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Sample records for agrobacterium sp atcc

  1. Metabolic engineering of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC31749 for curdlan production from cellobiose.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Dong; Liu, Long; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Park, Yong-Il; Chen, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Curdlan is a commercial polysaccharide made by fermentation of Agrobacterium sp. Its anticipated expansion to larger volume markets demands improvement in its production efficiency. Metabolic engineering for strain improvement has so far been limited due to the lack of genetic tools. This research aimed to identify strong promoters and to engineer a strain that converts cellobiose efficiently to curdlan. Three strong promoters were identified and were used to install an energy-efficient cellobiose phosphorolysis mechanism in a curdlan-producing strain. The engineered strains were shown with enhanced ability to utilize cellobiose, resulting in a 2.5-fold increase in titer. The availability of metabolically engineered strain capable of producing β-glucan from cellobiose paves the way for its production from cellulose. The identified native promoters from Agrobacterium open up opportunities for further metabolic engineering for improved production of curdlan and other products. The success shown here marks the first such metabolic engineering effort in this microbe. PMID:27387419

  2. Production and downstream processing of (1→3)-β-D-glucan from mutant strain of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We isolated a mutant that produced higher levels of curdlan than the wild strain Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750 by chemical mutagenesis using N-methyl-N-nitro-nitrosoguanidine. The mutant strain produced 66 g/L of curdlan in 120 h with a yield of (0.88) while, the wild strain produced 41 g/L in 120 h with a yield of (0.62) in a stirred bioreactor. The mutant could not produce curdlan when the pH was shifted from 7.0 to 5.5 after nitrogen depletion as followed for wild strain. In contrast, pH optimum for cell growth and curdlan production for mutant was found to be 7.0. We optimized the downstream processing of curdlan by varying different volumes of NaOH and HCl for extraction and precipitation of curdlan. The molecular weight of the purified curdlan from the wild and mutant strain was 6.6 × 105 Da and 5.8 × 105 Da respectively. The monosaccharide analyses confirm that curdlan from both wild and mutant strain contains only glucose units. From the NMR and FTIR data, it has been confirmed that curdlan was exclusively composed of β (1 → 3)-D-glucan residues. PMID:22681895

  3. Sequence and transcriptional analysis of the genes responsible for curdlan biosynthesis in Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 under simulated dissolved oxygen gradients conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Tao; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Jian-Rong; Yu, Xiao-Bin; Jiang, Yun; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2011-07-01

    Expression at the mRNA level of ten selected genes in Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 under various dissolved oxygen (DO) levels during curdlan fermentation related to electron transfer chain (ETC), tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, peptidoglycan/lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose biosynthesis were determined by qRT-PCR. Experiments were performed at DO levels of 30%, 50%, and 75%, as well as under low-oxygen conditions. The effect of high cell density on transcriptional response of the above genes under low oxygen was also studied. Besides cytochrome d (cyd A), the transcription levels of all the other genes were increased at higher DO and reached maximum at 50% DO. Under 75% DO, the transcriptional levels of all the genes were repressed. In addition, transcription levels of icd, sdh, cyo A, and fix N genes did not exhibit significant fluctuation with high cell density culture under low oxygen. These results suggested a mechanism for DO regulation of curdlan synthesis through regulation of transcriptional levels of ETCs, TCA, and UDP-glucose synthesis genes during curdlan fermentation. To our knowledge, this is the first report that DO concentration apparently regulates curdlan biosynthesis in Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 providing essential lead for the optimization of the fermentation at the industrial scale. PMID:21472535

  4. Recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan by Agrobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zichao; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2007-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a sugar polymer of a repeating disaccharide, beta1-3 D-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) beta1-4 D-glucuronic acid (GlcA). It finds applications in numerous biomedical procedures such as ophthalmic surgery and osteoarthritis treatment. Until recently, the only commercial sources were extraction of rooster combs and from fermentation of pathogenic Streptococcus. In this work, we demonstrate that metabolic engineering strategies enable the recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan in a safe microorganism. Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 is a commercial production strain for a food polymer, Curdlan. A broad host range expression vector was successfully developed to express the 3 kb HA synthase gene from Pasteurella multocida, along with a kfiD gene encoding UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli K5 strain. Coexpression of these two heterologous enzymes enables Agrobacterium to produce HA. Hyaluronan was accumulated up to 0.3 g/L in shaker flask cultivation. The molecular weight of the polymer from various Agrobacterium strains is in the range of 0.7-2 MD. To our knowledge, this is the first successful recombinant hyaluronan synthesis in a Gram-negative bacterium that naturally produces a food product. The ease of genetic modifications provides future opportunities to tailor properties of polymers for specific applications. PMID:17705506

  5. Cloning and Characterization of the Phosphatidylserine Synthase Gene of Agrobacterium sp. Strain ATCC 31749 and Effect of Its Inactivation on Production of High-Molecular-Mass (1→3)-β-d-Glucan (Curdlan)

    PubMed Central

    Karnezis, Tara; Fisher, Helen C.; Neumann, Gregory M.; Stone, Bruce A.; Stanisich, Vilma A.

    2002-01-01

    Genes involved in the production of the extracellular (1→3)-β-glucan, curdlan, by Agrobacterium sp. strain ATCC 31749 were described previously (Stasinopoulos et al., Glycobiology 9:31-41, 1999). To identify additional curdlan-related genes whose protein products occur in the cell envelope, the transposon TnphoA was used as a specific genetic probe. One mutant was unable to produce high-molecular-mass curdlan when a previously uncharacterized gene, pssAG, encoding a 30-kDa, membrane-associated phosphatidylserine synthase was disrupted. The membranes of the mutant lacked phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), whereas the phosphatidylcholine (PC) content was unchanged and that of both phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin was increased. In the mutant, the continued appearance of PC revealed that its production by this Agrobacterium strain is not solely dependent on PE in a pathway controlled by the PssAG protein at its first step. Moreover, PC can be produced in a medium lacking choline. When the pssAG::TnphoA mutation was complemented by the intact pssAG gene, both the curdlan deficiency and the phospholipid profile were restored to wild-type, demonstrating a functional relationship between these two characteristics. The effect of the changed phospholipid profile could occur through an alteration in the overall charge distribution on the membrane or a specific requirement for PE for the folding into or maintenance of an active conformation of any or all of the structural proteins involved in curdlan production or transport. PMID:12107128

  6. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin promotes Salecan production by Agrobacterium sp. ZX09*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-mei; Xu, Hai-yang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jian-fa; Wang, Shi-ming

    2014-01-01

    Salecan is a novel exopolysaccharide produced by the strain Agrobacterium sp. ZX09, and it is composed of only glucose monomers. The unique chemical composition and excellent physicochemical properties make Salecan a promising material for applications in coagulation, lubrication, protection against acute liver injury, and alleviating constipation. In this study, we cloned the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene into a broad-host-range plasmid pCM158. Without antibiotic selection, there was negligible loss of the plasmid in the host Agrobacterium sp. ZX09 after one passage of cultivation. The expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin was demonstrated by carbon monoxide (CO) difference spectrum. The engineered strain Agrobacterium sp. ZX09 increased Salecan yield by 30%. The other physiological changes included its elevated respiration rate and cellular invertase activity. PMID:25367790

  7. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin promotes Salecan production by Agrobacterium sp. ZX09.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-mei; Xu, Hai-yang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jian-fa; Wang, Shi-ming

    2014-11-01

    Salecan is a novel exopolysaccharide produced by the strain Agrobacterium sp. ZX09, and it is composed of only glucose monomers. The unique chemical composition and excellent physicochemical properties make Salecan a promising material for applications in coagulation, lubrication, protection against acute liver injury, and alleviating constipation. In this study, we cloned the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene into a broad-host-range plasmid pCM158. Without antibiotic selection, there was negligible loss of the plasmid in the host Agrobacterium sp. ZX09 after one passage of cultivation. The expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin was demonstrated by carbon monoxide (CO) difference spectrum. The engineered strain Agrobacterium sp. ZX09 increased Salecan yield by 30%. The other physiological changes included its elevated respiration rate and cellular invertase activity. PMID:25367790

  8. A new QRT-PCR assay designed for the differentiation between elements provided from Agrobacterium sp. in GMOs plant events and natural Agrobacterium sp. bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Nesrine; Chaouachi, Maher; Zellama, Mohamed Salem; Ben Hafsa, Ahmed; Mrabet, Besma; Saïd, Khaled; Fathia, Harzallah Skhiri

    2016-04-01

    The question asked in the present work was how to differentiate between contamination of field samples with and GM plants contained sequences provided from this bacterium in order to avoid false positives in the frame of the detection and the quantification of GMO. For this, new set of primers and corresponding TaqMan Minor Groove Binder (MGB) probes were designed to target Agrobacterium sp. using the tumor-morphology-shooty gene (TMS1). Final standard curves were calculated for each pathogen by plotting the threshold cycle value against the bacterial number (log (colony forming units) per milliliter) via linear regression. The method designed was highly specific and sensitive, with a detection limit of 10CFU/ml. No significant cross-reaction was observed. Results from this study showed that TaqMan real-time PCR, is potentially an effective method for the rapid and reliable quantification of Agrobacterium sp. in samples containing GMO or non GMO samples. PMID:26593465

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. ATCC 21022, a Host for Bacteriophage Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. ATCC 21022, a strain maintained by ATCC and a commonly used host for bacteriophage isolation and genomic analysis. The strain is prophage-free and CRISPR-free but codes for two predicted restriction-modification systems. PMID:27013048

  10. Genetic transformation of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. gladioli with Agrobacterium to study pathogenesis in Gladiolus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium rot caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. gladioli (Fog) is one of the most serious diseases of Gladiolus, both in the field and in stored bulbs. In order to study the pathogenesis of this fungus, we have transformed Fog with Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary vectors containing the hygromycin B...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium sp. Strain R89-1, a Morphine Alkaloid-Biotransforming Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kyslíková, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium sp. strain R89-1 isolated from composted wastes of Papaver somniferum can effectively biotransform codeine/morphine into 14-OH-derivatives. Here, we present a 4.7-Mb assembly of the R89-1 strain genome. The draft shows that the strain R89-1 represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage within the genus Agrobacterium. PMID:27056219

  12. Agrobacterium arsenijevicii sp. nov., isolated from crown gall tumors on raspberry and cherry plum.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanović, Nemanja; Puławska, Joanna; Prokić, Anđelka; Ivanović, Milan; Zlatković, Nevena; Jones, Jeffrey B; Obradović, Aleksa

    2015-09-01

    Two plant-tumorigenic strains KFB 330(T) and KFB 335 isolated from galls on raspberry (Rubus idaeus) in Serbia, and a non-pathogenic strain AL51.1 recovered from a cherry plum (Prunus cerasifera) tumor in Poland, were genotypically and phenotypically characterized. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on 16S rDNA placed them within the genus Agrobacterium, with A. nepotum as their closest relative. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) based on the partial sequences of atpD, glnA, gyrB, recA and rpoB housekeeping genes suggested that these three strains represent a new Agrobacterium species, that clustered with type strains of A. nepotum, A. radiobacter, "A. fabrum" and A. pusense. This was further supported by average nucleotide identity values (<92%) between the whole genome sequences of strain KFB 330(T) and related Agrobacterium species. The major cellular fatty acids of the novel strains were 18:1 w7c (72.8-77.87%) and 16:0 (6.82-8.58%). Phenotypic features allowed their differentiation from closely related species. Polyphasic characterization showed that the three strains represent a novel species of the genus Agrobacterium, for which the name Agrobacterium arsenijevicii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of A. arsenijevicii is KFB 330(T) (= CFBP 8308(T) = LMG 28674(T)). PMID:26117193

  13. Relationship between Glycopeptide Production and Resistance in the Actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727

    PubMed Central

    Binda, Elisa; Carrano, Lucia; Bibb, Mervyn; Marinelli, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides and β-lactams inhibit bacterial peptidoglycan synthesis in Gram-positive bacteria; resistance to these antibiotics is studied intensively in enterococci and staphylococci because of their relevance to infectious disease. Much less is known about antibiotic resistance in glycopeptide-producing actinomycetes that are likely to represent the evolutionary source of resistance determinants found in bacterial pathogens. Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727, the producer of A40926 (the precursor for the semisynthetic dalbavancin), does not harbor the canonical vanHAX genes. Consequently, we investigated the role of the β-lactam-sensitive d,d-peptidase/d,d-carboxypeptidase encoded by vanYn, the only van-like gene found in the A40926 biosynthetic gene cluster, in conferring immunity to the antibiotic in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727. Taking advantage of the tools developed recently to genetically manipulate this uncommon actinomycete, we varied vanYn gene dosage and expressed vanHatAatXat from the teicoplanin producer Actinoplanes teichomyceticus in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727. Knocking out vanYn, complementing a vanYn mutant, or duplicating vanYn had no effect on growth but influenced antibiotic resistance and, in the cases of complementation and duplication, antibiotic production. Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727 was found to be resistant to penicillins, but its glycopeptide resistance was diminished in the presence of penicillin G, which inhibits VanYn activity. The heterologous expression of vanHatAatXat increased A40926 resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727 but did not increase antibiotic production, indicating that the level of antibiotic production is not directly determined by the level of resistance. The vanYn-based self-resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727 resembles the glycopeptide resistance mechanism described recently in mutants of Enterococcus faecium selected in vitro for high-level resistance to glycopeptides and penicillins. PMID:24957828

  14. Agroinfiltration by cytokinin-producing Agrobacterium sp. strain GV3101 primes defense responses in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Arsheed Hussain; Raghuram, Badmi; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2014-11-01

    Transient infiltrations in tobacco are commonly used in plant studies, but the host response to different disarmed Agrobacterium strains is not fully understood. The present study shows that pretreatment with disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 primes the defense response to subsequent infection by Pseudomonas syringae in Nicotiana tabacum. The presence of a trans-zeatin synthase (tzs) gene in strain GV3101 may be partly responsible for the priming response, as the tzs-deficient Agrobacterium sp. strain LBA4404 only weakly imparts such responses. Besides inducing the expression of defense-related genes like PR-1 and NHL10, GV3101 pretreatment increased the expression of tobacco mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway genes like MEK2, WIPK (wound-induced protein kinase), and SIPK (salicylic acid-induced protein kinase). Furthermore, the GV3101 strain showed a stronger effect than the LBA4404 strain in activating phosphorylation of the tobacco MAPK, WIPK and SIPK, which presumably prime the plant immune machinery. Lower doses of exogenously applied cytokinins increased the activation of MAPK, while higher doses decreased the activation, suggesting a balanced level of cytokinins is required to generate defense response in planta. The current study serves as a cautionary warning for plant researchers over the choice of Agrobacterium strains and their possible consequences on subsequent pathogen-related studies. PMID:25054409

  15. Genome sequence of the methanotrophic Alphaproteobacterium, Methylocystis sp. Rockwell (ATCC 49242)

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Lisa Y.; Bringel, Francoise O.; DiSpiritto, Alan A.; Han, Sukkyun; Jetten, MSM; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Kits, K. Dimitri; Klotz, Martin G; Op den Camp, HJM; Semrau, Jeremy D.; Vuilleumier, Stephane; Bruce, David; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Copeland, A; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Lajus, Aurelie; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Medigue, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    Methylocystis sp. strain Rockwell (ATCC 49242) is an aerobic methane-oxidizing Alphaproteobacterium isolated from an aquifer in southern California. Unlike most methanotrophs in the Methylocystaceae family, this strain has a single pmo operon encoding particulate methane monooxygenase and no evidence of the genes encoding soluble methane monooxygenase. This is the first reported genome sequence of a member of the Methylocystis species of the Methylocystaceae family in the order Rhizobiales.

  16. Production of fructosyltransferase by Aureobasidium sp. ATCC 20524 in batch and two-step batch cultures.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Martín A; Perotti, Nora I

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of fructosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.9) production by Aureobasidium sp. ATCC 20524 in batch and two step batch cultures was investigated in a 1-l stirred tank reactor using a sucrose supply of 200 g/l. Results showed that the innovative cultivation in two step of Aureobasidium sp. produced more fructosyltransferase (FFase) than the single batch culture at the same sucrose concentration with a maximal enzyme production of 523 U/ml, which was 80.5% higher than the one obtained in the batch culture. The production of fructooligosaccharides (FOSs) was also analyzed; their concentration reached a maximum value of 160 g/l the first day in the two-step culture and 127 g/l in the single-batch mode. The use of the two-step batch culture with Aureobasidium sp. ATCC 20524 in allowing the microorganism to grow up prior to the induction of sucrose (second step), proved to be a powerful method for producing fructosyltransferase and FOSs. PMID:18810518

  17. Classification of Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727, an actinomycete that produces the glycopeptide antibiotic A40926, as Nonomuraea gerenzanensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Dalmastri, Claudia; Gastaldo, Luciano; Marcone, Giorgia Letizia; Binda, Elisa; Congiu, Terenzio; Marinelli, Flavia

    2016-02-01

    Strain ATCC 39727, which produces the antibiotic A40926 (the natural precursor of the antibiotic dalbavancin), was isolated from a soil sample collected in India, and it was originally classified as a member of the genus Actinomadura on the base of morphology and cell-wall composition. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicates that the strain forms a distinct clade within the genus Nonomuraea, and it is most closely related to Nonomuraea angiospora DSM 43173T (98.72 % similarity) and Nonomuraea jabiensis A4036T (98.69 %). The strain forms an extensively branched substrate mycelium and aerial hyphae that form spiral chains of spores with ridged surfaces. The cell wall contains meso-diaminopimelic acid and the whole-cell sugars are glucose, ribose, galactose, mannose and madurose (madurose as the diagnostic sugar). The N-acyl type of muramic acid is acetyl. The predominant menaquinone is MK-9(H4), with minor amounts of MK-9(H2), MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H0). The polar-lipid profile includes diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, hydroxyphosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, hydroxyphosphatidylmethylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and a series of uncharacterized phospholipids, glycolipids and phosphoglycolipids. The major cellular fatty acids are iso-C16 : 0 and 10-methyl C17 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content is 71.2 mol%. Significant differences in the morphological, chemotaxonomic and biochemical data, together with DNA-DNA relatedness between strain ATCC 39727 and closely related type strains, clearly demonstrated that strain ATCC 39727 represents a novel species of the genus Nonomuraea, for which the name Nonomuraea gerenzanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ATCC 39727T ( = DSM 100948T). PMID:26944798

  18. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of branching enzymes from Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mari; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Colleoni, Christophe; Ball, Steven G; Fujita, Naoko; Suzuki, Eiji

    2015-08-01

    Several cyanobacterial species, including Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, remarkably have four isoforms of α-glucan branching enzymes (BEs). Based on their primary structures, they are classified into glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 13 (BE1, BE2 and BE3) or family 57 (GH57 BE). In the present study, GH13-type BEs from Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 (BE1, BE2 and BE3) have been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically characterized. The recombinant BE1 was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of BE1 were obtained at 293 K in the presence of 0.2 M Mg(2+), 7-10%(w/v) ethanol, 0.1 M HEPES-NaOH pH 7.2-7.9. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 133.75, c = 185.90 Å, and diffracted to beyond 1.85 Å resolution. Matthews coefficient calculations suggested that the crystals of BE1 contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:26249708

  19. Ferulic acid transformation into the main vanilla aroma compounds by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Noelia; Oliveira, Ricardo Pinheiro de Souza; Agrasar, Ana María Torrado; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2016-02-01

    The wild strain Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 was explored in ferulic acid-based media to produce naturally the aroma components of the cured vanilla pod, namely vanillin,vanillic acid, and vanillyl alcohol. Other phenolic compounds(4-vinyl guaiacol, guaiacol, and protocatechuic acid) were also evaluated. The influence of medium composition,fermentation technology (batch or fed-batch), supplementation with vanillic acid, and inoculum concentration on ferulic acid biotransformation were evaluated. The results postulate the initial concentration of cell mass as the variable with the strongest impact on ferulic acid metabolization under the studied conditions. The highest amounts of vanillin and vanillic acid were achieved at intermediate values of cell mass.Vanillyl alcohol and protocatechuic acid were more closely linked to high cell mass concentrations. Conversely, 4-vinyl guaiacol reached its highest amount at the lowest amount of cell mass. Guaiacol was not detected in any case. Therefore,the initial cell concentration must be considered a critical parameter when using Amycolaptosis sp. ATCC 39116 for the production of vanillin and related compounds. PMID:26476645

  20. Composition of the carbohydrate granules of the cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Sherman, D. M.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is an aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that temporally separates O2-sensitive N2 fixation from oxygenic photosynthesis. The energy and reducing power needed for N2 fixation appears to be generated by an active respiratory apparatus that utilizes the contents of large interthylakoidal carbohydrate granules. We report here on the carbohydrate and protein composition of the granules of Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142. The carbohydrate component is a glucose homopolymer with branches every nine residues and is chemically identical to glycogen. Granule-associated protein fractions showed temporal changes in the number of proteins and their abundance during the metabolic oscillations observed under diazotrophic conditions. There also were temporal changes in the protein pattern of the granule-depleted supernatant fractions from diazotrophic cultures. None of the granule-associated proteins crossreacted with antisera directed against several glycogen-metabolizing enzymes or nitrogenase, although these proteins were tentatively identified in supernatant fractions. It is suggested that the granule-associated proteins are structural proteins required to maintain a complex granule architecture.

  1. Effect of continuous light on diurnal rhythms in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    PubMed Central

    Elvitigala, Thanura; Stöckel, Jana; Ghosh, Bijoy K; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2009-01-01

    Background Life on earth is strongly affected by alternating day and night cycles. Accordingly, many organisms have evolved an internal timekeeping system with a period of approximately 24 hours. Cyanobacteria are the only known prokaryotes with robust rhythms under control of a central clock. Numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate components of the circadian clock and to identify circadian-controlled genes. However, the complex interactions between endogenous circadian rhythms and external cues are currently not well understood, and a direct and mathematical based comparison between light-mediated and circadian-controlled gene expression is still outstanding. Therefore, we combined and analyzed data from two independent microarray experiments, previously performed under alternating light-dark and continuous light conditions in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, and sought to classify light responsive and circadian controlled genes. Results Fourier Score-based methods together with random permutations and False Discovery Rates were used to identify genes with oscillatory expression patterns, and an angular distance based criterion was applied to recognize transient behaviors in gene expression under constant light conditions. Compared to previously reported mathematical approaches, the combination of these methods also facilitated the detection of modified amplitudes and phase-shifts of gene expression. Our analysis showed that the majority of diurnally regulated genes, essentially those genes that are maximally expressed during the middle of the light and dark period, are in fact light responsive. In contrast, most of the circadian controlled genes are up-regulated during the beginning of the dark or subjective dark, and are greatly enriched for genes associated with energy metabolism. Many of the circadian controlled and light responsive genes are found in gene clusters within the Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 genome. Interestingly, in addition to cyclic

  2. Effective Immobilization of Agrobacterium sp. IFO 13140 Cells in Loofa Sponge for Curdlan Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Camila Ortiz; Ruiz, Suelen Pereira; Nogueira, Marcela Tiemi; Bona, Evandro; Portilho, Márcia; Matioli, Graciette

    2015-01-01

    Curdlan production by Agrobacterium sp. IFO13140 immobilized on loofa sponge, alginate and loofa sponge with alginate was investigated. There was no statistically-significant difference in curdlan production when the microorganism was immobilized in different matrices. The loofa sponge was chosen because of its practical application and economy and because it provides a high stability through its continued use. The best conditions for immobilization on loofa sponge were 50 mg of cell, 200 rpm and 72 h of incubation, which provided a curdlan production 1.50-times higher than that obtained by free cells. The higher volumetric productivity was achieved by immobilized cells (0.09 g/L/h) at 150 rpm. The operating stability was evaluated, and until the fourth cycle, immobilized cells retained 87.40% of the production of the first cycle. The immobilized cells remained active after 300 days of storage at 4 °C. The results of this study demonstrate success in immobilizing cells for curdlan biosynthesis, making the process potentially suitable for industrial scale-up. Additional studies may show a possible contribution to the reduction of operating costs. PMID:25946555

  3. Isolation of a mutant strain of Pseudomonas sp ATCC 31461 exhibiting elevated polysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    West, T P

    2002-10-01

    A mutant strain of the bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31461 that exhibited elevated production of the polysaccharide gellan on glucose or corn syrup as a carbon source was isolated. Gellan production by the mutant strain was about twofold higher than its parent strain on glucose or corn syrup after 48 h of growth, and about 1.4-fold higher after 72 h. An increase in biomass production was not correlated with enhanced gellan synthesis by the mutant strain. The increased gellan production by the mutant strain on either carbon source resulted in an increase in its culture medium viscosity and the viscosity of the isolated polysaccharide produced by glucose-grown cells. No differences in the glucuronic acid content of the polysaccharides produced by the mutant and parent strains were observed. PMID:12355317

  4. Construction of expression vectors for metabolic engineering of the vanillin-producing actinomycete Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116.

    PubMed

    Fleige, Christian; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 is able to synthesize the important flavoring agent vanillin from cheap natural substrates. The bacterium is therefore of great interest for the industry and used for the fermentative production of vanillin. In order to improve the production of natural vanillin with Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116, the strain has been genetically engineered to optimize the metabolic flux towards the desired product. Extensive metabolic engineering was hitherto hampered, due to the lack of genetic tools like functional promoters and expression vectors. In this study, we report the establishment of a plasmid-based gene expression system for Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 that allows a further manipulation of the genotype. Four new Escherichia coli-Amycolatopsis shuttle vectors harboring different promoter elements were constructed, and the functionality of these regulatory elements was proven by the expression of the reporter gene gusA, encoding a β-glucuronidase. Glucuronidase activity was detected in all plasmid-harboring strains, and remarkable differences in the expression strength of the reporter gene depending on the used promoter were observed. The new expression vectors will promote the further genetic engineering of Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 to get insight into the metabolic network and to improve the strain for a more efficient industrial use. PMID:24743982

  5. Investigation of the Amycolatopsis sp. Strain ATCC 39116 Vanillin Dehydrogenase and Its Impact on the Biotechnical Production of Vanillin

    PubMed Central

    Fleige, Christian; Hansen, Gunda; Kroll, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The actinomycete Amycolatopsis sp. strain ATCC 39116 is capable of synthesizing large amounts of vanillin from ferulic acid, which is a natural cell wall component of higher plants. The desired intermediate vanillin is subject to undesired catabolism caused by the metabolic activity of a hitherto unknown vanillin dehydrogenase (VDHATCC 39116). In order to prevent the oxidation of vanillin to vanillic acid and thereby to obtain higher yields and concentrations of vanillin, the responsible vanillin dehydrogenase in Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 was investigated for the first time by using data from our genome sequence analysis and further bioinformatic approaches. The vdh gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded vanillin dehydrogenase was characterized in detail. VDHATCC 39116 was purified to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity and exhibited NAD+-dependent activity toward vanillin, coniferylaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, and benzaldehyde. The enzyme showed its highest level of activity toward vanillin at pH 8.0 and at a temperature of 44°C. In a next step, a precise vdh deletion mutant of Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 was generated. The mutant lost its ability to grow on vanillin and did not show vanillin dehydrogenase activity. A 2.3-times-higher vanillin concentration and a substantially reduced amount of vanillic acid occurred with the Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 Δvdh::Kmr mutant when ferulic acid was provided for biotransformation in a cultivation experiment on a 2-liter-bioreactor scale. Based on these results and taking further metabolic engineering into account, the Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 Δvdh::Kmr mutant represents an optimized and industrially applicable platform for the biotechnological production of natural vanillin. PMID:23064333

  6. Compositional and toxicological evaluation of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Arieli, B.; McKeehen, J. D.; Stephens, S. D.; Nielsen, S. S.; Saha, P. R.; Trumbo, P. R.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Compositional analyses of Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 showed high protein (50-60%) and low fat (0.4-1%) content, and the ability to synthesize vitamin B12. The amino acid profile indicated that Cyanothece sp. was a balanced protein source. Fatty acids of the 18:3n-3 type were also present. Mineral analyses indicated that the cellular biomass may be a good source of Fe, Zn and Na. Caloric content was 4.5 to 5.1 kcal g dry weight-1 and the carbon content was approximately 40% on a dry weight basis. Nitrogen content was 8 to 9% on a dry weight basis and total nucleic acids were 1.3% on a dry weight basis. Short-term feeding studies in rats followed by histopathology found no toxicity or dietary incompatibility problems. The level of uric acid and allantoin in urine and tissues was low, suggesting no excess of nucleic acids, as sometimes reported in the past for a cyanobacteria-containing diet. The current work discusses the potential implications of these results for human nutrition applications.

  7. Reconstruction and Comparison of the Metabolic Potential of Cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rajib; Verseput, Alex T.; Berla, Bertram M.; Mueller, Thomas J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an important group of photoautotrophic organisms that can synthesize valuable bio-products by harnessing solar energy. They are endowed with high photosynthetic efficiencies and diverse metabolic capabilities that confer the ability to convert solar energy into a variety of biofuels and their precursors. However, less well studied are the similarities and differences in metabolism of different species of cyanobacteria as they pertain to their suitability as microbial production chassis. Here we assemble, update and compare genome-scale models (iCyt773 and iSyn731) for two phylogenetically related cyanobacterial species, namely Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. All reactions are elementally and charge balanced and localized into four different intracellular compartments (i.e., periplasm, cytosol, carboxysome and thylakoid lumen) and biomass descriptions are derived based on experimental measurements. Newly added reactions absent in earlier models (266 and 322, respectively) span most metabolic pathways with an emphasis on lipid biosynthesis. All thermodynamically infeasible loops are identified and eliminated from both models. Comparisons of model predictions against gene essentiality data reveal a specificity of 0.94 (94/100) and a sensitivity of 1 (19/19) for the Synechocystis iSyn731 model. The diurnal rhythm of Cyanothece 51142 metabolism is modeled by constructing separate (light/dark) biomass equations and introducing regulatory restrictions over light and dark phases. Specific metabolic pathway differences between the two cyanobacteria alluding to different bio-production potentials are reflected in both models. PMID:23133581

  8. Two Master Switch Regulators Trigger A40926 Biosynthesis in Nonomuraea sp. Strain ATCC 39727

    PubMed Central

    Lo Grasso, Letizia; Maffioli, Sonia; Sosio, Margherita; Bibb, Mervyn; Puglia, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 produces the glycopeptide A40926, the precursor of dalbavancin. Biosynthesis of A40926 is encoded by the dbv gene cluster, which contains 37 protein-coding sequences that participate in antibiotic biosynthesis, regulation, immunity, and export. In addition to the positive regulatory protein Dbv4, the A40926-biosynthetic gene cluster encodes two additional putative regulators, Dbv3 and Dbv6. Independent mutations in these genes, combined with bioassays and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses, demonstrated that Dbv3 and Dbv4 are both required for antibiotic production, while inactivation of dbv6 had no effect. In addition, overexpression of dbv3 led to higher levels of A40926 production. Transcriptional and quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses showed that Dbv4 is essential for the transcription of two operons, dbv14-dbv8 and dbv30-dbv35, while Dbv3 positively controls the expression of four monocistronic transcription units (dbv4, dbv29, dbv36, and dbv37) and of six operons (dbv2-dbv1, dbv14-dbv8, dbv17-dbv15, dbv21-dbv20, dbv24-dbv28, and dbv30-dbv35). We propose a complex and coordinated model of regulation in which Dbv3 directly or indirectly activates transcription of dbv4 and controls biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyphenylglycine and the heptapeptide backbone, A40926 export, and some tailoring reactions (mannosylation and hexose oxidation), while Dbv4 directly regulates biosynthesis of 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine and other tailoring reactions, including the four cross-links, halogenation, glycosylation, and acylation. IMPORTANCE This report expands knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms used to control the biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotic A40926 in the actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727. A40926 is the precursor of dalbavancin, approved for treatment of skin infections by Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, understanding the regulation of its biosynthesis

  9. A novel meta-cleavage product hydrolase from Flavobacterium sp. ATCC27551

    SciTech Connect

    Khajamohiddin, Syed; Babu, Pakala Suresh; Chakka, Deviprasanna; Merrick, Mike; Bhaduri, Anirban; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Siddavattam, Dayananda . E-mail: sdsl@uohyd.ernet.in

    2006-12-22

    The organophosphate degrading (opd) gene cluster of plasmid pPDL2 of Flavobacterium sp. ATCC27551 contains a novel open-reading frame, orf243. This was predicted to encode an {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase distantly related to the meta-fission product (MFP) hydrolases such as XylF, PhnD, and CumD. By homology modeling Orf243 has most of the structural features of MFP hydrolases including the characteristic active site catalytic triad. The purified protein (designated MfhA) is a homotetramer and shows similar affinity for 2-hydroxy-6-oxohepta-2,4-dienoate (HOHD), 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde (HMSA), and 2-hydroxy-5-methylmuconic semialdehyde (HMMSA), the meta-fission products of 3-methyl catechol, catechol, and 4-methyl catechol. The unique catalytic properties of MfhA and the presence near its structural gene of cis-elements required for transposition suggest that mfhA has evolved towards encoding a common hydrolase that can act on meta-fission products containing either aldehyde or ketone groups.

  10. Improved welan gum production by Alcaligenes sp. ATCC31555 from pretreated cane molasses.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hongxia; Liu, Min; Yu, Pingru; Zhang, Shaozhi; Suo, Yukai; Luo, Ping; Li, Shuang; Wang, Jufang

    2015-09-20

    Welan gum production by Alcaligenes sp. ATCC31555 from cane molasses was studied in batch fermentation to reduce production costs and enhance gum production. The pretreatment of cane molasses, agitation speed and the addition of supplements were investigated to optimize the process. Sulfuric acid hydrolysis was found to be the optimal pretreatment, resulting in a maximum gum concentration of 33.5 g/L, which is 50.0% higher than those obtained from the molasses' mother liquor. Agitation at 600 rpm at 30°C and addition of 10% n-dodecane following fermentation for 36 h increased the maximum gum production up to 41.0 ± 1.41 g/L, which is 49.1% higher than the greatest welan gum concentration in the literature so far. The welan gum product showed an acceptable molecular weight, similar rheological properties and better thermal stability to that obtained from glucose. These results indicate that cane molasses may be a suitable and inexpensive substrate for cost-effective industrial-scale welan gum production. PMID:26050885

  11. Evaluation of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 as a candidate for inclusion in a CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Arieli, B.; Nielsen, S. S.; Trumbo, P. R.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) have been proposed to make long-duration manned space flights more cost-effective. Higher plants will presumably provide food and a breathable atmosphere for the crew. It has been suggested that imbalances between the CO2/O2 gas exchange ratios of the heterotrophic and autotrophic components of the system will inevitably lead to an unstable system, and the loss of O2 from the atmosphere. Ratio imbalances may be corrected by including a second autotroph with an appropriate CO2/O2 gas exchange ratio. Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a large unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium, exhibiting high growth rates under diverse physiological conditions. A rat-feeding study showed the biomass to be edible. Furthermore, it may have a CO2/O2 gas exchange ratio that theoretically can compensate for ratio imbalances. It is suggested that Cyanothece spp. could fulfill several roles in a CELSS: supplementing atmosphere recycling, generating fixed N from the air, providing a balanced protein supplement, and protecting a CELSS in case of catastrophic crop failure.

  12. Evaluation of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 as a candidate for inclusion in a CELSS.

    PubMed

    Schneegurt, M A; Arieli, B; Nielsen, S S; Trumbo, P R; Sherman, L A

    1996-01-01

    Controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) have been proposed to make long-duration manned space flights more cost-effective. Higher plants will presumably provide food and a breathable atmosphere for the crew. It has been suggested that imbalances between the CO2/O2 gas exchange ratios of the heterotrophic and autotrophic components of the system will inevitably lead to an unstable system, and the loss of O2 from the atmosphere. Ratio imbalances may be corrected by including a second autotroph with an appropriate CO2/O2 gas exchange ratio. Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a large unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium, exhibiting high growth rates under diverse physiological conditions. A rat-feeding study showed the biomass to be edible. Furthermore, it may have a CO2/O2 gas exchange ratio that theoretically can compensate for ratio imbalances. It is suggested that Cyanothece spp. could fulfill several roles in a CELSS: supplementing atmosphere recycling, generating fixed N from the air, providing a balanced protein supplement, and protecting a CELSS in case of catastrophic crop failure. PMID:11538794

  13. A model of cyclic transcriptomic behavior in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Jason E; Oehmen, Christopher S; McCue, Lee Ann; Hill, Eric; Choi, Daniel M; Stöckel, Jana; Liberton, Michelle; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Sherman, Louis A

    2011-08-01

    Systems biology attempts to reconcile large amounts of disparate data with existing knowledge to provide models of functioning biological systems. The cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is an excellent candidate for such systems biology studies because: (i) it displays tight functional regulation between photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation; (ii) it has robust cyclic patterns at the genetic, protein and metabolomic levels; and (iii) it has potential applications for bioenergy production and carbon sequestration. We have represented the transcriptomic data from Cyanothece 51142 under diurnal light/dark cycles as a high-level functional abstraction and describe development of a predictive in silico model of diurnal and circadian behavior in terms of regulatory and metabolic processes in this organism. We show that incorporating network topology into the model improves performance in terms of our ability to explain the behavior of the system under new conditions. The model presented robustly describes transcriptomic behavior of Cyanothece 51142 under different cyclic and non-cyclic growth conditions, and represents a significant advance in the understanding of gene regulation in this important organism. PMID:21698331

  14. Genome mining of astaxanthin biosynthetic genes from Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 55669 for heterologous overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian; Zhou, Yuanjie; Li, Xiaowei; Zhu, Fayin; Cheng, Yongbo; Liu, Yi; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    As a highly valued keto-carotenoid, astaxanthin is widely used in nutritional supplements and pharmaceuticals. Therefore, the demand for biosynthetic astaxanthin and improved efficiency of astaxanthin biosynthesis has driven the investigation of metabolic engineering of native astaxanthin producers and heterologous hosts. However, microbial resources for astaxanthin are limited. In this study, we found that the α-Proteobacterium Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 55669 could produce astaxanthin naturally. We used whole-genome sequencing to identify the astaxanthin biosynthetic pathway using a combined PacBio-Illumina approach. The putative astaxanthin biosynthetic pathway in Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 55669 was predicted. For further confirmation, a high-efficiency targeted engineering carotenoid synthesis platform was constructed in E. coli for identifying the functional roles of candidate genes. All genes involved in astaxanthin biosynthesis showed discrete distributions on the chromosome. Moreover, the overexpression of exogenous E. coli idi in Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 55669 increased astaxanthin production by 5.4-fold. This study described a new astaxanthin producer and provided more biosynthesis components for bioengineering of astaxanthin in the future. PMID:26580858

  15. Formation of Se (0) Nanoparticles by Duganella sp. andAgrobacterium sp. isolated from Se-laden soil of North-East Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element, but is toxic at high concentrations. Depending upon the geological background, the land use or on anthropogenic pollution, different amounts of Se may be present in soil. Its toxicity is related to the oxyanions selenate and selenite as they are water soluble and bioavailable. Microorganisms play an important role in Se transformations in soil and its cycling in the environment by transforming water-soluble oxyanions into water insoluble, non-toxic elemental Se (0). For this study, soil samples were collected from selenium-contaminated agricultural soils of Punjab/India to enrich and isolate microbes that interacted with the Se cycle. Results A mixed microbial culture enriched from the arable soil of Punjab could reduce 230 mg/l of water soluble selenite to spherical Se (0) nanoparticles during aerobic growth as confirmed by SEM-EDX. Four pure cultures (C 1, C 4, C 6, C 7) of Gram negative, oxidase and catalase positive, aerobic bacteria were isolated from this mixed microbial consortium and identified by 16 S rDNA gene sequence alignment as two strains of Duganella sp. (C 1, C 4) and two strains of Agrobacterium sp.(C 6, C 7). SEM/TEM-EDX analyses of the culture broth of the four strains revealed excretion of uniformly round sharply contoured Se (0) nanoparticles by all cultures. Their size ranged from 140–200 nm in cultures of strains C 1 and C 4, and from 185–190 nm in cultures of strains C 6 and C 7. Both Duganella sp. revealed better selenite reduction efficiencies than the two Agrobacterium sp. Conclusions This is the first study reporting the capability of newly isolated, aerobically growing Duganella sp. and Agrobacterium sp. from soils of Punjab/India to form spherical, regularly formed Se (0) nanoparticles from water soluble selenite. Among others, the four strains may significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycling of Se in soil. Bioconversion of toxic selenite to non-toxic Se (0

  16. A Model of Cyclic Transcriptomic Behavior in Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; McCue, Lee Ann; Hill, Eric A.; Choi, Daniel M.; Stockel, Jana; Liberton, Michelle L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Sherman, Louis A.

    2011-07-01

    Systems biology attempts to reconcile large amounts of disparate data with existing knowledge to provide models of functioning biological systems. Useful and predictive models aim to summarize complex and dynamic processes and represent the relationships between these processes. The cyanobacterial Cyanothece species Strain sp. ATCC 51142 is an excellent candidate for such systems studies because: (i) it displays tight functional regulation as it must separate the opposing processes of oxygen-generating photosynthesis and oxygen-sensitive nitrogen fixation temporally in the same cell, ; (ii) it has robust cyclic patterns at the genetic, protein and metabolomic levels, ; and (iii) and it has potential applications for bioenergy and carbon sequestration, and thus a predictive model of its function is of practical use. We have represented the transcriptomic data from Cyanothece 51142 under diurnal light/dark cycles as a high-level functional abstraction and describe development of a predictive in silico model of diurnal and circadian behavior in terms of regulatory and metabolic processes in Cyanothece 51142. Our model provides a way to integrate disparate data types into a framework that can be used to explain behavior, generate high-quality predictions for validation, and to suggest future experiments. We show that incorporating network topology into the model improves performance in terms of our ability to explain the behavior of the system under new conditions. The model presented robustly describes transcriptomic behavior of Cyanothece 51142 under different cyclic and non-cyclic growth conditions robustly, and represents a significant advance in the understanding of gene regulation in this important organism.

  17. Metabolic flux analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under mixotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alagesan, Swathi; Gaudana, Sandeep B; Sinha, Avinash; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2013-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes capable of utilizing solar energy to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide to biomass. Despite several "proof of principle" studies, low product yield is an impediment in commercialization of cyanobacteria-derived biofuels. Estimation of intracellular reaction rates by (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) would be a step toward enhancing biofuel yield via metabolic engineering. We report (13)C-MFA for Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, known for enhanced hydrogen yield under mixotrophic conditions. Rates of reactions in the central carbon metabolism under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions were estimated by monitoring the competitive incorporation of (12)C and (13)C from unlabeled CO2 and uniformly labeled glycerol, respectively, into terminal metabolites such as amino acids. The observed labeling patterns suggest mixotrophic growth under both the conditions, with a larger fraction of unlabeled carbon in nitrate-sufficient cultures asserting a greater contribution of carbon fixation by photosynthesis and an anaplerotic pathway. Indeed, flux analysis complements the higher growth observed under nitrate-sufficient conditions. On the other hand, the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle was greater in nitrate-deficient conditions, possibly to supply the precursors and reducing equivalents needed for nitrogen fixation. In addition, an enhanced flux through fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase possibly suggests the organism's preferred mode under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The (13)C-MFA results complement the reported predictions by flux balance analysis and provide quantitative insight into the organism's distinct metabolic features under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions. PMID:23954952

  18. Purification, gene cloning, and characterization of γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from Agrobacterium sp. 525a.

    PubMed

    Fujimitsu, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Takubo, Sayaka; Fukui, Akiko; Okada, Kazuma; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Arima, Jiro; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    The report is the first of purification, overproduction, and characterization of a unique γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from soil-isolated Agrobacterium sp. 525a. The primary structure of the enzyme shares 70-95% identity with those of ATP-dependent microbial acyl-CoA synthetases of the Rhizobiaceae family. As distinctive characteristics of the enzyme of this study, ADP was released in the catalytic reaction process, whereas many acyl CoA synthetases are annotated as an AMP-forming enzyme. The apparent Km values for γ-butyrobetaine, CoA, and ATP were, respectively, 0.69, 0.02, and 0.24 mM. PMID:27125317

  19. Initial Reaction(s) in Biotransformation of CL-20 Is Catalyzed by Salicylate 1-Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain ATCC 29352

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Bharat; Halasz, Annamaria; Spain, Jim C.; Hawari, Jalal

    2004-01-01

    CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) (C6H6N12O12), a future-generation high-energy explosive, is biodegradable by Pseudomonas sp. strain FA1 and Agrobacterium sp. strain JS71; however, the nature of the enzyme(s) involved in the process was not understood. In the present study, salicylate 1-monooxygenase, a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-containing purified enzyme from Pseudomonas sp. strain ATCC 29352, biotransformed CL-20 at rates of 0.256 ± 0.011 and 0.043 ± 0.003 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The disappearance of CL-20 was accompanied by the release of nitrite ions. Using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in the negative electrospray ionization mode, we detected a metabolite with a deprotonated mass ion [M − H]− at 345 Da, corresponding to an empirical formula of C6H6N10O8, produced as a result of two sequential N denitration steps on the CL- 20 molecule. We also detected two isomeric metabolites with [M − H]− at 381 Da corresponding to an empirical formula of C6H10N10O10. The latter was a hydrated product of the metabolite C6H6N10O8 with addition of two H2O molecules, as confirmed by tests using 18O-labeled water. The product stoichiometry showed that each reacted CL-20 molecule produced about 1.7 nitrite ions, 3.2 molecules of nitrous oxide, 1.5 molecules of formic acid, and 0.6 ammonium ion. Diphenyliodonium-mediated inhibition of salicylate 1-monooxygenase and a comparative study between native, deflavo, and reconstituted enzyme(s) showed that FAD site of the enzyme was involved in the biotransformation of CL-20 catalyzed by salicylate 1-monooxygenase. The data suggested that salicylate 1-monooxygenase catalyzed two oxygen-sensitive single-electron transfer steps necessary to release two nitrite ions from CL-20 and that this was followed by the secondary decomposition of this energetic chemical. PMID:15240281

  20. The effects of different light-dark cycles on the metabolism of the diazotrophic, unicellular cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, and Cyanothecesp. PCC 7822.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Sarah; Mishra, Sujata; Sherman, Louis A

    2014-10-01

    The diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 demonstrates circadian patterns in nitrogenase activity, H2 production and glycogen storage when grown under nitrogen-fixing, 12:12 light:dark (L:D) conditions. In this study, we grew Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, and another strain in this genus, Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822, under long-day (16:8 L:D) and short-day (8:16 L:D) nitrogen-fixing conditions to determine if they continued to display circadian rhythms. Both strains demonstrated similar circadian patterns for all three metabolic parameters when grown under long-day conditions. However, the strains responded differently to short-day growth conditions. Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 retained reasonable circadian patterns under 8:16 L:D conditions, whereas Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 had quite damped patterns without a clear circadian pattern. In particular, glycogen storage changed very little throughout the day and we ascribe this to the difference in the type of glycogen granules in Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 which has small β-granules, compared to the large, starch-like granules in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The results suggested that both mechanistic and regulatory processes play a role in establishing the basis for these metabolic oscillations. PMID:26988646

  1. Oscillating behavior of carbohydrate granule formation and dinitrogen fixation in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142.

    PubMed Central

    Schneegurt, M A; Sherman, D M; Nayar, S; Sherman, L A

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that some aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacteria temporally separate photosynthetic O2 evolution and oxygen-sensitive N2 fixation. Cyanothece sp. ATCC strain 51142 is an aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that fixes N2 during discrete periods of its cell cycle. When the bacteria are maintained under diurnal light-dark cycles, N2 fixation occurs in the dark. Similar cycling is observed in continuous light, implicating a circadian rhythm. Under N2-fixing conditions, large inclusion granules form between the thylakoid membranes. Maximum granulation, as observed by electron microscopy, occurs before the onset of N2 fixation, and the granules decrease in number during the period of N2 fixation. The granules can be purified from cell homogenates by differential centrifugation. Biochemical analyses of the granules indicate that these structures are primarily carbohydrate, with some protein. Further analyses of the carbohydrate have shown that it is a glucose polymer with some characteristics of glycogen. It is proposed that N2 fixation is driven by energy and reducing power stored in these inclusion granules. Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 represents an excellent experimental organism for the study of the protective mechanisms of nitrogenase, metabolic events in cyanobacteria under normal and stress conditions, the partitioning of resources between growth and storage, and biological rhythms. Images PMID:8132452

  2. Oscillating behavior of carbohydrate granule formation and dinitrogen fixation in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Sherman, D. M.; Nayar, S.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that some aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacteria temporally separate photosynthetic O2 evolution and oxygen-sensitive N2 fixation. Cyanothece sp. ATCC strain 51142 is an aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that fixes N2 during discrete periods of its cell cycle. When the bacteria are maintained under diurnal light-dark cycles, N2 fixation occurs in the dark. Similar cycling is observed in continuous light, implicating a circadian rhythm. Under N2-fixing conditions, large inclusion granules form between the thylakoid membranes. Maximum granulation, as observed by electron microscopy, occurs before the onset of N2 fixation, and the granules decrease in number during the period of N2 fixation. The granules can be purified from cell homogenates by differential centrifugation. Biochemical analyses of the granules indicate that these structures are primarily carbohydrate, with some protein. Further analyses of the carbohydrate have shown that it is a glucose polymer with some characteristics of glycogen. It is proposed that N2 fixation is driven by energy and reducing power stored in these inclusion granules. Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 represents an excellent experimental organism for the study of the protective mechanisms of nitrogenase, metabolic events in cyanobacteria under normal and stress conditions, the partitioning of resources between growth and storage, and biological rhythms.

  3. Dynamic proteome analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under constant light

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, Uma K.; Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Jacobs, Jon M.

    2012-02-03

    Understanding the dynamic nature of protein abundances provides insights into protein turnover not readily apparent from conventional, static mass spectrometry measurements. This level of data is particularly informative when surveying protein abundances in biological systems subjected to large perturbations or alterations in environment such as cyanobacteria. Our current analysis expands upon conventional proteomic approaches in cyanobacteria by measuring dynamic changes of the proteome using a 13C15N-L-leucine metabolic labeling in Cyanothece ATCC51142. Metabolically labeled Cyanothece ATCC51142 cells grown under nitrogen sufficient conditions in continuous light were monitored longitudinally for isotope incorporation over a 48 h period, revealing 422 proteins with dynamic changes in abundances. In particular, proteins involved in carbon fixation, pentose phosphate pathway, cellular protection, redox regulation, protein folding, assembly and degradation showed higher levels of isotope incorporation suggesting that these biochemical pathways are important for growth under non-diazotrophic conditions. Calculation of relative isotope abundances (RIA) values allowed to measure actual active protein synthesis over time for different biochemical pathways under non-diazotrophic conditions. Overall results demonstrated the utility of 'non-steady state' pulsed metabolic labeling for systems-wide dynamic quantification of the proteome in Cyanothece ATCC51142 that can also be applied to other cyanobacteria.

  4. Multi-Omic Dynamics Associate Oxygenic Photosynthesis with Nitrogenase-Mediated H2 Production in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Charania, Moiz A.; McClure, Ryan S.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wright, Aaron T.; Romine, Margaret F.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    To date, the proposed mechanisms of nitrogenase-driven photosynthetic H2 production by the diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 have assumed that reductant and ATP requirements are derived solely from glycogen oxidation and cyclic-electron flow around photosystem I. Through genome-scale transcript and protein profiling, this study presents and tests a new hypothesis on the metabolic relationship between oxygenic photosynthesis and nitrogenase-mediated H2 production in Cyanothece 51142. Our results show that net-positive rates of oxygenic photosynthesis and increased expression of photosystem II reaction centers correspond and are synchronized with nitrogenase expression and H2 production. These findings provide a new and more complete view on the metabolic processes contributing to the energy budget of photosynthetic H2 production and highlight the role of concurrent photocatalytic H2O oxidation as a participating process. PMID:26525576

  5. Multi-omic dynamics associate oxygenic photosynthesis with nitrogenase-mediated H2 production in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Charania, Moiz A.; McClure, Ryan S.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wright, Aaron T.; Romine, Margaret F.; et al

    2015-11-03

    This study combines transcriptomic and proteomic profiling to provide new insights on the metabolic relationship between oxygenic photosynthesis and nitrogenase-mediated H2 production in the model cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. To date, the proposed mechanisms used to describe the energy metabolism processes that support H2 production in Cyanothece 51142 have assumed that ATP and reductant requirements are derived solely from glycogen oxidation and/or cyclic-electron flow around photosystem I. The results from this study present and test an alternative hypothesis by showing that net-positive rates of oxygenic photosynthesis and increased expression of photosystem II reaction centers correspond and are synchronized withmore » nitrogenase expression and H2 production. These findings provide a new and more complete view on the metabolic processes contributing to the energy budget of photosynthetic H2 production and highlight the likely role of photocatalytic H2O oxidation as a major participating process.« less

  6. Factors affecting the photoproduction of ammonia from dinitrogen and water by the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain ATCC 33047

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, J.L.; Guerrero, M.G.; Losada, M.

    1987-04-01

    Synthesis of ammonia from dinitrogen and water by suspensions of Anabaena sp. strain ATCC 33047 treated with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionine-D,L-sulfoximine is strictly dependent on light. Under otherwise optimal conditions, the yield of ammonia production is influenced by irradiance, as well as by the density, depth, and turbulence of the cell suspension. The interaction among these factors seems to determine the actual amount of light available to each single cell or filament in the suspension for the photoproduction process. Under convenient illumination, the limiting factor in the synthesis of ammonia seems to be the cellular nitrogenase activity level, but under limiting light conditions the limiting factor could, however, be the assimilatory power required for nitrogen fixation. Photosynthetic ammonia production from atmospheric nitrogen and water can operate with an efficiency of ca. 10% of its theoretical maximum, representing a remarkable process for the conversion of light energy into chemical energy.

  7. Control of nitrogenase recovery from oxygen inactivation by ammonia in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain CA (ATCC 33047).

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R L; Van Baalen, C; Tabita, F R

    1990-01-01

    The control of nitrogenase recovery from inactivation by oxygen was studied in Anabaena sp. strain CA (ATCC 33047). Nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction) in cultures grown in 1% CO2 in air was inhibited by exposure to 1% CO2-99% O2 and allowed to recover in the presence of high oxygen tensions. Cultures exposed to hyperbaric levels of oxygen in the presence of 10 mM NH4NO3 were incapable of regaining nitrogenase activity, whereas control cultures returned to 65 to 80% of their original activity within about 3 h after exposure to high oxygen tension. In contrast to the regulation of heterocyst differentiation and nitrogenase synthesis, recovery from oxygen inactivation in this organism was shown to be under the control of NH4+ rather than NO3-. PMID:2110151

  8. Genome Sequence of the Microsporidian Species Nematocida sp1 Strain ERTm6 (ATCC PRA-372)

    PubMed Central

    Bakowski, Malina A.; Priest, Margaret; Young, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia comprise a phylum of obligate intracellular pathogens related to fungi. Microsporidia Nematocida sp1 strain ERTm6 was isolated from wild-caught Caenorhabditis briggsae and causes a lethal intestinal infection in Caenorhabditis nematodes. We report the genome sequence of N. sp1 ERTm6, which will facilitate study of the Nematocida genus and other Microsporidia. PMID:25237020

  9. Genome Sequence of Amycolatopsis sp Strain ATCC 39116, a Plant Biomass-Degrading Actinomycete

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jennifer R.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Shunsheng; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Land, Miriam L; Sello, Jason K.

    2012-01-01

    We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals.

  10. Genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain ATCC 39116, a plant biomass-degrading actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer R; Goodwin, Lynne A; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Shunsheng; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Land, Miriam L; Sello, Jason K

    2012-05-01

    We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals. PMID:22493203

  11. Assessment of the CO2 fixation capacity of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 outdoor cultures in vertical flat-panel reactors.

    PubMed

    Clares, Marta E; Moreno, José; Guerrero, Miguel G; García-González, Mercedes

    2014-10-10

    The extent of biological CO2 fixation was evaluated for outdoor cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047. Culture conditions were optimized indoors in bubble-column photochemostats operating in continuous mode, subjected to irradiance cycles mimicking the light regime outdoors. Highest values achieved for CO2 fixation rate and biomass productivity were 1 and 0.6 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The comparison among different reactors operating simultaneously - open pond, horizontal tubular reactor and vertical flat-panel - allowed to assess their relative efficiency for the outdoor development of Anabaena cultures. Despite the higher volumetric CO2 fixation capacity (and biomass productivity) exhibited by the tubular photobioreactor, yield of the flat-panel reactor was 50% higher than that of the tubular option on a per area basis, reaching values over 35 g CO2 fixed m(-2) d(-1). The flat-panel reactor actually represents a most suitable system for CO2 capture coupled to the generation of valuable biomass by Anabaena cultures. PMID:25068618

  12. Coupling of Cellular Processes and Their Coordinated Oscillations under Continuous Light in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a Diazotrophic Unicellular Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Vinh, Nguyen X.; Viswanathan, Ganesh A.; Chetty, Madhu; Wangikar, Pramod P.

    2015-01-01

    Unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 (henceforth Cyanothece), temporally separate the oxygen sensitive nitrogen fixation from oxygen evolving photosynthesis not only under diurnal cycles (LD) but also in continuous light (LL). However, recent reports demonstrate that the oscillations in LL occur with a shorter cycle time of ~11 h. We find that indeed, majority of the genes oscillate in LL with this cycle time. Genes that are upregulated at a particular time of day under diurnal cycle also get upregulated at an equivalent metabolic phase under LL suggesting tight coupling of various cellular events with each other and with the cell’s metabolic status. A number of metabolic processes get upregulated in a coordinated fashion during the respiratory phase under LL including glycogen degradation, glycolysis, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle. These precede nitrogen fixation apparently to ensure sufficient energy and anoxic environment needed for the nitrogenase enzyme. Photosynthetic phase sees upregulation of photosystem II, carbonate transport, carbon concentrating mechanism, RuBisCO, glycogen synthesis and light harvesting antenna pigment biosynthesis. In Synechococcus elongates PCC 7942, a non-nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria, expression of a relatively smaller fraction of genes oscillates under LL condition with the major periodicity being 24 h. In contrast, the entire cellular machinery of Cyanothece orchestrates coordinated oscillation in anticipation of the ensuing metabolic phase in both LD and LL. These results may have important implications in understanding the timing of various cellular events and in engineering cyanobacteria for biofuel production. PMID:25973856

  13. Sustained photoproduction of ammonia from dinitrogen and water by the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain ATCC33047

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, J.L.; Guerrero, M.G.; Losada, M.

    1984-07-01

    Conditions have been developed that lengthen the time during which photosynthetic dinitrogen fixation by filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain ATCC 33047 proceeds freely, whereas the subsequent conversion of ammonia into organic nitrogen remains blocked, with the resulting ammonia released to the outer medium. When L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine was added every 20 h, maximal rates of ammonia production (25 to 30 ..mu..mol/mg of chlorophyll per h) were maintained for about 50 h. After this time, ammonia production ceased due to a deficiency of glutamine and other nitrogenous compounds in the filaments, conditions which finally led to cell lysis. The effective ammonia production period could be further extended to about 7 days by adding a small amount of glutamine at the end of a 40-h production period or by allowing the cells to recover for 8 h in the absence of L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine after every 40-h period in the presence of the inhibitor. A more prolonged steady production of ammonia, lasting for longer than 2 weeks, was achieved by alternating treatments with the glutamine synthetase inhibitors L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine and phosphinothricin, provided that 8-h recovery periods in the absence of either compound were also alternated throughout. The biochemically manipulated cyanobacterial filaments thus represent a system that is relatively stable with time for the conversion of light energy into chemical energy, with the net generation of a valuable fuel and fertilizer through the photoreduction of dinitrogen to ammonia.

  14. Transcriptional analysis of the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 grown under short day/night cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Toepel, Jorg; McDermott, Jason E.; Summerfield, Tina; Sherman, Louis A.

    2009-06-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that demonstrates extensive metabolic periodicities of photosynthesis, respiration and nitrogen fixation when grown under N2-fixing conditions. We have performed a global transcription analysis of this organism using 6 h light/dark cycles in order to determine the response of the cell to these conditions and to differentiate between diurnal and circadian regulated genes. In addition, we used a context-likelihood of relatedness (CLR) analysis with this data and those from two-day light/dark and light-dark plus continuous light experiments to better differentiate between diurnal and circadian regulated genes. Cyanothece sp. adapted in several ways to growth under short light/dark conditions. Nitrogen was fixed in every second dark period and only once in each 24 h period. Nitrogen fixation was strongly correlated to the energy status of the cells and glycogen breakdown and high respiration rates were necessary to provide appropriate energy and anoxic conditions for this process. We conclude that glycogen breakdown is a key regulatory step within these complex processes. Our results demonstrated that the main metabolic genes involved in photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen fixation and central carbohydrate metabolism have strong (or total) circadian-regulated components. The short light/dark cycles enable us to identify transcriptional differences among the family of psbA genes, as well as the differing patterns of the hup genes, which follow the same pattern as nitrogenase genes, relative to the hox genes which displayed a diurnal, dark-dependent gene expression.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium sp. Strain R89-1, a Morphine Alkaloid-Biotransforming Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zahradník, Jiří; Kyslíková, Eva; Kyslík, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacteriumsp. strain R89-1 isolated from composted wastes ofPapaver somniferumcan effectively biotransform codeine/morphine into 14-OH-derivatives. Here, we present a 4.7-Mb assembly of the R89-1 strain genome. The draft shows that the strain R89-1 represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage within the genusAgrobacterium. PMID:27056219

  16. Differential Transcriptional Analysis of the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Strain ATCC 51142 during Light-Dark and Continuous-Light Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Toepel, Jorg; Welsh, Eric A.; Summerfield, Tina; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Sherman, Louis A.

    2008-06-01

    We analyzed the metabolic rhythms and differential gene transcription in the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC51142 under N₂-fixing conditions with 12h light-12h dark cycles followed by 36 h continuous light. Cultures were grown in a 6-L bioreactor that was specially designed for photosynthetic microorganisms and that permitted continuous monitoring of parameters such as pH and dissolved oxygen. Our main objective was to determine the strategies used by these cells to perform N₂ fixation under normal day-night conditions, as well as under greater stress caused by continuous light. Our results strongly suggested that the level of N₂ fixation is dependent upon respiration for energy production and for removal of intracellular O₂. We determined that N₂ fixation cycled in continuous light, but that the N₂ fixation peak was lower and that glycogen degradation and respiration were also lower under these conditions. We also demonstrated that nifH (the gene encoding the Fe protein) and nifB and nifX were strongly induced in the continuous light; this is consistent with the mode of operation of these proteins relative to the MoFe protein and suggested that any regulation of N₂ fixation was at a posttranscriptional level. Also, many soluble electron carriers (e.g., ferredoxins), as well as redox carriers (e.g., thioredoxin and glutathione) were strongly induced during N₂ fixation in continuous light. We suggest that these carriers were required to generate enhanced cyclic electron transport and phosphorylation for energy production and to maintain appropriate redox levels in the presence of enhanced O₂, respectively.

  17. Genome-scale modeling of light-driven reductant partitioning and carbon fluxes in diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Trang; Stolyar, Sergey; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Lipton, Mary S.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2012-04-05

    Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC) share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When photosystem II flux is high, terminal oxidases of respiratory electron transport are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess electrons. When photosystem I flux is high cyclic electron transport becomes important. Model predictions of growth rates were in good quantitative agreement with measured growth rates, and predictions of reaction usage were qualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, when these latter datasets were used to constrain the model.

