta@Ge8As4](3-) and [Ta@Ge8As6](3-). The study makes use of efficient quantum-chemical tools, enabling the first detailed screening of the energy hypersurface along the formation of ligand-free inorganic species for a semi-quantitative picture. The results can be generalized for an entire family of multimetallic clusters.

  16. Cluster computing for digital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Walter A; Lisin, Dimitri

    2004-06-01

    Microscopy is becoming increasingly digital and dependent on computation. Some of the computational tasks in microscopy are computationally intense, such as image restoration (deconvolution), some optical calculations, image segmentation, and image analysis. Several modern microscope technologies enable the acquisition of very large data sets. 3D imaging of live cells over time, multispectral imaging, very large tiled 3D images of thick samples, or images from high throughput biology all can produce extremely large images. These large data sets place a very large burden on laboratory computer resources. This combination of computationally intensive tasks and larger data sizes can easily exceed the capability of single personal computers. The large multiprocessor computers that are the traditional technology for larger tasks are too expensive for most laboratories. An alternative approach is to use a number of inexpensive personal computers as a cluster; that is, use multiple networked computers programmed to run the problem in parallel on all the computers in the cluster. By the use of relatively inexpensive over-the-counter hardware and open source software, this approach can be much more cost effective for many tasks. We discuss the different computer architectures available, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  17. Demixing cascades in cluster crystals.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Nigel B; Sollich, Peter

    2014-09-07

    In a cluster crystal, each lattice site is occupied by multiple soft-core particles. As the number density is increased at zero temperature, a "cascade" of isostructural phase transitions can occur between states whose site occupancy differs by unity. For low but finite temperature, each of these transitions terminates in a critical point. Using tailored Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we have studied such demixing cascades in systems of soft particles interacting via potentials of the generalized exponential form u(r) = ε exp [-(r/σ)(n)]. We have estimated the critical parameters of the first few transitions in the cascade as a function of the softness parameter n. The critical temperature and pressure exhibit non-monotonic behavior as n is varied, although the critical chemical potential remains monotonic. The trends for the pressure and chemical potential are confirmed by cell model calculations at zero temperature. As n → 2(+), all the transitions that we have observed are preempted by melting although we cannot rule out that clustering transitions survive at high density.

  18. Understanding of multimetallic cluster growth

    PubMed Central

    Mitzinger, Stefan; Broeckaert, Lies; Massa, Werner; Weigend, Florian; Dehnen, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    The elucidation of formation mechanisms is mandatory for understanding and planning of synthetic routes. For (bio-)organic and organometallic compounds, this has long been realized even for very complicated molecules, whereas the formation of ligand-free inorganic molecules has widely remained a black box to date. This is due to poor structural relationships between reactants and products and the lack of structurally related intermediates—due to the comparably high coordination flexibility of involved atoms. Here we report on investigations of the stepwise formation of multimetallic clusters, based on a series of crystal structures and complementary quantum-chemical studies of (Ge2As2)2−, (Ge7As2)2−, [Ta@Ge6As4]3−, [Ta@Ge8As4]3− and [Ta@Ge8As6]3−. The study makes use of efficient quantum-chemical tools, enabling the first detailed screening of the energy hypersurface along the formation of ligand-free inorganic species for a semi-quantitative picture. The results can be generalized for an entire family of multimetallic clusters. PMID:26805602

  19. Azafullerene-like nanosized clusters.

    PubMed

    López, Vicente; Pérez, Guillermo Román; Arregui, Andrés; Mateo-Marti, Eva; Bañares, Luis; Martín-Gago, José Angel; Soler, José M; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2009-11-24

    Carbon nitride materials have extraordinary potential in various applications, including catalysts, filled-particles, and superhard materials. Carbon nitride nanoclusters have been prepared under mild solvothermal conditions by a reaction between 1,3,5-trichlotriazine and sodium azide in toluene. The bulk material formed has a C(3)N(4) composition and consists of spheres with diameters ranging from approximately 1 nm to 4 mum. Nanometer-sized clusters of C(3)N(4) stoichiometry have been isolated on surfaces by sublimation or simple physicochemical methods. The clusters have then been characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The laser desorption ionization mass spectra show peaks assignable to the C(12)N(16), C(21)N(28), and C(33)N(44) molecules which could correspond to cage structures with 4, 7, and 11 units of the C(3)N(4) subunit, respectively. The structure and stability of these new nitrogen-rich carbon nitride nanocages has been investigated using density functional theory calculations.

  20. Hot stars in globular clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, S.

    Globular clusters are ideal laboratories to study the evolution of low-mass stars. In this review, I shall concentrate on two types of hot stars observed in globular clusters: horizontal branch stars and UV bright stars. The third type, the white dwarfs, are covered by Bono in this volume. While the morphology of the horizontal branch correlates strongly with metallicity, it has been known for a long time that one parameter is not sufficient to describe the diversity of observed horizontal branch morphologies. A veritable zoo of candidates for this elusive ``2{nd} parameter'' has been suggested over the past decades, and the most prominent ones will be briefly discussed here. Adding to the complications, diffusion is active in the atmospheres of hot horizontal branch stars, which makes their analysis much more diffcult. The latest twist along the horizontal branch was added by the recent discovery of an extension to hotter temperatures and fainter magnitudes, the so-called ``blue hook''. The evolutionary origin of these stars is still under debate. I shall also give a brief overview of our current knowledge about hot UV bright stars and use them to illustrate the adverse effects of selection bias.

  1. The nearby Abell clusters. III - Luminosity functions for eight rich clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William R.; Hoessel, John G.

    1989-01-01

    Red photographic data on eight rich Abell clusters are combined with previous results on four other Abell clusters to study the luminosity functions of the clusters. The results produce a mean value of the characteristic galaxy magnitude (M asterisk) that is consistent with previous results. No relation is found between the magnitude of the first-ranked cluster galaxy and M asterisk, suggesting that the value of M asterisk is not changed by dynamical evolution. The faint ends of the luminosity functions for many of the clusters are quite flat, validating the nonuniversality in the parametrization of Schechter (1976) functions for rich clusters of galaxies.

  2. The nearby Abell clusters. III. Luminosity functions for eight rich clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Oegerle, W.R.; Hoessel, J.G. Washburn Observatory, Madison, WI )

    1989-11-01

    Red photographic data on eight rich Abell clusters are combined with previous results on four other Abell clusters to study the luminosity functions of the clusters. The results produce a mean value of the characteristic galaxy magnitude (M asterisk) that is consistent with previous results. No relation is found between the magnitude of the first-ranked cluster galaxy and M asterisk, suggesting that the value of M asterisk is not changed by dynamical evolution. The faint ends of the luminosity functions for many of the clusters are quite flat, validating the nonuniversality in the parametrization of Schechter (1976) functions for rich clusters of galaxies. 40 refs.

  3. cluster-in-a-box: Statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2016-10-01

    Cluster-in-a-box provides a statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters and consists of three modules grouped in two scripts. The first (cluster_distribution) generates the cluster based on the number of stars, input initial mass function, spatial distribution and age distribution. The second (cluster_emission) takes an input file of observations, determines the mass-intensity correlation and generates outflow emission for all low-mass Class 0 and I sources. The output is stored as a FITS image where the flux density is determined by the desired resolution, pixel scale and cluster distance.

  4. K-band Properties of Galaxy Clusters and Groups: Brightest Cluster Galaxies and Intracluster Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Ting; Mohr, Joseph J.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the near-infrared K-band properties of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of 93 X-ray galaxy clusters and groups, using data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Our cluster sample spans a factor of 70 in mass, making it sensitive to any cluster mass-related trends. We derive the cumulative radial distribution for the BCGs in the ensemble and find that 70% of the BCGs are centered in the cluster to within 5% of the virial radius r200; this quantifies earlier findings that BCG position coincides with the cluster center as defined by the X-ray emission peak. We study the correlations between the luminosity of the BCGs (Lb) and the mass and the luminosity of the host clusters, finding that BCGs in more massive clusters are more luminous than their counterparts in less massive systems and that the BCGs become less important in the overall cluster light (L200) as cluster mass increases. By examining a large sample of optically selected groups, we find that these correlations hold for galactic systems less massive than our clusters (<3×1013 Msolar). From the differences between luminosity functions in high- and low-mass clusters, we argue that BCGs grow in luminosity mainly by merging with other luminous galaxies as the host clusters grow hierarchically; the decreasing BCG luminosity fraction (Lb/L200) with cluster mass indicates that the rate of luminosity growth in BCGs is slow compared to the rate at which clusters acquire galaxy light from the field or other merging clusters. Utilizing the observed correlation between the cluster luminosity and mass and a merger tree model for cluster formation, we estimate that the amount of intracluster light (ICL) increases with cluster mass; our calculations suggest that in 1015 Msolar clusters more than 50% of total stellar mass is in ICL, making the role of ICL very important in the evolution and thermodynamic history of clusters. The cluster baryon fraction accounting for the ICL is in good

  5. Globular Clusters and Spur Clusters in NGC 4921, the Brightest Spiral Galaxy in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung

    2016-03-01

    We resolve a significant fraction of globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 4921, the brightest spiral galaxy in the Coma cluster. We also find a number of extended bright star clusters (star complexes) in the spur region of the arms. The latter are much brighter and bluer than those in the normal star-forming region, being as massive as 3 × 105 M⊙. The color distribution of the GCs in this galaxy is found to be bimodal. The turnover magnitudes of the luminosity functions of the blue (metal-poor) GCs (0.70 < (V - I) ≤ 1.05) in the halo are estimated V(max) = 27.11 ± 0.09 mag and I(max) = 26.21 ± 0.11 mag. We obtain similar values for NGC 4923, a companion S0 galaxy, and two Coma cD galaxies (NGC 4874 and NGC 4889). The mean value for the turnover magnitudes of these four galaxies is I(max) = 26.25 ± 0.03 mag. Adopting MI (max) = -8.56 ± 0.09 mag for the metal-poor GCs, we determine the mean distance to the four Coma galaxies to be 91 ± 4 Mpc. Combining this with the Coma radial velocity, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H0 = 77.9 ± 3.6 km s-1 Mpc-1. We estimate the GC specific frequency of NGC 4921 to be SN = 1.29 ± 0.25, close to the values for early-type galaxies. This indicates that NGC 4921 is in the transition phase to S0s.

  6. Toward understanding environmental effects in SDSS clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Einasto, Jaan; Tago, E.; Einasto, M.; Saar, E.; Suhhonenko, I.; Heinamaki, P.; Hutsi, G.; Tucker, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    We find clusters and superclusters of galaxies using the Data Release 1 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine the luminosity function of clusters and find that clusters in a high-density environment have a luminosity a factor of {approx}5 higher than in a low-density environment. We also study clusters and superclusters in numerical simulations. Simulated clusters in a high-density environment are also more massive than those in a low-density environment. Comparison of the density distribution at various epochs in simulations shows that in large low-density regions (voids) dynamical evolution is very slow and stops at an early epoch. In contrast, in large regions of higher density (superclusters) dynamical evolution starts early and continues until the present; here particles cluster early, and by merging of smaller groups very rich systems of galaxies form.

  7. A Review of Subsequence Time Series Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ying Wah

    2014-01-01

    Clustering of subsequence time series remains an open issue in time series clustering. Subsequence time series clustering is used in different fields, such as e-commerce, outlier detection, speech recognition, biological systems, DNA recognition, and text mining. One of the useful fields in the domain of subsequence time series clustering is pattern recognition. To improve this field, a sequence of time series data is used. This paper reviews some definitions and backgrounds related to subsequence time series clustering. The categorization of the literature reviews is divided into three groups: preproof, interproof, and postproof period. Moreover, various state-of-the-art approaches in performing subsequence time series clustering are discussed under each of the following categories. The strengths and weaknesses of the employed methods are evaluated as potential issues for future studies. PMID:25140332

  8. Cluster production within antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Clusters are quite important at various situations in heavy-ion collisions. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics was improved to take into account the correlations to form light clusters, such as deuterons and α particles, and light nuclei composed of several clusters. The momentum fluctuations of emitted particles are also taken into account by a simple method. Formation of fragments and light clusters in a wide range of heavy-ion collisions was well described with a single set of model parameters. Fragmentation in a proton induced reaction was also well reproduced by introducing cluster correlations. Calculated results demonstrate strong impacts of clusters in various observables including those usually regarded as probes of the density dependence of symmetry energy.

  9. A review of subsequence time series clustering.

    PubMed

    Zolhavarieh, Seyedjamal; Aghabozorgi, Saeed; Teh, Ying Wah

    2014-01-01

    Clustering of subsequence time series remains an open issue in time series clustering. Subsequence time series clustering is used in different fields, such as e-commerce, outlier detection, speech recognition, biological systems, DNA recognition, and text mining. One of the useful fields in the domain of subsequence time series clustering is pattern recognition. To improve this field, a sequence of time series data is used. This paper reviews some definitions and backgrounds related to subsequence time series clustering. The categorization of the literature reviews is divided into three groups: preproof, interproof, and postproof period. Moreover, various state-of-the-art approaches in performing subsequence time series clustering are discussed under each of the following categories. The strengths and weaknesses of the employed methods are evaluated as potential issues for future studies.

  10. Where have all the cluster halos gone?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Sulkanen, Martin E.; Gisler, Galen R.; Perley, Rick A.

    1992-01-01

    A new LF (330 MHz) VLA image of the Perseus cluster confirms the presence of a miniradio halo with diameter of about 430 kpc (H0 = 75 km/s Mpc) surrounding 3C 84. A careful comparison with the Coma cluster shows that there is no evidence for a similar, very extended halo in Perseus despite the large number of cluster radio galaxies which could power such a halo. These two clusters represent two classes of radio halos which differ by the absence (Coma) or presence (Perseus) of cooling inflows. It is argued that smaller halos as in Perseus result form insufficient clusterwide magnetic fields. A simple model is presented which suggests that cooling flows can suppress the diffusion of turbulently amplified B-fields outward from the cluster core. Such a suppression leads to the development of minihalos which are confined to the cores of cooling flow clusters.

