Science.gov

Sample records for agronomic management practices

  1. AEPAT: SOFTWARE FOR ASSESSING AGRONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN LONG-TERM AGROECOSYSTEM EXPERIMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approaches to assess the effects of management practices on agroecosystem functions are needed to determine the relative sustainability of agricultural management systems. This paper describes a computer program designed to assess the relative sustainability of management practices using agronomic ...

  2. Effects of Agronomic and Conservation Management Practices On Organic Matter and Associated Properties in Claypan Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic matter plays several important roles in the biogeochemistry of soil and impacts the sustainability and profitability of agroecosystems. Retention and transformation of soil organic matter (SOM) are affected by agronomic and conservation management practices. The primary objective of this stu...

  3. ESSENTIAL AGRONOMIC PRACTICES FOR MANAGING SWITCHGRASS FOR BIOENERGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective is to present the state of the art for establishing and managing switchgrass for Bioenergy. The best and most productive switchgrass stands have been no-till seeded into soybean stubble. It is crucial to select the proper cultivar for the specific plant adaptation region, purchase qu...

  4. Integration of Agronomic Practices with Herbicides for Sustainable Weed Management in Aerobic Rice

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, M. P.; Juraimi, A. S.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Uddin, M. K.; Samedani, B.; Puteh, A.; Man, Azmi

    2013-01-01

    Till now, herbicide seems to be a cost effective tool from an agronomic view point to control weeds. But long term efficacy and sustainability issues are the driving forces behind the reconsideration of herbicide dependent weed management strategy in rice. This demands reappearance of physical and cultural management options combined with judicious herbicide application in a more comprehensive and integrated way. Keeping those in mind, some agronomic tools along with different manual weeding and herbicides combinations were evaluated for their weed control efficacy in rice under aerobic soil conditions. Combination of competitive variety, higher seeding rate, and seed priming resulted in more competitive cropping system in favor of rice, which was reflected in lower weed pressure, higher weed control efficiency, and better yield. Most of the herbicides exhibited excellent weed control efficiency. Treatments comprising only herbicides required less cost involvement but produced higher net benefit. On the contrary, treatments comprising both herbicide and manual weeding required high cost involvement and thus produced lower net benefit. Therefore, adoption of competitive rice variety, higher seed rate, and seed priming along with spraying different early-postemergence herbicides in rotation at 10 days after seeding (DAS) followed by a manual weeding at 30 DAS may be recommended from sustainability view point. PMID:24223513

  5. Effect of different agronomic management practices on greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient cycling in a long-term field trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koal, Philipp; Schilling, Rolf; Gerl, Georg; Pritsch, Karin; Munch, Jean Charles

    2015-04-01

    In order to achieve a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, modern agronomic management practices need to be established. Therefore, to assess the effect of different farming practices on greenhouse gas emissions, reliable data are required. The experiment covers and compares two main aspects of agricultural management for a better implementation of sustainable land use. The focus lies on the determination and interpretation of greenhouse gas emissions, however, regarding in each case a different agricultural management system, namely an organic farming system and an integrated farming system where the effect of diverse tillage systems and fertilisation practices are observed. In addition, with analysis of the alterable biological, physical and chemical soil properties a link between the impact of different management systems on greenhouse gas emissions and the observed cycle of matter in the soil, especially the nitrogen and carbon cycle, will be enabled. Measurements have been carried out on long-term field trials at the Research Farm Scheyern located in a Tertiary hilly landscape approximately 40 km north of Munich (South Germany). The long-term field trials of the organic and integrated farming system were started in 1992. Since then parcels of land (each around 0.2-0.4 ha) with a particular interior plot set-up have been conducted with the same crop rotation, tillage and fertilisation practice referring to organic and integrated farming management. Thus, the management impacts on the soil of more than 20 years are being examined. Fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 have been monitored since 2007 for the integrated farming system trial and since 2012 for the organic farming system trial using an automated system which consists of chambers (0.4 m2 area) with a motor-driven lid, an automated gas sampling unit, an on-line gas chromatographic analysis system, and a control and data logging unit. Precipitation and temperature data have been observed for each experimental

  6. Integrating Agronomic Principles with Management Experience in Introductory Agronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorst, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Explains the use of a cropping systems project to teach agronomic principles and crop management techniques, and to enhance communication skills. Provides a sample progress report instructions sheet which was used for the project. (Author/RT)

  7. Data access and interchange in agronomic and natural resources management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Challenges related to agriculture and natural resource management have never been greater. Comprehensive agronomic and natural resources data relevant to climate change, food security, bioenergy, and sustainable water supply are rare and in demand. Data used for policy development must be rigorous...

  8. Agronomic Practices for Improving Gentle Remediation of Trace Element-Contaminated Soils.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Petra; Mench, Michel; Álvarez-López, Vanessa; Bert, Valérie; Dimitriou, Ioannis; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Herzig, Rolf; Janssen, Jolien Olga; Kolbas, Aliaksandr; Müller, Ingo; Neu, Silke; Renella, Giancarlo; Ruttens, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The last few decades have seen the rise of Gentle soil Remediation Options (GRO), which notably include in situ contaminant stabilization ("inactivation") and plant-based (generally termed "phytoremediation") options. For trace element (TE)-contaminated sites, GRO aim to either decrease their labile pool and/or total content in the soil, thereby reducing related pollutant linkages. Much research has been dedicated to the screening and selection of TE-tolerant plant species and genotypes for application in GRO. However, the number of field trials demonstrating successful GRO remains well below the number of studies carried out at a greenhouse level. The move from greenhouse to field conditions requires incorporating agronomical knowledge into the remediation process and the ecological restoration of ecosystem services. This review summarizes agronomic practices against their demonstrated or potential positive effect on GRO performance, including plant selection, soil management practices, crop rotation, short rotation coppice, intercropping/row cropping, planting methods and plant densities, harvest and fertilization management, pest and weed control and irrigation management. Potentially negative effects of GRO, e.g., the introduction of potentially invasive species, are also discussed. Lessons learnt from long-term European field case sites are given for aiding the choice of appropriate management practices and plant species. PMID:25581041

  9. The agronomic science of spatial and temporal water management:How much, when and where

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agronomic sciences are those that are applied to soil and water management and crop production, including soil, water and plant sciences and related disciplines. The science of spatial and temporal water management includes many agronomic science factors, including soil physics, biophysics, plan...

  10. Linkages Among Agronomic, Environmental and Weed Management Characteristics in North American Sweet Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Performance of weed management systems varies greatly across the landscape in both growers’ fields and in experimental trials conducted by agricultural scientists. Using agronomic, environmental, and weed management information from growers’ fields and experimental trials, we identified dominant ch...

  11. Practice management.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    The practicing orthopaedic traumatologist must have a sound knowledge of business fundamentals to be successful in the changing healthcare environment. Practice management encompasses multiple topics including governance, the financial aspects of billing and coding, physician extender management, ancillary service development, information technology, transcription utilization, and marketing. Some of these are universal, but several of these areas may be most applicable to the private practice of medicine. Attention to each component is vital to develop an understanding of the intricacies of practice management. PMID:24918826

  12. Copper accumulation in vineyard soils: Rhizosphere processes and agronomic practices to limit its toxicity.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Gustavo; Bastos de Melo, George Wellington; Terzano, Roberto; Del Buono, Daniele; Astolfi, Stefania; Tomasi, Nicola; Pii, Youry; Mimmo, Tanja; Cesco, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Viticulture represents an important agricultural practice in many countries worldwide. Yet, the continuous use of fungicides has caused copper (Cu) accumulation in soils, which represent a major environmental and toxicological concern. Despite being an important micronutrient, Cu can be a potential toxicant at high concentrations since it may cause morphological, anatomical and physiological changes in plants, decreasing both food productivity and quality. Rhizosphere processes can, however, actively control the uptake and translocation of Cu in plants. In particular, root exudates affecting the chemical, physical and biological characteristics of the rhizosphere, might reduce the availability of Cu in the soil and hence its absorption. In addition, this review will aim at discussing the advantages and disadvantages of agronomic practices, such as liming, the use of pesticides, the application of organic matter, biochar and coal fly ashes, the inoculation with bacteria and/or mycorrhizal fungi and the intercropping, in alleviating Cu toxicity symptoms. PMID:27513550

  13. Productivity of sodic soils can be enhanced through the use of salt tolerant rice varieties and proper agronomic practices

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Y.P.; Mishra, V.K.; Singh, Sudhanshu; Sharma, D.K.; Singh, D.; Singh, U.S.; Singh, R.K.; Haefele, S.M.; Ismail, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Regaining the agricultural potential of sodic soils in the Indo-Gangetic plains necessitates the development of suitable salt tolerant rice varieties to provide an entry for other affordable agronomic and soil manipulation measures. Thus selection of high yielding rice varieties across a range of sodic soils is central. Evaluation of breeding lines through on-station and on-farm farmers’ participatory varietal selection (FPVS) resulted in the identification of a short duration (110–115 days), high yielding and disease resistant salt-tolerant rice genotype ‘CSR-89IR-8’, which was later released as ‘CSR43’ in 2011. Several agronomic traits coupled with good grain quality and market value contributed to commercialization and quick adoption of this variety in the sodic areas of the Indo-Gangetic plains of eastern India. Management practices required for rice production in salt affected soils are evidently different from those in normal soils and practices for a short duration salt tolerant variety differ from those for medium to long duration varieties. Experiments were conducted at the Indian Council of Agricultural Research-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute (ICAR-CSSRI), Regional Research Station, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India during 2011 and 2013 wet seasons, to test the hypothesis that combining matching management practices (Mmp) with an improved genotype would enhance productivity and profitability of rice in sodic soils. Mmp were developed on-station by optimizing existing best management practices (Bmp) recommended for the region to match the requirements of CSR43. The results revealed that transplanting 4 seedlings hill−1 at a spacing of 15 × 20 cm produced significantly higher yield over other treatments. The highest additional net gain was US$ 3.3 at 90 kg ha−1 N, and the lowest was US$ 0.4 at 150 kg ha−1 N. Above 150 kg ha−1, the additional net gain became negative, indicating decreasing returns from additional N

  14. Reduction of the movement and persistence of pesticides in soil through common agronomic practices.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Ruiz, Encarnación; Flores, Pilar; Hellín, Pilar; Navarro, Simón

    2011-11-01

    Laboratory and field studies were conducted in order to determine the leaching potential of eight pesticides commonly used during pepper cultivation by use of disturbed soil columns and field lysimeters, respectively. Two soils with different organic matter content (soils A and B) were used. Additionally, soil B was amended with compost (sheep manure). The tested compounds were cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos-methyl, bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, cyfluthrin, endosulfan, malathion and tolclofos-methyl. In soil B (lower organic matter content), only endosulfan sulphate, malathion and tolclofos-methyl were found in leachates. For the soil A (higher organic matter content) and amended soil B, pesticide residues were not found in the leachates. In addition, this paper reports on the use of common agronomic practices (solarization and biosolarization) to enhance degradation of these pesticides from polluted soil A. The results showed that both solarization and biosolarization enhanced the degradation rates of endosulfan, bifenthrin and tolclofos-methyl compared with the control. Most of the studied pesticides showed similar behavior under solarization and biosolarization conditions. However, chlorpyrifos was degraded to a greater extent in the solarization than in biosolarization treatment. The results obtained point to the interest in the use of organic amendment in reducing the pollution of groundwater by pesticide drainage and in the use of solarization and biosolarization in reducing the persistence of pesticides in soil. PMID:21872905

  15. Effect of agronomical practices on carpology, fruit and oil composition, and oil sensory properties, in olive (Olea europaea L.).