  18. Genome-Scale Modeling of Light-Driven Reductant Partitioning and Carbon Fluxes in Diazotrophic Unicellular Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Trang; Stolyar, Sergey; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Lipton, Mary S.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2012-04-05

    Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC) share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When photosystem II flux is high, terminal oxidases of respiratory electron transport are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess electrons. When photosystem I flux is high cyclic electron transport becomes important. Model predictions of growth rates were in good quantitative agreement with measured growth rates, and predictions of reaction usage were ualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, when these latter datasets were used to constrain the model.

  19. Effect of bioconversion conditions on vanillin production by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 through an analysis of competing by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-kui; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of transformation conditions such as initial pH, the initial concentration of glucose and yeast extract in the medium, and the separate addition of ferulic acid and vanillic acid, on the production of vanillin through an analysis of competing by-product formation by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116. The extent and nature of by-product formation and vanillin yield were affected by initial pH and different initial concentrations of glucose and yeast extract in the medium, with a high yield of vanillin and high cell density obtained at pH 8.0, 10 g/l glucose, and 8 g/l yeast extract. High concentrations of ferulic acid were found to negatively affect cell density. Additional supplementation of 100 mg/l vanillic acid, a metabolically linked by-product, was found to result in a high concentration of vanillin and guaiacol, an intermediate of vanillin. Via an analysis of the effect of these transformation conditions on competing by-product formation, high concentrations of ferulic acid were transformed with a molar yield to vanillin of 96.1 and 95.2 %, by Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 and Streptomyces V1, respectively, together with a minor accumulation of by-products. These are among the highest performance values reported in the literature to date for Streptomyces in batch cultures. PMID:24078147

  20. Inoculation of Phaseolus vulgaris with the nodule-endophyte Agrobacterium sp. 10C2 affects richness and structure of rhizosphere bacterial communities and enhances nodulation and growth.

    PubMed

    Chihaoui, Saif-Allah; Trabelsi, Darine; Jdey, Ahmed; Mhadhbi, Haythem; Mhamdi, Ridha

    2015-08-01

    Agrobacterium sp. 10C2 is a nonpathogenic and non-symbiotic nodule-endophyte strain isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris. The effect of this strain on nodulation, plant growth and rhizosphere bacterial communities of P. vulgaris is investigated under seminatural conditions. Inoculation with strain 10C2 induced an increase in nodule number (+54 %) and plant biomass (+16 %). Grains also showed a significant increase in phosphorus (+53 %), polyphenols (+217 %), flavonoids (+62 %) and total antioxidant capacity (+82 %). The effect of strain 10C2 on bacterial communities was monitored using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. When the initial soil was inoculated with strain 10C2 and left 15 days, the Agrobacterium strain did not affect TRF richness but changed structure. When common bean was sown in these soils and cultivated during 75 days, both TRF richness and structure were affected by strain 10C2. TRF richness increased in the rhizosphere soil, while it decreased in the bulk soil (root free). The taxonomic assignation of TRFs induced by strain 10C2 in the bean rhizosphere revealed the presence of four phyla (Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria) with a relative preponderance of Firmicutes, represented mainly by Bacillus species. Some of these taxa (i.e., Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus senegalensis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus firmus and Paenibacillus koreensis) are particularly known for their plant growth-promoting potentialities. These results suggest that the beneficial effects of strain 10C2 observed on plant growth and grain quality are explained at least in part by the indirect effect through the promotion of beneficial microorganisms. PMID:25967041

  1. Utilization of Trihalogenated Propanes by Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 through Heterologous Expression of the Haloalkane Dehalogenase from Rhodococcus sp. Strain m15-3

    PubMed Central

    Bosma, Tjibbe; Kruizinga, Edwin; de Bruin, Erik J.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    1999-01-01

    Trihalogenated propanes are toxic and recalcitrant organic compounds. Attempts to obtain pure bacterial cultures able to use these compounds as sole carbon and energy sources were unsuccessful. Both the haloalkane dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 (DhlA) and that from Rhodococcus sp. strain m15-3 (DhaA) were found to dehalogenate trihalopropanes to 2,3-dihalogenated propanols, but the kinetic properties of the latter enzyme are much better. Broad-host-range dehalogenase expression plasmids, based on RSF1010 derivatives, were constructed with the haloalkane dehalogenase from Rhodococcus sp. strain m15-3 under the control of the heterologous promoters Plac, PdhlA, and Ptrc. The resulting plasmids yielded functional expression in several gram-negative bacteria. A catabolic pathway for trihalopropanes was designed by introducing these broad-host-range dehalogenase expression plasmids into Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1, which has the ability to utilize dihalogenated propanols for growth. The recombinant strain AD1(pTB3), expressing the haloalkane dehalogenase gene under the control of the dhlA promoter, was able to utilize both 1,2,3-tribromopropane and 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane as sole carbon sources. Moreover, increased expression of the haloalkane dehalogenase resulted in elevated resistance to trihalopropanes. PMID:10508091

  2. Endogenously synthesized (-)-proto-quercitol and glycine betaine are principal compatible solutes of Schizochytrium sp. strain S8 (ATCC 20889) and three new isolates of phylogenetically related thraustochytrids.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Anita N; Aasen, Inga M; Strøm, Arne R

    2007-09-01

    We report that endogenously synthesized (-)-proto-quercitol (1D-1,3,4/2,5-cyclohexanepentol) and glycine betaine were the principal compatible solutes of Schizochytrium sp. strain S8 (ATCC 20889) and three new osmotolerant isolates of thraustochytrids (strains T65, T66, and T67). The compatible solutes were identified and quantified by use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and their identity was confirmed by mass spectroscopy and measurement of the specific optical rotation. The cellular content of compatible solutes increased with increasing NaCl concentration of a defined medium. (-)-proto-Quercitol was the dominating solute at all NaCl concentrations tested (0.25 to 1.0 M), e.g., cells of S8 and T66 stressed with 1.0 M NaCl accumulated about 500 micromol (-)-proto-quercitol and 100 micromol glycine betaine per g dry weight. To our knowledge, (-)-proto-quercitol has previously been found only in eucalyptus. The 18S rRNA gene sequences of the four (-)-proto-quercitol-producing strains showed 99% identity, and they displayed the same fatty acid profile. The only polyunsaturated fatty acids accumulated were docosahexaenoic acid (78%) and docosapentaenoic acid (22%). A less osmotolerant isolate (strain T29), which was closely phylogenetically related to Thraustochytrium aureum (ATCC 34304), did not contain (-)-proto-quercitol or glycine betaine. Thus, the level of osmotolerance and the osmolyte systems vary among thraustochytrids. PMID:17660311

  3. Enzymological Characterization of Atm, the First Laccase from Agrobacterium sp. S5-1, with the Ability to Enhance In Vitro digestibility of Maize Straw

    PubMed Central

    Si, Wei; Wu, ZhaoWei; Wang, LiangLiang; Yang, MingMing; Zhao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Laccase is an enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of phenolic compounds, diamines and aromatic amines. In this study, a novel laccase-like gene (atm) in a ligninolyitic isolate Agrobacterium sp. S5-1 from soil humus was identified and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Atm exhibited its maximal activity at pH 4.5 and at 50°C. This enzyme was tolerant to high temperature, a broad range of pH, heavy metal ions (Co3+, Mn2+, Cu2+ and Ni2+, 20 mM) and all tested organic solvents. Furthermore, Atm significantly (p<0.05) increased dry matter digestibility of maize straw from 23.44% to 27.96% and from 29.53% to 37.10% after 8 or 24 h of digestion and improved acid detergent fiber digestibility from 5.81% to 10.33% and from 12.80% to 19.07% after 8 or 24 h of digestion, respectively. The combination of Atm and fibrolytic enzymes significantly (p<0.05) enhanced neutral detergent fiber digestibility from 19.02% to 24.55% after 24 h of digestion respectively. Results showed treatment with Atm effectively improved in vitro digestibility of maize straw, thus suggesting that Atm has an application potential for bioconversion of lignin rich agricultural byproducts into animal feed and cellulosic ethanol. PMID:26010258

  4. Transcriptional and translational regulation of nitrogenase in light-dark- and continuous-light-grown cultures of the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142.

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, M S; Sherman, D M; Sherman, L A

    1997-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium which demonstrated extensive metabolic periodicities of photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrogen fixation when grown under N2-fixing conditions. N2 fixation and respiration peaked at 24-h intervals early in the dark or subjective-dark period, whereas photosynthesis was approximately 12 h out of phase and peaked toward the end of the light or subjective-light phase. Gene regulation studies demonstrated that nitrogenase is carefully controlled at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Indeed, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 has developed an expensive mode of regulation, such that nitrogenase was synthesized and degraded each day. These patterns were seen when cells were grown under either light-dark or continuous-light conditions. Nitrogenase mRNA was synthesized from the nifHDK operon during the first 4 h of the dark period under light-dark conditions or during the first 6 h of the subjective-dark period when grown in continuous light. The nitrogenase NifH and NifDK subunits reached a maximum level at 4 to 10 h in the dark or subjective-dark periods and were shown by Western blotting and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry to be thoroughly degraded toward the end of the dark periods. An exception is the NifDK protein (MoFe-protein), which appeared not to be completely degraded under continuous-light conditions. We hypothesize that cellular O2 levels were kept low by decreasing photosynthesis and by increasing respiration in the early dark or subjective-dark periods to permit nitrogenase activity. The subsequent increase in O2 levels resulted in nitrogenase damage and eventual degradation. PMID:9209050

  5. Proteome Analyses of Strains ATCC 51142 and PCC 7822 of the Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. under Culture Conditions Resulting in Enhanced H2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Uma K.; Callister, Stephen J.; Mishra, Sujata; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Angel, Thomas E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Cultures of the cyanobacterial genus Cyanothece have been shown to produce high levels of biohydrogen. These strains are diazotrophic and undergo pronounced diurnal cycles when grown under N2-fixing conditions in light-dark cycles. We seek to better understand the way in which proteins respond to these diurnal changes, and we performed quantitative proteome analysis of Cyanothece sp. strains ATCC 51142 and PCC 7822 grown under 8 different nutritional conditions. Nitrogenase expression was limited to N2-fixing conditions, and in the absence of glycerol, nitrogenase gene expression was linked to the dark period. However, glycerol induced expression of nitrogenase during part of the light period, together with cytochrome c oxidase (Cox), glycogen phosphorylase (Glp), and glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) enzymes. This indicated that nitrogenase expression in the light was facilitated via higher levels of respiration and glycogen breakdown. Key enzymes of the Calvin cycle were inhibited in Cyanothece ATCC 51142 in the presence of glycerol under H2-producing conditions, suggesting a competition between these sources of carbon. However, in Cyanothece PCC 7822, the Calvin cycle still played a role in cofactor recycling during H2 production. Our data comprise the first comprehensive profiling of proteome changes in Cyanothece PCC 7822 and allow an in-depth comparative analysis of major physiological and biochemical processes that influence H2 production in both strains. Our results revealed many previously uncharacterized proteins that may play a role in nitrogenase activity and in other metabolic pathways and may provide suitable targets for genetic manipulation that would lead to improvement of large-scale H2 production. PMID:23204418

  6. Complete Genome Sequence for Treponema sp. OMZ 838 (ATCC 700772, DSM 16789), Isolated from a Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yuki; Ma, Angel P. Y.; Lacap-Bugler, Donnabella C.; Huo, Yong-Biao; Keung Leung, W.

    2014-01-01

    The oral treponeme bacterium Treponema sp. OMZ 838 was originally isolated from a human necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) lesion. Its taxonomic status remains uncertain. The complete genome sequence length was determined to be 2,708,067 bp, with a G+C content of 44.58%, and 2,236 predicted coding DNA sequences (CDS). PMID:25540346

  7. Selective oxidation of trimethylolpropane to 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)butyric acid using growing cells of Corynebacterium sp. ATCC 21245.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Mahmoud; Dishisha, Tarek; Sayed, Waiel F; Salem, Wesam M; Temerk, Hanan A; Pyo, Sang-Hyun

    2016-03-10

    Multifunctional chemicals including hydroxycarboxylic acids are gaining increasing interest due to their growing applications in the polymer industry. One approach for their production is a biological selective oxidation of polyols, which is difficult to achieve by conventional chemical catalysis. In the present study, trimethylolpropane (TMP), a trihydric alcohol, was subjected to selective oxidation using growing cells of Corynebacterium sp. ATCC 21245 as a biocatalyst and yielding the dihydroxy-monocarboxylic acid, 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)butyric acid (BHMB). The study revealed that co-substrates are crucial for this reaction. Among the different evaluated co-substrates, a mixture of glucose, xylose and acetate at a ratio of 5:5:2 was found optimum. The optimal conditions for biotransformation were pH 8, 1v/v/m airflow and 500rpm stirring speed. In batch mode of operation, 70.6% of 5g/l TMP was converted to BHMB in 10 days. For recovery of the product the adsorption pattern of BHMB to the anion exchange resin, Ambersep(®) 900 (OH(-)), was investigated in batch and column experiments giving maximum static and dynamic binding capacities of 135 and 144mg/g resin, respectively. BHMB was separated with 89.7% of recovery yield from the fermentation broth. The approach is applicable for selective oxidation of other highly branched polyols by biotransformation. PMID:26804932

  8. Multi-omic dynamics associate oxygenic photosynthesis with nitrogenase-mediated H2 production in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Charania, Moiz A.; McClure, Ryan S.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wright, Aaron T.; Romine, Margaret F.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2015-11-03

    This study combines transcriptomic and proteomic profiling to provide new insights on the metabolic relationship between oxygenic photosynthesis and nitrogenase-mediated H2 production in the model cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. To date, the proposed mechanisms used to describe the energy metabolism processes that support H2 production in Cyanothece 51142 have assumed that ATP and reductant requirements are derived solely from glycogen oxidation and/or cyclic-electron flow around photosystem I. The results from this study present and test an alternative hypothesis by showing that net-positive rates of oxygenic photosynthesis and increased expression of photosystem II reaction centers correspond and are synchronized with nitrogenase expression and H2 production. These findings provide a new and more complete view on the metabolic processes contributing to the energy budget of photosynthetic H2 production and highlight the likely role of photocatalytic H2O oxidation as a major participating process.

  9. Cloning and sequencing of the kedarcidin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 revealing new insights into biosynthesis of the enediyne family of antitumor antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Jeremy R; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Horsman, Geoffrey P; Dilfer, Paul E; Huang, Tingting; Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Shen, Ben

    2013-03-01

    Enediyne natural product biosynthesis is characterized by a convergence of multiple pathways, generating unique peripheral moieties that are appended onto the distinctive enediyne core. Kedarcidin (KED) possesses two unique peripheral moieties, a (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and an iso-propoxy-bearing 2-naphthonate moiety, as well as two deoxysugars. The appendage pattern of these peripheral moieties to the enediyne core in KED differs from the other enediynes studied to date with respect to stereochemical configuration. To investigate the biosynthesis of these moieties and expand our understanding of enediyne core formation, the biosynthetic gene cluster for KED was cloned from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 and sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis of the ked cluster revealed the presence of the conserved genes encoding for enediyne core biosynthesis, type I and type II polyketide synthase loci likely responsible for 2-aza-l-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthonate formation, and enzymes known for deoxysugar biosynthesis. Genes homologous to those responsible for the biosynthesis, activation, and coupling of the l-tyrosine-derived moieties from C-1027 and maduropeptin and of the naphthonate moiety from neocarzinostatin are present in the ked cluster, supporting 2-aza-l-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid as precursors, respectively, for the (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and the 2-naphthonate moieties in KED biosynthesis. PMID:23360970

  10. Cloning and sequencing of the kedarcidin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 revealing new insights into biosynthesis of the enediyne family of antitumor antibiotics†

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Jeremy R.; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Horsman, Geoffrey P.; Dilfer, Paul E.; Huang, Tingting; Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Shen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Enediyne natural product biosynthesis is characterized by a convergence of multiple pathways, generating unique peripheral moieties that are appended onto the distinctive enediyne core. Kedarcidin (KED) possesses two unique peripheral moieties, a (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and an iso-propoxy-bearing 2-naphthonate moiety, as well as two deoxysugars. The appendage pattern of these peripheral moieties to the enediyne core in KED differs from the other enediynes studied to date with respect to stereochemical configuration. To investigate the biosynthesis of these moieties and expand our understanding of enediyne core formation, the biosynthetic gene cluster for KED was cloned from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 and sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis of the ked cluster revealed the presence of the conserved genes encoding for enediyne core biosynthesis, type I and type II polyketide synthase loci likely responsible for 2-aza-L-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthonate formation, and enzymes known for deoxysugar biosynthesis. Genes homologous to those responsible for the biosynthesis, activation, and coupling of the L-tyrosine-derived moieties from C-1027 and maduropeptin and of the naphthonate moiety from neocarzinostatin are present in the ked cluster, supporting 2-aza-L-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid as precursors, respectively, for the (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and the 2-naphthonate moieties in KED biosynthesis. PMID:23360970

  11. High-yield production, refolding and a molecular modelling of the catalytic module of (1,3)-beta-D-glucan (curdlan) synthase from Agrobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Hrmova, Maria; Stone, Bruce A; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2010-05-01

    Biosynthesis of the (1,3)-beta-D: -glucan (curdlan) in Agrobacterium sp., is believed to proceed by the repetitive addition of glucosyl residues from UDP-glucose by a membrane-embedded curdlan synthase (CrdS) [UDP-glucose: (1,3)-beta-D: -glucan 3-beta-D: -glucosyltransferase; EC 2.4.1.34]. The catalytic module of CrdS (cm-CrdS) was expressed in good yield from a cDNA encoding cm-CrdS cloned into the pET-32a(+) vector, containing a coding region for thioredoxin, and from the Champion pET SUMO system that possesses a coding region of a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) partner protein. The two DNA fusions, designated pET-32a_cm-CrdS and SUMO_cm-CrdS were expressed as chimeric proteins. High yields of inclusion bodies were produced in E. coli and these could be refolded to form soluble proteins, using a range of buffers and non-detergent sulfobetaines. A purification protocol was developed, which afforded a one-step on-column refolding and simultaneous purification of the recombinant 6xHis-tagged SUMO_cm-CrdS protein. The latter protein was digested by a specific protease to yield intact cm-CrdS in high yields. The refolded SUMO_cm-CrdS protein did not exhibit curdlan synthase activity, but showed a circular dischroism spectrum, which had an alpha/beta-type-like conformation. Amino acid sequences of tryptic fragments of the SUMO_cm-CrdS fusion and free cm-CrdS proteins, determined by MALDI/TOF confirmed that the full-length proteins were synthesized by E. coli, and that no alterations in amino acid sequences occurred. A three-dimensional model of cm-CrdS predicted the juxtaposition of highly conserved aspartates D156, D208, D210 and D304, and the QRTRW motif, which are likely to play roles in donor and acceptor substrate binding and catalysis. PMID:20473714

  12. Microbial metabolism of the pyridine ring. The metabolism of pyridine-3,4-diol (3,4-dihydroxypyridine) by Agrobacterium sp

    PubMed Central

    Watson, G. Keith; Houghton, Charles; Cain, Ronald B.

    1974-01-01

    1. Pyridine-3,4-diol (3,4-dihydroxypyridine, 3-hydroxypyrid-4-one), an intermediate in 4-hydroxypyridine metabolism by an Agrobacterium sp (N.C.I.B. 10413), was converted by extracts into 1mol of pyruvate, 2mol of formate and 1mol of NH3 at pH7.0. 2. Formate, but not the alternative likely product formamide, was further oxidized fivefold faster by 4-hydroxypyridine-grown washed cells than by similar organisms grown on succinate. 3. The oxidation of pyridine-3,4-diol by crude extracts at pH8.5 required 1mol of O2/mol of substrate, produced 1mol of acid and led to the formation of formate and a new compound with an extinction maximum of 285nm (Compound I). This step was believed to be mediated by a new labile dioxygenase (t½=4h at pH7.0, 4°C) cleaving the pyridine ring between C-2 and C-3. 4. Many of the properties of this pyridine-3,4-diol dioxygenase paralleled those of the extradiol (`meta') oxygenases of aromatic-ring cleavage. The extreme lability of the enzyme has so far precluded extensive purification. 5. Compound I showed changes in the u.v.-absorption spectrum with pH but after acidification it was converted into a new product, 3-formylpyruvate, with an extinction maximum now at 279nm. 6. Both Compound I and 3-formylpyruvate were metabolized by extracts but at very different rates. The slower rate of metabolism of Compound I was nevertheless consistent with that of pyridine-3,4-diol metabolism. 7. On acidification Compound I released about 0.65mol of NH3 and has been identified as 3-formiminopyruvate. 8. 3-Formylpyruvate was hydrolysed to formate and pyruvate (Km 2μm) by an acylpyruvate hydrolase active against several other dioxo homologues. The activity of this enzyme was much lower in extracts of succinate-grown cells. PMID:4375963

  13. Endogenously Synthesized (−)-proto-Quercitol and Glycine Betaine Are Principal Compatible Solutes of Schizochytrium sp. Strain S8 (ATCC 20889) and Three New Isolates of Phylogenetically Related Thraustochytrids▿

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Anita N.; Aasen, Inga M.; Strøm, Arne R.

    2007-01-01

    We report that endogenously synthesized (−)-proto-quercitol (1d-1,3,4/2,5-cyclohexanepentol) and glycine betaine were the principal compatible solutes of Schizochytrium sp. strain S8 (ATCC 20889) and three new osmotolerant isolates of thraustochytrids (strains T65, T66, and T67). The compatible solutes were identified and quantified by use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and their identity was confirmed by mass spectroscopy and measurement of the specific optical rotation. The cellular content of compatible solutes increased with increasing NaCl concentration of a defined medium. (−)-proto-Quercitol was the dominating solute at all NaCl concentrations tested (0.25 to 1.0 M), e.g., cells of S8 and T66 stressed with 1.0 M NaCl accumulated about 500 μmol (−)-proto-quercitol and 100 μmol glycine betaine per g dry weight. To our knowledge, (−)-proto-quercitol has previously been found only in eucalyptus. The 18S rRNA gene sequences of the four (−)-proto-quercitol-producing strains showed 99% identity, and they displayed the same fatty acid profile. The only polyunsaturated fatty acids accumulated were docosahexaenoic acid (78%) and docosapentaenoic acid (22%). A less osmotolerant isolate (strain T29), which was closely phylogenetically related to Thraustochytrium aureum (ATCC 34304), did not contain (−)-proto-quercitol or glycine betaine. Thus, the level of osmotolerance and the osmolyte systems vary among thraustochytrids. PMID:17660311

  14. Proteome Analyses of Strains ATCC 51142 and PCC 7822 of the Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp under Culture Conditions Resulting in Enhanced H-2 Production

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, Uma K.; Callister, Stephen J.; Mishra, Sujata; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Angel, Thomas E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Sherman, Louis

    2013-02-01

    Cultures of the cyanobacterial genus Cyanothece have been shown to produce high levels of biohydrogen. These strains are diazotrophic and undergo pronounced diurnal cycles when grown under N2-fixing conditions in light-dark cycles. We seek to better understand the way in which proteins respond to these diurnal changes and we performed quantitative proteome analysis of Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and PCC 7822 grown under 8 different nutritional conditions. Nitrogenase expression was limited to N2-fixing conditions, and in the absence of glycerol, nitrogenase gene expression was linked to the dark period. However, glycerol induced expression of nitrogenase during part of the light period, together with cytochrome c oxidase (Cox), glycogen phosphorylase (Glp), and glycolytic and pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP) enzymes. This indicated that nitrogenase expression in the light was facilitated via higher respiration and glycogen breakdown. Key enzymes of the Calvin cycle were inhibited in Cyanothece ATCC 51142 in the presence of glycerol under H2 producing conditions, suggesting a competition between these sources of carbon. However, in Cyanothece PCC 7822, the Calvin cycle still played a role in cofactor recycling during H2 production. Our data comprise the first comprehensive profiling of proteome changes in Cyanothece PCC 7822, and allows an in-depth comparative analysis of major physiological and biochemical processes that influence H2-production in both the strains. Our results revealed many previously uncharacterized proteins that may play a role in nitrogenase activity and in other metabolic pathways and may provide suitable targets for genetic manipulation that would lead to improvement of large scale H2 production.

  15. Agrobacterium: nature's genetic engineer.

    PubMed

    Nester, Eugene W

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium was identified as the agent causing the plant tumor, crown gall over 100 years ago. Since then, studies have resulted in many surprising observations. Armin Braun demonstrated that Agrobacterium infected cells had unusual nutritional properties, and that the bacterium was necessary to start the infection but not for continued tumor development. He developed the concept of a tumor inducing principle (TIP), the factor that actually caused the disease. Thirty years later the TIP was shown to be a piece of a tumor inducing (Ti) plasmid excised by an endonuclease. In the next 20 years, most of the key features of the disease were described. The single-strand DNA (T-DNA) with the endonuclease attached is transferred through a type IV secretion system into the host cell where it is likely coated and protected from nucleases by a bacterial secreted protein to form the T-complex. A nuclear localization signal in the endonuclease guides the transferred strand (T-strand), into the nucleus where it is integrated randomly into the host chromosome. Other secreted proteins likely aid in uncoating the T-complex. The T-DNA encodes enzymes of auxin, cytokinin, and opine synthesis, the latter a food source for Agrobacterium. The genes associated with T-strand formation and transfer (vir) map to the Ti plasmid and are only expressed when the bacteria are in close association with a plant. Plant signals are recognized by a two-component regulatory system which activates vir genes. Chromosomal genes with pleiotropic functions also play important roles in plant transformation. The data now explain Braun's old observations and also explain why Agrobacterium is nature's genetic engineer. Any DNA inserted between the border sequences which define the T-DNA will be transferred and integrated into host cells. Thus, Agrobacterium has become the major vector in plant genetic engineering. PMID:25610442

  16. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of three freshwater microalgal strains.

    PubMed

    Sanitha, Mary; Radha, Sudhakar; Fatima, Anwar Aliya; Devi, Selvaraju Gayathri; Ramya, Mohandass

    2014-01-01

    Microalgal transformation has gained interest in recent years. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation remains as the most efficient method for the development of transgenic plants and microalgae due to its wide host range, inexpensive procedure and transfer of large segments of DNA. In the present study, three different microalgal species were isolated from freshwater environment and identified based on the morphological characteristics and ITS-2 region amplification. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was successful for the isolates Chlorella sp., Ankistrodesmus sp and Scenedesmus bajacalifornicus. Gene integration and expression was confirmed by PCR amplification of hptII and GUS histochemical assay. A. tumifaciens contamination was checked by amplification of npt II gene (kanamycin resistant) which lies outside the T-border. Based on GUS assay, transformation efficiencies were found to be 12.25% for Chlorella sp. 2.96% for Scenedesmus bajacalifornicus and 3.5% for Ankistrodesmus sp. PMID:25804057

  17. Two fatty acid elongases possessing C18-Δ6/C18-Δ9/C20-Δ5 or C16-Δ9 elongase activity in Thraustochytrium sp. ATCC 26185.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Junichiro; Sakaguchi, Keishi; Okita, Yuji; Okino, Nozomu; Ito, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    Thraustochytrids, unicellular eukaryotic marine protists, accumulate polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of two fatty acid elongase genes (designated tselo1 and tselo2), which could be involved in the desaturase/elongase (standard) pathway in Thraustochytrium sp. ATCC 26185. TsELO1, the product of tselo1 and classified into a Δ6 elongase group by phylogenetic analysis, showed strong C18-Δ6 elongase activity and relatively weak C18-Δ9 and C20-Δ5 activities when expressed in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. TsELO2, classified into a Δ9 elongase subgroup, showed only C16-Δ9 activity. When expressed in Aurantiochytrium limacinum mh0186 using a thraustochytrid-derived promoter and a terminator, TsELO1 exhibited almost the same specificity as expressed in the yeast but TsELO2 showed weak C18-Δ9 activity, in addition to its main C16-Δ9 activity. These results suggest that TsELO1 functions not only as a C18-Δ6 and a C20-Δ5 elongase in the main route but also as a C18-Δ9 elongase in the alternative route of standard pathway, while TsELO2 functions mainly as a C16-Δ9 elongase generating vaccenic acid (C18:1n-7) in thraustochytrids. This is the first report describing a fatty acid elongase harboring C16-Δ9 activity in thraustochytrids. PMID:23547001

  18. Identification of an opd (organophosphate degradation) gene in an Agrobacterium isolate.

    PubMed

    Horne, Irene; Sutherland, Tara D; Harcourt, Rebecca L; Russell, Robyn J; Oakeshott, John G

    2002-07-01

    We isolated a bacterial strain, Agrobacterium radiobacter P230, which can hydrolyze a wide range of organophosphate (OP) insecticides. A gene encoding a protein involved in OP hydrolysis was cloned from A. radiobacter P230 and sequenced. This gene (called opdA) had sequence similarity to opd, a gene previously shown to encode an OP-hydrolyzing enzyme in Flavobacterium sp. strain ATCC 27551 and Brevundimonas diminuta MG. Insertional mutation of the opdA gene produced a strain lacking the ability to hydrolyze OPs, suggesting that this is the only gene encoding an OP-hydrolyzing enzyme in A. radiobacter P230. The OPH and OpdA proteins, encoded by opd and opdA, respectively, were overexpressed and purified as maltose-binding proteins, and the maltose-binding protein moiety was cleaved and removed. Neither protein was able to hydrolyze the aliphatic OP malathion. The kinetics of the two proteins for diethyl OPs were comparable. For dimethyl OPs, OpdA had a higher k(cat) than OPH. It was also capable of hydrolyzing the dimethyl OPs phosmet and fenthion, which were not hydrolyzed at detectable levels by OPH. PMID:12089017

  19. Cloning and Characterization of the Pyrrolomycin Biosynthetic Gene Clusters from Actinosporangium vitaminophilum ATCC 31673 and Streptomyces sp. Strain UC 11065▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujun; Parry, Ronald J.

    2007-01-01

    The pyrrolomycins are a family of polyketide antibiotics, some of which contain a nitro group. To gain insight into the nitration mechanism associated with the formation of these antibiotics, the pyrrolomycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Actinosporangium vitaminophilum was cloned. Sequencing of ca. 56 kb of A. vitaminophilum DNA revealed 35 open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence analysis revealed a clear relationship between some of these ORFs and the biosynthetic gene cluster for pyoluteorin, a structurally related antibiotic. Since a gene transfer system could not be devised for A. vitaminophilum, additional proof for the identity of the cloned gene cluster was sought by cloning the pyrrolomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. strain UC 11065, a transformable pyrrolomycin producer. Sequencing of ca. 26 kb of UC 11065 DNA revealed the presence of 17 ORFs, 15 of which exhibit strong similarity to ORFs in the A. vitaminophilum cluster as well as a nearly identical organization. Single-crossover disruption of two genes in the UC 11065 cluster abolished pyrrolomycin production in both cases. These results confirm that the genetic locus cloned from UC 11065 is essential for pyrrolomycin production, and they also confirm that the highly similar locus in A. vitaminophilum encodes pyrrolomycin biosynthetic genes. Sequence analysis revealed that both clusters contain genes encoding the two components of an assimilatory nitrate reductase. This finding suggests that nitrite is required for the formation of the nitrated pyrrolomycins. However, sequence analysis did not provide additional insights into the nitration process, suggesting the operation of a novel nitration mechanism. PMID:17158935

  20. Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  1. Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H.C.

    1997-12-30

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  2. Comparative properties of glutamine synthetases I and II in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, R L; Keister, D L

    1980-01-01

    Some properties of glutamine synthetase I (GSI) and GSII are described for a fast-growing Rhizobium sp. (Rhizobium trifolii T1), a slow-growing Rhizobium sp. (Rhizobium japonicum USDA 83), and Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58. GSII of the fast-growing Rhizobium sp. and GSII of the Agrobacterium sp. were considerably more heat labile than GSII of the slow-growing Rhizobium sp. As previously shown in R. japonicum 61A76, GSI became adenylylated rapidly in all species tested in response to ammonium. GSII activity disappeared within one generation of growth in two of the strains, but the disappearance of GSII activity required two generations in another. Isoactivity points for transferase assay, which were derived from the pH curves of adenylylated GSI and deadenylylated GSI, were approximately pH 7.8 for both R. trifolii and A. tumefaciens. No isoactivity point was found for R. japonicum under the standard assay conditions used. When the feedback inhibitor glycine was used to inhibit differentially the adenylylated GSI and deadenylylated GSI of R. japonicum, an isoactivity point was observed at pH 7.3. Thus, the transferase activity of GSI could be determined independent of the state of adenylation. A survey of 23 strains of bacteria representing 11 genera indicated that only Rhizobium spp. and Agrobacterium spp. contained GSII. Thus, this enzyme appears to be unique for the Rhizobiaceae. PMID:6107288

  3. Agrobacterium and Tumor Induction: A Model System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John E.

    1980-01-01

    The author offers laboratory procedures for experiments using the bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, which causes crown gall disease in a large number of plants. Three different approaches to growing a culture are given. (SA)

  4. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation of haptophytes (Isochrysis species).

    PubMed

    Prasad, Binod; Vadakedath, Nithya; Jeong, Hyun-Jeong; General, Thiyam; Cho, Man-Gi; Lein, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Isochrysis galbana and Isochrysis sp. are economically important microalgae from the division of haptophytes. Here, we report Agrobacterium-mediated stable DNA transfer into their nuclear genomes. Initial studies were performed to standardize co-cultivation media and determine the sensitivity of the microalgae to selective agents. Up to 1 mg/ml of the antibiotic hygromycin did not inhibit growth, whereas both the haptophytes bleached in artificial seawater (ASW) medium containing micromolar concentrations of the herbicide norflurazon. Co-cultivation of Isochrysis sp. and I. galbana with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA 4404 harboring the binary vector pCAMBIA 1380-pds-L504R yielded norflurazon-resistant (NR) colonies visible on selective plates after 20-30 days. pCAMBIA 1380-pds-L540R was constructed by cloning a mutated genomic phytoene desaturase (pds) gene from Haematococcus pluvialis as a selectable marker gene into the binary vector system pCAMBIA 1380. Co-cultivation of Isochrysis sp. with A. tumefaciens in ASW medium containing 200 μM of acetosyringone for 72 h produced the highest number of NR cells. For I. galbana, 100 μM of acetosyringone, ASW medium, and 48 h co-cultivation period appeared to be optimum co-cultivation parameters. The NR colonies kept their resistance phenotype for at least 24 months, even in the absence of selective pressure. The transfer of the pds gene in NR cells was shown by PCR amplification of the T-DNA sequences from the genomic DNA of NR cells and Southern blot analysis using T-DNA sequences as probes. The genetic manipulation described here will allow metabolic engineering and a better understanding of several biochemical pathways in the future. PMID:24993358

  5. Plant–Agrobacterium interaction mediated by ethylene and super-Agrobacterium conferring efficient gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Satoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a unique ability to transfer genes into plant genomes. This ability has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. However, the efficiency is not sufficient for all plant species. Several studies have shown that ethylene decreased the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequency. Thus, A. tumefaciens with an ability to suppress ethylene evolution would increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Some studies showed that plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) can reduce ethylene levels in plants through 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, which cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia, resulting in reduced ethylene production. The whole genome sequence data showed that A. tumefaciens does not possess an ACC deaminase gene in its genome. Therefore, providing ACC deaminase activity to the bacteria would improve gene transfer. As expected, A. tumefaciens with ACC deaminase activity, designated as super-Agrobacterium, could suppress ethylene evolution and increase the gene transfer efficiency in several plant species. In this review, we summarize plant–Agrobacterium interactions and their applications for improving Agrobacterium-mediated genetic engineering techniques via super-Agrobacterium. PMID:25520733

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Rhodosporidium toruloides Strains ATCC 10788 and ATCC 10657 with Compatible Mating Types

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides ATCC 10788 (haploid, A1 mating type) and ATCC 10657 (haploid, A2 mating type) were derived from the same diploid parent strain Rhodotorula glutinis ATCC 90781 and are important strains for metabolic engineering. Draft genome sequences of both strains are reported here. The current assembly of strain ATCC 10788 comprises 61 scaffolds with a total size of 20.75 Mbp and a GC content of 62.01%, while that of strain ATCC 10657 comprises 137 scaffolds with a total size of 21.49 Mbp and a GC content of 61.81%. Genome annotation predicts 7,730 and 7,800 protein encoding genes for strain ATCC 10788 and strain ATCC 10657, respectively. PMID:26966203

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Rhodosporidium toruloides Strains ATCC 10788 and ATCC 10657 with Compatible Mating Types.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Ji, Lianghui

    2016-01-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides ATCC 10788 (haploid, A1 mating type) and ATCC 10657 (haploid, A2 mating type) were derived from the same diploid parent strain Rhodotorula glutinis ATCC 90781 and are important strains for metabolic engineering. Draft genome sequences of both strains are reported here. The current assembly of strain ATCC 10788 comprises 61 scaffolds with a total size of 20.75 Mbp and a GC content of 62.01%, while that of strain ATCC 10657 comprises 137 scaffolds with a total size of 21.49 Mbp and a GC content of 61.81%. Genome annotation predicts 7,730 and 7,800 protein encoding genes for strain ATCC 10788 and strain ATCC 10657, respectively. PMID:26966203

  8. Ferrisiderophore reductase activity in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, J S; Gaines, C G; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1982-01-01

    Reduction of the iron in ferriagrobactin by the cytoplasmic fraction of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strictly required NaDH as the reductant. Addition of flavin mononucleotide and anaerobic conditions were necessary for the reaction; when added with flavin mononucleotide, magnesium was stimulatory. This ferrisiderophore reductase activity may be a part of the iron assimilation process in A. tumefaciens. PMID:7056702

  9. Agrobacterium: nature’s genetic engineer

    PubMed Central

    Nester, Eugene W.

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium was identified as the agent causing the plant tumor, crown gall over 100 years ago. Since then, studies have resulted in many surprising observations. Armin Braun demonstrated that Agrobacterium infected cells had unusual nutritional properties, and that the bacterium was necessary to start the infection but not for continued tumor development. He developed the concept of a tumor inducing principle (TIP), the factor that actually caused the disease. Thirty years later the TIP was shown to be a piece of a tumor inducing (Ti) plasmid excised by an endonuclease. In the next 20 years, most of the key features of the disease were described. The single-strand DNA (T-DNA) with the endonuclease attached is transferred through a type IV secretion system into the host cell where it is likely coated and protected from nucleases by a bacterial secreted protein to form the T-complex. A nuclear localization signal in the endonuclease guides the transferred strand (T-strand), into the nucleus where it is integrated randomly into the host chromosome. Other secreted proteins likely aid in uncoating the T-complex. The T-DNA encodes enzymes of auxin, cytokinin, and opine synthesis, the latter a food source for Agrobacterium. The genes associated with T-strand formation and transfer (vir) map to the Ti plasmid and are only expressed when the bacteria are in close association with a plant. Plant signals are recognized by a two-component regulatory system which activates vir genes. Chromosomal genes with pleiotropic functions also play important roles in plant transformation. The data now explain Braun’s old observations and also explain why Agrobacterium is nature’s genetic engineer. Any DNA inserted between the border sequences which define the T-DNA will be transferred and integrated into host cells. Thus, Agrobacterium has become the major vector in plant genetic engineering. PMID:25610442

  10. Effect of Medium Supplements on Agrobacterium rhizogenes Mediated Hairy Root Induction from the Callus Tissues of Camellia sinensis var. sinensis.

    PubMed

    Rana, Mohammad M; Han, Zhuo-Xiao; Song, Da-Peng; Liu, Guo-Feng; Li, Da-Xiang; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Karthikeyan, Alagarsamy; Wei, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) is recalcitrant to Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation largely due to the bactericidal effects of tea polyphenols and phenolics oxidation induced by necrosis of explant tissue over the process of transformation. In this study, different antioxidants/adsorbents were added as supplements to the co-cultivation and post co-cultivation media to overcome these problems for the transformation improvement. Tea-cotyledon-derived calli were used as explants and Agrobacterium rhizognes strain ATCC 15834 was used as a mediator. Results showed that Agrobacterium growth, virulence (vir) gene expression and browning of explant tissue were greatly influenced by different supplements. Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal salts medium supplemented with 30 g·L(-1) sucrose, 0.1 g·L(-1) l-glutamine and 5 g·L(-1) polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) as co-cultivation and post co-cultivation media could maintain these parameters better that ultimately led to significant improvement of hairy root generation efficiency compared to that in the control (MS + 30 g·L(-1) sucrose). Additionally, the reporter genes β-glucuronidase (gusA) and cyan fluorescent protein (cfp) were also stably expressed in the transgenic hairy roots. Our study would be helpful in establishing a feasible approach for tea biological studies and genetic improvement of tea varieties. PMID:27428960

  11. Effect of Medium Supplements on Agrobacterium rhizogenes Mediated Hairy Root Induction from the Callus Tissues of Camellia sinensis var. sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Mohammad M.; Han, Zhuo-Xiao; Song, Da-Peng; Liu, Guo-Feng; Li, Da-Xiang; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Karthikeyan, Alagarsamy; Wei, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) is recalcitrant to Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation largely due to the bactericidal effects of tea polyphenols and phenolics oxidation induced by necrosis of explant tissue over the process of transformation. In this study, different antioxidants/adsorbents were added as supplements to the co-cultivation and post co-cultivation media to overcome these problems for the transformation improvement. Tea-cotyledon-derived calli were used as explants and Agrobacterium rhizognes strain ATCC 15834 was used as a mediator. Results showed that Agrobacterium growth, virulence (vir) gene expression and browning of explant tissue were greatly influenced by different supplements. Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal salts medium supplemented with 30 g·L−1 sucrose, 0.1 g·L−1 l-glutamine and 5 g·L−1 polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) as co-cultivation and post co-cultivation media could maintain these parameters better that ultimately led to significant improvement of hairy root generation efficiency compared to that in the control (MS + 30 g·L−1 sucrose). Additionally, the reporter genes β-glucuronidase (gusA) and cyan fluorescent protein (cfp) were also stably expressed in the transgenic hairy roots. Our study would be helpful in establishing a feasible approach for tea biological studies and genetic improvement of tea varieties. PMID:27428960

  12. Rapid and accurate species and genomic species identification and exhaustive population diversity assessment of Agrobacterium spp. using recA-based PCR.

    PubMed

    Shams, M; Vial, L; Chapulliot, D; Nesme, X; Lavire, C

    2013-07-01

    Agrobacteria are common soil bacteria that interact with plants as commensals, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria or alternatively as pathogens. Indigenous agrobacterial populations are composites, generally with several species and/or genomic species and several strains per species. We thus developed a recA-based PCR approach to accurately identify and specifically detect agrobacteria at various taxonomic levels. Specific primers were designed for all species and/or genomic species of Agrobacterium presently known, including 11 genomic species of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens complex (G1-G9, G13 and G14, among which only G2, G4, G8 and G14 still received a Latin epithet: pusense, radiobacter, fabrum and nepotum, respectively), A. larrymoorei, A. rubi, R. skierniewicense, A. sp. 1650, and A. vitis, and for the close relative Allorhizobium undicola. Specific primers were also designed for superior taxa, Agrobacterium spp. and Rhizobiaceace. Primer specificities were assessed with target and non-target pure culture DNAs as well as with DNAs extracted from composite agrobacterial communities. In addition, we showed that the amplicon cloning-sequencing approach used with Agrobacterium-specific or Rhizobiaceae-specific primers is a way to assess the agrobacterial diversity of an indigenous agrobacterial population. Hence, the agrobacterium-specific primers designed in the present study enabled the first accurate and rapid identification of all species and/or genomic species of Agrobacterium, as well as their direct detection in environmental samples. PMID:23578959

  13. Transformation of oil palm using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Izawati, Abang Masli Dayang; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantlets are regenerated after Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of embryogenic calli derived from young leaves of oil palm. The calli are transformed with an Agrobacterium strain, LBA4404, harboring the plasmid pUBA, which carries a selectable marker gene (bar) for resistance to the herbicide Basta and is driven by a maize ubiquitin promoter. Modifications of the transformation method, treatment of the target tissues using acetosyringone, exposure to a plasmolysis medium, and physical injury via biolistics are applied. The main reasons for such modifications are to activate the bacterial virulence system and, subsequently, to increase the transformation efficiency. Transgenic oil palm cells are selected and regenerated on a medium containing herbicide Basta. Molecular analyses revealed the presence and integration of the introduced bar gene into the genome of the transformants. PMID:22351008

  14. Improving plant transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Neto, L V; Oliveira, A P; Lourenço, M V; Bertoni, B W; França, S C; Rosa-Santos, T M; Zingaretti, S M

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a quick and low-cost method to improve plant transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This method involves the use of physical wounding, ultrasound, and an increase in exposure time to the bacteria. We show how the transformation rate increased from 0 to 14% when an ultrasound pulse of 10 s was used in conjunction with 96 h of bacterial exposure in Eclipta alba explants. PMID:26125878

  15. Efficiency of different Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains on hairy roots induction in Solanum mammosum.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chai Theam; Syahida, Ahmad; Stanslas, Johnson; Maziah, Mahmood

    2013-03-01

    This article presents the abilities and efficiencies of five different strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes (strain ATCC 31798, ATCC 43057, AR12, A4 and A13) to induce hairy roots on Solanum mammosum through genetic transformation. There is significant difference in the transformation efficiency (average number of days of hairy root induction) and transformation frequency for all strains of A. rhizogenes (P < 0.05). Both A. rhizogenes strain AR12 and A13 were able to induce hairy root at 6 days of co-cultivation, which were the fastest among those tested. However, the transformation frequencies of all five strains were below 30 %, with A. rhizogenes strain A4 and A13 showing the highest, which were 21.41 ± 10.60 % and 21.43 ± 8.13 % respectively. Subsequently, the cultures for five different hairy root lines generated by five different strains of bacteria were established. However, different hairy root lines showed different growth index under the same culture condition, with the hairy root lines induced by A. rhizogenes strain ATCC 31798 exhibited largest increase in fresh biomass at 45 days of culture under 16 h light/8 h dark photoperiod in half-strength MS medium. The slowest growing hairy root line, which was previously induced by A. rhizogenes strain A13, when cultured in optimized half-strength MS medium containing 1.5 times the standard amount of ammonium nitrate and potassium nitrate and 5 % (w/v) sucrose, had exhibited improvement in growth index, that is, the fresh biomass was almost double as compared to its initial growth in unmodified half-strength MS medium. PMID:23090845

  16. Draft genome sequence of Agrobacterium albertimagni strain AOL15.

    PubMed

    Trimble, William L; Phung, Le T; Meyer, Folker; Gilbert, Jack A; Silver, Simon

    2012-12-01

    Agrobacterium albertimagni strain AOL15 is an alphaproteobacterium isolated from arsenite-oxidizing biofilms whose draft genome contains 5.1 Mb in 55 contigs with 61.2% GC content and includes a 21-gene arsenic gene island. This is the first available genome for this species and the second Agrobacterium arsenic gene island. PMID:23209236

  17. Aboveground insect infestation attenuates belowground Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation.

    PubMed

    Song, Geun Cheol; Lee, Soohyun; Hong, Jaehwa; Choi, Hye Kyung; Hong, Gun Hyong; Bae, Dong-Won; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-07-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease. Although Agrobacterium can be popularly used for genetic engineering, the influence of aboveground insect infestation on Agrobacterium induced gall formation has not been investigated. Nicotiana benthamiana leaves were exposed to a sucking insect (whitefly) infestation and benzothiadiazole (BTH) for 7 d, and these exposed plants were inoculated with a tumorigenic Agrobacterium strain. We evaluated, both in planta and in vitro, how whitefly infestation affects crown gall disease. Whitefly-infested plants exhibited at least a two-fold reduction in gall formation on both stem and crown root. Silencing of isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1), required for salicylic acid (SA) synthesis, compromised gall formation indicating an involvement of SA in whitefly-derived plant defence against Agrobacterium. Endogenous SA content was augmented in whitefly-infested plants upon Agrobacterium inoculation. In addition, SA concentration was three times higher in root exudates from whitefly-infested plants. As a consequence, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of roots of whitefly-infested plants was clearly inhibited when compared to control plants. These results suggest that aboveground whitefly infestation elicits systemic defence responses throughout the plant. Our findings provide new insights into insect-mediated leaf-root intra-communication and a framework to understand interactions between three organisms: whitefly, N. benthamiana and Agrobacterium. PMID:25676198

  18. Stability analysis of chickpea large genomic DNA inserts in Agrobacterium.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of large DNA inserts directly into plants facilitates the transfer of gene clusters and flanking regulatory elements. It is recommended that the integrity of large genomic fragments in Agrobacterium be verified prior to plant transformation. In this ...

  19. Agrobacterium tumefaciens responses to plant-derived signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Nathoo, Naeem; Klimov, Eugene; Yuan, Ze-Chun

    2014-01-01

    As a special phytopathogen, Agrobacterium tumefaciens infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes plant tumors also known as crown galls. The complexity of Agrobacterium–plant interaction has been studied for several decades. Agrobacterium pathogenicity is largely attributed to its evolved capabilities of precise recognition and response to plant-derived chemical signals. Agrobacterium perceives plant-derived signals to activate its virulence genes, which are responsible for transferring and integrating its Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from its Tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid into the plant nucleus. The expression of T-DNA in plant hosts leads to the production of a large amount of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), cytokinin (CK), and opines. IAA and CK stimulate plant growth, resulting in tumor formation. Agrobacterium utilizes opines as nutrient sources as well as signals in order to activate its quorum sensing (QS) to further promote virulence and opine metabolism. Intriguingly, Agrobacterium also recognizes plant-derived signals including γ-amino butyric acid and salicylic acid (SA) to activate quorum quenching that reduces the level of QS signals, thereby avoiding the elicitation of plant defense and preserving energy. In addition, Agrobacterium hijacks plant-derived signals including SA, IAA, and ethylene to down-regulate its virulence genes located on the Ti plasmid. Moreover, certain metabolites from corn (Zea mays) also inhibit the expression of Agrobacterium virulence genes. Here we outline the responses of Agrobacterium to major plant-derived signals that impact Agrobacterium–plant interactions. PMID:25071805

  20. Polygalacturonase Production by Agrobacterium tumefaciens Biovar 3

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Raymond G.; Rodriguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Collmer, Alan; Burr, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens biovar 3 causes both crown gall and root decay of grape. Twenty-two Agrobacterium strains representing biovars 1, 2, and 3 were analyzed for tumorigenicity, presence of a Ti plasmid, ability to cause grape seedling root decay, and pectolytic activity. All of the biovar 3 strains, regardless of their tumorigenicity or presence of a Ti plasmid, caused root decay and were pectolytic, whereas none of the biovar 1 and 2 strains had these capacities. Isoelectrically focused gels that were activity stained with differentially buffered polygalacturonate-agarose overlays revealed that all of the biovar 3 strains produced a single polygalacturonase with a pH optimum of 4.5 and pIs ranging from 4.8 to 5.2. The enzyme was largely extracellular and was produced constitutively in basal medium supplemented with a variety of carbon sources including polygalacturonic acid. Lesions on grape seedling roots inoculated with A. tumefaciens biovar 3 strain CG49 yielded polygalacturonase activity with a pI similar to that of the enzyme produced by the bacterium in culture. These observations support the hypothesis that the polygalacturonase produced by A. tumefaciens biovar 3 has a role in grape root decay. Images PMID:16348433

  1. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Fusarium proliferatum.

    PubMed

    Bernardi-Wenzel, J; Quecine, M C; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium proliferatum is an important pathogen that is associated with plant diseases and primarily affects aerial plant parts by producing different mycotoxins, which are toxic to humans and animals. Within the last decade, this fungus has also been described as one of the causes of red root rot or sudden death syndrome in soybean, which causes extensive damage to this crop. This study describes the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of F. proliferatum as a tool for the disruption of pathogenicity genes. The genetic transformation was performed using two binary vectors (pCAMDsRed and pFAT-GFP) containing the hph (hygromycin B resistance) gene as a selection marker and red and green fluorescence, respectively. The presence of acetosyringone and the use of filter paper or nitrocellulose membrane were evaluated for their effect on the transformation efficiency. A mean processing rate of 94% was obtained with 96 h of co-cultivation only in the presence of acetosyringone and the use of filter paper or nitrocellulose membrane did not affect the transformation process. Hygromycin B resistance and the presence of the hph gene were confirmed by PCR, and fluorescence due to the expression of GFP and DsRed protein was monitored in the transformants. A high rate of mitotic stability (95%) was observed. The efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of F. proliferatum allows the technique to be used for random insertional mutagenesis studies and to analyze fungal genes involved in the infection process. PMID:27323127

  2. Induction of hairy roots by various strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes in different types of Capsicum species explants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens, also known as “chilies”, belong to the Solanaceae family and have tremendous beneficial properties. The application of hairy root culture may become an alternative method for future development of these species by adding value, such as by increasing secondary metabolites and improving genetic and biochemical stability compared with normal Capsicum plants. Therefore, in this research, different types of explants of both species were infected with various Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains to provide more information about the morphology and induction efficiency of hairy roots. After 2 weeks of in vitro seed germination, young seedling explants were cut into three segments; the cotyledon, hypocotyl, and radical. Then, the explants were co-cultured with four isolated A. rhizogenes strains in Murashige & Skoog culture media (MS) containing decreasing carbenicillin disodium concentrations for one month. Results In this experiment, thick and short hairy roots were induced at all induction sites of C. annuum while thin, elongated hairy roots appeared mostly at wound sites of C. frutescens. Overall, the hairy root induction percentages of C. frutescens were higher compared with C. annuum. Hairy root initiation was observed earliest using radicles (1st week), followed by cotyledons (2nd week), and hypocotyls (3rd week). Cotyledon explants of both species had the highest induction frequency with all strains compared with the other explants types. Strains ATCC 13333 and ATCC 15834 were the most favourable for C. frutescens while ATCC 43056 and ATCC 43057 were the most favourable for C. annuum. The interactions between the different explants and strains showed significant differences with p-values < 0.0001 in both Capsicum species. Conclusions Both Capsicum species were amenable to A. rhizogenes infection and hairy root induction is recommended for use as an alternative explants in future plant-based studies. PMID

  3. Genome sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 8530.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Vanessa; Ewen, Emily; Bushell, Barry R; Ziola, Barry

    2012-02-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is found in the human gastrointestinal tract and is important for probiotics. We became interested in L. rhamnosus isolate ATCC 8530 in relation to beer spoilage and hops resistance. We report here the genome sequence of this isolate, along with a brief comparison to other available L. rhamnosus genome sequences. PMID:22247527

  4. Genome Sequence of Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 55737.

    PubMed

    Luna-Flores, Carlos H; Nielsen, Lars K; Marcellin, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acidipropionici produces propionic acid as its main fermentation product. Traditionally derived from fossil fuels, environmental and sustainable issues have revived the interest in producing propionic acid using biological resources. Here, we present the closed sequence of Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 55737, an efficient propionic acid producer. PMID:27198010

  5. Draft Genome Assemblies of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 and Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Chertkov, O; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    The pleomorphic swarming bacilli of the genus Proteus are common human gut commensal organisms but also the causative agents of recurrent urinary tract infections and bacteremia. We sequenced and assembled the 3.99-Mbp genome of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 (accession no. JOVJ00000000) and the 3.97-Mbp genome of Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132 (accession no. JPIX00000000), both of which are commonly used reference strains. PMID:25342681

  6. Horizontal gene transfer from Agrobacterium to plants

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Tatiana V.; Lutova, Ludmila A.

    2014-01-01

    Most genetic engineering of plants uses Agrobacterium mediated transformation to introduce novel gene content. In nature, insertion of T-DNA in the plant genome and its subsequent transfer via sexual reproduction has been shown in several species in the genera Nicotiana and Linaria. In these natural examples of horizontal gene transfer from Agrobacterium to plants, the T-DNA donor is assumed to be a mikimopine strain of A. rhizogenes. A sequence homologous to the T-DNA of the Ri plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes was found in the genome of untransformed Nicotiana glauca about 30 years ago, and was named “cellular T-DNA” (cT-DNA). It represents an imperfect inverted repeat and contains homologs of several T-DNA oncogenes (NgrolB, NgrolC, NgORF13, NgORF14) and an opine synthesis gene (Ngmis). A similar cT-DNA has also been found in other species of the genus Nicotiana. These presumably ancient homologs of T-DNA genes are still expressed, indicating that they may play a role in the evolution of these plants. Recently T-DNA has been detected and characterized in Linaria vulgaris and L. dalmatica. In Linaria vulgaris the cT-DNA is present in two copies and organized as a tandem imperfect direct repeat, containing LvORF2, LvORF3, LvORF8, LvrolA, LvrolB, LvrolC, LvORF13, LvORF14, and the Lvmis genes. All L. vulgaris and L. dalmatica plants screened contained the same T-DNA oncogenes and the mis gene. Evidence suggests that there were several independent T-DNA integration events into the genomes of these plant genera. We speculate that ancient plants transformed by A. rhizogenes might have acquired a selective advantage in competition with the parental species. Thus, the events of T-DNA insertion in the plant genome might have affected their evolution, resulting in the creation of new plant species. In this review we focus on the structure and functions of cT-DNA in Linaria and Nicotiana and discuss their possible evolutionary role. PMID:25157257

  7. Attachment of Agrobacterium to plant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Matthysse, Ann G.

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens binds to the surfaces of inanimate objects, plants, and fungi. These bacteria are excellent colonizers of root surfaces. In addition, they also bind to soil particles and to the surface of artificial or man-made substances, such as polyesters and plastics. The mechanisms of attachment to these different surfaces have not been completely elucidated. At least two types of binding have been described unipolarpolysaccharide-dependent polar attachment and unipolar polysaccharide-independent attachment (both polar and lateral). The genes encoding the enzymes for the production of the former are located on the circular chromosome, while the genes involved in the latter have not been identified. The expression of both of these types of attachment is regulated in response to environmental signals. However, the signals to which they respond differ so that the two types of attachment are not necessarily expressed coordinately. PMID:24926300

  8. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K. )

    1990-07-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate {sup 15}N supplied as {sup 15}N{sub 2}. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship.