  11. Two photon photoemission of deposited silver clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busolt, U.; Cottancin, E.; Röhr, H.; Socaciu, L.; Leisner, T.; Wöste, L.

    We use time resolved two photon photoemission to study the stability of size selected silver clusters deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates. Size-selected Agn+ clusters (n=2-9) are deposited at low coverage onto HOPG surfaces at liquid nitrogen temperatures. After deposition, the samples are irradiated by a series of ultrashort laser pulse pairs. Photoelectrons created by two photon photoemission are collected in a magnetic bottle type time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer. Their kinetic energy distribution is recorded as a function of the delay time between subsequent light pulses. With the exception of Ag3 the size dependence of the photoelectron spectra reveals a pronounced odd/even effect, which is well known for gas phase silver clusters. This indicates that the deposited clusters retain their size and identity on the sample. The lifetime of the photoexcitation rises with cluster size. This is attributed to an increasing electronic density of states for larger clusters.

  12. Clustering gene expression data using graph separators.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Bangaly; Pinet, Nicolas; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Sigayret, Alain; Berry, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has used graphs to modelize expression data from microarray experiments, in view of partitioning the genes into clusters. In this paper, we introduce the use of a decomposition by clique separators. Our aim is to improve the classical clustering methods in two ways: first we want to allow an overlap between clusters, as this seems biologically sound, and second we want to be guided by the structure of the graph to define the number of clusters. We test this approach with a well-known yeast database (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our results are good, as the expression profiles of the clusters we find are very coherent. Moreover, we are able to organize into another graph the clusters we find, and order them in a fashion which turns out to respect the chronological order defined by the the sporulation process.

  13. Pattern Clustering Using a Swarm Intelligence Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Swagatam; Abraham, Ajith

    Clustering aims at representing large datasets by a fewer number of prototypes or clusters. It brings simplicity in modeling data and thus plays a central role in the process of knowledge discovery and data mining. Data mining tasks, in these days, require fast and accurate partitioning of huge datasets, which may come with a variety of attributes or features. This, in turn, imposes severe computational requirements on the relevant clustering techniques. A family of bio-inspired algorithms, well-known as Swarm Intelligence (SI) has recently emerged that meets these requirements and has successfully been applied to a number of real world clustering problems. This chapter explores the role of SI in clustering different kinds of datasets. It finally describes a new SI technique for partitioning a linearly non-separable dataset into an optimal number of clusters in the kernel- induced feature space. Computer simulations undertaken in this research have also been provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  14. The young SMC cluster NGC 330

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, B. W.; Janes, K. A.; Flower, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    A color-magnitude diagram has been obtained for the young SMC cluster NGC 330. The diagram shows a well-defined main sequence, a group of blue supergiants, a group of red supergiants between B-V = 1.2 m and 1.6 m about one magnitude fainter, and an empty Hertzsprung gap. The surrounding field is a composite of a very gold population resembling galactic globular clusters and a very young population. DDO and infrared photometry strongly suggest that the cluster is metal-poor, but a definitive measure could not be made because of calibration difficulties. The cluster's age is estimated at 12 million years, with the surrounding field about 50 percent older. The cluster will prove very useful in testing stellar evolution models for young, metal-poor stars if the cluster's metallicity can be established via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  15. Nature of multiple-nucleus cluster galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, D.

    1984-05-01

    In models for the evolution of galaxy clusters which include dynamical friction with the dark binding matter, the distribution of galaxies becomes more concentrated to the cluster center with time. In a cluster like Coma, this evolution could increase by a factor of approximately 3 the probability of finding a galaxy very close to the cluster center, without decreasing the typical velocity of such a galaxy significantly below the cluster mean. Such an enhancement is roughly what is needed to explain the large number of first-ranked cluster galaxies which are observed to have extra ''nuclei''; it is also consistent with the high velocities typically measured for these ''nuclei.'' Unlike the cannibalism model, this model predicts that the majority of multiple-nucleus systems are transient phenomena, and not galaxies in the process of merging.

  16. Cluster model of aluminum dense vapor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomkin, A. L.; Shumikhin, A. S.

    2009-08-01

    The chemical model of aluminum vapor plasma, that take into account the formation of neutral and charged clusters, is suggested. Caloric and thermal equations of state and composition of plasma were received using the available information about properties of metal clusters. It is shown, that aluminum vapors are clusterized with decrease of temperature and with increase of density. Pressure dependence on internal energy is calculated and comparison with experimental data is made. The important role of aluminum clusters, especially in an initial phase of the metals vapor heating, is demonstrated. It is shown, that the region of plasma clusterization in gaseous phase agree with known literature data for binodal of vapor-liquid transition from gaseous region. Suggested cluster model may be used to forecast the location of metal vapors binodal. The conductivity of aluminum vapor plasma was calculated. The satisfactory agreement with available experimental data is received.

  17. Discriminative clustering via extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gao; Liu, Tianchi; Yang, Yan; Lin, Zhiping; Song, Shiji; Wu, Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Discriminative clustering is an unsupervised learning framework which introduces the discriminative learning rule of supervised classification into clustering. The underlying assumption is that a good partition (clustering) of the data should yield high discrimination, namely, the partitioned data can be easily classified by some classification algorithms. In this paper, we propose three discriminative clustering approaches based on Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). The first algorithm iteratively trains weighted ELM (W-ELM) classifier to gradually maximize the data discrimination. The second and third methods are both built on Fisher's Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA); but one approach adopts alternative optimization, while the other leverages kernel k-means. We show that the proposed algorithms can be easily implemented, and yield competitive clustering accuracy on real world data sets compared to state-of-the-art clustering methods.

  18. The self-enrichment of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Siobahn; Lake, George

    1989-04-01

    It is shown that protoglobular clusters of primordial gas can confine the supernovae needed to enrich themselves. The required protocluster cloud masses and structural parameters are the same as those currently observed for the clusters. Two causal scenarios for star formation are examined to calculate the initial enrichment of primordial clouds. In the 'Christmas tree' scheme, the maximum final (Fe/H) is about 0.1. Since the time scale for formation and evolution of massive stars at the center of a cluster is nearly an order of magnitude less than the collapse time of the cluster, every globular cluster may have to survive a suprernova detonation. If this is the case, the minimum mass of a globular cluster is about 10 to the 4.6th solar mass.

  19. X ray studies of the Hyades cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The Hyades cluster occupies a unique position in both the history of astronomy and at the frontiers of contemporary astronomical research. At a distance of only 45 pc, the Hyades is the nearest star cluster in the Galaxy which is localized in the sky: the UMa cluster, which is closer, but much sparser, essentially surrounds the Solar neighborhood. The Hyades is the prototype cluster for distance determination using the 'moving-cluster' method, and thus serves to define the zero-age main sequence from which the cosmic distance scale is essentially bootstrapped. The Hyades age (0.6-0.7 Gyr), nearly 8 times younger than the Sun, guarantees the Hyades critical importance to studies of stellar evolution. The results of a complete survey of the Hyades cluster using the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) are reported.

  20. Reactive cluster model of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Travis E.; Miorelli, Jonathan; Eberhart, Mark E.

    2014-02-28

    Though discovered more than a half century ago metallic glasses remain a scientific enigma. Unlike crystalline metals, characterized by short, medium, and long-range order, in metallic glasses short and medium-range order persist, though long-range order is absent. This fact has prompted research to develop structural descriptions of metallic glasses. Among these are cluster-based models that attribute amorphous structure to the existence of clusters that are incommensurate with crystalline periodicity. Not addressed, however, are the chemical factors stabilizing these clusters and promoting their interconnections. We have found that glass formers are characterized by a rich cluster chemistry that above the glass transformation temperature promotes exchange as well as static and vibronic sharing of atoms between clusters. The vibronic mechanism induces correlated motions between neighboring clusters and we hypothesize that the distance over which these motions are correlated mediates metallic glass stability and influences critical cooling rates.

  1. High intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmire, T

    2000-08-07

    The development of ultrashort pulse table top lasers with peak pulse powers in excess of 1 TW has permitted an access to studies of matter subject to unprecedented light intensities. Such interactions have accessed exotic regimes of multiphoton atomic and high energy-density plasma physics. Very recently, the nature of the interactions between these very high intensity laser pulses and atomic clusters of a few hundred to a few thousand atoms has come under study. Such studies have found some rather unexpected results, including the striking finding that these interactions appear to be more energetic than interactions with either single atoms or solid density plasmas. Recent experiments have shown that the explosion of such clusters upon intense irradiation can expel ions from the cluster with energies from a few keV to nearly 1 MeV. This phenomenon has recently been exploited to produce DD fusion neutrons in a gas of exploding deuterium clusters. Under this project, we have undertaken a general study of the intense femtosecond laser cluster interaction. Our goal is to understand the macroscopic and microscopic coupling between the laser and the clusters with the aim of optimizing high flux fusion neutron production from the exploding deuterium clusters or the x-ray yield in the hot plasmas that are produced in this interaction. In particular, we are studying the physics governing the cluster explosions. The interplay between a traditional Coulomb explosion description of the cluster disassembly and a plasma-like hydrodynamic explosion is not entirely understood, particularly for small to medium sized clusters (<1000 atoms) and clusters composed of low-Z atoms. We are focusing on experimental studies of the ion and electron energies resulting from such explosions through various experimental techniques. We are also examining how an intense laser pulse propagates through a dense medium containing these clusters.

  2. Cluster Dynamics Largely Shapes Protoplanetary Disk Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincke, Kirsten; Pfalzner, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    To what degree the cluster environment influences the sizes of protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars is still an open question. This is particularly true for the short-lived clusters typical for the solar neighborhood, in which the stellar density and therefore the influence of the cluster environment change considerably over the first 10 Myr. In previous studies, the effect of the gas on the cluster dynamics has often been neglected this is remedied here. Using the code NBody6++, we study the stellar dynamics in different developmental phases—embedded, expulsion, and expansion—including the gas, and quantify the effect of fly-bys on the disk size. We concentrate on massive clusters (M cl ≥ 103-6 ∗ 104 M Sun), which are representative for clusters like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) or NGC 6611. We find that not only the stellar density but also the duration of the embedded phase matters. The densest clusters react fastest to the gas expulsion and drop quickly in density, here 98% of relevant encounters happen before gas expulsion. By contrast, disks in sparser clusters are initially less affected, but because these clusters expand more slowly, 13% of disks are truncated after gas expulsion. For ONC-like clusters, we find that disks larger than 500 au are usually affected by the environment, which corresponds to the observation that 200 au-sized disks are common. For NGC 6611-like clusters, disk sizes are cut-down on average to roughly 100 au. A testable hypothesis would be that the disks in the center of NGC 6611 should be on average ≈20 au and therefore considerably smaller than those in the ONC.

  3. Tracking star formation in dwarf cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rude, Cody Millard

    The evolution of galaxies in dense environments can be affected by close encounters with neighboring galaxies and interactions with the intracluster medium (ICM). Dwarf galaxies may be especially susceptible to these effects due to their low mass. The goal of my dissertation research is to look for signs of star formation in cluster dwarf galaxies by measuring and comparing the r- and u-band luminosity functions of 15 low redshift Abell galaxy clusters using archival data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions are measured in four cluster-centric annuli from stacked cluster data. To account for differences in cluster optical richness, each cluster is scaled according to r200, where r200 is the radius of a sphere, centered on the cluster, whose average density is 200 times the critical density of the universe. The outer region of the cluster sample shows an increase in the faint-end slope of the u-band luminosity function relative to the r-band, indicating star formation in dwarf galaxies. The blue fraction for dwarf galaxies steadily rises with increasing cluster-centric radii. The change in the blue fraction of giant galaxies also increases, but at a lower rate. Additionally, the inner regions of clusters ranging from 0.185 < z < 0.7 from the "Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH)" are used to generate blue- and red-band luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions. Comparisons of the inner region of the CLASH and CFHT clusters show an increase in the blue fraction of dwarf galaxies with redshift that is not present in giant galaxies.

  4. The robustness of interdependent clustered networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuqing; Shao, Shuai; Wang, Huijuan; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    It was recently found that cascading failures can cause the abrupt breakdown of a system of interdependent networks. Using the percolation method developed for single clustered networks by Newman (Phys. Rev. Lett., 103 (2009) 058701), we develop an analytical method for studying how clustering within the networks of a system of interdependent networks affects the system's robustness. We find that clustering significantly increases the vulnerability of the system, which is represented by the increased value of the percolation threshold pc in interdependent networks.

  5. Genome Sequence of Cluster W Mycobacteriophage Taptic

    PubMed Central

    Mageeney, Catherine M.; Seier, Emily R.; Esposito, Elise C.; Graham, Lee H.; Heckman, Emily L.; Hipwell, Chelsea M.; Kelliher, Allison B.; Lando, Nicole A.; Morales, Patricia Y.; Russell, Daniel A.; Tsaousis, Barbara E.; Kenna, Margaret A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Taptic genome is the first to be annotated from the W cluster of mycobacteriophages infecting Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. All 92 predicted open reading frames (ORFs) and a single tRNA specifying glycine (tRNA-gly) are transcribed rightward. Many functionally uncharacterized ORFs appear to be W cluster specific, as nucleotide similarity is shared only with other W cluster genomes. PMID:28302785

  6. Contribution of globular clusters to halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragaglia, Angela

    2017-03-01

    The contribution of massive star clusters to their hosting halo dramatically depends on their formation mechanism and their early evolution. Massive globular clusters in the Milky Way (and in other galaxies) have been shown to display peculiar chemical patterns (light-elements correlations and anti-correlations) indicative of a complex star formation, confirmed by photometric evidence (spread or split sequences). I use these chemical signatures to try to understand what is the fraction of halo stars originally born in globular clusters.