    PubMed

    Rosati, Adolfo; Cafiero, Caterina; Paoletti, Andrea; Alfei, Barbara; Caporali, Silvia; Casciani, Lorena; Valentini, Massimiliano

    2014-09-15

    We examined whether some agronomical practices (i.e. organic vs. conventional) affect olive fruit and oil composition, and oil sensory properties. Fruit characteristics (i.e. fresh and dry weight of pulp and pit, oil content on a fresh and dry weight basis) did not differ. Oil chemical traits did not differ except for increased content of polyphenols in the organic treatments, and some changes in the acidic composition. Sensory analysis revealed increased bitterness (both cultivars) and pungency (Frantoio) and decreased sweetness (Frantoio) in the organic treatment. Fruit metabolomic analysis with HRMAS-NMR indicated significant changes in some compounds including glycocholate, fatty acids, NADPH, NADP+, some amino acids, thymidine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid, 5,6-dihydrouracil, hesanal, cis-olefin, β-D-glucose, propanal and some unassigned species. The results suggest that agronomical practices may have effects on fruit composition that may be difficult to detect unless a broad-spectrum analysis is used. PMID:24767050

  16. Agronomic Weeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University examines agronomic weed problems and control. Contents include a listing of the characteristics of weeds, a section on herbicides, and a section on the important weeds of agronomic crops in Pennsylvania. The herbicide section discusses systemic herbicides, contact…

  17. Status report of Area 15 experimental dairy farm: dairy husbandry January 1977-June 1979, agronomic practices January 1978-June 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    This is the final status report on the operation of the experimental dairy herd and farm in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site. Operation of the farm was transferred from the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas to a contractor in September of 1979. The dairy herd portion of the report covers the period from January 1977 to June 1979. Improvement and addition to the facilities, production and reproduction statistics for individual cows and the herd, the veterinary medicine practices employed, and summaries of the metabolism studies that involved the dairy herd are discussed. The agronomic portion of the report covers the period January 1978 to June 1979. Topics include irrigation, fertilization, weed and insect control, and forage production.

  18. Relationship of sphinganine analog mycotoxin contamination in maize silage to seasonal weather conditions and to agronomic and ensiling practices.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Michele A; Archibald, Douglas D; Jones, A Daniel; Kuldau, Gretchen A

    2007-04-01

    ABSTRACT Sphinganine analog mycotoxins (SAMs) are reported in maize and maize based feeds. Our objectives were to detect and quantify fumonisins B(1) and B(2) and Alternaria toxins (AAL toxins) AAL-TA and AAL-TB and determine how agronomic practices, weather conditions, and ensiling affected the occurrence and levels in maize silage. Silage was collected at harvest and after ensiling in 2001 and 2002 from 30 to 40 dairies, representing four regions in Pennsylvania. SAMs were quantified using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection and high pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry HPLC-MS. The average concentrations and ranges were as follows: fumonisin B(1) 2.02 mug/g (0.20 to 10.10), fumonisin B(2) 0.98 mug/g (0.20 to 20.30), AAL-TA 0.17 mug/g (0.20 to 2.01), and AAL-TB 0.05 mug/g (0.03 to 0.90). Fumonisin B(1) was the most frequently detected toxin (92%) in all samples, followed by fumonisin B(2) (55%), AAL-TA (23%), and -TB (13%). Temperature during maize development was positively correlated with fumonisin occurrence and levels and negatively with AAL-TA, while moisture events were negatively correlated with fumonisins and positively with AAL-TA. Fumonisin levels were higher in silage harvested at later developmental stages (dough through physiological maturity). Ensiling did not affect toxin concentration nor did agronomic practices (tillage system, inoculant use, or silo type) or silage characteristics (dry matter, pH, or organic acid concentration). This is the first report of AAL-TB in silage and on factors that affect SAM frequency and levels in maize silage. PMID:18943291

  19. Fertigation effect of distillery effluent on agronomical practices of Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (Fenugreek).

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar; Chopra, A K

    2012-03-01

    The fertigation effect of distillery effluents concentrations such as 5%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% were studied on Trigonella foenu-graecu (Pusa early bunching) along with control (bore well water). On irrigation of soil with different effluents up to 90 days of harvesting, it was observed that there was a significant effect on moisture content (P < 0.001), EC, pH, Cl(-), total organic carbon (TOC), HCO₃⁻, CO₃⁻², Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), TKN, NO₃²⁻, PO₄³⁻, and SO₄²⁻ (P < 0.0001) and insignificant effect on WHC and bulk density (P > 0.05).There was no significant change in the soil texture of the soil. Among various concentrations of effluent irrigation, the irrigation with 100% effluent concentration decreased pH (16.66%) and increased moisture content (30.82%), EC(84.13%), Cl(-) (292.37%), TOC (4311.61%), HCO₃⁻ (27.76%), CO₃⁻² (32.63%), Na +) (273%), K(+) (31.59%), Ca(2+) (729.76%), Mg(2+) (740.47%), TKN (1723.32%), NO₃²⁻ (98.02%), PO₄³⁻ (337.79%), and SO₄²⁻ (77.78%), Fe(2+) (359.91%), Zn (980.48%), Cu (451.51%), Cd (3033.33%), Pb (2350.00%), and Cr (2375.00%) in the soil. The agronomical parameters such as shoot length, root length, number of leaves, flowers, pods, dry weight, chlorophyll content, LAI, crop yield, and HI of T. foenum-graecum were recorded to be in increasing order at low concentration of the effluent, i.e., from 5% to 50% and in decreasing order at higher effluent concentration, i.e., from 75% to 100% as compared to control. The enrichment factor of various heavy metals was ordered for soil Cd>Cr> Pb>Zn>Cu>Fe and for T. foenum-graecum plants Pb>Cr>Cd>Cu>Zn>Fe after irrigation with distillery effluent. PMID:21499700

  20. Polyphenol metabolite profile of artichoke is modulated by agronomical practices and cooking method.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Mariantonella; Colla, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Giancarlo; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2013-08-21

    In this paper artichoke phenolic pattern was characterized using an Orbitrap Exactive Mass Spectrometer at high mass accuracy and conventional HPLC MS/MS. Twenty four phenolic acids and 40 flavonoids were identified, many of them not previously reported in artichoke. Variations in phenolic compounds were investigated in relation to mycorrhization: results showed that inoculation with mycorrhizae greatly influences metabolite profile proving to be a good strategy to enhance the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in this plant. This practice also caused a different distribution of the main phenolic compounds within head parts. Both steaming and microwaving cooking treatments caused an increase in antioxidant activity: the lower the initial concentration the higher the effect. A similar trend was observed looking at the phenolic compounds concentration: it increased because of cooking treatments the lower the initial content, the highest the increase. Steamed artichoke showed higher phenols content than microwaved ones. PMID:23865390

  1. Impact of agronomic practices on arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice grain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Shen, Jianlin; Wu, Jinshui; Tang, Zhong; Shen, Qirong; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Rice is a major source of dietary arsenic (As). The effects of paddy water management, straw incorporation, the applications of nitrogen fertilizer or organic manure, and the additions of biochar on arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice grain were investigated under field conditions over four cropping seasons in Hunan, China. Treatments that promoted anaerobic conditions in the soil, including continuous flooding and straw incorporation, significantly increased the concentration of As, especially methylated As species, in rice grain, whereas N application rate and biochar additions had little or inconsistent effect. Continuous flooding and straw incorporation also increased the abundance of the arsenite methyltransferase gene arsM in the soil, potentially enhancing As methylation in the soil and the uptake of methylated As by rice plants. Intermittent flooding was an effective method to decrease As accumulation in rice grain. PMID:25150455

  2. Contributions of climate, varieties, and agronomic management to rice yield change in the past three decades in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Tao, Fulu; Xiao, Dengpan; Shi, Wenjiao; Liu, Fengshan; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Yujie; Wang, Meng; Bai, Huizi

    2016-06-01

    The long-term field experiment data at four representative agro-meteorological stations, together with a crop simulation model, were used to disentangle the contributions of climate change, variety renewal, and fertilization management to rice yield change in the past three decades. We found that during 1981-2009 varieties renewal increased rice yield by 16%-52%, management improvement increased yield by 0-16%, and the contributions of climate change to rice yield varied from — 16% to 10%. Varieties renewal and management improvement offset the negative impacts of climate change on rice production. Among the major climate variables, decreases in solar radiation reduced rice yield on average by 0.1%per year. The impact of temperature change had an explicit spatial pattern. It increased yield by 0.04%-0.4% per year for single rice at Xinbin and Ganyu station and for late rice at Tongcheng station, by contrast reduced yield by 0.2%-0.4% per year for single rice at Mianyang station and early rice at Tongcheng station. During 1981-2009, rice varieties renewal was characterized by increases in thermal requirements, grain number per spike and harvest index. The new varieties were less sensitive to climate change than old ones. The development of high thermal requirements, high yield potential and heat tolerant rice varieties, together with improvement of agronomic management, should be encouraged to meet the challenges of climate change and increasing food demand in future.