  9. Sonication-assisted Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of Verbascum xanthophoeniceum Griseb. for bioactive metabolite accumulation.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Milen I; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Alipieva, Kalina; Lippert, Annemarie

    2011-05-01

    An efficient protocol for the establishment of transformed root culture of Verbascum xanthophoeniceum using sonication-assisted Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation is reported. Only 10 days after the inoculation with A. rhizogenes ATCC 15834 and 45 s ultrasound exposure, hairy roots appeared on 75% of the Verbascum leaves. Ten hairy root lines were isolated, although only half of them were free of bacterial contamination and started growing when excised from mother explants. The transgenic nature of the most vigorously growing hairy root clones (VX1 and VX6) was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Under submerged cultivation both hairy root clones accumulated high biomass amounts (12.8 and 14.3 g L(-1), respectively) and significant amounts of bioactive phenylethanoid glycoside verbascoside (over 6-times more than in mother plant leaves). LC-APCI-MS analyses confirmed verbascoside accumulation in hairy root clones along with three other phenylethanoid glycosides (forsythoside B, leucosceptoside B and martynoside) and an iridoid glycoside aucubin. This is the first report on the induction of hairy roots of Verbascum plants. PMID:21184229

  10. Bacteriophytochromes control conjugation in Agrobacterium fabrum.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yingnan; Rottwinkel, Gregor; Feng, Juan; Liu, Yiyao; Lamparter, Tilman

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial conjugation, the transfer of single stranded plasmid DNA from donor to recipient cell, is mediated through the type IV secretion system. We performed conjugation assays using a transmissible artificial plasmid as reporter. With this assay, conjugation in Agrobacterium fabrum was modulated by the phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2, photoreceptors that are most sensitive in the red region of visible light. In conjugation studies with wild-type donor cells carrying a pBIN-GUSINT plasmid as reporter that lacked the Ti (tumor inducing) plasmid, no conjugation was observed. When either agp1(-) or agp2(-) knockout donor strains were used, plasmid DNA was delivered to the recipient, indicating that both phytochromes suppress conjugation in the wild type donor. In the recipient strains, the loss of Agp1 or Agp2 led to diminished conjugation. When wild type cells with Ti plasmid and pBIN-GUS reporter plasmid were used as donor, a high rate of conjugation was observed. The DNA transfer was down regulated by red or far-red light by a factor of 3.5. With agp1(-) or agp2(-) knockout donor cells, conjugation in the dark was about 10 times lower than with the wild type donor, and with the double knockout donor no conjugation was observed. These results imply that the phytochrome system has evolved to inhibit conjugation in the light. The decrease of conjugation under different temperature correlated with the decrease of phytochrome autophosphorylation. PMID:27261700

  11. Proteomic Analysis of the Secretome of Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484 and Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482

    PubMed Central

    Wakarchuk, Warren W.; Brochu, Denis; Foote, Simon; Robotham, Anna; Saxena, Hirak; Erak, Tamara; Kelly, John

    2016-01-01

    The bacteria in the genus Cellulomonas are known for their ability to degrade plant cell wall biomass. Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484 and C. flavigena ATCC 482 have been the subject of much research into secreted cellulases and hemicellulases. Recently the genome sequences of both C. fimi ATCC 484 and C. flavigena ATCC 482 were published, and a genome comparison has revealed their full spectrum of possible carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). Using mass spectrometry, we have compared the proteins secreted by C. fimi and C. flavigena during growth on the soluble cellulose substrate, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), as well as a soluble xylan fraction. Many known C. fimi CAZymes were detected, which validated our analysis, as were a number of new CAZymes and other proteins that, though identified in the genome, have not previously been observed in the secretome of either organism. Our data also shows that many of these are co-expressed on growth of either CMC or xylan. This analysis provides a new perspective on Cellulomonas enzymes and provides many new CAZyme targets for characterization. PMID:26950732

  12. Biodegradation of crystal violet by Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Parshetti, G K; Parshetti, S G; Telke, A A; Kalyani, D C; Doong, R A; Govindwar, S P

    2011-01-01

    Agrobacterium radiobacter MTCC 8161 completely decolorized the Crystal Violet with 8 hr (10 mg/L) at static anoxic conditions. The decreased decolorization capability by A. radiobacter was observed, when the Crystal Violet concentration was increased from 10 to 100 mg/L. Semi-synthetic medium containing 1% yeast extract and 0.1% NH4C1 has shown 100% decolorization of Crystal Violet within 5 hr. A complete degradation of Crystal Violet by A. radiobacter was observed up to 7 cycles of repeated addition (10 mg/L). When the effect of increasing inoculum concentration on decolorization of Crystal Violet (100 mg/L) was studied, maximum decolorization was observed with 15% inoculum concentration. A significant increase in the activities of laccase (184%) and aminopyrine N-demethylase (300%) in cells obtained after decolorization indicated the involvement of these enzymes in decolorization process. The intermediates formed during the degradation of Crystal Violet were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). It was detected the presence of N,N,N',N"-tetramethylpararosaniline, [N, N-dimethylaminophenyl] [N-methylaminophenyl] benzophenone, N, N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde, 4-methyl amino phenol and phenol. We proposed the hypothetical metabolic pathway of Crystal Violet biodegradation by A. radiobacter. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity study showed that Crystal Violet biodegradation metabolites were less toxic to bacteria (A. radiobacter, P. aurugenosa and A. vinelandii) contributing to soil fertility and for four kinds of plants (Sorghum bicolor Vigna radiata, Lens culinaris and Triticum aestivum) which are most sensitive, fast growing and commonly used in Indian agriculture. PMID:22128547

  13. Two-way chemical signaling in Agrobacterium-plant interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Winans, S C

    1992-01-01

    The discovery in 1977 that Agrobacterium species can transfer a discrete segment of oncogenic DNA (T-DNA) to the genome of host plant cells has stimulated an intense interest in the molecular biology underlying these plant-microbe associations. This attention in turn has resulted in a series of insights about the biology of these organisms that continue to accumulate at an ever-increasing rate. This excitement was due in part to the notion that this unprecedented interkingdom DNA transfer could be exploited to create transgenic plants containing foreign genes of scientific or commercial importance. In the course of these discoveries, Agrobacterium became one of the best available models for studying the molecular interactions between bacteria and higher organisms. One extensively studied aspect of this association concerns the exchange of chemical signals between Agrobacterium spp. and host plants. Agrobacterium spp. can recognize no fewer than five classes of low-molecular-weight compounds released from plants, and other classes probably await discovery. The most widely studied of these are phenolic compounds, which stimulate the transcription of the genes needed for infection. Other compounds include specific monosaccharides and acidic environments which potentiate vir gene induction, acidic polysaccharides which induce one or more chromosomal genes, and a family of compounds called opines which are released from tumorous plant cells to the bacteria as nutrient sources. Agrobacterium spp. in return release a variety of chemical compounds to plants. The best understood is the transferred DNA itself, which contains genes that in various ways upset the balance of phytohormones, ultimately causing neoplastic cell proliferation. In addition to transferring DNA, some Agrobacterium strains directly secrete phytohormones. Finally, at least some strains release a pectinase, which degrades a component of plant cell walls. PMID:1579105

  14. Recent allopolyploid origin of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii strain ATCC 42981.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jonathan L; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2008-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii strain ATCC 42981 has been reported to have two copies of several genes including HOG1 and SOD2, whereas the type strain of Z. rouxii (CBS 732) has only one. To investigate the structure of the ATCC 42981 genome we sequenced random fragments from this genome and compared the data to the type strain. We found that ATCC 42981 contains two versions of the ribosomal RNA array, one of which is identical in the ITS1-ITS2 and 26S D1/D2 regions to Z. rouxii CBS 732, while the other is almost identical to a species provisionally named Z. pseudorouxii. We found that most genomic regions from Z. rouxii CBS 732 map in a one-to-two fashion to pairs of regions in ATCC 42981, with one of the ATCC 42981 regions having 97-100% DNA sequence identity to CBS 732 and the other having about 80-90% identity. Complete sequencing of regions containing 30 pairs of genes from ATCC 42981 and their orthologues in CBS 732 showed no evidence of the gene deletions or pseudogene formation that might be expected if ATCC 42981 had undergone whole-genome duplication several million years ago and was in the early stages of gene loss. Instead, we conclude that ATCC 42981 is a Z. rouxii-Z. pseudorouxii interspecies hybrid that was formed so recently that its genome has not had time to decay. PMID:18509846

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Type Strain Streptococcus gordonii ATCC 10558

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Louise H.; Dargis, Rimtas; Skovgaard, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii ATCC 10558T was isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis in 1946 and announced as a type strain in 1989. Here, we report the 2,154,510-bp draft genome sequence of S. gordonii ATCC 10558T. This sequence will contribute to knowledge about the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. PMID:26893427

  16. Temperature Effects on Agrobacterium Phytochrome Agp1

    PubMed Central

    Njimona, Ibrahim; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely distributed biliprotein photoreceptors with a conserved N-terminal chromophore-binding domain. Most phytochromes bear a light-regulated C-terminal His kinase or His kinase-like region. We investigated the effects of light and temperature on the His kinase activity of the phytochrome Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. As in earlier studies, the phosphorylation activity of the holoprotein after far-red irradiation (where the red-light absorbing Pr form dominates) was stronger than that of the holoprotein after red irradiation (where the far red-absorbing Pfr form dominates). Phosphorylation activities of the apoprotein, far red-irradiated holoprotein, and red-irradiated holoprotein decreased when the temperature increased from 25°C to 35°C; at 40°C, almost no kinase activity was detected. The activity of a holoprotein sample incubated at 40°C was nearly completely restored when the temperature returned to 25°C. UV/visible spectroscopy indicated that the protein was not denatured up to 45°C. At 50°C, however, Pfr denatured faster than the dark-adapted sample containing the Pr form of Agp1. The Pr visible spectrum was unaffected by temperatures of 20–45°C, whereas irradiated samples exhibited a clear temperature effect in the 30–40°C range in which prolonged irradiation resulted in the photoconversion of Pfr into a new spectral species termed Prx. Pfr to Prx photoconversion was dependent on the His-kinase module of Agp1; normal photoconversion occurred at 40°C in the mutant Agp1-M15, which lacks the C-terminal His-kinase module, and in a domain-swap mutant in which the His-kinase module of Agp1 is replaced by the His-kinase/response regulator module of the other A. tumefaciens phytochrome, Agp2. The temperature-dependent kinase activity and spectral properties in the physiological temperature range suggest that Agp1 serves as an integrated light and temperature sensor in A. tumefaciens. PMID:22043299

  17. Manganese transport in Brevibacterium ammoniagenes ATCC 6872.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, J; Auling, G

    1987-01-01

    Uptake of manganese by Brevibacterium ammoniagenes ATCC 6872 was energy dependent and obeyed saturation kinetics (Km = 0.65 microM; Vmax = 0.12 mumol/min per g [dry weight]). Uptake showed optima at 27 degrees C and pH 9.5. 54Mn2+ accumulated by the cells was released by treatment with toluene or by exchange for unlabeled manganese ions, via an energy-dependent process. Co2+, Fe2+, Cd2+, and Zn2+ inhibited manganese uptake. Inhibition by Cd2+ and Zn2+ was competitive (Ki = 0.15 microM Cd2+ and 1.2 microM Zn2+). Experiments with 65Zn2+ provided no evidence for Zn2+ uptake via the Mn2+ transport system. PMID:3597325

  18. Co-culturing a novel Bacillus strain with Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 to produce butyric acid from sucrose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, the most promising microorganism used for the bio-production of butyric acid is Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T; however, it is unable to use sucrose as a sole carbon source. Consequently, a newly isolated strain, Bacillus sp. SGP1, that was found to produce a levansucrase enzyme, which hydrolyzes sucrose into fructose and glucose, was used in a co-culture with this strain, permitting C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T to ferment sucrose to butyric acid. Results B. sp. SGP1 alone did not show any butyric acid production and the main metabolite produced was lactic acid. This allowed C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T to utilize the monosaccharides resulting from the activity of levansucrase together with the lactic acid produced by B. sp. SGP1 to generate butyric acid, which was the main fermentative product within the co-culture. Furthermore, the final acetic acid concentration in the co-culture was significantly lower when compared with pure C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T cultures grown on glucose. In fed-batch fermentations, the optimum conditions for the production of butyric acid were around pH 5.50 and a temperature of 37°C. Under these conditions, the final butyrate concentration was 34.2±1.8 g/L with yields of 0.35±0.03 g butyrate/g sucrose and maximum productivity of 0.3±0.04 g/L/h. Conclusions Using this co-culture, sucrose can be utilized as a carbon source for butyric acid production at a relatively high yield. In addition, this co-culture offers also the benefit of a greater selectivity, with butyric acid constituting 92.8% of the acids when the fermentation was terminated. PMID:23452443

  19. Virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281 on legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, E.E.; Fraley, R.T.; Chilton, M.D.

    1987-03-01

    This study addresses the basis of host range on legumes of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281, an L,L-succinamopine strain. The authors tested virulence of T-DNA and vir region constructs from this tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid with complementary Ti plasmid regions from heterologous nopaline and octopine strains.

  20. Is VIP1 important for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation?

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong; Lee, Lan-Ying; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium genetically transforms plants by transferring and integrating T-(transferred) DNA into the host genome. This process requires both Agrobacterium and host proteins. VirE2 interacting protein 1 (VIP1), an Arabidopsis bZIP protein, has been suggested to mediate transformation through interaction with and targeting of VirE2 to nuclei. We examined the susceptibility of Arabidopsis vip1 mutant and VIP1 overexpressing plants to transformation by numerous Agrobacterium strains. In no instance could we detect altered transformation susceptibility. We also used confocal microscopy to examine the subcellular localization of Venus-tagged VirE2 or Venus-tagged VIP1, in the presence or absence of the other untagged protein, in different plant cell systems. We found that VIP1-Venus localized in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus of Arabidopsis roots, agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts and tobacco BY-2 protoplasts, regardless of whether VirE2 was co-expressed. VirE2 localized exclusively to the cytoplasm of tobacco and Arabidopsis protoplasts, whether in the absence or presence of VIP1 overexpression. In transgenic Arabidopsis plants and agroinfiltrated N. benthamina leaves we could occasionally detect small aggregates of the Venus signal in nuclei, but these were likely to be imagining artifacts. The vast majority of VirE2 remained in the cytoplasm. We conclude that VIP1 is not important for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation or VirE2 subcellular localization. PMID:24953893

  1. [Agrobacterium rubi strains from blueberry plants are highly diverse].

    PubMed

    Abrahamovich, Eliana; López, Ana C; Alippi, Adriana M

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of a collection of Agrobacterium rubi strains isolated from blueberries from different regions of Argentina was studied by conventional microbiological tests and molecular techniques. Results from biochemical and physiological reactions, as well as from rep-PCR and RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified 23S rDNA showed high phenotypic and genotypic intraspecific variation. PMID:25444133

  2. Transgene expression in tick cells using agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ticks transmit infectious diseases to humans and other animals. Genetic manipulation of these arthropods would allow the development of alternative disease control strategies. Interestingly, Agrobacterium tumefaciens (At) mediated T-DNA transfer has been recently shown to promote the genetic modific...

  3. Genetic transformation of wheat via Agrobacterium-mediated DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Caroline A; Doherty, Angela; Jones, Huw D

    2014-01-01

    The method described involves an initial incubation of wheat immature embryos in a liquid culture of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The Agrobacterium strain is engineered to contain a binary vector with a gene of interest and a selectable marker gene placed between the T-DNA borders; the T-DNA is the region transferred to the plant cells, thus harnessing the bacterium's natural ability to deliver specific DNA into host cells. Following the initial inoculation with the Agrobacterium, the embryos are co-cultivated for several days after which the Agrobacterium is selectively destroyed using an antibiotic. Tissue culture of the embryos on plant media with a correct balance of hormones allows embryogenic callus formation followed by regeneration of plantlets, and in the later stages of tissue culture a selectable marker (herbicide) is included to minimize the incidence of non-transformed plants. This protocol has been used successfully to generate transformed plants of a wide range of wheat varieties, both spring and winter bread wheats (T. aestivum L.) and durum wheats (T. turgidum L.). PMID:24243208

  4. Impact of biological amendments on Agrobacterium tumefaciens soil survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paradox, the primary walnut rootstock used in California, is susceptible to Agrobacterium tumefaciens, which causes crown gall. While A. tumefaciens is susceptible to commonly used fumigants such as methyl bromide (MeBr) and Telone-C35 (1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin), these fumigants also sig...

  5. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Prunus salicina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation from hypocotyls slices of two Prunus salicina varieties, 'Angeleno' and 'Larry Anne', using a modification of the technique previously described for P. domestica. Regeneration rates on thidiazuron (TDZ) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) supp...

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium brumae ATCC 51384

    PubMed Central

    D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium brumae type strain ATCC 51384. This is the first draft genome sequence of M. brumae, a nonpathogenic, rapidly growing, nonchromogenic mycobacterium, with immunotherapeutic capacities. PMID:27125480

  7. Genome Sequence of Streptomyces aureofaciens ATCC Strain 10762

    PubMed Central

    Gradnigo, Julien S.; Somerville, Greg A.; Huether, Michael J.; Kemmy, Richard J.; Johnson, Craig M.; Oliver, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces aureofaciens is a Gram-positive actinomycete that produces the antibiotics tetracycline and chlortetracycline. Here, we report the assembly and initial annotation of the draft genome sequence of S. aureofaciens ATCC strain 10762. PMID:27340076

  8. Genome sequence of the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare ATCC 49512

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is a Gram-negative, rod shaped, motile, and highly prevalent fish pathogen causing columnaris disease in freshwater fish worldwide. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of F. columnare strain ATCC 49512. ...

  9. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Silvina; Gonzalez, Cintia Daniela; Petruccelli, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Transient assays provide a convenient alternative to stable transformation. Compared to the generation of stably transformed plants, agroinfiltration is more rapid, and samples can be analyzed a few days after inoculation. Nevertheless, at difference of tobacco and other plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana remains recalcitrant to routine transient assays. In this chapter, we describe a transient expression assay using simple infiltration of intact Arabidopsis leaves with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying a plasmid expressing a reporter fluorescent protein. In this protocol, Agrobacterium aggressiveness was increased by a prolonged treatment in an induction medium deficient in nutrients and containing acetosyringone. Besides, Arabidopsis plants were cultivated in intermediate photoperiod (12 h light-12 h dark) to promote leaf growth. PMID:24057365

  10. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of maize (Zea mays) immature embryos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Zhang, Zhanyuan J

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is one of the most efficient and simple gene delivery systems for genetic improvement and biology studies in maize. This system has become more widely used by both public and private laboratories. However, transformation efficiencies vary greatly from laboratory to laboratory for the same genotype. Here, we illustrate our advanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method in Hi-II maize using simple binary vectors. The protocol utilizes immature embryos as starting explants and the bar gene as a selectable marker coupled with bialaphos as a selective agent. The protocol offers efficient transformation results with high reproducibility, provided that some experimental conditions are well controlled. This transformation method, with minor modifications, can be also employed to transform certain maize inbreds. PMID:24243211

  11. Plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens and crown gall development

    PubMed Central

    Gohlke, Jochen; Deeken, Rosalia

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease on various plant species by introducing its T-DNA into the genome. Therefore, Agrobacterium has been extensively studied both as a pathogen and an important biotechnological tool. The infection process involves the transfer of T-DNA and virulence proteins into the plant cell. At that time the gene expression patterns of host plants differ depending on the Agrobacterium strain, plant species and cell-type used. Later on, integration of the T-DNA into the plant host genome, expression of the encoded oncogenes, and increase in phytohormone levels induce a fundamental reprogramming of the transformed cells. This results in their proliferation and finally formation of plant tumors. The process of reprogramming is accompanied by altered gene expression, morphology and metabolism. In addition to changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, further genome-wide (“omic”) approaches have recently deepened our understanding of the genetic and epigenetic basis of crown gall tumor formation. This review summarizes the current knowledge about plant responses in the course of tumor development. Special emphasis is placed on the connection between epigenetic, transcriptomic, metabolomic, and morphological changes in the developing tumor. These changes not only result in abnormally proliferating host cells with a heterotrophic and transport-dependent metabolism, but also cause differentiation and serve as mechanisms to balance pathogen defense and adapt to abiotic stress conditions, thereby allowing the coexistence of the crown gall and host plant. PMID:24795740

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. 33047

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 (Anabaena CA), a filamentous, nitrogen-fixing marine cyanobacterium, which under salt stress conditions accumulates sucrose internally. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the understanding of cyanobacterial diversity. PMID:27516507

  13. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) using optimized systems for epicotyls and cotelydons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epicotyl and internodal stem segments provide the predominantly used explants for regeneration of transgenic citrus plants following co-cultivation with Agrobacterium. Previous reports using epicotyls segments from Mexican lime have shown low affinity for Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection which re...

  14. A Fruiting Body Tissue Method for Efficient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Stone, Michelle; Schlagnhaufer, Carl; Romaine, C. Peter

    2000-01-01

    We describe a modified Agrobacterium-mediated method for the efficient transformation of Agaricus bisporus. Salient features of this procedure include cocultivation of Agrobacterium and fruiting body gill tissue and use of a vector with a homologous promoter. This method offers new prospects for the genetic manipulation of this commercially important mushroom species. PMID:11010906

  15. Cryptococcus socialis sp. nov. and Cryptococcus consortionis sp. nov., Antarctic basidioblastomycetes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    New yeasts from the Ross Desert (dry valley area) of Antarctica include Cryptococcus socialis sp. nov. and Cryptococcus consortionis sp. nov. Cryptococcus socialis MYSW A801-3aY1 (= ATCC 56685) requires no vitamins, assimilates L-arabinose, cellobiose, D-glucuronate, maltose, melezitose, raffinose, soluble starch, sucrose, and trehalose, and may be distinguished from all other basidioblastomycetes by the combination of amylose production, cellobiose assimilation, and failure to utilize nitrate, D-galactose, myo-inositol, and mannitol. Its guanine-plus-cytosine content is 56 mol%. Cryptococcus consortionis MYSW A801-3aY92 (= ATCC 56686) requires thiamine, assimilates L-arabinose, D-glucuronate, 2-ketogluconate, salicin, succinate, sucrose, trehalose, and D-xylose, and may be distinguished from all other basidioblastomycetes by the combination of amylose production and failure to utilize nitrate, cellobiose, D-galactose, myo-inositol, and mannitol. Its guanine-plus-cytosine content is 56 mol%.

  16. Reclassification of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 15820 as Lactobacillus zeae nom. rev., designation of ATCC 334 as the neotype of L. casei subsp. casei, and rejection of the name Lactobacillus paracasei.

    PubMed

    Dicks, L M; Du Plessis, E M; Dellaglio, F; Lauer, E

    1996-01-01

    The type strain of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei (ATCC 393) exhibits low levels of DNA homology with other strains of L. casei subsp. casei (8 to 46%) and strains of Lactobacillus paracasei (30 to 50%), but exhibits a level of DNA similarity of 80% with Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 15820, the original type strain of "Lactobacterium zeae" Kuznetsov 1959. Strains ATCC 393T (T = type strain) and ATCC 15820T are members of one protein profile cluster that is separate from the other Lactobacillus spp. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR profile of strain ATCC 393T is also different from the profiles obtained for the other species. L. casei ATCC 334T is genetically closely related to L. casei subsp. casei strains (71 to 97%) and L. paracasei strains (71 to 91%), is a member of the same protein profile cluster as these organisms, and shares several DNA amplicons with L. paracasei strains. On the basis of these results, we propose that L. casei subsp. casei ATCC 393T and L. rhamnosus ATCC 15820 should be reclassified as members of Lactobacillus zeae nom. rev. (type strain, ATCC 15820), that strain ATCC 334 should be designated the neotype strain of L. casei subsp. casei, and that the name L. paracasei should be rejected. PMID:8573516

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium rhizogenes Strain NCPPB2659

    PubMed Central

    Valdes Franco, Jose A.; Collier, Ray; Wang, Yi; Huo, Naxin; Gu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This work reports the draft genome sequence of Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain NCPPB2659 (also known as strain K599). The assembled genome contains 5,277,347 bp, composed of one circular chromosome, the pRi2659 virulence plasmid, and 17 scaffolds pertaining to the linear chromosome. The wild-type strain causes hairy root disease in dicots and has been used to make transgenic hairy root cultures and composite plants (nontransgenic shoots with transgenic roots). Disarmed variants of the strain have been used to produce stable transgenic monocot and dicot plants. PMID:27469966

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium rhizogenes Strain NCPPB2659.

    PubMed

    Valdes Franco, Jose A; Collier, Ray; Wang, Yi; Huo, Naxin; Gu, Yong; Thilmony, Roger; Thomson, James G

    2016-01-01

    This work reports the draft genome sequence of Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain NCPPB2659 (also known as strain K599). The assembled genome contains 5,277,347 bp, composed of one circular chromosome, the pRi2659 virulence plasmid, and 17 scaffolds pertaining to the linear chromosome. The wild-type strain causes hairy root disease in dicots and has been used to make transgenic hairy root cultures and composite plants (nontransgenic shoots with transgenic roots). Disarmed variants of the strain have been used to produce stable transgenic monocot and dicot plants. PMID:27469966

  19. Transformation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Michelmore, R; Marsh, E; Seely, S; Landry, B

    1987-12-01

    Lactuca sativa can be routinely transformed using Ti plasmids of Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing a chimeric kanamycin resistance gene (NOS.NPTII.NOS). Critical experimental variables were plant genotype, bacterial concentration, presence of a nurse culture and timing of transfers between tissue culture media. Transformation was confirmed by the ability to callus and root in the presence of kanamycin, nopaline production, and by hybridization in Southern blots. Transformation has been achieved with several Ti vectors. Several hundred transformed plants have been regenerated. Kanamycin resistance was inherited monogenically. Homozygotes can be selected by growing R2 seedlings on media containing G418. PMID:24248927

  20. Three new cembranoids from the Bornean soft coral Nephthea sp.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takahiro; Kamada, Takashi; Vairappan, Charles S

    2016-05-01

    Three new cembranoid diterpenes, 10-hydroxy-nephthenol acetate (1), 7,8-epoxy-10-hydroxy-nephthenol acetate (2), and 6-acetoxy-7,8-epoxy-10-hydroxy-nephthenol acetate (3), along with a known compound, 6-acetoxy-7,8-epoxy-nephthenol acetate (4), were isolated from the Bornean soft coral Nephthea sp. Antibacterial and anticancer activities were exhibited by compounds 1 and 2 against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538)/Escherichia coli (ATCC 13311) and Hela/MCF-7, respectively. PMID:26983053

  1. Microgravity Alters the Physiological Characteristics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 35150, ATCC 43889, and ATCC 43895 under Different Nutrient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. W.; Matin, A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide understanding of microgravity effects on important food-borne bacteria, Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 35150, ATCC 43889, and ATCC 43895, cultured in nutrient-rich or minimal medium. Physiological characteristics, such as growth (measured by optical density and plating), cell morphology, and pH, were monitored under low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG; space conditions) and normal gravity (NG; Earth conditions). In nutrient-rich medium, all strains except ATCC 35150 showed significantly higher optical density after 6 h of culture under LSMMG conditions than under NG conditions (P < 0.05). LSMMG-cultured cells were approximately 1.8 times larger than NG-cultured cells at 24 h; therefore, it was assumed that the increase in optical density was due to the size of individual cells rather than an increase in the cell population. The higher pH of the NG cultures relative to that of the LSMMG cultures suggests that nitrogen metabolism was slower in the latter. After 24 h of culturing in minimal media, LSMMG-cultured cells had an optical density 1.3 times higher than that of NG-cultured cells; thus, the higher optical density in the LSMMG cultures may be due to an increase in both cell size and number. Since bacteria actively grew under LSMMG conditions in minimal medium despite the lower pH, it is of some concern that LSMMG-cultured E. coli O157:H7 may be able to adapt well to acidic environments. These changes may be caused by changes in nutrient metabolism under LSMMG conditions, although this needs to be demonstrated in future studies. PMID:24487539

  2. Identification of a cryptic type III polyketide synthase (1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase) from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Gopal Prasad; Oh, Tae-Jin; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2008-10-31

    We identified a 1,134-bp putative type III polyketide synthase from the sequence analysis of Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952, named Sp-RppA, which is characterized as 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase and shares 33% identity with SCO1206 from S. coelicolor A3(2) and 32% identity with RppA from S. griseus. The 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase is known to catalyze the sequential decarboxylative condensation, intramolecular cyclization, and aromatization of an oligoketide derived from five units of malonyl-CoA to give 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene, which spontaneously oxidizes to form 2,5,7-trihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (flaviolin). In this study, we report the in vivo expression and in vitro synthesis of flaviolin from purified gene product (Sp-RppA). PMID:18612244

  3. Conjugation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens in the absence of plant tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, R A; Farrand, S K; Gordon, M P; Nester, E W

    1976-01-01

    A general, reliable conjugation system for Agrobacterium tumefaciens in the absence of plant tissue is described in which A. tumefaciens can serve either as the donor or recipient of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid with reasonable efficiency. Plasmid RP4 was transferred from Escherichia coli to A. tumefaciens and from strain of A. tumefaciens. Both RP4 and the A. tumefaciens virulence-associated plasmids were detected by alkaline sucrose gradients in A. tumefaciens strains A6 and C58 after mating with E. coli J53(RP4). The pathogenicity (tumor foramtion) of strains A6 and C58 and the sensitivity of strain C58 to bacteriocin 84 were unaffected by the acquistion of RP4 by the Agrobacterium strains. Plasmid R1drd-19 was not transferred to A. tumefaciens. Transformation experiments with plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid were unsuccessful, even though, in the case of RP4, conjugation studies showed taht the deoxyribonucleic acid was compatible with that of the recipient strains. PMID:783141

  4. Genome Sequence of Ureaplasma diversum Strain ATCC 49782.

    PubMed

    Marques, Lucas M; Guimarães, Ana M S; Martins, Hellen B; Rezende, Izadora S; Barbosa, Maysa S; Campos, Guilherme B; do Nascimento, Naíla C; Dos Santos, Andrea P; Amorim, Aline T; Santos, Verena M; Messick, Joanne B; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Ureaplasma diversum strain ATCC 49782. This species is of bovine origin, having an association with reproductive disorders in cattle, including placentitis, fetal alveolitis, abortion, and birth of weak calves. It has a small circular chromosome of 975,425 bp. PMID:25883297

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Zymomonas mobilis ZM481 (ATCC 31823)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ning; Pan, Yongxu

    2016-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis ZM481 (ATCC 31823) is an ethanol-tolerant strain that can produce the highest level of ethanol in Z. mobilis from glucose in the shortest time. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of ZM481, which can help us understand the genes related to the ethanol tolerance of this strain. PMID:27056218

  6. Genome Assembly of Serratia marcescens Type Strain ATCC 13880.

    PubMed

    Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Minogue, T D; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Rosenzweig, C N; Scholz, M; Teshima, H; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880 is the type strain of the species and a commonly used quality control strain. Here, we present the annotated genome assembly of 5.13 Mbp (59.8% G+C content) as submitted to NCBI under accession no. JOVM00000000. PMID:25291774

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris Strain ATCC 49025

    PubMed Central

    Pasvolsky, Ronit; Sela, Noa; Green, Stefan J.; Zakin, Varda

    2013-01-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is a spore-forming Gram-positive, thermo-acidophilic, nonpathogenic bacterium which contaminates commercial pasteurized fruit juices. The draft genome sequence for A. acidoterrestris strain ATCC 49025 is reported here, providing genetic data relevant to the successful adaptation and survival of this strain in its ecological niche. PMID:24009113

  8. 3-Methylindole production is regulated in Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: 3-Methylindole (3-MI) is a degradation product of L-tryptophan and is both an animal waste malodorant and threat to ruminant health. Culture conditions which influence 3-MI production in Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775 were investigated. Methods and Results: Cells cultured in anaerobic ...

  9. Genome Sequence of the Oleaginous Yeast Rhodotorula glutinis ATCC 204091.

    PubMed

    Paul, Debarati; Magbanua, Zenaida; Arick, Mark; French, Todd; Bridges, Susan M; Burgess, Shane C; Lawrence, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    Rhodotorula glutinis ATCC 204091 is an oleaginous oxidative red yeast that can accumulate lipids to >50% of its biomass when grown with appropriate carbon and nitrogen ratios. It produces a red pigment consisting of useful antioxidants, such as carotenoids, torulene, and torularhodin, when cultivated under carbon-deficient conditions. PMID:24526636

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium interjectum Strain ATCC 51457T

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Anthony; Asmar, Shady; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium interjectum is a nontuberculosis species rarely responsible for human infection. The draft genome of M. interjectum ATCC 51457T comprises 5,927,979 bp, exhibiting 67.91% G+C content, 5,314 protein-coding genes, and 51 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27231376

  11. Complete genome sequence of Campylobacter gracilis ATCC 33236T

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human oral pathogen Campylobacter gracilis has been isolated from periodontal and endodontal infections, and also from non-oral head, neck or lung infections. This study describes the whole-genome sequence of the human periodontal isolate ATCC 33236T (=FDC 1084), which is the first closed genome...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Alternaria alternata ATCC 34957.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai D T; Lewis, Christopher T; Lévesque, C André; Gräfenhan, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Alternaria alternata ATCC 34957. This strain was previously reported to produce alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether on weathered grain sorghum. The genome was sequenced with PacBio technology and assembled into 27 scaffolds with a total genome size of 33.5 Mb. PMID:26769939

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain ATCC 21198

    SciTech Connect

    Shields-Menard, Sara A.; Brown, Steven D; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Indest, Karl; Hancock, Dawn; Wewalwela, Jayani; French, Todd; Donaldson, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous is a Gram-positive red-pigmented bacterium commonly found in the soil. The draft genome sequence for R. rhodochrous strain ATCC 21198 is presented here to provide genetic data for a better understanding of its lipid-accumulating capabilities.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium houstonense Strain ATCC 49403T

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Anthony; Asmar, Shady; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium houstonense is a nontuberculous species rarely responsible for human infection. The draft genome of M. houstonense ATCC 49403T comprises 6,451,020 bp, exhibiting a 66.96% G+C content, 5,881 protein-coding genes, and 65 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27231371

  15. Genome Assembly of Serratia marcescens Type Strain ATCC 13880

    PubMed Central

    Daligault, H. E.; Davenport, K. W.; Minogue, T. D.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Coyne, S. R.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Rosenzweig, C. N.; Scholz, M.; Teshima, H.

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880 is the type strain of the species and a commonly used quality control strain. Here, we present the annotated genome assembly of 5.13 Mbp (59.8% G+C content) as submitted to NCBI under accession no. JOVM00000000. PMID:25291774

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Sesbania Symbiont and Rice Growth-Promoting Endophyte Rhizobium sp. Strain IRBG74

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Matthew B.; Mitra, Shubhajit; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain IRBG74 is the first known nitrogen-fixing symbiont in the Agrobacterium/Rhizobium clade that nodulates the aquatic legume Sesbania sp. and is also a growth-promoting endophyte of wetland rice. Here, we present the sequence of the IRBG74 genome, which is composed of a circular chromosome, a linear chromosome, and a symbiotic plasmid, pIRBG74a. PMID:24265489

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Strain ATCC 33958, Reported To Be Elizabethkingia miricola

    PubMed Central

    Matyi, Stephanie A.; Hoyt, Peter R.; Ayoubi-Canaan, Patricia; Hasan, Nabeeh A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome of Elizabethkingia strain ATCC 33958, which has been classified as Elizabethkingia miricola. Similar to other Elizabethkingia species, the ATCC 33958 draft genome contains numerous β-lactamase genes. ATCC 33958 also harbors a urease gene cluster which supports classification as E. miricola. PMID:26205869

  18. 40 CFR 180.1205 - Beauveria bassiana ATCC #74040; exemption from the requirements of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Beauveria bassiana ATCC #74040... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1205 Beauveria bassiana ATCC #74040; exemption from the... the insecticide Beauveria bassiana (ATCC #74040) in or on all food commodities when applied or used...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1205 - Beauveria bassiana ATCC #74040; exemption from the requirements of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Beauveria bassiana ATCC #74040... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1205 Beauveria bassiana ATCC #74040; exemption from the... the insecticide Beauveria bassiana (ATCC #74040) in or on all food commodities when applied or used...

  20. Spectrophotometric evaluation of selenium binding by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC MYA-2200 and Candida utilis ATCC 9950 yeast.

    PubMed

    Kieliszek, Marek; Błażejak, Stanisław; Płaczek, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the ability of selenium binding the biomas of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC MYA-2200 and Candida utilis ATCC 9950 was investigated. Sodium selenite(IV) salts were added to the experimental media at concentrations of 10, 20, 40, and 60mg Se(4+) L(-1). In the tested concentration range, one concentration reported a significant reduction in the biomass yield of both yeast strains. Intense growth was observed for C. utilis yeast, which reached the highest biomass yield of 15gd.w.L(-1) after 24h cultivation in the presence of 10mg Se(4+) L(-1). Based on the use of spectrophotometric method for the determination of selenium content by using Variamine Blue as a chromogenic agent, efficient accumulation of this element in the biomass of the investigated yeast was observed. The highest amount of selenium, that is, 5.64mg Se(4+)gd.w.(-1), was bound from the environment by S. cerevisiae ATCC MYA-2200 cultured in the presence of 60mg Se(4+) L(-1) medium 72h Slightly less amount, 5.47mg Se(4+) gd.w.(-1), was absorbed by C. utilis ATCC 9950 during similar cultural conditions. Based on the results of the biomass yield and the use of selenium from the medium, it can be observed that yeasts of the genus Candida are more efficient in binding this element, and this property finds practical application in the production of selenium-enriched yeast. PMID:27049131

  1. Heterologous expression and localization of gentisate transporter Ncg12922 from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Ying; Yan Dazhong; Zhou Ningyi . E-mail: n.zhou@pentium.whiov.ac.cn

    2006-07-28

    Ralstonia sp. strain U2 metabolizes naphthalene via gentisate (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate) to central metabolites, but it was found unable to utilize gentisate as growth substrate. A putative gentisate transporter encoded by ncg12922 from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was functionally expressed in Ralstonia sp. strain U2, converting strain U2 to a gentisate utilizer. After ncg12922 was inserted into plasmid pGFPe with green fluorescence protein gene gfp, the expressed fusion protein Ncg12922-GFP could be visualized in the periphery of Escherichia coli cells under confocal microscope, consistent with a cytoplasmic membrane location. In contrast, GFP was ubiquitous in the cytoplasm of E. coli cells carrying pGFPe only. Gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase activity was present in the cell extract from strain U2 induced with gentisate but at a much lower level (one-fifth) than that obtained with salicylate. However, it exhibited a similar level in strain U2 containing Ncg12922 induced either by salicylate or gentisate.

  2. First Report of Crown Gall Caused by Agrobacterium sp. on Diffuse Knapweed (Centaurea diffusa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A specimen of diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa, DK) with crown gall-like symptoms was collected July 27, 2004, in Mosier, Wasco Co., OR (N 45.6842, W 121.4021), and sent to the USDA at Ft. Detrick, MD, for identification. A bacterium was isolated on Potato Dextrose Agar that caused hyperplasia a...

  3. Highly efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Volvariella volvacea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Guo, Liqiong; Zhang, Kai; Wu, Qi; Lin, Junfang

    2008-11-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was successfully applied to the edible straw mushroom, Volvariella volvacea. Mycelium pellets were transformed to cold stress resistance using the afp gene as both a selective marker and a reporter gene, under the control of a heterologous Lentinula edodes gpd promoter. The efficiency of transformation is over 100 times higher than that previously reported in V. volvacea. Stable integration of the afp gene with 1-4 copy numbers was confirmed in all 10 randomly selected transgenic events by Southern blot analysis. The mitotic stability of the transformants was demonstrated after five successive transfers on PDA medium without selection pressure and the PCR analysis of basidiospores harvested from transformants. PMID:18434137

  4. Succinoglycan production by solid-state fermentation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Stredansky, M; Conti, E

    1999-09-01

    Succinoglycan was produced by cultivating Agrobacterium tumefaciens on various solid substrates, including agar medium, spent malt grains, ivory nut shavings, and grated carrots, impregnated with a nutrient+ solution. Fermentations were performed on a laboratory scale, both under static conditions and with agitation, using bottles and a prototype horizontal bioreactor. Several fermentation parameters were examined and optimized, including carbon and nitrogen composition, water content and layer thickness of the substrate. The yields and rheological properties of the polymers obtained under different fermentation conditions were compared. The highest succinoglycan yield was achieved in static cultivation, reaching 42 g/l of impregnating solution, corresponding to 30 g/kg of wet substrate. The polymer production in the horizontal bioreactor was faster, but the final yield was lower (29 g/l of impregnating solution). PMID:10531645

  5. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Botryosphaeria dothidea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Wang, Qun; Chen, Hua; Sun, Gengwu; Liu, Huixiang; Wang, Hongkai

    2016-07-01

    Botryosphaeria dothidea is a severe causal agent of die-back and cankers of many woody plants and causes great losses in many regions. The pathogenic mechanism of this pathogen has not been well explored due to lack of mutants and genetic information. In this study, we developed an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) protocol for B. dothidea protoplasts using vector pBHt2 containing the hph gene as a selection marker under the control of trp C promoter. Using this protocol we successfully generated the B. dothidea transformants with efficiency about 23 transformants per 10(5) protoplasts. This is the first report of genetic transformation of B. dothidea via ATMT and this protocol provides an effective tool for B. dothidea genome manipulation, gene identification and functional analysis. PMID:27263001

  6. Transformation of the mycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Minna J; Pardo, Alejandro G

    2011-01-01

    Most boreal and temperate forest trees form a mutualistic symbiosis with soil borne fungi called ectomycorrhiza (ECM). In this association both partners benefit due to nutrient exchange at the symbiotic interface. Laccaria bicolor is the first mycorrhizal fungus with its genome sequenced thus making possible for the first time to analyze genome scale gene expression profiles of a mutualistic fungus. However, in order to be able to take full advantage of the genome sequence, reverse genetic tools are needed. Among them a high throughput transformation system is crucial. Herein we present a detailed protocol for genetic transformation of L. bicolor by means of Agrobacterium tumefaciens with emphasis on critical steps affecting the success and efficiency of the approach. PMID:21636986

  7. Enterococcus Xinjiangensis sp. nov., Isolated from Yogurt of Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaopu; Li, Mingyang; Guo, Dongqi

    2016-09-01

    A Gram-strain-positive bacterial strain 48(T) was isolated from traditional yogurt in Xinjiang Province, China. The bacterium was characterized by a polyphasic approach, including 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, polymerase α subunit (rpoA) gene sequence analysis, determination of DNA G+C content, DNA-DNA hybridization with the type strain of Enterococcus ratti and analysis of phenotypic features. Strain 48(T) accounted for 96.1, 95.8, 95.8, and 95.7 % with Enterococcus faecium CGMCC 1.2136(T), Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790(T), Enterococcus durans CECT 411(T), and E. ratti ATCC 700914(T) in the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, respectively. The sequence of rpoA gene showed similarities of 99.0, 96.0, 96.0, and 96 % with that of E. faecium ATCC 19434(T), Enterococcus villorum LMG12287, E. hirae ATCC 9790(T), and E. durans ATCC 19432(T), respectively. Based upon of polyphasic characterization data obtained in the study, a novel species, Enterococcus xinjiangensis sp. nov., was proposed and the type strain was 48(T)(=CCTCC AB 2014041(T) = JCM 30200(T)). PMID:27260143

  8. Progress of cereal transformation technology mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hiei, Yukoh; Ishida, Yuji; Komari, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Monocotyledonous plants were believed to be not transformable by the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens until two decades ago, although convenient protocols for infection of leaf disks and subsequent regeneration of transgenic plants had been well established in a number of dicotyledonous species by then. This belief was reinforced by the fact that monocotyledons are mostly outside the host range of crown gall disease caused by the bacterium and by the failures in trials in monocotyledons to mimic the transformation protocols for dicotyledons. However, a key reason for the failure could have been the lack of active cell divisions at the wound sites in monocotyledons. The complexity and narrow optimal windows of critical factors, such as genotypes of plants, conditions of the plants from which explants are prepared, tissue culture methods and culture media, pre-treatments of explants, strains of A. tumefaciens, inducers of virulence genes, transformation vectors, selection marker genes and selective agents, kept technical hurdles high. Eventually it was demonstrated that rice and maize could be transformed by co-cultivating cells of callus cultures or immature embryos, which are actively dividing or about to divide, with A. tumefaciens. Subsequently, these initial difficulties were resolved one by one by many research groups, and the major cereals are now transformed quite efficiently. As many as 15 independent transgenic events may be regenerated from a single piece of immature embryo of rice. Maize transformation protocols are well established, and almost all transgenic events deregulated for commercialization after 2003 were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Wheat, barley, and sorghum are also among those plants that can be efficiently transformed by A. tumefaciens. PMID:25426132

  9. Application of succulent plant leaves for Agrobacterium infiltration-mediated protein production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infiltration of tobacco leaves with a suspension of Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring a binary plant expression plasmid provides a convenient method for laboratory scale protein production. When expressing plant cell wall degrading enzymes in the widely used tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), diffic...

  10. Competence of Immature Maize Embryos for Agrobacterium-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Schlappi, M; Hohn, B

    1992-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of viral sequences to plant cells (agroinfection) was applied to study the susceptibility of immature maize embryos to the pathogen. The shoot apical meristem of immature embryos 10 to 20 days after pollination from four different maize genotypes was investigated for competence for agroinfection. There was a direct correlation between different morphological stages of the unwounded immature embryos and their competence for agroinfection. Agroinfection frequency was highest in the embryogenic line A188. All developmental stages tested showed Agrobacterium virulence gene-inducing activity, whereas bacteriocidal substances were produced at stages of the immature embryos competent for agroinfection. The results suggested that Agrobacterium may require differentiated tissue in the maize shoot apical meristem before wounding for successful T-DNA transfer. This requirement for the young maize embryo has implications for the possible use of Agrobacterium for maize transformation. PMID:12297627

  11. Closed Genome Sequence of Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013

    PubMed Central

    Rotta, Carlo; Poehlein, Anja; Schwarz, Katrin; McClure, Peter; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    We report here the closed genome of Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013, a saccharolytic, nitrogen-fixing, and spore-forming Gram-positive obligate anaerobe. The organism is of biotechnological interest due to the production of solvents (butanol and 1,3-propanediol) but can be associated with food spoilage. The genome comprises a total of 4,351,223 bp. PMID:25700419

  12. Thermostable purified endoglucanase II from Acidothermus cellulolyticus ATCC

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Thomas, Steven R.; Nieves, Rafael A.; Himmel, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    A purified low molecular weight endoglucanase II from Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) is disclosed. The endoglucanase is water soluble, possesses both C.sub.1, and C.sub.x types of enzyme activity, a high degree of stability toward heat, and exhibits optimum temperature activity at about 81.degree. C. at pH's from about 2 to about 9, and at a inactivation temperature of about 100.degree. C. at pH's from about 2 to about 9.

  13. Magnetic response in cultures of Streptococcus mutans ATCC-27607.

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, V W; Bassous, C; Morency, D; Lorrain, P; Lepage, J L

    1987-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans ATCC-27607 produces exopolysaccharides that adhere to glass. In the normal geomagnetic field about 50% more polysaccharide adhere preferentially to glass surfaces facing North as compared to South facing surfaces. Reversal of the direction of the magnetic field by 180 degrees produces a similar reversal in the direction of the preferential accumulation. Reduction of the field by 90% abolishes the preferential accumulation. PMID:3582582

  14. Thermostable purified endoglucanase II from Acidothermus cellulolyticus ATCC

    DOEpatents

    Adney, W.S.; Thomas, S.R.; Nieves, R.A.; Himmel, M.E.

    1994-11-22

    A purified low molecular weight endoglucanase II from Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) is disclosed. The endoglucanase is water soluble, possesses both C[sub 1], and C[sub x] types of enzyme activity, a high degree of stability toward heat, and exhibits optimum temperature activity at about 81 C at pH's from about 2 to about 9, and at a inactivation temperature of about 100 C at pH's from about 2 to about 9. 9 figs.

  15. Review of methodologies and a protocol for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of wheat

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Huw D; Doherty, Angela; Wu, Huixia

    2005-01-01

    Since the first report of wheat transformation by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in 1997, various factors that influence T-DNA delivery and regeneration in tissue culture have been further investigated and modified. This paper reviews the current methodology literature describing Agrobacterium transformation of wheat and provides a complete protocol that we have developed and used to produce over one hundred transgenic lines in both spring and winter wheat varieties. PMID:16270934

  16. Review of methodologies and a protocol for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of wheat.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw D; Doherty, Angela; Wu, Huixia

    2005-09-01

    Since the first report of wheat transformation by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in 1997, various factors that influence T-DNA delivery and regeneration in tissue culture have been further investigated and modified. This paper reviews the current methodology literature describing Agrobacterium transformation of wheat and provides a complete protocol that we have developed and used to produce over one hundred transgenic lines in both spring and winter wheat varieties. PMID:16270934

  17. Attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens B6 and A. radiobacter K84 to Tomato Root Tips

    PubMed Central

    Penalver, R.; Serra, M. T.; Duran-Vila, N.; Lopez, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens B6 and the avirulent Agrobacterium radiobacter strain K84 attached to in vitro-cultured tomato root tips, but the binding of strain B6 to root tips was greater than the binding of strain K84. Strain K84 was not able to block the attachment of A. tumefaciens B6 to in vitro-cultured tomato root tips. PMID:16535413

  18. A Novel Phenolic Compound, Chloroxynil, Improves Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Transformation in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Cutler, Sean; Isobe, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a commonly used method for plant genetic engineering. However, the limitations of Agrobacterium host-plant interactions and the complexity of plant tissue culture often make the production of transgenic plants difficult. Transformation efficiency in many legume species, including soybean and the common bean, has been reported to be quite low. To improve the transformation procedure in legumes, we screened for chemicals that increase the transformation efficiency of Lotus japonicus, a model legume species. A Chemical library was screened and chemicals that increase in transient transformation efficiency of L. japonicus accession, Miyakojima MG-20 were identified. The transient transformation efficiency was quantified by reporter activity in which an intron-containing reporter gene produces the GUS protein only when the T-DNA is expressed in the plant nuclei. We identified a phenolic compound, chloroxynil, which increased the genetic transformation of L. japonicus by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105. Characterization of the mode of chloroxynil action indicated that it enhanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation through the activation of the Agrobacterium vir gene expression, similar to acetosyringone, a phenolic compound known to improve Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency. Transient transformation efficiency of L. japonicus with 5 μM chloroxynil was 60- and 6- fold higher than that of the control and acetosyringone treatment, respectively. In addition, transgenic L. japonicus lines were successfully generated by 5 μM chloroxynil treatment.Furthermore, we show that chloroxynil improves L. japonicus transformation by Agrobacterium strain GV3101 and rice transformation. Our results demonstrate that chloroxynil significantly improves Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation efficiency of various agriculturally important crops. PMID:26176780

  19. Heterologous DNA Uptake in Cultured Symbiodinium spp. Aided by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Boris; Menzel, Diedrik; Baluška, František; Villanueva, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-targeted pCB302 plasmids containing sequences encoding gfp fusions with a microtubule-binding domain; gfp with the fimbrin actin-binding domain 2; and gfp with AtRACK1C from Arabidopsis thaliana, all harbored in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, were used to assay heterologous expression on three different clades of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium. Accessibility to the resistant cell wall and through the plasma membrane of these dinoflagellates was gained after brief but vigorous shaking in the presence of glass beads and polyethylene glycol. A resistance gene to the herbicide Basta allowed appropriate selection of the cells expressing the hybrid proteins, which showed a characteristic green fluorescence, although they appeared to lose their photosynthetic pigments and did not further divide. Cell GFP expression frequency measured as green fluorescence emission yielded 839 per every 106 cells for Symbiodinium kawagutii, followed by 640 and 460 per every 106 cells for Symbiodinium microadriaticum and Symbiodinium sp. Mf11, respectively. Genomic PCR with specific primers amplified the AtRACK1C and gfp sequences after selection in all clades, thus revealing their presence in the cells. RT-PCR from RNA of S. kawagutii co-incubated with A. tumefaciens harboring each of the three vectors with their respective constructs, amplified products corresponding to the heterologous gfp sequence while no products were obtained from three distinct negative controls. The reported procedure shows that mild abrasion followed by co-incubation with A. tumefaciens harboring heterologous plasmids with CaMV35S and nos promoters can lead to expression of the encoded proteins into the Symbiodinium cells in culture. Despite the obvious drawbacks of the procedure, this is an important first step towards a stable transformation of Symbiodinium. PMID:26167858

  20. Heterologous DNA Uptake in Cultured Symbiodinium spp. Aided by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Matamoros, Mario Fernando; Islas-Flores, Tania; Voigt, Boris; Menzel, Diedrik; Baluška, František; Villanueva, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Plant-targeted pCB302 plasmids containing sequences encoding gfp fusions with a microtubule-binding domain; gfp with the fimbrin actin-binding domain 2; and gfp with AtRACK1C from Arabidopsis thaliana, all harbored in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, were used to assay heterologous expression on three different clades of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium. Accessibility to the resistant cell wall and through the plasma membrane of these dinoflagellates was gained after brief but vigorous shaking in the presence of glass beads and polyethylene glycol. A resistance gene to the herbicide Basta allowed appropriate selection of the cells expressing the hybrid proteins, which showed a characteristic green fluorescence, although they appeared to lose their photosynthetic pigments and did not further divide. Cell GFP expression frequency measured as green fluorescence emission yielded 839 per every 106 cells for Symbiodinium kawagutii, followed by 640 and 460 per every 106 cells for Symbiodinium microadriaticum and Symbiodinium sp. Mf11, respectively. Genomic PCR with specific primers amplified the AtRACK1C and gfp sequences after selection in all clades, thus revealing their presence in the cells. RT-PCR from RNA of S. kawagutii co-incubated with A. tumefaciens harboring each of the three vectors with their respective constructs, amplified products corresponding to the heterologous gfp sequence while no products were obtained from three distinct negative controls. The reported procedure shows that mild abrasion followed by co-incubation with A. tumefaciens harboring heterologous plasmids with CaMV35S and nos promoters can lead to expression of the encoded proteins into the Symbiodinium cells in culture. Despite the obvious drawbacks of the procedure, this is an important first step towards a stable transformation of Symbiodinium. PMID:26167858

  1. Treponema berlinense sp. nov. and Treponema porcinum sp. nov., novel spirochaetes isolated from porcine faeces.

    PubMed

    Nordhoff, Marcel; Taras, David; Macha, Moritz; Tedin, Karsten; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Wieler, Lothar H

    2005-07-01

    Limit-dilution procedures were used to isolate seven, helically coiled bacterial strains from faeces of swine that constituted two unidentified taxa. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed highest similarity values with species of the genus Treponema indicating that the isolates are members of this genus. Strain 7CPL208(T), as well as five further isolates, and 14V28(T) displayed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Treponema pectinovorum ATCC 33768(T) (92.3%) and Treponema parvum OMZ 833(T) (89.9%), respectively. Polar lipid profiles distinguished 7CPL208(T) and 14V28(T) from each other as well as from related species. Based on their phenotypic and genotypic distinctiveness, strains 7CPL208(T) and 14V28(T) are suggested to represent two novel species of the genus Treponema, for which the names Treponema berlinense sp. nov. and Treponema porcinum sp. nov. are proposed. The type strain for Treponema berlinense is 7CPL208(T) (=ATCC BAA-909(T)=CIP 108244(T)=JCM 12341(T)) and for Treponema porcinum 14V28(T) (=ATCC BAA-908(T)=CIP 108245(T)=JCM 12342(T)). PMID:16014500

  2. Synergistic Action of D-Glucose and Acetosyringone on Agrobacterium Strains for Efficient Dunaliella Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramachandran

    2016-01-01

    An effective transformation protocol for Dunaliella, a β-carotene producer, was developed using the synergistic mechanism of D-glucose and Acetosyringone on three different Agrobacterium strains (EHA105, GV3101 and LBA4404). In the present study, we investigated the pre-induction of Agrobacterium strains harboring pMDC45 binary vector in TAP media at varying concentrations of D-glucose (5 mM, 10 mM, and 15mM) and 100 μM of Acetosyringone for co-cultivation. Induction of Agrobacterium strains with 10 mM D-glucose and 100 μM Acetosyringone showed higher rates of efficiency compared to other treatments. The presence of GFP and HPT transgenes as a measure of transformation efficiency from the transgenic lines were determined using fluorescent microscopy, PCR, and southern blot analyzes. Highest transformation rate was obtained with the Agrobacterium strain LBA4404 (181 ± 3.78 cfu per 106 cells) followed by GV3101 (128 ± 5.29 cfu per 106 cells) and EHA105 (61 ± 5.03 cfu per 106 cells). However, the Agrobacterium strain GV3101 exhibited more efficient single copy transgene (HPT) transfer into the genome of D. salina than LBA4404. Therefore, future studies dealing with genetic modifications in D. salina can utilize GV3101 as an optimal Agrobacterium strain for gene transfer. PMID:27351975

  3. Enhanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiencies in monocot cells is associated with attenuated defense responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wan-Jun; Dewey, Ralph E; Boss, Wendy; Phillippy, Brian Q; Qu, Rongda

    2013-02-01

    Plant defense responses can lead to altered metabolism and even cell death at the sites of Agrobacterium infection, and thus lower transformation frequencies. In this report, we demonstrate that the utilization of culture conditions associated with an attenuation of defense responses in monocot plant cells led to highly improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiencies in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). The removal of myo-inositol from the callus culture media in combination with a cold shock pretreatment and the addition of L-Gln prior to and during Agrobacterium-infection resulted in about 84 % of the treated calluses being stably transformed. The omission of myo-inositol from the callus culture media was associated with the failure of certain pathogenesis related genes to be induced after Agrobacterium infection. The addition of a cold shock and supplemental Gln appeared to have synergistic effects on infection and transformation efficiencies. Nearly 60 % of the stably transformed calluses regenerated into green plantlets. Calluses cultured on media lacking myo-inositol also displayed profound physiological and biochemical changes compared to ones cultured on standard growth media, such as reduced lignin within the cell walls, increased starch and inositol hexaphosphate accumulation, enhanced Agrobacterium binding to the cell surface, and less H(2)O(2) production after Agrobacterium infection. Furthermore, the cold treatment greatly reduced callus browning after infection. The simple modifications described in this report may have broad application for improving genetic transformation of recalcitrant monocot species. PMID:23242917

  4. Cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus strains ATCC 53524 and ATCC 23768: Pellicle formation, post-synthesis aggregation and fiber density.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher M; Gu, Jin; Kafle, Kabindra; Catchmark, Jeffrey; Kim, Seong H

    2015-11-20

    The pellicle formation, crystallinity, and bundling of cellulose microfibrils produced by bacterium Gluconacetobacter xylinus were studied. Cellulose pellicles were produced by two strains (ATCC 53524 and ATCC 23769) for 1 and 7 days; pellicles were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrational sum-frequency-generation (SFG) spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The bacterial cell population was higher at the surface exposed to air, indicating that the newly synthesized cellulose is deposited at the top of the pellicle. XRD, ATR-IR, and SFG analyses found no significant changes in the cellulose crystallinity, crystal size or polymorphic distribution with the culture time. However, SEM and SFG analyses revealed cellulose macrofibrils produced for 7 days had a higher packing density at the top of the pellicle, compared to the bottom. These findings suggest that the physical properties of cellulose microfibrils are different locally within the bacterial pellicles. PMID:26344281

  5. A new Agrobacterium strain isolated from aerial tumors on Ficus benjamina L.

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, H; Chilton, W S; Nesme, X; Dessaux, Y; Vaudequin, V; Petit, A; Jones, J B; Hodge, N C

    1995-01-01

    Crown gall tumors, collected from branches of 1-year-old weeping fig (Ficus benjamina L.) trees, yielded both tumorigenic and nonpathogenic agrobacteria. On the basis of classical diagnostic tests, the nonpathogenic strains were identified as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, whereas the tumorigenic strains could not be assigned to any of the known terrestrial Agrobacterium spp. The tumorigenic strains also differed from other members of the genus by producing more acid from mannitol. According to cluster analysis of carbon substrate oxidation (GN Microplate; Biolog, Inc.) and fatty acid content, the tumorigenic fig strains were distinct from strains of A. tumefaciens, Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Agrobacterium vitis, and Agrobacterium rubi. Furthermore, they had unusual opine metabolism, inducing tumors that synthesized nopaline and three recently discovered opines: chrysopine (d-lactone of N-1-deoxy-D-fructosyl-L-glutamine, and N-1-deoxy-D-fructosyl-L-glutamine, and N-1-deoxy-D-fructosyl-5-oxo-L-proline. The nonpathogenic A. tumefaciens strains present in the same tumors were unable to degrade any of the opines tested. The phylogenetic position of the tumorigenic fig strain AF3.10 was inferred from comparing its rrs (i.e., 16S rRNA gene) sequence with those from the type strains of Agrobacterium and Rhizobium species. The analysis showed that strain AF3.10 clustered with A. tumefaciens and A. rubi but not with A. vitis and was far removed from A. rhizogenes. However, the sequence was significantly different from those of A. tumefaciens and A. rubi to suggest that the tumorigenic fig strain may be a new Agrobacterium species that is as different from A. tumefaciens and A. rubi as these two species are from one another. PMID:7887626

  6. Complementation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing aux mutants by genes from the TR-region of the Ri plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    PubMed Central

    Offringa, I. A.; Melchers, L. S.; Regensburg-Tuink, A. J. G.; Costantino, P.; Schilperoort, R. A.; Hooykaas, P. J. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we provide information indicating that the agropine-type root-inducing (Ri) plasmid pRi1855 of Agrobacterium rhizogenes contains functional genes for auxin production (aux) in the right transferred DNA (T-DNA) region (TR-region). These genes were cloned and introduced into the T-region of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmids of mutants of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying an aux mutation. Depending on the Ri aux gene present, the oncogenicity of the Ti aux-1 and/or aux-2 mutations was restored, showing that the Ri aux genes are able to complement the Ti aux genes. Agrobacterium strains with an agropine-type Ri plasmid not only cause hairy root on certain plant species, but they also induce tumors on other plant species. In this paper it is shown that a mutation in either of the aux genes in the Ri plasmid leads to a total loss of tumorigenicity and a strongly diminished rhizogenicity of the host bacterium, revealing that the aux genes are important for tumor and root induction. Agrobacterium strains containing the TR-region but not the TL (left)-region of the Ri plasmid are still tumorigenic on certain plant species but are no longer capable of hairy-root induction. Images PMID:16593762

  7. Regeneration of horseradish hairy roots incited by Agrobacterium rhizogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Noda, T; Tanaka, N; Mano, Y; Nabeshima, S; Ohkawa, H; Matsui, C

    1987-07-01

    Surface-sterilized leaf disks of horse-radish (Armoracia lapathifolia) were immersed in a suspension of Agrobacterium rhizogenes harboring the root-inducing plasmid (pRi) and cultured on a solid medium. Within about 10 days after inoculation, adventitious roots (hairy roots) emerged from the leaf disks. No roots emerged from the uninoculated leaf disks. The excised hairy roots grew vigorously in the dark and exhibited extensive lateral branches in the absence of phytohormones. When the hairy roots were moved into the light, numerous adventitious buds thrust out of the roots within about 10 days, and they developed into complete plants (R0 generation). R0 plants revealed leaf wrinkle. Root masses of cultured R0 plants were of two types. One had fibrous roots only and the other had both fibrous and tuberous roots Leaf disks of the R0 plants proliferated adventitious roots (R1 generation) on a solid medium after 1-2 weeks of culture. Phenotypical characters of the R1 roots were the same as those observed with the initial hairy roots. The T-DNA sequences of pRi were detected within DNA isolated from the hairy roots and their regenerants. PMID:24248760

  8. Functions and regulation of quorum-sensing in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Julien; Faure, Denis

    2014-01-01

    In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, horizontal transfer and vegetative replication of oncogenic Ti plasmids involve a cell-to-cell communication process called quorum-sensing (QS). The determinants of the QS-system belong to the LuxR/LuxI class. The LuxI-like protein TraI synthesizes N-acyl-homoserine lactone molecules which act as diffusible QS-signals. Beyond a threshold concentration, these molecules bind and activate the LuxR-like transcriptional regulator TraR, thereby initiating the QS-regulatory pathway. For the last 20 years, A. tumefaciens has stood as a prominent model in the understanding of the LuxR/LuxI type of QS systems. A number of studies also unveiled features which are unique to A. tumefaciens QS, some of them being directly related to the phytopathogenic lifestyle of the bacteria. In this review, we will present the current knowledge of QS in A. tumefaciens at both the genetic and molecular levels. We will also describe how interactions with plant host modulate the QS pathway of A. tumefaciens, and discuss what could be the advantages for the agrobacteria to use such a tightly regulated QS-system to disseminate the Ti plasmids. PMID:24550924

  9. Dual control of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid virulence genes.

    PubMed Central

    Close, T J; Rogowsky, P M; Kado, C I; Winans, S C; Yanofsky, M F; Nester, E W

    1987-01-01

    The virulence genes of nopaline (pTiC58) and octopine (pTiA6NC) Ti plasmids are similarly affected by the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ros mutation. Of six vir region complementation groups (virA, virB, virG, virC, virD, and virE) examined by using fusions to reporter genes, the promoters of only two (virC and virD) responded to the ros mutation. For each promoter that was affected by ros, the level of expression of its associated genes was substantially elevated in the mutant. This increase was not influenced by Ti plasmid-encoded factors, and the mutation did not interfere with the induction of pTiC58 vir genes by phenolic compounds via the VirA/VirG regulatory control mechanism. The effects of the ros mutation and acetosyringone were cumulative for all vir promoters examined. The pleiotropic characteristics of the ros mutant include the complete absence of the major acidic capsular polysaccharide. Images PMID:3667525

  10. Functional diversity and mutational analysis of Agrobacterium 6B oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Helfer, A; Pien, S; Otten, L

    2002-07-01

    Many Agrobacterium T-DNA genes belong to a diverse family of T-DNA genes, the rolB family. These genes cause various growth abnormalities but their modes of action remain largely unknown. So far, none of the RolB-like proteins has been subjected to mutational analysis. The RolB-like oncoprotein 6B, which induces tumours on species such as Nicotiana glauca and Kalanchoe tubiflora, was chosen to investigate the role of the most conserved amino acid residues within the RolB family. We first determined which of the natural 6B variants had the strongest oncogenic activity; to this end, six 6b coding sequences (A- 6b, AB- 6b, C- 6b, CG- 6b, S- 6b and T- 6b) were placed under the control of the strong constitutive 2x35S promoter and compared for tumour induction on N. glauca, N. tabacum and K. daigremontiana. Oncogenicity increased in the order C- 6b/CG- 6b, A- 6b/AB- 6b, and S- 6b/T- 6b. The most conserved amino acid residues in the strongly oncogenic T-6B protein were mutated and shown to be required for oncogenicity and accumulation of the T-6B protein in planta but not in bacteria. Hybrids between T-6B and the weakly oncogenic A-6B protein revealed an additional oncogenic determinant required for the formation of large tumours. PMID:12172796

  11. Transformation of the monocotyledonous Alstroemeria by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, M; Ishizaki, T; Sato, H

    2004-03-01

    An efficient procedure is described for the transformation of the monocotyledonous Alstroemeria by Agrobacterium tumefaciens via callus regeneration. Calli derived from ovules were co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens strains EHA101 and LBA4404, which harbored the binary vector plasmids pIG121Hm and pTOK233, respectively. These plasmids contain the beta-glucuronidase gene ( gusA) as a reporter gene and the hygromycin phosphotransferase and neomycin phosphotransferase II ( nptII) genes as selective markers. Inoculated calli were first plated for 4 weeks on medium containing cefotaxime to eliminate bacteria, following which time transformed cells were selected on medium that contained 20 mg/l hygromycin. A histochemical assay for GUS activity revealed that hygromycin-based selection was completed after 8 weeks. The integration of the T-DNA of pIG121Hm and pTOK233 into the genome of the cells was confirmed by PCR analysis. Efficient shoot regeneration from the transformed calli was observed on half-strength MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l naphthaleneacetic acid and 0.5 mg/l benzyladenine after about 5 months of culture. The presence of the gusA and nptII genes in the genomic DNA of regenerated plants was detected by means of PCR and PCR-Southern hybridization, and the expression of these transgenes was verified by reverse transcription-PCR. PMID:14615906

  12. Diversity among B6 strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, S E; Farrand, S K

    1980-01-01

    A total of 20 laboratory substrains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain B6 were compared with respect to six characteristics, including 3-ketolactose production, lysogeny, octopine catabolism, tumorigenic host range, and plasmid content. Within this group of strains diversity was found for all characteristics except 3-ketolactose production. Six substrains were lysogenized with an omega-type phage, whereas one substrain appeared neither sensitive to nor lysogenized with this bacteriophage. All but two substrains catabolized octopine and induced tumors on carrot disks. These 18 substrains harbor deoxyribonucleic acid sequences homologous to pTiB6-806. The two substrains unable to catabolize octopine were nontumorigenic and lacked detectable Ti plasmid sequences. Of the 20 substrains, 13 also contained sequences homologous to the cryptic plasmid pAtB6-806; 2 of the 18 substrains tumorigenic on carrots failed to induce tumors on Kalanchoe leaves. Their inability to induced tumors on this host, could not be correlated with lysogeny, with the presence or absence of pAtB6-806, or with the very large cryptic plasmid recently described. The Ti plasmids from these two strains were indistinguishable from pTiB6-806 by restriction enzyme analysis and could genetically convert a cured A. tumefaciens strain to tumorigenicity on both plant species. The results with these two strains suggest that parameters of tumorigenicity, such as host range, may be controlled by the bacterial chromosome. Images PMID:7364725

  13. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Interaction with Suspension-Cultured Tomato Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Nicola T.; Binns, Andrew N.