  7. Impact of Regulation on Spectral Clustering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-22

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The performance of spectral clustering can be considerably improved via regularization, as demonstrated empirically in Amini...its extensions, previous results on spectral clustering relied on the minimum degree of the graph being sufficiently large for its good performance...public release; distribution is unlimited. Impact of regularization on Spectral Clustering The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report

  8. Breaking the hierarchy - a new cluster selection mechanism for hierarchical clustering methods

    PubMed Central

    Zahoránszky, László A; Katona, Gyula Y; Hári, Péter; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Zweig, Katharina A; Zahoránszky-Köhalmi, Gergely

    2009-01-01

    Background Hierarchical clustering methods like Ward's method have been used since decades to understand biological and chemical data sets. In order to get a partition of the data set, it is necessary to choose an optimal level of the hierarchy by a so-called level selection algorithm. In 2005, a new kind of hierarchical clustering method was introduced by Palla et al. that differs in two ways from Ward's method: it can be used on data on which no full similarity matrix is defined and it can produce overlapping clusters, i.e., allow for multiple membership of items in clusters. These features are optimal for biological and chemical data sets but until now no level selection algorithm has been published for this method. Results In this article we provide a general selection scheme, the level independent clustering selection method, called LInCS. With it, clusters can be selected from any level in quadratic time with respect to the number of clusters. Since hierarchically clustered data is not necessarily associated with a similarity measure, the selection is based on a graph theoretic notion of cohesive clusters. We present results of our method on two data sets, a set of drug like molecules and set of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. In both cases the method provides a clustering with very good sensitivity and specificity values according to a given reference clustering. Moreover, we can show for the PPI data set that our graph theoretic cohesiveness measure indeed chooses biologically homogeneous clusters and disregards inhomogeneous ones in most cases. We finally discuss how the method can be generalized to other hierarchical clustering methods to allow for a level independent cluster selection. Conclusion Using our new cluster selection method together with the method by Palla et al. provides a new interesting clustering mechanism that allows to compute overlapping clusters, which is especially valuable for biological and chemical data sets. PMID:19840391

  9. GALAXY CLUSTERS AT HIGH REDSHIFT AND EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Z. L.; Han, J. L.

    2011-06-10

    Identification of high-redshift clusters is important for studies of cosmology and cluster evolution. Using photometric redshifts of galaxies, we identify 631 clusters from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) wide field, 202 clusters from the CFHT deep field, 187 clusters from the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, and 737 clusters from the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) field. The redshifts of these clusters are in the range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.6. Merging these cluster samples gives 1644 clusters in the four survey fields, of which 1088 are newly identified and more than half are from the large SWIRE field. Among 228 clusters of z {>=} 1, 191 clusters are newly identified, and most of them from the SWIRE field. With this large sample of high-redshift clusters, we study the color evolution of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The r' - z' and r{sup +} - m{sub 3.6{mu}m} colors of the BCGs are consistent with a stellar population synthesis model in which the BCGs are formed at redshift z{sub f} {>=} 2 and evolved passively. The g' - z' and B - m{sub 3.6{mu}m} colors of the BCGs at redshifts z > 0.8 are systematically bluer than the passive evolution model for galaxies formed at z{sub f} {approx} 2, indicating star formation in high-redshift BCGs.

  10. The 3XMM/SDSS Stripe 82 Galaxy Cluster Survey. I. Cluster catalogue and discovery of two merging cluster candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takey, A.; Durret, F.; Mahmoud, E.; Ali, G. B.

    2016-10-01

    We present a galaxy cluster survey based on XMM-Newton observations that are located in Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The survey covers an area of 11.25 deg2. The X-ray cluster candidates were selected as serendipitously extended detected sources from the third XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue (3XMM-DR5). A cross-correlation of the candidate list that comprises 94 objects with recently published X-ray and optically selected cluster catalogues provided optical confirmations and redshift estimates for about half of the candidate sample. We present a catalogue of X-ray cluster candidates previously known in X-ray and/or optical bands from the matched catalogues or NED. The catalogue consists of 54 systems with redshift measurements in the range of 0.05-1.19 with a median of 0.36. Of these, 45 clusters have spectroscopic confirmations as stated in the matched catalogues. We spectroscopically confirmed another 6 clusters from the available spectroscopic redshifts in the SDSS-DR12. The cluster catalogue includes 17 newly X-ray discovered clusters, while the remainder were detected in previous XMM-Newton and/or ROSAT cluster surveys. Based on the available redshifts and fluxes given in the 3XMM-DR5 catalogue, we estimated the X-ray luminosities and masses for the cluster sample. We also present the list of the remaining X-ray cluster candidates (40 objects) that have no redshift information yet in the literature. Of these candidates, 25 sources are considered as distant cluster candidates beyond a redshift of 0.6. We also searched for galaxy cluster mergers in our cluster sample and found two strong candidates for newly discovered cluster mergers at redshifts of 0.11 and 0.26. The X-ray and optical properties of these systems are presented. Tables A.1, C.1, and C.2 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A32

  11. Uranyl peroxide closed clusters containing topological squares

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Burtner, Alicia; Pressprich, Laura; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Four self-assembling clusters of uranyl peroxide polyhedra have been formed in alkaline aqueous solutions and structurally characterized. These clusters consist of 28, 30, 36 and 44 uranyl polyhedra and exhibit complex new topologies. Each has a structure that contains topological squares, pentagons and hexagons. Analysis of possible topologies within boundary constraints indicates a tendency for adoption of higher symmetry topologies in these cases. Small angle X-ray scattering data demonstrated that crystals of one of these clusters can be dissolved in ultrapure water and that the clusters remain intact for at least several days.

  12. Semantic Clustering of Search Engine Results

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Sara Saad; El-Sayed, Maged F.; Hassan, Yasser F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for search engine results clustering that relies on the semantics of the retrieved documents rather than the terms in those documents. The proposed approach takes into consideration both lexical and semantics similarities among documents and applies activation spreading technique in order to generate semantically meaningful clusters. This approach allows documents that are semantically similar to be clustered together rather than clustering documents based on similar terms. A prototype is implemented and several experiments are conducted to test the prospered solution. The result of the experiment confirmed that the proposed solution achieves remarkable results in terms of precision. PMID:26933673

  13. Self-shielding clumps in starburst clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palouš, Jan; Wünsch, Richard; Ehlerová, Soňa; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    Young and massive star clusters above a critical mass form thermally unstable clumps reducing locally the temperature and pressure of the hot 107 K cluster wind. The matter reinserted by stars, and mass loaded in interactions with pristine gas and from evaporating circumstellar disks, accumulate on clumps that are ionized with photons produced by massive stars. We discuss if they may become self-shielded when they reach the central part of the cluster, or even before it, during their free fall to the cluster center. Here we explore the importance of heating efficiency of stellar winds.

  14. Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. S., III

    2014-09-01

    The Magellanic Clouds (MC) are prime locations for studies of star clusters covering a full range in age and mass. This contribution briefly reviews selected properties of Magellanic star clusters, by focusing first on young systems that show evidence for hierarchical star formation. The structures and chemical abundance patterns of older intermediate age star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are a second topic. These suggest a complex history has affected the chemical enrichment in the SMC and that low tidal stresses in the SMC foster star cluster survival.

  15. Complementary ensemble clustering of biomedical data.

    PubMed

    Fodeh, Samah Jamal; Brandt, Cynthia; Luong, Thai Binh; Haddad, Ali; Schultz, Martin; Murphy, Terrence; Krauthammer, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The rapidly growing availability of electronic biomedical data has increased the need for innovative data mining methods. Clustering in particular has been an active area of research in many different application areas, with existing clustering algorithms mostly focusing on one modality or representation of the data. Complementary ensemble clustering (CEC) is a recently introduced framework in which Kmeans is applied to a weighted, linear combination of the coassociation matrices obtained from separate ensemble clustering of different data modalities. The strength of CEC is its extraction of information from multiple aspects of the data when forming the final clusters. This study assesses the utility of CEC in biomedical data, which often have multiple data modalities, e.g., text and images, by applying CEC to two distinct biomedical datasets (PubMed images and radiology reports) that each have two modalities. Referent to five different clustering approaches based on the Kmeans algorithm, CEC exhibited equal or better performance in the metrics of micro-averaged precision and Normalized Mutual Information across both datasets. The reference methods included clustering of single modalities as well as ensemble clustering of separate and merged data modalities. Our experimental results suggest that CEC is equivalent or more efficient than comparable Kmeans based clustering methods using either single or merged data modalities.

  16. An algorithm for spatial heirarchy clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Velasco, F. R. D.

    1981-01-01

    A method for utilizing both spectral and spatial redundancy in compacting and preclassifying images is presented. In multispectral satellite images, a high correlation exists between neighboring image points which tend to occupy dense and restricted regions of the feature space. The image is divided into windows of the same size where the clustering is made. The classes obtained in several neighboring windows are clustered, and then again successively clustered until only one region corresponding to the whole image is obtained. By employing this algorithm only a few points are considered in each clustering, thus reducing computational effort. The method is illustrated as applied to LANDSAT images.

  17. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  18. INTERRUPTED STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Aaron M.; Leigh, Nathan W. C. E-mail: nleigh@amnh.org

    2015-07-20

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single–binary and binary–binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%–40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  19. Stellar black holes in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of large populations of millisec pulsars associated with neutron stars in globular clusters indicates that several hundred stellar black holes of about 10 solar masses each can form within a typical cluster. While, in clusters of high central density, the rapid dynamical evolution of the black-hole population leads to an ejection of nearly all holes on a short timescale, systems of intermediate density may involve a normal star's capture by one of the surviving holes to form a low-mass X-ray binary. One or more such binaries may be found in the globular clusters surrounding our galaxy.

  20. A serach for 'failed clusters' of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, W. H.; Tananbaum, H.; Remillard, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a search for a new type of object - large clouds of hot gas with no visible galaxies - which we call failed clusters of galaxies. We calculate the expected X-ray luminosity, temperature, and angular diameter of such objects as a function of total cloud mass and convert the results to expected X-ray fluxes from failed clusters at different redshifts. Using the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) database, we establish a strategy to search for candidate failed clusters. From this initial screening of 1435 IPC fields, 17 candidates are selected for more detailed analysis, which indicates that 10 of these are very probably extended X-ray sources. Optical follow-up on the 10 prime candidates finds eight clusters of galaxies (including six reproted for the first time in this paper), one stellar identification, and one without an obvious optical counterpart (the candidate with the weakest evidence for X-ray extent). Investigation of several candidates with less evidence for X-ray extent yields two additional new clusters of galaxies. A conservative comparison of our results with the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey demonstrates that failed clusters are a relatively unimportant contributor to the mass density of the universe. Our inability to find failed clusters is consistent with the hierarchical clustering scenario for the formation of galaxies and clusters.

  1. Laser-driven Acceleration in Clustered Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, X.; Wang, X.; Shim, B.; Downer, M. C.

    2009-01-22

    We propose a new approach to avoid dephasing limitation of laser wakefield acceleration by manipulating the group velocity of the driving pulse using clustered plasmas. We demonstrated the control of phase velocity in clustered plasmas by third harmonic generation and frequency domain interferometry experiments. The results agree with a numerical model. Based on this model, the group velocity of the driving pulse in clustered plasmas was calculated and the result shows the group velocity can approach the speed of light c in clustered plasmas.

  2. DNA-Protected Silver Clusters for Nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Gwinn, Elisabeth; Schultz, Danielle; Copp, Stacy M.; Swasey, Steven

    2015-01-01

    DNA-protected silver clusters (AgN-DNA) possess unique fluorescence properties that depend on the specific DNA template that stabilizes the cluster. They exhibit peak emission wavelengths that range across the visible and near-IR spectrum. This wide color palette, combined with low toxicity, high fluorescence quantum yields of some clusters, low synthesis costs, small cluster sizes and compatibility with DNA are enabling many applications that employ AgN-DNA. Here we review what is known about the underlying composition and structure of AgN-DNA, and how these relate to the optical properties of these fascinating, hybrid biomolecule-metal cluster nanomaterials. We place AgN-DNA in the general context of ligand-stabilized metal clusters and compare their properties to those of other noble metal clusters stabilized by small molecule ligands. The methods used to isolate pure AgN-DNA for analysis of composition and for studies of solution and single-emitter optical properties are discussed. We give a brief overview of structurally sensitive chiroptical studies, both theoretical and experimental, and review experiments on bringing silver clusters of distinct size and color into nanoscale DNA assemblies. Progress towards using DNA scaffolds to assemble multi-cluster arrays is also reviewed.

  3. A periodic probabilistic photonic cluster state generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanto, Michael L.; Smith, A. Matthew; Alsing, Paul M.; Tison, Christopher C.; Preble, Stefan F.; Lott, Gordon E.; Osman, Joseph M.; Szep, Attila; Kim, Richard S.

    2014-10-01

    The research detailed in this paper describes a Periodic Cluster State Generator (PCSG) consisting of a monolithic integrated waveguide device that employs four wave mixing, an array of probabilistic photon guns, single mode sequential entanglers and an array of controllable entangling gates between modes to create arbitrary cluster states. Utilizing the PCSG one is able to produce a cluster state with nearest neighbor entanglement in the form of a linear or square lattice. Cluster state resources of this type have been proven to be able to perform universal quantum computation.

  4. Giant Star Clusters Near Galactic Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A video sequence of still images goes deep into the Milky Way galaxy to the Arches Cluster. Hubble, penetrating through dust and clouds, peers into the core where two giant clusters shine more brightly than any other clusters in the galaxy. Footage shows the following still images: (1) wide view of Sagittarius constellation; (2) the Palomar Observatory's 2 micron all-sky survey; and (3) an image of the Arches Cluster taken with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS instrument. Dr. Don Figer of the Space Telescope Science Institute discusses the significance of the observations and relates his first reaction to the images.