  3. Practice Experience with a Practice Management Company.

    PubMed

    Tankersley, Ron

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of a dentist using a contracted dental services organization to manage the business aspects of a multisite group oral and maxillofacial practice. The need for help with management functions first became apparent in medicine, and several models emerged there. The model used in this practice sought to take advantage of specialized expertise without reducing practitioners' control over dental decisions, including those going beyond narrow clinical decisions. Personal experiences and suggestions for best fit between practices on contracted services are presented. PMID:26562977

  4. Practice management companies improve practices' financial position.

    PubMed

    Dupell, T

    1997-11-01

    To maintain control over healthcare delivery and financial decisions, as well as increase access to capital markets, some group practices are forming their own physician practice management companies. These companies should be organized to balance the expectations of physicians with the values of capital markets. This organization should include retained earnings, financial reporting in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), predictable earnings and cash flow, physician ownership and leadership, and incentives for high-quality management. Three large, primary care and multispecialty clinics that merged to form a new physician practice management company increased their access to capital markets and improved their overall financial position, which will help them achieve long-term survival. PMID:10174772

  5. Evaluation of different agronomic managements on rice mesofauna: a case study in Piedmont (North Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Silvia; d'Errico, Giada; Gagnarli, Elena; Barzanti, Gian Paolo; Cito, Annarita; Papini, Rossella; Simoni, Sauro; Roversi, Pio Federico

    2014-05-01

    Rice is the most important cereal crop in the developing world and, in Europe, Italy is leader in rice production. The intensive cultivation of rice leads to continuous inputs chemicals as fertilizers, weeding and pesticides. The intensification of sustainable rice production by minimizing the impact on the environment of cultivation is a main issue . In this context this study, supported by the Italian National Project POLORISO (MIPAAF), aims to afford preliminary indications about the evaluation of ecological impact by different managements on soil mesofauna biodiversity. Biomonitoring of soil mesofauna, in particular nematodes and microarthropods, allows to determine the effects of crop management on the communities; the lack and/or reduction of these organisms can allow inference on the soil quality. This preliminary study aims at evaluate the different influence of conventional, integrated and biological managements on mesofauna communities. The samplings were conducted in Summer and Autumn 2013 near Vercelli (North Italy) in three study sites with similar pedologic characteristics but different in control strategies (conventional, organic farming, Integrated Pest Management (IPM)). The extraction of nematodes and microarthropods was performed by Bermann method and the Berlese-Tullgren selector, respectively. All specimens were counted and determined up to the order level. The biological soil quality was evaluated by Maturity Index (MI) for nematodes, BSQar and the soil Biological Classes (sBC)(range I-VII) for microarthropods. Regarding nematodes, Rhabditidae, Dorylamidae, Mononchidae, Tylenchidae and Heteroderidae were the most represented families. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) evidenced that the trophic group of plant parasites was favored in organic farming, while groups of omnivores and predators were abundant in the other managements. The lowest nematodes' abundance was found in submerged rice soil with dominance of omnivores and plant

  6. Ecohydrology of managed ecosystems: Linking rainfall unpredictability, agronomic performance, and sustainable water use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vico, Giulia; Porporato, Amilcare

    2014-05-01

    The field of ecohydrology, traditionally focusing on natural ecosystems, can offer the necessary quantitative tools to assess and compare the sustainability of agriculture across climates, soil types, crops, and irrigation strategies, including rainfall unpredictability. In particular, irrigation is one of the main strategies to enhance and stabilize agricultural productivity, but represents a cost in terms of often scarce water resources. Here, the sustainability of irrigated and rainfed agriculture is assessed by means of water productivity (defined as the ratio between yield and total supplied water), yields, water requirements, and their variability. These indicators are quantified using a probabilistic description of the soil water balance and crop development. Employing this framework, we interpret changes in water productivity as total water input is altered, in two staple crops (maize and wheat) grown under different soils, climates, and irrigation strategies. Climate change scenarios are explored by using the same approach and altering the rainfall statistics. For a given irrigation strategy, intermediate rainfall inputs leads to the highest variability in yield and irrigation water requirement - it is under these conditions that water management is most problematic. When considering the contrasting needs of limiting water requirements while ensuring adequate yields, micro-irrigation emerges as the most sustainable strategy at the field level, although consideration should be given to its profitability and long-term environmental implications.

  7. Practical management of hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, M.S.; Hay, I.D. )

    1990-03-01

    There are several causes of hyperthyroidism, and correct diagnosis is essential for management. Graves' disease is most commonly managed with radioactive iodine therapy ({sup 131}I), antithyroid drugs or surgery. Toxic adenomas (single or multiple) may be treated with {sup 131}I or surgery. Most types of thyroiditis are managed expectantly. Pregnant women, children and the elderly deserve special consideration. Follow-up is vital to identify the later development of hypothyroidism.18 references.

  8. LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    USDA Conservation Practices are applied at various scales ranging from a portion of a field or a specific farm operation to the watershed or landscape scale. The Conservation Effects Assessment Project is a joint effort of USDA Conservation and Research agencies to determine the...

  9. Managing a solo practice.

    PubMed

    Sharara, Fady I

    2013-05-01

    Our health care system has been facing significant changes over the past 20 years with the introduction of health maintenance organizations plus the seismic changes associated with the introduction of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act and accountable care organizations. Lower reimbursements by health plans and the need for significant infrastructure investments in information technology such as electronic medical records have also put major financial and organizational strains on solo practices. Although it is unknown how these changes will have an impact on reproductive endocrinologists, consolidation and mergers seem to be on the rise in anticipation of the coming tsunami. Many solo physicians have cherished the freedom and opportunity of small practices, but it appears that the delivery system of the future will be dramatically different. PMID:23609152

  10. Management Review of Evaluation Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Jonathan

    Evaluation practice within state education agencies (SEAs) is reviewed from a management consultant's perspective. The study is based upon a review of literature, discussions with the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory Research on Evaluation Program, and visits to SEAs in California, Montana and Washington. The main findings of the study…

  11. Management Practices in Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Five articles on management practices in dental schools include: "Overview" (Robert W. Comer et al.); "Patient Support Services" (Betsy A. Hagan et al.); "Health and Financial Records" (Robert W. Comer et al.); "Support Services and Staff Responsibilities" (Wayne William Herman et al.) and "Implications and Future Challenges" (Robert W. Comer et…

  12. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Implementation of an effective BMP monitoring program is not a straight-forward task. BMPs by definition are devices, practices, or methods used to manage stormwater runoff. This umbrella term lumps widely varying techniques into a single category. Also, with the existence of ...

  13. Educational Management: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okumbe, J. A.

    This book provides the reader with principal theories and practices of management in educational organizations. It attempts to widen both the breadth and depth of the body of knowledge in this area of specialization. The work provides useful reference material for students and scholars at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels in universities…

  14. Spatial dynamics of farming practices in the Seine basin: methods for agronomic approaches on a regional scale.

    PubMed

    Mignolet, C; Schott, C; Benoît, M

    2007-04-01

    A research procedure is proposed which aims to analyse the agricultural spatial dynamics during the last thirty years using two levels of organisation of farming activity: the agricultural production system and the cropping system. Based on methods of statistical mapping and data mining, this procedure involves modelling the diversity of production systems and cropping systems (crop successions and sequences of cultural practices for each crop) in the form of classes independently of their localisation within the basin. It identifies homogeneous regions made up of groups of contiguous agricultural districts which exhibit similar combinations of production systems, crop successions or cultural practices during a given period of time. The results show a major increase in arable farms since 1970 at the expense of dairy farms and mixed cropping/livestock. This trend however appeared to be greatly spatially differentiated according to the agricultural districts, since livestock remained important on the edges of the basin, whereas it practically disappeared in its centre. The crop successions practiced in the basin and the cultural practices used on them also appear to be spatially differentiated, although the link to the production systems is not always clear. Thus it appears pertinent to combine the analysis of the two levels of organisation of the agriculture (methods of land use described by the concept of cropping system, and also the production systems into which the cropping systems fit) in the context of an environmental problem. PMID:17316763

  15. Crop management and agronomic context of the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops.

    PubMed

    Champion, G T; May, M J; Bennett, S; Brooks, D R; Clark, S J; Daniels, R E; Firbank, L G; Haughton, A J; Hawes, C; Heard, M S; Perry, J N; Randle, Z; Rossall, M J; Rothery, P; Skellern, M P; Scott, R J; Squire, G R; Thomas, M R

    2003-11-29

    The Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops (GMHT) were conducted in the UK from 2000 to 2002 on beet (sugar and fodder), spring oilseed rape and forage maize. The management of the crops studied is described and compared with current conventional commercial practice. The distribution of field sites adequately represented the areas currently growing these crops, and the sample contained sites operated at a range of management intensities, including low intensity. Herbicide inputs were audited, and the active ingredients used and the rates and the timings of applications compared well with current practice for both GMHT and conventional crops. Inputs on sugar beet were lower than, and inputs on spring oilseed rape and forage maize were consistent with, national averages. Regression analysis of herbicide-application strategies and weed emergence showed that inputs applied by farmers increased with weed densities in beet and forage maize. GMHT crops generally received only one herbicide active ingredient per crop, later and fewer herbicide sprays and less active ingredient (for beet and maize) than the conventional treatments. The audit of inputs found no evidence of bias. PMID:14561315

  16. Crop management and agronomic context of the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops.

    PubMed Central

    Champion, G T; May, M J; Bennett, S; Brooks, D R; Clark, S J; Daniels, R E; Firbank, L G; Haughton, A J; Hawes, C; Heard, M S; Perry, J N; Randle, Z; Rossall, M J; Rothery, P; Skellern, M P; Scott, R J; Squire, G R; Thomas, M R

    2003-01-01

    The Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops (GMHT) were conducted in the UK from 2000 to 2002 on beet (sugar and fodder), spring oilseed rape and forage maize. The management of the crops studied is described and compared with current conventional commercial practice. The distribution of field sites adequately represented the areas currently growing these crops, and the sample contained sites operated at a range of management intensities, including low intensity. Herbicide inputs were audited, and the active ingredients used and the rates and the timings of applications compared well with current practice for both GMHT and conventional crops. Inputs on sugar beet were lower than, and inputs on spring oilseed rape and forage maize were consistent with, national averages. Regression analysis of herbicide-application strategies and weed emergence showed that inputs applied by farmers increased with weed densities in beet and forage maize. GMHT crops generally received only one herbicide active ingredient per crop, later and fewer herbicide sprays and less active ingredient (for beet and maize) than the conventional treatments. The audit of inputs found no evidence of bias. PMID:14561315

  17. Human resource management in general practice: survey of current practice.

    PubMed Central

    Newton, J; Hunt, J; Stirling, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The organization and management of general practice is changing as a result of government policies designed to expand primary health care services. One aspect of practice management which has been underresearched concerns staffing: the recruitment, retention, management and motivation of practice managers. AIM: A study set out to find out who is routinely involved in making decisions about staffing matters in general practice, to establish the extent to which the human resource management function is formalized and specialized, and to describe the characteristics of the practice managers. METHOD: A postal questionnaire was sent to a stratified random sample of 750 general practices in England and Wales in February 1994 enquiring about the practice (for example, the fundholding status and number of general practitioner partners), how the practice dealt with a range of staffing matters and about the practice manager (for example, employment background and training in human resource management). Practices were classed as small (single-handed and two or three general practitioner partners), medium (four or five partners) or large (six or more partners). RESULTS: Replies were received from 477 practices (64%). Practice managers had limited authority to make decisions alone in the majority of practices although there was a greater likelihood of them taking independent action as the size of practice increased. Formality in handling staffing matters (as measured by the existence and use of written policies and procedures) also increased with practice size. Larger practices were more likely than smaller practices to have additional tiers in their management structure through the creation of posts with the titles assistant practice manager, fund manager and senior receptionist. Most practice managers had been recruited from within general practice but larger practices were more likely than smaller practices to recruit from outwith general practice. Three quarters

  18. AGRICULTURAL BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE EFFECTIVENESS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The Agricultural Best Management Practice Effectiveness Database contains the results of research projects which have collected water quality data for the purpose of determining the effectiveness of agricultural management practices in reducing pollutants ...

  19. 40 CFR 503.24 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management practices. 503.24 Section... FOR THE USE OR DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE Surface Disposal § 503.24 Management practices. (a) Sewage... the permitting authority that through management practices public health and the environment...

  20. 40 CFR 503.24 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Management practices. 503.24 Section... FOR THE USE OR DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE Surface Disposal § 503.24 Management practices. (a) Sewage... the permitting authority that through management practices public health and the environment...