    1985-01-01

    Adherence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to suspension-cultured tomato cells has been characterized using a quantitative binding assay. Saturable binding of radiolabeled A. tumefaciens to plant cells resulted in 100 to 300 bacteria bound per cell. Specificity of A. tumefaciens binding was also inferred from two additional results: (a) an initial incubation of plant cells with A. tumefaciens reduced subsequent binding of radiolabeled A. tumefaciens by 60% to 75%; (b) tomato cells bound less than three E. coli per cell. Protease treatment of plant cells had no effect on subsequent bacterial binding, but prior treatment of plant cells with pectinolytic enzymes increased binding 2- to 3-fold. Pectin-enriched and neutral polymer-enriched fractions were obtained from tomato cell walls. The soluble pectin-enriched fraction inhibited binding of bacteria to plant cells by 85% to 95%, whereas the neutral polymer fraction only partially inhibited binding. Preliminary characterization of the activity showed it is heat stable, partially inactivated by protease treatment, and substantially inactivated by acid hydrolysis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664024

  14. Isozyme gene expression in potato tumors incited by Agrobacterium.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J L

    1986-06-01

    Two plant tumors (crown galls and hairy roots) were experimentally provoked on potato cv. 'Désirée' by oncogenic strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes. A marked shift in the expression of some organ-specific genes occurred in crown galls derived from the central zone of tubers: two novel isozyme genes (Est-B and Pox-E) were expressed, two others (Est-C and Pox-F) were suppressed and the remaining ones were maintained in the original state. When the starting tissue was the stem segment, a smaller shift occurred, namely the activation of Adh-A and the suppression of Pox-F. In all cases, the isozyme profiles characterizing all crown galls, whatever their origin, were identical. Under normal aeration conditions, Adh-A was not expressed in either tumoral or non-tumoral roots. However, under the relative anaerobic conditions of in vitro cultures, a difference existed between both types of roots: Adh-A was expressed in normal but not in tumoral roots. This means that hairy roots can tolerate higher levels of anaerobiosis without giving rise to an anaerobic response. For the remaining isozymes, no alteration occurred in either organized (hairy root) or unorganized (crown gall) tumors, as compared to the corresponding non-tumoral tissues (normal root and callus, respectively). PMID:24247945

  15. Biodegradation of Glycerol Trinitrate and Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate by Agrobacterium radiobacter

    PubMed Central

    White, G. F.; Snape, J. R.; Nicklin, S.

    1996-01-01

    Bacteria capable of metabolizing highly explosive and vasodilatory glycerol trinitrate (GTN) were isolated under aerobic and nitrogen-limiting conditions from soil, river water, and activated sewage sludge. One of these strains (from sewage sludge) chosen for further study was identified as Agrobacterium radiobacter subgroup B. A combination of high-pressure liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the culture medium during the growth of A. radiobacter on basal salts-glycerol-GTN medium showed the sequential conversion of GTN to glycerol dinitrates and glycerol mononitrates. Isomeric glycerol 1,2-dinitrate and glycerol 1,3-dinitrate were produced simultaneously and concomitantly with the disappearance of GTN, with significant regioselectivity for the production of the 1,3-dinitrate. Dinitrates were further degraded to glycerol 1- and 2-mononitrates, but mononitrates were not biodegraded. Cells were also capable of metabolizing pentaerythritol tetranitrate, probably to its trinitrate and dinitrate analogs. Extracts of broth-grown cells contained an enzyme which in the presence of added NADH converted GTN stoichiometrically to nitrite and the mixture of glycerol dinitrates. The specific activity of this enzyme was increased 160-fold by growth on GTN as the sole source of nitrogen. PMID:16535244

  16. Two Distinct Cardiolipin Synthases Operate in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Czolkoss, Simon; Fritz, Christiane; Hölzl, Georg; Aktas, Meriyem

    2016-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a universal component of energy generating membranes. In most bacteria, it is synthesized via the condensation of two molecules phosphatidylglycerol (PG) by phospholipase D-type cardiolipin synthases (PLD-type Cls). In the plant pathogen and natural genetic engineer Agrobacterium tumefaciens CL comprises up to 15% of all phospholipids in late stationary growth phase. A. tumefaciens harbors two genes, atu1630 (cls1) and atu2486 (cls2), coding for PLD-type Cls. Heterologous expression of either cls1 or cls2 in Escherichia coli resulted in accumulation of CL supporting involvement of their products in CL synthesis. Expression of cls1 and cls2 in A. tumefaciens is constitutive and irrespective of the growth phase. Membrane lipid profiling of A. tumefaciens mutants suggested that Cls2 is required for CL synthesis at early exponential growth whereas both Cls equally contribute to CL production at later growth stages. Contrary to many bacteria, which suffer from CL depletion, A. tumefaciens tolerates large changes in CL content since the CL-deficient cls1/cls2 double mutant showed no apparent defects in growth, stress tolerance, motility, biofilm formation, UV-stress and tumor formation on plants. PMID:27472399

  17. Two Distinct Cardiolipin Synthases Operate in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Czolkoss, Simon; Fritz, Christiane; Hölzl, Georg; Aktas, Meriyem

    2016-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a universal component of energy generating membranes. In most bacteria, it is synthesized via the condensation of two molecules phosphatidylglycerol (PG) by phospholipase D-type cardiolipin synthases (PLD-type Cls). In the plant pathogen and natural genetic engineer Agrobacterium tumefaciens CL comprises up to 15% of all phospholipids in late stationary growth phase. A. tumefaciens harbors two genes, atu1630 (cls1) and atu2486 (cls2), coding for PLD-type Cls. Heterologous expression of either cls1 or cls2 in Escherichia coli resulted in accumulation of CL supporting involvement of their products in CL synthesis. Expression of cls1 and cls2 in A. tumefaciens is constitutive and irrespective of the growth phase. Membrane lipid profiling of A. tumefaciens mutants suggested that Cls2 is required for CL synthesis at early exponential growth whereas both Cls equally contribute to CL production at later growth stages. Contrary to many bacteria, which suffer from CL depletion, A. tumefaciens tolerates large changes in CL content since the CL-deficient cls1/cls2 double mutant showed no apparent defects in growth, stress tolerance, motility, biofilm formation, UV-stress and tumor formation on plants. PMID:27472399

  18. Draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain ATCC 17895

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Otten, Linda G.; Resch, Verena; Muyzer, Gerard; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 17895 possesses an array of mono- and dioxygenases, as well as hydratases, which makes it an interesting organism for biocatalysis. R. rhodochrous is a Gram-positive aerobic bacterium with a rod-like morphology. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 6,869,887 bp long genome contains 6,609 protein-coding genes and 53 RNA genes. Based on small subunit rRNA analysis, the strain is more likely to be a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis rather than Rhodococcus rhodochrous. PMID:24501654

  19. Thermostable purified endoglucanas from acidothermus cellulolyticus ATCC 43068

    DOEpatents

    Himmel, Michael E.; Adney, William S.; Tucker, Melvin P.; Grohmann, Karel

    1994-01-01

    A purified low molecular weight cellulase endoglucanase I having a molecular weight of between about 57,420 to about 74,580 daltons from Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068). The cellulase is water soluble, possesses both C.sub.1 and C.sub.x types of enzyme activity, a high degree of stability toward heat, and exhibits optimum temperature activity at about 83.degree. C. at pH's from about 2 to about 9, and in inactivation temperature of about 110.degree. C. at pH's from about 2 to about 9.

  20. Thermostable purified endoglucanase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus ATCC 43068

    DOEpatents

    Himmel, M.E.; Adney, W.S.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

    1994-01-04

    A purified low molecular weight cellulase endoglucanase I having a molecular weight of between about 57,420 to about 74,580 daltons from Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) is presented. The cellulase is water soluble, possesses both C[sub 1] and C[sub x] types of enzyme activity, a high degree of stability toward heat, and exhibits optimum temperature activity at about 83 C at pH's from about 2 to about 9, and in inactivation temperature of about 110 C at pH's from about 2 to about 9. 7 figures.

  1. Transcriptional and Mutational Analysis of the Uptake Hydrogenase of the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    PubMed Central

    Happe, Thomas; Schütz, Kathrin; Böhme, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    A 10-kb DNA region of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 containing the structural genes of the uptake hydrogenase (hupSL) was cloned and sequenced. In contrast to the hupL gene of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which is interrupted by a 10.5-kb DNA fragment in vegetative cells, there is no programmed rearrangement within the hupL gene during the heterocyst differentiation of A. variabilis. The hupSL genes were transcribed as a 2.7-kb operon and were induced only under nitrogen-fixing conditions, as shown by Northern blot experiments and reverse transcriptase PCR. Primer extension experiments with a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide primer confirmed these results and identified the 5′ start of the mRNA transcript 103 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. A consensus sequence in the promoter that is recognized by the fumarate nitrate reductase regulator (Fnr) could be detected. The hupSL operon in A. variabilis was interrupted by an interposon deletion (mutant strain AVM13). Under N2-fixing conditions, the mutant strain exhibited significantly increased rates in H2 accumulation and produced three times more hydrogen than the wild type. These results indicate that the uptake hydrogenase is catalytically active in the wild type and that the enzyme reoxidizes the H2 developed by the nitrogenase. The Nif phenotype of the mutant strain showed a slight decrease of acetylene reduction compared to that of the wild type. PMID:10692368

  2. Cloning and sequencing of the trpE gene from Arthrobacter globiformis ATCC 8010 and several related subsurface Arthrobacter isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chernova, T.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Austria, N.; Nichols, B.P.

    1998-09-01

    Tryptophan dependent mutants of Arthrobacter globiformis ATCC 8010 were isolated and trp genes were cloned by complementation and marker rescue of the auxotrophic strains. Rescue studies and preliminary sequence analysis reveal that at least the genes trpE, trpC, and trpB are clustered together in this organism. In addition, sequence analysis of the entire trpE gene, which encodes component I of anthranilate synthase, is described. Segments of the trpE gene from 17 subsurface isolates of Arthrobacter sp. were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The partial trpE sequences from the various strains were aligned and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The data suggest that in addition to single base changes, recombination and genetic exchange play a major role in the evolution of the Arthrobacter genome.

  3. Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  4. Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H.C.

    1998-05-26

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  5. Cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1997-12-16

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  6. Cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H.C.

    1997-12-16

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  7. Deep sequencing uncovers numerous small RNAs on all four replicons of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wilms, Ina; Overlöper, Aaron; Nowrousian, Minou; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Narberhaus, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Agrobacterium species are capable of interkingdom gene transfer between bacteria and plants. The genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens consists of a circular and a linear chromosome, the At-plasmid and the Ti-plasmid, which harbors bacterial virulence genes required for tumor formation in plants. Little is known about promoter sequences and the small RNA (sRNA) repertoire of this and other α-proteobacteria. We used a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach to map transcriptional start sites of 388 annotated genes and operons. In addition, a total number of 228 sRNAs was revealed from all four Agrobacterium replicons. Twenty-two of these were confirmed by independent RNA gel blot analysis and several sRNAs were differentially expressed in response to growth media, growth phase, temperature or pH. One sRNA from the Ti-plasmid was massively induced under virulence conditions. The presence of 76 cis-antisense sRNAs, two of them on the reverse strand of virulence genes, suggests considerable antisense transcription in Agrobacterium. The information gained from this study provides a valuable reservoir for an in-depth understanding of sRNA-mediated regulation of the complex physiology and infection process of Agrobacterium. PMID:22336765

  8. Re-examination of the genus Acetobacter, with descriptions of Acetobacter cerevisiae sp. nov. and Acetobacter malorum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Cleenwerck, I; Vandemeulebroecke, K; Janssens, D; Swings, J

    2002-09-01

    Thirty-four Acetobacter strains, representing Acetobacter aceti, Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter pomorum, Acetobacter peroxydans, Acetobacter lovaniensis, Acetobacter estunensis, Acetobacter orleanensis, Acetobacter indonesiensis and Acetobacter tropicalis, were subjected to a polyphasic study that included DNA-DNA hybridizations, DNA base ratio determinations, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and phenotypic characterization. Two novel species are proposed, Acetobacter cerevisiae sp. nov. and Acetobacter malorum sp. nov. The type strains of these species are respectively LMG 1625T (= DSM 14362T = NCIB 8894T = ATCC 23765T) and LMG 1746T (= DSM 14337T). PMID:12361257

  9. Production of Biohydrogen from Wastewater by Klebsiella oxytoca ATCC 13182.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Veena; Tiwari, K L; Jadhav, S K

    2015-08-01

    Production of biohydrogen from distillery effluent was carried out by using Klebsiella oxytoca ATCC 13182. The work focuses on optimization of pH, temperature, and state of bacteria, which are the various affecting factors for fermentative biohydrogen production. Results indicates that at 35 °C for suspended cultures, the production was at its maximum (i.e., 91.33 ± 0.88 mL) when compared with other temperatures. At 35 °C and at pH 5 and 6, maximum productions of 117.67 ± 1.45 and 111.67 ± 2.72 mL were observed with no significant difference. When immobilized, Klebsiella oxytoca ATCC 13182 was used for biohydrogen production at optimized conditions, production was 186.33 ± 3.17 mL. Hence, immobilized cells were found to be more advantageous for biological hydrogen production over suspended form. Physicochemical analysis of the effluent was conducted before and after fermentation and the values suggested that the fermentative process is an efficient method for biological treatment of wastewater. PMID:26237683

  10. Induction of natural competence in Bacillus cereus ATCC14579

    PubMed Central

    Mirończuk, Aleksandra M.; Kovács, Ákos T.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Natural competence is the ability of certain microbes to take up exogenous DNA from the environment and integrate it in their genome. Competence development has been described for a variety of bacteria, but has so far not been shown to occur in Bacillus cereus. However, orthologues of most proteins involved in natural DNA uptake in Bacillus subtiliscould be identified in B. cereus. Here, we report that B. cereus ATCC14579 can become naturally competent. When expressing the B. subtilis ComK protein using an IPTG‐inducible system in B. cereus ATCC14579, cells grown in minimal medium displayed natural competence, as either genomic DNA or plasmid DNA was shown to be taken up by the cells and integrated into the genome or stably maintained respectively. This work proves that a sufficient structural system for DNA uptake exists in B. cereus. Bacillus cereus can be employed as a model system to investigate the mechanism of DNA uptake in related bacteria such as Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis. Moreover, natural competence provides an important tool for biotechnology, as it will allow more efficient transformation of B. cereus and related organisms, e.g. to knockout genes in a high‐throughput way. PMID:21261842

  11. Effect of Agrobacterium culture and inoculation density on transformation efficiency of a citrange (Citrus reticulata x Poncirus trifoliata).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of Agrobacterium growth phase and density on transformation of citrus rootstock US-812 (Citrus reticulata x Poncirus trifoliata) epicotyl explants was determined. In the first experiment, Agrobacterium EHA105 containing pBINGUSint was grown in YEP medium to an OD600 of 1 and glycerol sto...

  12. Genetic control and regulatory mechanisms of succinoglycan and curdlan biosynthesis in genus Agrobacterium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Li, Ang; Ma, Fang; Yang, Jixian; Xie, Yutong

    2016-07-01

    Agrobacterium is a genus of gram-negative bacteria that can produce several typical exopolysaccharides with commercial uses in the food and pharmaceutical fields. In particular, succinoglycan and curdlan, due to their good quality in high yield, have been employed on an industrial scale comparatively early. Exopolysaccharide biosynthesis is a multiple-step process controlled by different functional genes, and various environmental factors cause changes in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis through regulatory mechanisms. In this mini-review, we focus on the genetic control and regulatory mechanisms of succinoglycan and curdlan produced by Agrobacterium. Some key functional genes and regulatory mechanisms for exopolysaccharide biosynthesis are described, possessing a high potential for application in metabolic engineering to modify exopolysaccharide production and physicochemical properties. This review may contribute to the understanding of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and exopolysaccharide modification by metabolic engineering methods in Agrobacterium. PMID:27255488

  13. Ecological dynamics and complex interactions of Agrobacterium megaplasmids

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Thomas G.; Morton, Elise R.; Barton, Ian S.; Bever, James D.; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-01-01

    As with many pathogenic bacteria, agrobacterial plant pathogens carry most of their virulence functions on a horizontally transmissible genetic element. The tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid encodes the majority of virulence functions for the crown gall agent Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This includes the vir genes which drive genetic transformation of host cells and the catabolic genes needed to utilize the opines produced by infected plants. The Ti plasmid also encodes, an opine-dependent quorum sensing system that tightly regulates Ti plasmid copy number and its conjugal transfer to other agrobacteria. Many natural agrobacteria are avirulent, lacking the Ti plasmid. The burden of harboring the Ti plasmid depends on the environmental context. Away from diseased hosts, plasmid costs are low but the benefit of the plasmid is also absent. Consequently, plasmidless genotypes are favored. On infected plants the costs of the Ti plasmid can be very high, but balanced by the opine benefits, locally favoring plasmid bearing cells. Cheating derivatives which do not incur virulence costs but can benefit from opines are favored on infected plants and in most other environments, and these are frequently isolated from nature. Many agrobacteria also harbor an At plasmid which can stably coexist with a Ti plasmid. At plasmid genes are less well characterized but in general facilitate metabolic activities in the rhizosphere and bulk soil, such as the ability to breakdown plant exudates. Examination of A. tumefaciens C58, revealed that harboring its At plasmid is much more costly than harboring it’s Ti plasmid, but conversely the At plasmid is extremely difficult to cure. The interactions between these co-resident plasmids are complex, and depend on environmental context. However, the presence of a Ti plasmid appears to mitigate At plasmid costs, consistent with the high frequency with which they are found together. PMID:25452760

  14. Antibacterial Activity of Synthetic Peptides Derived from Lactoferricin against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212

    PubMed Central

    León-Calvijo, María A.; Leal-Castro, Aura L.; Almanzar-Reina, Giovanni A.; Rosas-Pérez, Jaiver E.; García-Castañeda, Javier E.; Rivera-Monroy, Zuly J.

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from human and bovine lactoferricin were designed, synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Specific changes in the sequences were designed as (i) the incorporation of unnatural amino acids in the sequence, the (ii) reduction or (iii) elongation of the peptide chain length, and (iv) synthesis of molecules with different number of branches containing the same sequence. For each peptide, the antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was evaluated. Our results showed that Peptides I.2 (RWQWRWQWR) and I.4 ((RRWQWR)4K2Ahx2C2) exhibit bigger or similar activity against E. coli (MIC 4–33 μM) and E. faecalis (MIC 10–33 μM) when they were compared with lactoferricin protein (LF) and some of its derivate peptides as II.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGA) and IV.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGAPSITCVRRAE). It should be pointed out that Peptides I.2 and I.4, containing the RWQWR motif, are short and easy to synthesize; our results demonstrate that it is possible to design and obtain synthetic peptides that exhibit enhanced antibacterial activity using a methodology that is fast and low-cost and that allows obtaining products with a high degree of purity and high yield. PMID:25815317

  15. Antibacterial activity of synthetic peptides derived from lactoferricin against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212.

    PubMed

    León-Calvijo, María A; Leal-Castro, Aura L; Almanzar-Reina, Giovanni A; Rosas-Pérez, Jaiver E; García-Castañeda, Javier E; Rivera-Monroy, Zuly J

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from human and bovine lactoferricin were designed, synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Specific changes in the sequences were designed as (i) the incorporation of unnatural amino acids in the sequence, the (ii) reduction or (iii) elongation of the peptide chain length, and (iv) synthesis of molecules with different number of branches containing the same sequence. For each peptide, the antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was evaluated. Our results showed that Peptides I.2 (RWQWRWQWR) and I.4 ((RRWQWR)4K2Ahx2C2) exhibit bigger or similar activity against E. coli (MIC 4-33 μM) and E. faecalis (MIC 10-33 μM) when they were compared with lactoferricin protein (LF) and some of its derivate peptides as II.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGA) and IV.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGAPSITCVRRAE). It should be pointed out that Peptides I.2 and I.4, containing the RWQWR motif, are short and easy to synthesize; our results demonstrate that it is possible to design and obtain synthetic peptides that exhibit enhanced antibacterial activity using a methodology that is fast and low-cost and that allows obtaining products with a high degree of purity and high yield. PMID:25815317

  16. Advances in Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation of graminaceous crops.

    PubMed

    Singh, Roshan Kumar; Prasad, Manoj

    2016-05-01

    Steady increase in global population poses several challenges to plant science research, including demand for increased crop productivity, grain yield, nutritional quality and improved tolerance to different environmental factors. Transgene-based approaches are promising to address these challenges by transferring potential candidate genes to host organisms through different strategies. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is one such strategy which is well known for enabling efficient gene transfer in both monocot and dicots. Due to its versatility, this technique underwent several advancements including development of improved in vitro plant regeneration system, co-cultivation and selection methods, and use of hyper-virulent strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring super-binary vectors. The efficiency of this method has also been enhanced by the use of acetosyringone to induce the activity of vir genes, silver nitrate to reduce the Agrobacterium-induced necrosis and cysteine to avoid callus browning during co-cultivation. In the last two decades, extensive efforts have been invested towards achieving efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in cereals. Though high-efficiency transformation systems have been developed for rice and maize, comparatively lesser progress has been reported in other graminaceous crops. In this context, the present review discusses the progress made in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system in rice, maize, wheat, barley, sorghum, sugarcane, Brachypodium, millets, bioenergy and forage and turf grasses. In addition, it also provides an overview of the genes that have been recently transferred to these graminaceous crops using Agrobacterium, bottlenecks in this technique and future possibilities for crop improvement. PMID:26660352

  17. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

    PubMed

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  18. Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis subsp. nov., and reclassification of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440T as later synonym of Pseudomonas oleovorans ATCC 8062 T.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratul; Spröer, Cathrin; Beck, Brian; Bagley, Susan

    2010-04-01

    Isolate RS1(T) isolated from used metalworking fluid was found to be a Gram-negative, motile, and non-spore forming rod. Based on phylogenetic analyses with 16S rRNA, isolate RS1(T) was placed into the mendocina sublineage of Pseudomonas. The major whole cell fatty acids were C(18:1)omega7c (32.6%), C(16:0) (25.5%), and C(15:0) ISO 2OH/C(16:1)omega7c (14.4%). The sequence similarities of isolate RS1(T) based on gyrB and rpoD genes were 98.9 and 98.0% with Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and 98.5 and 98.1% with Pseudomonas oleovorans, respectively. The ribotyping pattern showed a 0.60 similarity with P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) and 0.63 with P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC17440(T). The DNA G + C content of isolate RS1(T) was 62.2 mol.%. The DNA-DNA relatedness was 73.0% with P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) and 79.1% with P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440(T). On the basis of morphological, biochemical, and molecular studies, isolate RS1(T) is considered to represent a new subspecies of P. oleovorans. Furthermore, based on the DNA-DNA relatedness (>70%), chemotaxonomic, and molecular profile, P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440(T) and P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) should be united under the same name; according to the rules of priority, P. oleovorans, the first described species, is the earlier synonym and P. pseudoalcaligenes is the later synonym. As a consequence, the division of the species P. oleovorans into two novel subspecies is proposed: P. oleovorans subsp. oleovorans subsp. nov. (type strain ATCC 8062(T) = DSM 1045(T) = NCIB 6576(T)), P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis subsp. nov. (type strain RS1(T) = ATCC BAA-1494(T) = DSM 21016(T)). PMID:19936829

  19. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J.; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  20. Growth of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC334 in a cheese model system: A biochemical approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334, in a cheese-ripening model system based upon a medium prepared from ripening Cheddar cheese extract (CCE) was evaluated. Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 grows in CCE made from cheese ripened for 2 (2mCCE), 6 (6mCCE), and 8 (8mCCE) mo, to final cell densit...

  1. Identification of the Herboxidiene Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Streptomyces chromofuscus ATCC 49982

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lei; Zi, Jiachen; Zeng, Jia

    2012-01-01

    The 53-kb biosynthetic gene cluster for the novel anticholesterol natural product herboxidiene was identified in Streptomyces chromofuscus ATCC 49982 by genome sequencing and gene inactivation. In addition to herboxidiene, a biosynthetic intermediate, 18-deoxy-herboxidiene, was also isolated from the fermentation broth of S. chromofuscus ATCC 49982 as a minor metabolite. PMID:22247174

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Chemolithoautotrophic Acetogenic Butanol-Producing Eubacterium limosum ATCC 8486

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yoseb

    2015-01-01

    Eubacterium limosum ATCC 8486 is an anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic acetogenic bacterium that converts and transforms syngas and isoflavonoids to butanol and phytoestrogens, respectively. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the E. limosum ATCC 8486 (4.37 Mb) strain and its annotation information, including syngas fermentation and denitrification metabolic pathways. PMID:25676768

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae Strain ATCC 700603

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Alysha G.; Ganesamoorthy, Devika; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae strain ATCC 700603, formerly known as K. pneumoniae K6, is known for producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes that can hydrolyze oxyimino-β-lactams, resulting in resistance to these drugs. We herein report the complete genome of strain ATCC 700603 and show that the ESBL genes are plasmid-encoded. PMID:27231369

  4. Comparison between Agrobacterium-mediated and direct gene transfer using the gene gun.

    PubMed

    Gao, Caixia; Nielsen, Klaus K

    2013-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and direct gene transfer using the gene gun (microparticle -bombardment) are the two most widely used methods for plant genetic modification. The Agrobacterium method has been successfully practiced in dicots for many years, but only recently have efficient protocols been developed for grasses. Microparticle bombardment has evolved as a method delivering exogenous nucleic acids into plant genome and is a commonly employed technique in plant science. Here these two systems are compared for transformation efficiency, transgene integration, and transgene expression when used to transform tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.). The tall fescue transformation protocols lead to the production of large numbers of fertile, independent transgenic lines. PMID:23104329

  5. Pseudomonas psychrotolerans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Elke; Kämpfer, Peter; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2004-09-01

    Three yellow-pigmented, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterial strains, C36T, C37 and C39, were isolated in the Medical Clinic for Small Animals and Ungulates at the University for Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain C36T was shown to belong to the genus Pseudomonas; Pseudomonas oleovorans DSM 1045T was the nearest relative (99.5 % sequence similarity). Other Pseudomonas species shared <97 % sequence similarity with strain C36T. The presence of Q-9 as the major ubiquinone, the predominance of putrescine and spermidine in its polyamine patterns and its fatty acid profile [i.e. the predominance of C(16 : 0), summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or 2-OH C(15 : 0) iso), C(18 : 1)omega7c and the presence of 3-OH C(10 : 0), 3-OH C(12 : 0) and 2-OH C(12 : 0)] were in agreement with identification of this strain as a member of the genus Pseudomonas. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and the results of genomic fingerprinting clearly differentiated strain C36T from its phylogenetic relative P. oleovorans DSM 1045T. Results from DNA-DNA hybridization showed that strain C36T represents a species that is distinct from P. oleovorans DSM 1045T. These data demonstrate that strain C36T represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas psychrotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is C36T (= LMG 21977T = DSM 15758T). Additionally, physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and genomic fingerprints indicate that P. oleovorans ATCC 29347 may not be a member of the species P. oleovorans sensu stricto. PMID:15388721

  6. Osmoresistant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii: the two most studied wild-type strains (ATCC 2623 and ATCC 42981) differ in osmotolerance and glycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pribylova, Lenka; de Montigny, Jacky; Sychrova, Hana

    2007-03-01

    The yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is known for its high tolerance to osmotic stress, which is thought to be caused by sets of specific genes. Relatively few Z. rouxii genes have been identified so far, all of them having homologues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; none of them was Z. rouxii-specific. Most of the known Z. rouxii genes were isolated from two wild-type strains, ATCC 2623 and ATCC 42981. In this study, we compared these two strains with regard to some of their morphological, physiological and genomic properties. Important differences were found in their salt tolerance and assimilation of glycerol and karyotype; slight differences were also present in their cell morphology. The ATCC 42981 strain showed a higher resistance to salts, higher glycerol production and, unlike ATCC 2623, was able to assimilate glycerol. Under conditions of osmotic stress, the glycerol production in both Z. rouxii strains was much lower than in a S. cerevisiae S288c culture, which suggested the presence of a system that efficiently retains glycerol inside Z. rouxii cells. The karyotype analysis revealed that ATCC 42981 cells contain more chromosomes and have a bigger genome size than those of ATCC 2623. PMID:17351908

  7. Genetic transformation of Gentiana macrophylla with Agrobacterium rhizogenes: growth and production of secoiridoid glucoside gentiopicroside in transformed hairy root cultures.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Rajesh Kumar; Trivedi, Mala; Guang, Zhang Chun; Guo, Guang-Qin; Zheng, Guo-Chang

    2007-02-01

    Hairy root cultures of Gentiana macrophylla were established by infecting the different explants four Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains namely A(4)GUS, R1000, LBA 9402 and ATCC11325, and hairy root lines were established with A. rhizogenes strain R1000 in 1/2 MS + B(5) medium. Initially, 42 independent hairy root clones were maintained and seven clones belongs to different category were evaluated for growth, morphology, integration and expression of Ri T-DNA genes, and alkaloid contents in dry root samples. On the basis of total root elongation, lateral root density and biomass accumulation on solid media, hairy root clones were separated into three categories. PCR and Southern hybridization analysis revealed both left and right T-DNA integration in the root clones and RT-PCR analysis confirmed the expression of hairy root inducible gene. GUS assay was also performed to confirm the integration of left T-DNA. The accumulation of considerable amounts of the root-specific secoiridoid glucosides gentiopicroside was observed in GM1 (T +/L and T +/R) and the GM2 (T +/L and T -/R DNA) type clones in considerably higher amount whether as two T -/L but T +/R callus-type clones (GM3) accumulated much less or only very negligible amounts of gentiopicroside. Out of four media composition the 1/2 MS + B(5) vitamin media was found most suitable. We found that initial establishment of root cultures largely depends on root:media ratio. Maximum growth rate was recorded in 1:50 root:media ratio. The maximum biomass in terms of fresh weight (33-fold) was achieved in 1/2 MS + B(5) media composition after 35 days in comparison to sixfold increase in control. The biomass increase was most abundant maximum from 15 to 30 days. Influence of A. rhizogenes strains and Ri plasmid of hairy root induction, the possible role of the T(L)-DNA and T(R)-DNA genes on growth pattern of hairy root, initial root inoculum:media ratio and effect of media composition is discussed. PMID:16972092

  8. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda S.; Zhong, Jinshun; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Ana-baena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40 C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence.

  9. Xanthomonas campestris atcc 31601 and process for use

    SciTech Connect

    Weisrock, W.P.; McCarthy, E.F.

    1983-11-29

    A degenerative-resistant strain of Xanthomonas campestris has been developed and a process for using this strain to effectively overcome the problems of continuous xanthan production. This strain of X. campestris, designated X. campestris XCP-19 ATCC 31601, is capable of continuously producing xanthan at high specific productivities, i.e., 0.24 to 0.32 gm xanthan/gm cells/hr, for several hundred hours without culture degeneration from inexpensive aqueous nutrient media such as, for example, a minimal medium consisting primarily of inorganic salts, glucose, and NH4Cl. The medium may or may not also contain a yeast extract or yeast autolysate as a supplemental nitrogen source. Any medium having assimilable sources of carbon, nitrogen, and inorganic substances will serve satisfactorily for use with this new organism. 14 claims.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda S; Zhong, Jinshun; Goodwin, Lynne; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-06-15

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Anabaena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40(°) C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence. PMID:25197444

  11. Thermostable Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingyan; Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2009-01-01

    Cyanuric acid, a metabolic intermediate in the degradation of many s-triazine compounds, is further metabolized by cyanuric acid hydrolase. Cyanuric acid also accumulates in swimming pools due to the breakdown of the sanitizing agents di- and trichloroisocyanuric acid. Structurally stable cyanuric acid hydrolases are being considered for usage in pool water remediation. In this study, cyanuric acid hydrolase from the thermophile Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. The recombinant enzyme was found to have a broader temperature range and greater stability, at both elevated and low temperatures, than previously described cyanuric acid hydrolases. The enzyme had a narrow substrate specificity, acting only on cyanuric acid and N-methylisocyanuric acid. The M. thermoacetica enzyme did not require metals or other discernible cofactors for activity. Cyanuric acid hydrolase from M. thermoacetica is the most promising enzyme to use for cyanuric acid remediation applications. PMID:19767460

  12. Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov., from nodules of Dalea leporina, Leucaena leucocephala and Clitoria ternatea, and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris, siratro, cowpea and Mimosa pudica.

    PubMed

    López-López, Aline; Rogel-Hernández, Marco A; Barois, Isabelle; Ortiz Ceballos, Angel I; Martínez, Julio; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-09-01

    Two novel related Rhizobium species, Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., were identified by a polyphasic approach using DNA-DNA hybridization, whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic and phenotypic characterization including nodulation of Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris (bean). As similar bacteria were found in the Los Tuxtlas rainforest in Mexico and in Central America, we suggest the existence of a Mesoamerican microbiological corridor. The type strain of Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. is CCGE 502(T) (= ATCC BAA-2124(T) = CFN 242(T) = Dal4(T) = HAMBI 3152(T)) and that of Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov. is CCGE 501(T) (= ATCC BAA-2123(T) = HAMBI 3151(T) = CIP 110148(T) = 1847(T)). PMID:22081714

  13. Plant cell transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens under simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnatska, Veresa; Gladun, Hanna; Padalko, Svetlana

    To investigate simulated microgravity (clinorotation) effect on plant cell transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens and crown gall formation, the culture of primary explants of potato and Jerusalem artichoke tubers was used. It is found that the efficiency of tumor formation and development in clinorotated explants are considerably reduced. When using the explants isolated from potato tubers clinorotated for 3, 5 and 19 days, drastic reduction of formation and development of crown gall tumors was observed. Conversely, the tumor number and their development increased when potato tubers were clinorotated for one day. As was estimated by us previously, cells of Jerusalem artichoke explants are the most sensitive to agrobacteria on 4-5 h of in vitro culturing and this time corresponds to the certain period of G1-stage of the cell cycle. We have also estimated that this period is characterized by the increase of binding of acridine orange by nuclear chromatin and increase in activity of RNA-polymerase I and II. Inoculation of explants with agrobacteria in this period was the most optimal for transformation and crown gall induction. We estimated that at four - hour clinorotation of explants the intensity of acridine orange binding to nuclei was considerably lower than on 4h in the control. At one-day clinorotation of potato tubers, a considerable increase in template accessibility of chromatin and in activity of RNA-polymerase I and II occurred. These results may serve as an evidence for the ability of plant dormant tissues to respond to microgravity. Another demonstration of dormant tissue response to changed gravity we obtained when investigating pathogenesis-related proteins (PR-proteins). PR-proteins were subjected to nondenaturing PAGE.and we have not found any effect of microgravity on PR-proteins of potato explants with normal or tumorous growth. We may suggest that such response derives from the common effects of two stress factors - wounding and changed

  14. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of friable embryogenic calli and regeneration of transgenic cassava.

    PubMed

    Bull, S E; Owiti, J A; Niklaus, M; Beeching, J R; Gruissem, W; Vanderschuren, H

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of friable embryogenic calli (FEC) is the most widely used method to generate transgenic cassava plants. However, this approach has proven to be time-consuming and can lead to changes in the morphology and quality of FEC, influencing regeneration capacity and plant health. Here we present a comprehensive, reliable and improved protocol, taking approximately 6 months, that optimizes Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of FEC from cassava model cultivar TMS60444. We cocultivate the FEC with Agrobacterium directly on the propagation medium and adopt the extensive use of plastic mesh for easy and frequent transfer of material to new media. This minimizes stress to the FEC cultures and permits a finely balanced control of nutrients, hormones and antibiotics. A stepwise increase in antibiotic concentration for selection is also used after cocultivation with Agrobacterium to mature the transformed FEC before regeneration. The detailed information given here for each step should enable successful implementation of this technology in other laboratories, including those being established in developing countries where cassava is a staple crop. PMID:20010938

  15. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated-transformation of Asimina triloba L. seedling cuttings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cuttings from full-grown pawpaw (Asimina triloba) trees can be difficult to root. Innoculation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes at the base of cuttings in vivo/vitro can improve rooting efficiency of some tree fruit and ornamental species. The current research compared rooting of pawpaw with softwood c...

  16. Transformation of the plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Garcês, Helena; Sinha, Neelima

    2009-10-01

    Kalanchoë daigremontiana can be stably transformed using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated T-DNA transfer method, as described here. Sterilized plant tissue is cocultivated with an A. tumefaciens suspension, transformants are selected and the shoots are grown in rooting medium and then in soil. Plant phenotypes can be examined approximately 3 mo after transfer of plants to soil. PMID:20147048

  17. X-ray Structure of Imidazolonepropionase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens at 1.87 angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi,R.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Histidine degradation in agrobacterium tumefaciens involves four enzymes, including histidase, urocanase, imidazolonepropionase, and N-formylglutamate amido hydrolase. The third enzyme of the pathway, imidazolone-propionase, a 45.6 kDa protein, catalyzes conversion of imidazolone-5-propanoate to N-forminio-t-glutamate.

  18. Agrobacterium-Mediated Stable Genetic Transformation of Populus angustifolia and Populus balsamifera.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Priti; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of two species of poplar - Populus angustifolia and Populus balsamifera. The binary vector pCAMBIA-Npro-long-Luc containing the luciferase reporter gene was used to transform stem internode and axillary bud explants. Putative transformants were regenerated on selection-free medium using our previously established in vitro regeneration method. Explant type, genotype, effect of pre-culture, Agrobacterium concentration, a time period of infection and varying periods of co-culture with bacteria were tested for the transformation frequency. The highest frequency of transformation was obtained with stem internode explants pre-cultured for 2 days, infected with Agrobacterium culture at the concentration of OD600 = 0.5 for 10 min and co-cultivated with Agrobacterium for 48 h. Out of the two genotypes tested, P. balsamifera exhibited a higher transformation rate in comparison to P. angustifolia. The primary transformants that exhibited luciferase activity in a bioluminescence assay under the CCD camera when subjected to polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis revealed a stable single-copy integration of luc in their genomes. The reported protocol is highly reproducible and can be applied to other species of poplar; it will also be useful for future genetic engineering of one of the most important families of woody plants for sustainable development. PMID:27014319

  19. Comparison of Soybean Transformation Efficiency and Plant Factors Affecting Transformation during the Agrobacterium Infection Process

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuying; Yao, Xingdong; Zhao, Mingzhe; Zhao, Qiang; Du, Yanli; Yu, Cuimei; Xie, Futi

    2015-01-01

    The susceptibility of soybean genotype to Agrobacterium infection is a key factor for the high level of genetic transformation efficiency. The objective of this study is to evaluate the plant factors related to transformation in cotyledonary nodes during the Agrobacterium infection process. This study selected three genotypes (Williams 82, Shennong 9 and Bert) with high transformation efficiency, which presented better susceptibility to Agrobacterium infection, and three low transformation efficiency genotypes (General, Liaodou 16 and Kottman), which showed a relatively weak susceptibility. Gibberellin (GA) levels and soybean GA20ox2 and CYP707A2 transcripts of high-efficiency genotypes increased and were higher than those of low-efficiency genotypes; however, the opposite performance was shown in abscisic acid (ABA). Higher zeatin riboside (ZR) content and DNA quantity, and relatively higher expression of soybean IPT5, CYCD3 and CYCA3 were obtained in high-efficiency genotypes. High-efficiency genotypes had low methyl jasmonate (MeJA) content, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) activity, and relatively lower expression of soybean OPR3, PPO1 and PRX71. GA and ZR were positive plant factors for Agrobacterium-mediated soybean transformation by facilitating germination and growth, and increasing the number of cells in DNA synthesis cycle, respectively; MeJA, PPO, POD and ABA were negative plant factors by inducing defence reactions and repressing germination and growth, respectively. PMID:26262617

  20. Agrobacterium rhizogenes-induced cotton hairy root culture as an alternative tool for cotton functional genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although well-accepted as the ultimate method for cotton functional genomics, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated cotton transformation is not widely used for functional analyses of cotton genes and their promoters since regeneration of cotton in tissue culture is lengthy and labor intensive. In cer...

  1. Nodulation of Sesbania Species by Rhizobium (Agrobacterium) Strain IRBG74 and Other Rhizobia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concatenated sequence analysis with 16S rRNA, rpoB and fusA genes identified a strain (IRBG74) isolated from root nodules of the aquatic legume Sesbania cannabina as a close relative of the plant pathogen Rhizobium radiobacter (syn. Agrobacterium tumefaciens). However, DNA:DNA hybridisation with R. ...

  2. Agrobacterium-Mediated Stable Genetic Transformation of Populus angustifolia and Populus balsamifera

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Priti; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of two species of poplar – Populus angustifolia and Populus balsamifera. The binary vector pCAMBIA-Npro-long-Luc containing the luciferase reporter gene was used to transform stem internode and axillary bud explants. Putative transformants were regenerated on selection-free medium using our previously established in vitro regeneration method. Explant type, genotype, effect of pre-culture, Agrobacterium concentration, a time period of infection and varying periods of co-culture with bacteria were tested for the transformation frequency. The highest frequency of transformation was obtained with stem internode explants pre-cultured for 2 days, infected with Agrobacterium culture at the concentration of OD600 = 0.5 for 10 min and co-cultivated with Agrobacterium for 48 h. Out of the two genotypes tested, P. balsamifera exhibited a higher transformation rate in comparison to P. angustifolia. The primary transformants that exhibited luciferase activity in a bioluminescence assay under the CCD camera when subjected to polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis revealed a stable single-copy integration of luc in their genomes. The reported protocol is highly reproducible and can be applied to other species of poplar; it will also be useful for future genetic engineering of one of the most important families of woody plants for sustainable development. PMID:27014319

  3. DETECTION AND IMPLICATIONS OF EARLY AGROBACTERIUM TUMEFACIENS INFECTION OF PARADOX SEEDS AND SEEDLINGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paradox (Juglans hindsii x J. regia), the dominant rootstock used in California, USA walnut production, has many desirable horticultural characteristics, but is highly susceptible to crown gall. Crown gall, caused by the soil-borne bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens, can not be consistently control...

  4. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation for the investigation of somatic recombination in the fungal pathogen Armillaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The honey fungus Armillaria mellea is a destructive soil-borne pathogen that affects over 300 plant species, and is of increasing interest due to its ability to decompose lignin. Here we report the transformation of this fungus. A range of techniques was evaluated, and Agrobacterium-mediated trans...

  5. Application of succulent plant leaves for Agrobacterium infiltration-mediated protein production.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    When expressing plant cell wall degrading enzymes in the widely used tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) after Agrobacterium infiltration, difficulties arise due to the thin leaf structure. Thick leaved succulents, Kalanchoe blossfeldiana and Hylotelephium telephium, were tested as alternatives. A xyloglucanase, as well as a xyloglucanase inhibitor protein was successfully produced. PMID:26658852

  6. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of corn (Zea mays L.) multiple shoots

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shi-liang; Masilamany, Pathmalojiny; Li, Wen-bin; Pauls, K. Peter

    2014-01-01

    An Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated corn transformation method based on multiple shoot tissue cultures was developed, which is effective with a variety of corn inbred lines and standard binary vectors. Six factors that affected the success of corn transformation were tested, including A. tumefaciens strain, corn genotype, tissue culture growth stage, medium composition, co-culture temperature and surfactant treatment. Agropine-type bacteria (EHA 101 and AGL 1) were eightfold more effective than octopine-type strain for corn multi-shoot tissues transformation. The average frequency of Glucuronidase (GUS)-positive explants obtained from 14 corn genotypes ranged from 36% to 76%. L-proline (0.7 g L−1) in the co-culture medium apparently improved the frequency of transformation. The newly initiated multi-shoot tissues were most responsive to Agrobacterium infection. A positive correlation was found between multi-shoot tissue susceptibility to Agrobacterium and the proportion of cells in G1 phase. Transformants were identified by reverse transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and by southern blot hybridization assays. The frequency of transformants was approximately 2% based on the number of multi-shoot explants co-cultivated with Agrobacterium. PMID:26019506

  7. Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of the Recalcitrant Vanda Kasem's Delight Orchid with Higher Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gnasekaran, Pavallekoodi; James Antony, Jessica Jeyanthi; Uddain, Jasim; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2014-01-01

    The presented study established Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation using protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) for the production of transgenic Vanda Kasem's Delight Tom Boykin (VKD) orchid. Several parameters such as PLB size, immersion period, level of wounding, Agrobacterium density, cocultivation period, and concentration of acetosyringone were tested and quantified using gusA gene expression to optimize the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of VKD's PLBs. Based on the results, 3-4 mm PLBs wounded by scalpel and immersed for 30 minutes in Agrobacterium suspension of 0.8 unit at A600nm produced the highest GUS expression. Furthermore, cocultivating infected PLBs for 4 days in the dark on Vacin and Went cocultivation medium containing 200 𝜇M acetosyringone enhanced the GUS expression. PCR analysis of the putative transformants selected in the presence of 250 mg/L cefotaxime and 30 mg/L geneticin proved the presence of wheatwin1, wheatwin2, and nptII genes. PMID:24977213

  8. Novel primers for detection of genetically diverse virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens bv1 strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel primers were developed to amplify a 243 bp fragment of an intergenic region between gene5 and tms2 on the T-DNA of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. These primers exhibit 100% positive correlation with strain virulence, 100% negative correlation with avirulence and did not generate extraneous bands,...

  9. Long Chain N-acyl Homoserine Lactone Production by Enterobacter sp. Isolated from Human Tongue Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wai-Fong; Purmal, Kathiravan; Chin, Shenyang; Chan, Xin-Yue; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-01-01

    We report the isolation of N-acyl homoserine lactone-producing Enterobacter sp. isolate T1-1 from the posterior dorsal surfaces of the tongue of a healthy individual. Spent supernatants extract from Enterobacter sp. isolate T1-1 activated the biosensor Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4(pZLR4), suggesting production of long chain AHLs by these isolates. High resolution mass spectrometry analysis of these extracts confirmed that Enterobacter sp. isolate T1-1 produced a long chain N-acyl homoserine lactone, namely N-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first isolation of Enterobacter sp., strain T1-1 from the posterior dorsal surface of the human tongue and N-acyl homoserine lactones production by this bacterium. PMID:23202161

  10. Bipolamides A and B, triene amides isolated from the endophytic fungus Bipolaris sp. MU34.

    PubMed

    Siriwach, Ratklao; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Kitani, Shigeru; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Pansuksan, Kanokthip; Panbangred, Watanalai; Nihira, Takuya

    2014-02-01

    As a result of the continued screening for new metabolites produced by endophytic fungi from Thai medicinal plants, two new triene fatty acid amides, bipolamides A (1) and B (2), were discovered from the endophytic fungus Bipolaris sp. MU34. The structures of all of the isolated compounds were elucidated on the basis of the spectroscopic data of NMR and MS. An antimicrobial assay revealed that bipolamide B (2) had moderate antifungal activity against Cladosporium cladosporioides FERMS-9, Cladosporium cucumerinum NBRC 6370, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 9804, Aspergillus niger ATCC 6275 and Rhisopus oryzae ATCC 10404, with Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 16, 32, 32, 64 and 64 μg ml(-1), respectively. PMID:24192556

  11. A genomic island provides Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 53993 additional copper resistance: a possible competitive advantage.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Luis H; Jerez, Carlos A

    2011-11-01

    There is great interest in understanding how extremophilic biomining bacteria adapt to exceptionally high copper concentrations in their environment. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 53993 genome possesses the same copper resistance determinants as strain ATCC 23270. However, the former strain contains in its genome a 160-kb genomic island (GI), which is absent in ATCC 23270. This GI contains, amongst other genes, several genes coding for an additional putative copper ATPase and a Cus system. A. ferrooxidans ATCC 53993 showed a much higher resistance to CuSO(4) (>100 mM) than that of strain ATCC 23270 (<25 mM). When a similar number of bacteria from each strain were mixed and allowed to grow in the absence of copper, their respective final numbers remained approximately equal. However, in the presence of copper, there was a clear overgrowth of strain ATCC 53993 compared to ATCC 23270. This behavior is most likely explained by the presence of the additional copper-resistance genes in the GI of strain ATCC 53993. As determined by qRT-PCR, it was demonstrated that these genes are upregulated when A. ferrooxidans ATCC 53993 is grown in the presence of copper and were shown to be functional when expressed in copper-sensitive Escherichia coli mutants. Thus, the reason for resistance to copper of two strains of the same acidophilic microorganism could be determined by slight differences in their genomes, which may not only lead to changes in their capacities to adapt to their environment, but may also help to select the more fit microorganisms for industrial biomining operations. PMID:21789491

  12. Molecular cloning and heterologous expression of the isopullulanase gene from Aspergillus niger A.T.C.C. 9642.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, H; Yopi; Sakano, Y

    1997-01-01

    Isopullulanase (IPU) from Aspergillus niger A.T.C.C. (American Type Culture Collection) 9642 hydrolyses pullulan to isopanose. IPU is important for the production of isopanose and is used in the structural analysis of oligosaccharides with alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,6 glucosidic linkages. We have isolated the ipuA gene encoding IPU from the filamentous fungi A. niger A.T.C.C. 9642. The ipuA gene encodes an open reading frame of 1695 bp (564 amino acids). IPU contained a signal sequence of 19 amino acids, and the molecular mass of the mature form was calculated to be 59 kDa. IPU has no amino-acid-sequence similarity with the other pullulan-hydrolysing enzymes, which are pullulanase, neopullulanase and glucoamylase. However, IPU showed a high amino-acid-sequence similarity with dextranases from Penicillium minioluteum (61%) and Arthrobacter sp. (56%). When the ipuA gene was expressed in Aspergillus oryzae, the expressed protein (recombinant IPU) had IPU activity and was immunologically reactive with antibodies raised against native IPU. The substrate specificity, thermostability and pH profile of recombinant IPU were identical with those of the native enzyme, but recombinant IPU (90 kDa) was larger than the native enzyme (69-71 kDa). After deglycosylation with peptide-N-glycosidase F, the deglycosylated recombinant IPU had the same molecular mass as deglycosylated native enzyme (59 kDa). This result suggests that the carbohydrate chain of recombinant IPU differed from that of the native enzyme. PMID:9169610

  13. Genome Sequence of the Ethanol-Producing Zymomonas mobilis subsp. mobilis Lectotype Strain ATCC 10988 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Katherine M.; Kouvelis, Vassili N.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Brettin, Thomas S.; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Balakireva, Mariya; Han, Cliff S.; Savvakis, Giannis; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Typas, Milton A.

    2011-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis ATCC 10988 is the type strain of the Z. mobilis subsp. mobilis taxon, members of which are some of the most rigorous ethanol-producing bacteria. Isolated from Agave cactus fermentations in Mexico, ATCC 10988 is one of the first Z. mobilis strains to be described and studied. Its robustness in sucrose-substrate fermentations, physiological characteristics, large number of plasmids, and overall genomic plasticity render this strain important to the study of the species. Here we report the finishing and annotation of the ATCC 10988 chromosomal and plasmid genome. PMID:21725006

  14. Delimiting the genus Staphylococcus through description of Macrococcus caseolyticus gen. nov., comb. nov. and Macrococcus equipercicus sp. nov., and Macrococcus bovicus sp. no. and Macrococcus carouselicus sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kloos, W E; Ballard, D N; George, C G; Webster, J A; Hubner, R J; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Fiedler, F; Schubert, K

    1998-07-01

    Four species of the newly proposed genus Macrococcus, namely macrococcus caseolyticus gen. nov., comb. nov. (formerly Staphylococcus caseolyticus Schleifer, Kilpper-Bälz, Fischer, Faller and Endl 1982, 19VP), Macrococcus equipercicus sp. nov., Macrococcus bovicus sp. nov. Macrococcus carouselicus sp. nov., are described on the basis of a phylogenetic analysis comparing 16S rRNA sequences, DNA-DNA liquid hybridization, DNA base composition, normalized ribotype patterns, macrorestriction pattern analysis and estimation of genome size using PFGE, cell wall composition, phenotypic characteristics and plasmid profiles. Compared with their closet relatives, members of the genus Staphylococcus, these organisms demonstrated significantly lower 16S rRNA sequence similarities (93.4-95.3%), higher DNA G+C content (38-45 mol%), absence of cell wall teichoic acids (with the possible exception of M. caseolyticus), unique ribotype pattern types and macrorestriction patterns, smaller genome size (approx. 1500-1800 kb) and generally larger Gram-stained cell size (1.1-2.5% microns in diameter). Macrococci can be distinguished from most species of staphylococci (except Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus vitulus and Staphylococcus lentus) by thier oxidase activity. The four Macrococcus species can be distinguished from one another on the basis of DNA-DNA hybridization, ribotype pattern types, macrorestriction patterns and their phenotypic properties, including colony morphology, cell morphology, haemolysins, Staphy Latex agglutination, acid production from a variety of carbohydrates, acetoin production, nitrate reduction, aesculin hydrolysis, and DNase and urease activities. The type species is M. equipercicus. The type strains of M. equipercicus, M. caseolyticus, M. bovicus and M. carouselicus are ATTCC 51831T (= DD 9350T) ATCC 13548T (= TDD 4508T) (Schleifer et al. 1982, ATCC 51825T (= DD 4516T) and ATCC 51828T (= DD 9348), respectively. PMID:9734040

  15. Dielectric characterization of forespores isolated from Bacillus megaterium ATCC 19213.

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, R E; Bender, G R; Carstensen, E L; Child, S Z

    1983-01-01

    Isolated stage III forespores of Bacillus megaterium ATCC 19213 in aqueous suspensions were nearly as dehydrated as mature spores, as indicated by low dextran-impermeable volumes of ca. 3.0 ml per g (dry weight) of cells compared with values of ca. 2.6 for mature spores and 7.3 for vegetative cells. The forespores lacked dipicolinate, had only minimal levels of calcium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, and sodium, and were more heat sensitive than vegetative cells. The effective homogeneous conductivities and dielectric constants measured over a frequency range of 1 to 200 MHz indicated that the inherent conductivities of the forespores were unusually low, in keeping with their low mineral contents, but that the forespores could be invaded by environmental ions which could penetrate dielectrically effective membranes. Overall, our findings support the view that the dehydration of a forespore during stage III of sporogenesis may be the result of ion movements out of the forespore into the sporangium. PMID:6401285

  16. L-Lactic Acid Production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 10863

    PubMed Central

    Senedese, Ana Lívia Chemeli; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid has been shown to have the most promising application in biomaterials as poly(lactic acid). L. rhamnosus ATCC 10863 that produces L-lactic acid was used to perform the fermentation and molasses was used as substrate. A solution containing 27.6 g/L of sucrose (main composition of molasses) and 3.0 g/L of yeast extract was prepared, considering the final volume of 3,571 mL (14.0% (v/v) inoculum). Batch and fed batch fermentations were performed with temperature of 43.4°C and pH of 5.0. At the fed batch, three molasses feed were applied at 12, 24, and 36 hours. Samples were taken every two hours and the amounts of lactic acid, sucrose, glucose, and fructose were determined by HPLC. The sucrose was barely consumed at both processes; otherwise the glucose and fructose were almost entirely consumed. 16.5 g/L of lactic acid was produced at batch and 22.0 g/L at fed batch. Considering that lactic acid was produced due to the low concentration of the well consumed sugars, the final amount was considerable. The cell growth was checked and no substrate inhibition was observed. A sucrose molasses hydrolysis is suggested to better avail the molasses fermentation with this strain, surely increasing the L-lactic acid. PMID:25922852

  17. New Insights into Chloramphenicol Biosynthesis in Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 10712

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T.; Borsetto, Chiara; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Bibb, Maureen J.; Al-Bassam, Mahmoud M.; Chandra, Govind

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genome analysis revealed seven uncharacterized genes, sven0909 to sven0915, adjacent to the previously identified chloramphenicol biosynthetic gene cluster (sven0916–sven0928) of Streptomyces venezuelae strain ATCC 10712 that was absent in a closely related Streptomyces strain that does not produce chloramphenicol. Transcriptional analysis suggested that three of these genes might be involved in chloramphenicol production, a prediction confirmed by the construction of deletion mutants. These three genes encode a cluster-associated transcriptional activator (Sven0913), a phosphopantetheinyl transferase (Sven0914), and a Na+/H+ antiporter (Sven0915). Bioinformatic analysis also revealed the presence of a previously undetected gene, sven0925, embedded within the chloramphenicol biosynthetic gene cluster that appears to encode an acyl carrier protein, bringing the number of new genes likely to be involved in chloramphenicol production to four. Microarray experiments and synteny comparisons also suggest that sven0929 is part of the biosynthetic gene cluster. This has allowed us to propose an updated and revised version of the chloramphenicol biosynthetic pathway. PMID:25267678

  18. Highly Hydrolytic Reuteransucrase from Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri Strain ATCC 55730

    PubMed Central

    Kralj, S.; Stripling, E.; Sanders, P.; van Geel-Schutten, G. H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri strain ATCC 55730 (LB BIO) was isolated as a pure culture from a Reuteri tablet purchased from the BioGaia company. This probiotic strain produces a soluble glucan (reuteran), in which the majority of the linkages are of the α-(1→4) glucosidic type (∼70%). This reuteran also contains α-(1→6)- linked glucosyl units and 4,6-disubstituted α-glucosyl units at the branching points. The LB BIO glucansucrase gene (gtfO) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the GTFO enzyme was purified. The recombinant GTFO enzyme and the LB BIO culture supernatants synthesized identical glucan polymers with respect to linkage type and size distribution. GTFO thus is a reuteransucrase, responsible for synthesis of this reuteran polymer in LB BIO. The preference of GTFO for synthesizing α-(1→4) linkages is also evident from the oligosaccharides produced from sucrose with different acceptor substrates, e.g., isopanose from isomaltose. GTFO has a relatively high hydrolysis/transferase activity ratio. Complete conversion of 100 mM sucrose by GTFO nevertheless yielded large amounts of reuteran, although more than 50% of sucrose was converted into glucose. This is only the second example of the isolation and characterization of a reuteransucrase and its reuteran product, both found in different L. reuteri strains. GTFO synthesizes a reuteran with the highest amount of α-(1→4) linkages reported to date. PMID:16000808

  19. Inter-organ defense networking: Leaf whitefly sucking elicits plant immunity to crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Plants have elaborate defensive machinery to protect against numerous pathogens and insects. Plant hormones function as modulators of defensive mechanisms to maintain plant resistance to natural enemies. Our recent study suggests that salicylic acid (SA) is the primary phytohormone regulating plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. Tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana Domin.) immune responses against Agrobacterium-mediated crown gall disease were activated by exposure to the sucking insect whitefly, which stimulated SA biosynthesis in aerial tissues; in turn, SA synthesized in aboveground tissues systemically modulated SA secretion in root tissues. Further investigation revealed that endogenous SA biosynthesis negatively modulated Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. Our study provides novel evidence that activation of the SA-signaling pathway mediated by a sucking insect infestation has a pivotal role in subsequently attenuating Agrobacterium infection. These results demonstrate new insights into interspecies cross-talking among insects, plants, and soil bacteria. PMID:26357873

  20. Inter-organ defense networking: Leaf whitefly sucking elicits plant immunity to crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Plants have elaborate defensive machinery to protect against numerous pathogens and insects. Plant hormones function as modulators of defensive mechanisms to maintain plant resistance to natural enemies. Our recent study suggests that salicylic acid (SA) is the primary phytohormone regulating plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. Tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana Domin.) immune responses against Agrobacterium-mediated crown gall disease were activated by exposure to the sucking insect whitefly, which stimulated SA biosynthesis in aerial tissues; in turn, SA synthesized in aboveground tissues systemically modulated SA secretion in root tissues. Further investigation revealed that endogenous SA biosynthesis negatively modulated Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. Our study provides novel evidence that activation of the SA-signaling pathway mediated by a sucking insect infestation has a pivotal role in subsequently attenuating Agrobacterium infection. These results demonstrate new insights into interspecies cross-talking among insects, plants, and soil bacteria. PMID:26357873

  1. Bacteremia due to Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter). Report of infection in a pregnant women and her stillborn fetus.

    PubMed

    Southern, P M

    1996-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter) is usually a plant pathogen, but is isolated occasionally from human clinical specimens, frequently along with other bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter) has been isolated from blood, central intravenous catheters, peritoneal fluid, urine, and cellulitis aspirates, often in immunocompromised individuals. This report details the isolation of A. tumefaciens (radiobacter) from the blood of a pregnant woman, as well as from the blood of her stillborn, premature fetus. It is, to our knowledge, the first report of such an occurrence. PMID:8988763

  2. Multiple host-cell recombination pathways act in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plant cells.

    PubMed

    Mestiri, Imen; Norre, Frédéric; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I

    2014-02-01

    Using floral-dip, tumorigenesis and root callus transformation assays of both germline and somatic cells, we present here results implicating the four major non-homologous and homologous recombination pathways in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana. All four single mutant lines showed similar mild reductions in transformability, but knocking out three of four pathways severely compromised Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Although integration of T-DNA into the plant genome is severely compromised in the absence of known DNA double-strand break repair pathways, it does still occur, suggesting the existence of other pathways involved in T-DNA integration. Our results highlight the functional redundancy of the four major plant recombination pathways in transformation, and provide an explanation for the lack of strong effects observed in previous studies on the roles of plant recombination functions in transformation. PMID:24299074

  3. Morphogenetic and chemical stability of long-term maintained Agrobacterium-mediated transgenic Catharanthus roseus plants.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Sharma, Abhishek; Khan, Shamshad Ahmad; Mathur, Ajay Kumar; Shanker, Karuna

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic Catharanthus roseus plants (transgenic Dhawal [DT] and transgenic Nirmal [NT]) obtained from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizognenes-mediated transformations, respectively, have been maintained in vitro for 5 years. Plants were studied at regular intervals for various parameters such as plant height, leaf size, multiplication rate, alkaloid profile and presence of marker genes. DT plant gradually lost the GUS gene expression and it was not detected in the fifth year while NT plant demonstrated the presence of genes rolA, rolB and rolC even in the fifth year, indicating the more stable nature of Ri transgene. Vindoline content in the DT was two times more than in non-transformed control plants. Alkaloid and tryptophan profiles were almost constant during the 5 years. The cluster analysis revealed that the DT plant is more close to the control Nirmal plant followed by NT plant. PMID:25102992

  4. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation and plant regeneration of the hardwood tree species Fraxinus profunda.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Micah E; Pijut, Paula M

    2014-06-01

    This transformation and regeneration protocol provides an integral framework for the genetic improvement of Fraxinus profunda (pumpkin ash) for future development of plants resistant to the emerald ash borer. Using mature hypocotyls as the initial explants, an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation system was successfully developed for pumpkin ash (Fraxinus profunda). This transformation protocol is an invaluable tool to combat the highly aggressive, non-native emerald ash borer (EAB), which has the potential to eliminate native Fraxinus spp. from the natural landscape. Hypocotyls were successfully transformed with Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harboring the pq35GR vector, containing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as well as a fusion gene between neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and gusA. Hypocotyls were cultured for 7 days on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 22.2 μM 6-benzyladenine (BA), 4.5 μM thidiazuron (TDZ), 50 mg L(-1) adenine hemisulfate (AS), and 10 % coconut water (CW) prior to transformation. Hypocotyls were transformed using 90 s sonication plus 10 min vacuum infiltration after Agrobacterium was exposed to 100 μM acetosyringone for 1 h. Adventitious shoots were regenerated on MS medium with 22.2 μM BA, 4.5 μM TDZ, 50 mg L(-1) AS, 10 % CW, 400 mg L(-1) timentin, and 20 mg L(-1) kanamycin. Timentin at 400 and 20 mg L(-1) kanamycin were most effective at controlling Agrobacterium growth and selecting for transformed cells, respectively. The presence of nptII, GUS (β-glucuronidase), and EGFP in transformed plants was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), while the expression of EGFP was also confirmed through fluorescent microscopy and reverse transcription-PCR. This transformation protocol provides an integral foundation for future genetic modifications of F. profunda to provide resistance to EAB. PMID:24493252

  5. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  6. Development of an Agrobacterium-Mediated Stable Transformation Method for the Sensitive Plant Mimosa pudica

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Hiroaki; Fujii, Tomomi; Sumikawa, Naomi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-01-01

    The sensitive plant Mimosa pudica has long attracted the interest of researchers due to its spectacular leaf movements in response to touch or other external stimuli. Although various aspects of this seismonastic movement have been elucidated by histological, physiological, biochemical, and behavioral approaches, the lack of reverse genetic tools has hampered the investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. To overcome this obstacle, we developed an efficient genetic transformation method for M. pudica mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agrobacterium). We found that the cotyledonary node explant is suitable for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation because of its high frequency of shoot formation, which was most efficiently induced on medium containing 0.5 µg/ml of a synthetic cytokinin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). Transformation efficiency of cotyledonary node cells was improved from almost 0 to 30.8 positive signals arising from the intron-sGFP reporter gene by using Agrobacterium carrying a super-binary vector pSB111 and stabilizing the pH of the co-cultivation medium with 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer. Furthermore, treatment of the explants with the detergent Silwet L-77 prior to co-cultivation led to a two-fold increase in the number of transformed shoot buds. Rooting of the regenerated shoots was efficiently induced by cultivation on irrigated vermiculite. The entire procedure for generating transgenic plants achieved a transformation frequency of 18.8%, which is comparable to frequencies obtained for other recalcitrant legumes, such as soybean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum). The transgene was stably integrated into the host genome and was inherited across generations, without affecting the seismonastic or nyctinastic movements of the plants. This transformation method thus provides an effective genetic tool for studying genes involved in M. pudica movements. PMID:24533121

  7. Development of an Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation method for the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica.