  5. Black holes in young stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Sanghamitra; Kiel, Paul; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2014-02-01

    We present theoretical models for stellar black hole (BH) properties in young, massive star clusters. Using a Monte Carlo code for stellar dynamics, we model realistic star clusters with N ≅ 5 × 10{sup 5} stars and significant binary fractions (up to 50%) with self-consistent treatments of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. We compute the formation rates and characteristic properties of single and binary BHs for various representative ages, cluster parameters, and metallicities. Because of dynamical interactions and supernova (SN) kicks, more single BHs end up retained in clusters compared to BHs in binaries. We also find that the ejection of BHs from a cluster is a strong function of initial density. In low-density clusters (where dynamical effects are negligible), it is mainly SN kicks that eject BHs from the cluster, whereas in high-density clusters (initial central density ρ {sub c}(0) ∼ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} pc{sup –3} in our models) the BH ejection rate is enhanced significantly by dynamics. Dynamical interactions of binary systems in dense clusters also modify the orbital period and eccentricity distributions while increasing the probability of a BH having a more massive companion.

  6. The Andromeda Project and PHAT Stellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lent C.; Seth, A.; Dalcanton, J.; Kapadia, A.; Simpson, R.; Lintott, C. J.; Skillman, E. D.; Holwerda, B.; Keel, W. C.; Fouesneau, M.; PHAT Team; Andromeda Project Team

    2013-01-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is a multicycle Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program that has imaged nearly 1/3 of the star forming disk of M31 at high spatial resolution in 6 wavelengths ranging from the UV to the NIR. This high-quality data set allows for a detailed study of the galaxy's star clusters, ranging from massive 10^6 Msolar globular clusters to objects equivalent to Galactic open clusters with masses of <10^3 Msolar. The Andromeda Project, one of the latest additions to the Zooniverse collection of citizen science projects, builds on the success of our Year 1 by-eye cluster search and enlists the public to help create one of the largest catalog of star clusters available for any galaxy. Using an interactive website, volunteers scour HST images to identify clusters, background galaxies, and image artifacts. By incorporating synthetic star clusters into the search, we will also obtain the first robust measurement of completeness for a by-eye cluster catalog. The detailed knowledge of catalog completeness is essential to assessing and interpreting age and mass distributions of Andromeda's cluster population. We present the website and compare our initial expert-derived approach with the use of citizen scientists.

  7. Improved dynamical modelling of the Arches cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joowon; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Clarkson et al. (2012) measured the intrinsic velocity dispersion of the Arches cluster, a young and massive star cluster in the Galactic center. Using the observed velocity dispersion profile and the surface brightness profile of Espinoza et al. (2009), they estimate the cluster's present-day mass to be ˜ 1.5×104 M⊙ by fitting an isothermal King model. In this study, we trace the best-fit initial mass for the Arches cluster using the same observed data set and also the anisotropic Fokker-Planck calculations for the dynamical evolution.

  8. The life and death of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, B. C.

    It is generally believed that most stars are born in groups and clusters, rather than in the field. In recent years it has been demonstrated that merging galaxies produce large numbers of young massive star clusters, sometimes called super star clusters. Understanding what triggers the formation of these young massive clusters provides important information about the formation of stars in general. In recent years it has also become apparent that most clusters do not survive more than ~ 10 Myr (i.e., "infant mortality"). Hence, it is just as important to understand the disruption of star clusters as it is to to understand their formation if we want to understand the demographics of both star clusters and field stars. This talk will first discuss what triggers star cluster formation in merging galaxies (primarily in the Antennae galaxies) and will then outline a general framework designed to empirically fit observations of both star clusters and field stars in a wide variety of galaxies from mergers to quiescent spirals.

  9. Nursing home care quality: a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Fagerli, Liv Berit

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore potential differences in how nursing home residents rate care quality and to explore cluster characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional design was used, with one questionnaire including questions from quality from patients' perspective and Big Five personality traits, together with questions related to socio-demographic aspects and health condition. Residents ( n=103) from four Norwegian nursing homes participated (74.1 per cent response rate). Hierarchical cluster analysis identified clusters with respect to care quality perceptions. χ(2) tests and one-way between-groups ANOVA were performed to characterise the clusters ( p<0.05). Findings Two clusters were identified; Cluster 1 residents (28.2 per cent) had the best care quality perceptions and Cluster 2 (67.0 per cent) had the worst perceptions. The clusters were statistically significant and characterised by personal-related conditions: gender, psychological well-being, preferences, admission, satisfaction with staying in the nursing home, emotional stability and agreeableness, and by external objective care conditions: healthcare personnel and registered nurses. Research limitations/implications Residents assessed as having no cognitive impairments were included, thus excluding the largest group. By choosing questionnaire design and structured interviews, the number able to participate may increase. Practical implications Findings may provide healthcare personnel and managers with increased knowledge on which to develop strategies to improve specific care quality perceptions. Originality/value Cluster analysis can be an effective tool for differentiating between nursing homes residents' care quality perceptions.

  10. On the formation process of charged clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youmei; Chen, Qi; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-11-01

    The clustering process of charged grains often resembles a formation stage of colloidal and spongy matter, as well as some astrophysical objects. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulation is used to simulate the formation process of clusters of massive charged grains in plasmas. It is found that, from an initially uniform distribution of grains with Maxwellian velocity distribution, a statistically stationary system of clusters, each with different dynamic as well as thermodynamic characteristics, can form. The dependence of the asymptotic, of the final, state of the cluster system on the initial temperature and density of the grains is discussed.

  11. Introduction to Cluster Monte Carlo Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijten, E.

    This chapter provides an introduction to cluster Monte Carlo algorithms for classical statistical-mechanical systems. A brief review of the conventional Metropolis algorithm is given, followed by a detailed discussion of the lattice cluster algorithm developed by Swendsen and Wang and the single-cluster variant introduced by Wolff. For continuum systems, the geometric cluster algorithm of Dress and Krauth is described. It is shown how their geometric approach can be generalized to incorporate particle interactions beyond hardcore repulsions, thus forging a connection between the lattice and continuum approaches. Several illustrative examples are discussed.

  12. Scaling law of Wolff cluster surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Pai-Yi; Monceau, Pascal

    2003-05-01

    We study the scaling properties of the clusters grown by the Wolff algorithm on seven different Sierpinski-type fractals of Hausdorff dimension 1cluster follows a power law with respect to the lattice size. Moreover, we investigate the probability density distribution of the surface energy of the Wolff cluster and are able to establish a different scaling relation. It enables us to introduce an exponent that is associated to the surface energy of the Wolff cluster. Finally, this exponent is linked to a dynamical exponent via an inequality.

  13. Cluster hybrid Monte Carlo simulation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Plascak, J A; Ferrenberg, Alan M; Landau, D P

    2002-06-01

    We show that addition of Metropolis single spin flips to the Wolff cluster-flipping Monte Carlo procedure leads to a dramatic increase in performance for the spin-1/2 Ising model. We also show that adding Wolff cluster flipping to the Metropolis or heat bath algorithms in systems where just cluster flipping is not immediately obvious (such as the spin-3/2 Ising model) can substantially reduce the statistical errors of the simulations. A further advantage of these methods is that systematic errors introduced by the use of imperfect random-number generation may be largely healed by hybridizing single spin flips with cluster flipping.

  14. Cluster hybrid Monte Carlo simulation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascak, J. A.; Ferrenberg, Alan M.; Landau, D. P.

    2002-06-01

    We show that addition of Metropolis single spin flips to the Wolff cluster-flipping Monte Carlo procedure leads to a dramatic increase in performance for the spin-1/2 Ising model. We also show that adding Wolff cluster flipping to the Metropolis or heat bath algorithms in systems where just cluster flipping is not immediately obvious (such as the spin-3/2 Ising model) can substantially reduce the statistical errors of the simulations. A further advantage of these methods is that systematic errors introduced by the use of imperfect random-number generation may be largely healed by hybridizing single spin flips with cluster flipping.

  15. A Dynamical Study of Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colless, M. M.

    Photometry and spectroscopy for fourteen rich clusters of galaxies are presented. Redshifts are obtained for 604 galaxies using the spectroscopic multiplexing capability of the fibre-optic facility at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Stellar velocity dispersions are obtained for about half this number. Blue photometry is derived from the UK Schmidt Southern Sky Survey for several hundred galaxies in each cluster using the Automated Photographic Measuring system (APM) at the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge. The cluster and galaxy samples are defined according to strict criteria, and the dataset represents the largest homogeneous collection of information presently available on the positions, luminosities, velocities and internal dispersions of cluster galaxies. The individual cluster luminosity functions are constructed and found to be satisfactorily represented by Schechter functions. The luminosity functions are consistent with a universal form which is well-approximated by a Schechter function with M*_J=-19.8 and alpha=-1.25. There are no statistically significant variations of the luminosity functions associated with cluster richness, velocity dispersion or Bautz-Morgan type. Isopleth maps of the galaxy distributions in the clusters show considerable substructure, in degree and form similar to that exhibited in recent N-body simulations. Nonetheless, the radial surface density profiles of the more regular clusters are well-fitted by truncated isothermal or deVaucouleurs models. The mean core radius is 0.23 Mpc/h with a relatively small dispersion of 0.07 Mpc/h, in accord with the results of Dressler (1978). The suggestion by Beers and Tonry (1986) that clusters have 1/r surface density profiles is rejected. Detailed examination of the luminosity functions, radial surface density distributions and velocity dispersion profiles reveals no evidence for any luminosity segregation in the clusters. However previous results stressing the special position of dominant

  16. Generalized quantum kinetic expansion: Time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Wu, Jianlan

    2015-09-14

    For a general two-cluster network, a new methodology of the cluster-based generalized quantum kinetic expansion (GQKE) is developed in the matrix formalism under two initial conditions: the local cluster equilibrium and system-bath factorized states. For each initial condition, the site population evolution follows exactly a distinct closed equation, where all the four terms involved are systematically expanded over inter-cluster couplings. For the system-bath factorized initial state, the numerical investigation of the two models, a biased (2, 1)-site system and an unbiased (2, 2)-site system, verifies the reliability of the GQKE and the relevance of higher-order corrections. The time-integrated site-to-site rates and the time evolution of site population reveal the time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics. The population evolution of aggregated clusters can be quantitatively described by the approximate cluster Markovian kinetics.

  17. HST Imaging of the Globular Clusters in the Formax Cluster: Color and Luminosity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillmair, C. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Brodie, J.; Elson, R.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the luminosity and B - I color distribution of globular clusters for three early-type galaxies in the Fornax cluster using imaging data from the Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope.

  18. Clustering instability of focused swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Nadal, Francois

    2016-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of active matter is its rich nonlinear dynamics and instabilities. Recent numerical simulations of phototactic algae showed that a thin jet of swimmers, obtained from hydrodynamic focusing inside a Poiseuille flow, was unstable to longitudinal perturbations with swimmers dynamically clustering (Jibuti L. et al., Phys. Rev. E, 90, (2014) 063019). As a simple starting point to understand these instabilities, we consider in this paper an initially homogeneous one-dimensional line of aligned swimmers moving along the same direction, and characterise its instability using both a continuum framework and a discrete approach. In both cases, we show that hydrodynamic interactions between the swimmers lead to instabilities in density for which we compute the growth rate analytically. Lines of pusher-type swimmers are predicted to remain stable while lines of pullers (such as flagellated algae) are predicted to always be unstable.

  19. Universality in Molecular Halo Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipanović, P.; Markić, L. Vranješ; Bešlić, I.; Boronat, J.

    2014-12-01

    The ground state of weakly bound dimers and trimers with a radius extending well into the classically forbidden region is explored, with the goal to test the predicted universality of quantum halo states. The focus of the study is molecules consisting of T ↓ , D ↓ , 3He, 4He, and alkali atoms, where the interaction between particles is much better known than in the case of nuclei, which are traditional examples of quantum halos. The study of realistic systems is supplemented by model calculations in order to analyze how low-energy properties depend on the interaction potential. The use of variational and diffusion Monte Carlo methods enabled a very precise calculation of both the size and binding energy of the trimers. In the quantum halo regime, and for large values of scaled binding energies, all clusters follow almost the same universal line. As the scaled binding energy decreases, Borromean states separate from tango trimers.

  20. Electron clusters in inert gases.

    PubMed

    Nazin, S; Shikin, V

    2008-10-17

    This Letter addresses the counterintuitive behavior of electrons injected into dense cryogenic media with negative scattering length L. Instead of strongly reduced mobility at all but the lowest densities due to the polaronic effect involving the formation of density enhancement clusters (expected in the theory with a simple gas-electron interaction successfully applied earlier to electrons in helium where L>0) which should substantially decrease the electron mobility, an opposite picture is observed: with increasing |L| (the trend taking place for inert gases with the growth of atomic number) and the gas density, the electrons remain practically free. An explanation of this behavior is provided based on consistent accounting for the nonlinearity of the electron interaction with the gaseous medium in the gas atom number density.

  1. Statistical thermodynamics of clustered populations.

    PubMed

    Matsoukas, Themis

    2014-08-01

    We present a thermodynamic theory for a generic population of M individuals distributed into N groups (clusters). We construct the ensemble of all distributions with fixed M and N, introduce a selection functional that embodies the physics that governs the population, and obtain the distribution that emerges in the scaling limit as the most probable among all distributions consistent with the given physics. We develop the thermodynamics of the ensemble and establish a rigorous mapping to regular thermodynamics. We treat the emergence of a so-called giant component as a formal phase transition and show that the criteria for its emergence are entirely analogous to the equilibrium conditions in molecular systems. We demonstrate the theory by an analytic model and confirm the predictions by Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Nanophase materials assembled from clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    The preparation of metal and ceramic atom clusters by means of the gas-condensation method, followed by their in situ collection and consolidation under high-vacuum conditions, has recently led to the synthesis of a new class of ultrafine-grained materials. These nanophase materials, with typical average grain sizes of 5 to 50 nm and, hence, a large fraction of their atoms in interfaces, exhibit properties that are often considerably improved relative to those of conventional materials. Furthermore, their synthesis and processing characteristics should enable the design of new materials with unique properties. Some examples are ductile ceramics that can be formed and sintered to full density at low temperatures without the need for binding or sintering aids, and metals with dramatically increased strength. The synthesis of these materials is briefly described along with what is presently known of their structure and properties. Their future impact on materials science and technology is also considered.