  1. 40 CFR 503.24 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Management practices. 503.24 Section... FOR THE USE OR DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE Surface Disposal § 503.24 Management practices. (a) Sewage... the permitting authority that through management practices public health and the environment...

  2. 40 CFR 503.24 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Management practices. 503.24 Section... FOR THE USE OR DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE Surface Disposal § 503.24 Management practices. (a) Sewage... the permitting authority that through management practices public health and the environment...

  3. 40 CFR 503.24 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Management practices. 503.24 Section... FOR THE USE OR DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE Surface Disposal § 503.24 Management practices. (a) Sewage... the permitting authority that through management practices public health and the environment...

  4. Physician practice management. Sustainable solutions for practice profitability.

    PubMed

    Rhie, Frank; Volmert, Gina

    2004-01-01

    Too often, IT solutions for group practices generate, at best, a quick fix. Forward-thinking group practice managers will evaluate technology for its capacity to enhance long-term profitability. PMID:14727397

  5. Practical management of hair loss.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, J.; Wiseman, M.; Lui, H.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe an organized diagnostic approach for both nonscarring and scarring alopecias to help family physicians establish an accurate in-office diagnosis. To explain when ancillary laboratory workup is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Current diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for hair loss are based on randomized controlled studies, uncontrolled studies, and case series. MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to December 1998 with the MeSH words alopecia, hair, and alopecia areata. Articles were selected on the basis of experimental design, with priority given to the most current large multicentre controlled studies. Overall global evidence for therapeutic intervention for hair loss is quite strong. MAIN MESSAGE: The most common forms of nonscarring alopecias are androgenic alopecia, telogen effluvium, and alopecia areata. Other disorders include trichotillomania, traction alopecia, tinea capitis, and hair shaft abnormalities. Scarring alopecia is caused by trauma, infections, discoid lupus erythematosus, or lichen planus. Key to establishing an accurate diagnosis is a detailed history, including medication use, systemic illnesses, endocrine dysfunction, hair-care practices, and family history. All hair-bearing sites should be examined. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the scalp is useful, particularly to diagnose scarring alopecias. Once a diagnosis has been established, specific therapy can be initiated. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis and management of hair loss is an interesting challenge for family physicians. An organized approach to recognizing characteristic differential features of hair loss disorders is key to diagnosis and management. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10925761

  6. Weight management practices among primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, G M; Reifsnider, E; Allan, J D

    2000-04-01

    This pilot study examined how primary care providers manage patients with weight problems, an important component of primary care. A convenience sample of 17 nurse practitioners and 15 physicians were surveyed about assessments and interventions used in practice for weight management along with perceived barriers to providing effective weight management. Practice patterns between gender, profession and practice setting of the nurse practitioners were compared. PMID:11930414

  7. Problem and Preferred Management Practices Identification Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, Douglas G.

    2003-03-10

    The goals for this workshop were: to introduce key players in the Appalachian basin oil industry to DOE's new Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) program; to explain the various elements of our two-year project in detail; to transfer technology through a series of short, invited talks; to identify technical problems and best management practices; and to recruit members for our Preferred Management Practices (PMP) Council.

  8. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitz, Patricia; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    Organizations with increasingly diverse workforces and customer populations face challenges in reaping diversity's benefits while managing its potentially disruptive effects. This article defines workplace diversity and identifies best practices supporting planned and positive diversity management. It explores how academic libraries can apply diversity management best practices and provides a reading list for leaders and human resource managers wishing to optimize their organization's approach to diversity.

  9. Practical risk management principles for physicians.

    PubMed

    Bunting, R F; Benton, J; Morgan, W D

    1998-01-01

    Most medical schools and postgraduate residency programs do not focus adequate attention on risk management and quality management issues. This article will prepare physicians with an adequate working knowledge of risk management and quality management information, which will enable them to practice more effectively in today's litigious and regulatory climate. PMID:10537840

  10. Survey of Records Management Practices in Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blue, Richard I.; Schramm, Robert M.

    A 1990 survey of 68 records management operations in Wisconsin indicates current practices regarding records retention schedules, retention audits, use of computers, record destruction practices, and the effects of federal legislation on records management operations. The 1990 survey results are compared to similar surveys in the 1970s and 1980s.…

  11. Linking Theory with Practice in Basic Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Archie B.

    1974-01-01

    Instructors of management in higher education have not been cautious in explaining the relation between practice and theory in their basic courses. The author distinguished between the two in suggesting that management theory is based on observed practices and may or may not have broader application. (AG)

  12. New Directions in Practice Management: A Model Practice Management Curriculum for Optometry Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussenblatt, Harris; Troeger, Carolyn

    1988-01-01

    The rationale and development of the University of Houston College of Optometry's revised practice management curriculum are discussed, and the curriculum is outlined. It focuses on development of competence in communications, data management, ethics, practice management, and public health practice. (MSE)

  13. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  14. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  15. Pavement management practices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    This synthesis will be of interest to pavement designers, maintenance engineers, and others responsible for the management of highway pavements. Information is presented on pavement management systems - the established, documented procedures used to treat all activities involved in providing and sustaining pavements in an acceptable condition. As highway agencies focus more attention on maintenance and rehabilitation of highway networks, the use of some form of a pavement management system becomes increasingly important. This report of the Transportation Research Board describes the features, applicability, and used of a pavement management system and recommends five general steps for implementing a new pavement management system or improving an existing system.

  16. Growth of oncology physician practice management companies.

    PubMed

    Mighion, K; Gesme, D H; Rifkin, R M; Bennett, C L

    1999-01-01

    The practice of oncology is changing dramatically, spurred on by managed care initiatives throughout the United States. As a result, physicians are faced with multiple demands from insurers, managed care organizations, and patients. In response to these demands, oncology physician practice management companies have entered the cancer market. This article describes the driving factors leading to consolidation in practice settings, the risks and benefits to oncologists of affiliating with these companies, and the organizational characteristics of four of these larger corporations. This review article is of broad interest to oncologists practicing in the United States and is meant to provide a useful reference for considering a physician practice management company as a business partner. PMID:10370365

  17. Incident Management: Process into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Tornados, shootings, fires--these are emergencies that require fast action by school district personnel, but they are not the only incidents that require risk management. The authors have introduced the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) and assured that these systems can help educators plan for and…

  18. URBAN STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE (BMP) RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation on urban best management practice research conducted by the Urban Watershed Research Branch. The presentation to Region 3 started with Branch history, discussed results of recent projects, identified mechanisms for collaboration between ORD and Regions and discussed ...

  19. Effects of conservation practices on fisheries management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beasley Lake watershed was subjected to a series of conservation management practices with the goal of reducing sediment and nutrients entering the lake via agricultural runoff. Concurrent with the application of conservation practices, the lake was renovated and restocked to produce a sports fishe...

  20. Managing chronic pain in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Librach, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Pain is common in family practice. In dealing with chronic pain, both the family physician and the patient often have problems in defining and in understanding the origin of chronic pain and in providing effective pain relief. This article explores a practical, holistic approach to understanding and managing chronic pain. PMID:8471902

  1. Managing uncertainty in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Biehn, J.

    1982-01-01

    Because patients present in the early stages of undifferentiated problems, the family physician often faces uncertainty, especially in diagnosis and management. The physician's uncertainty may be unacceptable to the patient and may lead to inappropriate use of diagnostic procedures. The problem is intensified by the physician's hospital training, which emphasizes mastery of available knowledge and decision-making based on certainty. Strategies by which a physician may manage uncertainty include (a) a more open doctor-patient relationship, (b) understanding the patient's reason for attending the office, (c) a thorough assessment of the problem, (d) a commitment to reassessment and (e) appropriate consultation. PMID:7074488

  2. MONITORING OF A BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE POND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's Urban Stormwater Management Branch has monitored stormwater drainage and best management practices (BMP) as part of its research program. One BMP being monitored, a wetland/retention pond, is in the Richmond Creek (RC) watershed in the New York City Department of Envi...

  3. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreitz, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Organizations with increasingly diverse workforces and customer populations face challenges in reaping diversity's benefits while managing its potentially disruptive effects. This article defines workplace diversity and identifies best practices supporting planned and positive diversity management. It explores how academic libraries can apply…

  4. Classroom Management, Bullying, and Teacher Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kathleen P.

    2010-01-01

    While bullying in schools has begun to receive attention, little is known about the relationship between classroom management and bullying in the classroom. The process for exploring this relationship will be a review of research and literature related to bullying in the school environment, classroom management, teacher practices, and student…

  5. Social media best practices in emergency management.

    PubMed

    Siskey, Ashley; Islam, Tanveer

    2016-01-01

    Social media platforms have become popular as means of communications in emergency management. Many people use social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter on a daily basis including during disaster events. Emergency management agencies (EMAs) need to recognize the value of not only having a presence on social media but also actively engaging stakeholders and the public on these sites. However, identifying best practices for the use of social media in emergency management is still in its infancy. The objective of this article is to begin to create or further define best practices for emergency managers to use social media sites particularly Facebook and Twitter in four key areas: 1) implementation, 2) education, 3) collaboration, and 4) communication. A list of recommendations of best practices is formulated for each key area and results from a nationwide survey on the use of social media by county EMAs are discussed in this article. PMID:27108920

  6. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for High-Throughput Phenotyping and Agronomic Research

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yeyin; Thomasson, J. Alex; Murray, Seth C.; Pugh, N. Ace; Rooney, William L.; Shafian, Sanaz; Rajan, Nithya; Rouze, Gregory; Morgan, Cristine L. S.; Neely, Haly L.; Rana, Aman; Bagavathiannan, Muthu V.; Henrickson, James; Bowden, Ezekiel; Valasek, John; Olsenholler, Jeff; Bishop, Michael P.; Sheridan, Ryan; Putman, Eric B.; Popescu, Sorin; Burks, Travis; Cope, Dale; Ibrahim, Amir; McCutchen, Billy F.; Baltensperger, David D.; Avant, Robert V.; Vidrine, Misty; Yang, Chenghai

    2016-01-01

    Advances in automation and data science have led agriculturists to seek real-time, high-quality, high-volume crop data to accelerate crop improvement through breeding and to optimize agronomic practices. Breeders have recently gained massive data-collection capability in genome sequencing of plants. Faster phenotypic trait data collection and analysis relative to genetic data leads to faster and better selections in crop improvement. Furthermore, faster and higher-resolution crop data collection leads to greater capability for scientists and growers to improve precision-agriculture practices on increasingly larger farms; e.g., site-specific application of water and nutrients. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have recently gained traction as agricultural data collection systems. Using UAVs for agricultural remote sensing is an innovative technology that differs from traditional remote sensing in more ways than strictly higher-resolution images; it provides many new and unique possibilities, as well as new and unique challenges. Herein we report on processes and lessons learned from year 1—the summer 2015 and winter 2016 growing seasons–of a large multidisciplinary project evaluating UAV images across a range of breeding and agronomic research trials on a large research farm. Included are team and project planning, UAV and sensor selection and integration, and data collection and analysis workflow. The study involved many crops and both breeding plots and agronomic fields. The project’s goal was to develop methods for UAVs to collect high-quality, high-volume crop data with fast turnaround time to field scientists. The project included five teams: Administration, Flight Operations, Sensors, Data Management, and Field Research. Four case studies involving multiple crops in breeding and agronomic applications add practical descriptive detail. Lessons learned include critical information on sensors, air vehicles, and configuration parameters for both. As the first