    PubMed

    Mano, Hiroaki; Fujii, Tomomi; Sumikawa, Naomi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-01-01

    The sensitive plant Mimosa pudica has long attracted the interest of researchers due to its spectacular leaf movements in response to touch or other external stimuli. Although various aspects of this seismonastic movement have been elucidated by histological, physiological, biochemical, and behavioral approaches, the lack of reverse genetic tools has hampered the investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. To overcome this obstacle, we developed an efficient genetic transformation method for M. pudica mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agrobacterium). We found that the cotyledonary node explant is suitable for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation because of its high frequency of shoot formation, which was most efficiently induced on medium containing 0.5 µg/ml of a synthetic cytokinin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). Transformation efficiency of cotyledonary node cells was improved from almost 0 to 30.8 positive signals arising from the intron-sGFP reporter gene by using Agrobacterium carrying a super-binary vector pSB111 and stabilizing the pH of the co-cultivation medium with 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer. Furthermore, treatment of the explants with the detergent Silwet L-77 prior to co-cultivation led to a two-fold increase in the number of transformed shoot buds. Rooting of the regenerated shoots was efficiently induced by cultivation on irrigated vermiculite. The entire procedure for generating transgenic plants achieved a transformation frequency of 18.8%, which is comparable to frequencies obtained for other recalcitrant legumes, such as soybean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum). The transgene was stably integrated into the host genome and was inherited across generations, without affecting the seismonastic or nyctinastic movements of the plants. This transformation method thus provides an effective genetic tool for studying genes involved in M. pudica movements. PMID:24533121

  8. Scheffersomyces parashehatae f.a., sp. nov., Scheffersomyces xylosifermentans f.a., sp. nov., Candida broadrunensis sp. nov. and Candida manassasensis sp. nov., novel yeasts associated with wood-ingesting insects, and their ecological and biofuel implications.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Oui; Houseknecht, Janice L; Gujjari, Pushpa; Zhou, Jianlong J

    2013-11-01

    During a survey of yeasts associated with wood-ingesting insects, 69 strains in the Scheffersomyces clade and related taxa were isolated from passalid and tenebrionid beetles and the decayed wood inhabited by them. The majority of these yeasts was found to be capable of fermenting xylose, and was recognized as Scheffersomyces stipitis or its close relative Scheffersomyces illinoinensis, which are known to be associated with wood-decaying beetles and rotten wood. Yeasts in 'Scheffersomyces' ( = Candida) ergatensis and 'Scheffersomyces' ( = Candida) coipomoensis were also frequently isolated. The remaining six strains were identified as representing four novel species in the genera Scheffersomyces and Candida based on multilocus sequence analyses of nuclear rRNA genes and four protein-coding genes, as well as other taxonomic characteristics. Two xylose-fermenting species, Scheffersomyces parashehatae f.a., sp. nov. (type strain ATCC MYA-4653(T) = CBS 12535(T) = EH045(T); MycoBank MB805440) and Scheffersomyces xylosifermentans f.a., sp. nov. (type strain ATCC MYA-4859(T) = CBS 12540(T) = MY10-052(T); MycoBank MB805441), formed a clade with Scheffersomyces shehatae and related Scheffersomyces species. Interestingly, S. xylosifermentans can survive at 40 °C, which is a rare property among xylose-fermenting yeasts. Candida broadrunensis sp. nov. (type strain ATCC MYA-4650(T) = CBS 11838(T) = EH019(T); MycoBank MB805442) is a sister taxon of C. ergatensis, while Candida manassasensis sp. nov. (type strain ATCC MYA-4652(T) = CBS 12534(T) = EH030(T); MycoBank MB805443) is closely related to Candida palmioleophila in the Candida glaebosa clade. The multilocus DNA sequence comparisons in this study suggest that the genus Scheffersomyces needs to be circumscribed to the species near S. stipitis (type species) and S. shehatae that can be characterized by the ability to ferment xylose. PMID:24014624

  9. [Methods for the detection of Agrobacterium from plant, soil and water samples].

    PubMed

    Alippi, Adriana M; López, Ana C; Balatti, Pedro A

    2011-01-01

    The genus Agrobacterium includes phytopathogenic bacteria that induce the development of root crown galls and/or aerial galls at the base of the stem or hairy roots on more than 600 species of plants belonging to 90 dicotyledonous families and non-pathogenic species. These bacteria being natural soil inhabitants are particularly difficult to eradicate, which is a problem in nurseries where more than 80% of infections occur. Since early detection is crucial to avoid the inadvertent spread of the disease, the aim of this work was to develop sensitive and precise identification techniques by using a set of semi-selective and differential culture media in combination with a specific PCR to amplify a partial sequence derived from the virC operon, as well as a multiplex PCR on the basis of 23SrDNA sequences, and biological assays to identify and differentiate species and biovars of Agrobacterium obtained either from soil, water or plant samples. The combination of the different assays allowed us to reduce the number of false positive and negative results from bacteria isolated from any of the three types of samples. Therefore, the combination of multiplex PCR, specific PCR, isolations in semi-selective D1, D1-M and YEM-RCT media combined with bioassays on cut leaves of Kalanchoe and seedlings of California Wonder pepper cultivar constitute an accurate tool to detect species and biovars of Agrobacterium for diagnostic purposes. PMID:22274826

  10. Use of Ti Plasmid DNA Probes for Determining Tumorigenicity of Agrobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Thomas J.; Norelli, John L.; Katz, Barbara H.; Bishop, Andrew L.

    1990-01-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two 32P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 106 CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains. Images PMID:16348218

  11. Lox-dependent gene expression in transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, N; Kishchenko, O; Sakhno, L; Komarnytsky, I; Kuchuk, M

    2013-01-01

    Lox sites of the Cre/lox recombination system from bacteriophage P1 were analyzed for their ability to affect on transgene expression when inserted upstream from a gene coding sequence adjacent to the right border (RB) of T-DNA. Wild and mutated types of lox sites were tested for their effect upon bar gene expression in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated and biolistic transformation methods. Lox-mediated expression of bar gene, recognized by resistance of transgenic plants to PPT, occurred only in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. RT-PCR analysis confirms that PPT-resistant phenotype of transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was caused by activation of bar gene. The plasmid with promoterless gus gene together with the lox site adjacent to the RB was constructed and transferred to Nicotiana tabacum as well. Transgenic plants exhibited GUS activity and expression of gus gene was detected in plant leaves. Expression of bar gene from the vectors containing lox site near RB allowed recovery of numerous PPT-resistant transformants of such important crops as Beta vulgaris, Brassica napus, Lactuca sativa and Solanum tuberosum. Our results demonstrate that the lox site sequence adjacent to the RB can be used to control bar gene expression in transgenic plants. PMID:23821951

  12. Use of Ti plasmid DNA probes for determining tumorigenicity of agrobacterium strains

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.J.; Norelli, J.L.; Katz, B.H.; Bishop, A.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two {sup 32}P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 10{sup 6} CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains.

  13. Molecular insights into plant cell proliferation disturbance by Agrobacterium protein 6b

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meimei; Soyano, Takashi; Machida, Satoru; Yang, Jun-Yi; Jung, Choonkyun; Chua, Nam-Hai; Yuan, Y. Adam

    2011-01-01

    The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid (T-DNA) 6b proteins interact with many different host proteins implicated in plant cell proliferation. Here, we show that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing 6b display microRNA (miRNA) deficiency by directly targeting SERRATE and AGO1 via a specific loop fragment (residues 40–55). In addition, we report the crystal structures of Agrobacterium tumefaciens AK6b at 2.1 Å, Agrobacterium vitis AB6b at 1.65 Å, and Arabidopsis ADP ribosylation factor (ARF) at 1.8 Å. The 6b structure adopts an ADP-ribosylating toxin fold closely related to cholera toxin. In vitro ADP ribosylation analysis demonstrates that 6b represents a new toxin family, with Tyr 66, Thr 93, and Tyr 153 as the ADP ribosylation catalytic residues in the presence of Arabidopsis ARF and GTP. Our work provides molecular insights, suggesting that 6b regulates plant cell growth by the disturbance of the miRNA pathway through its ADP ribosylation activity. PMID:21156810

  14. [Meristematic characteristics of tumors initiated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in pea plants].

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, A P; Lebedeva, M A; Lutova, L A

    2015-01-01

    It is known that two key groups of plant hormones--auxins and cytokinins--play an important role in plant tumor development. The formation of Agrobacterium-induced tumors results from the horizontal transfer of bacterial oncogenes involved in the biosynthesis of these hormones in the plant genome. The role of transcriptional factors in plant tumor development is poorly investigated. It can be assumed that tumor development associated with abnormal cell proliferation can be controlled by the same set of transcription factors that control normal cell proliferation and, in particular, transcription factors that regulate meristem activity. In the present study, we analyzed the histological organization and distribution of proliferating cells in tumors induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens on pea hypocotyls. In addition, the expression of a set of meristem-specific genes with Agrobacterium tumefaciens-induced tumor development was analyzed. In general, our results indicate that meristematic structures are present in A. tumefaciens-induced tumors and that the development of such tumors is associated with increased expression of a key gene regulating the root apical meristem--the WOX5 gene. PMID:25857193

  15. AGROBACTERIUM-MEDIATED TRANSFORMATION IN THE GREEN ALGA HAEMATOCOCCUS PLUVIALIS (CHLOROPHYCEAE, VOLVOCALES)(1).

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, S; Chandrashekar, A; Ravishankar, G A; Sarada, R

    2009-06-01

    The first successful Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis Flot. using the binary vectors hosting the genes coding for GUS (β-glucuronidase), GFP (green fluorescent protein), and hpt (hygromycin phosphotransferase) is reported here. Colonies resistant to hygromycin at 10 mg · L(-1) expressed β-glucuronidase. The greenish yellow fluorescence of GFP was observed when the hygromycin-resistant cells were viewed with a fluorescent microscope. PCR was used to successfully amplify fragments of the hpt (407 bp) and GUS (515 bp) genes from transformed cells, while Southern blots indicated the integration of the hygromycin gene into the genome of H. pluvialis. SEM indicated that the cell wall of H. pluvialis was altered on infection with Agrobacterium. The transformation achieved here by Agrobacterium does not need treatment with acetosyringone or the wounding of cells. A robust transformation method for this alga would pave the way for manipulation of many important pathways relevant to the food, pharmaceutical, and nutraceutical industries. PMID:27034041

  16. Highly efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of banana cv. Rasthali (AAB) via sonication and vacuum infiltration.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Kondeti; Subramanyam, Koona; Sailaja, K V; Srinivasulu, M; Lakshmidevi, K

    2011-03-01

    A reproducible and efficient transformation method was developed for the banana cv. Rasthali (AAB) via Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of suckers. Three-month-old banana suckers were used as explant and three Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains (EHA105, EHA101, and LBA4404) harboring the binary vector pCAMBIA1301 were used in the co-cultivation. The banana suckers were sonicated and vacuum infiltered with each of the three A. tumefaciens strains and co-cultivated in the medium containing different concentrations of acetosyringone for 3 days. The transformed shoots were selected in 30 mg/l hygromycin-containing selection medium and rooted in rooting medium containing 1 mg/l IBA and 30 mg/l hygromycin. The presence and integration of the hpt II and gus genes into the banana genome were confirmed by GUS histochemical assay, polymerase chain reaction, and southern hybridization. Among the different combinations tested, high transformation efficiency (39.4 ± 0.5% GUS positive shoots) was obtained when suckers were sonicated and vacuum infiltered for 6 min with A. tumefaciens EHA105 in presence of 50 μM acetosyringone followed by co-cultivation in 50 μM acetosyringone-containing medium for 3 days. These results suggest that an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol for stable integration of foreign genes into banana has been developed and that this transformation system could be useful for future studies on transferring economically important genes into banana. PMID:21212957

  17. Strategies to improve low copy transgenic events in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of maize.

    PubMed

    Sivamani, Elumalai; Li, Xianggan; Nalapalli, Samson; Barron, Yoshimi; Prairie, Anna; Bradley, David; Doyle, Michele; Que, Qiudeng

    2015-12-01

    Transgenic plants containing low copy transgene insertion free of vector backbone are highly desired for many biotechnological applications. We have investigated two different strategies for increasing the percentage of low copy events in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation experiments in maize. One of the strategies is to use a binary vector with two separate T-DNAs, one T-DNA containing an intact E.coli manA gene encoding phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) as selectable marker gene cassette and another T-DNA containing an RNAi cassette of PMI sequences. By using this strategy, low copy transgenic events containing the transgenes were increased from 43 to 60 % in maize. An alternate strategy is using selectable marker gene cassettes containing regulatory or coding sequences derived from essential plant genes such as 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) or MADS box transcription factor. In this paper we demonstrate that higher percentage of low copy transgenic events can be obtained in Agrobacterium-mediated maize transformation experiments using both strategies. We propose that the above two strategies can be used independently or in combination to increase transgenic events that contain low copy transgene insertion in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation experiments. PMID:26338266

  18. Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev., an extremely halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, A.; Ginzburg, M.; Ginzburg, B. Z.; Hochstein, L. I.; Volcani, B. E.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely halophilic red archaebacterium isolated from the Dead Sea (Ginzburg et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 55: 187-207, 1970) belongs to the genus Haloarcula and differs sufficiently from the previously described species of the genus to be designated a new species; we propose the name Haloarcula marismortui (Volcani) sp. nov., nom. rev. because of the close resemblance of this organism to "Halobacterium marismortui," which was first described by Volcani in 1940. The type strain is strain ATCC 43049.

  19. RNAi silencing of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase disrupts the ability of a filamentous fungus, Graphium sp. to grow on short-chain gaseous alkanes and ethers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graphium sp. (ATCC 58400), a filamentous fungus, is one of the few eukaryotes that grows on short-chain alkanes and ethers. In this study, we investigated the genetic underpinnings that enable this fungus to catalyze the first step in the alkane and ether oxidation pathway. A gene, CYP52L1, was iden...

  20. Female Reproductive Tissues Are the Primary Target of Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation by the Arabidopsis Floral-Dip Method1

    PubMed Central

    Desfeux, Christine; Clough, Steven J.; Bent, Andrew F.

    2000-01-01

    The floral-dip method for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis allows efficient plant transformation without need for tissue culture. To facilitate use with other plant species, we investigated the mechanisms that underlie this method. In manual outcrossing experiments, application of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to pollen donor plants did not produce any transformed progeny, whereas application of Agrobacterium to pollen recipient plants yielded transformants at a rate of 0.48%. Agrobacterium strains with T-DNA carrying gusA (encoding β-glucuronidase [GUS]) under the control of 35S, LAT52, or ACT11 promoters revealed delivery of GUS activity to developing ovules, whereas no GUS staining of pollen or pollen tubes was observed. Transformants derived from the same seed pod contained independent T-DNA integration events. In Arabidopsis flowers, the gynoecium develops as an open, vase-like structure that fuses to form closed locules roughly 3 d prior to anthesis. In correlation with this fact, we found that the timing of Agrobacterium infection was critical. Transformants were obtained and GUS staining of ovules and embryo sacs was observed only if the Agrobacterium were applied 5 d or more prior to anthesis. A 6-fold higher rate of transformation was obtained with a CRABS-CLAW mutant that maintains an open gynoecium. Our results suggest that ovules are the site of productive transformation in the floral-dip method, and further suggest that Agrobacterium must be delivered to the interior of the developing gynoecium prior to locule closure if efficient transformation is to be achieved. PMID:10889238

  1. Antifungal effects of citronella oil against Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Ru; Shi, Qing-Shan; Ouyang, You-Sheng; Chen, Yi-Ben; Duan, Shun-Shan

    2013-08-01

    Essential oils are aromatic oily liquids obtained from some aromatic plant materials. Certain essential oils such as citronella oil contain antifungal activity, but the antifungal effect is still unknown. In this study, we explored the antifungal effect of citronella oil with Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404. The antifungal activity of citronella oil on conidia of A. niger was determined by poisoned food technique, broth dilution method, and disc volatility method. Experimental results indicated that the citronella oil has strong antifungal activity: 0.125 (v/v) and 0.25 % (v/v) citronella oil inhibited the growth of 5 × 10⁵ spore/ml conidia separately for 7 and 28 days while 0.5 % (v/v) citronella oil could completely kill the conidia of 5 × 10⁵ spore/ml. Moreover, the fungicidal kinetic curves revealed that more than 90 % conidia (initial concentration is 5 × 10⁵ spore/ml) were killed in all the treatments with 0.125 to 2 % citronella oil after 24 h. Furthermore, with increase of citronella oil concentration and treatment time, the antifungal activity was increased correspondingly. The 0.5 % (v/v) concentration of citronella oil was a threshold to kill the conidia thoroughly. The surviving conidia treated with 0.5 to 2 % citronella oil decreased by an order of magnitude every day, and no fungus survived after 10 days. With light microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope, we found that citronella oil could lead to irreversible alteration of the hyphae and conidia. Based on our observation, we hypothesized that the citronella oil destroyed the cell wall of the A. niger hyphae, passed through the cell membrane, penetrated into the cytoplasm, and acted on the main organelles. Subsequently, the hyphae was collapsed and squashed due to large cytoplasm loss, and the organelles were severely destroyed. Similarly, citronella oil could lead to the rupture of hard cell wall and then act on the sporoplasm to kill the

  2. The Zur regulon of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zinc is considered as an essential element for all living organisms, but it can be toxic at large concentrations. Bacteria therefore tightly regulate zinc metabolism. The Cg2502 protein of Corynebacterium glutamicum was a candidate to control zinc metabolism in this species, since it was classified as metalloregulator of the zinc uptake regulator (Zur) subgroup of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family of DNA-binding transcription regulators. Results The cg2502 (zur) gene was deleted in the chromosome of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 by an allelic exchange procedure to generate the zur-deficient mutant C. glutamicum JS2502. Whole-genome DNA microarray hybridizations and real-time RT-PCR assays comparing the gene expression in C. glutamicum JS2502 with that of the wild-type strain detected 18 genes with enhanced expression in the zur mutant. The expression data were combined with results from cross-genome comparisons of shared regulatory sites, revealing the presence of candidate Zur-binding sites in the mapped promoter regions of five transcription units encoding components of potential zinc ABC-type transporters (cg0041-cg0042/cg0043; cg2911-cg2912-cg2913), a putative secreted protein (cg0040), a putative oxidoreductase (cg0795), and a putative P-loop GTPase of the COG0523 protein family (cg0794). Enhanced transcript levels of the respective genes in C. glutamicum JS2502 were verified by real-time RT-PCR, and complementation of the mutant with a wild-type zur gene reversed the effect of differential gene expression. The zinc-dependent expression of the putative cg0042 and cg2911 operons was detected in vivo with a gfp reporter system. Moreover, the zinc-dependent binding of purified Zur protein to double-stranded 40-mer oligonucleotides containing candidate Zur-binding sites was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. Conclusion Whole-genome expression profiling and DNA band shift assays demonstrated that Zur directly represses in a zinc

  3. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 cellulose fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Catherine K; Brown, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 wild-type strain to hydrolyze cellulose and ferment the degradation products directly to ethanol and other metabolic byproducts makes it an attractive candidate for consolidated bioprocessing of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. In this study, whole-genome microarrays were used to investigate the expression of C. thermocellum mRNA during growth on crystalline cellulose in controlled replicate batch fermentations. A time-series analysis of gene expression revealed changes in transcript levels of {approx}40% of genes ({approx}1300 out of 3198 ORFs encoded in the genome) during transition from early-exponential to late-stationary phase. K-means clustering of genes with statistically significant changes in transcript levels identified six distinct clusters of temporal expression. Broadly, genes involved in energy production, translation, glycolysis and amino acid, nucleotide and coenzyme metabolism displayed a decreasing trend in gene expression as cells entered stationary phase. In comparison, genes involved in cell structure and motility, chemotaxis, signal transduction and transcription showed an increasing trend in gene expression. Hierarchical clustering of cellulosome-related genes highlighted temporal changes in composition of this multi-enzyme complex during batch growth on crystalline cellulose, with increased expression of several genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in degradation of non-cellulosic substrates in stationary phase. Overall, the results suggest that under low substrate availability, growth slows due to decreased metabolic potential and C. thermocellum alters its gene expression to (i) modulate the composition of cellulosomes that are released into the environment with an increased proportion of enzymes than can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides other than cellulose, (ii) enhance signal transduction and chemotaxis mechanisms perhaps to sense the oligosaccharide hydrolysis products

  4. Purification and characterization of an extracellular muramidase of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 that acts on non-N-acetylated peptidoglycan.

    PubMed Central

    Croux, C; Canard, B; Goma, G; Soucaille, P

    1992-01-01

    An extracellular enzyme showing lytic activity on non-N-acetylated peptidoglycan has been isolated from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The lytic enzyme was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration, with a recovery of 24%. The enzyme was monomeric and had an estimated molecular weight of 41,000 and an isoelectric point of 3.8. It has been characterized as a muramidase whose 23-amino-acid N terminus displayed 39% homology with the N,O-diacetyl muramidase of the fungus Chalaropsis sp. The muramidase hydrolyzed purified cell walls at an optimum pH of 3, with a maximum velocity of 9.1 mumol of reducing sugars released min-1 mg of muramidase-1 and a concentration of cell walls giving a half-maximum rate of 0.01 mg ml-1. Its activity was inhibited by glucosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, Hg2+, Fe3+, and Ag+ but not by choline. The muramidase-peptidoglycan complex rapidly dissociated before total hydrolysis of the chain and randomly reassociated on another peptidoglycan chain. The affinity of the muramidase was affected by the protein content and the acetylation of the cell wall. Images PMID:1599233

  5. Biotransformation of natural compounds: unexpected thio conjugation of Sch-642305 with 3-mercaptolactate catalyzed by Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404 cells.

    PubMed

    Adelin, Emilie; Martin, Marie-Thérèse; Bricot, Marie-Françoise; Cortial, Sylvie; Retailleau, Pascal; Ouazzani, Jamal

    2012-12-01

    Sch-642305 is produced by the endophytic fungi Phomopsis sp. CMU-LMA and exhibits both antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. The incubation of Sch-642305 with Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404 resting cells leads to two unexpected thio conjugates. Compound (1) is formed by the addition of the cysteine metabolite 3-mercaptolactate to the double bond of Sch-642305. Compound (1) undergoes an intramolecular rearrangement to give compound (2), which contains two rings: a five-membered hydroxylactone ring and a five-membered thiophene ring. The absolute configuration of compound (1) is similar to that of the parent compound, but the configuration of the mercaptolactate side-chain was not determined. The absolute configuration of compound (2) was deduced from the crystal structure and confirmed by the anomal effect of the sulfur atom. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such a conjugation rearrangement reactions were observed. The biological significance and the reaction mechanisms are discussed. Compound (1) exhibits a weak antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, whereas derivatives (1) and (2) showed an IC₅₀ of 1 and 1.2 μM, respectively, against colonic epithelial cancer cells. PMID:22975164

  6. Detergent composition comprising a cellulase containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702 or mutant thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  7. Detergent composition comprising a cellulase containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702 or mutant thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H.C.

    1998-07-14

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  8. Nocardia donostiensis sp. nov., isolated from human respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Ercibengoa, Maria; Bell, Melissa; Marimón, José Maria; Humrighouse, Benjamin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Pötter, Gabrielle; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Three human clinical isolates (X1654, X1655, and W9944) were recovered from the sputum and bronchial washings of two patients with pulmonary infections. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the isolates showed that they share 100 % sequence similarity with each other and belong to the genus Nocardia. Close phylogenetic neighbours are Nocardia brevicatena ATCC 15333(T) (98.6 %) and Nocardia paucivorans ATCC BAA-278T (98.4 %). The in silico DNA-DNA relatedness between the isolates ranges from 96.8 to 100 % suggesting that they belong to the same genomic species. The DNA-DNA relatedness between X1654 and N. brevicatena ATCC 15333(T) is 13.3 ± 2.3 % and N. paucivorans ATCC BAA-278T is 18.95 ± 1.1 % suggesting that they do not belong to the same genomic species. Believed to represent a novel species, these isolates were further characterised to establish their taxonomic standing within the genus. Chemotaxonomic data for isolate X1654 are consistent with those described for the genus Nocardia: this isolate produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, tuberculostearic acid (15.9 %), the major menaquinone was MK-8 (H4cyclic), mycolic acid chain lengths ranged from 38 to 58 carbons, produced meso-diaminopimelic acid with arabinose, glucose, and galactose as the whole cell sugars. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylinositol mannosides. The DNA G+C content is 66.7 mol  %. Based on the combination of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and genotypic data for X1654, X1655, and W9944, we conclude that these isolates represent a novel species within the genus Nocardia for which we propose the name Nocardia donostiensis sp. nov. with X1654(T) (=DSM 46814(T) = CECT 8839(T)) as the type strain. PMID:26914251

  9. Characterization of Plasmid-Borne and Chromosome-Encoded Traits of Agrobacterium Biovar 1, 2, and 3 Strains from France

    PubMed Central

    Ridé, Michel; Ridé, Suzanne; Petit, Annik; Bollet, Claude; Dessaux, Yves; Gardan, Louis

    2000-01-01

    We collected 111 Agrobacterium isolates from galls of various origins (most of them from France) and analyzed both their plasmid-borne and chromosome-encoded traits. Phenotypic analysis of these strains allowed their classification in three phena which exactly matched the delineation of biovars 1, 2, and 3. A fourth phenon was identified which comprises three atypical strains. The phenotypic analysis has also allowed us to identify 12 additional characteristics which could be used to identify the three biovars of Agrobacterium. Our results also suggest that biovar 1 and 2 represent distinct species. Analysis of plasmid-borne traits confirmed that tartrate utilization is a common feature of biovar 3 strains (now named Agrobacterium vitis) and of Agrobacterium grapevine strains in general. Among pathogenic strains of Agrobacterium, several exhibited unusual opine synthesis and degradation patterns, and one strain of biovar 3 induced tumors containing vitopine and a novel opine-like molecule derived from putrescine. We have named this compound ridéopine. PMID:10788345

  10. High-efficiency Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenck, A. R.; Quinn, M.; Whetten, R. W.; Pullman, G.; Sederoff, R.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is the method of choice for many plant biotechnology laboratories; however, large-scale use of this organism in conifer transformation has been limited by difficult propagation of explant material, selection efficiencies and low transformation frequency. We have analyzed co-cultivation conditions and different disarmed strains of Agrobacterium to improve transformation. Additional copies of virulence genes were added to three common disarmed strains. These extra virulence genes included either a constitutively active virG or extra copies of virG and virB, both from pTiBo542. In experiments with Norway spruce, we increased transformation efficiencies 1000-fold from initial experiments where little or no transient expression was detected. Over 100 transformed lines expressing the marker gene beta-glucuronidase (GUS) were generated from rapidly dividing embryogenic suspension-cultured cells co-cultivated with Agrobacterium. GUS activity was used to monitor transient expression and to further test lines selected on kanamycin-containing medium. In loblolly pine, transient expression increased 10-fold utilizing modified Agrobacterium strains. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is a useful technique for large-scale generation of transgenic Norway spruce and may prove useful for other conifer species.

  11. Emended description of Actinomyces naeslundii and descriptions of Actinomyces oris sp. nov. and Actinomyces johnsonii sp. nov., previously identified as Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1, 2 and WVA 963.

    PubMed

    Henssge, Uta; Do, Thuy; Radford, David R; Gilbert, Steven C; Clark, Douglas; Beighton, David

    2009-03-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an important early colonizer in the oral biofilm and consists of three genospecies (1, 2 and WVA 963) which cannot be readily differentiated using conventional phenotypic testing or on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We have investigated a representative collection of type and reference strains and clinical and oral isolates (n=115) and determined the partial gene sequences of six housekeeping genes (atpA, rpoB, pgi, metG, gltA and gyrA). These sequences identified the three genospecies and differentiated them from Actinomyces viscosus isolated from rodents. The partial sequences of atpA and metG gave best separation of the three genospecies. A. naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 formed two distinct clusters, well separated from both genospecies WVA 963 and A. viscosus. Analysis of the same genes in other oral Actinomyces species (Actinomyces gerencseriae, A. israelii, A. meyeri, A. odontolyticus and A. georgiae) indicated that, when sequence data were obtained, these species each exhibited <90 % similarity with the A. naeslundii genospecies. Based on these data, we propose the name Actinomyces oris sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 27044(T) =CCUG 34288(T)) for A. naeslundii genospecies 2 and Actinomyces johnsonii sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 49338(T) =CCUG 34287(T)) for A. naeslundii genospecies WVA 963. A. naeslundii genospecies 1 should remain as A. naeslundii sensu stricto, with the type strain ATCC 12104(T) =NCTC 10301(T) =CCUG 2238(T). PMID:19244431

  12. Specific point mutations in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 cause a phenotype switch from Lac- to Lac+.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Kuo; Chen, Hung-Wen; Lo, Ta-Chun; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2009-03-01

    Lactose metabolism is a changeable phenotype in strains of Lactobacillus casei. In this study, we found that L. casei ATCC 27139 was unable to utilize lactose. However, when exposed to lactose as the sole carbon source, spontaneous Lac(+) clones could be obtained. A gene cluster (lacTEGF-galKETRM) involved in the metabolism of lactose and galactose in L. casei ATCC 27139 (Lac(-)) and its Lac(+) revertant (designated strain R1) was sequenced and characterized. We found that only one nucleotide, located in the lacTEGF promoter (lacTp), of the two lac-gal gene clusters was different. The protein sequence identity between the lac-gal gene cluster and those reported previously for some L. casei (Lac(+)) strains was high; namely, 96-100 % identity was found and no premature stop codon was identified. A single point mutation located within the lacTp promoter region was also detected for each of the 41 other independently isolated Lac(+) revertants of L. casei ATCC 27139. The revertants could be divided into six classes based on the positions of the point mutations detected. Primer extension experiments conducted on transcription from lacTp revealed that the lacTp promoter of these six classes of Lac(+) revertants was functional, while that of L. casei ATCC 27139 was not. Northern blotting experiments further confirmed that the lacTEGF operon of strain R1 was induced by lactose but suppressed by glucose, whereas no blotting signal was ever detected for L. casei ATCC 27139. These results suggest that a single point mutation in the lacTp promoter was able to restore the transcription of a fully functional lacTEGF operon and cause a phenotype switch from Lac(-) to Lac(+) for L. casei ATCC 27139. PMID:19246746

  13. Expression of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 Genes in Escherichia coli for Acetone Production and Acetate Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Lourdes L.; Welker, Neil E.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1998-01-01

    A synthetic acetone operon (ace4) composed of four Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 genes (adc, ctfAB, and thl, coding for the acetoacetate decarboxylase, coenzyme A transferase, and thiolase, respectively) under the control of the thl promoter was constructed and was introduced into Escherichia coli on vector pACT. Acetone production demonstrated that ace4 is expressed in E. coli and resulted in the reduction of acetic acid levels in the fermentation broth. Since different E. coli strains vary significantly in their growth characteristics and acetate metabolism, ace4 was expressed in three E. coli strains: ER2275, ATCC 11303, and MC1060. Shake flask cultures of MC1060(pACT) produced ca. 2 mM acetone, while both strains ER2275(pACT) and ATCC 11303(pACT) produced ca. 40 mM acetone. Glucose-fed cultures of strain ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in a 150% increase in acetone titers compared to those of batch shake flask cultures. External addition of sodium acetate to glucose-fed cultures of ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in further increased acetone titers. In bioreactor studies, acidic conditions (pH 5.5 versus 6.5) improved acetone production. Despite the substantial acetone evaporation due to aeration and agitation in the bioreactor, 125 to 154 mM acetone accumulated in ATCC 11303(pACT) fermentations. These acetone titers are equal to or higher than those produced by wild-type C. acetobutylicum. This is the first study to demonstrate the ability to use clostridial genes in nonclostridial hosts for solvent production. In addition, acetone-producing E. coli strains may be useful hosts for recombinant protein production in that detrimental acetate accumulation can be avoided. PMID:9501448

  14. Genome sequence and comparative genome analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae type strain ATCC 19310.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Soon; Jeong, Haeyoung; Sim, Young Mi; Yi, Hwe-Su; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2014-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (Psy) is a major bacterial pathogen of many economically important plant species. Despite the severity of its impact, the genome sequence of the type strain has not been reported. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Psy ATCC 19310. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that Psy ATCC 19310 is closely related to Psy B728a. However, only a few type III effectors, which are key virulence factors, are shared by the two strains, indicating the possibility of host-pathogen specificity and genome dynamics, even under the pathovar level. PMID:24444998

  15. Conversion of BAC clones into binary BAC (BIBAC) vectors and their delivery into basidiomycete fungal cells using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shawkat; Bakkeren, Guus

    2015-01-01

    The genetic transformation of certain organisms, required for gene function analysis or complementation, is often not very efficient, especially when dealing with large gene constructs or genomic fragments. We have adapted the natural DNA transfer mechanism from the soil pathogenic bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens, to deliver intact large DNA constructs to basidiomycete fungi of the genus Ustilago where they stably integrated into their genome. To this end, Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones containing large fungal genomic DNA fragments were converted via a Lambda phage-based recombineering step to Agrobacterium transfer-competent binary vectors (BIBACs) with a Ustilago-specific selection marker. The fungal genomic DNA fragment was subsequently successfully delivered as T-DNA through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation into Ustilago species where an intact copy stably integrated into the genome. By modifying the recombineering vector, this method can theoretically be adapted for many different fungi. PMID:25239747

  16. Bifidobacterium actinocoloniiforme sp. nov. and Bifidobacterium bohemicum sp. nov., from the bumblebee digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Killer, J; Kopečný, J; Mrázek, J; Koppová, I; Havlík, J; Benada, O; Kott, T

    2011-06-01

    Our previous study, based primarily on PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, focused on the isolation of four bifidobacterial groups from the digestive tract of three bumblebee species. In that study, we proposed that these isolated groups potentially represented novel species of the family Bifidobacteriaceae. One of the four, Bifidobacterium bombi, has been described recently. Strains representing two of the other groups have been classified as members of the genus Bifidobacterium on the basis of positive results for fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase activity and analysis of partial 16S rRNA and heat-shock protein 60 (hsp60) gene sequences. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities revealed that the isolates of the first group were affiliated to Bifidobacterium asteroides YIT 11866(T), B. indicum JCM 1302(T) and B. coryneforme ATCC 25911(T) (96.2, 96.0 and 95.9 % sequence similarity, respectively), together with other bifidobacteria showing lower sequence similarity. Additional representatives of the second group were found to be affiliated to Bifidobacterium minimum YIT 4097(T) and B. coryneforme ATCC 25911(T) (96.0 and 96.3 % sequence similarity) and also to other bifidobacteria with lower sequence similarity. These results indicate that the isolates of the two groups belong to novel species within the genus Bifidobacterium. This observation was further substantiated by the results of partial sequencing of hsp60. On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses and analysis of 16S rRNA and partial hsp60 gene sequences, we propose two novel species, Bifidobacterium actinocoloniiforme sp. nov. (type strain LISLUCIII-P2(T)  = DSM 22766(T)  = CCM 7728(T)) and Bifidobacterium bohemicum sp. nov. (type strain JEMLUCVIII-4(T)  = DSM 22767(T)  = CCM 7729(T)). PMID:20656822

  17. An embryogenic suspension cell culture system for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of citrus.

    PubMed

    Dutt, M; Grosser, J W

    2010-11-01

    A method for the genetic transformation of several citrus cultivars is described, including cultivars observed to be recalcitrant to conventional epicotyl-mediated transformation. Embryogenic cell suspension cultures, established from unfertilized ovules were used as target tissues for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Several modifications were made to the culture environment to investigate factors required for efficient transfer of the T-DNA and the subsequent regeneration of transgenic citrus plants. It was determined that co-cultivation of citrus cells and Agrobacterium in EME medium supplemented with maltose (EME-M) and 100 μM acetosyringone for 5 days at 25°C was optimum for transformation of each of the citrus cultivars. Efficient selection was obtained and escapes were prevented when the antibiotic hygromycin B was used as a selection antibiotic following transformation with an Agrobacterium strain containing hptII in the T-DNA region. Transgenic embryo regeneration and development was enhanced in medium that contained a liquid overlay consisting of a 1:2 mixture of 0.6 M BH3 and 0.15 M EME-M media. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed the presence of the T-DNA and the stable integration into the genome of regenerated plants, while RT-PCR demonstrated variable amounts of RNA being transcribed in different transgenic lines. This protocol can create an avenue for insertion of useful traits into any polyembryonic citrus cultivar that can be established as embryogenic cell suspension cultures, including popular specialty mandarins and seedless cultivars. PMID:20711728

  18. Linear Chromosome-generating System of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58: Protelomerase Generates and Protects Hairpin Ends

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wai Mun; DaGloria, Jeanne; Fox, Heather; Ruan, Qiurong; Tillou, John; Shi, Ke; Aihara, Hideki; Aron, John; Casjens, Sherwood

    2012-09-05

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, the pathogenic bacteria that causes crown gall disease in plants, harbors one circular and one linear chromosome and two circular plasmids. The telomeres of its unusual linear chromosome are covalently closed hairpins. The circular and linear chromosomes co-segregate and are stably maintained in the organism. We have determined the sequence of the two ends of the linear chromosome thus completing the previously published genome sequence of A. tumefaciens C58. We found that the telomeres carry nearly identical 25-bp sequences at the hairpin ends that are related by dyad symmetry. We further showed that its Atu2523 gene encodes a protelomerase (resolvase) and that the purified enzyme can generate the linear chromosomal closed hairpin ends in a sequence-specific manner. Agrobacterium protelomerase, whose presence is apparently limited to biovar 1 strains, acts via a cleavage-and-religation mechanism by making a pair of transient staggered nicks invariably at 6-bp spacing as the reaction intermediate. The enzyme can be significantly shortened at both the N and C termini and still maintain its enzymatic activity. Although the full-length enzyme can uniquely bind to its product telomeres, the N-terminal truncations cannot. The target site can also be shortened from the native 50-bp inverted repeat to 26 bp; thus, the Agrobacterium hairpin-generating system represents the most compact activity of all hairpin linear chromosome- and plasmid-generating systems to date. The biochemical analyses of the protelomerase reactions further revealed that the tip of the hairpin telomere may be unusually polymorphically capable of accommodating any nucleotide.

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tomato with the ICE1 transcription factor gene.

    PubMed

    Juan, J X; Yu, X H; Jiang, X M; Gao, Z; Zhang, Y; Li, W; Duan, Y D; Yang, G

    2015-01-01

    ICE1 genes play a very important role in plants in cold conditions. To improve the cold resistance of tomato, the ICE1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was used to construct the plant expression vector p3301-ICE1, and was overexpressed in tomato through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Five strains of resistant plants were obtained. PCR and half-quantitative results showed that the ICE1 gene was transferred to tomato; three strains tested positive. After low-temperature stress treatment, praline content and peroxide and catalase activities in the transgenic tomato plants were higher compared with non-transgenic controls, while malondialdehyde content was clearly lower. PMID:25729995

  20. Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) plants with chrysanthemum stunt viroid.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Tomoyuki; Doi, Motoaki; Hosokawa, Munetaka

    2016-08-01

    Agroinfiltration was tested as a method of inoculation of chrysanthemum plants with chrysanthemum stunt viroid (CSVd). Binary vectors harboring dimeric CSVd sequences in sense and antisense orientations were constructed, and Agrobacterium transfected with these binary vectors was infiltrated into chrysanthemum leaves. Northern blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that local infection was established within 7 days and systemic infection within 20 days. CSVd polarities showed no difference in infectivity. This study showed that agroinfiltration of chrysanthemum plants is an easy, rapid, and cost-effective method for CSVd inoculation. PMID:27155239

  1. Marine algae that display anti-tumorigenic activity against Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    el-Masry, M H; Mostafa, M H; Ibrahim, A M; el-Naggar, M M

    1995-05-01

    Thirty-five extracts representing different seasonal growths of 17 marine algal species collected from the Alexandria coast were tested for anti-tumorigenic activity against Agrobacterium tumefaciens galls on potato discs. Eleven extracts (nine species) displayed > 20% inhibition of tumor initiation, with three of these (Codium tomentosum, winter; Jania rubens, summer; Padina pavonia, winter) displaying relatively high activity. Bacterial viability tests showed that the inhibitory effects were directly due to anti-tumorigenesis rather than an indirect result of anti-bacterial activity. PMID:7750733

  2. Direct visualization of Agrobacterium-delivered VirE2 in recipient cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyang; Yang, Qinghua; Tu, Haitao; Lim, Zijie; Pan, Shen Q

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a natural genetic engineer widely used to deliver DNA into various recipients, including plant, yeast and fungal cells. The bacterium can transfer single-stranded DNA molecules (T–DNAs) and bacterial virulence proteins, including VirE2. However, neither the DNA nor the protein molecules have ever been directly visualized after the delivery. In this report, we adopted a split-GFP approach: the small GFP fragment (GFP11) was inserted into VirE2 at a permissive site to create the VirE2-GFP11 fusion, which was expressed in A. tumefaciens; and the large fragment (GFP1–10) was expressed in recipient cells. Upon delivery of VirE2-GFP11 into the recipient cells, GFP fluorescence signals were visualized. VirE2-GFP11 was functional like VirE2; the GFP fusion movement could indicate the trafficking of Agrobacterium-delivered VirE2. As the natural host, all plant cells seen under a microscope received the VirE2 protein in a leaf-infiltration assay; most of VirE2 moved at a speed of 1.3–3.1 μm sec−1 in a nearly linear direction, suggesting an active trafficking process. Inside plant cells, VirE2-GFP formed filamentous structures of different lengths, even in the absence of T-DNA. As a non-natural host recipient, 51% of yeast cells received VirE2, which did not move inside yeast. All plant cells seen under a microscope transiently expressed the Agrobacterium-delivered transgene, but only 0.2% yeast cells expressed the transgene. This indicates that Agrobacterium is a more efficient vector for protein delivery than T-DNA transformation for a non-natural host recipient: VirE2 trafficking is a limiting factor for the genetic transformation of a non-natural host recipient. The split-GFP approach could enable the real-time visualization of VirE2 trafficking inside recipient cells. PMID:24299048

  3. Effects of ribosome-inactivating proteins on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens translation systems.

    PubMed Central

    Girbés, T; Barbieri, L; Ferreras, M; Arias, F J; Rojo, M A; Iglesias, R; Alegre, C; Escarmis, C; Stirpe, F

    1993-01-01

    The effects of 30 type 1 and of 2 (ricin and volkensin) type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens cell-free translation systems were compared with the effects on a rabbit reticulocyte translation system. The depurinating activity of RIPs on E. coli ribosomes was also evaluated. Only six type 1 RIPs inhibited endogenous mRNA-directed translational activity of E. coli lysates, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Four RIPs had similar activities on poly(U)-directed phenylalanine polymerization by E. coli ribosomes, and three RIPs inhibited poly(U)-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis by A. tumefaciens ribosomes, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Images PMID:8407849

  4. Cadophora finlandia and Phialocephala fortinii: Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and functional GFP expression.

    PubMed

    Gorfer, Markus; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Bandian, Dragana; Strauss, Joseph

    2007-07-01

    Hygromycin B resistance was transferred to the sterile mycelia of Cadophora finlandia and Phialocephala fortinii by co-cultivation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Constitutively expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) was also introduced using the same vector. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed strong fluorescence of transformants. Both traits were mitotically stable during one year of subculturing on non-selective growth medium. Southern blot analysis showed that the majority of the transformants contained single-copy integrations at random sites in the genome. PMID:17662587

  5. A robust family of Golden Gate Agrobacterium vectors for plant synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Shahram; Yee, Muh-ching; Dinneny, José R.

    2013-01-01

    Tools that allow for rapid, accurate and inexpensive assembly of multi-component combinatorial libraries of DNA for transformation into plants will accelerate the progress of synthetic biology research. Recent innovations in molecular cloning methods has vastly expanded the repertoire with which plant biologists can engineer a transgene. Here we describe a new set of binary vectors for use in Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation that utilizes the Golden-Gate Cloning approach. Our optimized protocol facilitates the rapid and inexpensive generation of multi-component transgenes for later introduction into plants. PMID:24032037

  6. Emended descriptions of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii, and descriptions of Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sp. nov. and Clostridium saccharobutylicum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Keis, S; Shaheen, R; Jones, D T

    2001-11-01

    On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA-DNA reassociation, industrial solvent-producing clostridia have been assigned to four species. In this study, the phenotypic characteristics of Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, 'Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum', and an unnamed Clostridium sp. represented by the strains NCP 262T and NRRL B643 are compared. In addition, a further 40 strains of solvent-producing clostridia have been classified by biotyping, DNA fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These included 14 C. beijerinckii strains, two strains currently designated as 'Clostridium kaneboi' and 'Clostridium butanologenum', and 24 production strains used in the commercial acetone-butanol fermentation. All of the C. beijerinckii strains were confirmed to have been classified correctly. The 'C. kaneboi' and 'C. butanologenum' strains require reclassification as C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii, respectively. The commercial production strains were found to belong either to C. beijerinckii or to the unnamed Clostridium sp. For the comparative phenotypic studies of the four species, representative strains were selected from each of the DNA-fingerprint subgroups within each species. These strains were analysed for their ability to utilize different carbohydrates, hydrolyse gelatin or aesculin, and produce indole, and were tested for the presence of catalase and urease. On the basis of these results, several phenotypic traits were found to be useful for differentiating between the four species. The descriptions of C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii have been emended. The names Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sp. nov. [type strain = N1-4 (HMT) = ATCC 27021T] and Clostridium saccharobutylicum sp. nov. (type strain = DSM 13864T = ATCC BAA-117T) are proposed for the two new species. PMID:11760952

  7. Genome sequence and plasmid transformation of the model high-yield bacterial cellulose producer Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, Michael; Reeve, Benjamin; Abbott, James; Freemont, Paul S.; Ellis, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong, highly pure form of cellulose that is used in a range of applications in industry, consumer goods and medicine. Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582 is one of the highest reported bacterial cellulose producing strains and has been used as a model organism in numerous studies of bacterial cellulose production and studies aiming to increased cellulose productivity. Here we present a high-quality draft genome sequence for G. hansenii ATCC 53582 and find that in addition to the previously described cellulose synthase operon, ATCC 53582 contains two additional cellulose synthase operons and several previously undescribed genes associated with cellulose production. In parallel, we also develop optimized protocols and identify plasmid backbones suitable for transformation of ATCC 53582, albeit with low efficiencies. Together, these results provide important information for further studies into cellulose synthesis and for future studies aiming to genetically engineer G. hansenii ATCC 53582 for increased cellulose productivity.

  8. Genome sequence and plasmid transformation of the model high-yield bacterial cellulose producer Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582.

    PubMed

    Florea, Michael; Reeve, Benjamin; Abbott, James; Freemont, Paul S; Ellis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong, highly pure form of cellulose that is used in a range of applications in industry, consumer goods and medicine. Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582 is one of the highest reported bacterial cellulose producing strains and has been used as a model organism in numerous studies of bacterial cellulose production and studies aiming to increased cellulose productivity. Here we present a high-quality draft genome sequence for G. hansenii ATCC 53582 and find that in addition to the previously described cellulose synthase operon, ATCC 53582 contains two additional cellulose synthase operons and several previously undescribed genes associated with cellulose production. In parallel, we also develop optimized protocols and identify plasmid backbones suitable for transformation of ATCC 53582, albeit with low efficiencies. Together, these results provide important information for further studies into cellulose synthesis and for future studies aiming to genetically engineer G. hansenii ATCC 53582 for increased cellulose productivity. PMID:27010592

  9. Genome sequence and plasmid transformation of the model high-yield bacterial cellulose producer Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Michael; Reeve, Benjamin; Abbott, James; Freemont, Paul S.; Ellis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong, highly pure form of cellulose that is used in a range of applications in industry, consumer goods and medicine. Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582 is one of the highest reported bacterial cellulose producing strains and has been used as a model organism in numerous studies of bacterial cellulose production and studies aiming to increased cellulose productivity. Here we present a high-quality draft genome sequence for G. hansenii ATCC 53582 and find that in addition to the previously described cellulose synthase operon, ATCC 53582 contains two additional cellulose synthase operons and several previously undescribed genes associated with cellulose production. In parallel, we also develop optimized protocols and identify plasmid backbones suitable for transformation of ATCC 53582, albeit with low efficiencies. Together, these results provide important information for further studies into cellulose synthesis and for future studies aiming to genetically engineer G. hansenii ATCC 53582 for increased cellulose productivity. PMID:27010592

  10. Multigene disruption in undomesticated Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051a using the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kang; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051a is an undomesticated strain used in the industrial production of enzymes. Because it is poorly transformable, genetic manipulation in this strain requires a highly efficient genome editing method. In this study, a Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR/Cas9 system consisting of an all-in-one knockout plasmid containing a target-specific guide RNA, cas9, and a homologous repair template was established for highly efficient gene disruption in B. subtilis ATCC 6051a. With an efficiency of 33% to 53%, this system was used to disrupt the srfC, spoIIAC, nprE, aprE and amyE genes of B. subtilis ATCC 6051a, which hamper its use in industrial fermentation. Compared with B. subtilis ATCC 6051a, the final mutant, BS5 (ΔsrfC, ΔspoIIAC, ΔnprE, ΔaprE, ΔamyE), produces much less foam during fermentation, displays greater resistant to spore formation, and secretes 2.5-fold more β-cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase into the fermentation medium. Thus, the CRISPR/Cas9 system proved to be a powerful tool for targeted genome editing in an industrially relevant, poorly transformable strain. PMID:27305971

  11. Genome sequence of the vertebrate gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 53608.

    PubMed

    Heavens, Darren; Tailford, Louise E; Crossman, Lisa; Jeffers, Faye; Mackenzie, Donald A; Caccamo, Mario; Juge, Nathalie

    2011-08-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri, inhabiting the gastrointestinal tracts of a range of vertebrates, is a true symbiont with effects established as beneficial to the host. Here we describe the draft genome of L. reuteri ATCC 53608, isolated from a pig. The genome sequence provides important insights into the evolutionary changes underlying host specialization. PMID:21622738

  12. Multigene disruption in undomesticated Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051a using the CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kang; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051a is an undomesticated strain used in the industrial production of enzymes. Because it is poorly transformable, genetic manipulation in this strain requires a highly efficient genome editing method. In this study, a Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR/Cas9 system consisting of an all-in-one knockout plasmid containing a target-specific guide RNA, cas9, and a homologous repair template was established for highly efficient gene disruption in B. subtilis ATCC 6051a. With an efficiency of 33% to 53%, this system was used to disrupt the srfC, spoIIAC, nprE, aprE and amyE genes of B. subtilis ATCC 6051a, which hamper its use in industrial fermentation. Compared with B. subtilis ATCC 6051a, the final mutant, BS5 (ΔsrfC, ΔspoIIAC, ΔnprE, ΔaprE, ΔamyE), produces much less foam during fermentation, displays greater resistant to spore formation, and secretes 2.5-fold more β-cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase into the fermentation medium. Thus, the CRISPR/Cas9 system proved to be a powerful tool for targeted genome editing in an industrially relevant, poorly transformable strain. PMID:27305971

  13. Interaction of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and Bacteriophage gh-1 in Berea Sandstone Rock.

    PubMed

    Chang, P L; Yen, T F

    1985-12-01

    Measurements of the passage of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and a phage-resistant mutant through Berea sandstone rock were made. When bacteriophage gh-1 was adsorbed within the rock matrix, a reduction in the passage of the susceptible but not the resistant cells through the rock was observed. PMID:16346956

  14. Interaction of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and Bacteriophage gh-1 in Berea Sandstone Rock

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Philip Lee; Yen, Teh Fu

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the passage of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 and a phage-resistant mutant through Berea sandstone rock were made. When bacteriophage gh-1 was adsorbed within the rock matrix, a reduction in the passage of the susceptible but not the resistant cells through the rock was observed. PMID:16346956

  15. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain ATCC 35246.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhe; Geng, Jianing; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Haiying; Yi, Li; Lei, Meng; Lu, Cheng-ping; Fan, Hong-jie; Hu, Songnian

    2011-10-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is an opportunistic pathogen. It has caused a very large economic loss in the swine industry of China and has become a threat to human health. We announce the complete genome sequence of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain ATCC 35246, which provides opportunities to understand its pathogenesis mechanism and genetic basis. PMID:21914890

  16. Draft Genome Assembly of Ralstonia pickettii Type Strain K-288 (ATCC 27853)

    PubMed Central

    Daligault, H. E.; Davenport, K. W.; Minogue, T. D.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Coyne, S. R.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Lo, C.-C.; Meincke, L.; Munk, A. C.; Rosenzweig, C. N.

    2014-01-01

    We present the genome assembly of Ralstonia pickettii K-288 (ATCC 27511), consisting of 27 contigs placed into a single scaffold. This 4.76-Mbp genome has 64.0% G+C content and 4,425 coding sequences. Because this is the type strain, inclusion of its data set among other Ralstonia genomes should provide a historical genomic perspective. PMID:25258272

  17. Draft Genome Assembly of Ralstonia pickettii Type Strain K-288 (ATCC 27853).

    PubMed

    Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Minogue, T D; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Lo, C-C; Meincke, L; Munk, A C; Rosenzweig, C N; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    We present the genome assembly of Ralstonia pickettii K-288 (ATCC 27511), consisting of 27 contigs placed into a single scaffold. This 4.76-Mbp genome has 64.0% G+C content and 4,425 coding sequences. Because this is the type strain, inclusion of its data set among other Ralstonia genomes should provide a historical genomic perspective. PMID:25258272

  18. Genome Assembly of Shigella flexneri ATCC 12022, a Quality Control Reference Strain

    PubMed Central

    Daligault, H. E.; Davenport, K. W.; Minogue, T. D.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Coyne, S. R.; Freitas, T.; Frey, K. G.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Lo, C.-C.; Meincke, L.; Munk, A. C.; Redden, C. L.; Rosenzweig, C. N.

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri causes shigellosis, severe and potentially life-threatening diarrhea, and accounts for 18% of shigellosis cases in the United States. Here, we present the 4.51-Mbp genome assembly of S. flexneri ATCC 12022, a quality control and reference strain, in 10 scaffolds. PMID:25359907

  19. Complete Genome Assembly of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, a Serotype O6 Reference Strain.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H A; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Chertkov, O; Coyne, S R; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Redden, C L; Rosenzweig, C N; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    We present the complete genome assembly of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 as submitted to NCBI under accession no. CP009072. This strain was originally isolated from a clinical sample in Seattle, Washington (1946), and is often used in quality control testing. The assembled genome is 5.20 Mb (50.4% G+C content) and includes two plasmids. PMID:25291776

  20. Complete Genome Assembly of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, a Serotype O6 Reference Strain

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, T. D.; Daligault, H. A.; Davenport, K. W.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Chertkov, O.; Coyne, S. R.; Freitas, T.; Frey, K. G.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Redden, C. L.; Rosenzweig, C. N.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We present the complete genome assembly of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 as submitted to NCBI under accession no. CP009072. This strain was originally isolated from a clinical sample in Seattle, Washington (1946), and is often used in quality control testing. The assembled genome is 5.20 Mb (50.4% G+C content) and includes two plasmids. PMID:25291776

  1. Genome Assembly of Shigella flexneri ATCC 12022, a Quality Control Reference Strain.

    PubMed

    Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Minogue, T D; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Lo, C-C; Meincke, L; Munk, A C; Redden, C L; Rosenzweig, C N; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri causes shigellosis, severe and potentially life-threatening diarrhea, and accounts for 18% of shigellosis cases in the United States. Here, we present the 4.51-Mbp genome assembly of S. flexneri ATCC 12022, a quality control and reference strain, in 10 scaffolds. PMID:25359907

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Type Strain 810-2 (ATCC 13637).

    PubMed

    Davenport, K W; Daligault, H E; Minogue, T D; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Li, P-E; Rosenzweig, C N; Scholz, M B; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    An emerging nosocomial pathogen, Stenotrophomonas maltophila has a high mortality rate in those it infects. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia 810-2 (ATCC 13637), the type strain of the species. The 5-Mb (66.1% G+C content) genome has been deposited in NCBI under accession number CP008838. PMID:25258273

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Type Strain 810-2 (ATCC 13637)

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, K. W.; Daligault, H. E.; Minogue, T. D.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Coyne, S. R.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Li, P.-E.; Rosenzweig, C. N.; Scholz, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    An emerging nosocomial pathogen, Stenotrophomonas maltophila has a high mortality rate in those it infects. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia 810-2 (ATCC 13637), the type strain of the species. The 5-Mb (66.1% G+C content) genome has been deposited in NCBI under accession number CP008838. PMID:25258273

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Thiostrepton-Producing Streptomyces laurentii ATCC 31255.

    PubMed

    Doi, Katsumi; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Nagayoshi, Yuko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Ogata, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces laurentii ATCC 31255 produces thiostrepton, a thiopeptide class antibiotic. Here, we report the complete genome sequence for this strain, which contains a total of 8,032,664 bp, 7,452 predicted coding sequences, and a G+C content of 72.3%. PMID:27257211

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii Strain ATCC MYA-796

    PubMed Central

    Marques, E. T. A.; Franco, G. R.

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is the only yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the strain ATCC MYA-796, derived from the French Ultra Levure probiotic drug. The genome has a size of 11.6 Mb with 5,305 putative open reading frames predicted. PMID:25523784

  6. Genome Sequence of meso-2,3-Butanediol-Producing Strain Serratia marcescens ATCC 14041

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lixiang; Wang, Yu; Li, Kun; Su, Fei; Ma, Cuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens strain ATCC 14041 was found to be an efficient meso-2,3-butanediol (meso-2,3-BD) producer from glucose and sucrose. Here we present a 5.0-Mb assembly of its genome. We have annotated 4 coding sequences (CDSs) for meso-2,3-BD fermentation and 2 complete operons including 6 CDSs for sucrose utilization. PMID:24948764

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Type Strain B-78 (ATCC 27164)

    PubMed Central

    Mirajkar, Nandita S.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Reported herein is the complete genome sequence of the type strain B-78 (ATCC 27164) of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the etiological agent of swine dysentery. The 3.1-Mb genome consists of a 3.056-Mb chromosome and a 45-kb plasmid, with 2,617 protein-coding genes, 39 RNA genes, and 40 pseudogenes. PMID:27540064

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Hervey, W Judson; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan; Vora, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative marine γ-proteobacterium that is known to be a formidable pathogen of aquatic animals and is a model organism for the study of bacterial bioluminescence and quorum sensing. In this report, we describe the complete genome sequence of the most studied strain of this species: V. harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]). PMID:25635019

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV])

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Hervey, W. Judson; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative marine γ-proteobacterium that is known to be a formidable pathogen of aquatic animals and is a model organism for the study of bacterial bioluminescence and quorum sensing. In this report, we describe the complete genome sequence of the most studied strain of this species: V. harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]). PMID:25635019

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of a Metronidazole-Resistant Derivative of Gardnerella vaginalis Strain ATCC 14019

    PubMed Central

    Schuyler, Jessica A.; Mordechai, Eli; Adelson, Martin E.; Gygax, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of a metronidazole-resistant derivative of Gardnerella vaginalis ATCC 14019. This strain was obtained after serial selection to increase the MIC from 4 to ≥500 µg/ml. Two coding changes, in genes encoding a response regulator and an NAD+ synthetase, arose during selection. PMID:26564054

  11. Genome Sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus Strain T7A ATCC 39115, a Lignin-Degrading Actinomycete

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jennifer R.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Teshima, Hazuki; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Huntemann, Marcel; Wei, Chia-Lin; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, K; Szeto, Ernest; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Sello, Jason K.

    2013-01-01

    We announce the availability of the genome sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus strain T7A ATCC 39115, a plant biomass- degrading actinomycete. This bacterium is of special interest because of its capacity to degrade lignin, an underutilized compo- nent of plants in the context of bioenergy. It has a full complement of genes for plant biomass catabolism.