  3. Cluster headache and lifestyle habits.

    PubMed

    Schürks, Markus; Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2008-04-01

    Cluster headache (CH) has traditionally been associated with certain anthropometric features, personality traits, and lifestyle features. This article focuses on lifestyle features in patients with CH. Especially excessive smoking and alcohol consumption have been ascribed to patients with CH. Despite country-specific habits and a time trend, smoking is much more prevalent among CH patients compared with the general population. Although excessive alcohol consumption was reported in early studies, this was not corroborated more recently. On the contrary, patients with CH seem to avoid alcohol, particularly during active phases, likely due to its ability to trigger attacks. Present studies are purely descriptive. Thus, the associations sketched give no information about the long-term effects of smoking or alcohol consumption on the course of CH.

  4. Caloric curve of star clusters.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  5. Caloric curve of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  6. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    SciTech Connect

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  7. Scientific Cluster Deployment and Recovery - Using puppet to simplify cluster management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Val; Benjamin, Doug; Yao, Yushu

    2012-12-01

    Deployment, maintenance and recovery of a scientific cluster, which has complex, specialized services, can be a time consuming task requiring the assistance of Linux system administrators, network engineers as well as domain experts. Universities and small institutions that have a part-time FTE with limited time for and knowledge of the administration of such clusters can be strained by such maintenance tasks. This current work is the result of an effort to maintain a data analysis cluster (DAC) with minimal effort by a local system administrator. The realized benefit is the scientist, who is the local system administrator, is able to focus on the data analysis instead of the intricacies of managing a cluster. Our work provides a cluster deployment and recovery process (CDRP) based on the puppet configuration engine allowing a part-time FTE to easily deploy and recover entire clusters with minimal effort. Puppet is a configuration management system (CMS) used widely in computing centers for the automatic management of resources. Domain experts use Puppet's declarative language to define reusable modules for service configuration and deployment. Our CDRP has three actors: domain experts, a cluster designer and a cluster manager. The domain experts first write the puppet modules for the cluster services. A cluster designer would then define a cluster. This includes the creation of cluster roles, mapping the services to those roles and determining the relationships between the services. Finally, a cluster manager would acquire the resources (machines, networking), enter the cluster input parameters (hostnames, IP addresses) and automatically generate deployment scripts used by puppet to configure it to act as a designated role. In the event of a machine failure, the originally generated deployment scripts along with puppet can be used to easily reconfigure a new machine. The cluster definition produced in our CDRP is an integral part of automating cluster deployment

  8. Entropy-based cluster validation and estimation of the number of clusters in gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Novoselova, Natalia; Tom, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Many external and internal validity measures have been proposed in order to estimate the number of clusters in gene expression data but as a rule they do not consider the analysis of the stability of the groupings produced by a clustering algorithm. Based on the approach assessing the predictive power or stability of a partitioning, we propose the new measure of cluster validation and the selection procedure to determine the suitable number of clusters. The validity measure is based on the estimation of the "clearness" of the consensus matrix, which is the result of a resampling clustering scheme or consensus clustering. According to the proposed selection procedure the stable clustering result is determined with the reference to the validity measure for the null hypothesis encoding for the absence of clusters. The final number of clusters is selected by analyzing the distance between the validity plots for initial and permutated data sets. We applied the selection procedure to estimate the clustering results on several datasets. As a result the proposed procedure produced an accurate and robust estimate of the number of clusters, which are in agreement with the biological knowledge and gold standards of cluster quality.

  9. The High-mass Truncation of the Star Cluster Mass Function: Limits on Massive Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. C.; PHAT Team

    2017-01-01

    Long-lived star clusters serve as useful tracers of star formation, and massive clusters in particular are often associated with vigorous star formation activity. We examine how massive cluster formation varies as a function of star formation surface density (ΣSFR) by comparing cluster populations from galaxies that span a wide range of characteristic ΣSFR values. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey yielded an unparalleled census of young star clusters in M31 and allows us to examine massive cluster formation in a low intensity star formation environment. We measure the cluster mass function for a sample of 840 young star clusters with ages between 10-300 Myr. The data show clear evidence of a high-mass truncation: only 15 clusters more massive than 104 M⊙ are observed, compared to ~100 expected for a canonical M-2 power-law mass function with the same total number of clusters above the catalog completeness limit. Adopting a Schechter function parameterization, we fit a characteristic truncation mass (Mc) of 8.5×103 M⊙ — the lowest truncation mass ever reported. When combined with previous mass function results, we find that the cluster mass function truncation correlates strongly with the star formation rate surface density, where Mc ∝ ΣSFR1.3. We also find evidence that suggests the observed Mc-ΣSFR relation also holds for globular clusters, linking the two populations via a common formation pathway.

  10. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND SPUR CLUSTERS IN NGC 4921, THE BRIGHTEST SPIRAL GALAXY IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung E-mail: isjang@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2016-03-01

    We resolve a significant fraction of globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 4921, the brightest spiral galaxy in the Coma cluster. We also find a number of extended bright star clusters (star complexes) in the spur region of the arms. The latter are much brighter and bluer than those in the normal star-forming region, being as massive as 3 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙}. The color distribution of the GCs in this galaxy is found to be bimodal. The turnover magnitudes of the luminosity functions of the blue (metal-poor) GCs (0.70 < (V − I) ≤ 1.05) in the halo are estimated V(max) = 27.11 ± 0.09 mag and I(max) = 26.21 ± 0.11 mag. We obtain similar values for NGC 4923, a companion S0 galaxy, and two Coma cD galaxies (NGC 4874 and NGC 4889). The mean value for the turnover magnitudes of these four galaxies is I(max) = 26.25 ± 0.03 mag. Adopting M{sub I} (max) = −8.56 ± 0.09 mag for the metal-poor GCs, we determine the mean distance to the four Coma galaxies to be 91 ± 4 Mpc. Combining this with the Coma radial velocity, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H{sub 0} = 77.9 ± 3.6 km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1}. We estimate the GC specific frequency of NGC 4921 to be S{sub N} = 1.29 ± 0.25, close to the values for early-type galaxies. This indicates that NGC 4921 is in the transition phase to S0s.

  11. Structural change from doping the gold cluster.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yiji; Wang, Shu-Guang; Li, Jia

    2011-05-01

    Doping gold clusters with a transition metal (M@Au(n)) causes structural change. To determine the mechanism by which these changes occur, the central gold atom of Au(5) was doped with its same row transition metals Pt, Ir, Os, Re, and W. Based on theoretical calculations, a similar trend was found in other gold clusters.

  12. Family cluster of Mayaro fever, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jaime R; Russell, Kevin L; Vasquez, Clovis; Barrera, Roberto; Tesh, Robert B; Salas, Rosalba; Watts, Douglas M

    2004-07-01

    A cluster of protracted migratory polyarthritis involving four adult family members occurred in January 2000 after a brief overnight outing in a rural area of Venezuela. Laboratory testing demonstrated Mayaro virus as the cause of the cluster. These results documented the first human cases of Mayaro virus in Venezuela.

  13. Searching for the missing baryons in clusters

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Bilhuda; Bahcall, Neta; Bode, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies suggest that they contain fewer baryons (gas plus stars) than the cosmic baryon fraction. This “missing baryon” puzzle is especially surprising for the most massive clusters, which are expected to be representative of the cosmic matter content of the universe (baryons and dark matter). Here we show that the baryons may not actually be missing from clusters, but rather are extended to larger radii than typically observed. The baryon deficiency is typically observed in the central regions of clusters (∼0.5 the virial radius). However, the observed gas-density profile is significantly shallower than the mass-density profile, implying that the gas is more extended than the mass and that the gas fraction increases with radius. We use the observed density profiles of gas and mass in clusters to extrapolate the measured baryon fraction as a function of radius and as a function of cluster mass. We find that the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value near the virial radius for all groups and clusters above . This suggests that the baryons are not missing, they are simply located in cluster outskirts. Heating processes (such as shock-heating of the intracluster gas, supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei feedback) likely contribute to this expanded distribution. Upcoming observations should be able to detect these baryons. PMID:21321229

  14. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the surface alloys were formed by exchanging sites between the cluster and substrate atoms, and the cluster atoms rearranged following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up in the deposition course. The ability and scope of the structural reconstruction are largely determined by both the size and incident energy of the impacted cluster.

  15. Investigations of galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Matthew P.

    In this dissertation, we discuss the properties of galaxy clusters that have been determined using strong and weak gravitational lensing. A galaxy cluster is a collection of galaxies that are bound together by the force of gravity, while gravitational lensing is the bending of light by gravity. Strong lensing is the formation of arcs or rings of light surrounding clusters and weak lensing is a change in the apparent shapes of many galaxies. In this work we examine the properties of several samples of galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing. In Chapter 1 we introduce astrophysical theory of galaxy clusters and gravitational lensing. In Chapter 2 we examine evidence from our data that galaxy clusters are more concentrated than cosmology would predict. In Chapter 3 we investigate whether our assumptions about the number of galaxies in our clusters was valid by examining new data. In Chapter 4 we describe a determination of a relationship between mass and number of galaxies in a cluster at higher redshift than has been found before. In Chapter 5 we describe a model of the mass distribution in one of the ten lensing systems discovered by our group at Fermilab. Finally in Chapter 6 we summarize our conclusions.

  16. Note on the cluster variation method

    SciTech Connect

    An, G.

    1988-08-01

    Kikuchi's cluster variation method (CVM) is reformulated as the truncation of a Moebius inversion. An attempt is made to explicate and simplify the various approaches to the CVM. This formulation makes apparent the connection of the method with other types of cluster approximation. An illustration of the procedure is provided.

  17. The luminosity of Population III star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early Universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e. with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using non-axisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disc (i.e. Mdisc /M* ≳ 0.1), whose evolution we follow for a further 30-40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disc. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of 106 L⊙. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5-10 times greater than expected, and that the cluster spends ˜15 per cent of its star-forming history at these levels. This enhanced luminosity effect is particularly enabled in clusters of modest size with ≃10-20 members. In one such instance, we identify a confluence of burst events that raise the luminosity to nearly 1000 times greater than the cluster mean luminosity, resulting in L > 108 L⊙. This phenomenon arises solely through the gravitational-instability-driven episodic fragmentation and accretion that characterizes this early stage of protostellar evolution.

  18. Finding approximate gene clusters with Gecko 3

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Sascha; Jahn, Katharina; Wehner, Stefanie; Kuchenbecker, Leon; Marz, Manja; Stoye, Jens; Böcker, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Gene-order-based comparison of multiple genomes provides signals for functional analysis of genes and the evolutionary process of genome organization. Gene clusters are regions of co-localized genes on genomes of different species. The rapid increase in sequenced genomes necessitates bioinformatics tools for finding gene clusters in hundreds of genomes. Existing tools are often restricted to few (in many cases, only two) genomes, and often make restrictive assumptions such as short perfect conservation, conserved gene order or monophyletic gene clusters. We present Gecko 3, an open-source software for finding gene clusters in hundreds of bacterial genomes, that comes with an easy-to-use graphical user interface. The underlying gene cluster model is intuitive, can cope with low degrees of conservation as well as misannotations and is complemented by a sound statistical evaluation. To evaluate the biological benefit of Gecko 3 and to exemplify our method, we search for gene clusters in a dataset of 678 bacterial genomes using Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a reference. We confirm detected gene clusters reviewing the literature and comparing them to a database of operons; we detect two novel clusters, which were confirmed by publicly available experimental RNA-Seq data. The computational analysis is carried out on a laptop computer in <40 min. PMID:27679480

  19. The Longitudinal Development of Clusters in French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demuth, Katherine; McCullough, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Studies of English and German find that children tend to acquire word-final consonant clusters before word-initial consonant clusters. This order of acquisition is generally attributed to articulatory, frequency and/or morphological factors. This contrasts with recent experimental findings from French, where two-year-olds were better at producing…

  20. Investigations of Galaxy Clusters Using Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Matthew P.

    2014-08-01

    In this dissertation, we discuss the properties of galaxy clusters that have been determined using strong and weak gravitational lensing. A galaxy cluster is a collection of galaxies that are bound together by the force of gravity, while gravitational lensing is the bending of light by gravity. Strong lensing is the formation of arcs or rings of light surrounding clusters and weak lensing is a change in the apparent shapes of many galaxies. In this work we examine the properties of several samples of galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing. In Chapter 1 we introduce astrophysical theory of galaxy clusters and gravitational lensing. In Chapter 2 we examine evidence from our data that galaxy clusters are more concentrated than cosmology would predict. In Chapter 3 we investigate whether our assumptions about the number of galaxies in our clusters was valid by examining new data. In Chapter 4 we describe a determination of a relationship between mass and number of galaxies in a cluster at higher redshift than has been found before. In Chapter 5 we describe a model of the mass distribution in one of the ten lensing systems discovered by our group at Fermilab. Finally in Chapter 6 we summarize our conclusions.

  1. Business Clusters: Building on Local Strengths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    2001-01-01

    The Northwest Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center's "wood cluster initiative" illustrates the benefits of rural business clusters. The initiative is turning a loose grouping of timber and forest-product firms into a competitive system by providing technical assistance, helping businesses plan and conduct job training programs,…

  2. Star clusters as simple stellar populations.

    PubMed

    Bruzual A, Gustavo

    2010-02-28

    In this paper, I review to what extent we can understand the photometric properties of star clusters, and of low-mass, unresolved galaxies, in terms of population-synthesis models designed to describe 'simple stellar populations' (SSPs), i.e. groups of stars born at the same time, in the same volume of space and from a gas cloud of homogeneous chemical composition. The photometric properties predicted by these models do not readily match the observations of most star clusters, unless we properly take into account the expected variation in the number of stars occupying sparsely populated evolutionary stages, owing to stochastic fluctuations in the stellar initial mass function. In this case, population-synthesis models reproduce remarkably well the full ranges of observed integrated colours and absolute magnitudes of star clusters of various ages and metallicities. The disagreement between the model predictions and observations of cluster colours and magnitudes may indicate problems with or deficiencies in the modelling, and does not necessarily tell us that star clusters do not behave like SSPs. Matching the photometric properties of star clusters using SSP models is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for clusters to be considered SSPs. Composite models, characterized by complex star-formation histories, also match the observed cluster colours.