  7. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for High-Throughput Phenotyping and Agronomic Research.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yeyin; Thomasson, J Alex; Murray, Seth C; Pugh, N Ace; Rooney, William L; Shafian, Sanaz; Rajan, Nithya; Rouze, Gregory; Morgan, Cristine L S; Neely, Haly L; Rana, Aman; Bagavathiannan, Muthu V; Henrickson, James; Bowden, Ezekiel; Valasek, John; Olsenholler, Jeff; Bishop, Michael P; Sheridan, Ryan; Putman, Eric B; Popescu, Sorin; Burks, Travis; Cope, Dale; Ibrahim, Amir; McCutchen, Billy F; Baltensperger, David D; Avant, Robert V; Vidrine, Misty; Yang, Chenghai

    2016-01-01

    Advances in automation and data science have led agriculturists to seek real-time, high-quality, high-volume crop data to accelerate crop improvement through breeding and to optimize agronomic practices. Breeders have recently gained massive data-collection capability in genome sequencing of plants. Faster phenotypic trait data collection and analysis relative to genetic data leads to faster and better selections in crop improvement. Furthermore, faster and higher-resolution crop data collection leads to greater capability for scientists and growers to improve precision-agriculture practices on increasingly larger farms; e.g., site-specific application of water and nutrients. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have recently gained traction as agricultural data collection systems. Using UAVs for agricultural remote sensing is an innovative technology that differs from traditional remote sensing in more ways than strictly higher-resolution images; it provides many new and unique possibilities, as well as new and unique challenges. Herein we report on processes and lessons learned from year 1-the summer 2015 and winter 2016 growing seasons-of a large multidisciplinary project evaluating UAV images across a range of breeding and agronomic research trials on a large research farm. Included are team and project planning, UAV and sensor selection and integration, and data collection and analysis workflow. The study involved many crops and both breeding plots and agronomic fields. The project's goal was to develop methods for UAVs to collect high-quality, high-volume crop data with fast turnaround time to field scientists. The project included five teams: Administration, Flight Operations, Sensors, Data Management, and Field Research. Four case studies involving multiple crops in breeding and agronomic applications add practical descriptive detail. Lessons learned include critical information on sensors, air vehicles, and configuration parameters for both. As the first and

  8. Financial Management: Cash Management Practices in Florida Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiwak, Rand S.

    A study was conducted to identify those variables appearing to affect cash management practices in Florida community colleges, and recommend prescriptive measures concerning these practices. The study methodology included informal discussions with the chief fiscal officers of each Florida community college and appropriate state board staff,…

  9. Total quality management in orthodontic practice.

    PubMed

    Atta, A E

    1999-12-01

    Quality is the buzz word for the new Millennium. Patients demand it, and we must serve it. Yet one must identify it. Quality is not imaging or public relations; it is a business process. This short article presents quality as a balance of three critical notions: core clinical competence, perceived values that our patients seek and want, and the cost of quality. Customer satisfaction is a variable that must be identified for each practice. In my practice, patients perceive quality as communication and time, be it treatment or waiting time. Time is a value and cost that must be managed effectively. Total quality management is a business function; it involves diagnosis, design, implementation, and measurement of the process, the people, and the service. Kazien is a function that reduces value services, eliminates waste, and manages time and cost in the process. Total quality management is a total commitment for continuous improvement. PMID:10587600

  10. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES DESIGN GUIDE VOLUME 3 - BASIN BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual provides design guidelines for a group of stormwater management (SWM) best management practices (BMPs) broadly referred to as basin or pond BMPs. Basin BMPs are the mainstay of stormwater management. Water resources engineers have designed small and large ponds for ma...

  11. Endoscopy Practice Management, Fee Structures, and Marketing.

    PubMed

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Although our knowledge and appreciation of endoscopic procedures in exotic pets is extensive, associated management practices, including equipment preferences and fee structures, have rarely been discussed. This short article highlights the results of a small survey of 35 experienced exotic animal endoscopists and details their equipment ownership/preferences and fee structures. The importance of marketing is also emphasized. PMID:26117522

  12. COST ESTIMATING EQUATIONS FOR BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the development of an interactive internet-based cost-estimating tool for commonly used urban storm runoff best management practices (BMP), including: retention and detention ponds, grassed swales, and constructed wetlands. The paper presents the cost data, c...

  13. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES TEST FACILITY - SWALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NRMRL swale evaluation is part of a larger collection of long-term research projects that evaluates many Best Management Practices. EPA has ongoing research examining the performance of constructed wet lands, and detention and retention ponds. Other projects will evaluate ra...

  14. 40 CFR 503.45 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart O of 40 CFR part 60, operation of the air pollution control device shall not violate the requirements for the air pollution control device in subpart O of 40 CFR part 60. For all other sewage sludge... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management practices. 503.45...

  15. 40 CFR 503.45 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... subpart O of 40 CFR part 60, operation of the air pollution control device shall not violate the requirements for the air pollution control device in subpart O of 40 CFR part 60. For all other sewage sludge... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Management practices. 503.45...

  16. 40 CFR 503.14 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... other waters of the United States, as defined in 40 CFR 122.2, except as provided in a permit issued... 40 CFR 122.2, unless otherwise specified by the permitting authority. (d) Bulk sewage sludge shall be... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management practices. 503.14...

  17. 40 CFR 503.45 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subpart O of 40 CFR part 60, operation of the air pollution control device shall not violate the requirements for the air pollution control device in subpart O of 40 CFR part 60. For all other sewage sludge... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Management practices. 503.45...

  18. 40 CFR 503.14 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... other waters of the United States, as defined in 40 CFR 122.2, except as provided in a permit issued... 40 CFR 122.2, unless otherwise specified by the permitting authority. (d) Bulk sewage sludge shall be... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Management practices. 503.14...

  19. 40 CFR 503.45 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subpart O of 40 CFR part 60, operation of the air pollution control device shall not violate the requirements for the air pollution control device in subpart O of 40 CFR part 60. For all other sewage sludge... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Management practices. 503.45...

  20. 40 CFR 503.14 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... other waters of the United States, as defined in 40 CFR 122.2, except as provided in a permit issued... 40 CFR 122.2, unless otherwise specified by the permitting authority. (d) Bulk sewage sludge shall be... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Management practices. 503.14...

  1. 40 CFR 503.14 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... other waters of the United States, as defined in 40 CFR 122.2, except as provided in a permit issued... 40 CFR 122.2, unless otherwise specified by the permitting authority. (d) Bulk sewage sludge shall be... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Management practices. 503.14...

  2. 40 CFR 503.14 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... other waters of the United States, as defined in 40 CFR 122.2, except as provided in a permit issued... 40 CFR 122.2, unless otherwise specified by the permitting authority. (d) Bulk sewage sludge shall be... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Management practices. 503.14...

  3. 40 CFR 503.45 - Management practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart O of 40 CFR part 60, operation of the air pollution control device shall not violate the requirements for the air pollution control device in subpart O of 40 CFR part 60. For all other sewage sludge... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Management practices. 503.45...

  4. Sugarcane water tolerance and best management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strict regulations limit the discharge of phosphorus from farmers’ fields in the Everglades Agricultural Area of Florida. University of Florida scientists have developed a robust set of best management practices (BMPs) that help farmers meet these regulations. Major principles of these best manageme...

  5. Sugarcane Water Tolerance and Best Management Practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Strict regulations limit the discharge of phosphorus from farmers’ fields in the Everglades Agricultural Area of Florida. University of Florida scientists have developed a robust set of best management practices (BMPs) that help farmers meet these regulations. Major principles o...

  6. Understanding Management Students' Reflective Practice through Blogging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Gihan; Koh, Joyce Hwee Ling

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses the results of a study on the use of blogging to encourage students to engage in the making of theory-practice linkages and critical thinking within the context of a graduate management course. Sixty-five students participated in collaborative blogging for a period of five weeks. The transcripts of these blogs were analyzed…

  7. Managing N with Sensors: Some Practical Issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adoption of precision agriculture practices in cotton has been fast for some technologies and slow for others. Nitrogen management is one of the technologies lagging behind, which is unfortunate considering the hikes in N fertilizer costs. “On-the-go” equipment-mounted sensors are one precision tech...

  8. Practice management skills for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, S; Hawley, L J; Pollock, S; Varnell, G

    2001-01-01

    The faculties of three schools of nursing involved in a collaborative family nurse practitioner (FNP) program designed a study to address issues involved in preparing the nurse practitioner for the challenges of practice management in the clinical environment. The purposes of the study were to (1) identify business concepts necessary to successfully manage a primary care practice; (2) determine which of these concepts should be incorporated into an FNP curriculum; and (3) clarify information to be taught regarding each identified concept. Fifty-four business concepts related to primary care were identified from a literature review. A survey was then developed to assess the extent to which the identified concepts were necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice. Seven experts and five FNP faculty responded to the survey. The Content Validity Index (CVI) defined by Lynn (1986) was applied and 20 concepts necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice were identified. A focus group that included nurse practitioners (both faculty and nonfaculty) from the three collaborative sites connected by interactive telecommunications determined that all 20 of the identified concepts should be included in an FNP curriculum. Additionally, the focus group clarified relevant information to be taught regarding each identified concept. PMID:11559878

  9. Practice Management Skills for the Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Susan; Hawley, Linda J.; Pollock, Susan; Varnell, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    An expert panel identified 20 business concepts important for a family nurse practitioner curriculum. A focus group of practitioners verified the concepts and clarified relevant information to be taught. The business concepts center on management and operations of a clinical practice. (SK)

  10. New Management Practices and Enterprise Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Oczkowski, Eddie; Noble, Charles; Macklin, Robert

    The changing nature of the demand for training in Australian enterprises adopting new management practices and the implications of those changes for training providers were examined. More than 3,400 private sector enterprises were surveyed by mail, after which follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with 80 human resource practitioners from…

  11. Sustainable water management practices and remote sensing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s charge to protect human health and the environment requires a long-term commitment to creating sustainable solutions to environmental problems. The most direct way to ensure that management practices are achieving sustainability...

  12. Environmental Best Management Practices for Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book “Environmental Best Management Practices for Aquaculture” provides technical guidance to improve the environmental performance of fish and shellfish farming. The book is the only comprehensive guide to mitigation of environmental impacts of aquaculture. Topics include the histiory and use...