  12. Effect of Calcium in Assay Medium on D Value of Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 Spores

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Koichi; Shintani, Hideharu; Itoh, Junpei; Kamogawa, Takuji; Kajihara, Yousei

    2000-01-01

    The D value of commercial biological indicator spore strips using Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 was increased by higher calcium concentrations in assay media. The calcium concentration in assay media varied among the manufacturers. The calcium concentration in assay media is an important factor to consider to minimize the variation of D value. PMID:11097939

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Maria Mercedes; Allievi, Mariana C.; Fina Martin, Joaquina; Waehner, Pablo M.; Prado Acosta, Mariano; Sanchez Rivas, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    We present the 1,956,699-bp draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain ATCC 4356. Comparative genomic analysis revealed 99.96% similarity with L. acidophilus NCFM NC_006814.3 and 99.97% with La-14 NC_021181.2 genomes. PMID:25593259

  14. Effect of calcium in assay medium on D value of Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Shintani, H; Itoh, J; Kamogawa, T; Kajihara, Y

    2000-12-01

    The D value of commercial biological indicator spore strips using Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 was increased by higher calcium concentrations in assay media. The calcium concentration in assay media varied among the manufacturers. The calcium concentration in assay media is an important factor to consider to minimize the variation of D value. PMID:11097939

  15. Antimicrobial mechanism of flavonoids against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by model membrane study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mengying; Wu, Ting; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun

    2014-06-01

    Antimicrobial mechanism of four flavonoids (kaempferol, hesperitin, (+)-catechin hydrate, biochanin A) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was investigated through cell membranes and a liposome model. The release of bacterial protein and images from transmission electron microscopy demonstrated damage to the E. coli ATCC 25922 membrane. A liposome model with dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) (0.6 molar ratio) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) (0.4 molar ratio), representative of the phospholipid membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922, was used to specify the mode of action of four selected flavonoids through Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is suggested that for flavonoids, to be effective antimicrobials, interaction with the polar head-group of the model membrane followed by penetration into the hydrophobic regions must occur. The antimicrobial efficacies of the flavonoids were consistent with liposome interaction activities, kaempferol > hesperitin > (+)-catechin hydrate > biochanin A. This study provides a liposome model capable of mimicking the cell membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922. The findings are important in understanding the antibacterial mechanism on cell membranes.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Maria Mercedes; Allievi, Mariana C; Fina Martin, Joaquina; Waehner, Pablo M; Prado Acosta, Mariano; Sanchez Rivas, Carmen; Ruzal, Sandra M

    2015-01-01

    We present the 1,956,699-bp draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain ATCC 4356. Comparative genomic analysis revealed 99.96% similarity with L. acidophilus NCFM NC_006814.3 and 99.97% with La-14 NC_021181.2 genomes. PMID:25593259

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces fradiae ATCC 19609, a Strain Highly Sensitive to Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Bekker, Olga B; Klimina, Ksenia M; Vatlin, Aleksey A; Zakharevich, Natalia V; Kasianov, Artem S; Danilenko, Valery N

    2014-01-01

    We report here a sequence of the genome of the Streptomyces fradiae ATCC 19609 strain, initially isolated from the soil, which produces tylosin. S. fradiae is highly sensitive to different classes of antibiotics, compared to the sensitivities of other bacteria. We have identified 9 groups of genes directly or indirectly involved in the resistome formation. PMID:25477406

  18. Complete Genome Sequence and Methylome Analysis of Bacillus globigii ATCC 49760.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis (Ehrenburg) Cohn ATCC 49760, deposited as Bacillus globigii, is the source strain for the restriction enzymes BglI and BglII. Its complete sequence and full methylome were determined using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. PMID:27231364

  19. Complete Genome Sequence and Methylome Analysis of Bacillus globigii ATCC 49760

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis (Ehrenburg) Cohn ATCC 49760, deposited as Bacillus globigii, is the source strain for the restriction enzymes BglI and BglII. Its complete sequence and full methylome were determined using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. PMID:27231364

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Thiostrepton-Producing Streptomyces laurentii ATCC 31255

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Yasuhiro; Nagayoshi, Yuko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Ogata, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces laurentii ATCC 31255 produces thiostrepton, a thiopeptide class antibiotic. Here, we report the complete genome sequence for this strain, which contains a total of 8,032,664 bp, 7,452 predicted coding sequences, and a G+C content of 72.3%. PMID:27257211

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Type Strain B-78 (ATCC 27164).

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Johnson, Timothy J; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-01-01

    Reported herein is the complete genome sequence of the type strain B-78 (ATCC 27164) of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the etiological agent of swine dysentery. The 3.1-Mb genome consists of a 3.056-Mb chromosome and a 45-kb plasmid, with 2,617 protein-coding genes, 39 RNA genes, and 40 pseudogenes. PMID:27540064

  2. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filaments from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    Isolated flagellar filaments from the type strain of Bacillus cereus, ATCC 14579, were shown to consist of 34, 32 and 31 kDa proteins in similar proportions as judged by band intensities on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of these three proteins of strain ATCC 14579 were identical with the deduced sequences of three flagellin genes BC1657, BC1658 and BC1659 in the whole genome sequence. Strain ATCC 14579 was classified into serotype T2 by a flagellar serotyping scheme for B. cereus strains that are untypeable into known flagellar serotypes H1 to H23. Flagellar filaments from a reference strain of serotype T2 contained two protein bands at 34 and 32 kDa, but a single protein band at 39 kDa was detected in flagellar filaments of a reference strain of serotype H1. Two murine monoclonal antibodies, 1A5 and 2A5, which recognize both the 34 and 32 kDa flagellins and a single flagellin of 32 kDa, respectively, were specifically reactive with B. cereus strains ATCC 14579 and serotype T2 in whole-cell ELISA and bacterial motility inhibition tests. In immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies 1A5 and 2A5, colloidal gold spheres were shown to localize almost evenly over the entire part of flagellar filaments. Since strain ATCC 14579, and presumably strain serotype T2, are unusual among B. cereus strains in possessing multiple genes that encode flagellin subunits, a possible unique mechanism may contribute to assembly of multiple flagellin subunits into the filament over its entire length. PMID:25227778

  3. Growth of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 in a cheese model system: a biochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Budinich, M F; Perez-Díaz, I; Cai, H; Rankin, S A; Broadbent, J R; Steele, J L

    2011-11-01

    Growth of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334, in a cheese-ripening model system based upon a medium prepared from ripening Cheddar cheese extract (CCE) was evaluated. Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 grows in CCE made from cheese ripened for 2 (2mCCE), 6 (6mCCE), and 8 (8mCCE) mo, to final cell densities of 5.9×10(8), 1.2×10(8), and 2.1×10(7)cfu/mL, respectively. Biochemical analysis and mass balance equations were used to determine substrate consumption patterns and products formed in 2mCCE. The products formed included formate, acetate, and D-lactate. These data allowed us to identify the pathways likely used and to initiate metabolic flux analysis. The production of volatiles during growth of Lb. paracasei ATCC 334 in 8mCCE was monitored to evaluate the metabolic pathways utilized by Lb. paracasei during the later stages of ripening Cheddar cheese. The 2 volatiles detected at high levels were ethanol and acetate. The remaining detected volatiles are present in significantly lower amounts and likely result from amino acid, pyruvate, and acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism. Carbon balance of galactose, lactose, citrate, and phosphoserine/phosphoserine-containing peptides in terms of D-lactate, acetate, and formate are in agreement with the amounts of substrates observed in 2mCCE; however, this was not the case for 6mCCE and 8mCCE, suggesting that additional energy sources are utilized during growth of Lb. paracasei ATCC 334 in these CCE. This study provides valuable information on the biochemistry and physiology of Lb. paracasei ATCC 334 in ripening cheese. PMID:22032349

  4. Agrobacterium rhizogenes: Transformed root cultures for the study of polyacetylene metabolism and biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, Y.Y.

    1988-02-01

    Biologically active polyacetylenes are produced at low levels by the roots of members of the Coreopsidinae subtribe in the Asteraceae. Ten taxa of Coreopsis and Bidens were tranformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes Strain A/sub 4/ and hairy root cultures established. These cultures grew rapidly and produced the same arrays of polyacetylenes as intact roots. The use of transformed roots for the study of polyacetylene biosynthesis is described in this paper. The engineering of plants with resistance to herbicides is now a practical reality because there are economic, intellectual and environmental incentives for using recombinant DNA technology in crop improvement programs, and because the biochemical and genetic basis for herbicide resistance is a simple trait conferred by a single gene. The transformation of plants with genes conferring resistance to insects or disease is more daunting, however, as biologically active secondary metabolites such as some alkaloids are typically products of multienzyme reactions. Photoactive polyacetylenes are probably plant defense chemicals and they are derived by a sequence of desaturation steps from oleic acid, which occurs ubiquitously in higher plants. Although the acetylene pathway may encompass as many genetic messages as those for morphine biosynthesis, it is likley that the genes controlling the biosynthesis of polyacetylenes may be isolated, identified in the near future and transferred via Agrobacterium to economically important plants susceptible to pathogen attack. 58 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. A cytometry microparticle platform approach for screening tobacco microRNA changes after agrobacterium delivery.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua D; Chen, Qiang; Mason, Hugh S

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs that can modulate development as well as alter innate antiviral defenses in plants. In this study we explored changes in Nicotiana benthamiana tobacco microRNA expression as it relates to expression of a recombinant anti-Ebola GP1 antibody. The antibody was delivered to tobacco leaves through a bacterial Agrobacterium tumefaciens "agroinfiltration" expression strategy. A multiplex microparticle-based cytometry assay tracked the expression changes of 53 host tobacco microRNAs. Our results revealed that the most abundant microRNAs in actively growing leaves corresponded to nanoparticle probes specific to nta-mir-6149 and nta-miR-168b. After agroinfiltration, probes specific for nta-mir-398, and nta-mir-482d were significantly altered in their respective expression levels, however changes were partially attributed to the infiltration broth medium used in the antibody delivery process. Confirmation of nta-mir-398 and nta-mir-482d expression changes was also verified through RT-qPCR. To our knowledge this study is the first to profile medium and Agrobacterium injection at the microRNA level through a multiplex microparticle approach. PMID:27343681

  6. A bifunctional glycosyltransferase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens synthesizes monoglucosyl and glucuronosyl diacylglycerol under phosphate deprivation.

    PubMed

    Semeniuk, Adrian; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Duda, Katarzyna; Hölzl, Georg

    2014-04-01

    Glycolipids are mainly found in phototrophic organisms (like plants and cyanobacteria), in Gram-positive bacteria, and a few other bacterial phyla. Besides the function as bulk membrane lipids, they often play a role under phosphate deprivation as surrogates for phospholipids. The Gram-negative Agrobacterium tumefaciens accumulates four different glycolipids under phosphate deficiency, including digalactosyl diacylglycerol and glucosylgalactosyl diacylglycerol synthesized by a processive glycosyltransferase. The other two glycolipids have now been identified by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as monoglucosyl diacylglycerol and glucuronosyl diacylglycerol. These two lipids are synthesized by a single promiscuous glycosyltransferase encoded by the ORF atu2297, with UDP-glucose or UDP-glucuronic acid as sugar donors. The transfer of sugars differing in their chemistry is a novel feature not observed before for lipid glycosyltransferases. Furthermore, this enzyme is the first glucuronosyl diacylglycerol synthase isolated. Deletion mutants of Agrobacterium lacking monoglucosyl diacylglycerol and glucuronosyl diacylglycerol or all glycolipids are not impaired in growth or virulence during infection of tobacco leaf discs. Our data suggest that the four glycolipids and the nonphospholipid diacylglyceryl trimethylhomoserine can mutually replace each other during phosphate deprivation. This redundancy of different nonphospholipids may represent an adaptation mechanism to enhance the competitiveness in nature. PMID:24558041

  7. A Bifunctional Glycosyltransferase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens Synthesizes Monoglucosyl and Glucuronosyl Diacylglycerol under Phosphate Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Semeniuk, Adrian; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Duda, Katarzyna; Hölzl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Glycolipids are mainly found in phototrophic organisms (like plants and cyanobacteria), in Gram-positive bacteria, and a few other bacterial phyla. Besides the function as bulk membrane lipids, they often play a role under phosphate deprivation as surrogates for phospholipids. The Gram-negative Agrobacterium tumefaciens accumulates four different glycolipids under phosphate deficiency, including digalactosyl diacylglycerol and glucosylgalactosyl diacylglycerol synthesized by a processive glycosyltransferase. The other two glycolipids have now been identified by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as monoglucosyl diacylglycerol and glucuronosyl diacylglycerol. These two lipids are synthesized by a single promiscuous glycosyltransferase encoded by the ORF atu2297, with UDP-glucose or UDP-glucuronic acid as sugar donors. The transfer of sugars differing in their chemistry is a novel feature not observed before for lipid glycosyltransferases. Furthermore, this enzyme is the first glucuronosyl diacylglycerol synthase isolated. Deletion mutants of Agrobacterium lacking monoglucosyl diacylglycerol and glucuronosyl diacylglycerol or all glycolipids are not impaired in growth or virulence during infection of tobacco leaf discs. Our data suggest that the four glycolipids and the nonphospholipid diacylglyceryl trimethylhomoserine can mutually replace each other during phosphate deprivation. This redundancy of different nonphospholipids may represent an adaptation mechanism to enhance the competitiveness in nature. PMID:24558041

  8. X-ray structure of imidazolonepropionase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens at 1.87 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Rajiv; Kumaran, Desigan; Burley, Stephen K.; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2010-01-12

    Histidine degradation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens involves four enzymes, including histidase (EC 4.3.1.3), urocanase (EC 4.2.1.49), imidazolonepropionase (EC 3.5.2.7), and N-formylglutamate amidohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.8). The third enzyme of the pathway, imidazolone-propionase, a 45.6 kDa protein, catalyzes conversion of imidazolone-5-propanoate to N-forminio-L-glutamate. Initial studies of the role of imidazolonepropionase in histidine degradation were published in 1953. Subsequent publications have been limited to enzyme kinetics, crystallization, and a recently reported structure determination. The imidazolonepropionases are members of metallodepenent-hydrolases (or amidohydroase) superfamily, which includs ureases, adenosine deaminases, phosphotriesterases, dihydroorotases, allantoinases, hydantoinases, adenine and cytosine deaminases, imidazolonepropionases, aryldial-kylphosphatases, chlorohydrolases, and formylmethanofuran dehydroases. Proteins belonging to this large group share a common three-dimensional structural motif (an eightfold {alpha}/{beta} or TIM barrel) with similar active sites. Most superfamily members also share a conserved metal binding site, involving four histidine residues and one aspartic acid. Imidazolonepropionase is one of the targets selected for X-ray crystallpgrahpic structure determination by the New York Structural GenomiX Research Consortium (NYSGXRC) Target ID: 9252b to correlate the structure function relationship of poorly studied by important enzyme. Here they report the crystal structure of imidazolonepropionase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens determined at 1.87 {angstrom} resolution.

  9. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-Mediated Transformation of the Lichen Fungus, Umbilicaria muehlenbergii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Ying; Kim, Jung A.; Yu, Nan-Hee; Kim, Sungbeom; Cheong, Yong Hwa; Kang, Seogchan; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Hur, Jae-Seoun

    2013-01-01

    Transformation-mediated mutagenesis in both targeted and random manners has been widely applied to decipher gene function in diverse fungi. However, a transformation system has not yet been established for lichen fungi, severely limiting our ability to study their biology and mechanism underpinning symbiosis via gene manipulation. Here, we report the first successful transformation of the lichen fungus, Umbilicaria muehlenbergii, via the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We generated a total of 918 transformants employing a binary vector that carries the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene as a selection marker and the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene for labeling transformants. Randomly selected transformants appeared mitotically stable, based on their maintenance of hygromycin B resistance after five generations of growth without selection. Genomic Southern blot showed that 88% of 784 transformants contained a single T-DNA insert in their genome. A number of putative mutants affected in colony color, size, and/or morphology were found among these transformants, supporting the utility of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) for random insertional mutagenesis of U. muehlenbergii. This ATMT approach potentially offers a systematic gene functional study with genome sequences of U. muehlenbergii that is currently underway. PMID:24386304

  10. Genetic transformation of Metroxylon sagu (Rottb.) cultures via Agrobacterium-mediated and particle bombardment.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Evra Raunie; Hossain, Md Anowar; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2014-01-01

    Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu) is a perennial plant native to Southeast Asia and exploited mainly for the starch content in its trunk. Genetic improvement of sago palm is extremely slow when compared to other annual starch crops. Urgent attention is needed to improve the sago palm planting material and can be achieved through nonconventional methods. We have previously developed a tissue culture method for sago palm, which is used to provide the planting materials and to develop a genetic transformation procedure. Here, we report the genetic transformation of sago embryonic callus derived from suspension culture using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and gene gun systems. The transformed embryoids cells were selected against Basta (concentration 10 to 30 mg/L). Evidence of foreign genes integration and function of the bar and gus genes were verified via gene specific PCR amplification, gus staining, and dot blot analysis. This study showed that the embryogenic callus was the most suitable material for transformation as compared to the fine callus, embryoid stage, and initiated shoots. The gene gun transformation showed higher transformation efficiency than the ones transformed using Agrobacterium when targets were bombarded once or twice using 280 psi of helium pressure at 6 to 8 cm distance. PMID:25295258

  11. The multifaceted roles of the interspecies signalling molecule indole in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria utilize signal molecules to ensure their survival in environmental niches, and indole is an interspecies and interkingdom signalling molecule, which is widespread in the natural environment. In this study, we sought to identify novel roles of indole in soil-borne bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was found not to synthesize indole and to degrade it rapidly. The addition of exogenous indole dose-dependently inhibited A. tumefaciens growth and decreased its motility. Surprisingly, indole markedly increased A. tumefaciens biofilm formation on polystyrene, glass and nylon membrane surfaces and enhanced its antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptional analysis showed that indole markedly up-regulated several biofilm-related (celA, cheA, exoR, phoB, flgE, fliR and motA), stress-related genes (clpB, dnaK, gsp, gyrB, marR and soxR) and efflux genes (emrA, norM, and Atu2551) in A. tumefaciens, which partially explained the increased biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. In contrast, the plant auxin indole-3-acetic acid did not affect biofilm formation, antibiotic tolerance or gene expression. Interestingly, indole was found to exhibit several similarities with antibiotics, as it inhibited the growth of non-indole-producing bacteria, whereas these bacteria countered its effects by rapidly degrading indole, and by enhancing biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. PMID:25040348

  12. Influence of volatile organic compounds emitted by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains on Agrobacterium tumefaciens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Plyuta, Vladimir; Lipasova, Valentina; Popova, Alexandra; Koksharova, Olga; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Szegedi, Erno; Chernin, Leonid; Khmel, Inessa

    2016-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms plays an important role in bacteria-host interactions, including plant pathogenicity. In this work, we investigated the action of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by rhizospheric strains of Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, Pseudomonas fluorescens B-4117, Serratia plymuthica IC1270, as well as Serratia proteamaculans strain 94, isolated from spoiled meat, on biofilms formation by three strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens which are causative agents of crown-gall disease in a wide range of plants. In dual culture assays, the pool of volatiles emitted by the tested Pseudomonas and Serratia strains suppressed the formation of biofilms of A. tumefaciens strains grown on polycarbonate membrane filters and killed Agrobacterium cells in mature biofilms. The individual VOCs produced by the tested Pseudomonas strains, that is, ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) produced by Serratia strains, were shown to kill A. tumefaciens cells in mature biofilms and suppress their formation. The data obtained in this study suggest an additional potential of some ketones and DMDS as protectors of plants against A. tumefaciens strains, whose virulence is associated with the formation of biofilms on the infected plants. PMID:27214244

  13. Traversing the Cell: Agrobacterium T-DNA’s Journey to the Host Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Agrobacterium is unique in its ability to conduct interkingdom genetic exchange. Virulent Agrobacterium strains transfer single-strand forms of T-DNA (T-strands) and several Virulence effector proteins through a bacterial type IV secretion system into plant host cells. T-strands must traverse the plant wall and plasma membrane, traffic through the cytoplasm, enter the nucleus, and ultimately target host chromatin for stable integration. Because any DNA sequence placed between T-DNA “borders” can be transferred to plants and integrated into the plant genome, the transfer and intracellular trafficking processes must be mediated by bacterial and host proteins that form complexes with T-strands. This review summarizes current knowledge of proteins that interact with T-strands in the plant cell, and discusses several models of T-complex (T-strand and associated proteins) trafficking. A detailed understanding of how these macromolecular complexes enter the host cell and traverse the plant cytoplasm will require development of novel technologies to follow molecules from their bacterial site of synthesis into the plant cell, and how these transferred molecules interact with host proteins and sub-cellular structures within the host cytoplasm and nucleus. PMID:22645590

  14. Mendelian transmission of genes introduced into plants by the Ti plasmids of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Otten, L; De Greve, H; Hernalsteens, J P; Van Montagu, M; Schieder, O; Straub, J; Schell, J

    1981-01-01

    Insertion of the bacterial transposon Tn7 was used to obtain mutants of an octopine Ti plasmid. Crown gall tumours induced on tobacco by an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain carrying a particular mutant Ti plasmid (pGV2100) were found to give rise to shoots. These shoots were grown in vitro and one of them (rGV-1) was found to contain the T-DNA specific enzyme lysopine dehydrogenase (LpDH) and to form roots. After transfer to soil, rGV-1 developed into a morphologically and functionally normal tobacco plant. All cells of the regenerant and of vegetatively produced offspring were shown, by cloning of leaf protoplasts, to contain T-DNA and LpDH activity, rGV-1 and vegetatively produced offspring flowered normally. Plantlets obtained from haploid anther cultures were tested for LpDH activity. Forty-one percent of these plantlets were LpDH positive. Moreover, both self-pollination of rGV-1 and crosses between rGV-1 and normal tobacco plants showed that the LpDH character was transmitted both through the pollen and through the eggs of rGV-1 as a single dominant factor with Mendelian segregation ratios typical for monohybrid crosses. By repeated selfing, homozygous plants were obtained which bred true with respect to LpDH. The importance of these findings with respect to the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Ti plasmids for genetic engineering in plants is discussed. PMID:6948997

  15. Genetic transformation of Diaporthe phaseolorum, an endophytic fungus found in mangrove forests, mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Sebastianes, Fernanda L S; Lacava, Paulo T; Fávaro, Léia C L; Rodrigues, Maria B C; Araújo, Welington L; Azevedo, João L; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline A

    2012-02-01

    We describe the genetic transformation of the mycelial tissue of Diaporthe phaseolorum, an endophytic fungus isolated from the mangrove species Laguncularia racemosa, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT). ATMT uses both the hygromycin B resistant (hph) gene and green fluorescent protein as the selection agents. The T-DNA integration into the fungal genome was assessed by both PCR and Southern blotting. All transformants examined were mitotically stable. An analysis of the T-DNA flanking sequences by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR) demonstrated that the disrupted genes in the transformants had similarities with conserved domains in proteins involved in antibiotic biosynthesis pathways. A library of 520 transformants was generated, and 31 of these transformants had no antibiotic activity against Staphylococcus aureus, an important human pathogen. The protocol described here, using ATMT in D. phaseolorum, will be useful for the identification and analysis of fungal genes controlling pathogenicity and antibiotic pathways. Moreover, this protocol may be used as a reference for other species in the Diaporthe genus. This is the first report to describe Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of D. phaseolorum as a tool for insertional mutagenesis. PMID:22210192

  16. Genetic Transformation of Metroxylon sagu (Rottb.) Cultures via Agrobacterium-Mediated and Particle Bombardment

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Evra Raunie

    2014-01-01

    Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu) is a perennial plant native to Southeast Asia and exploited mainly for the starch content in its trunk. Genetic improvement of sago palm is extremely slow when compared to other annual starch crops. Urgent attention is needed to improve the sago palm planting material and can be achieved through nonconventional methods. We have previously developed a tissue culture method for sago palm, which is used to provide the planting materials and to develop a genetic transformation procedure. Here, we report the genetic transformation of sago embryonic callus derived from suspension culture using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and gene gun systems. The transformed embryoids cells were selected against Basta (concentration 10 to 30 mg/L). Evidence of foreign genes integration and function of the bar and gus genes were verified via gene specific PCR amplification, gus staining, and dot blot analysis. This study showed that the embryogenic callus was the most suitable material for transformation as compared to the fine callus, embryoid stage, and initiated shoots. The gene gun transformation showed higher transformation efficiency than the ones transformed using Agrobacterium when targets were bombarded once or twice using 280 psi of helium pressure at 6 to 8 cm distance. PMID:25295258

  17. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Vitis Cv. Monastrell suspension-cultured cells: Determination of critical parameters.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mingyu; Quiñonero, Carmen; Akdemir, Hülya; Alburquerque, Nuria; Pedreño, María Ángeles; Burgos, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    Although some works have explored the transformation of differentiated, embryogenic suspension-cultured cells (SCC) to produce transgenic grapevine plants, to our knowledge this is one of the first reports on the efficient transformation of dedifferentiated Vitis vinifera cv Monastrell SCC. This protocol has been developed using the sonication-assisted Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (SAAT) method. A construct harboring the selectable nptII and the eyfp/IV2 marker genes was used in the study and transformation efficiencies reached over 50 independent transformed SCC per gram of infected cells. Best results were obtained when cells were infected at the exponential phase. A high density plating (500 mg/dish) gave significantly better results. As selective agent, kanamycin was inefficient for the selection of Monastrell transformed SCC since wild type cells were almost insensitive to this antibiotic whereas application of paromomycin resulted in very effective selection. Selected eyfp-expressing microcalli were grown until enough tissue was available to scale up a new transgenic SCC. These transgenic SCC lines were evaluated molecularly and phenotypically demonstrating the presence and integration of both transgenes, the absence of Agrobacterium contamination and the ability of the transformed SCC to grow in highly selective liquid medium. The methodology described here opens the possibility of improving the production of valuable metabolites. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:725-734, 2016. PMID:26871543

  18. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation using cotyledons in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia)

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Ikuko; Sato, Yoshihiko; Saito, Toshihiro; Moriguchi, Takaya; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2013-01-01

    Genetic transformation was successfully established producing both transformed adventitious shoots and calli in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) by using cotyledons as explants. Cotyledons of five cultivars were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 carrying the pBIN19-sgfp, which contained a green fluorescent protein gene and the neomycin phosphotransferase gene. In order to increase transformation efficiency, sonication and ethylenedioxybis (ethylamine)-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) treatments were applied, which could produce physical wounds across the tissue and prevent plant defense reaction, respectively. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence was evaluated two weeks and five months after Agrobacterium inoculation as measures of transient and stable transformations, respectively. As a result, sonication significantly increased both transient and stable expression of GFP fluorescence, whereas EGTA treatment did not show a positive effect on either. Out of 18 regenerated plantlets obtained, one plant regenerated from ‘Agenosho Shinanashi’ showed stable GFP fluorescence. This plant was confirmed as a transformant by PCR and genomic Southern blotting. Three other transformed regenerated shoots by myb gene showed red color, which were derived from ‘Imamuraaki’ by the same transformation method. Transformation system in this study was shown to be reproducible since plural transformants were obtained. PMID:24273422

  19. Agrobacterium infection and plant defense—transformation success hangs by a thread

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The value of Agrobacterium tumefaciens for plant molecular biologists cannot be appreciated enough. This soil-borne pathogen has the unique capability to transfer DNA (T-DNA) into plant systems. Gene transfer involves both bacterial and host factors, and it is the orchestration of these factors that determines the success of transformation. Some plant species readily accept integration of foreign DNA, while others are recalcitrant. The timing and intensity of the microbially activated host defense repertoire sets the switch to “yes” or “no.” This repertoire is comprised of the specific induction of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), defense gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hormonal adjustments. Agrobacterium tumefaciens abuses components of the host immunity system it mimics plant protein functions and manipulates hormone levels to bypass or override plant defenses. A better understanding of the ongoing molecular battle between agrobacteria and attacked hosts paves the way toward developing transformation protocols for recalcitrant plant species. This review highlights recent findings in agrobacterial transformation research conducted in diverse plant species. Efficiency-limiting factors, both of plant and bacterial origin, are summarized and discussed in a thought-provoking manner. PMID:24391655

  20. Field performance of transgenic sugarcane produced using Agrobacterium and biolistics methods.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Priya; Hermann, Scott; O'Connell, Anthony; Dinh, Quang; Shumbe, Leonard; Lakshmanan, Prakash

    2014-05-01

    Future genetic improvement of sugarcane depends, in part, on the ability to produce high-yielding transgenic cultivars with improved traits such as herbicide and insect resistance. Here, transgenic sugarcane plants generated by different transformation methods were assessed for field performance over 3 years. Agrobacterium-mediated (Agro) transgenic events (35) were produced using four different Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains, while biolistic (Biol) transgenic events (48) were produced using either minimal linearized DNA (LDNA) transgene cassettes with 5', 3' or blunt ends or whole circular plasmid (PDNA) vectors containing the same transgenes. A combined analysis showed a reduction in growth and cane yield in Biol, Agro as well as untransformed tissue culture (TC) events, compared with the parent clone (PC) Q117 (no transformation or tissue culture) in the plant, first ratoon and second ratoon crops. However, when individual events were analysed separately, yields of some transgenic events from both Agro and Biol were comparable to PC, suggesting that either transformation method can produce commercially suitable clones. Interestingly, a greater percentage of Biol transformants were similar to PC for growth and yield than Agro clones. Crop ratoonability and sugar yield components (Brix%, Pol%, and commercial cane sugar (CCS)) were unaffected by transformation or tissue culture. Transgene expression remained stable over different crop cycles and increased with plant maturity. Transgene copy number did not influence transgene expression, and both transformation methods produced low transgene copy number events. No consistent pattern of genetic changes was detected in the test population using three DNA fingerprinting techniques. PMID:24330327

  1. Agrobacterium tumefasciens-mediated transformation of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Vieira, André L G; Camilo, César M

    2011-08-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is widely used for plant DNA transformation and more recently, has also been used to transform yeast, filamentous fungi and even human cells. Using this technique, we developed the first transformation protocol for the saprobic aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii, a Blastocladiomycete localized at the base of fungal phylogenetic tree, which has been shown as a promising and interesting model of study of cellular function and differentiation. We constructed binary T-DNA vectors containing hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) genes, under the control of Aspergillus nidulans trpC promoter and terminator sequences. 24 h of co-cultivation in induction medium (IM) agar plates, followed by transfer to PYG-agar plates containing cefotaxim to kill Agrobacterium tumefsciens and hygromycin to select transformants, resulted in growth and sporulation of resistant transformants. Genomic DNA from the pool o resistant zoospores were shown to contain T-DNA insertion as evidenced by PCR amplification of hph gene. Using a similar protocol we could also evidence the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in zoospores derived from transformed cells. This protocol can also open new perspectives for other non-transformable closely related fungi, like the Chytridiomycete class. PMID:21396477

  2. Agrobacterium-mediated transient MaFT expression in mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Su-Li; Yang, Xiao-Bing; Liu, Li-Qun; Jiang, Tao; Wu, Hai; Su, Chao; Qian, Yong-Hua; Jiao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    To optimize Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation assay in mulberry (Morus alba L.), various infiltration methods, Agrobacterium tumefaciens (A. tumefaciens) strains, and bacterial concentrations were tested in mulberry seedlings. Compared with LBA4404, GV3101 harboring pBE2133 plasmids presented stronger GUS signals at 3 days post infiltration using syringe. Recombinant plasmids pBE2133:GFP and pBE2133:GFP:MaFT were successfully constructed. Transient expression of MaFT:GFP protein was found in leaves, petiole (cross section), and shoot apical meristem (SAM) of mulberry according to the GFP signal. Moreover, MaFT:GFP mRNA was also detected in leaves and SAM via RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. An efficient transient transformation system could be achieved in mulberry seedlings by syringe using A. tumefaciens GV3101 at the OD600 of 0.5. The movement of MaFT expression from leaves to SAM might trigger the precocious flowering of mulberry. PMID:26024368

  3. Processing of cellulosic material by a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from cellulase-producing bacteria, ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate, have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase degrading bacterium ATCC 55702, which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic materials.

  4. Processing of cellulosic material by a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from cellulase-producing bacteria, ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H.C.

    1998-08-04

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate, have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase degrading bacterium ATCC 55702, which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic materials. 5 figs.

  5. Transcriptome Profiling and Functional Analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Reveals a General Conserved Response to Acidic Conditions (pH 5.5) and a Complex Acid-Mediated Signaling Involved in Agrobacterium-Plant Interactions▿

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ze-Chun; Liu, Pu; Saenkham, Panatda; Kerr, Kathleen; Nester, Eugene W.

    2008-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens transferred DNA (T-DNA) transfer requires that the virulence genes (vir regulon) on the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid be induced by plant phenolic signals in an acidic environment. Using transcriptome analysis, we found that these acidic conditions elicit two distinct responses: (i) a general and conserved response through which Agrobacterium modulates gene expression patterns to adapt to environmental acidification and (ii) a highly specialized acid-mediated signaling response involved in Agrobacterium-plant interactions. Overall, 78 genes were induced and 74 genes were repressed significantly under acidic conditions (pH 5.5) compared to neutral conditions (pH 7.0). Microarray analysis not only confirmed previously identified acid-inducible genes but also uncovered many new acid-induced genes which may be directly involved in Agrobacterium-plant interactions. These genes include virE0, virE1, virH1, and virH2. Further, the chvG-chvI two-component system, previously shown to be critical for virulence, was also induced under acid conditions. Interestingly, acidic conditions induced a type VI secretion system and a putative nonheme catalase. We provide evidence suggesting that acid-induced gene expression was independent of the VirA-VirG two-component system. Our results, together with previous data, support the hypothesis that there is three-step sequential activation of the vir regulon. This process involves a cascade regulation and hierarchical signaling pathway featuring initial direct activation of the VirA-VirG system by the acid-activated ChvG-ChvI system. Our data strengthen the notion that Agrobacterium has evolved a mechanism to perceive and subvert the acidic conditions of the rhizosphere to an important signal that initiates and directs the early virulence program, culminating in T-DNA transfer. PMID:17993523

  6. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of two Serbian potato cultivars (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Dragacevka and cv. Jelica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An efficient protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Serbian potato cultivars Dragacevka and Jelica, enabling the introduction of oryzacystatin genes OCI and OCII, was established. Starting with leaf explants a two-stage transformation protocol combining procedures of Webb and Wenzler...

  7. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  8. Effect of pre-plant soil fumigants on Agrobacterium tumefaciens, pythiaceous species, and subsequent soil recolonization by A. tumefaciens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paradox (Juglans hindsii x J. regia), the dominant rootstock used in the California walnut industry, is susceptible to crown gall, caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In practice, soil fumigation has been a common preplant management strategy for crown gall, but even an industry standard, methyl b...

  9. Influences of Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains, plant genotypes, and tissue types on the induction of transgenic hairy roots in Vitis species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated induction of transgenic hairy roots was previously demonstrated in Vitis vinifera L. and a few other Vitis species. In this study, 13 Vitis species, including V. aestivalis, V. afghanistan, V. champinii, V. doaniana, V. flexuosa, V. labrusca, V. nesbittiana, V. pal...

  10. Evaluations and modifications of semi-selective media for improved isolation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens biovar 1 from cultivated walnut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the causal agent of crown gall of walnut, is an aerobic, Gram negative bacterium belonging to the family Rhizobiaceae. Like many in this group, A. tumefaciens is a common inhabitant of soil and plant host tissue. Isolation from these complex environments is difficult even ...

  11. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND DETERGENTS ON AGROBACTERIUM TUMEFACIENS, THE CAUSAL PATHOGEN OF CROWN GALL DISEASE OF WALNUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown gall disease caused by the bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes significant economic losses in commercial walnut orchards and nursery operations in California. In an effort to develop integrated control strategies to ensure pathogen and disease free plant material at nurseries, the effe...

  12. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 prevents atherosclerosis via inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Jinfeng; Quan, Guihua; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, Longfei; Zhong, Lili

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Eight-week-old ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a Western diet with or without L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 daily for 16 weeks. L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 protected ApoE(-/-) mice from atherosclerosis by reducing their plasma cholesterol levels from 923 ± 44 to 581 ± 18 mg/dl, likely via a marked decrease in cholesterol absorption caused by modulation of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1). In addition, suppression of cholesterol absorption induced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in macrophages through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor/liver X receptor (PPAR/LXR) pathway. Fecal lactobacillus and bifidobacterium counts were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 treatment groups than in the control groups. Furthermore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 was detected in the rat small intestine, colon, and feces during the feeding trial. The bacterial levels remained high even after the administration of lactic acid bacteria had been stopped for 2 weeks. These results suggest that administration of L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 can protect against atherosclerosis through the inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption. Therefore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 may be a potential therapeutic material for preventing the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25261526

  13. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 Prevents Atherosclerosis via Inhibition of Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption in Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; Quan, Guihua; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, Longfei; Zhong, Lili

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE−/−) mice. Eight-week-old ApoE−/− mice were fed a Western diet with or without L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 daily for 16 weeks. L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 protected ApoE−/− mice from atherosclerosis by reducing their plasma cholesterol levels from 923 ± 44 to 581 ± 18 mg/dl, likely via a marked decrease in cholesterol absorption caused by modulation of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1). In addition, suppression of cholesterol absorption induced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in macrophages through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor/liver X receptor (PPAR/LXR) pathway. Fecal lactobacillus and bifidobacterium counts were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 treatment groups than in the control groups. Furthermore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 was detected in the rat small intestine, colon, and feces during the feeding trial. The bacterial levels remained high even after the administration of lactic acid bacteria had been stopped for 2 weeks. These results suggest that administration of L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 can protect against atherosclerosis through the inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption. Therefore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 may be a potential therapeutic material for preventing the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25261526

  14. Plasmids in Frankia sp.

    PubMed

    Normand, P; Simonet, P; Butour, J L; Rosenberg, C; Moiroud, A; Lalonde, M

    1983-07-01

    A method to achieve cell lysis and isolate Frankia sp. plasmid DNA was developed. A screening of Frankia sp. strains belonging to different host compatibility groups (Alnus sp., Elaeagnus sp., Ceanothus sp.) showed that, of 39 strains tested, 4 (strains Cp11, ARgN22d, ArI3, and EUN1f) possessed plasmids ranging in size from 7.1 to 32.2 kilobase pairs as estimated from agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. A total of 11 plasmids were detected. PMID:6863219

  15. Stability of free and encapsulated Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 in yogurt and in an artificial human gastric digestion system.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, F; Sert, S

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of encapsulation on survival of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 (ATCC 4356) in yogurt and during artificial gastric digestion. Strain ATCC 4356 was added to yogurt either encapsulated in calcium alginate or in free form (unencapsulated) at levels of 8.26 and 9.47 log cfu/g, respectively, and the influence of alginate capsules (1.5 to 2.5mm) on the sensorial characteristics of yogurts was investigated. The ATCC 4356 strain was introduced into an artificial gastric solution consisting of 0.08 N HCl (pH 1.5) containing 0.2% NaCl or into artificial bile juice consisting of 1.2% bile salts in de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe broth to determine the stability of the probiotic bacteria. When incubated for 2h in artificial gastric juice, the free ATCC 4356 did not survive (reduction of >7 log cfu/g). We observed, however, greater survival of encapsulated ATCC 4356, with a reduction of only 3 log cfu/g. Incubation in artificial bile juice (6 h) did not significantly affect the viability of free or encapsulated ATCC 4356. Moreover, statistically significant reductions (~1 log cfu/g) of both free and encapsulated ATCC 4356 were observed during 4-wk refrigerated storage of yogurts. The addition of probiotic cultures in free or alginate-encapsulated form did not significantly affect appearance/color or flavor/odor of the yogurts. However, significant deficiencies were found in body/texture of yogurts containing encapsulated ATCC 4356. We concluded that incorporation of free and encapsulated probiotic bacteria did not substantially change the overall sensory properties of yogurts, and encapsulation in alginate using the extrusion method greatly enhanced the survival of probiotic bacteria against an artificial human gastric digestive system. PMID:23021757

  16. Roseomonas elaeocarpi sp. nov., isolated from olive (Elaeocarpus hygrophilus Kurz.) phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Damtab, Jenjira; Nutaratat, Pumin; Boontham, Wanatchaporn; Srisuk, Nantana; Duangmal, Kannika; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Muramatsu, Yuki; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, coccobacillus-shaped, non-endospore-forming, pink-pigmented bacterium, designated PN2T, was isolated from an olive leaf. The strain grew at 15-35 °C with an optimum temperature for growth at 30 °C, and at pH 5.0-7.5 with an optimum pH for growth at 6.0. Growth was observed in the presence of up to 1.02 % (w/v) NaCl. The major fatty acids were C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, unknown aminolipids, an unknown phospholipid and an unknown lipid. The respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-10. The DNA G+C content of strain PN2T was 70.4 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain PN2T was closely related to members of the genus Roseomonas and shared highest similarity with Roseomonas mucosa ATCC BAA-692T (96.5 %), Roseomonas gilardii subsp. gilardii ATCC 49956T (96.2 %) and Roseomonas gilardii subsp. rosea ATCC BAA-691T (96.2 %). Furthermore, the DNA-DNA relatedness value between strain PN2T and the closest related species R. mucosa ATCC BAA-692T was 27 %. These data allowed the phenotypic and genotypic differentiation of strain PN2T from its closest phylogenetic neighbour (R. mucosa ATCC BAA-692T). Based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain PN2T is classified as representing a novel species of the genus Roseomonas for which the name Roseomonas elaeocarpi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PN2T ( = BCC 44864T = NBRC 107871T). PMID:26552692

  17. Significant differences between Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393T and a commonly used plasmid-cured derivative revealed by a polyphasic study.

    PubMed

    Acedo-Félix, Evelia; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2003-01-01

    Many studies on Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei (L. casei) have been carried out using strain ATCC 393 (pLZ15-). Four strains of L. casei ATCC 393T and three of ATCC 393 (pLZ15-) were compared using phenotypic methods and many of the available genotyping techniques. These tests showed that strains of ATCC 393T obtained from independent public type-culture collections were significantly different from the plasmid-free (pLZ15-) strains of ATCC 393T. These findings were confirmed by sequencing the first 580 nt (domain I) of the 16S and 23S rDNAs of the strains. Complete sequencing of the 16S rDNA of one representative strain from each group revealed that strain ATCC 393T from culture collections was 99% similar to Lactobacillus zeae ATCC 15820T and that the strain so far considered as L. casei ATCC 393 (pLZ15-) was, in turn, 100% similar to L. casei ATCC 334 and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei ATCC 4022. All data obtained in this work indicate that the ancestral strain of ATCC 393 (pLZ15-) might never have been the strain that is now available from culture collections. PMID:12656154

  18. Aminobacter ciceronei sp. nov. and Aminobacter lissarensis sp. nov., isolated from various terrestrial environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, I.R.; Kampfer, P.; Topp, E.; Warner, K.L.; Cox, M.J.; Connell, Hancock T.L.; Miller, L.G.; Larkin, M.J.; Ducrocq, V.; Coulter, C.; Harper, D.B.; Murrell, J.C.; Oremland, R.S.

    2005-01-01

    The bacterial strains IMB-1T and CC495T, which are capable of growth on methyl chloride (CH3Cl, chloromethane) and methyl bromide (CH3Br, bromomethane), were isolated from agricultural soil in California fumigated with CH3Br, and woodland soil in Northern Ireland, respectively. Two pesticide- /herbicide-degrading bacteria, strains ER2 and C147, were isolated from agricultural soil in Canada. Strain ER2 degrades N-methyl carbamate insecticides, and strain C147 degrades triazine herbicides widely used in agriculture. On the basis of their morphological, physiological and genotypic characteristics, these four strains are considered to represent two novel species of the genus Aminobacter, for which the names Aminobacter ciceronei sp. nov. (type strain IMB-1T=ATCC 202197T=CIP 108660T=CCUG 50580T; strains ER2 and C147) and Aminobacter lissarensis sp. nov. (type strain CC495T=NCIMB 13798T=CIP 108661T=CCUG 50579T) are proposed. ?? 2005 IUMS.

  19. Identification and Plant Interaction of a Phyllobacterium sp., a Predominant Rhizobacterium of Young Sugar Beet Plants.

    PubMed

    Lambert, B; Joos, H; Dierickx, S; Vantomme, R; Swings, J; Kersters, K; Van Montagu, M

    1990-04-01

    The second most abundant bacterium on the root surface of young sugar beet plants was identified as a Phyllobacterium sp. (Rhizobiaceae) based on a comparison of the results of 39 conventional identification tests, 167 API tests, 30 antibiotic susceptibility tests, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic fingerprints of total cellular proteins with type strains of Phyllobacterium myrsinacearum and Phyllobacterium rubiacearum. It was found on 198 of 1,100 investigated plants between the 2nd and 10th leaf stage on three different fields in Belgium and one field in Spain. Densities ranged from 2 x 10 to 2 x 10 CFU/g of root. Five isolates exerted a broad-spectrum in vitro antifungal activity. DNA-DNA hybridizations showed that Phyllobacterium sp. does not contain DNA sequences that are homologous with the attachment genes chvA, chvB, the transferred-DNA (T-DNA) hormone genes iaaH and ipt from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, iaaM from A. tumefaciens and Pseudomonas savastanoi, or the nitrogenase genes nifHDK from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Phyllobacterium sp. produces indolylacetic acid in in vitro cultures and induces auxinlike effects when cocultivated with callus tissue of tobacco. When Phyllobacterium sp. was transformed with a Ti plasmid derivative, it gained the capacity to induce tumors on Kalanchoe daigremontiana. The potential role of Phyllobacterium sp. in this newly recognized niche is discussed. PMID:16348158

  20. Effect of nitrogen source on curdlan production by Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC 31749.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Longfa

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of nitrogen source on curdlan production by Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC 31749. Curdlan production fell when excess nitrogen source was present, while biomass accumulation increased as the level of nitrogen source raised. Curdlan production and biomass accumulation were greater with urea compared with those with other nitrogen sources. The highest production of curdlan and biomass accumulation by A. faecalis ATCC 31749 was 28.16 g L(-1) and 9.58 g L(-1), respectively, with urea, whereas those with NH(4)Cl were 15.17 g L(-1) and 6.25 g L(-1), respectively. The optimum fermentation time for curdlan production was also affected by the nitrogen source in the medium. PMID:23085490

  1. Escherichia marmotae sp. nov., isolated from faeces of Marmota himalayana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Jin, Dong; Lan, Ruiting; Wang, Yiting; Meng, Qiong; Dai, Hang; Lu, Shan; Hu, Shoukui; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-07-01

    The taxonomic position of a group of seven closely related lactose-negative enterobacterial strains, which were isolated from fresh faecal samples of Marmota himalayana collected from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, China, was determined by using a polyphasic approach. Cells were Gram-reaction-negative, non-sporulating, non-motile, short rods (0.5-1 × 1-2.5 μm). By 16S rRNA gene sequences, the representative strain, HT073016(T), showed highest similarity values with Escherichia fergusonii ATCC 35469(T) at 99.3%, Escherichia coli ATCC 11775(T) at 99.2%, Escherichia albertii LMG 20976(T) at 98.9%, Escherichia hermannii CIP 103176(T) at 98.4%, and Escherichia vulneris ATCC 33821(T) at 97.7%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the seven strains formed a monophyletic group with five other species of the genus Escherichia. Digital DNA-DNA hybridization studies between strain HT073016(T) and five other species of the genus Escherichia showed that it shared less than 70% DNA-DNA relatedness with all known species of the genus Escherichia, supporting the novel species status of the strain. The DNA G+C content of strain HT073016(T) was 53.8 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain HT073016(T) and the six other HT073016(T)-like strains were clearly distinct from the type strains of other recognized species of the genus Escherichia and represent a novel species of the genus Escherichia, for which the name Escherichia marmotae sp. nov. is proposed, with HT073016(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12862(T) = DSM 28771(T)) as the type strain. PMID:25851592

  2. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of promising oil-bearing marine algae Parachlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Jayant Pralhad; Prakash, Gunjan; Pandit, Reena; Lali, Arvind M

    2013-11-01

    Parachlorella kessleri is a unicellular alga which grows in fresh as well as marine water and is commercially important as biomass/lipid feedstock and in bioremediation. The present study describes the successful transformation of marine P. kessleri with the help of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transformed marine P. kessleri was able to tolerate more than 10 mg l(-1) hygromycin concentration. Co-cultivation conditions were modulated to allow the simultaneous growth of both marine P. kessleri and A. tumefaciens. For co-cultivation, P. kessleri was shifted from Walne's to tris acetate phosphate medium to reduce the antibiotic requirement during selection. In the present study, the transfer of T-DNA was successful without using acetosyringone. Biochemical and genetic analyses were performed for expression of transgenes by GUS assay and PCR in transformants. Establishment of this protocol would be useful in further genetic modification of oil-bearing Parachlorella species. PMID:24097049

  3. Common loci for Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide synthesis and their roles in plant interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cangelosi, G.A.; Hung, L.; Puvanesarajah, V.; Stacey, G.; Ozga, D.A.; Leigh, J.A.; Nester, E.W.

    1987-05-01

    The authors isolated approximately 100 analogous EPS-deficient (Exo) mutants of the closely related plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, including strains whose EPS deficiencies were specifically complemented by each of five cloned, R. meliloti exo loci. They also cloned A. tumefaciens genes which complemented EPS defects in three of the R. meliloti Exo mutants. In two of these cases, symbiotic defects were also complemented. All of the A. tumefaciens Exo mutants formed normal crown gall tumors on four different plant hosts, except ExoC mutants, which were nontumorigenic and unable to attach to plant cells in vitro. Like their R. meliloti counterparts, A. tumefaciens Exo mutants were deficient in production of succinoglycan, the major acidic EPS species produced by both genera. A. tumefaciens ExoC mutants also produced extremely low levels of another major EPS, cyclic 1,2-..beta..-D-glucan. This deficiency has been noted previously in a different set of nontumorigenic, attachment-defective A. tumefaciens mutants.

  4. Efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and regeneration of garlic (Allium sativum) immature leaf tissue.

    PubMed

    Kenel, Fernand; Eady, Colin; Brinch, Sheree

    2010-03-01

    Transgenic garlic (Allium sativum) plants have been recovered directly from immature leaf material by selective culture following Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This method involved the use of a binary vector containing the mgfp-ER reporter gene and hpt selectable marker, and followed a similar protocol developed previously for the transformation of immature onion embryos. The choice of tissue and post-transformation selection procedure resulted in a large increase in recovery of transgenic plants compared with previously confirmed allium transformation protocols. The presence of transgenes in the genome of the plants was confirmed using Southern analysis. This improvement in frequency and the use of clonal commercial "Printanor" germplasm now makes possible the integration of useful agronomic and quality traits into this crop. PMID:20099065

  5. Delineation of the regulatory region sequences of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virB operon.

    PubMed Central

    Das, A; Pazour, G J

    1989-01-01

    A virB-lacZ translational fusion was constructed to monitor expression of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens virB operon. Expression of the fusion gene was dependent on the presence of pTiA6 virA, virG, and a plant factor acetosyringone. Analysis of deletion mutants, constructed by exonuclease Bal31 digestion, showed that 68 residues upstream of the virB transcription initiation site was necessary for its expression. A TT----CC substitution at positions -62 and -61 led to a 7 fold reduction in virB expression. The virB upstream region contains a tetradecameric sequence, dPuT/ATDCAATGHAAPy (D = A, G or T; H = A, C or T), that is conserved in the non-transcribed regions of all vir genes. Alteration of the position of this sequence relative to the promoter region sequences had a drastic negative effect on virB expression. PMID:2748333

  6. Isotherm for Adsorption of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to Susceptible Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kluepfel, D A; Pueppke, S G

    1985-06-01

    Potato tuber disks were submerged in suspensions containing 10 to 10 cells of Agrobacterium tumefaciens B6 per ml. After 60 min, the disks were rinsed and homogenized, and portions of the homogenates were plated to measure the number of adsorbed bacteria. At low initial bacterial concentrations (10/ml), 5 to 23% of the bacteria adsorbed. At higher bacterial concentrations, the corresponding value was approximately 1.2%. Adsorption was a reversible equilibrium process. Binding saturation was not achieved, and adsorbed bacteria were confined to monolayers on the surfaces of tissue prepared for scanning electron microscopy. Adsorption of strain B6 to potato tuber tissues is described accurately by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm and may be a nonspecific phenomenon. PMID:16346800

  7. Identification of Different Agrobacterium Strains Isolated from the Same Forest Nursery

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Marie-France; Brasileiro, Ana Cristina Miranda; Depierreux, Christiane; Otten, Leon; Delmotte, Francis; Jouanin, Lise

    1990-01-01

    Several Agrobacterium strains isolated from the same forest nursery from 1982 to 1988 were compared by serological, biochemical, and DNA-DNA hybridization methods. Similarities among strains belonging to biovar 2 were observed by indirect immunofluorescence, whereas biovar 1 strains showed serological heterogeneity. Electrophoretic analysis of bacterial envelope-associated proteins showed that few bands appeared in the strains belonging to biovar 1, whereas many proteins appeared in the case of biovar 2 strains. Chromosomal DNA was analyzed with six random C58 chromosomal fragments. None of the six probes hybridized to the DNA of the two biovar 2 strains. One of the probes gave the same hybridization pattern with all biovar 1 strains, whereas the other probes yielded different patterns. The vir regions were closely related in the different pathogenic strains. The T-DNA and replication regions were less conserved and showed some variations among the strains. Images PMID:16348358

  8. Agrobacterium and biolistic transformation of onion using non-antibiotic selection marker phosphomannose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Aswath, Chenna Reddy; Mo, Sung Youn; Kim, Doo Hwan; Park, S Won

    2006-03-01

    A new selection system for onion transformation that does not require the use of antibiotics or herbicides was developed. The selection system used the Escherichia coli gene that encodes phosphomannose isomerase (pmi). Transgenic plants carrying the manA gene that codes for pmi can detoxify mannose-6-phosphate by conversion to fructose-6-phosphate, an intermediate of glycolysis, via the pmi activity. Six-week-old embryogenic callus initiated from seedling radicle was used for transformation. Transgenic plants were produced efficiently with transformation rates of 27 and 23% using Agrobacterium and biolistic system, respectively. Untransformed shoots were eliminated by a stepwise increase from 10 g l(-1) sucrose with 10 g l(-1) mannose in the first selection to only 10 g l(-1) mannose in the second selection. Integrative transformation was confirmed by PCR, RT-PCR and Southern hybridization. PMID:16211408

  9. Identification of pTiC58 plasmid-encoded proteins for virulence in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Hagiya, M; Close, T J; Tait, R C; Kado, C I

    1985-01-01

    Analyses were made of the host-dependent-variation (hdv) locus of the virulence (vir) region of the pTiC58 plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The hdv locus is comprised of at least four genes that encode polypeptides of 13, 15, 29, and 28 kDa. Insertion of transposon Tn5 in the first gene abolishes the expression of all four genes in vitro and in vivo. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the hdv locus revealed four open reading frames tandemly arranged with spacer sequences having no promoter-like sequences and lacking the ability to bind A. tumefaciens RNA polymerase. These studies suggest that the hdv locus is comprised of at least four genes arranged in an operon in the vir region. The protein products of these genes are likely to function in some aspect of the host-range determination of A. tumefaciens. Images PMID:2986128

  10. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  11. Complete Genome Assembly of Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615, a Group A β-Hemolytic Reference Strain.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H A; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Chertkov, O; Coyne, S R; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Redden, C L; Rosenzweig, C N; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    We present the complete genome assembly of Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615 (Rosenbach) as submitted to GenBank under accession number CP008926. This group A nonmotile β-hemolytic clinical isolate is used for quality control in a variety of commercially available tests. The assembled genome is 1.84 Mb (38.5% G+C content) and contains 1,788 coding regions. PMID:25258274

  12. Complete Genome Assembly of Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615, a Group A β-Hemolytic Reference Strain

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, T. D.; Daligault, H. A.; Davenport, K. W.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Chertkov, O.; Coyne, S. R.; Freitas, T.; Frey, K. G.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Redden, C. L.; Rosenzweig, C. N.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We present the complete genome assembly of Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615 (Rosenbach) as submitted to GenBank under accession number CP008926. This group A nonmotile β-hemolytic clinical isolate is used for quality control in a variety of commercially available tests. The assembled genome is 1.84 Mb (38.5% G+C content) and contains 1,788 coding regions. PMID:25258274

  13. Efficacy of oral Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521 on microflora and antioxidant in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Gui; Xu, Hai-Bo; Xu, Feng; Zeng, Zhe-Ling; Wei, Hua

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to examine whether Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521, a species of colonic microflora in humans, is involved in the intestinal tract of mice. This study was also conducted to determine the antioxidant activity of this species by evaluating different microbial populations and reactive oxygen species isolated from feces and intestinal contents for 28 days of oral administration. Microbial diversities were assessed through bacterial culture techniques, PCR-DGGE, and real-time PCR. This study showed that the intake of B. bifidum ATCC 29521 significantly (p < 0.05) improved the ecosystem of the intestinal tract of BALB/c mice by increasing the amount of probiotics (Lactobacillus intestinalis and Lactobacillus crispatus) and by reducing unwanted bacterial populations (Enterobacter, Escherichia coli). Antioxidative activities of incubated cell-free extracts were evaluated through various assays, including the scavenging ability of DPPH radical (64.5% and 67.54% (p < 0.05), respectively, at 21 days in nutrients and 28 days in MRS broth), superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radical (85% and 61.5% (p < 0.05), respectively, at intestinal contents in nutrients and 21 days in MRS broth). Total reducing power (231.5 μmol/L (p < 0.05), 14 days in MRS broth) and mRNA level of genes related to oxidative stress were also determined. Results indicated that B. bifidum ATCC 29521 elicits a beneficial effect on murine gut microbiota and antioxidant activities compared with the control samples. This species can be considered as a potential bioresource antioxidant to promote health. Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521 may also be used as a promising material in microbiological and food applications. PMID:26863255

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. lapsa Strain ATCC 10859, Isolated from Infected Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jun; Jiang, Hongshan; Li, Baiyun; Zhao, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. lapsa is a pathovar of Pseudomonas syringae that can infect wheat. The complete genome of P. syringae pv. lapsa strain ATCC 10859 contains a 5,918,899-bp circular chromosome with 4,973 coding sequences, 16 rRNAs, 69 tRNAs, and an average GC content of 59.13%. The analysis of this genome revealed several gene clusters that are related to pathogenesis and virulence. PMID:26941133

  15. Reprogramming of plant cells induced by 6b oncoproteins from the plant pathogen Agrobacterium.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Machida, Yasunori

    2015-05-01

    Reprogramming of plant cells is an event characterized by dedifferentiation, reacquisition of totipotency, and enhanced cell proliferation, and is typically observed during formation of the callus, which is dependent on plant hormones. The callus-like cell mass, called a crown gall tumor, is induced at the sites of infection by Agrobacterium species through the expression of hormone-synthesizing genes encoded in the T-DNA region, which probably involves a similar reprogramming process. One of the T-DNA genes, 6b, can also by itself induce reprogramming of differentiated cells to generate tumors and is therefore recognized as an oncogene acting in plant cells. The 6b genes belong to a group of Agrobacterium T-DNA genes, which include rolB, rolC, and orf13. These genes encode proteins with weakly conserved sequences and may be derived from a common evolutionary origin. Most of these members can modify plant growth and morphogenesis in various ways, in most cases without affecting the levels of plant hormones. Recent studies have suggested that the molecular function of 6b might be to modify the patterns of transcription in the host nuclei, particularly by directly targeting the host transcription factors or by changing the epigenetic status of the host chromatin through intrinsic histone chaperone activity. In light of the recent findings on zygotic resetting of nucleosomal histone variants in Arabidopsis thaliana, one attractive idea is that acquisition of totipotency might be facilitated by global changes of epigenetic status, which might be induced by replacement of histone variants in the zygote after fertilization and in differentiated cells upon stimulation by plant hormones as well as by expression of the 6b gene. PMID:25694001

  16. Stable recombinase-mediated cassette exchange in Arabidopsis using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Louwerse, Jeanine D; van Lier, Miranda C M; van der Steen, Dirk M; de Vlaam, Clementine M T; Hooykaas, Paul J J; Vergunst, Annette C

    2007-12-01

    Site-specific integration is an attractive method for the improvement of current transformation technologies aimed at the production of stable transgenic plants. Here, we present a Cre-based targeting strategy in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) of transferred DNA (T-DNA) delivered by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The rationale for effective RMCE is the precise exchange of a genomic and a replacement cassette both flanked by two heterospecific lox sites that are incompatible with each other to prevent unwanted cassette deletion. We designed a strategy in which the coding region of a loxP/lox5171-flanked bialaphos resistance (bar) gene is exchanged for a loxP/lox5171-flanked T-DNA replacement cassette containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) coding region via loxP/loxP and lox5171/lox5171 directed recombination. The bar gene is driven by the strong 35S promoter, which is located outside the target cassette. This placement ensures preferential selection of RMCE events and not random integration events by expression of nptII from this same promoter. Using root transformation, during which Cre was provided on a cotransformed T-DNA, 50 kanamycin-resistant calli were selected. Forty-four percent contained a correctly exchanged cassette based on PCR analysis, indicating the stringency of the selection system. This was confirmed for the offspring of five analyzed events by Southern-blot analysis. In four of the five analyzed RMCE events, there were no additional T-DNA insertions or they easily segregated, resulting in high-efficiency single-copy RMCE events. Our approach enables simple and efficient selection of targeting events using the advantages of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PMID:17921337

  17. Agrobacterium phytochrome as an enzyme for the production of ZZE bilins.

    PubMed

    Lamparter, Tilman; Michael, Norbert

    2005-06-14

    Photoconversion of phytochrome from the red-absorbing form Pr to the far-red-absorbing form Pfr is initiated by a Z to E isomerization around the ring C-ring D connecting double bond; the chromophore undergoes a ZZZ to ZZE isomerization. In vivo, phytochrome chromophores are covalently bound to the protein, but several examples of noncovalent in vitro adducts have been reported which also undergo Pr to Pfr photoconversion. We show that free biliverdin or phycocyanobilin, highly enriched in the ZZE isomer, can easily be obtained from chromophores bound in a noncovalent manner to Agrobacterium phytochrome Agp1, and used for spectral assays. Photoconversion of free biliverdin in a methanol/HCl solution from ZZE to ZZZ proceeded with a quantum yield of 1.8%, but was negligible in neutral methanol solution, indicating that this process is proton-dependent. The ZZE form of biliverdin and phycocyanobilin were tested for their ability to assemble with Agp1 and cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1, respectively. In both cases, a Pfr-like adduct was formed but the chromophore was bound in a noncovalent manner to the protein. Agp1 Pfr undergoes dark reversion to Pr; the same feature was found for the noncovalent ZZE adduct. After dark reversion, the chromophore became covalently bound to the protein. In analogy, the PCB chromophore became covalently bound to Cph1 upon irradiation with strong far-red light which initiated ZZE to ZZZ isomerization. Agrobacterium Agp2 belongs to a yet small group of phytochromes which also assemble in the Pr form but convert from Pr to Pfr in darkness. When the Agp2 apoprotein was assembled with the ZZE form of biliverdin, the formation of the final adduct was accelerated compared to the formation of the ZZZ control, indicating that the ZZE chromophore fits directly into the chromophore pocket of Agp2. PMID:15938635

  18. Identification of hairy root loci in the T-regions of Agrobacterium rhizogenes Ri plasmids.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, F; Berkaloff, A; Richaud, F

    1986-07-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes induces root formation at the wound site of inoculation in plants and inserts a fragment of its plasmid (Ri) into the plant nuclear DNA. Parts of the transferred region (T-region) of the Ri plasmid of A. rhizogenes strain A4 or 8196 are cloned in Escherichia coli. Insertions of the E. coli lacZ coding region into the hybrid plasmids were made in vivo using transduction by miniMu. Twenty insertions localized in the TL-DNA of pRiA4 (or pRi1855) and 2 inserts in the T-DNA of pRi8196 were obtained in E. coli. One of the TL-DNA insertions is saved up because it is linked to an internal T-DNA deletion; the others because they confer a lactose plus phenotype on E. coli; this indicates that the T-DNA harbours sequences that are expressed in E. coli. Fifteen of these T-DNA insertions were transfered to Agrobacterium where they substitute the corresponding wild-type T-DNA of the Ri plasmid by homologous recombination. These strains corresponding to insertion-directed mutagenesis were used to inoculate Daucus carota slices and stems and leaves of Kalanchoe daigremontiana. The two insertions strains obtained in the T-DNA of pRi8196 are avirulent on K. daigremontiana; but their phenotypes differ on D. carota slices, suggesting that insertions affect distinct loci on the T-DNA involved in hairy root formation. Only one insertion out of the twenty obtained in the TL-DNA of pRiA4 (or 1855) induces a loss of virulence on leaves of K. daigremontiana. However the TL-DNA deletion harbouring strain induces a loss of virulence on D. carota and K. daigremontiana (stems and leaves), confirming the importance of the TL-DNA for hairy root induction. re]19850711 rv]19851230 ac]19860114. PMID:24307326

  19. The Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS Gene Encodes Two Secreted Proteins Required for Genetic Transformation of Plants▿

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Larry D.; Lee, Lan-Ying; McNett, Henry; Gelvin, Stanton B.; Ream, Walt

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are related pathogens that cause crown gall and hairy root diseases, which result from integration and expression of bacterial genes in the plant genome. Single-stranded DNA (T strands) and virulence proteins are translocated into plant cells by a type IV secretion system. VirD2 nicks a specific DNA sequence, attaches to the 5′ end, and pilots the DNA into plant cells. A. tumefaciens translocates single-stranded DNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells where it likely binds T strands and may aid in targeting them into the nucleus. Although some A. rhizogenes strains lack VirE2, they transfer T strands efficiently due to the GALLS gene, which complements an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation. Unlike VirE2, full-length GALLS (GALLS-FL) contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. GALLS-FL and VirE2 contain nuclear localization signals (NLS) and secretion signals. Mutations in any of these domains abolish the ability of the GALLS gene to substitute for virE2. Here, we show that the GALLS gene encodes two proteins from one open reading frame: GALLS-FL and a protein comprised of the C-terminal domain, which initiates at an internal in-frame start codon. On some hosts, both GALLS proteins were required to substitute for VirE2. GALLS-FL tagged with yellow fluorescent protein localized to the nucleus of tobacco cells in an NLS-dependent manner. In plant cells, the GALLS proteins interacted with themselves, VirD2, and each other. VirD2 interacted with GALLS-FL and localized inside the nucleus, where its predicted helicase activity may pull T strands into the nucleus. PMID:18952790

  20. Correlative Association between Resident Plasmids and the Host Chromosome in a Diverse Agrobacterium Soil Population

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, Hacène; Ouadah, Djaouida; Krimi, Zoulikha; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Trovato, Maurizio; Petit, Annik; Dessaux, Yves

    1993-01-01

    Soil samples collected from a fallow field which had not been cultivated for 5 years harbored a population of Agrobacterium spp. estimated at 3 × 107 CFU/g. Characterization of 72 strains selected from four different isolation media showed the presence of biovar 1 (56%) and bv. 2 (44%) strains. Pathogenicity assays on five different test plants revealed a high proportion (33%) of tumorigenic strains in the resident population. All tumorigenic strains belonged to bv. 1. Differentiation of the strains by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of cellular proteins, and utilization patterns of 95 carbon substrates (Biolog GN microplate) revealed a diversified bv. 1 population, composed of five distinct chromosomal backgrounds (chr A, C, D, E, and F), and a homogeneous bv. 2 population (chr B). chr A, B, C, and D were detected at similar levels throughout the study site. According to opine metabolism, pathogenicity, and agrocin sensitivity, chr A strains carried a nopaline Ti plasmid (pTi), whereas chr C strains had an octopine pTi. In addition, four of six nontumorigenic bv. 1 strains (two chr D, one chr E, and one chr F) had distinct and unusual opine catabolism patterns. chr B (bv. 2) strains were nonpathogenic and catabolized nopaline. Although agrocin sensitivity is a pTi-borne trait, 14 chr B strains were sensitive to agrocin 84, apparently harboring a defective nopaline pTi similar to pAtK84b. The other two chr B strains were agrocin resistant. The present analysis of chromosomal and plasmid phenotypes suggests that in this Agrobacterium soil population, there is a preferential association between the resident plasmids and their bacterial host. Images PMID:16348927

  1. Stable Recombinase-Mediated Cassette Exchange in Arabidopsis Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens1

    PubMed Central

    Louwerse, Jeanine D.; van Lier, Miranda C.M.; van der Steen, Dirk M.; de Vlaam, Clementine M.T.; Hooykaas, Paul J.J.; Vergunst, Annette C.