  3. Cremmer–Gervais cluster structure on SLn

    PubMed Central

    Gekhtman, Michael; Shapiro, Michael; Vainshtein, Alek

    2014-01-01

    We study natural cluster structures in the rings of regular functions on simple complex Lie groups and Poisson–Lie structures compatible with these cluster structures. According to our main conjecture, each class in the Belavin–Drinfeld classification of Poisson–Lie structures on G corresponds to a cluster structure in O(G). We have shown before that this conjecture holds for any G in the case of the standard Poisson–Lie structure and for all Belavin–Drinfeld classes in SLn, n<5. In this paper we establish it for the Cremmer–Gervais Poisson–Lie structure on SLn, which is the least similar to the standard one. Besides, we prove that on SL3 the cluster algebra and the upper cluster algebra corresponding to the Cremmer–Gervais cluster structure do not coincide, unlike the case of the standard cluster structure. Finally, we show that the positive locus with respect to the Cremmer–Gervais cluster structure is contained in the set of totally positive matrices. PMID:24982188

  4. SETI in star clusters: a theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente Marcos, R.; de La Fuente Marcos, C.

    2003-05-01

    For several decades, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) has proceeded using advanced astronomical techniques. Different strategies have been proposed for target selection for targeted searches with goals of improving the chances of successful detection of signals from technological civilizations that may inhabit planets around solar-type stars, and to minimize the chances of missing signals from unexpected sites. In this paper we demonstrate that these goals are best achieved by observing star clusters. We show that standard open clusters are not appropriate for SETI scans because their disruption time scale is shorter than the characteristic time scale for the development of a protective atmospheric layer on a habitable planet. However, the old open clusters, those older than some Gy are optimal candidates for SETI surveys as their ages are older than the likely time for intelligent civilizations to emerge and the probability of catastrophic orbital modification as a result of close encounters with other cluster stars is, in general, rather negligible. The final performance of the proposed survey can be significantly increased by using initially a radio telescope beam larger than the cluster apparent size so that the entire cluster can be observed simultaneously. Globular clusters are also good candidates from the statistical point of view but only if hypothetical civilizations located in these clusters have been able to develop astronomical engineering technologies or have been involved in (rather speculative) cosmic colonization.

  5. Exploring the Outskirts of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E.; George, J.; Mushotzky, R.; Bautz, M.; Davis, D.; Henry, J.

    2014-07-01

    A number of recent studies have traced the hot intracluster medium (ICM) to the virial radius in a sizeable sample of galaxy clusters. These results have begun to clarify the thermodynamic conditions at the edge of clusters, constraining models of cluster growth and evolution, yet the observations are challenging and bedeviled by a host of systematic issues due to the very low ICM surface brightness in the cluster outskirts. We are currently embarked on a program to observe a sample of about ten relaxed clusters with Suzaku, fully imaging each cluster to beyond R_{200}, and leveraging complementary data from XMM-Newton and Chandra. Our results support the idea that the ICM is not in hydrostatic equilibrium in the cluster outskirts, where we see indications of low-entropy substructures and some evidence for azimuthal variations in temperature and surface brightness. I will present the latest results from this project, explore the possible sources of systematic error, and discuss the remarkable ``universality'' of thermodynamic profiles to the outer limits of galaxy clusters.

  6. Giant light enhancement in atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gadomsky, O. N. Gadomskaya, I. V.; Altunin, K. K.

    2009-07-15

    We show that the polarizing effect of the atoms in an atomic cluster can lead to full compensation of the radiative damping of excited atomic states, a change in the sign of the dispersion of the atomic polarizability, and giant light enhancement by the atomic cluster.

  7. STELLAR ENCOUNTER RATE IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C.

    2013-04-01

    The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates ({Gamma}) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed 'King-model' profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat 'King-model' and 'core-collapsed' clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on {Gamma}, producing the first catalog of globular cluster stellar encounter rates with estimated errors. Comparing our results with published observations of likely products of stellar interactions (numbers of X-ray binaries, numbers of radio millisecond pulsars, and {gamma}-ray luminosity) we find both clear correlations and some differences with published results.

  8. Galaxy clusters in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acebrón, A.; Durret, F.; Martinet, N.; Adami, C.; Guennou, L.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations of large scale structure formation in the universe predict that matter is essentially distributed along filaments at the intersection of which lie galaxy clusters. We have analysed 9 clusters in the redshift range 0.4clusters. Based on colour-magnitude diagrams, we have selected the galaxies likely to be in the cluster redshift range and studied their spatial distribution. We detect a number of structures and filaments around several clusters, proving that colour-magnitude diagrams are a reliable method to detect filaments around galaxy clusters. Since this method excludes blue (spiral) galaxies at the cluster redshift, we also apply the LePhare software to compute photometric redshifts from BVRIZ images to select galaxy cluster members and study their spatial distribution. We then find that, if only galaxies classified as early-type by LePhare are considered, we obtain the same distribution than with a red sequence selection, while taking into account late-type galaxies just pollutes the background level and deteriorates our detections. The photometric redshift based method therefore does not provide any additional information.

  9. Mass Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.; McNamara, B. R.; Pulido, F.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Russell, H. R.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Edge, A. C.; Main, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    Many processes within galaxy clusters, such as those believed to govern the onset of thermally unstable cooling and active galactic nucleus feedback, are dependent upon local dynamical timescales. However, accurate mapping of the mass distribution within individual clusters is challenging, particularly toward cluster centers where the total mass budget has substantial radially dependent contributions from the stellar (M *), gas (M gas), and dark matter (M DM) components. In this paper we use a small sample of galaxy clusters with deep Chandra observations and good ancillary tracers of their gravitating mass at both large and small radii to develop a method for determining mass profiles that span a wide radial range and extend down into the central galaxy. We also consider potential observational pitfalls in understanding cooling in hot cluster atmospheres, and find tentative evidence for a relationship between the radial extent of cooling X-ray gas and nebular Hα emission in cool-core clusters. At large radii the entropy profiles of our clusters agree with the baseline power law of K ∝ r 1.1 expected from gravity alone. At smaller radii our entropy profiles become shallower but continue with a power law of the form K ∝ r 0.67 down to our resolution limit. Among this small sample of cool-core clusters we therefore find no support for the existence of a central flat “entropy floor.”

  10. The X-ray cluster Abell 744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gioia, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray and optical observations of the cluster of galaxies Abell 744 are presented. The X-ray flux (assuming H(0) = 100 km/s per Mpc) is about 9 x 10 to the 42nd erg/s. The X-ray source is extended, but shows no other structure. Photographic photometry (in Kron-Cousins R), calibrated by deep CCD frames, is presented for all galaxies brighter than 19th magnitude within 0.75 Mpc of the cluster center. The luminosity function is normal, and the isopleths show little evidence of substructure near the cluster center. The cluster has a dominant central galaxy, which is classified as a normal brightest-cluster elliptical on the basis of its luminosity profile. New redshifts were obtained for 26 galaxies in the vicinity of the cluster center; 20 appear to be cluster members. The spatial distribution of redshifts is peculiar; the dispersion within the 150 kpc core radius is much greater than outside. Abell 744 is similar to the nearby cluster Abell 1060.

  11. cluster trials v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, John; Castillo, Andrew

    2016-09-21

    This software contains a set of python modules – input, search, cluster, analysis; these modules read input files containing spatial coordinates and associated attributes which can be used to perform nearest neighbor search (spatial indexing via kdtree), cluster analysis/identification, and calculation of spatial statistics for analysis.

  12. The psychiatric comorbidities of cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S

    2013-02-01

    Although the comorbidity of migraine has been extensively studied, the relationships between cluster headache and psychiatric disease have not been well-addressed. In this review the available literature concerning cluster headache and depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, aggression, suicide, and their implications are discussed. Potential mechanisms, confounding variables, and unanswered questions are also addressed.

  13. Correcting a Significance Test for Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2007-01-01

    A common mistake in analysis of cluster randomized trials is to ignore the effect of clustering and analyze the data as if each treatment group were a simple random sample. This typically leads to an overstatement of the precision of results and anticonservative conclusions about precision and statistical significance of treatment effects. This…

  14. Reinvestigating the clusters Koposov 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Paust, Nathaniel; Wilson, Danielle; Van Belle, Gerard

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the fundamental parameters of age, distance, and mass function slope for the poorly studied clusters Koposov 1 and Koposov 2. These clusters were discovered recently and tentatively classified as globular clusters. Using the Large Monolithic Imager on Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope, we present photometry extending to V = 25, three to four magnitudes below the main sequence turnoffs for the clusters. We find the clusters have tidal radii of 15 pc and 10.7 pc and distances of 34.9 kpc and 33.3 kpc for Koposov 1 and Koposov 2, respectively. Studying the stellar content of the clusters, we use completeness-corrected star counts to reveal extremely faint total magnitudes of 2.01 and 0.03 in V, and steep Salpeter-like present-day mass functions. Finally, we show that the spatial positions of the clusters agree well with the position of the Sagittarius stream and conclude that these two objects are open clusters removed from the Sagittarius galaxy.

  15. Cluster networks and Bruhat-Tits buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, S. V.

    2014-08-01

    We consider a clustering procedure in the case where a family of metrics is used instead of a fixed metric. In this case, a classification network (a directed acyclic graph with nondirected cycles) is obtained instead of a classification tree. We discuss the relation to Bruhat-Tits buildings and introduce the notion of the dimension of a general cluster network.

  16. Unbridled growth of spin-glass clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David A.; Bretz, Michael

    1990-03-01

    We investigate the application of the recent cluster-based acceleration methods of Wolff and of Kandel et al. to the problem of simulating spin glasses. We find the techniques offer no improvement as the clusters generated by these algorithms are infinitely large or interact infinitely strongly, respectively. We comment on the reasons for this failure.

  17. Organomimetic clusters: Precision in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Marek B.; Howarth, Ashlee J.; Farha, Omar K.

    2017-03-01

    Biomimetic molecules that can be easily tailored offer numerous opportunities. Now, boron-based clusters have been shown to be excellent biomimetics. The ease with which the cluster surfaces can be modified stands to change how chemists might go about preparing materials for imaging, drug delivery and other applications.

  18. The evolution of groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Klypin, A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Turchaninov, V.

    Using high resolution N -body simulations we study the formation and evolution of clusters and groups in a &Lambda CDM cosmological model. Groups of galaxies already form before z = 4. Merging of groups and accretion leads to cluster formation at z <&sim2. Some of the groups merge into large isolated halos.

  19. Submersion of potassium clusters in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An der Lan, Lukas; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Schöbel, Harald; Denifl, Stephan; Märk, Tilmann D.; Ellis, Andrew M.; Scheier, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Small alkali clusters do not submerge in liquid helium nanodroplets but instead survive predominantly in high spin states that reside on the surface of the nanodroplet. However, a recent theoretical prediction by Stark and Kresin [Phys. Rev. BPLRBAQ1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.085401 81, 085401 (2010)], based on a classical description of the energetics of bubble formation for a fully submerged alkali cluster, suggests that the alkali clusters can submerge on energetic grounds when they exceed a critical size. Following recent work on sodium clusters, where ion yield data from electron impact mass spectrometry was used to obtain the first experimental evidence for alkali cluster submersion, we report here on similar experiments for potassium clusters. Evidence is presented for full cluster submersion at n>80 for Kn clusters, which is in good agreement with the recent theoretical prediction. In an additional observation, we report “magic number” sizes for both Kn+ and Kn2+ ions derived from helium droplets, which are found to be consistent with the jellium model.

  20. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  1. Some Applications of Graph Theory to Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubert, Lawrence J.

    1974-01-01

    The connection between graph theory and clustering is reviewed and extended. Major emphasis is on restating, in a graph-theoretic context, selected past work in clustering, and conversely, developing alternative strategies from several standard concepts used in graph theory per se. (Author/RC)

  2. Experience in setting up a PC cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ganghua; Zhang, Mei

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we summary and present our thinking and experience in setting up a PC cluster, with a consideration that the described thinking and experience may be relevant to or useful for those who intend to buy a similar cluster in the near future.

  3. Enhanced momentum feedback from clustered supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Eric S.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Dekel, Avishai; Madau, Piero

    2017-02-01

    Young stars typically form in star clusters, so the supernovae (SNe) they produce are clustered in space and time. This clustering of SNe may alter the momentum per SN deposited in the interstellar medium (ISM) by affecting the local ISM density, which in turn affects the cooling rate. We study the effect of multiple SNe using idealized 1D hydrodynamic simulations which explore a large parameter space of the number of SNe, and the background gas density and metallicity. The results are provided as a table and an analytic fitting formula. We find that for clusters with up to ∼100 SNe, the asymptotic momentum scales superlinearly with the number of SNe, resulting in a momentum per SN which can be an order of magnitude larger than for a single SN, with a maximum efficiency for clusters with 10-100 SNe. We argue that additional physical processes not included in our simulations - self-gravity, breakout from a galactic disc, and galactic shear - can slightly reduce the momentum enhancement from clustering, but the average momentum per SN still remains a factor of 4 larger than the isolated SN value when averaged over a realistic cluster mass function for a star-forming galaxy. We conclude with a discussion of the possible role of mixing between hot and cold gas, induced by multidimensional instabilities or pre-existing density variations, as a limiting factor in the build-up of momentum by clustered SNe, and suggest future numerical experiments to explore these effects.