  13. Effective maintenance practices to manage system aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chockie, Alan; Bjorkelo, Kenneth

    A study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was recently undertaken to identify effective maintenance practices that could be adapted by the nuclear industry in the United States to assist in managing the aging degradation of plant systems and components. Four organizations were examined to assess the influence of maintenance programs on addressing the system and component aging degradation issues. An effective maintenance program was found to be essential to the management of system and component aging. Four key elements of an effective maintenance program that are important to an aging management were identified: (1) the selection of critical systems and components; (2) the development of an understanding of aging through the collection and analysis of equipment performance information; (3) the development of appropriate preventive and predictive maintenance tasks to manage equipment and system aging degradation; and (4) the use of feedback mechanisms to continuously improve the management of aging systems and components. These elements were found to be common to all four organizations.

  14. Data Management Practices for Collaborative Research

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Charles P.; Burchinal, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The success of research in the field of maternal–infant health, or in any scientific field, relies on the adoption of best practices for data and knowledge management. Prior work by our group and others has identified evidence-based solutions to many of the data management challenges that exist, including cost–effective practices for ensuring high-quality data entry and proper construction and maintenance of data standards and ontologies. Quality assurance practices for data entry and processing are necessary to ensure that data are not denigrated during processing, but the use of these practices has not been widely adopted in the fields of psychology and biology. Furthermore, collaborative research is becoming more common. Collaborative research often involves multiple laboratories, different scientific disciplines, numerous data sources, large data sets, and data sets from public and commercial sources. These factors present new challenges for data and knowledge management. Data security and privacy concerns are increased as data may be accessed by investigators affiliated with different institutions. Collaborative groups must address the challenges associated with federating data access between the data-collecting sites and a centralized data management site. The merging of ontologies between different data sets can become formidable, especially in fields with evolving ontologies. The increased use of automated data acquisition can yield more data, but it can also increase the risk of introducing error or systematic biases into data. In addition, the integration of data collected from different assay types often requires the development of new tools to analyze the data. All of these challenges act to increase the costs and time spent on data management for a given project, and they increase the likelihood of decreasing the quality of the data. In this paper, we review these issues and discuss theoretical and practical approaches for addressing these issues

  15. Fever management: Evidence vs current practice

    PubMed Central

    El-Radhi, A Sahib Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Fever is a very common complaint in children and is the single most common non-trauma-related reason for a visit to the emergency department. Parents are concerned about fever and it’s potential complications. The biological value of fever (i.e., whether it is beneficial or harmful) is disputed and it is being vigorously treated with the belief of preventing complications such as brain injury and febrile seizures. The practice of alternating antipyretics has become widespread at home and on paediatric wards without supporting scientific evidence. There is still a significant contrast between the current concept and practice, and the scientific evidence. Why is that the case in such a common complaint like fever The article will discuss the significant contrast between the current concepts and practice of fever management on one hand, and the scientific evidence against such concepts and practice. PMID:25254165

  16. Best Practices for Managing Organizational Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitz, Patricia A.; /SLAC

    2007-05-18

    should human resource specialists play in creating and managing diverse organizations? What are the best practices they should apply? The purpose of this review is to define workplace diversity, to identify best practices, and to identify how diversity management best practices can be applied in academic libraries. Finally, this review will provide a resource list for HR managers and leaders to learn more about those best practices with the goal of optimizing their organization's approach to diversity.

  17. Soil management practices under organic farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Adel; Chami Ziad, Al; Hamdy, Atef

    2015-04-01

    Organic farming methods combine scientific knowledge of ecology and modern technology with traditional farming practices based on naturally occurring biological processes. Soil building practices such as crop rotations, intercropping, symbiotic associations, cover crops, organic fertilizers and minimum tillage are central to organic practices. Those practices encourage soil formation and structure and creating more stable systems. In farm nutrient and energy cycling is increased and the retentive abilities of the soil for nutrients and water are enhanced. Such management techniques also play an important role in soil erosion control. The length of time that the soil is exposed to erosive forces is decreased, soil biodiversity is increased, and nutrient losses are reduced, helping to maintain and enhance soil productivity. Organic farming as systematized and certifiable approach for agriculture, there is no surprise that it faces some challenges among both farmers and public sector. This can be clearly demonstrated particularly in the absence of the essential conditions needed to implement successfully the soil management practices like green manure and composting to improve soil fertility including crop rotation, cover cropping and reduced tillage. Those issues beside others will be fully discussed highlighting their beneficial impact on the environmental soil characteristics. Keywords: soil fertility, organic matter, plant nutrition

  18. Calving management practices on Canadian dairy farms: Prevalence of practices.

    PubMed

    Villettaz Robichaud, M; de Passillé, A M; Pearl, D L; LeBlanc, S J; Godden, S M; Pellerin, D; Vasseur, E; Rushen, J; Haley, D B

    2016-03-01

    Little information is available about current practices around calving in dairy cattle. The aim of this study was to describe calving management practices in the Canadian dairy industry related to housing, calving protocols, monitoring of parturition, and calving assistance. Information was gathered by in-person interviews from 236 dairy farms from 3 Canadian provinces (Alberta, Ontario, and Québec) with freestalls and an automatic milking system (n=24), freestalls with a parlor (n=112), and tiestalls (n=100). The most commonly used types of calving facilities were group calving pens (35%) followed by individual calving pens (30%). Tiestalls were used by 26% of all surveyed producers as their main type of calving area (49% of the tiestall, 7% of the freestall with parlor, and 13% of the automatic milking system farms). Written protocols related to calving were found on only 7% of the farms visited, and only 50% of those protocols were developed with a veterinarian. However, 90% of producers kept written records of calving difficulty. Monitoring of cows around calving occurred 5 times more often during the daytime (between morning and evening milking) compared with nighttime. Cameras were used to monitor cows around and during calvings on 18% of farms. Sixteen percent of producers vaginally palpated all animals during calving. Twenty-seven percent of producers interviewed assisted all calvings on their farms by pulling the calf, and 37% assisted all heifers at calving. According to the producers' reported perception, 93% of them had "a minor problem" or "no problem" with calving difficulties on their farms. This study provides basic data on current calving practices and identifies areas for improvement and potential targets for knowledge transfer efforts or research to clarify best management practices. PMID:26723128

  19. Practice management based on risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The management of a dental practice is most often focused on what clinicians do (production of items), and not so much on what is achieved in terms of oral health. The main reason for this is probably that it is easier to measure production and more difficult to measure health outcome. This paper presents a model based on individual risk assessment that aims to achieve a financially sound economy and good oral health. The close-to-the-clinic management tool, the HIDEP Model (Health Improvement in a DEntal Practice) was pioneered initially in Sweden at the end of 1980s. The experience over a 15-year period with different elements of the model is presented, including: the basis of examination and risk assessment; motivation; task delegation and leadership issues; health-finance evaluations; and quality development within a dental clinic. DentiGroupXL, a software program designed to support the work based on the model, is also described. PMID:15646588

  20. Contributions of cultivar shift, management practice and climate change to maize yield in North China Plain in 1981-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dengpan; Tao, Fulu

    2016-07-01

    The impact of climate change on crop yield is compounded by cultivar shifts and agronomic management practices. To determine the relative contributions of climate change, cultivar shift, and management practice to changes in maize ( Zea mays L.) yield in the past three decades, detailed field data for 1981-2009 from four representative experimental stations in North China Plain (NCP) were analyzed via model simulation. The four representative experimental stations are geographically and climatologically different, represent the typical cropping system in the study area, and have more complete weather/crop records for the period of 1981-2009. The results showed that while the shift from traditional to modern cultivar increased yield by 23.9-40.3 %, new fertilizer management increased yield by 3.3-8.6 %. However, the trends in climate variables for 1981-2009 reduced maize yield by 15-30 % in the study area. Among the main climate variables, solar radiation had the largest effect on maize yield, followed by temperature and then precipitation. While a significant decline in solar radiation in 1981-2009 (maybe due to air pollution) reduced yield by 12-24 %, a significant increase in temperature reduced yield by 3-9 %. In contrast, a non-significant increase in precipitation during the maize growth period increased yield by 0.9-3 % at three of the four investigated stations. However, a decline in precipitation reduced yield by 3 % in the remaining station. The study revealed that although the shift from traditional to modern cultivars and agronomic management practices contributed most to the increase in maize yield, the negative impact of climate change was large enough to offset 46-67 % of the trend in the observed yields in the past three decades in NCP. The reduction in solar radiation, especially in the most critical period of maize growth, limited the process of photosynthesis and thereby further reduced maize yield.

  1. Contributions of cultivar shift, management practice and climate change to maize yield in North China Plain in 1981-2009.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dengpan; Tao, Fulu

    2016-07-01

    The impact of climate change on crop yield is compounded by cultivar shifts and agronomic management practices. To determine the relative contributions of climate change, cultivar shift, and management practice to changes in maize (Zea mays L.) yield in the past three decades, detailed field data for 1981-2009 from four representative experimental stations in North China Plain (NCP) were analyzed via model simulation. The four representative experimental stations are geographically and climatologically different, represent the typical cropping system in the study area, and have more complete weather/crop records for the period of 1981-2009. The results showed that while the shift from traditional to modern cultivar increased yield by 23.9-40.3 %, new fertilizer management increased yield by 3.3-8.6 %. However, the trends in climate variables for 1981-2009 reduced maize yield by 15-30 % in the study area. Among the main climate variables, solar radiation had the largest effect on maize yield, followed by temperature and then precipitation. While a significant decline in solar radiation in 1981-2009 (maybe due to air pollution) reduced yield by 12-24 %, a significant increase in temperature reduced yield by 3-9 %. In contrast, a non-significant increase in precipitation during the maize growth period increased yield by 0.9-3 % at three of the four investigated stations. However, a decline in precipitation reduced yield by 3 % in the remaining station. The study revealed that although the shift from traditional to modern cultivars and agronomic management practices contributed most to the increase in maize yield, the negative impact of climate change was large enough to offset 46-67 % of the trend in the observed yields in the past three decades in NCP. The reduction in solar radiation, especially in the most critical period of maize growth, limited the process of photosynthesis and thereby further reduced maize yield. PMID:26589829

  2. Contributions of cultivar shift, management practice and climate change to maize yield in North China Plain in 1981-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dengpan; Tao, Fulu

    2015-11-01

    The impact of climate change on crop yield is compounded by cultivar shifts and agronomic management practices. To determine the relative contributions of climate change, cultivar shift, and management practice to changes in maize (Zea mays L.) yield in the past three decades, detailed field data for 1981-2009 from four representative experimental stations in North China Plain (NCP) were analyzed via model simulation. The four representative experimental stations are geographically and climatologically different, represent the typical cropping system in the study area, and have more complete weather/crop records for the period of 1981-2009. The results showed that while the shift from traditional to modern cultivar increased yield by 23.9-40.3 %, new fertilizer management increased yield by 3.3-8.6 %. However, the trends in climate variables for 1981-2009 reduced maize yield by 15-30 % in the study area. Among the main climate variables, solar radiation had the largest effect on maize yield, followed by temperature and then precipitation. While a significant decline in solar radiation in 1981-2009 (maybe due to air pollution) reduced yield by 12-24 %, a significant increase in temperature reduced yield by 3-9 %. In contrast, a non-significant increase in precipitation during the maize growth period increased yield by 0.9-3 % at three of the four investigated stations. However, a decline in precipitation reduced yield by 3 % in the remaining station. The study revealed that although the shift from traditional to modern cultivars and agronomic management practices contributed most to the increase in maize yield, the negative impact of climate change was large enough to offset 46-67 % of the trend in the observed yields in the past three decades in NCP. The reduction in solar radiation, especially in the most critical period of maize growth, limited the process of photosynthesis and thereby further reduced maize yield.