    2007-01-01

    Site-specific integration is an attractive method for the improvement of current transformation technologies aimed at the production of stable transgenic plants. Here, we present a Cre-based targeting strategy in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) of transferred DNA (T-DNA) delivered by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The rationale for effective RMCE is the precise exchange of a genomic and a replacement cassette both flanked by two heterospecific lox sites that are incompatible with each other to prevent unwanted cassette deletion. We designed a strategy in which the coding region of a loxP/lox5171-flanked bialaphos resistance (bar) gene is exchanged for a loxP/lox5171-flanked T-DNA replacement cassette containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) coding region via loxP/loxP and lox5171/lox5171 directed recombination. The bar gene is driven by the strong 35S promoter, which is located outside the target cassette. This placement ensures preferential selection of RMCE events and not random integration events by expression of nptII from this same promoter. Using root transformation, during which Cre was provided on a cotransformed T-DNA, 50 kanamycin-resistant calli were selected. Forty-four percent contained a correctly exchanged cassette based on PCR analysis, indicating the stringency of the selection system. This was confirmed for the offspring of five analyzed events by Southern-blot analysis. In four of the five analyzed RMCE events, there were no additional T-DNA insertions or they easily segregated, resulting in high-efficiency single-copy RMCE events. Our approach enables simple and efficient selection of targeting events using the advantages of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PMID:17921337

  2. Cloning, characterization, and production of three α-l-fucosidases from Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shuquan; Zhang, Huaqin; Chen, Xiaodi; Lu, Lili; Xu, Li; Xiao, Min

    2016-04-01

    α-l-Fucosidases are key enzymes for the degradation of intestinal glycans by gut microbes. In this work, three putative α-l-fucosidases (Afc1, Afc2, and Afc3) genes from Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124 were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Afc1 had the α-l-fucosidase domain of glycoside hydrolase (GH) 29 family but showed no enzyme activity toward all the substrates examined. The putative acid/base residue of Afc1, Ser205, was replaced by a glutamic acid which is conserved in GH29-B α-l-fucosidases. However, the mutant Afc1-S205E still failed to show enzyme activity. Afc2 and Afc3 were determined to be 1,3-1,4-α-l-fucosidase of GH29-B subfamily and 1,2-α-l-fucosidase of GH95 family, respectively, and both of them could release fucose from porcine gastric mucin (PGM). When C. perfringens ATCC 13124 grew with the presence of PGM, the transcription of afc1 decreased slightly, while those of afc2 and afc3 increased to 2.2-fold and 1.4-fold, respectively, and the enzyme activities of Afc2 and Afc3 in the culture increased to 2.2-fold and 2.6-fold, respectively. These results suggest that Afc2 and Afc3 are involved in the degradation of intestinal fucosyl glycans by C. perfringens ATCC 13124. PMID:26663202

  3. Genome-scale reconstruction of metabolic networks of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 and 12A.

    PubMed

    Vinay-Lara, Elena; Hamilton, Joshua J; Stahl, Buffy; Broadbent, Jeff R; Reed, Jennifer L; Steele, James L

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains are widely used in industry and the utility of this organism in these industrial applications is strain dependent. Hence, tools capable of predicting strain specific phenotypes would have utility in the selection of strains for specific industrial processes. Genome-scale metabolic models can be utilized to better understand genotype-phenotype relationships and to compare different organisms. To assist in the selection and development of strains with enhanced industrial utility, genome-scale models for L. casei ATCC 334, a well characterized strain, and strain 12A, a corn silage isolate, were constructed. Draft models were generated from RAST genome annotations using the Model SEED database and refined by evaluating ATP generating cycles, mass-and-charge-balances of reactions, and growth phenotypes. After the validation process was finished, we compared the metabolic networks of these two strains to identify metabolic, genetic and ortholog differences that may lead to different phenotypic behaviors. We conclude that the metabolic capabilities of the two networks are highly similar. The L. casei ATCC 334 model accounts for 1,040 reactions, 959 metabolites and 548 genes, while the L. casei 12A model accounts for 1,076 reactions, 979 metabolites and 640 genes. The developed L. casei ATCC 334 and 12A metabolic models will enable better understanding of the physiology of these organisms and be valuable tools in the development and selection of strains with enhanced utility in a variety of industrial applications. PMID:25365062

  4. Cloning, Purification and Characterization of the Collagenase ColA Expressed by Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    Abfalter, Carmen M; Schönauer, Esther; Ponnuraj, Karthe; Huemer, Markus; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Regl, Christof; Briza, Peter; Ferreira, Fatima; Huber, Christian G; Brandstetter, Hans; Posselt, Gernot; Wessler, Silja

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial collagenases differ considerably in their structure and functions. The collagenases ColH and ColG from Clostridium histolyticum and ColA expressed by Clostridium perfringens are well-characterized collagenases that cleave triple-helical collagen, which were therefore termed as ´true´ collagenases. ColA from Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) has been added to the collection of true collagenases. However, the molecular characteristics of B. cereus ColA are less understood. In this study, we identified ColA as a secreted true collagenase from B. cereus ATCC 14579, which is transcriptionally controlled by the regulon phospholipase C regulator (PlcR). B. cereus ATCC 14579 ColA was cloned to express recombinant wildtype ColA (ColAwt) and mutated to a proteolytically inactive (ColAE501A) version. Recombinant ColAwt was tested for gelatinolytic and collagenolytic activities and ColAE501A was used for the production of a polyclonal anti-ColA antibody. Comparison of ColAwt activity with homologous proteases in additional strains of B. cereus sensu lato (B. cereus s.l.) and related clostridial collagenases revealed that B. cereus ATCC 14579 ColA is a highly active peptidolytic and collagenolytic protease. These findings could lead to a deeper insight into the function and mechanism of bacterial collagenases which are used in medical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27588686

  5. The sim operon facilitates the transport and metabolism of sucrose isomers in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John; Jakubovics, Nicholas; Abraham, Bindu; Hess, Sonja; Pikis, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Inspection of the genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 revealed two operons that might dissimilate the five isomers of sucrose. To test this hypothesis, cells of L. casei ATCC 334 were grown in a defined medium supplemented with various sugars, including each of the five isomeric disaccharides. Extracts prepared from cells grown on the sucrose isomers contained high levels of two polypeptides with M(r)s of approximately 50,000 and approximately 17,500. Neither protein was present in cells grown on glucose, maltose or sucrose. Proteomic, enzymatic, and Western blot analyses identified the approximately 50-kDa protein as an NAD(+)- and metal ion-dependent phospho-alpha-glucosidase. The oligomeric enzyme was purified, and a catalytic mechanism is proposed. The smaller polypeptide represented an EIIA component of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system. Phospho-alpha-glucosidase and EIIA are encoded by genes at the LSEI_0369 (simA) and LSEI_0374 (simF) loci, respectively, in a block of seven genes comprising the sucrose isomer metabolism (sim) operon. Northern blot analyses provided evidence that three mRNA transcripts were up-regulated during logarithmic growth of L. casei ATCC 334 on sucrose isomers. Internal simA and simF gene probes hybridized to approximately 1.5- and approximately 1.3-kb transcripts, respectively. A 6.8-kb mRNA transcript was detected by both probes, which was indicative of cotranscription of the entire sim operon. PMID:18310337

  6. Dynamic proteomic profiling of a unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece ATCC51142 across light-dark diurnal cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, Uma K.; Stockel, Jana; Krovvidi, Ravi K.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Jacobs, Jon M.

    2011-12-01

    Unicellular cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece are recognized for their ability to execute nitrogen (N2)-fixation in the dark and photosynthesis in the light. Systems-wide dynamic proteomic profiling with mass spectrometry (MS) analysis reveals fundamental insights into the control and regulation of these functions. To expand upon the current knowledge of protein expression patterns in Cyanothece ATCC51142, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using partial ("unsaturated") metabolic labeling and high mass accuracy LC-MS analysis. This dynamic proteomic profiling identified 721 actively synthesized proteins with significant temporal changes in expression throughout the light-dark cycles, of which 425 proteins matched with previously characterized cycling transcripts. The remaining 296 proteins contained a cluster of proteins uniquely involved in DNA replication and repair, protein degradation, tRNA synthesis and modification, transport and binding, and regulatory functions. Analysis of protein functions revealed that the expression of nitrogenase in the dark is mediated by higher respiration and glycogen metabolism. We have also shown that Cyanothece ATCC51142 utilizes alternative pathways for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) acquisition, particularly, aspartic acid and glutamate as substrates of C and N, respectively. Utilization of phosphoketolase (PHK) pathway for the conversion of xylulose-5P to pyruvate and acetyl-P likely constitutes an alternative strategy to compensate higher ATP and NADPH demand. In conclusion, this study provides a deeper insight into how Cyanothece ATCC51142 modulates cellular functions to accommodate photosynthesis and N2-fixation within the single cell.

  7. Genome –Scale Reconstruction of Metabolic Networks of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 and 12A

    PubMed Central

    Vinay-Lara, Elena; Hamilton, Joshua J.; Stahl, Buffy; Broadbent, Jeff R.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Steele, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains are widely used in industry and the utility of this organism in these industrial applications is strain dependent. Hence, tools capable of predicting strain specific phenotypes would have utility in the selection of strains for specific industrial processes. Genome-scale metabolic models can be utilized to better understand genotype-phenotype relationships and to compare different organisms. To assist in the selection and development of strains with enhanced industrial utility, genome-scale models for L. casei ATCC 334, a well characterized strain, and strain 12A, a corn silage isolate, were constructed. Draft models were generated from RAST genome annotations using the Model SEED database and refined by evaluating ATP generating cycles, mass-and-charge-balances of reactions, and growth phenotypes. After the validation process was finished, we compared the metabolic networks of these two strains to identify metabolic, genetic and ortholog differences that may lead to different phenotypic behaviors. We conclude that the metabolic capabilities of the two networks are highly similar. The L. casei ATCC 334 model accounts for 1,040 reactions, 959 metabolites and 548 genes, while the L. casei 12A model accounts for 1,076 reactions, 979 metabolites and 640 genes. The developed L. casei ATCC 334 and 12A metabolic models will enable better understanding of the physiology of these organisms and be valuable tools in the development and selection of strains with enhanced utility in a variety of industrial applications. PMID:25365062

  8. Characterization of KfrA proteins encoded by a plasmid of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T

    PubMed Central

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Mon, Hiroaki; Mori, Kazuki; Mitsudome, Takumi; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Tashiro, Kousuke; Asano, Shin-ichiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa

    2015-01-01

    A scaffold obtained from whole-genome shotgun sequencing of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T shares partial homology with plasmids found in other strains of P. popilliae. PCR and sequencing for gap enclosure indicated that the scaffold originated from a 15,929-bp circular DNA. The restriction patterns of a plasmid isolated from P. popilliae ATCC 14706T were identical to those expected from the sequence; thus, this circular DNA was identified as a plasmid of ATCC 14706T and designated pPOP15.9. The plasmid encodes 17 putative open reading frames. Orfs 1, 5, 7, 8, and 9 are homologous to Orfs 11, 12, 15, 16, and 17, respectively. Orf1 and Orf11 are annotated as replication initiation proteins. Orf8 and Orf16 are homologs of KfrA, a plasmid-stabilizing protein in Gram-negative bacteria. Recombinant Orf8 and Orf16 proteins were assessed for the properties of KfrA. Indeed, they formed multimers and bound to inverted repeat sequences in upstream regions of both orf8 and orf16. A phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences of Orf8, Orf16 and Kfr proteins did not correlate with species lineage. PMID:25853059

  9. Generation of Backbone-Free, Low Transgene Copy Plants by Launching T-DNA from the Agrobacterium Chromosome1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Oltmanns, Heiko; Frame, Bronwyn; Lee, Lan-Ying; Johnson, Susan; Li, Bo; Wang, Kan; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2010-01-01

    In both applied and basic research, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is commonly used to introduce genes into plants. We investigated the effect of three Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains and five transferred (T)-DNA origins of replication on transformation frequency, transgene copy number, and the frequency of integration of non-T-DNA portions of the T-DNA-containing vector (backbone) into the genome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). Launching T-DNA from the picA locus of the Agrobacterium chromosome increases the frequency of single transgene integration events and almost eliminates the presence of vector backbone sequences in transgenic plants. Along with novel Agrobacterium strains we have developed, our findings are useful for improving the quality of T-DNA integration events. PMID:20023148

  10. Development of Efficient Plant Regeneration and Transformation System for Impatiens Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Multiple Bud Cultures as Explants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) is a top selling floriculture crop. The potential for genetic transformation of Impatiens to introduce novel flower colors or virus resistance has been limited by its general recalcitrance to tissue culture and transformation manipulations. We have established a regeneration and transformation system for Impatiens that provides new alternatives to genetic improvement of this crop. Results In a first step towards the development of transgenic INSV-resistant Impatiens, we developed an efficient plant regeneration system using hypocotyl segments containing cotyledonary nodes as explants. With this regeneration system, 80% of explants produced an average of 32.3 elongated shoots per initial explant plated, with up to 167 elongated shoots produced per explant. Rooting efficiency was high, and 100% of shoots produced roots within 12 days under optimal conditions, allowing plant regeneration within approximately 8 weeks. Using this regeneration system, we developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated Impatiens transformation method using in vitro multiple bud cultures as explants and a binary plasmid (pHB2892) bearing gfp and nptII genes. Transgenic Impatiens plants, with a frequency up to 58.9%, were obtained within 12 to 16 weeks from inoculation to transfer of transgenic plants to soil. Transgenic plants were confirmed by Southern blot, phenotypic assays and T1 segregation analysis. Transgene expression was observed in leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruit. The transgenic plants were fertile and phenotypically normal. Conclusion We report the development of a simple and efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for Impatiens. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Impatiens with experimental evidence of stable integration of T-DNA and of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method for plants using in vitro maintained multiple bud cultures as

  11. Analysis of Chromobacterium sp. natural isolates from different Brazilian ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Bittencourt, Cláudia I; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Santos, Fabrício R; Nascimento, Andréa MA

    2007-01-01

    Background Chromobacterium violaceum is a free-living bacterium able to survive under diverse environmental conditions. In this study we evaluate the genetic and physiological diversity of Chromobacterium sp. isolates from three Brazilian ecosystems: Brazilian Savannah (Cerrado), Atlantic Rain Forest and Amazon Rain Forest. We have analyzed the diversity with molecular approaches (16S rRNA gene sequences and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis) and phenotypic surveys of antibiotic resistance and biochemistry profiles. Results In general, the clusters based on physiological profiles included isolates from two or more geographical locations indicating that they are not restricted to a single ecosystem. The isolates from Brazilian Savannah presented greater physiologic diversity and their biochemical profile was the most variable of all groupings. The isolates recovered from Amazon and Atlantic Rain Forests presented the most similar biochemical characteristics to the Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 strain. Clusters based on biochemical profiles were congruent with clusters obtained by the 16S rRNA gene tree. According to the phylogenetic analyses, isolates from the Amazon Rain Forest and Savannah displayed a closer relationship to the Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472. Furthermore, 16S rRNA gene tree revealed a good correlation between phylogenetic clustering and geographic origin. Conclusion The physiological analyses clearly demonstrate the high biochemical versatility found in the C. violaceum genome and molecular methods allowed to detect the intra and inter-population diversity of isolates from three Brazilian ecosystems. PMID:17584942

  12. Characterization and evaluation of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of Streptomyces sp. HUST012 isolated from medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour.

    PubMed Central

    Khieu, Thi-Nhan; Liu, Min-Jiao; Nimaichand, Salam; Quach, Ngoc-Tung; Chu-Ky, Son; Phi, Quyet-Tien; Vu, Thu-Trang; Nguyen, Tien-Dat; Xiong, Zhi; Prabhu, Deene M.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    A highly potent secondary metabolite producing endophytic strain, Streptomyces sp. HUST012 was isolated from the stems of the medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour. Strain HUST012 showed antimicrobial and antitumor activities which were significantly much higher than those of dragon's blood extracted from D. cochinchinensis Lour. On further analysis, the strain was found to produce two metabolites, SPE-B11.8 (elucidated to be a novel metabolite (Z)-tridec-7-ene-1,2,13-tricarboxylic acid) and SPE-B5.4 (elucidated as Actinomycin-D). The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration values of SPE-B11.8 against a set of test bacterial organisms (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermis ATCC 35984, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883) ranged between 15.63 and 62.5 μg/ml while that for SPE-B5.4 ranged between 0.04 and 2.24 μg/ml. The compound SPE-B11.8 showed cytotoxic effect at 41.63 and 29.54 μg/ml IC50-values against Hep G2 and MCF-7, respectively, while the compound SPE-B5.4 exhibited stronger activities against them at 0.23 and 0.18 μg/ml IC50-values. PMID:26106377

  13. Characterization and evaluation of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of Streptomyces sp. HUST012 isolated from medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour.

    PubMed

    Khieu, Thi-Nhan; Liu, Min-Jiao; Nimaichand, Salam; Quach, Ngoc-Tung; Chu-Ky, Son; Phi, Quyet-Tien; Vu, Thu-Trang; Nguyen, Tien-Dat; Xiong, Zhi; Prabhu, Deene M; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    A highly potent secondary metabolite producing endophytic strain, Streptomyces sp. HUST012 was isolated from the stems of the medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour. Strain HUST012 showed antimicrobial and antitumor activities which were significantly much higher than those of dragon's blood extracted from D. cochinchinensis Lour. On further analysis, the strain was found to produce two metabolites, SPE-B11.8 (elucidated to be a novel metabolite (Z)-tridec-7-ene-1,2,13-tricarboxylic acid) and SPE-B5.4 (elucidated as Actinomycin-D). The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration values of SPE-B11.8 against a set of test bacterial organisms (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermis ATCC 35984, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883) ranged between 15.63 and 62.5 μg/ml while that for SPE-B5.4 ranged between 0.04 and 2.24 μg/ml. The compound SPE-B11.8 showed cytotoxic effect at 41.63 and 29.54 μg/ml IC 50-values against Hep G2 and MCF-7, respectively, while the compound SPE-B5.4 exhibited stronger activities against them at 0.23 and 0.18 μg/ml IC 50-values. PMID:26106377

  14. Biological Control of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Colonization, and pAgK84 Transfer with Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 and the Tra- Mutant Strain K1026

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Begonya; Peñalver, Ramón; Asins, María José; López, María M.

    1993-01-01

    The efficacies of Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 and K1026 in root colonization, crown gall control, and plasmid transfer were compared. Levels of root colonization by K84 and K1026 of Montclar and Nemaguard peach seedlings were similar during the 21 days of the experiment. Four strains of A. tumefaciens bv. 1 were used for soil inoculations in biological control experiments on GF677 and Adafuel peach × almond rootstocks; two were sensitive and two were resistant to agrocin 84. Both strains K84 and K1026 were very efficient in controlling the sensitive strains, but some tumors appeared with both treatments. In the biocontrol of resistant strains, no galls were observed in K1026-treated plants, but some K84-treated plants had galls. Recovery of agrobacteria from galls in experiments with sensitive and resistant strains showed that all of the isolates from the controls or K1026-treated plants and most of the isolates from K84-treated plants had the same characteristics as the inoculated strains. Nine isolates from the K84-treated plants growing in soil inoculated with one resistant strain were virulent and produced agrocin 84. These isolates had a plasmid that hybridized with a probe prepared with the BamHI C fragment from pAgK84. These results show the efficiency of K1026 in biocontrol of agrocin 84-sensitive and -resistant strains of A. tumefaciens and suggest the use of K1026 as a safer organism than K84 for biological control of crown gall. Images PMID:16348854

  15. Effects of oakmoss and its components on Acanthamoeba castellanii ATCC 30234 and the uptake of Legionella pneumophila JCM 7571 (ATCC 33152) into A. castellanii.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Harue; Isshiki, Yasunori; Sakuda, Keisuke; Sakuma, Katsuya; Kondo, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii, a ubiquitous organism in water environments, is pathogenic toward humans and also is a host for bacteria of the genus Legionella, a causative agent of legionellosis. Oakmoss, a natural fragrance ingredient, and its components are antibacterial agents specifically against the genus Legionella. In the present study, oakmoss and its components were investigated for their amoebicidal activity against A. castellanii ATCC 30234 and the inhibitory effect on the uptake of L. pneumophila JCM 7571 (ATCC 33152) into A. castellanii. The oakmoss and its components 3-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl 2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylbenzoate(5), and 6,8-dihydroxy-3-pentyl-1H-isochromen-1-one (12) exhibited high amoebicidal activity (IC50 values; 10.5 ± 2.3, 16.3 ± 4.0 and 17.5 ± 2.8 μg/mL, respectively) after 48 h of treatment, which were equivalent to that of the reference compound, chlorhexidine gluconate. Pretreatment of L. pneumophila with sub-minimal inhibitory concentration of oakmoss, compound 5, 3-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-6-methylbenzoate (10) and 8-(2,4-dihydroxy-6-pentylphenoxy)-6-hydroxy-3-pentyl-1H-isochromen-1-one (14) obviously reduced the uptake of L. pneumophila into A.castellanii (p < 0.05).The inhibitory effect of compound 5 on the uptake of L. pneumophila was almost equivalent to that of ampicillin used as a reference. Thus, the oakmoss and its components were considered to be good candidates for disinfectants against not only genus Legionella but also A. castellanii. PMID:25817814

  16. Inhibitory Effects of a Pectin-Enriched Tomato Cell Wall Fraction on Agrobacterium tumefaciens Binding and Tumor Formation 1

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Nicola T.; Binns, Andrew N.; Brandt, Christine

    1987-01-01

    A pectin-enriched soluble cell wall fraction (CWF) prepared from suspension cultured tomato cells inhibits binding of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to these cells. It was hypothesized that the CWF contains the plant surface binding site for A. tumefaciens (NT Neff, AN Binns 1985 Plant Physiol 77: 35-42). Experiments described here demonstrate that tomato CWF inhibited tumor formation on potato slices and Agrobacterium binding to intact tomato cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Boiling the fraction reduced both its binding and tumor inhibitory activities. Tumor inhibitory activity was titrated out by increased concentrations of bacterial inocula with no inhibition apparent at 1 × 108 bacteria per milliliter. These results indicate that a tomato CWF is enriched for a putative A. tumefaciens binding site which may also be involved in tumor formation in potato. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16665282

  17. Origin of somatic embryos from repetitively embryogenic cultures of walnut (Juglans regia L.): Implications forAgrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Polito, V S; McGranahan, G; Pinney, K; Leslie, C

    1989-04-01

    Early stages of somatic embryo development from embryogenic cultures ofJuglans regia (Persian or English walnut) are described. Histological examination reveals that secondary somatic embryos arise from cotyledons and hypocotyls of primary embryos cultured in the dark. The embryos originate by transverse to oblique divisions of surface cells. Single-cell origin of the secondary embryos confirms the potential of the repetitive embryogenesis system forAgrobacterium-mediated transformation and regeneration of non-chimeric, transgenic walnut plants. PMID:24233141

  18. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids. PMID:27222814

  19. Use of Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain 18r12v and paromomycin selection for transformation of Brachypodium distachyon and Brachypodium sylvaticum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collier, Ray; Bragg, Jennifer; Hernandez, Bryan T.; Vogel, John P.; Thilmony, Roger

    2016-05-24

    In this study, the genetic transformation of monocot grasses is a resource intensive process, the quality and efficiency of which is dependent in part upon the method of DNA introduction, as well as the ability to effectively separate transformed from wildtype tissue. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Brachypodium has relied mainly on Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain AGL1. Currently the antibiotic hygromycin B has been the selective agent of choice for robust identification of transgenic calli in Brachypodium distachyon and Brachypodium sylvaticum but few other chemicals have been shown to work as well for selection of transgenic Brachypodium cells in tissue culture. This studymore » demonstrates that Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain 18r12v and paromomycin selection can be successfully used for the efficient generation of transgenic B. distachyon and B. sylvaticurn. Additionally we observed that the transformation rates were similar to or higher than those obtained with A. turnefaciens strain AGL1 and hygromycin selection. The A. rhizogenes strain 18r12v harboring the pARS1 binary vector and paromomycin selection is an effective means of generating transgenic Brachypodium plants. This novel approach will facilitate the transgenic complementation of T-DNA knockout mutants of B. distachyon which were created using hygromycin selection, as well as aid the implementation of more complex genome manipulation strategies which require multiple rounds of transformation.« less

  20. Use of Agrobacterium rhizogenes Strain 18r12v and Paromomycin Selection for Transformation of Brachypodium distachyon and Brachypodium sylvaticum

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Ray; Bragg, Jennifer; Hernandez, Bryan T.; Vogel, John P.; Thilmony, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The genetic transformation of monocot grasses is a resource intensive process, the quality and efficiency of which is dependent in part upon the method of DNA introduction, as well as the ability to effectively separate transformed from wildtype tissue. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Brachypodium has relied mainly on Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain AGL1. Currently the antibiotic hygromycin B has been the selective agent of choice for robust identification of transgenic calli in Brachypodium distachyon and Brachypodium sylvaticum but few other chemicals have been shown to work as well for selection of transgenic Brachypodium cells in tissue culture. This study demonstrates that Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain 18r12v and paromomycin selection can be successfully used for the efficient generation of transgenic B. distachyon and B. sylvaticum. Additionally we observed that the transformation rates were similar to or higher than those obtained with A. tumefaciens strain AGL1 and hygromycin selection. The A. rhizogenes strain 18r12v harboring the pARS1 binary vector and paromomycin selection is an effective means of generating transgenic Brachypodium plants. This novel approach will facilitate the transgenic complementation of T-DNA knockout mutants of B. distachyon which were created using hygromycin selection, as well as aid the implementation of more complex genome manipulation strategies which require multiple rounds of transformation. PMID:27252729

  1. Mature seed-derived callus of the model indica rice variety Kasalath is highly competent in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2010-12-01

    We previously established an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system using primary calli derived from mature seeds of the model japonica rice variety Nipponbare. We expected that the shortened tissue culture period would reduce callus browning--a common problem with the indica transformation system during prolonged tissue culture in the undifferentiated state. In this study, we successfully applied our efficient transformation system to Kasalath--a model variety of indica rice. The Luc reporter system is sensitive enough to allow quantitative analysis of the competency of rice callus for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We unexpectedly discovered that primary callus of Kasalath exhibits a remarkably high competency for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation compared to Nipponbare. Southern blot analysis and Luc luminescence showed that independent transformation events in primary callus of Kasalath occurred successfully at ca. tenfold higher frequency than in Nipponbare, and single copy T-DNA integration was observed in ~40% of these events. We also compared the competency of secondary callus of Nipponbare and Kasalath and again found superior competency in Kasalath, although the identification and subsequent observation of independent transformation events in secondary callus is difficult due to the vigorous growth of both transformed and non-transformed cells. An efficient transformation system in Kasalath could facilitate the identification of QTL genes, since many QTL genes are analyzed in a Nipponbare × Kasalath genetic background. The higher transformation competency of Kasalath could be a useful trait in the establishment of highly efficient systems involving new transformation technologies such as gene targeting. PMID:20853107

  2. Improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and high efficiency of root formation from hypocotyl meristem of spring Brassica napus 'Precocity' cultivar.

    PubMed

    Liu, X X; Lang, S R; Su, L Q; Liu, X; Wang, X F

    2015-01-01

    Rape seed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil seed crops in the world. Genetic manipulation of rapeseed requires a suitable tissue culture system and an efficient method for plant regeneration, as well as an efficient transformation procedure. However, development of transgenic B. napus has been problematic, and current studies are limited to cultivated varieties. In this study, we report a protocol for regeneration of transgenic rape after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of hypocotyls from the spring B. napus 'Precocity' cultivar. We analyzed the effects of plant growth regulators in the medium on regeneration. Additionally, factors affecting the transformation efficiency, including seedling age, Agrobacterium concentration, infection time, and co-cultivation time, were assessed by monitoring GUS expression. Results from these experiments revealed that transformation was optimized when the meristematic parts of the hypocotyls were taken from 8 day-old seedlings, cultured on Murashinge and Skoog basal media containing 0.1 mg/L 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 2.5 mg/L 6-benzylaminopurine, and incubated in Agrobacterium suspension (OD600 = 0.5) for 3 to 5 min, followed by 2 days of co-cultivation. Integration of T-DNA into the plant genome was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), b-glucuronidase histochemical staining, and quantitative real-time PCR. The protocols developed for regeneration, transformation, and rooting described in this study could help to accelerate the development of transgenic spring rape varieties with novel features. PMID:26681030

  3. Chaxamycins A-D, bioactive ansamycins from a hyper-arid desert Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Rateb, Mostafa E; Houssen, Wael E; Arnold, Markus; Abdelrahman, Mostafa H; Deng, Hai; Harrison, William T A; Okoro, Chinyere K; Asenjo, Juan A; Andrews, Barbara A; Ferguson, Gail; Bull, Alan T; Goodfellow, Michael; Ebel, Rainer; Jaspars, Marcel

    2011-06-24

    Streptomyces sp. strain C34, isolated from soil collected in the Chilean hyper-arid Atacama Desert, was cultured on different media, resulting in the isolation and identification of four new ansamycin-type polyketides. The organism was selected for chemical investigation on the basis of a genome-mining PCR-based experiment targeting the gene encoding rifamycin-specific 3-amino-5-hydroxybenzoic acid synthetase (AHBA). The isolated compounds were structurally characterized using NMR and MS techniques and named chaxamycins A-D (1-4). Compounds 1-4 were tested for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and for their ability to inhibit the intrinsic ATPase activity of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Chaxamycin D (4), which showed a selective antibacterial activity against S. aureus ATCC 25923, was tested further against a panel of MRSA clinical isolates. In a virtual screening experiment, chaxamycins A-D (1-4) have also been docked into the ATP-binding pocket in the N-terminal domain of the Hsp90, and the observed interactions are discussed. PMID:21553813

  4. Development of efficient catharanthus roseus regeneration and transformation system using agrobacterium tumefaciens and hypocotyls as explants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As a valuable medicinal plant, Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) produces many terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), such as vindoline, ajamlicine, serpentine, catharanthine, vinblastine and vincristine et al. Some of them are important components of drugs treating cancer and hypertension. However, the yields of these TIAs are low in wild-type plants, and the total chemical synthesis is impractical in large scale due to high-cost and their complicated structures. The recent development of metabolic engineering strategy offers a promising solution. In order to improve the production of TIAs in C. roseus, the establishment of an efficient genetic transformation method is required. Results To develop a genetic transformation method for C. roseus, Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 was employed which harbors a binary vector pCAMBIA2301 containing a report β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene and a selectable marker neomycin phosphotransferase II gene (NTPII). The influential factors were investigated systematically and the optimal transformation condition was achieved using hypocotyls as explants, including the sonication treatment of 10 min with 80 W, A. tumefaciens infection of 30 min and co-cultivation of 2 d in 1/2 MS medium containing 100 μM acetosyringone. With a series of selection in callus, shoot and root inducing kanamycin-containing resistance media, we successfully obtained stable transgenic regeneration plants. The expression of GUS gene was confirmed by histochemistry, polymerase chain reaction, and genomic southern blot analysis. To prove the efficiency of the established genetic transformation system, the rate-limiting gene in TIAs biosynthetic pathway, DAT, which encodes deacetylvindoline-4-O-acetyltransferase, was transferred into C. roseus using this established system and 9 independent transgenic plants were obtained. The results of metabolite analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that

  5. Extraction, purification, and characterization of major outer membrane proteins from Wolinella recta ATCC 33238.

    PubMed Central

    Kennell, W L; Holt, S C

    1991-01-01

    The outer membrane of Wolinella recta ATCC 33238 was isolated by French pressure cell disruption and differential centrifugation. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were solubilized by Zwittergent 3.14 extraction and separated by DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography. The major OMPs that were found in W. recta ATCC 33238 and in several other Wolinella spp. consisted of proteins with apparent molecular masses of 51, 45, and 43 kDa. These three conserved proteins were purified to essential homogeneity by one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and characterized chemically. Heating at between 75 and 100 degrees C revealed both the 43- and 51-kDa proteins to be heat modified from apparent molecular masses of 32 and 38 kDa, respectively. The 45-kDa protein was unmodified at all temperatures tested. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-SDS-PAGE revealed the 51-kDa protein to be composed of multiple pIs between a pH of 5.0 and greater than 8.0 while the 43- and 45-kDa proteins had a pI of approximately 6.0. N'-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of the first 30 to 40 amino acids and search of the Protein Identification Resource data base for similar proteins only revealed the 43-kDa protein to be similar to the P.69 OMP of Bordetella pertussis; however, the homology was weak (33%). Amino acid analysis revealed the 43-kDa protein to be noncharged and the 45- and 51-kDa proteins to be hydrophilic, containing between 38 to 42% polar residues but no cysteine. This study reports the purification and partial characterization of three conserved proteins in W. recta ATCC 33238. Images PMID:1894372

  6. Dynamic proteomic profiling of a unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece ATCC51142 across light-dark diurnal cycles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unicellular cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece are recognized for their ability to execute nitrogen (N2)-fixation in the dark and photosynthesis in the light. An understanding of these mechanistic processes in an integrated systems context should provide insights into how Cyanothece might be optimized for specialized environments and/or industrial purposes. Systems-wide dynamic proteomic profiling with mass spectrometry (MS) analysis should reveal fundamental insights into the control and regulation of these functions. Results To expand upon the current knowledge of protein expression patterns in Cyanothece ATCC51142, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using partial ("unsaturated") metabolic labeling and high mass accuracy LC-MS analysis. This dynamic proteomic profiling identified 721 actively synthesized proteins with significant temporal changes in expression throughout the light-dark cycles, of which 425 proteins matched with previously characterized cycling transcripts. The remaining 296 proteins contained a cluster of proteins uniquely involved in DNA replication and repair, protein degradation, tRNA synthesis and modification, transport and binding, and regulatory functions. Functional classification of labeled proteins suggested that proteins involved in respiration and glycogen metabolism showed increased expression in the dark cycle together with nitrogenase, suggesting that N2-fixation is mediated by higher respiration and glycogen metabolism. Results indicated that Cyanothece ATCC51142 might utilize alternative pathways for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) acquisition, particularly, aspartic acid and glutamate as substrates of C and N, respectively. Utilization of phosphoketolase (PHK) pathway for the conversion of xylulose-5P to pyruvate and acetyl-P likely constitutes an alternative strategy to compensate higher ATP and NADPH demand. Conclusion This study provides a deeper systems level insight into how Cyanothece ATCC51142

  7. Improved penicillin amidase production using a genetically engineered mutant of escherichia coli ATCC 11105

    SciTech Connect

    Robas, N.; Zouheiry, H.; Branlant, G.; Branlant, C. )

    1993-01-05

    Penicillin G amidase (PGA) is a key enzyme for the industrial production of penicillin G derivatives used in therapeutics. Escherichia coli ATCC 11105 is the more commonly used strain for PGA production. To improve enzyme yield, the authors constructed various recombinant E. coli HB 101 and ATCC 11105 strains. For each strain, PGA production was determined for various concentrations of glucose and phenylacetic acid (PAA) in the medium. The E. coli strain, G271, was identified as the best performer (800 U NIPAB/L). This strain was obtained as follows: an E. coli ATCC 11105 mutant (E. coli G133) was first selected based on a low negative effect of glucose on PGA production. This mutant was then transformed with a pBR322 derivative containing the PGA gene. Various experiments were made to try to understand the reason for the high productivity of E. coli G271. The host strain, E. coli G133, was found to be mutated in one (or more) gene(s) whose product(s) act(s) in trans on the PGA gene expression. Its growth is not inhibited by high glucose concentration in the medium. Interestingly, whereas glucose still exerts some negative effect on the PGA production by E. coli G133, PGA production by its transformant (E. coli G271) is stimulated by glucose. The reason for this stimulation is discussed. Transformation of E. coli G133 with a pBR322 derivative containing the HindIII fragment of the PGA gene, showed that the performance of E. coli G271 depends both upon the host strain properties and the plasmid structure. Study of the production by the less efficient E. coli HB101 derivatives brought some light on the mechanism of regulation of the PGA gene.

  8. Evaluating Chemical Mitigation of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 in Animal Feed Ingredients.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Roger A; Huss, Anne R; Aldrich, Gregory C; Stark, Charles R; Jones, Cassandra K

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a potential feed safety hazard in animal feed ingredients. Thermal mitigation of Salmonella spp. during rendering is effective but does not eliminate the potential for cross-contamination. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of chemicals to mitigate postrendering Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 contamination in rendered proteins over time. Treatments were arranged in a 6 × 4 factorial with six chemical treatments and four rendered protein meals. The chemical treatments included (i) control without chemical treatment, (ii) 0.3% commercial formaldehyde product, (iii) 2% essential oil blend, (iv) 2% medium chain fatty acid blend, (v) 3% organic acid blend, and (vi) 1% sodium bisulfate. The four rendered protein meals included (i) feather meal, (ii) blood meal, (iii) meat and bone meal, and (iv) poultry by-product meal. After matrices were chemically treated, they were inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, stored at room temperature, and enumerated via plate counts on days 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 42 postinoculation. The Salmonella concentration in ingredients treated with medium chain fatty acid and commercial formaldehyde were similar to one another (P = 0.23) but were 2 log lower than the control (P < 0.05). Ingredients treated with organic acids and essential oils also had lower Salmonella concentrations than the control (P < 0.05). Time also played a significant role in Salmonella mitigation, because all days except days 14 and 21 (P = 0.92) differed from one another. Rendered protein matrix also affected Salmonella stability, because concentrations in meat and bone meal and blood meal were similar to one another (P = 0.36) but were greater than levels in feather meal and poultry by-product meal (P < 0.05). In summary, chemical treatment and time both mitigated Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, but their effectiveness was matrix dependent. Time and chemical treatment with medium

  9. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus ATCC 33787(T) isolated from seawater with three native megaplasmids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengxia; Wen, Zhongling; Li, Baiyuan; Zeng, Zhenshun; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-08-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus, an opportunistic pathogen, is commonly associated with vibriosis in fish and shellfish and can also cause superficial and ear infections in humans. V. alginolyticus ATCC 33787(T) was originally isolated from seawater and has been used as one of the type strains for exploring the virulence factors of marine bacteria and for developing vaccine against vibriosis. Here we sequenced and assembled the whole genome of this strain, and identified three megaplasmids and three Type VI secretion systems, thus providing useful information for the study of virulence factors and for the development of vaccine for Vibrio. PMID:27211073

  10. Multicenter Investigation of Gepotidacin (GSK2140944) Agar Dilution Quality Control Determinations for Neisseria gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Fedler, Kelley A; Scangarella-Oman, Nicole E; Ross, James E; Flamm, Robert K

    2016-07-01

    Gepotidacin, a novel triazaacenaphthylene antibacterial agent, is the first in a new class of type IIA topoisomerase inhibitors with activity against many biothreat and conventional pathogens, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae To assist ongoing clinical studies of gepotidacin to treat gonorrhea, a multilaboratory quality assurance investigation determined the reference organism (N. gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226) quality control MIC range to be 0.25 to 1 μg/ml (88.8% of gepotidacin MIC results at the 0.5 μg/ml mode). PMID:27161642

  11. Butrepyrazinone, a New Pyrazinone with an Unusual Methylation Pattern from a Ghanaian Verrucosispora sp. K51G

    PubMed Central

    Kyeremeh, Kwaku; Acquah, Kojo Sekyi; Camas, Mustafa; Tabudravu, Jioji; Houssen, Wael; Deng, Hai; Jaspars, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    We report the structural characterization of a new pyrazinone analogue; butrepyrazinone, which was isolated from a new actinomycete strain Verrucosispora sp. K51G recovered from Ghanaian mangrove river sediment. Spectroscopy-guided fractionation led to the isolation of a compound from the fermentation culture and a combination of NMR spectroscopy, high-resolution mass spectrometry and computer-aided calculations revealed that butrepyrazinone (10) possesses an unusual methylation pattern on the pyrazinone ring. Butrepyrazinone (10), however, displayed no antibacterial activity against Gram-positive S. aureus ATCC 25923, the Gram-negative E. coli ATCC 25922 and a panel of clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, suggesting that 10 may act as a signal molecule for this strain. Although the same molecule has been synthesized previously, this is the first report to disclose the discovery of butrepyrazinone (10) from nature. PMID:25325732

  12. Fate of arsenate following arsenite oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Qin, Dong; Zhang, Shengzhe; Wang, Lu; Li, Jingxin; Rensing, Christopher; McDermott, Timothy R; Wang, Gejiao

    2015-06-01

    The fate of arsenate (As(V) ) generated by microbial arsenite (As(III) ) oxidation is poorly understood. Agrobacterium tumefaciens wild-type strain (GW4) was studied to determine how the cell copes with As(V) generated in batch culture. GW4 grown heterotrophically with mannitol used As(III) as a supplemental energy supply as reflected by enhanced growth and increased cellular levels of NADH and ATP. Under low phosphate (Pi) conditions and presence of As(III) oxidation, up to ∼ 50% of the resulting As(V) was taken up and found associated with the periplasm, membrane or cytoplasm fractions of the cells. Arsenic was found associated with proteins and polar lipids, but not in nucleic acids or sugars. Thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis suggested the presence of arsenolipids in membranes, presumably as part of the bilayer structure of the cell membrane and replacing Pi under Pi-limiting conditions. The potential role of a Pi-binding protein (PstS) for As(V) uptake was assessed with the His-tag purified protein. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence spectra analysis suggests that PstS can bind As(V) , but with lower affinity as compared with Pi. In early stationary phase cells, the As(V)  : Pi ratio was approximately 4.3 and accompanied by an altered cell ultrastructure. PMID:24673976

  13. Purification, properties, and sequence of glycerol trinitrate reductase from Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed Central

    Snape, J R; Walkley, N A; Morby, A P; Nicklin, S; White, G F

    1997-01-01

    Glycerol trinitrate (GTN) reductase, which enables Agrobacterium radiobacter to utilize GTN and related explosives as sources of nitrogen for growth, was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme was a 39-kDa monomeric protein which catalyzed the NADH-dependent reductive scission of GTN (Km = 23 microM) to glycerol dinitrates (mainly the 1,3-isomer) with a pH optimum of 6.5, a temperature optimum of 35 degrees C, and no dependence on metal ions for activity. It was also active on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), on isosorbide dinitrate, and, very weakly, on ethyleneglycol dinitrate, but it was inactive on isopropyl nitrate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, ammonium ions, nitrate, or nitrite. The amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence was homologous (42 to 51% identity and 61 to 69% similarity) to those of PETN reductase from Enterobacter cloacae, N-ethylmaleimide reductase from Escherichia coli, morphinone reductase from Pseudomonas putida, and old yellow enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, placing the GTN reductase in the alpha/beta barrel flavoprotein group of proteins. GTN reductase and PETN reductase were very similar in many respects except in their distinct preferences for NADH and NADPH cofactors, respectively. PMID:9401040

  14. Integrative gene transfer in the truffle Tuber borchii by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Brenna, Andrea; Montanini, Barbara; Muggiano, Eleonora; Proietto, Marco; Filetici, Patrizia; Ottonello, Simone; Ballario, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is a powerful tool for reverse genetics and functional genomic analysis in a wide variety of plants and fungi. Tuber spp. are ecologically important and gastronomically prized fungi ("truffles") with a cryptic life cycle, a subterranean habitat and a symbiotic, but also facultative saprophytic lifestyle. The genome of a representative member of this group of fungi has recently been sequenced. However, because of their poor genetic tractability, including transformation, truffles have so far eluded in-depth functional genomic investigations. Here we report that A. tumefaciens can infect Tuber borchii mycelia, thereby conveying its transfer DNA with the production of stably integrated transformants. We constructed two new binary plasmids (pABr1 and pABr3) and tested them as improved transformation vectors using the green fluorescent protein as reporter gene and hygromycin phosphotransferase as selection marker. Transformants were stable for at least 12 months of in vitro culture propagation and, as revealed by TAIL- PCR analysis, integration sites appear to be heterogeneous, with a preference for repeat element-containing genome sites. PMID:24949275

  15. Survival of Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 on various carriers for crown gall control.

    PubMed Central

    Pesenti-Barili, B; Ferdani, E; Mosti, M; Degli-Innocenti, F

    1991-01-01

    Screening was performed on nine carriers to find an improved formulation for Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 cells. The survival data showed that it is possible to preserve A. radiobacter cells on dry solid supports for a long time provided that the storage temperature is 4 degrees C and that the inoculation volume for 4 x 10(9) CFU g-1 is not less than 0.15 ml g of carrier-1. On the other hand, a substantial carrier water content was necessary for room temperature storage. Many materials proved to be suitable as microbial carriers; in some cases, vermiculite allowed long storage times comparable to those reported for peat or carboxymethyl cellulose, which are already employed in some commercial A. radiobacter K84 products. Furthermore, vermiculite assured full and immediate biological activity in the prevention of crown gall, showing that it is suitable for a new formulation of strain K84. A hypothesis to explain the different survival abilities in wet and dry conditions is presented. PMID:1892394

  16. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation as a tool for insertional mutagenesis in medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhuangli; Huang, Chuanhua; Cao, Li; Xie, Cuihong; Han, Richou

    2011-03-01

    Cordyceps militaris is an insect-born fungus with various biological and pharmacological activities. The mutant library of C. militaris was constructed by improved Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT), for the ultimate identification of genes involved in isolate degeneration during fruiting body production. Successful transformation of C. militaris JM4 by A. tumefaciens AGL-1 carrying vector pATMT1 was performed, with efficiency in the range of 30-600 transformants per 1×10(5) conidia. Acetosyringone (AS) supplement in C. militaris ATMT was not necessary during either precultivation or cocultivation. The transformation procedure was optimised based on the ratios between donor A. tumefaciens and recipient conidia, and pH value of cocultivation media. The integration of the hyg gene into C. militaris genome was determined by PCR and Southern blot analysis, suggesting that 67-88% resulting transformants in cultivation conditions with or without AS were inserted by T-DNA and 55-80% were single-copy. Special mutants with altered phenotypes and growth potentials were characterised. The efficient TAIL-PCR approach was established for identifying T-DNA flanking sequences from C. militaris mutants. The successful construction of the mutant library indicated the usefulness of this approach for functional genetic analysis in this important fungus. PMID:21354533

  17. The plant GABA signaling downregulates horizontal transfer of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence plasmid.

    PubMed

    Lang, Julien; Gonzalez-Mula, Almudena; Taconnat, Ludivine; Clement, Gilles; Faure, Denis

    2016-05-01

    In the tumor-inducing (Ti) Agrobacterium tumefaciens, quorum sensing activates the horizontal transfer of the virulent Ti plasmid. In pure culture, this process can be impaired by the A. tumefaciens BlcC lactonase, whose expression is induced by gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). It was therefore hypothesized that host GABA content might modulate quorum sensing and virulence gene dissemination during A. tumefaciens infection. We examined GABA metabolism and transport in Arabidopsis thaliana tumors combining transcriptomic, metabolomic and histological approaches. In addition, using genetically modified plants and bacteria, we evaluated the impact of plant host GABA content on Ti plasmid dissemination. The results showed that GABA and free proline, which acts as an antagonist of GABA uptake in A. tumefaciens, accumulated in wild-type tumors relative to uninfected plant tissues. Moreover, comparisons of tumors induced on Col-0 and her1 plants showed that the increase in the plant GABA : proline ratio was associated with both the upregulated expression of the blcC gene and the decreased dissemination of Ti plasmid in tumor-colonizing A. tumefaciens populations. This work demonstrates experimentally that the variation in the GABA content in plant tumors can interfere with the dissemination of A. tumefaciens Ti plasmids, and therefore highlights plant GABA content as an important trait in the struggle against pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26714842

  18. Successful Agrobacterium mediated transformation of Thielaviopsis basicola by optimizing multiple conditions.

    PubMed

    Tzima, Aliki K; Paplomatas, Epaminondas J; Schoina, Charikleia; Domazakis, Emmanouil; Kang, Seogchan; Goodwin, Paul H

    2014-08-01

    Thielaviopsis basicola is a hemibiotrophic root pathogen causing black root rot in a wide range of economically important crops. Our initial attempts to transform T. basicola using standard Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) protocols were unsuccessful. Successful transformation required the addition of V8 juice (to induce germination of T. basicola chlamydospores) and higher concentrations of acetosyringone in the co-cultivation medium, and of chlamydospores/endoconidia, A. tumefaciens cells during co-cultivation. With these modifications, two T. basicola strains were successfully transformed with the green (egfp) or red (AsRed) fluorescent protein genes. Chlamydospores/endoconidia transformed with the egfp gene exhibited strong green fluorescence, but their fluorescence became weaker as the germ tubes emerged. Transformants harbouring the AsRed gene displayed strong red fluorescence in both chlamydospores/endoconidia and germ tubes. Fluorescent microscopic observations of an AsRed-labelled strain colonizing roots of transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants, which express the actin filaments labelled with EGFP, at 24 hours post inoculation showed varying levels of fungal germination and penetration. At this stage, the infection appeared to be biotrophic with the EGFP-labelled host actin filaments not being visibly degraded, even in host root cells in close contact with the hyphae. This is the first report of ATMT of T. basicola, and the use of an AsRed-labelled strain to directly observe the root infection process. PMID:25110130

  19. Characterization, correction and de novo assembly of an Oxford Nanopore genomic dataset from Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Stéphane; Mudge, Joann; Cameron, Connor; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Anand, Ajith; Fengler, Kevin; Hayes, Kevin; Llaca, Victor; Jones, Todd J.; May, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The MinION is a portable single-molecule DNA sequencing instrument that was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies in 2014, producing long sequencing reads by measuring changes in ionic flow when single-stranded DNA molecules translocate through the pores. While MinION long reads have an error rate substantially higher than the ones produced by short-read sequencing technologies, they can generate de novo assemblies of microbial genomes, after an initial correction step that includes alignment of Illumina sequencing data or detection of overlaps between Oxford Nanopore reads to improve accuracy. In this study, MinION reads were generated from the multi-chromosome genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. Errors in the consensus two-directional (sense and antisense) “2D” sequences were first characterized by way of comparison with an internal reference assembly. Both Illumina-based correction and self-correction were performed and the resulting corrected reads assembled into high-quality hybrid and non-hybrid assemblies. Corrected read datasets and assemblies were subsequently compared. The results shown here indicate that both hybrid and non-hybrid methods can be used to assemble Oxford Nanopore reads into informative multi-chromosome assemblies, each with slightly different outcomes in terms of contiguity and accuracy. PMID:27350167

  20. Identification and localization of transformed cells in agrobacterium tumefaciens-induced plant tumors

    PubMed

    Rezmer; Schlichting; Wachter; Ullrich

    1999-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-induced tumors of dicotyledonous plants consist of well-defined vascular bundle-like structures originating from transformed cells. The current view that 25% of the tumor cells are transformed has been re-investigated by using beta-glucuronidase (gus)-gene-containing wild-type bacteria (A281 p35S gus-int). Regularly growing stem and leaf tumors showed irregular GUS-staining patterns in the different plant species, Ricinus communis L., Cucurbita maxima L., Vicia faba L. and Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier. Variable staining and inconsistency between staining and tumor growth suggested an inhibition of gus expression. By polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses it became evident that gus is also integrated into the DNA of unstainable tumor parts but not expressed. These results and area calculations of tissues unable to contain the bacterial transferred-DNA with gus provide strong evidence that in A. tumefaciens-induced tumors most cells, or even all, are transformed, i.e. ca. 100%. PMID:10550620

  1. The virA promoter is a host-range determinant in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Turk, S C; Nester, E W; Hooykaas, P J

    1993-03-01

    The limited host range (LHR) Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain Ag162 is an isolate with a narrow host range. Introduction of the wide host range (WHR) virA gene is essential for extending the host range to Kalanchoë daigremontiana. In this report we show that the region upstream of the ATG start codon is responsible for the LHR phenomenon and that this is probably due to the non-inducibility of the LHRvirA promoter. By comparing the characteristics of the LHR and WHR VirA receptor proteins, it was found that the LHR VirA protein is able to activate the WHR VirG protein in the presence of acetosyringone and that this acetosyringone-dependent vir-induction is enhanced by the presence of D-glucose, as in the case of WHR VirA proteins. These results indicate that the domains, acting as receptors for sugars and phenolic signals, must be conserved between the LHR and WHR VirA receptor proteins. PMID:8469115

  2. Hfq Influences Multiple Transport Systems and Virulence in the Plant Pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wilms, Ina; Möller, Philip; Stock, Anna-Maria; Gurski, Rosemarie; Lai, Erh-Min

    2012-01-01

    The Hfq protein mediates gene regulation by small RNAs (sRNAs) in about 50% of all bacteria. Depending on the species, phenotypic defects of an hfq mutant range from mild to severe. Here, we document that the purified Hfq protein of the plant pathogen and natural genetic engineer Agrobacterium tumefaciens binds to the previously described sRNA AbcR1 and its target mRNA atu2422, which codes for the substrate binding protein of an ABC transporter taking up proline and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Several other ABC transporter components were overproduced in an hfq mutant compared to their levels in the parental strain, suggesting that Hfq plays a major role in controlling the uptake systems and metabolic versatility of A. tumefaciens. The hfq mutant showed delayed growth, altered cell morphology, and reduced motility. Although the DNA-transferring type IV secretion system was produced, tumor formation by the mutant strain was attenuated, demonstrating an important contribution of Hfq to plant transformation by A. tumefaciens. PMID:22821981

  3. Integrative gene transfer in the truffle Tuber borchii by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is a powerful tool for reverse genetics and functional genomic analysis in a wide variety of plants and fungi. Tuber spp. are ecologically important and gastronomically prized fungi (“truffles”) with a cryptic life cycle, a subterranean habitat and a symbiotic, but also facultative saprophytic lifestyle. The genome of a representative member of this group of fungi has recently been sequenced. However, because of their poor genetic tractability, including transformation, truffles have so far eluded in-depth functional genomic investigations. Here we report that A. tumefaciens can infect Tuber borchii mycelia, thereby conveying its transfer DNA with the production of stably integrated transformants. We constructed two new binary plasmids (pABr1 and pABr3) and tested them as improved transformation vectors using the green fluorescent protein as reporter gene and hygromycin phosphotransferase as selection marker. Transformants were stable for at least 12 months of in vitro culture propagation and, as revealed by TAIL- PCR analysis, integration sites appear to be heterogeneous, with a preference for repeat element-containing genome sites. PMID:24949275

  4. Profound Impact of Hfq on Nutrient Acquisition, Metabolism and Motility in the Plant Pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Philip; Overlöper, Aaron; Förstner, Konrad U.; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Lai, Erh-Min; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    As matchmaker between mRNA and sRNA interactions, the RNA chaperone Hfq plays a key role in riboregulation of many bacteria. Often, the global influence of Hfq on the transcriptome is reflected by substantially altered proteomes and pleiotropic phenotypes in hfq mutants. Using quantitative proteomics and co-immunoprecipitation combined with RNA-sequencing (RIP-seq) of Hfq-bound RNAs, we demonstrate the pervasive role of Hfq in nutrient acquisition, metabolism and motility of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. 136 of 2544 proteins identified by iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) were affected in the absence of Hfq. Most of them were associated with ABC transporters, general metabolism and motility. RIP-seq of chromosomally encoded Hfq3xFlag revealed 1697 mRNAs and 209 non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) associated with Hfq. 56 ncRNAs were previously undescribed. Interestingly, 55% of the Hfq-bound ncRNAs were encoded antisense (as) to a protein-coding sequence suggesting that A. tumefaciens Hfq plays an important role in asRNA-target interactions. The exclusive enrichment of 296 mRNAs and 31 ncRNAs under virulence conditions further indicates a role for post-transcriptional regulation in A. tumefaciens-mediated plant infection. On the basis of the iTRAQ and RIP-seq data, we assembled a comprehensive model of the Hfq core regulon in A. tumefaciens. PMID:25330313

  5. Genetic analysis of nonpathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants arising in crown gall tumors.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, C; Canfield, M L; Moore, L W; Dion, P

    1995-07-01

    Little is known about the effect of the host on the genetic stability of bacterial plant pathogens. Crown gall, a plant disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens, may represent a useful model to study this effect. Indeed, our previous observations on the natural occurrence and origin of nonpathogenic agrobacteria suggest that the host plant might induce loss of pathogenicity in populations of A. tumefaciens. Here we report that five different A. tumefaciens strains initially isolated from apple tumors produced up to 99% nonpathogenic mutants following their reintroduction into axenic apple plants. Two of these five strains were also found to produce mutants on pear and/or blackberry plants. Generally, the mutants of the apple isolate D10B/87 were altered in the tumor-inducing plasmid, harboring either deletions in this plasmid or point mutations in the regulatory virulence gene virG. Most of the mutants originating from the same tumor appeared to be of clonal origin, implying that the host plants influenced agrobacterial populations by favoring growth of nonpathogenic mutants over that of wild-type cells. This hypothesis was confirmed by coinoculation of apple rootstocks with strain D10B/87 and a nonpathogenic mutant. PMID:7601840

  6. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens virD3 gene is not essential for tumorigenicity on plants.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, A M; Das, A

    1992-01-01

    Genetic studies indicate that three of the four polypeptides encoded within the virD operon of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid are essential for virulence. In order to determine whether the fourth polypeptide, VirD3, has any role in virulence, complementation analysis was used. An A. tumefaciens strain, A348 delta D, which lacked the entire virD operon in the Ti plasmid pTiA6, was constructed. Plasmids containing defined regions of the virD operon were introduced into this strain, and virulence was tested by the strains' abilities to form tumors on Kalanchoe leaves, tomato stems, and potato tubers. As expected, deletion of the virD operon led to an avirulent phenotype. The virulence of this strain could be restored by providing virD1, virD2, and virD4 in trans. No requirement for virD3 in tumor formation was observed in these assays. Images PMID:1629176

  7. Agrobacterium rhizogenes-Mediated Transformation of the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Juliane K.; Yoshida, Satoko; Ito, Masaki; Namba, Shigetou; Shirasu, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Background Plants within the Orobanchaceae are an agriculturally important group of parasites that attack economically important crops to obtain water and nutrients from their hosts. Despite their agricultural importance, molecular mechanisms of the parasitism are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed transient and stable transformation systems for Phtheirospermum japonicum, a facultative parasitic plant in the Orobanchaceae. The transformation protocol was established by a combination of sonication and acetosyringone treatments using the hairy-root-inducing bacterium, Agrobacterium rhizogenes and young seedlings. Transgenic hairy roots of P. japonicum were obtained from cotyledons 2 to 3 weeks after A. rhizogenes inoculation. The presence and the expression of transgenes in P. japonicum were verified by genomic PCR, Southern blot and RT-PCR methods. Transgenic roots derived from A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation were able to develop haustoria on rice and maize roots. Transgenic roots also formed apparently competent haustoria in response to 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (DMBQ), a haustorium-inducing chemical. Using this system, we introduced a reporter gene with a Cyclin B1 promoter into P. japonicum, and visualized cell division during haustorium formation. Conclusions We provide an easy and efficient method for hairy-root transformation of P. japonicum. Transgenic marker analysis revealed that cell divisions during haustorium development occur 24 h after DMBQ treatment. The protocols described here will allow functional analysis of genes involved in plant parasitism. PMID:21991355

  8. Establishment of an Agrobacterium-mediated Inoculation System for Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Minji; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Song, Dami; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    The infectious full-length cDNA clones of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolates KW and KOM, which were isolated from watermelon and oriental melon, respectively, were constructed under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. We successfully inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana with the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM by Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration. Virulence and symptomatic characteristics of the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM were tested on several indicator plants. No obvious differences between two cloned isolates in disease development were observed on the tested indicator plants. We also determined full genome sequences of the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM. Sequence comparison revealed that only four amino acids (at positions 228, 699, 1212, and 1238 of the replicase protein region) differ between the cloned isolates KW and KOM. A previous study reported that the isolate KOM could not infect Chenopodium amaranticolor, but the cloned KOM induced chlorotic spots on the inoculated leaves. When compared with the previously reported sequence of the original KOM isolate, the cloned KOM contained one amino acid mutation (Ala to Thr) at position 228 of the replicase protein, suggesting that this mutation might be responsible for induction of chlorotic spots on the inoculated leaves of C. amaranticolor. PMID:26674677

  9. Membrane lipids in Agrobacterium tumefaciens: biosynthetic pathways and importance for pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Meriyem; Danne, Linna; Möller, Philip; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Many cellular processes critically depend on the membrane composition. In this review, we focus on the biosynthesis and physiological roles of membrane lipids in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The major components of A. tumefaciens membranes are the phospholipids (PLs), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cardiolipin, and ornithine lipids (OLs). Under phosphate-limited conditions, the membrane composition shifts to phosphate-free lipids like glycolipids, OLs and a betaine lipid. Remarkably, PC and OLs have opposing effects on virulence of A. tumefaciens. OL-lacking A. tumefaciens mutants form tumors on the host plant earlier than the wild type suggesting a reduced host defense response in the absence of OLs. In contrast, A. tumefaciens is compromised in tumor formation in the absence of PC. In general, PC is a rare component of bacterial membranes but amount to ~22% of all PLs in A. tumefaciens. PC biosynthesis occurs via two pathways. The phospholipid N-methyltransferase PmtA methylates PE via the intermediates monomethyl-PE and dimethyl-PE to PC. In the second pathway, the membrane-integral enzyme PC synthase (Pcs) condenses choline with CDP-diacylglycerol to PC. Apart from the virulence defect, PC-deficient A. tumefaciens pmtA and pcs double mutants show reduced motility, enhanced biofilm formation and increased sensitivity towards detergent and thermal stress. In summary, there is cumulative evidence that the membrane lipid composition of A. tumefaciens is critical for agrobacterial physiology and tumor formation. PMID:24723930

  10. Translation Start Sequences Affect the Efficiency of Silencing of Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA Oncogenes1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyewon; Humann, Jodi L.; Pitrak, Jennifer S.; Cuperus, Josh T.; Parks, T. Dawn; Whistler, Cheryl A.; Mok, Machteld C.; Ream, L. Walt

    2003-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens oncogenes cause transformed plant cells to overproduce auxin and cytokinin. Two oncogenes encode enzymes that convert tryptophan to indole-3-acetic acid (auxin): iaaM (tryptophan mono-oxygenase) and iaaH (indole-3-acetamide hydrolase). A third oncogene (ipt) encodes AMP isopentenyl transferase, which produces cytokinin (isopentenyl-AMP). Inactivation of ipt and iaaM (or iaaH) abolishes tumorigenesis. Because adequate means do not exist to control crown gall, we created resistant plants by introducing transgenes designed to elicit posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of iaaM and ipt. Transgenes that elicit silencing trigger sequence-specific destruction of the inducing RNA and messenger RNAs with related sequences. Although PTGS has proven effective against a variety of target genes, we found that a much higher percentage of transgenic lines silenced iaaM than ipt, suggesting that transgene sequences influenced the effectiveness of PTGS. Sequences required for oncogene silencing included a translation start site. A transgene encoding a translatable sense-strand RNA from the 5′ end of iaaM silenced the iaaM oncogene, but deletion of the translation start site abolished the ability of the transgene to silence iaaM. Silencing A. tumefaciens T-DNA oncogenes is a new and effective method to produce plants resistant to crown gall disease. PMID:12972655

  11. [Establishment of high efficiency genetic transformation system of maize mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens].