  4. Labor Market Information for Career Cluster Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jared

    2008-01-01

    In the midst of several upheavals in the American labor market, career clusters entered the scene in the late 1990s. Career clusters, sometimes called career pathways or ladders, have exploded in popularity and are now being implemented by most states. Job types can be grouped according to similar work interests and knowledge/skill requirements.…

  5. The School Improvement Cluster: A Concept Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Office of Field Services.

    This paper describes school improvement through clusters (or leagues) of the Colorado Department of Education. School improvement clusters are defined as associations of schools and cooperating organizations dedicated to improving the quality of education. Participants work together with a common goal or unifying concept. The paper describes 14…

  6. Geometrical parameters of a water dropwise cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlov, A. V. Dzumandzi, V. A.

    2012-02-15

    A dropwise cluster is obtained over the surface of water heated to 65-100 Degree-Sign C. The pair correlation function of drops in the cluster is constructed. The temperature dependences of the spacing between the drops, their diameter, and the altitude of their levitation over the water surface are measured.

  7. Abnormal tyrosine metabolism in chronic cluster headache.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Giovanni; Leone, Massimo; Bussone, Gennaro; Fiore, Paola Di; Bolner, Andrea; Aguggia, Marco; Saracco, Maria Gabriella; Perini, Francesco; Giordano, Giuseppe; Gucciardi, Antonina; Leon, Alberta

    2017-02-01

    Objective Episodic cluster headache is characterized by abnormalities in tyrosine metabolism (i.e. elevated levels of dopamine, tyramine, octopamine and synephrine and low levels of noradrenalin in plasma and platelets.) It is unknown, however, if such biochemical anomalies are present and/or constitute a predisposing factor in chronic cluster headache. To test this hypothesis, we measured the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline together with those of elusive amines, such as tyramine, octopamine and synephrine, in plasma of chronic cluster patients and control individuals. Methods Plasma levels of dopamine, noradrenaline and trace amines, including tyramine, octopamine and synephrine, were measured in a group of 23 chronic cluster headache patients (10 chronic cluster ab initio and 13 transformed from episodic cluster), and 16 control participants. Results The plasma levels of dopamine, noradrenaline and tyramine were several times higher in chronic cluster headache patients compared with controls. The levels of octopamine and synephrine were significantly lower in plasma of these patients with respect to control individuals. Conclusions These results suggest that anomalies in tyrosine metabolism play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache and constitute a predisposing factor for the transformation of the episodic into a chronic form of this primary headache.

  8. 7 CFR 51.913 - Clusters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clusters. 51.913 Section 51.913 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.913 Clusters....

  9. 7 CFR 51.913 - Clusters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clusters. 51.913 Section 51.913 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.913 Clusters....

  10. 7 CFR 51.913 - Clusters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clusters. 51.913 Section 51.913 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.913 Clusters....

  11. V-TECS Career Cluster Frameworks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocational Technical Education Consortium of States, Decatur, GA.

    This document includes 16 vocational-technical crosswalk wheels relating the 14 Vocational Technical Education Consortium of States (V-TECS) Career Families to the 16 Career Clusters developed by the U.S. Department of Education. The career clusters are based on the common academic, workplace, and technical knowledge and skills that cut across all…

  12. Effect Sizes in Cluster-Randomized Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2007-01-01

    Multisite research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to compare the results of cluster-randomized studies (and corresponding quasi-experiments) with other studies and to…

  13. Silver clusters and chemistry in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T.; Seff, K. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-06-01

    The spectroscopic work done on silver clusters trapped in solid noble gas matrices at low temperature has been extensively reviewed by Ozin, and Henglein has done the same for photochemical studies of colloidal silver particles in solution. This article will review the chemistry of silver in zeolite hosts, including the synthesis and structures of silver clusters. 127 refs.

  14. Record-breaking ancient galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    A tale of two record-breaking clusters hi-res Size hi-res: 768 kb Credits: for RDCS1252: NASA, ESA, J.Blakeslee (Johns Hopkins Univ.), M.Postman (Space Telescope Science Inst.) and P.Rosati, Chris Lidman & Ricardo Demarco (European Southern Observ.) for TNJ1338: NASA, ESA, G.Miley (Leiden Observ.) and R.Overzier (Leiden Obs) A tale of two record-breaking clusters Looking back in time to when the universe was in its formative youth, the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captured these revealing images of two galaxy clusters. The image at left, which is made with an additional infrared exposure taken with the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, shows mature galaxies in a massive cluster that existed when the cosmos was 5000 million years old. The cluster, called RDCS1252.9-2927, is as massive as ‘300 trillion’ suns and is the most massive known cluster for its epoch. The image reveals the core of the cluster and is part of a much larger mosaic of the entire cluster. Dominating the core are a pair of large, reddish elliptical galaxies [near centre of image]. Their red colour indicates an older population of stars. Most of the stars are at least 1000 million years old. The two galaxies appear to be interacting and may eventually merge to form a larger galaxy that is comparable to the brightest galaxies seen in present-day clusters. The red galaxies surrounding the central pair are also cluster members. The cluster probably contains many thousands of galaxies, but only about 50 can be seen in this image. The full mosaic (heic0313d) reveals several hundred cluster members. Many of the other galaxies in the image, including several of the blue galaxies, are foreground or background galaxies. The colour-composite image was assembled from two observations (through i and z filters) taken between May and June 2002 by the ACS Wide Field Camera, and one image with the ISAAC instrument on the VLT taken in 2002

  15. Voting-based consensus clustering for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although many consensus clustering methods have been successfully used for combining multiple classifiers in many areas such as machine learning, applied statistics, pattern recognition and bioinformatics, few consensus clustering methods have been applied for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures. It is known that any individual clustering method will not always give the best results for all types of applications. So, in this paper, three voting and graph-based consensus clusterings were used for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures to enhance the ability of separating biologically active molecules from inactive ones in each cluster. Results The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA), cluster-based similarity partitioning algorithm (CSPA) and hyper-graph partitioning algorithm (HGPA) were examined. The F-measure and Quality Partition Index method (QPI) were used to evaluate the clusterings and the results were compared to the Ward’s clustering method. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) dataset was used for experiments and was represented by two 2D fingerprints, ALOGP and ECFP_4. The performance of voting-based consensus clustering method outperformed the Ward’s method using F-measure and QPI method for both ALOGP and ECFP_4 fingerprints, while the graph-based consensus clustering methods outperformed the Ward’s method only for ALOGP using QPI. The Jaccard and Euclidean distance measures were the methods of choice to generate the ensembles, which give the highest values for both criteria. Conclusions The results of the experiments show that consensus clustering methods can improve the effectiveness of chemical structures clusterings. The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA) was the method of choice among consensus clustering methods. PMID:23244782

  16. Gas Physics in Cool-Core Clusters: the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    2013-10-01

    We have detected and confirmed the presence of high temperature gas at 10^5K associated with the low excitation 10^4K line emission filaments of M87. This is a profoundly important observation bearing on the physics of transport processes in cool-core clusters, mergers and feedback from AGN into the surrounding ISM. We propose to obtain a deep FUV COS spectrum in order to {1} detect lines that are characteristic of gas at a wide range of temperatures and {2} measure the FUV CIV and HeII line widths and velocity. The additional emission lines will allow us to empirically determine the temperature distribution across the critical region between 10^4K {"optical"} and 10^7K {"X-ray"} in the filament and understand how these two very different components of the ISM are connected, and which theoretical scenario is viable. The line widths and velocity further offer a direct discrimination between competing physical processes that include turbulence, condensation and evaporation - observationally broadening, inflow and outflow respectively. We will also acquire a two orbit ACS/SBC image to image the HeII line, which has a higher mean emission temperature than CIV, in isolation from CIV. In conjunction with our existing FUV deep image, we will be able to study the structure of the filaments in these two lines, and hence reveal the character of spatial variations of the interface between hot and cool gas.

  17. The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danae Griffin, Rhiannon; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.; Nugent, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    The Swift active galactic nucleus (AGN) and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift X-ray Telescope serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding X-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4 × 10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here, we present the first two papers in a series of publications for SACS. In the first paper, we introduce our method and catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources. We examine the number counts of the AGN and galaxy cluster populations. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. The depth and areal coverage of SACS is well suited for galaxy cluster surveys outside the local universe, reaching z ˜ 1 for massive clusters. In the second paper, we use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 data to study the 203 extended SACS sources that are located within the SDSS footprint. We search for galaxy over-densities in 3-D space using SDSS galaxies and their photometric redshifts near the Swift galaxy cluster candidates. We find 103 Swift clusters with a > 3σ over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmations as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, BCG magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, X-ray luminosity and red sequences. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≤ 0.3 and 80% complete for z ≤ 0.4, consistent with the survey depth of SDSS. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 2 and 1 matches in optical, X-ray and SZ catalogs, respectively, so the majority of these

  18. Surface deposition and encapsulation of metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, Jared Franklin

    In this work metallic clusters are produced by both encapsulation in an aerogel matrix and deposition on a surface. Entrapment of metal clusters inside aerogels is accomplished though synthesis of a hydrogel precursor, washing it with an aqueous metal salt solution, and controlled reduction of the metal. Although the aerogel matrix stabilizes and prevents subsequent loss or aggregation of the clusters once they are produced, controlling the rate of reduction is key to the size and morphology of the clusters. In order to do this, both radiolytic and chemical reduction methods are used. The radiolytic technique for the formation of metal cluster aerogel composites utilizes gamma radiation to reduce the solution of Ag+ or [AuCl 4]- ions inside of the hydrogel precursor. After exposure to gamma rays, the previously colorless gels have the coloration typical of colloids of Au (pink) and Ag (yellow/brown) clusters. Typical gamma doses are between 2 to 3.5 kGy for hydrogels containing 10-4 to 10-3 mol·L-1 metal solutions. Subsequent characterization confirmed the presence of metal clusters with a fcc structure. The cluster diameters varied between 10 and 200nm, depending on the synthesis parameters. More conventional chemical reduction is also employed in this work to produce noble metal clusters in an aerogel matrix. Hydrogels were washed in a basic solution of Ag+ or [AuCl4]- ions, and formaldehyde was added to the solution. The reduction proceeded relatively slowly, allowing the formaldehyde to diffuse into the hydrogel before complete reduction took place. This procedure was also used to produce alloys of gold and silver clusters embedded in silica aerogels. Also included in this dissertation is the surface deposition of metallic clusters on a silicon surface. The apparatus built produces a cold beam of gas droplets that pick up evaporated metal clusters and deposit them on a surface. The gas clusters are produced by supersonic expansion of a gas (Ar, He, or N2

  19. IgG1 antibodies to acetylcholine receptors in ‘seronegative’ myasthenia gravis†

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Maria Isabel; Jacob, Saiju; Viegas, Stuart; Cossins, Judy; Clover, Linda; Morgan, B. Paul; Beeson, David; Willcox, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Only around 80% of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have serum antibodies to acetylcholine receptor [AChR; acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis (AChR-MG)] by the radioimmunoprecipitation assay used worldwide. Antibodies to muscle specific kinase [MuSK; MuSK antibody positive myasthenia gravis (MuSK-MG)] make up a variable proportion of the remaining 20%. The patients with neither AChR nor MuSK antibodies are often called seronegative (seronegative MG, SNMG). There is accumulating evidence that SNMG patients are similar to AChR-MG in clinical features and thymic pathology. We hypothesized that SNMG patients have low-affinity antibodies to AChR that cannot be detected in solution phase assays, but would be detected by binding to the AChRs on the cell membrane, particularly if they were clustered at the high density that is found at the neuromuscular junction. We expressed recombinant AChR subunits with the clustering protein, rapsyn, in human embryonic kidney cells and tested for binding of antibodies by immunofluorescence. To identify AChRs, we tagged either AChR or rapsyn with enhanced green fluorescence protein, and visualized human antibodies with Alexa Fluor-labelled secondary or tertiary antibodies, or by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). We correlated the results with the thymic pathology where available. We detected AChR antibodies to rapsyn-clustered AChR in 66% (25/38) of sera previously negative for binding to AChR in solution and confirmed the results with FACS. The antibodies were mainly IgG1 subclass and showed ability to activate complement. In addition, there was a correlation between serum binding to clustered AChR and complement deposition on myoid cells in patients’ thymus tissue. A similar approach was used to demonstrate that MuSK antibodies, although mainly IgG4, were partially IgG1 subclass and capable of activating complement when bound to MuSK on the cell surface. These observations throw new

  20. Young star clusters in circumnuclear starburst rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Ma, Chao; Jia, Siyao; Ho, Luis C.; Anders, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We analyse the cluster luminosity functions (CLFs) of the youngest star clusters in two galaxies exhibiting prominent circumnuclear starburst rings. We focus specifically on NGC 1512 and NGC 6951, for which we have access to Hα data that allow us to unambiguously identify the youngest sample clusters. To place our results on a firm statistical footing, we first explore in detail a number of important technical issues affecting the process from converting the observational data into the spectral energy distributions of the objects in our final catalogues. The CLFs of the young clusters in both galaxies exhibit approximate power-law behaviour down to the 90 per cent observational completeness limits, thus showing that star cluster formation in the violent environments of starburst rings appears to proceed similarly as that elsewhere in the local Universe. We discuss this result in the context of the density of the interstellar medium in our starburst-ring galaxies.

  1. Molecular-dynamics simulations of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, S. C.; Hall, B. D.

    2001-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of nanometer-sized lead clusters have been performed using the Lim-Ong-Ercolessi glue potential [Surf. Sci. 269/270, 1109 (1992)]. The binding energies of clusters forming crystalline (fcc), decahedron and icosahedron structures are compared, showing that fcc cuboctahedra are the most energetically favored of these polyhedral model structures. However, simulations of the freezing of liquid droplets produced a characteristic form of surface-reconstructed ``shaved'' icosahedron, in which atoms are absent at the edges and apexes of the polyhedron. This arrangement is energetically favored for 600-4000 atom clusters. Larger clusters favor crystalline structures. Indeed, simulated freezing of a 6525-atom liquid droplet produced an imperfect fcc Wulff particle, containing a number of parallel stacking faults. The effects of temperature on the preferred structure of crystalline clusters below the melting point have been considered. The implications of these results for the interpretation of experimental data is discussed.