  3. Management of diabetes during Ramadan: practical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Sunni, Muna; Brunzell, Carol; Nathan, Brandon; Moran, Antoinette

    2014-06-01

    Ramadan is a month-long period of heightened self-reflection about one's religion and one's relationships with others. During Ramadan, fasting during daylight hours is required. The fast is typically followed by a feast after dark. Although Muslims with certain medical conditions are allowed by Islamic law to abstain from fasting, many choose to fast during Ramadan for personal reasons. Diabetes is one of the most challenging conditions to manage during this time, and physicians and clinics with Muslim patients who have diabetes will need to be prepared if they are to support their patients who desire to fast. This article provides a general overview of Ramadan and offers practical guidance for managing adults and children with diabetes who are fasting during this important time in the Muslim calendar. PMID:25029798

  4. Integrating Pain Management in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Robert N.; Edwards, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    There is much evidence to suggest that psychological and social issues are predictive of pain severity, emotional distress, work disability, and response to medical treatments among persons with chronic pain. Psychologists can play an important role in the identification of psychological and social dysfunction and in matching personal characteristics to effective interventions as part of a multidisciplinary approach to pain management, leading to a greater likelihood of treatment success. The assessment of different domains using semi-structured clinical interviews and standardized self-report measures permits identification of somatosensory, emotional, cognitive, behavioral and social issues in order to facilitate treatment planning. We briefly describe measures to assess constructs related to pain and intervention strategies for the behavioral treatment of chronic pain and discuss related psychiatric and substance abuse issues. Finally, we offer a future look at the role of integrating pain management in clinical practice in the psychological assessment and treatment for persons with chronic pain. PMID:22383018

  5. Frostbite: a practical approach to hospital management.

    PubMed

    Handford, Charles; Buxton, Pauline; Russell, Katie; Imray, Caitlin Ea; McIntosh, Scott E; Freer, Luanne; Cochran, Amalia; Imray, Christopher He

    2014-01-01

    Frostbite presentation to hospital is relatively infrequent, and the optimal management of the more severely injured patient requires a multidisciplinary integration of specialist care. Clinicians with an interest in wilderness medicine/freezing cold injury have the awareness of specific potential interventions but may lack the skill or experience to implement the knowledge. The on-call specialist clinician (vascular, general surgery, orthopaedic, plastic surgeon or interventional radiologist), who is likely to receive these patients, may have the skill and knowledge to administer potentially limb-saving intervention but may be unaware of the available treatment options for frostbite. Over the last 10 years, frostbite management has improved with clear guidelines and management protocols available for both the medically trained and winter sports enthusiasts. Many specialist surgeons are unaware that patients with severe frostbite injuries presenting within 24 h of the injury may be good candidates for treatment with either TPA or iloprost. In this review, we aim to give a brief overview of field frostbite care and a practical guide to the hospital management of frostbite with a stepwise approach to thrombolysis and prostacyclin administration for clinicians. PMID:24764516

  6. Frostbite: a practical approach to hospital management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Frostbite presentation to hospital is relatively infrequent, and the optimal management of the more severely injured patient requires a multidisciplinary integration of specialist care. Clinicians with an interest in wilderness medicine/freezing cold injury have the awareness of specific potential interventions but may lack the skill or experience to implement the knowledge. The on-call specialist clinician (vascular, general surgery, orthopaedic, plastic surgeon or interventional radiologist), who is likely to receive these patients, may have the skill and knowledge to administer potentially limb-saving intervention but may be unaware of the available treatment options for frostbite. Over the last 10 years, frostbite management has improved with clear guidelines and management protocols available for both the medically trained and winter sports enthusiasts. Many specialist surgeons are unaware that patients with severe frostbite injuries presenting within 24 h of the injury may be good candidates for treatment with either TPA or iloprost. In this review, we aim to give a brief overview of field frostbite care and a practical guide to the hospital management of frostbite with a stepwise approach to thrombolysis and prostacyclin administration for clinicians. PMID:24764516

  7. Case management: entry-level practice for occupational therapists?

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Tina M; Fisher, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    As American businesses have sought means to control employee health benefits, managed care has evolved. This evolution has brought greater demand for case management. Case management is not a profession but a practice area within one's own profession. Case managers come from a variety of disciplines and work in a variety of practice settings, which include medical, psychosocial, educational, vocational, and rehabilitation. PMID:16061158

  8. Patient Dose Management: Focus on Practical Actions.

    PubMed

    Park, Michael Yong; Jung, Seung Eun

    2016-02-01

    Medical radiation is a very important part of modern medicine, and should be only used when needed and optimized. Justification and optimization of radiation examinations must be performed. The first step of reduction of medical exposure is to know the radiation dose in currently performed examinations. This review covers radiation units, how various imaging modalities report dose, and the current status of radiation dose reports and legislation. Also, practical tips that can be applied to clinical practice are introduced. Afterwards, the importance of radiology exposure related education is emphasized and the current status of education for medical personal and the public is explained, and appropriate education strategies are suggested. Commonly asked radiation dose related example questions and answers are provided in detail to allow medical personnel to answer patients. Lastly, we talk about computerized programs that can be used in medical facilities for managing patient dose. While patient dose monitoring and management should be used to decrease and optimize overall radiation dose, it should not be used to assess individual cancer risk. One must always remember that medically justified examinations should always be performed, and unneeded examinations should be avoided in the first place. PMID:26908988

  9. Patient Dose Management: Focus on Practical Actions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Medical radiation is a very important part of modern medicine, and should be only used when needed and optimized. Justification and optimization of radiation examinations must be performed. The first step of reduction of medical exposure is to know the radiation dose in currently performed examinations. This review covers radiation units, how various imaging modalities report dose, and the current status of radiation dose reports and legislation. Also, practical tips that can be applied to clinical practice are introduced. Afterwards, the importance of radiology exposure related education is emphasized and the current status of education for medical personal and the public is explained, and appropriate education strategies are suggested. Commonly asked radiation dose related example questions and answers are provided in detail to allow medical personnel to answer patients. Lastly, we talk about computerized programs that can be used in medical facilities for managing patient dose. While patient dose monitoring and management should be used to decrease and optimize overall radiation dose, it should not be used to assess individual cancer risk. One must always remember that medically justified examinations should always be performed, and unneeded examinations should be avoided in the first place. PMID:26908988

  10. "Live cadavers" for practicing airway management.

    PubMed

    Aboud, Emad T; Aboud, Ghaith; Aboud, Talal

    2015-03-01

    Human cadavers have been used successfully as training models to practice airway management, but the lack of lifelike conditions reduces the utility of this model when softness of tissue and the ability to bleed are required for training scenarios. This report describes our "live cadaver" model, which combines lifelike conditions with real human anatomy. Five human cadavers were prepared as "live cadavers". This entailed cannulating the carotid and femoral arteries and the jugular and femoral veins, and then connected them to artificial blood reservoirs. An intra-aortic balloon pump was used to provide pulsating flow through the heart and major arteries. Finally, central and peripheral lines were inserted. Multiple techniques related to airway management were practiced in setting simulating the treatment of casualties with multiple trauma to include emergency cricothyroidotomy. With this model, participants were confronted with medical situations similar to those found in traumatized live patients (e.g., blood and other body fluids filling the mouth and nose, edema of the tongue and face). With the combination of lifelike conditions and real human anatomy, our experience demonstrated that the "live cadaver" increased the training value of traditionally prepared cadaver models. PMID:25747648

  11. Best practices for health technology management.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    In 2006, ECRI's Health Devices Group instituted the Health Devices Achievement Award to honor excellence in health technology management. The application process for this award yielded descriptions of many unique and effective technology management initiatives. This Guidance Article presents some of the best practices gleaned from the top award submissions. The following topics are discussed: The role of human factors testing in the technology management process. We describe one facility's approach to solving a particularly vexing problem: slow telemetry-alarm response times. The use of performance-based service contracting to improve inspection and preventive maintenance (IPM) completion rates. The advantages associated with one health system's process for grouping ventilator-dependent patients who are being cared for outside the intensive care unit. The ability of a technology assessment committee to bring a disciplined approach to the adoption of new technologies. The importance of customer satisfaction to a clinical engineering department. We describe how meeting the caregivers' needs contributes to building a patient-safe environment. The successful implementation of a new patient care technology: local anesthetic pumps. PMID:17300103

  12. Miscellaneous streams best management practices (BMP) report

    SciTech Connect

    Lueck, K.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-24

    The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and U.S. Department of Energy Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 (Consent Order) lists regulatory milestones for liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site to comply with the permitting requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-216 (`State Waste Discharge Permit Program`) or WAC 173-218 (`Washington Underground Injection Control Program`) where applicable. Hanford Site liquid effluent streams discharging to the soil column are categorized as Phase I and Phase II Streams, and Miscellaneous Streams. There were originally 33 Phase I and Phase II Streams, however some of these streams have been eliminated. Miscellaneous Streams are those liquid effluent streams discharged to the ground that are not categorized as Phase I or Phase II Streams, and are subject to the requirements of several milestones identified in the Consent Order. The three criteria for identifying streams that are potentially affecting groundwater are: (1) streams discharging to surface contaminated areas (referred to as category `b` streams); (2) potentially contaminated streams (referred to as category `c` streams); and (3) streams discharging within 91 meters (300 feet) of a contaminated crib, ditch, or trench (referred to as category `d` streams). Miscellaneous Streams that meet any of these criteria must be evaluated for application of best management practices (BMP). The purpose of this report is to provide the best management practice preferred alternative. The list of BMP streams has been revised since the original submittal. Several streams from the original list of BMP streams have already been eliminated through facility upgrades, reduction of steam usage, and facility shutdowns. This document contains a description of the changes to the list of BMP streams, applicable definitions and regulatory requirements and possible alternatives, and a schedule for implementing the preferred alternatives.

  13. Fault Management Practice: A Roadmap for Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesq, Lorraine M.; Oberhettinger, David

    2010-01-01

    Autonomous fault management (FM) is critical for deep space and planetary missions where the limited communication opportunities may prevent timely intervention by ground control. Evidence of pervasive architecture, design, and verification/validation problems with NASA FM engineering has been revealed both during technical reviews of spaceflight missions and in flight. These problems include FM design changes required late in the life-cycle, insufficient project insight into the extent of FM testing required, unexpected test results that require resolution, spacecraft operational limitations because certain functions were not tested, and in-flight anomalies and mission failures attributable to fault management. A recent NASA initiative has characterized the FM state-of-practice throughout the spacecraft development community and identified common NASA, DoD, and commercial concerns that can be addressed in the near term through the development of a FM Practitioner's Handbook and the formation of a FM Working Group. Initial efforts will focus on standardizing FM terminology, establishing engineering processes and tools, and training.