    PubMed

    WEI, Kai-Fa

    2009-11-01

    In order to establish high-frequency regeneration and high-efficiency genetic transformation system in maize, the significance of the 11 factors influencing maize embryonic callus induction and 9 factors affecting embryonic callus differentiation was researched by orthogonal experiment. The results showed that genotype had highly significant impact on induction of embryonic callus. The concentration of 6-BA, AgNO3, 2,4-D, ABA, and medium are the significant factors. The Multi-comparison showed that ABA 2 mg/L has a significant influence. Among the callus differentiation factors, the genotype and 6-BA concentration showed a strong main effect, the concentrations of NAA, medium, KT and 2,4-D had significant impacts on callus differentiation. Southern blotting analysis demonstrated that the resistant callus rate under the selection pressure of 25 mg/L hygromycin was a reliable indicator for system optimization in resistance screening. The concentration of acetosyringone (AS) showed sensitive differences among genotypes. The highest transformation rate was found with the optimized combination of 24-25 degrees C for co-culture temperature, 0.7 ODx15 min for Agrobacterium tumefa-ciens concentration and incubation-time, and pH 5.5-6.2. By this optimized combination, the survival rate of resistant calli as an index for the stable transformation rates of inbred lines Huangzao 4 and Zong 31 by introducing GUS gene into maize inbred lines was as high as 48.6% and 46.2%, respectively. PMID:19933098

  12. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penicillium expansum PE-12 and its application in molecular breeding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Qi, Zhen; Wang, Yueyue; Zhang, Fangyuan; Li, Renyong; Yu, Qingsheng; Chen, Xiangbin; Wang, Huojun; Xiong, Xin; Tang, Kexuan

    2013-03-30

    Lipase produced by Penicillium expansum is widely used in laundry detergent and leather industry; however, the absence of an efficient transformation technology sets a major obstacle for further enhancement of its lipase productivity through advanced gene engineering. In this work, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was investigated for P. expansum PE-12 transformation, using hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) as a selectable marker gene. As a result, we revealed that the frequency of transformation surpassed 100 transformants/10(5)condida, most of the integrated T-DNA appeared as a single copy at a random position in chromosomal DNA, and all the transformants showed mitotic stability. Facilitated by this newly established method, for the first time, P. expansum PE-12 was genetically engineered to improve the lipase yield, through a homologous expression vector carrying the endogenous lipase gene (PEL) driven by the strong constitutive promoter of the glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpdA) from Aspergillus nidulans. The highest expression level of the engineered strain reached up to 1700 U/mL, nearly 2-fold of the original industrial strain (900 U/mL). Our reproducible ATMT system has not only revealed the great potential of homologous expression-directed genetic engineering, which is more efficient and specific compared to traditional mutagenesis, but also provided new possibilities and perspectives for any other practical applications of P. expansum-related genetic engineering in the future. PMID:23265791

  13. Structure and function of a decarboxylating Agrobacterium tumefaciens keto-deoxy-d-galactarate dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Taberman, Helena; Andberg, Martina; Parkkinen, Tarja; Jänis, Janne; Penttilä, Merja; Hakulinen, Nina; Koivula, Anu; Rouvinen, Juha

    2014-12-30

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens (At) strain C58 contains an oxidative enzyme pathway that can function on both d-glucuronic and d-galacturonic acid. The corresponding gene coding for At keto-deoxy-d-galactarate (KDG) dehydratase is located in the same gene cluster as those coding for uronate dehydrogenase (At Udh) and galactarolactone cycloisomerase (At Gci) which we have previously characterized. Here, we present the kinetic characterization and crystal structure of At KDG dehydratase, which catalyzes the next step, the decarboxylating hydrolyase reaction of KDG to produce α-ketoglutaric semialdehyde (α-KGSA) and carbon dioxide. The crystal structures of At KDG dehydratase and its complexes with pyruvate and 2-oxoadipic acid, two substrate analogues, were determined to 1.7 Å, 1.5 Å, and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, mass spectrometry was used to confirm reaction end-products. The results lead us to propose a structure-based mechanism for At KDG dehydratase, suggesting that while the enzyme belongs to the Class I aldolase protein family, it does not follow a typical retro-aldol condensation mechanism. PMID:25454257

  14. Key Amino Acids in the Bacterial (6-4) Photolyase PhrB from Agrobacterium fabrum

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Dominik; Wesslowski, Janine; Ma, Hongju; Scheerer, Patrick; Krauß, Norbert; Oberpichler, Inga; Zhang, Fan; Lamparter, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Photolyases can repair pyrimidine dimers on the DNA that are formed during UV irradiation. PhrB from Agrobacterium fabrum represents a new group of prokaryotic (6–4) photolyases which contain an iron-sulfur cluster and a DMRL chromophore. We performed site-directed mutagenesis in order to assess the role of particular amino acid residues in photorepair and photoreduction, during which the FAD chromophore converts from the oxidized to the enzymatically active, reduced form. Our study showed that Trp342 and Trp390 serve as electron transmitters. In the H366A mutant repair activity was lost, which points to a significant role of His366 in the protonation of the lesion, as discussed for the homolog in eukaryotic (6–4) photolyases. Mutants on cysteines that coordinate the Fe-S cluster of PhrB were either insoluble or not expressed. The same result was found for proteins with a truncated C-terminus, in which one of the Fe-S binding cysteines was mutated and for expression in minimal medium with limited Fe concentrations. We therefore assume that the Fe-S cluster is required for protein stability. We further mutated conserved tyrosines that are located between the DNA lesion and the Fe-S cluster. Mutagenesis results showed that Tyr424 was essential for lesion binding and repair, and Tyr430 was required for efficient repair. The results point to an important function of highly conserved tyrosines in prokaryotic (6–4) photolyases. PMID:26489006

  15. A phage display-selected peptide inhibitor of Agrobacterium vitis polygalacturonase.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Kasun, George W; Leonard, Takara; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2016-05-01

    Agrobacterium vitis, the causal agent of crown gall of grapevine, is a threat to viticulture worldwide. A major virulence factor of this pathogen is polygalacturonase, an enzyme that degrades pectin components of the xylem cell wall. A single gene encodes for the polygalacturonase gene. Disruption of the polygalacturonase gene results in a mutant that is less pathogenic and produces significantly fewer root lesions on grapevines. Thus, the identification of peptides or proteins that could inhibit the activity of polygalacturonase could be part of a strategy for the protection of plants against this pathogen. A phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library was used to isolate peptides with a high binding affinity to A. vitis polygalacturonase. These peptides showed sequence similarity to regions of Oryza sativa (EMS66324, Japonica) and Triticum urartu (NP_001054402, wild wheat) polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs). Furthermore, these panning experiments identified a peptide, SVTIHHLGGGS, which was able to reduce A. vitis polygalacturonase activity by 35% in vitro. Truncation studies showed that the IHHL motif alone is sufficient to inhibit A. vitis polygalacturonase activity. PMID:26177065

  16. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells. PMID:26425545

  17. Generation of transgenic plants of a potential oilseed crop Camelina sativa by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chaofu; Kang, Jinling

    2008-02-01

    Camelina sativa is an alternative oilseed crop that can be used as a potential low-cost biofuel crop or a source of health promoting omega-3 fatty acids. Currently, the fatty acid composition of camelina does not uniquely fit any particular uses, thus limit its commercial value and large-scale production. In order to improve oil quality and other agronomic characters, we have developed an efficient and simple in planta method to generate transgenic camelina plants. The method included Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of plants at early flowering stage along with a vacuum infiltration procedure. We used a fluorescent protein (DsRed) as a visual selection marker, which allowed us to conveniently screen mature transgenic seeds from a large number of untransformed seeds. Using this method, over 1% of transgenic seeds can be obtained. Genetic analysis revealed that most of transgenic plants contain a single copy of transgene. In addition, we also demonstrated that transgenic camelina seeds produced novel hydroxy fatty acids by transforming a castor fatty acid hydroxylase. In conclusion, our results provide a rapid means to genetically improve agronomic characters of camelina, including fatty acid profiles of its seed oils. Camelina may serve as a potential industrial crop to produce novel biotechnology products. PMID:17899095

  18. [Transformation of sainfoin by Agrobacterium rhizogenes LBA9402 Bin19 and regeneration of transgenic plants].

    PubMed

    Xu, Z Q; Ma, H J; Hao, J G; Jia, J F

    2000-03-01

    Hypocotyl segments of Onobrychis viciaefolia were transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes LBA9402 which harboured pBin19 and pRi1855. Seedling age and preculture time of hypocotyl segments influenced the transformation frequency. Paper electrophoresis revealed that 70% of single hairy root cultures could synthesize agropine. Calli were induced from hairy root segments on MS medium containing 0-9.05 mumol/L 2,4-D and 0-2.22 mumol/L 6-BA at first, then they were transferred onto MS0 medium without kanamycin for regeneration. Constitution and concentration of phytohormones in callus induction media affected subsequent regeneration of calluses on MS0 medium remarkably. Regeneration frequency and shoot number per callus declined when 2,4-D concentration in callus induction media increased from 4.52 to 9.05 mumol/L, while they ascended when 6-BA in callus induction media increased from 0 to 2.22 mumol/L. On MS medium supplemented with 4.52 mumol/L 2,4-D and 2.22 mumol/L 6-BA, only 14.2% hairy root segments could produce calluses, but the regeneration frequency reached 58.1% and the shoot number per callus was 37.2. In 32 analysed plants regenerated from 8 kanamycin resistant hairy root lines, 25 were nptII positive and showed different copy numbers. PMID:12548853

  19. Structure And Specificity of a Quorum-Quenching Lactonase (AiiB) From Agrobacterium Tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Thomas, P.W.; Momb, J.; Hoang, Q.Q.; Petsko, G.A.; Ringe, D.; Fast, W.

    2009-06-03

    N-Acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) mediated quorum-sensing regulates virulence factor production in a variety of Gram-negative bacteria. Proteins capable of degrading these autoinducers have been called 'quorum-quenching' enzymes, can block many quorum-sensing dependent phenotypes, and represent potentially useful reagents for clinical, agricultural, and industrial applications. The most characterized quorum-quenching enzymes to date are the AHL lactonases, which are metalloproteins that belong to the metallo-beta-lactamase superfamily. Here, we report the cloning, heterologous expression, purification, metal content, substrate specificity, and three-dimensional structure of AiiB, an AHL lactonase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Much like a homologous AHL lactonase from Bacillus thuringiensis, AiiB appears to be a metal-dependent AHL lactonase with broad specificity. A phosphate dianion is bound to the dinuclear zinc site and the active-site structure suggests specific mechanistic roles for an active site tyrosine and aspartate. To our knowledge, this is the second representative structure of an AHL lactonase and the first of an AHL lactonase from a microorganism that also produces AHL autoinducers. This work should help elucidate the hydrolytic ring-opening mechanism of this family of enzymes and also facilitate the design of more effective quorum-quenching catalysts.

  20. An efficient protocol for genetic transformation of Platycodon grandiflorum with Agrobacterium rhizogenes.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam Il; Tuan, Pham Anh; Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Yong Kyoung; Yang, Tae Jin; Park, Sang Un

    2011-04-01

    The balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorum) is a popular traditional medicinal plant used in Korea to treat conditions such as bronchitis, asthma, tuberculosis, diabetes, and inflammatory diseases. Recently, immunopharmacological research identified triterpenoid and saponin as important active compounds in P. grandiflorum. To study and extract these compounds and other metabolites from P. grandiflorum, a technique was developed for producing hairy root cultures, which are a reliable source of plant compounds. To achieve this, the activity of Agrobacterium rhizogenes was exploited, which can transfer DNA segments into plant genomes after infecting them. In this study, the A. rhizogenes strain R1000 was determined that had the highest infection frequency (87.5%) and induced the most hairy roots per plant, and the concentration of antibiotics (75 mg/l kanamycin) was elucidated for selection after transformation. Wild-type and transgenic hairy roots contained various phenolic compounds, although both of them had similar concentrations of phenolic compounds. In the future, the protocols described here should be useful for studying and extracting valuable metabolites such as phenolic compounds from P. grandiflorum hairy root cultures. PMID:21052843

  1. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells. PMID:26425545

  2. Horticultural characteristics of transgenic tobacco expressing the rolC gene from Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, R.; Zimmerman, T.W.; Cordts, J.M.; Footen, K.J. ); Ravelonandro, M. . Station de Pathologie Vegetale)

    1994-09-01

    Wisconsin 38 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf discs were transformed with the disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 101 carrying the rolC gene from A. rhizogenes and NPT II and GUS genes. Shoots that regenerated on kanamycin-containing medium were confirmed as transgenic through GUS assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analyses, and transmission of the foreign genes through the sexual cycle. Transgenic plants were as short as half the height of control plants; were earlier flowering by up to 35 days; and had smaller leaves, shorter internodes, smaller seed capsules, fewer seeds, smaller flowers, and reduced pollen viability. The number of seed capsules, leaf number, and specific root length were similar between transgenic and control plants. Transgenic clones varied in the expression of the rolC-induced growth alterations as did the first generation of seedlings from these clones. Such differences suggested the potential for selecting for different levels of expression. Transformation with the rolC gene presents a potentially useful method of genetically modifying horticultural crops, particularly for flowering date, height, and leaf and flower size. Chemical names used: neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS).

  3. Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of ChiV gene to Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Yang, Qian; Sun, Kening; Tian, Ye; Li, Hulun

    2011-04-01

    As a soil-borne filamentous fungus, Trichoderma harzianum exhibits biological control properties because it parasitizes a large variety of phytopathogenic fungi. In this study, the vectors pBI121 and pCAMBIA1301 and cloning vector pUC18 were used to successfully construct expression vector pCA-GChiV for filamentous fungi transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.The ChiV gene was successfully transferred into the biocontrol fungus T. harzianum with an efficiency of 90-110 transformants per 10(7) spores using A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Putative transformants were analyzed to test the transformation by the southern blot, and the expression of ChiV was detected by reverse transcription PCR. The transformants were co-cultured to assay antifungal activities with Rhizoctonia solani. The inhibition rates of the transformants and no ChiV gene transferred T. harzianum were 98.56% and 82.42%, respectively, on the fourth day.The results showed that the ChiV transformants had significantly higher inhibition activity. PMID:20936373

  4. Hypocotyl-based Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of soybean (Glycine max) and application for RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Wang, Geliang; Xu, Yinong

    2008-07-01

    An efficient system of gene transformation is necessary for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] functional genomics and gene modification by using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. To establish such system, we improved the conditions of tissue culture and transformation for increasing the frequency of adventitious shoots and decreasing the browning and necrosis of hypocotyls. Adding N(6)-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and silver nitrate in culture medium enhanced the shoot formation on hypocotyls. BAP increased the frequency of the hypocotyls containing adventitious shoots, while silver nitrate increased the number of shoots on the hypocotyls. As a result, the number of adventitious shoots on hypocotyls cultured in medium containing both BAP and silver nitrate was 5-fold higher than the controls. Adding antioxidants in co-cultivation medium resulted in a significant decrease in occurrence of browning and necrosis of hypocotyls and increase in levels of beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) gene expression. Histochemical assays showed that the apical meristem of hypocotyls was the "target tissue" for Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of soybean. Gene silencing of functional gene by using RNAi technology was carried out under above conditions. A silencing construct containing an inverted-repeat fragment of the GmFAD2 gene was introduced into soybean by using the A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Several lines with high oleic acid were obtained, in which mean oleic acid content ranged from 71.5 to 81.9%. Our study demonstrates that this transgenic approach could be efficiently used to improve soybean quality and productivity through functional genomics. PMID:18347801

  5. Choline uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the high-affinity ChoXWV transporter.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called "Venus flytrap mechanism" of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  6. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens Transcription Factor BlcR Is Regulated via Oligomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yi; Fiscus, Valena; Meng, Wuyi; Zheng, Zhida; Zhang, Lian-Hui; Fuqua, Clay; Chen, Lingling

    2012-02-08

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens BlcR is a member of the emerging isocitrate lyase transcription regulators that negatively regulates metabolism of {gamma}-butyrolactone, and its repressing function is relieved by succinate semialdehyde (SSA). Our crystal structure showed that BlcR folded into the DNA- and SSA-binding domains and dimerized via the DNA-binding domains. Mutational analysis identified residues, including Phe{sup 147}, that are important for SSA association; BlcR{sup F147A} existed as tetramer. Two BlcR dimers bound to target DNA and in a cooperative manner, and the distance between the two BlcR-binding sequences in DNA was critical for BlcR-DNA association. Tetrameric BlcR{sup F147A} retained DNA binding activity, and importantly, this activity was not affected by the distance separating the BlcR-binding sequences in DNA. SSA did not dissociate tetrameric BlcR{sup F147A} or BlcR{sup F147A}-DNA. As well as in the SSA-binding site, Phe{sup 147} is located in a structurally flexible loop that may be involved in BlcR oligomerization. We propose that SSA regulates BlcR DNA-binding function via oligomerization.

  7. Peptidoglycan Synthesis Machinery in Agrobacterium tumefaciens During Unipolar Growth and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Todd A.; Anderson-Furgeson, James; Zupan, John R.; Zik, Justin J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The synthesis of peptidoglycan (PG) in bacteria is a crucial process controlling cell shape and vitality. In contrast to bacteria such as Escherichia coli that grow by dispersed lateral insertion of PG, little is known of the processes that direct polar PG synthesis in other bacteria such as the Rhizobiales. To better understand polar growth in the Rhizobiales Agrobacterium tumefaciens, we first surveyed its genome to identify homologs of (~70) well-known PG synthesis components. Since most of the canonical cell elongation components are absent from A. tumefaciens, we made fluorescent protein fusions to other putative PG synthesis components to assay their subcellular localization patterns. The cell division scaffolds FtsZ and FtsA, PBP1a, and a Rhizobiales- and Rhodobacterales-specific l,d-transpeptidase (LDT) all associate with the elongating cell pole. All four proteins also localize to the septum during cell division. Examination of the dimensions of growing cells revealed that new cell compartments gradually increase in width as they grow in length. This increase in cell width is coincident with an expanded region of LDT-mediated PG synthesis activity, as measured directly through incorporation of exogenous d-amino acids. Thus, unipolar growth in the Rhizobiales is surprisingly dynamic and represents a significant departure from the canonical growth mechanism of E. coli and other well-studied bacilli. PMID:24865559

  8. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated hairy root induction in endangered Berberis aristata DC.

    PubMed

    Brijwal, Latika; Tamta, Sushma

    2015-01-01

    An efficient protocol for hairy root induction in Berberis aristata DC. was established using two different strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, MTCC 532 and 2364 from IMTECH (Institute of Microbial Technology), Chandigarh, India. The strain 532 was more effective than strain 2364 in hairy root induction and in vitro grown callus (61.11 ± 1.60 % transformation frequency) was found to be suitable explant in comparison to leaves (42.59 ± 0.92 % transformation frequency) and nodal segments (34.25 ± 0.92 % transformation frequency) of in vitro grown microshoots for hairy root induction. The presence of rol A and rol B genes during amplification confirmed the transgenic nature of hairy roots and transformed callus. Transformation frequency of callus was further enhanced (from 61.11 ± 1.60 % to 72.22 ± 1.60 %; when infection time was 1 h) by using acetosyringone (100 µM) during co-cultivation period (48 h) on semisolid MS (Murashige and Skoog) medium. In conclusion, this study describes the protocol for hairy root induction which could further be useful for the production of berberin and may reduce the overharvesting of this endangered species from its natural habitat. PMID:26312208

  9. Lactobacillus brantae sp. nov., isolated from faeces of Canada geese (Branta canadensis).

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Amselle, Megan; Beck, Brian J; Popham, David L; Whittaker, Paul; Wang, Hua; Kerrigan, Elizabeth; Chizhikov, Vladimir E

    2012-09-01

    Three strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from the faeces of apparently healthy wild Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in 2010 by cultivating faecal LAB on Rogosa SL agar under aerobic conditions. These three isolates were found to share 99.9 % gene sequence similarity of their 16S rRNA, their 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer region (ITS), partial 23S rRNA, rpoB, rpoC, rpoA and pheS gene sequences. However, the three strains exhibited lower levels of sequence similarity of these genetic targets to all known LAB, and the phylogenetically closest species to the geese strains were Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus saniviri. In comparison to L. casei ATCC 393(T), L. paracasei ATCC 25302(T), L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469(T) and L. saniviri DSM 24301(T), the novel isolates reacted uniquely in tests for cellobiose, galactose, mannitol, citric acid, aesculin and dextrin, and gave negative results in tests for l-proline arylamidase and l-pyrrolydonyl-arylamidase, and in the Voges-Proskauer test. Biochemical tests for cellobiose, aesculin, galactose, gentiobiose, mannitol, melezitose, ribose, salicin, sucrose, trehalose, raffinose, turanose, amygdalin and arbutin could be used for differentiation between L. saniviri and the novel strains. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, and phylogenetic data, the three isolates represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus brantae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SL1108(T) (= ATCC BAA-2142(T) = LMG 26001(T) = DSM 23927(T)) and two additional strains are SL1170 and SL60106. PMID:22021580

  10. Genomic and genetic characterization of the bile stress response of probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Kristi; Versalovic, James; Roos, Stefan; Britton, Robert A

    2008-03-01

    Probiotic bacteria encounter various stresses after ingestion by the host, including exposure to the low pH in the stomach and bile in the small intestine. The probiotic microorganism Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 has previously been shown to survive in the human small intestine. To address how L. reuteri can resist bile stress, we performed microarray experiments to determine gene expression changes that occur when the organism is exposed to physiological concentrations of bile. A wide variety of genes that displayed differential expression in the presence of bile indicated that the cells were dealing with several types of stress, including cell envelope stress, protein denaturation, and DNA damage. Mutations in three genes were found to decrease the strain's ability to survive bile exposure: lr1864, a Clp chaperone; lr0085, a gene of unknown function; and lr1516, a putative esterase. Mutations in two genes that form an operon, lr1584 (a multidrug resistance transporter in the major facilitator superfamily) and lr1582 (unknown function), were found to impair the strain's ability to restart growth in the presence of bile. This study provides insight into the possible mechanisms that L. reuteri ATCC 55730 may use to survive and grow in the presence of bile in the small intestine. PMID:18245259

  11. Phosphoketolase pathway dominates in Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 containing dual pathways for glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Arsköld, Emma; Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke; Cao, Rong; Roos, Stefan; Rådström, Peter; van Niel, Ed W J

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic flux analysis indicated that the heterofermentative Lactobacillus reuteri strain ATCC 55730 uses both the Embden-Meyerhof pathway (EMP) and phosphoketolase pathway (PKP) when glucose or sucrose is converted into the three-carbon intermediate stage of glycolysis. In all cases studied, the main flux is through the PKP, while the EMP is used as a shunt. In the exponential growth phase, 70%, 73%, and 84% of the flux goes through the PKP in cells metabolizing (i) glucose plus fructose, (ii) glucose alone, and (iii) sucrose alone, respectively. Analysis of the genome of L. reuteri ATCC 55730 confirmed the presence of the genes for both pathways. Further evidence for the simultaneous operation of two central carbon metabolic pathways was found through the detection of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, phosphofructokinase, and phosphoglucoisomerase activities and the presence of phosphorylated EMP and PKP intermediates using in vitro 31P NMR. The maximum specific growth rate and biomass yield obtained on glucose were twice as low as on sucrose. This was the result of low ATP levels being present in glucose-metabolizing cells, although the ATP production flux was as high as in sucrose-metabolizing cells due to a twofold increase of enzyme activities in both glycolytic pathways. Growth performance on glucose could be improved by adding fructose as an external electron acceptor, suggesting that the observed behavior is due to a redox imbalance causing energy starvation. PMID:17965151

  12. In silico analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 metabolic response to an external electron supply.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Roberto; Acevedo, Alejandro; Quintero, Julián; Paredes, Ivan; Conejeros, Raúl; Aroca, Germán

    2016-02-01

    The biological production of butanol has become an important research field and thanks to genome sequencing and annotation; genome-scale metabolic reconstructions have been developed for several Clostridium species. This work makes use of the iCAC490 model of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 to analyze its metabolic capabilities and response to an external electron supply through a constraint-based approach using the Constraint-Based Reconstruction Analysis Toolbox. Several analyses were conducted, which included sensitivity, production envelope, and phenotypic phase planes. The model showed that the use of an external electron supply, which acts as co-reducing agent along with glucose-derived reducing power (electrofermentation), results in an increase in the butanol-specific productivity. However, a proportional increase in the butyrate uptake flux is required. Besides, the uptake of external butyrate leads to the coupling of butanol production and growth, which coincides with results reported in literature. Phenotypic phase planes showed that the reducing capacity becomes more limiting for growth at high butyrate uptake fluxes. An electron uptake flux allows the metabolism to reach the growth optimality line. Although the maximum butanol flux does not coincide with the growth optimality line, a butyrate uptake combined with an electron uptake flux would result in an increased butanol volumetric productivity, being a potential strategy to optimize the production of butanol by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. PMID:26650720

  13. Distinct adhesion of probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 to rat intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Saxami, Georgia; Ypsilantis, Petros; Sidira, Marianthi; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Galanis, Alex

    2012-08-01

    Adhesion to the intestine represents a critical parameter for probiotic action. In this study, the adhesion ability of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 to the gastrointestinal tract of Wistar rats was examined after single and daily administration of fermented milk containing either free or immobilized cells on apple pieces. The adhesion of the probiotic cells at the large intestine (cecum and colon) was recorded at levels ≥6 logCFU/g (suggested minimum levels for conferring a probiotic effect) following daily administration for 7 days by combining microbiological and strain-specific multiplex PCR analysis. Single dose administration resulted in slightly reduced counts (5 logCFU/g), while they were lower at the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum) (≤3 logCFU/g), indicating that adhesion was a targeted process. Of note, the levels of L. casei ATCC 393 were enhanced in the cecal and colon fluids both at single and daily administration of immobilized cells (6 and 7 logCFU/g, respectively). The adhesion of the GI tract was transient and thus daily consumption of probiotic products containing the specific strain is suggested as an important prerequisite for retaining its levels at an effective concentration. PMID:22554894

  14. Global transcriptome analysis of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 in response to silver nitrate stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using Bacillus cereus strains. Earlier, we had synthesized monodispersive crystalline silver nanoparticles using B. cereus PGN1 and ATCC14579 strains. These strains have showed high level of resistance to silver nitrate (1 mM) but their global transcriptomic response has not been studied earlier. In this study, we investigated the cellular and metabolic response of B. cereus ATCC14579 treated with 1 mM silver nitrate for 30 & 60 min. Global expression profiling using genomic DNA microarray indicated that 10% (n = 524) of the total genes (n = 5234) represented on the microarray were up-regulated in the cells treated with silver nitrate. The majority of genes encoding for chaperones (GroEL), nutrient transporters, DNA replication, membrane proteins, etc. were up-regulated. A substantial number of the genes encoding chemotaxis and flagellar proteins were observed to be down-regulated. Motility assay of the silver nitrate treated cells revealed reduction in their chemotactic activity compared to the control cells. In addition, 14 distinct transcripts overexpressed from the 'empty' intergenic regions were also identified and proposed as stress-responsive non-coding small RNAs. PMID:22071005

  15. Using an established pre adipose cell line (ATCC CL 173) for studying chromium metabolism and biopotency

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, D.G.; Azuka, C. ); Johnson, B. )

    1991-03-15

    Studies concerning the mechanism by which chromium enhances insulin action and identification of chromium compounds which have high glucose tolerance factor activity have been limited by biological testing methods. The isolated rat adipose tissue assay has been commonly used. The pre-adipose cell line (ATCC CL 173) has many advantages over the isolated rat adipose tissue method including: uniformity of cells; increased viability of the cell cultures; can readily be grown in a low chromium media with a cell doubling time of about 18 hours; studies can be made on rapidly multiplying cells or on mature adipose cells and using rate of cell number increase, percent attachment of cells or cultures in an Omni Spec instrument avoid the use of radio labeled compounds. The ATCC CL 173 pre adipose cell line has been used to evaluate various chromium compounds for insulin like and insulin enhancing activity using physiological and pharmacological chromium levels. Rapidly dividing cells and mature adipose cells do not always react similarly with the same chromium compound. Cell response to a chromium compound and/or insulin also differs based on the growth media in which the cells have been maintained. Duration of metabolic studies as well as metabolite chosen also influence cellular response to chromium and insulin. Using this method for biological testing several chromium compounds have shown insulin like activity and a few show actual insulin potentiation.

  16. Assessment of in vitro removal of cholesterol oxidation products by Lactobacillus casei ATCC334.

    PubMed

    Machorro-Méndez, I A; Hernández-Mendoza, A; Cardenia, V; Rodriguez-Estrada, M T; Lercker, G; Spinelli, F; Cellini, A; García, H S

    2013-11-01

    Cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) are a group of compounds formed during processing and storage of foods from animal origin. After ingestion, COPs are absorbed in the intestine and can be distributed to serum and various tissues, potentially promoting a variety of toxic effects. Therefore, inhibition of their intestinal absorption may contribute to reduce the health risks associated with dietary intake of COPs. Some studies have shown that drugs and dietary compounds may inhibit the intestinal absorption of dietary COPs. However, proven cholesterol- and/or food toxins-binding lactic acid bacteria have not been previously evaluated as potential COPs removal agents. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of Lactobacillus casei ATCC334 to remove COPs in aqueous solution. Results showed the ability of both growing and resting cells to remove COPs (ca. 30-60%). All COPs-bacterium interactions were specific and partly reversible, being resting cells the most efficient for COPs removal in a ranking order of 7-KC > 7α-OH/7β-OH > triol > 5,6β-EP > 5,6α-EP > 25-OH. Binding to the cell wall and/or cell membrane incorporation appears to be the most likely mechanisms involved on COPs removal by L. casei ATCC 334. PMID:23848962

  17. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Virulent Phage of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Lan, Yu; Jiao, Wenchao; Li, Yijing; Tang, Lijie; Jiang, Yanping; Cui, Wen; Qiao, Xinyuan

    2015-12-01

    A new virulent phage (Lcb) of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 was isolated from Chinese sauerkraut. It was specific to L. casei ATCC 393. Electron micrograph revealed that it had an icosahedral head (60.2 ± 0.8 nm in diameter) and a long tail (251 ± 2.6 nm). It belonged to the Siphoviridae family. The genome of phage Lcb was estimated to be approximately 40 kb and did not contain cohesive ends. One-step growth kinetics of its lytic development revealed latent and burst periods of 75 and 45 min, respectively, with a burst size of 16 PFU per infected cell. The phage was able to survive in a pH range between 4 and 11. However, a treatment of 70 °C for 30 min and 75% ethanol or isopropanol for 20 min was observed to inactivate phage Lcb thoroughly. The presence of both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) showed a little influence on phage adsorption, but they were indispensable to gain complete lysis and improve plaque formation. The adsorption kinetics were similar on viable or nonviable cells, and high adsorption rates maintained between 10 and 37 °C. The highest adsorption rate was at 30 °C. This study increased the knowledge on phages of L. casei. The characterization of phage Lcb is helpful to establish a basis for adopting effective strategies to control phage attack in industry. PMID:26123178

  18. Heterologous expression of Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 cephamycin C gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Burgo, Y; Álvarez-Álvarez, R; Pérez-Redondo, R; Liras, P

    2014-09-30

    The Streptomyces clavuligerus cephamycin C gene cluster has been subcloned in a SuperCos-derived cosmid and introduced in Streptomyces flavogriseus ATCC 33331, Streptomyces coelicolor M1146 and Streptomyces albus J1074. The exconjugant strains were supplemented with an additional copy of the S. clavuligerus cephamycin regulatory activator gene, ccaRC, expressed from the constitutive Pfur promoter. Only S. flavogriseus-derived exconjugants produced a compound active against Escherichia coli ESS22-31 that was characterized by HPLC-MS as cephamycin C. The presence of an additional ccaR copy resulted in about 40-fold increase in cephamycin C production. Optimal heterologous cephamycin C production was in the order of 9% in relation to that of S. clavuligerus ATCC 27064. RT-qPCR studies indicated that ccaRC expression in S. flavogriseus::[SCos-CF] was 7% of that in S. clavuligerus and increased to 47% when supplemented with a copy of Pfur-ccaR. The effect on cephamycin biosynthesis gene expression was thus improved but not in an uniform manner for every gene. In heterologous strains, integration of the cephamycin cluster results in a ccaR-independent increased resistance to penicillin, cephalosporin and cefoxitin, what corresponds well to the strong expression of the pcbR and pbpA genes in S. flavogriseus-derived strains. PMID:24975573

  19. Next-generation sequencing-based transcriptome analysis of L-lysine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 21300 strain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Il; Nam, Jae-Young; Cho, Jae-Yong; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, 151 genes showed a significant change in their expression levels in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 21300 compared with those of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032. Of these 151 genes, 56 genes (2%) were up-regulated and 95 genes (3%) were down-regulated. RNA sequencing analysis also revealed that 11 genes, involved in the L-lysine biosynthetic pathway of C. glutamicum, were up- or down-regulated compared with those of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032. Of the 151 genes, 10 genes were identified to have mutations including SNP (9 genes) and InDel (1 gene). This information will be useful for genome breeding of C. glutamicum to develop an industrial amino acid-producing strain with minimal mutation. PMID:24385368

  20. New Polyphenols from a Deep Sea Spiromastix sp. Fungus, and Their Antibacterial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Siwen; Liu, Dong; Proksch, Peter; Shao, Zongze; Lin, Wenhan

    2015-01-01

    Eleven new polyphenols namely spiromastols A–K (1–11) were isolated from the fermentation broth of a deep sea-derived fungus Spiromastix sp. MCCC 3A00308. Their structures were determined by extensive NMR data and mass spectroscopic analysis in association with chemical conversion. The structures are classified as diphenyl ethers, diphenyl esters and isocoumarin derivatives, while the n-propyl group in the analogues is rarely found in natural products. Compounds 1–3 exhibited potent inhibitory effects against a panel of bacterial strains, including Xanthomanes vesicatoria, Pseudomonas lachrymans, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Ralstonia solanacearum, Bacillus thuringensis, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 0.25 to 4 µg/mL. The structure-activity relationships are discussed, while the polychlorinated analogues 1–3 are assumed to be a promising structural model for further development as antibacterial agents. PMID:25913707

  1. Potential contribution of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain 51142, to a bioregenerative life support system.

    PubMed

    Arieli, B; Schneegurt, M A; Sherman, L A

    1996-01-01

    Long-duration manned space missions will likely require the development of bioregenerative means of life support. Such a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) would use higher plants to provide food and a breathable atmosphere for the crew and employ a waste processing system to recover elements for recycling. The current study identifies ways in which a cyanobacterial component may enhance the sustainability of a space-deployed CELSS, including balancing CO2/O2 gas exchange, production of bioavailable N, dietary supplementation, and contingency against catastrophic failure of the higher plant crops. Relevant quantitative data have been collected about the cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142, a large, aerobic, unicellular diazotroph. This organism grew rapidly (466 g dry wt. m-3 d-1) and under diverse environmental conditions, was amenable to large-scale culture, could be grown with relative energy efficiency (3.8% conversion), could actively fix atmospheric N2 (35.0 g m-3 d-1), could survive extreme environmental insults, and exhibited gas exchange properties (assimilatory quotient of 0.49) that may be useful for correcting the gas exchange ratio imbalances observed between humans and higher plants. It is suggested that a diazotrophic cyanobacterium, like Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142, may be a safe, effective, and renewable complement or alternative to physicochemical backup systems in a CELSS. PMID:11538563

  2. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Aneurinibacillus migulanus ATCC 9999T (DSM 2895), a Gramicidin S-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Garden Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie-ping; Liu, Guo-hong; Ge, Ci-bin; Xiao, Rong-feng; Zheng, Xue-fang; Shi, Huai

    2015-01-01

    Aneurinibacillus migulanus ATCC 9999T (DSM 2895) is a Gram-positive, round-spore-forming, and gramicidin S-producing bacterium. Here, we report the 6.35-Mb high-quality draft genome sequence of A. migulanus ATCC 9999T, which will provide useful information for the genomic taxonomy and phylogenomics of Bacillus-like bacteria. PMID:26494674

  3. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Aneurinibacillus migulanus ATCC 9999T (DSM 2895), a Gramicidin S-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Garden Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-Ping; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guo-Hong; Ge, Ci-Bin; Xiao, Rong-Feng; Zheng, Xue-Fang; Shi, Huai

    2015-01-01

    Aneurinibacillus migulanus ATCC 9999(T) (DSM 2895) is a Gram-positive, round-spore-forming, and gramicidin S-producing bacterium. Here, we report the 6.35-Mb high-quality draft genome sequence of A. migulanus ATCC 9999(T), which will provide useful information for the genomic taxonomy and phylogenomics of Bacillus-like bacteria. PMID:26494674

  4. The development of plasmid-free strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens by using incompatibility with a Rhizobium meliloti plasmid to eliminate pAtC58.

    PubMed

    Hynes, M F; Simon, R; Pühler, A

    1985-03-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains LBA275 and LBA290 were cured of their cryptic plasmid pAtC58 by the introduction of the Rhizobium meliloti plasmid pRme41a, which is incompatible with pAtC58. pRme41a and pTiC58, the resident Ti plasmid of LBA275, were subsequently eliminated by growth at supraoptimal temperature (40 degrees C). The resulting plasmid-free Agrobacterium strains, UBAPF1 and UBAPF2, have proved extremely useful for the study of Rhizobium plasmids. The loss of the cryptic plasmid pAtC58 has no effect on the tumor-forming ability of the Agrobacterium strains; when the Ti plasmid is present, normal tumors are formed on Kalanchoe daigremontiana. PMID:4001194

  5. Transformation of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) via sonication and vacuum infiltration of germinated seeds with Agrobacterium harboring a group 3 LEA gene from B. napus.

    PubMed

    Park, Byong-Jin; Liu, Zaochang; Kanno, Akira; Kameya, Toshiaki

    2005-10-01

    A protocol for producing transgenic radish (Raphanus sativus) was obtained by using both ultrasonic and vacuum infiltration assisted, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The Agrobacterium strain LBA4404 contained the binary vector pBI121-LEA (late embyogenesis abundant), which carried a Group 3 LEA gene, from Brassica napus. Among six combinations, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation assisted by a combination of 5-min sonication with 5-min vacuum infiltration resulted in the highest transformation frequency. The existence, integration and expression of transferred LEA gene in transgenic T(1) plants were confirmed by PCR, genomic Southern and Western blot analysis. Transgenic radish demonstrated better growth performance than non-transformed control plants under osmotic and salt stress conditions. Accumulation of Group 3 LEA protein in the vegetative tissue of transgenic radish conferred increased tolerance to water deficit and salt stress. PMID:15843933

  6. Mechanisms and regulation of surface interactions and biofilm formation in Agrobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Jason E.; Wang, Yi; Heckel, Brynn C.; Mohari, Bitan; Feirer, Nathan; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-01-01

    For many pathogenic bacteria surface attachment is a required first step during host interactions. Attachment can proceed to invasion of host tissue or cells or to establishment of a multicellular bacterial community known as a biofilm. The transition from a unicellular, often motile, state to a sessile, multicellular, biofilm-associated state is one of the most important developmental decisions for bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens genetically transforms plant cells by transfer and integration of a segment of plasmid-encoded transferred DNA (T-DNA) into the host genome, and has also been a valuable tool for plant geneticists. A. tumefaciens attaches to and forms a complex biofilm on a variety of biotic and abiotic substrates in vitro. Although rarely studied in situ, it is hypothesized that the biofilm state plays an important functional role in the ecology of this organism. Surface attachment, motility, and cell division are coordinated through a complex regulatory network that imparts an unexpected asymmetry to the A. tumefaciens life cycle. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which A. tumefaciens associates with surfaces, and regulation of this process. We focus on the transition between flagellar-based motility and surface attachment, and on the composition, production, and secretion of multiple extracellular components that contribute to the biofilm matrix. Biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens is linked with virulence both mechanistically and through shared regulatory molecules. We detail our current understanding of these and other regulatory schemes, as well as the internal and external (environmental) cues mediating development of the biofilm state, including the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, nutrient levels, and the role of the plant host in influencing attachment and biofilm formation. A. tumefaciens is an important model system contributing to our understanding of developmental transitions, bacterial cell biology, and biofilm formation

  7. Host range conferred by the virulence-specifying plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Loper, J E; Kado, C I

    1979-01-01

    The host range of Agrobacterium tumefaciens 1D1109, known to induce crown gall only on grapevine (Vitis spp.), was extended to include many plant species by transferring a tumor-inducing plasmid (pTi) from strain 1D1, a broad-host-range pathogen. The pTi plasmid was mobilized by the conjugative plasmid pRK2, which was inserted into 1D1 by mating with Escherichia coli J53(pRK2). The resulting transconjugants were screened for their ability to induce crown gall tumors on hosts other than grapevine by inoculation into sunflower. Transconjugants that were virulent on sunflower were then tested on 36 different host plants and compared with host-limited strain 1D1109 and the donor strain. Two transconjugants induced tumors on the same 28 plant species as those of the original plasmid donor 1D1(pRK2) (pTi). These results show that pRK2 promoted transfer of the pTi plasmid and suggest that the pTi plasmid rather than the A. tumefaciens chromosome determined the host range of the pathogen. Insertion of pRK2 alone did not extend the host range of strain 1D1109. Insertion of pS-a into A. tumefaciens 1D1 by mating with E. coli J53-1 (pS-a) resulted in the concomitant loss of pTi and virulence. There appears to be incompatibility between pTi and pS-a. Images PMID:457613

  8. Structural Analysis of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase From the Bacterium Agrobacterium Tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Cupp-Vickery, J.R.; Igarashi, R.Y.; Perez, M.; Poland, M.; Meyer, C.R.

    2009-05-14

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGlc PPase) catalyzes the conversion of glucose 1-phosphate and ATP to ADP-glucose and pyrophosphate. As a key step in glucan synthesis, the ADPGlc PPases are highly regulated by allosteric activators and inhibitors in accord with the carbon metabolism pathways of the organism. Crystals of Agrobacterium tumefaciens ADPGlc PPase were obtained using lithium sulfate as a precipitant. A complete anomalous selenomethionyl derivative X-ray diffraction data set was collected with unit cell dimensions a = 85.38 {angstrom}, b = 93.79 {angstrom}, and c = 140.29 {angstrom} ({alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90{sup o}) and space group I{sub 222}. The A. tumefaciens ADPGlc PPase model was refined to 2.1 {angstrom} with an R{sub factor} = 22% and R{sub free} = 26.6%. The model consists of two domains: an N-terminal {alpha}{beta}{alpha} sandwich and a C-terminal parallel {beta}-helix. ATP and glucose 1-phosphate were successfully modeled in the proposed active site, and site-directed mutagenesis of conserved glycines in this region (G20, G21, and G23) resulted in substantial loss of activity. The interface between the N- and the C-terminal domains harbors a strong sulfate-binding site, and kinetic studies revealed that sulfate is a competitive inhibitor for the allosteric activator fructose 6-phosphate. These results suggest that the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains binds the allosteric regulator, and fructose 6-phosphate was modeled into this region. The A. tumefaciens ADPGlc PPase/fructose 6-phosphate structural model along with sequence alignment analysis was used to design mutagenesis experiments to expand the activator specificity to include fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The H379R and H379K enzymes were found to be activated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate.

  9. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-Mediated Transformation for Investigation of Somatic Recombination in the Fungal Pathogen Armillaria mellea▿

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Fujiyoshi, Phillip; Foster, Gary D.; Bailey, Andy M.

    2010-01-01

    Armillaria root disease is one of the most damaging timber and fruit tree diseases in the world. Despite its economic importance, many basic questions about the biology of the causal fungi, Armillaria spp., are unanswered. For example, Armillaria undergoes matings between diploid and haploid mycelia, which can result in a recombinant diploid without meiosis. Evidence of such somatic recombination in natural populations suggests that this reproductive mode may affect the pathogen's ecology. Investigations of the mechanisms and adaptive consequences of somatic recombination are, however, hampered by the lack of a method to reliably synthesize somatic recombinants. Here we report the first genetic transformation system for the genus Armillaria. We transformed A. mellea with selective markers for use in diploid-haploid matings to reliably synthesize somatic recombinants. This was accomplished with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying pBGgHg, which carries the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hph). hph was integrated into transformants, as evidenced by serial transfer to selective media, PCR, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and Southern hybridization. Nuclear and mitochondrial markers were developed to genotype synthesized mycelia. In matings between a wild-type diploid and hygromycin-resistant haploids (transgenic), we identified recombinant, hygromycin-resistant diploids and, additionally, hygromycin-resistant triploids, all with the mitochondrial haplotype of the haploid partner. Our approach created no mycelium in which the haploid nucleus was replaced by the diploid nucleus, the typical outcome of diploid-haploid matings in Armillaria. This genetic transformation system, in combination with new markers to track chromosomal and cytoplasmic inheritance in A. mellea, will advance research aimed at characterizing the significance of somatic recombination in the ecology of this important fungus. PMID:20952653

  10. Enhanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of embryogenic calli of upland cotton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianzhen; Wu, Shen-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of cotton embryogenic calli (EC) was enhanced by choosing appropriate EC and improving efficiency of coculture, selection cultivation, and plant regeneration. The binary vector pBI121 (containing a neomycin phosphotransferase II gene npt-II as a selection marker and a uidA gene as a reporter gene) was used to research transformation efficiency. After 48 h cocultivation, the number of β-glucuronidase (GUS)-positive calli characterized by yellow, loose, and fine-grained EC was twofold greater than that of gray, brown, and coarse granule EC. It indicated that the efficiency of transient transformation was affected by EC morphology. Transient transformation efficiency also was improved by cocultivation on the medium by adding 50 mg/L acetosyringone at 19°C for 48 h. Subculturing EC on the selection medium with low cell density increased the production of kanamycin-resistant (Km-R) calli lines. From an original 0.3 g EC, an average of 20 Km-R calli lines were obtained from a selection dish, and the GUS-positive rate of Km-R clones was 81.97%. A large number of normal plants were rapidly regenerated on the differentiation medium with dehydration treatments, and the GUS-positive rate of regeneration plants was about 72.6%. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of GUS-positive plantlets revealed a 100% positive detection rate for neomycin phosphotransferase II gene and gus gene. Southern blot of transgenic plants regenerated from different Km-R calli lines demonstrated that the target gene, mostly with the low copy number, was integrated into the cotton genome. PMID:22351014

  11. A Photolyase-Like Protein from Agrobacterium tumefaciens with an Iron-Sulfur Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Oberpichler, Inga; Pierik, Antonio J.; Wesslowski, Janine; Pokorny, Richard; Rosen, Ran; Vugman, Michal; Zhang, Fan; Neubauer, Olivia; Ron, Eliora Z.; Batschauer, Alfred; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    Photolyases and cryptochromes are evolutionarily related flavoproteins with distinct functions. While photolyases can repair UV-induced DNA lesions in a light-dependent manner, cryptochromes regulate growth, development and the circadian clock in plants and animals. Here we report about two photolyase-related proteins, named PhrA and PhrB, found in the phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PhrA belongs to the class III cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyases, the sister class of plant cryptochromes, while PhrB belongs to a new class represented in at least 350 bacterial organisms. Both proteins contain flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a primary catalytic cofactor, which is photoreduceable by blue light. Spectral analysis of PhrA confirmed the presence of 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) as antenna cofactor. PhrB comprises also an additional chromophore, absorbing in the short wavelength region but its spectrum is distinct from known antenna cofactors in other photolyases. Homology modeling suggests that PhrB contains an Fe-S cluster as cofactor which was confirmed by elemental analysis and EPR spectroscopy. According to protein sequence alignments the classical tryptophan photoreduction pathway is present in PhrA but absent in PhrB. Although PhrB is clearly distinguished from other photolyases including PhrA it is, like PhrA, required for in vivo photoreactivation. Moreover, PhrA can repair UV-induced DNA lesions in vitro. Thus, A. tumefaciens contains two photolyase homologs of which PhrB represents the first member of the cryptochrome/photolyase family (CPF) that contains an iron-sulfur cluster. PMID:22066008

  12. Agrobacterium VirB10 domain requirements for type IV secretion and T pilus biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, Simon J.; Kerr, Jennifer E.; Garza, Isaac; Krishnamoorthy, Vidhya; Bayliss, Richard; Waksman, Gabriel; Christie, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB10 couples inner membrane (IM) ATP energy consumption to substrate transfer through the VirB/D4 type IV secretion (T4S) channel and also mediates biogenesis of the virB-encoded T pilus. Here, we determined the functional importance of VirB10 domains denoted as the: (i) N-terminal cytoplasmic region, (ii) transmembrane (TM) α-helix, (iii) proline-rich region (PRR) and (iv) C-terminal β-barrel domain. Mutations conferring a transfer- and pilus-minus (Tra−, Pil−) phenotype included PRR deletion and β-barrel substitution mutations that prevented VirB10 interaction with the outer membrane (OM) VirB7–VirB9 channel complex. Mutations permissive for substrate transfer but blocking pilus production (Tra+, Pil−) included a cytoplasmic domain deletion and TM domain insertion mutations. Another class of Tra+ mutations also selectively disrupted pilus biogenesis but caused release of pilin monomers to the milieu; these mutations included deletions of α-helical projections extending from the β-barrel domain. Our findings, together with results of Cys accessibility studies, indicate that VirB10 stably integrates into the IM, extends via its PRR across the periplasm, and interacts via its β-barrel domain with the VirB7–VirB9 channel complex. The data further support a model that distinct domains of VirB10 regulate formation of the secretion channel or the T pilus. PMID:19054325

  13. An Agrobacterium VirB10 Mutation Conferring a Type IV Secretion System Gating Defect▿

    PubMed Central

    Banta, Lois M.; Kerr, Jennifer E.; Cascales, Eric; Giuliano, Meghan E.; Bailey, Megan E.; McKay, Cedar; Chandran, Vidya; Waksman, Gabriel; Christie, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Agrobacterium VirB7, VirB9, and VirB10 form a “core complex” during biogenesis of the VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system (T4SS). VirB10 spans the cell envelope and, in response to sensing of ATP energy consumption by the VirB/D4 ATPases, undergoes a conformational change required for DNA transfer across the outer membrane (OM). Here, we tested a model in which VirB10 regulates substrate passage by screening for mutations that allow for unregulated release of the VirE2 secretion substrate to the cell surface independently of target cell contact. One mutation, G272R, conferred VirE2 release and also rendered VirB10 conformationally insensitive to cellular ATP depletion. Strikingly, G272R did not affect substrate transfer to target cells (Tra+) but did block pilus production (Pil−). The G272R mutant strain displayed enhanced sensitivity to vancomycin and SDS but did not nonspecifically release periplasmic proteins or VirE2 truncated of its secretion signal. G272 is highly conserved among VirB10 homologs, including pKM101 TraF, and in the TraF X-ray structure the corresponding Gly residue is positioned near an α-helical domain termed the antenna projection (AP), which is implicated in formation of the OM pore. A partial AP deletion mutation (ΔAP) also confers a Tra+ Pil− phenotype; however, this mutation did not allow VirE2 surface exposure but instead allowed the release of pilin monomers or short oligomers to the milieu. We propose that (i) G272R disrupts a gating mechanism in the core chamber that regulates substrate passage across the OM and (ii) the G272R and ΔAP mutations block pilus production at distinct steps of the pilus biogenesis pathway. PMID:21421757

  14. Fha Interaction with Phosphothreonine of TssL Activates Type VI Secretion in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jer-Sheng; Wu, Hsin-Hui; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Ma, Lay-Sun; Pang, Yin-Yuin; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Lai, Erh-Min

    2014-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread protein secretion system found in many Gram-negative bacteria. T6SSs are highly regulated by various regulatory systems at multiple levels, including post-translational regulation via threonine (Thr) phosphorylation. The Ser/Thr protein kinase PpkA is responsible for this Thr phosphorylation regulation, and the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain-containing Fha-family protein is the sole T6SS phosphorylation substrate identified to date. Here we discovered that TssL, the T6SS inner-membrane core component, is phosphorylated and the phosphorylated TssL (p-TssL) activates type VI subassembly and secretion in a plant pathogenic bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Combining genetic and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that TssL is phosphorylated at Thr 14 in a PpkA-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the PpkA kinase activity is responsible for the Thr 14 phosphorylation, which is critical for the secretion of the T6SS hallmark protein Hcp and the putative toxin effector Atu4347. TssL phosphorylation is not required for the formation of the TssM-TssL inner-membrane complex but is critical for TssM conformational change and binding to Hcp and Atu4347. Importantly, Fha specifically interacts with phosphothreonine of TssL via its pThr-binding motif in vivo and in vitro and this interaction is crucial for TssL interaction with Hcp and Atu4347 and activation of type VI secretion. In contrast, pThr-binding ability of Fha is dispensable for TssM structural transition. In conclusion, we discover a novel Thr phosphorylation event, in which PpkA phosphorylates TssL to activate type VI secretion via its direct binding to Fha in A. tumefaciens. A model depicting an ordered TssL phosphorylation-induced T6SS assembly pathway is proposed. PMID:24626341

  15. Seasonal Fluctuations and Long-Term Persistence of Pathogenic Populations of Agrobacterium spp. in Soils

    PubMed Central

    Krimi, Z.; Petit, A.; Mougel, C.; Dessaux, Y.; Nesme, X.

    2002-01-01

    Short- and long-term persistence of pathogenic (i.e., tumor forming) agrobacteria in soil was investigated in six nursery plots with a history of high crown gall incidence. No pathogenic Agrobacterium strains were isolated in soil samples taken in fall and winter in any plots, but such strains were isolated from both bulk soils and weed rhizospheres (over 0.5 × 105 pathogenic CFU/g of bulk soil or rhizosphere) in three out of six plots in spring and summer. PCR amplifications of a vir sequence from DNA extracted from soil confirmed the presence of Ti plasmids in summer and their absence in fall and winter. The results indicate that strains that harbor a Ti plasmid had an unforeseen positive fitness versus Ti plasmid-free strains in soil and rhizosphere in spring and summer in spite of the apparent absence of tumor, and hence of opines. The gain of fitness occurred during a bloom of all cultivable agrobacteria observed only in conducive soils. An evolution of the pathogenic population was recorded during a 4-year period in one particularly conducive soil. In 1990, the pathogenic population in this soil consisted of only biovar 1 strains harboring both octopine- and nopaline-type Ti plasmids. In 1994, it consisted of only nopaline-type Ti plasmids equally distributed among biovar 1 and 2 strains. These results suggest that nopaline-type Ti plasmids conferred a better survival ability than octopine-type Ti plasmids to biovar 2 agrobacteria under the present field conditions. PMID:12089015

  16. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators. PMID:27196733

  17. Expression and genomic integration of transgenes after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of mature barley embryos.

    PubMed

    Uçarlı, C; Tufan, F; Gürel, F

    2015-01-01

    Mature embryos in tissue cultures are advantageous because of their abundance and rapid germination, which reduces genomic instability problems. In this study, 2-day-old isolated mature barley embryos were infected with 2 Agrobacterium hypervirulent strains (AGL1 and EHA105), followed by a 3-day period of co-cultivation in the presence of L-cystein amino acid. Chimeric expression of the b-glucuronidase gene (gusA) directed by a viral promoter of strawberry vein banding virus was observed in coleoptile epidermal cells and seminal roots in 5-day-old germinated seedlings. In addition to varying infectivity patterns in different strains, there was a higher ratio of transient b-glucuronidase expression in developing coleoptiles than in embryonic roots, indicating the high competency of shoot apical meristem cells in the mature embryo. A total of 548 explants were transformed and 156 plants developed to maturity on G418 media after 18-25 days. We detected transgenes in 74% of the screened plant leaves by polymerase chain reaction, and 49% of these expressed neomycin phosphotransferase II gene following AGL1 transformation. Ten randomly selected T0 transformants were analyzed using thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction and 24 fragments ranged between 200-600 base pairs were sequenced. Three of the sequences flanked with transferred-DNA showed high similarity to coding regions of the barley genome, including alpha tubulin5, homeobox 1, and mitochondrial 16S genes. We observed 70-200-base pair filler sequences only in the coding regions of barley in this study. PMID:25730049

  18. Unmasking host and microbial strategies in the Agrobacterium-plant defense tango

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Elizabeth E.; Wang, Melinda B.; Bravo, Janis E.; Banta, Lois M.

    2015-01-01

    Coevolutionary forces drive adaptation of both plant-associated microbes and their hosts. Eloquently captured in the Red Queen Hypothesis, the complexity of each plant–pathogen relationship reflects escalating adversarial strategies, but also external biotic and abiotic pressures on both partners. Innate immune responses are triggered by highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or PAMPs, that are harbingers of microbial presence. Upon cell surface receptor-mediated recognition of these pathogen-derived molecules, host plants mount a variety of physiological responses to limit pathogen survival and/or invasion. Successful pathogens often rely on secretion systems to translocate host-modulating effectors that subvert plant defenses, thereby increasing virulence. Host plants, in turn, have evolved to recognize these effectors, activating what has typically been characterized as a pathogen-specific form of immunity. Recent data support the notion that PAMP-triggered and effector-triggered defenses are complementary facets of a convergent, albeit differentially regulated, set of immune responses. This review highlights the key players in the plant’s recognition and signal transduction pathways, with a focus on the aspects that may limit Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection and the ways it might overcome those defenses. Recent advances in the field include a growing appreciation for the contributions of cytoskeletal dynamics and membrane trafficking to the regulation of these exquisitely tuned defenses. Pathogen counter-defenses frequently manipulate the interwoven hormonal pathways that mediate host responses. Emerging systems-level analyses include host physiological factors such as circadian cycling. The existing literature indicates that varying or even conflicting results from different labs may well be attributable to environmental factors including time of day of infection, temperature, and/or developmental stage of the host plant. PMID:25873923

  19. Adaptation of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator to activate transcription in plants.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Verner, Eva; Salem, Tarek A; Gurley, William B

    2016-02-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator of the VirA/VirG two-component system was adapted to function in tobacco protoplasts. The subcellular localization of VirG and VirA proteins transiently expressed in onion cells was determined using GFP fusions. Preliminary studies using Gal4DBD-VP16 fusions with VirG and Escherichia coli UhpA, and NarL response regulators indicated compatibility of these bacterial proteins with the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus. A strong transcriptional activator based on tandem activation domains from the Drosophila fushi tarazu and Herpes simplex VP16 was created. Selected configurations of the two-site Gal4-vir box GUS reporters were activated by chimeric effectors dependent on either the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain or that of VirG. Transcriptional induction of the GUS reporter was highest for the VirE19-element promoter with both constitutive and wild-type VirG-tandem activation domain effectors. Multiple VirE19 elements increased the reporter activity proportionately, indicating that the VirG DNA binding domain was functional in plants. The VirG constitutive-Q-VP16 effector was more active than the VirG wild-type. In both the constitutive and wild-type forms of VirG, Q-VP16 activated transcription of the GUS reporter best when located at the C-terminus, i.e. juxtaposed to the VirG DNA binding domain. These results demonstrate the possibility of using DNA binding domains from bacterial response regulators and their cognate binding elements in the engineering of plant gene expression. PMID:26646288

  20. Unmasking host and microbial strategies in the Agrobacterium-plant defense tango.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Elizabeth E; Wang, Melinda B; Bravo, Janis E; Banta, Lois M

    2015-01-01

    Coevolutionary forces drive adaptation of both plant-associated microbes and their hosts. Eloquently captured in the Red Queen Hypothesis, the complexity of each plant-pathogen relationship reflects escalating adversarial strategies, but also external biotic and abiotic pressures on both partners. Innate immune responses are triggered by highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or PAMPs, that are harbingers of microbial presence. Upon cell surface receptor-mediated recognition of these pathogen-derived molecules, host plants mount a variety of physiological responses to limit pathogen survival and/or invasion. Successful pathogens often rely on secretion systems to translocate host-modulating effectors that subvert plant defenses, thereby increasing virulence. Host plants, in turn, have evolved to recognize these effectors, activating what has typically been characterized as a pathogen-specific form of immunity. Recent data support the notion that PAMP-triggered and effector-triggered defenses are complementary facets of a convergent, albeit differentially regulated, set of immune responses. This review highlights the key players in the plant's recognition and signal transduction pathways, with a focus on the aspects that may limit Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection and the ways it might overcome those defenses. Recent advances in the field include a growing appreciation for the contributions of cytoskeletal dynamics and membrane trafficking to the regulation of these exquisitely tuned defenses. Pathogen counter-defenses frequently manipulate the interwoven hormonal pathways that mediate host responses. Emerging systems-level analyses include host physiological factors such as circadian cycling. The existing literature indicates that varying or even conflicting results from different labs may well be attributable to environmental factors including time of day of infection, temperature, and/or developmental stage of the host plant. PMID:25873923