  2. Clusters in neutron-rich light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelavić Malenica, D.; Milin, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Lattuada, M.; Miljanić, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Prepolec, L.; Scuderi, V.; Skukan, N.; Soić, N.; Torresi, D.; Uroić, M.

    2016-05-01

    Due to their high selectivity, transfer and sequential decay reactions are powerful tools for studies of both single particle (nucleon) and cluster states in light nuclei. Their use is particularly simple for investigations of α-particle clustering (because α-particle has Jπ=0+, which simplifies spin and parity assignments to observed cluster states), but they are also easily applicable to other types of clustering. Recent results on clustering in neutron-rich isotopes of beryllium, boron and carbon obtained measuring the 10B+10B reactions (at 50 and 72 MeV) are presented. The highly efficient and segmented detector systems used, built from 4 Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSD) allowed detection of double and multiple coincidences and, in that way, studies of states populated in transfer reactions, as well as their sequential decay.

  3. The longitudinal development of clusters in French.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Katherine; McCullough, Elizabeth

    2009-03-01

    Studies of English and German find that children tend to acquire word-final consonant clusters before word-initial consonant clusters. This order of acquisition is generally attributed to articulatory, frequency and/or morphological factors. This contrasts with recent experimental findings from French, where two-year-olds were better at producing word-initial than word-final clusters (Demuth & Kehoe, 2006). The purpose of the present study was to examine French-speaking children's longitudinal acquisition of clusters to determine if these results replicate developmentally. Analysis of spontaneous speech productions from two French-speaking children between one and three years confirmed the earlier acquisition of initial clusters, even when sonority factors were controlled. The findings suggest that French-speaking children acquire complexity at the beginnings of words before complexity appears word-finally. The role of frequency, morphological, structural and input factors is discussed.

  4. Clusters of Galaxies in Infrared Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wszołek, B.

    2008-12-01

    Far infrared emission (FIR) of the sky is generally thought to originate mainly in cold dust grains distributed in space. The FIR emission of galaxy clusters may be considered therefore as a tracer of the dust constituent of the intracluster medium. The presence of dust distributed in the intergalactic medium of galaxy clusters is of considerable interest for several studies. Based on IRAS and COBE/DIRBE sky surveys we found excess FIR emission from the sky area occupied by galaxy cluster ZW5897. Very good positional and extensional coincidence between infrared source and ZW5897 may suggest intracluster origin of the emission. We studied the distribution of stars and galaxies in the cluster area using Palomar Survey data to check whether these distributions are affected by local dust. We found that a foreground obscuring cloud, overlapping accidentally the distant cluster ZW5897, may be responsible for some part of the detected FIR emission.

  5. Cluster outskirts and the missing baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy clusters are located at the crossroads of intergalactic filaments and are still forming through the continuous merging and accretion of smaller structures from the surrounding cosmic web. Deep, wide-field X-ray studies of the outskirts of the most massive clusters bring us valuable insight into the processes leading to the growth of cosmic structures. In addition, cluster outskirts are privileged sites to search for the missing baryons, which are thought to reside within the filaments of the cosmic web. I will present the XMM cluster outskirts project, a VLP that aims at mapping the outskirts of 13 nearby clusters. Based on the results obtained with this program, I will then explore ideas to exploit the capabilities of XMM during the next decade.

  6. Web document clustering using hyperlink structures

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiaofeng; Zha, Hongyuan; Ding, Chris H.Q; Simon, Horst D.

    2001-05-07

    With the exponential growth of information on the World Wide Web there is great demand for developing efficient and effective methods for organizing and retrieving the information available. Document clustering plays an important role in information retrieval and taxonomy management for the World Wide Web and remains an interesting and challenging problem in the field of web computing. In this paper we consider document clustering methods exploring textual information hyperlink structure and co-citation relations. In particular we apply the normalized cut clustering method developed in computer vision to the task of hyperdocument clustering. We also explore some theoretical connections of the normalized-cut method to K-means method. We then experiment with normalized-cut method in the context of clustering query result sets for web search engines.

  7. Worldwide clustering of the corruption perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulus, Michal; Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2015-06-01

    We inspect a possible clustering structure of the corruption perception among 134 countries. Using the average linkage clustering, we uncover a well-defined hierarchy in the relationships among countries. Four main clusters are identified and they suggest that countries worldwide can be quite well separated according to their perception of corruption. Moreover, we find a strong connection between corruption levels and a stage of development inside the clusters. The ranking of countries according to their corruption perfectly copies the ranking according to the economic performance measured by the gross domestic product per capita of the member states. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first one to present an application of hierarchical and clustering methods to the specific case of corruption.

  8. Dynamic multifactor clustering of financial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Gordon J.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the tendency for financial instruments to form clusters when there are multiple factors influencing the correlation structure. Specifically, we consider a stock portfolio which contains companies from different industrial sectors, located in several different countries. Both sector membership and geography combine to create a complex clustering structure where companies seem to first be divided based on sector, with geographical subclusters emerging within each industrial sector. We argue that standard techniques for detecting overlapping clusters and communities are not able to capture this type of structure and show how robust regression techniques can instead be used to remove the influence of both sector and geography from the correlation matrix separately. Our analysis reveals that prior to the 2008 financial crisis, companies did not tend to form clusters based on geography. This changed immediately following the crisis, with geography becoming a more important determinant of clustering structure.

  9. IP Profiling via Service Cluster Membership Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoletti, A

    2009-02-23

    This study investigates the feasibility of establishing and maintaining a system of compact IP behavioral profiles as a robust means of computer anomaly definition and detection. These profiles are based upon the degree to which a system's (IP's) network traffic is distributed among stable characteristic clusters derived of the aggregate session traffic generated by each of the major network services. In short, an IP's profile represents its degree of membership in these derived service clusters. The goal is to quantify and rank behaviors that are outside of the statistical norm for the services in question, or present significant deviation from profile for individual client IPs. Herein, we establish stable clusters for accessible features of common session traffic, migrate these clusters over time, define IP behavior profiles with respect to these clusters, migrate individual IP profiles over time, and demonstrate the detection of IP behavioral changes in terms of deviation from profile.

  10. Swarm Intelligence in Text Document Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Social animals or insects in nature often exhibit a form of emergent collective behavior. The research field that attempts to design algorithms or distributed problem-solving devices inspired by the collective behavior of social insect colonies is called Swarm Intelligence. Compared to the traditional algorithms, the swarm algorithms are usually flexible, robust, decentralized and self-organized. These characters make the swarm algorithms suitable for solving complex problems, such as document collection clustering. The major challenge of today's information society is being overwhelmed with information on any topic they are searching for. Fast and high-quality document clustering algorithms play an important role in helping users to effectively navigate, summarize, and organize the overwhelmed information. In this chapter, we introduce three nature inspired swarm intelligence clustering approaches for document clustering analysis. These clustering algorithms use stochastic and heuristic principles discovered from observing bird flocks, fish schools and ant food forage.

  11. Bipartite graph partitioning and data clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, Hongyuan; He, Xiaofeng; Ding, Chris; Gu, Ming; Simon, Horst D.

    2001-05-07

    Many data types arising from data mining applications can be modeled as bipartite graphs, examples include terms and documents in a text corpus, customers and purchasing items in market basket analysis and reviewers and movies in a movie recommender system. In this paper, the authors propose a new data clustering method based on partitioning the underlying biopartite graph. The partition is constructed by minimizing a normalized sum of edge weights between unmatched pairs of vertices of the bipartite graph. They show that an approximate solution to the minimization problem can be obtained by computing a partial singular value decomposition (SVD) of the associated edge weight matrix of the bipartite graph. They point out the connection of their clustering algorithm to correspondence analysis used in multivariate analysis. They also briefly discuss the issue of assigning data objects to multiple clusters. In the experimental results, they apply their clustering algorithm to the problem of document clustering to illustrate its effectiveness and efficiency.

  12. Equilibrium Structure of Tantalum Oxygen Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgic, S. Sentürk; Caliskan, M.

    2007-04-01

    We determine a refined model for the interionic interactions in TaOn clusters by an analysis of data on their molecular structures. The potential energy function of an ionic cluster we adopt is based on the interionic force model proposed by Akdeniz and Tosi. The microscopic model used for Tantalum oxygen clusters incorporates the Born Model of cohesion and shell model for vibrational motions and crystal defects. Electron shell deformability is described through the effective valences, the electric and overlap polarizabilities of the oxygens, the electric polarizability of the tantalum ions. The two different overlap repulsive energy form have been tested. The molecular structure of clusters in equilibrium have been shown. It has been found in a good agreement for the bond lengths and bond angles by comparing with those obtained by chemical structure calculations and experimental data Thus the applicability of interionic model is tested for transition metal oxide clusters.

  13. Structures of small bismuth cluster cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelting, Rebecca; Baldes, Alexander; Schwarz, Ulrike; Rapps, Thomas; Schooss, Detlef; Weis, Patrick; Neiss, Christian; Weigend, Florian; Kappes, Manfred M.

    2012-04-01

    The structures of bismuth cluster cations in the range between 4 and 14 atoms have been assigned by a combination of gas phase ion mobility and trapped ion electron diffraction measurements together with density functional theory calculations. We find that above 8 atoms the clusters adopt prolate structures with coordination numbers between 3 and 4 and highly directional bonds. These open structures are more like those seen for clusters of semiconducting-in-bulk elements (such as silicon) rather than resembling the compact structures typical for clusters of metallic-in-bulk elements. An accurate description of bismuth clusters at the level of density functional theory, in particular of fragmentation pathways and dissociation energetics, requires taking spin-orbit coupling into account. For n = 11 we infer that low energy isomers can have fragmentation thresholds comparable to their structural interconversion barriers. This gives rise to experimental isomer distributions which are dependent on formation and annealing histories.

  14. Electrochemical Potential Derived from Atomic Cluster Structures.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinglian; Xiao, Debao; Wen, Bin; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-04

    Based on the atomic cluster structures and free electron approximation model, it is revealed that the electrochemical potential (ECP) for the system of interest is proportional to the reciprocal of atomic cluster radius squared, i.e., φ = k·(1/r(2)). Applied to elemental crystals, the correlation between atomic cluster radii and the ECP that we have predicted agrees well with the previously reported results. In addition, some other physicochemical properties associated with the ECP have also been found relevant to the atomic cluster radii of materials. Thus, the atomic cluster radii can be perceived as an effective characteristic parameter to measure the ECP and related properties of materials. Our results provide a better understanding of ECP directly from the atomic structures perspective.

  15. On the clustering of multidimensional pictorial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Obvious approaches to reducing the cost (in computer resources) of applying current clustering techniques to the problem of remote sensing are discussed. The use of spatial information in finding fields and in classifying mixture pixels is examined, and the AMOEBA clustering program is described. Internally, a pattern recognition program, from without, AMOEBA appears to be an unsupervised clustering program. It is fast and automatic. No choices (such as arbitrary thresholds to set split/combine sequences) need be made. The problem of finding the number of clusters is solved automatically. At the conclusion of the program, all points in the scene are classified; however, a provision is included for a reject classification of some points which, within the theoretical framework, cannot rationally be assigned to any cluster.

  16. Clustering high dimensional data using RIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Nazrina

    2015-05-01

    Clustering may simply represent a convenient method for organizing a large data set so that it can easily be understood and information can efficiently be retrieved. However, identifying cluster in high dimensionality data sets is a difficult task because of the curse of dimensionality. Another challenge in clustering is some traditional functions cannot capture the pattern dissimilarity among objects. In this article, we used an alternative dissimilarity measurement called Robust Influence Angle (RIA) in the partitioning method. RIA is developed using eigenstructure of the covariance matrix and robust principal component score. We notice that, it can obtain cluster easily and hence avoid the curse of dimensionality. It is also manage to cluster large data sets with mixed numeric and categorical value.

  17. Clustering high dimensional data using RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Nazrina

    2015-05-15

    Clustering may simply represent a convenient method for organizing a large data set so that it can easily be understood and information can efficiently be retrieved. However, identifying cluster in high dimensionality data sets is a difficult task because of the curse of dimensionality. Another challenge in clustering is some traditional functions cannot capture the pattern dissimilarity among objects. In this article, we used an alternative dissimilarity measurement called Robust Influence Angle (RIA) in the partitioning method. RIA is developed using eigenstructure of the covariance matrix and robust principal component score. We notice that, it can obtain cluster easily and hence avoid the curse of dimensionality. It is also manage to cluster large data sets with mixed numeric and categorical value.

  18. Structure stability and spectroscopy of metal clusters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Theory based on self-consistent field-linear combinations of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital theory was applied to clusters. Four areas were covered: electronic structure, equilibrium geometries, and stability of charged clusters, interaction of metal clusters with H and halogen atoms, thermal stability of isolated clusters, and stability and optical properties of hetero-atomic clusters. (DLC)

  19. Lattice QCD production on commodity clusters at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    D. Holmgren et al.

    2003-09-30

    We describe the construction and results to date of Fermilab's three Myrinet-networked lattice QCD production clusters (an 80-node dual Pentium III cluster, a 48-node dual Xeon cluster, and a 128-node dual Xeon cluster). We examine a number of aspects of performance of the MILC lattice QCD code running on these clusters.

  20. Dynamical evolution of globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzio, J.C.

    1987-04-01

    The dynamical processes that affect globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies are analyzed. Two-body and impulsive approximations are utilized to study dynamical friction, drag force, tidal stripping, tidal radii, globular-cluster swapping, tidal accretion, and galactic cannibalism. The evolution of galaxies and the collision of galaxies are simulated numerically; the steps involved in the simulation are described. The simulated data are compared with observations. Consideration is given to the number of galaxies, halo extension, location of the galaxies, distribution of the missing mass, nonequilibrium initial conditions, mass dependence, massive central galaxies, globular-cluster distribution, and lost globular clusters. 116 references.