  14. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  15. Agronomic and environmental implications of enhanced s-triazine degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krutz, L. J.; Dale L. Shaner; Mark A. Weaver; Webb, Richard M.; Zablotowicz, Robert M.; Reddy, Krishna N.; Huang, Y.; Thompson, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Novel catabolic pathways enabling rapid detoxification of s-triazine herbicides have been elucidated and detected at a growing number of locations. The genes responsible for s-triazine mineralization, i.e. atzABCDEF and trzNDF, occur in at least four bacterial phyla and are implicated in the development of enhanced degradation in agricultural soils from all continents except Antarctica. Enhanced degradation occurs in at least nine crops and six crop rotation systems that rely on s-triazine herbicides for weed control, and, with the exception of acidic soil conditions and s-triazine application frequency, adaptation of the microbial population is independent of soil physiochemical properties and cultural management practices. From an agronomic perspective, residual weed control could be reduced tenfold in s-triazine-adapted relative to non-adapted soils. From an environmental standpoint, the off-site loss of total s-triazine residues could be overestimated 13-fold in adapted soils if altered persistence estimates and metabolic pathways are not reflected in fate and transport models. Empirical models requiring soil pH and s-triazine use history as input parameters predict atrazine persistence more accurately than historical estimates, thereby allowing practitioners to adjust weed control strategies and model input values when warranted. 

  16. Snow management practices in French ski resorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandre, Pierre; Francois, Hugues; George-Marcelpoil, Emmanuelle; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Winter tourism plays a fundamental role in the economy of French mountain regions but also in other countries such as Austria, USA or Canada. Ski operators originally developed grooming methods to provide comfortable and safe skiing conditions. The interannual variability of snow conditions and the competition with international destinations and alternative tourism activities encouraged ski resorts to mitigate their dependency to weather conditions through snowmaking facilities. However some regions may not be able to produce machine made snow due to inadequate conditions and low altitude resorts are still negatively impacted by low snow seasons. In the meantime, even though the operations of high altitude resorts do not show any dependency to the snow conditions they invest in snowmaking facilities. Such developments of snowmaking facilities may be related to a confused and contradictory perception of climate change resulting in individualistic evolutions of snowmaking facilities, also depending on ski resorts main features such as their altitude and size. Concurrently with the expansion of snowmaking facilities, a large range of indicators have been used to discuss the vulnerability of ski resorts such as the so-called "100 days rule" which was widely used with specific thresholds (i.e. minimum snow depth, dates) and constraints (i.e. snowmaking capacity). The present study aims to provide a detailed description of snow management practices and major priorities in French ski resorts with respect to their characteristics. We set up a survey in autumn 2014, collecting data from 56 French ski operators. We identify the priorities of ski operators and describe their snowmaking and grooming practices and facilities. The operators also provided their perception of the ski resort vulnerability to snow and economic challenges which we could compare with the actual snow conditions and ski lift tickets sales during the period from 2001 to 2012.

  17. Resources to Manage a Private Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aigner, John; Cheek, Fredricka; Donati, Georgia; Zuravicky, Dori

    1997-01-01

    Includes four theme articles: "The Digital Toolkit: Electronic Necessities for Private Practice" (John Aigner); "Organizing a Private Practice: Forms, Fees, and Physical Set-up (Fredricka Cheek); "Career Development Resources: Guidelines for Setting Up a Private Practice Library" (Georgia Donati); and "Books to Enhance Private Practice Management…

  18. INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE. Book Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    Through a wide range of information and topics, Integrated Watershed Management Principles and Practice shows how involved the watershed management planning process can be. The book is informative, and the author obviously has researched the subject thoroughly. The book's case...

  19. A Practical Guide for Personnel Management: The Essential Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todaro, Julie B.

    The essential elements of personnel management are outlined. Personnel management may be called by various names and may be practiced by various levels of management, but in any case it is one of the most important elements of a management position. While sample forms generally relate to Texas community colleges and libraries, the guide is written…

  20. Student Teachers' Management Practices in Elementary Classrooms: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildenbrand, Susan M.; Arndt, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study of four student teachers completing certification in elementary and special education investigated the classroom management practices of the student teachers. This is an important area of study because management practices are essential for an effective classroom, and student teachers often lack confidence and skill in the…

  1. Clinical Practice Strategies outside the Realm of Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walfish, Steven

    While more and more psychologists criticize managed care companies, most must depend upon them in order to maintain their practices. In this study, psychologists were surveyed and asked to identify activities in their own independent practice that fall outside of the purview of managed care. A total of 180 specific activities were identified that…

  2. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES DESIGN GUIDE VOLUME 2 - VEGETATIVE BIOFILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is Volume 2 of a three volume document that provides guidance on the selection and design of stormwater management Best Management Practices (BMPs). This second volume provides specific design guidance for a group of onsite BMP control practices that are referred t...

  3. A scientific assessment of the effectiveness of riparian management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The CEAP Riparian Team reviewed the influence of riparian management practices (RMP) on vegetation, soils and ecosystem services. We developed a conceptual model that links management practices to riparian vegetation and soil attributes and then links these attributes to ecosystem services such as w...

  4. Practical management of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Eric S

    2009-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) describes a diversity of painful conditions following trauma, coupled with abnormal regulation of blood flow and sweating, trophic changes, and edema of skin. The excruciating pain and diverse autonomic dysfunctions in CRPS are disproportionate to any inciting and recovering event. CRPS type I is formerly identified as "reflex sympathetic dystrophy." CRPS type II is the new term for "causalgia" that always coexists with documented nerve injury. The present diagnostic criteria of CRPS I and II depend solely on meticulous history and physical examination without any confirmation by specific test procedure (or gold standard). There are only few clinical studies with large-scale randomized trials of pharmacologic agents on the treatment of CRPS. Bisphosphonates have been studied in multiple controlled trials, based on theoretical benefit of bone resorption, to offer pain relief and functional improvement in patients with CRPS. Many current rationales in treatment of CRPS (such as topical agents, antiepileptic drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, and opioids) are mainly dependent on efficacy originate in other common conditions of neuropathic pain. There are additional innovative therapies on CRPS that are still in infancy. No wonder all the treatment of individual CRPS case nowadays is pragmatic at best. Although the interventional therapies in CRPS (such as nerve blockade, sympathetic block, spinal cord and peripheral nerve stimulation, implantable spinal medication pumps, and chemical and surgical sympathectomy) may offer more rapid response, yet it is still controversial with unpredictable outcome. Nevertheless, we need to start pain management immediately with the ambition to restore function in every probable case of CRPS. An interdisciplinary setting with comprehensive approach (pharmacologic, interventional, and psychological in conjunction with rehabilitation pathway) has been proposed as protocol in the practical management

  5. Sustainable Water Management - Slogan or Practicable Concept?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzelbach, W. K.

    2009-05-01

    A definition of sustainability is difficult. It is much easier to define what is not sustainable. In general a practice is non-sustainable, if on one hand there is no alternative to it and on the other hand it cannot go on indefinitely without running into a crisis. Translated to water resources, non-sustainability may show in the depletion of a finite resource, which cannot be substituted, the resource being water itself, or resources linked to it such as soil and ecosystems. It can also show in the accumulation of substances - such as salts - to harmful levels, build-up of conflict potential due to unfair water allocation or bad governance leading to failure of institutions. To judge whether a regional water resources management strategy is sustainable, one can model the situation and extrapolate to time infinity to determine whether the system has a solution which is acceptable in economic, social and environmental terms. An example from the arid west of China is given. The solution of such a modeling effort need not be steady state but could be quasi-periodic or even non-stationary. A difficulty in testing for sustainability is the fact that system parameters and boundary conditions are not constant in time. Population, climate and values keep changing and adaptivity to those changes should be provided for. Another difficulty stems from the fact that parameters and boundary conditions (especially those in the future) are subject to uncertainty. That requires conservatism and robustness of a strategy. It may well be that for a region no sustainable solution can be designed without a substantial change in system characteristics such as population, area of cultivated land, or trans-basin water transfer.

  6. Blending soil conservation with production: Assessment of diverse crop rotations under no-till soil management for agronomic yield and soil C sequestration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diversified crop rotations, which reduce risk associated with adoption of no-till soil management, may influence soil C sequestration and soil quality. This study measured effects of corn-soybean (C-S), corn-soybean-oat/pea hay (C-S-H), or corn-soybean-oat/pea hay-alfalfa-alfalfa (C-S-H-A-A) annual...

  7. Advanced practice roles in the managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Madden, M J; Ponte, P R

    1994-01-01

    The role of the advanced practice nurse is based on expert clinical knowledge and skill and is practiced in multiple settings. As healthcare reform emerges, the context in which healthcare is delivered changes. The authors describe a creative approach to packaging and marketing the services of advanced practice nurses to the customers of the managed care system. PMID:8308561

  8. Overview of practice management in child and adolescent psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Schreter, Robert K

    2010-01-01

    The manager of a psychiatric practice must create and direct a clinical delivery system, design and oversee the administrative services necessary to support the system, and guide the business operations that contribute to its success. Regardless of the size of the practice, the psychiatrist administrator must handle seven core administrative responsibilities and oversee individual functions and capabilities within each domain. These responsibilities include practice development, clinical services management, medical office operations, clinical management, information management, business management, and risk management. This article provides a roadmap for creating and sustaining successful clinical and administrative endeavors. It can also be used by existing practices as an audit instrument to provide a snapshot of current capabilities so that strengths as well as opportunities for continued growth can be identified. PMID:19951808

  9. Project management practices in engineering university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirazitdinova, Y.; Dulzon, A.; Mueller, B.

    2015-10-01

    The article presents the analysis of usage of project management methodology in Tomsk Polytechnic University, in particular the experience with the course Project management which started 15 years ago. The article presents the discussion around advantages of project management methodology for engineering education and administration of the university in general and the problems impeding extensive implementation of this methodology in teaching, research and management in the university.

  10. Pain Management Practices by Nurses: An Application of the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) Model

    PubMed Central

    Alzghoul, Bashar I.; Abdullah, Nor Azimah Chew

    2016-01-01

    Pain is one of the most common reasons that drive people to go to hospitals. It has been found that several factors affect the practices of pain management. In this regard, this study aimed at investigating the underlying determinants in terms of pain management practices. Based on reviewing the previous studies and the suggestions of the KAP model, it was hypothesized that the main elements of the KAP model (attitudes and knowledge) significantly predict the variation in the practices of nurses regarding pain management. A questionnaire comprising the KAP model’ s constructs, i.e. knowledge and attitude towards pain management, as well as pain management practices, was used to collect data from 266 registered nurses (n=266) who are deemed competent in the management of patients’ pain in the Jordanian public hospitals. The two constructs, attitude and knowledge, which are the main determinants of the KAP model were found to independently predict nurses’ practices of managing patients’ pain. Knowledge of pain management was found to be the strongest predictor. Additionally, it was found that about 69% of the variance in pain management could be explained by the constructs of the KAP model. Therefore, it is recommended that the Jordanian hospitals and universities focus on nurses’ knowledge and attitude towards pain management in order to enhance their practices in the field of pain management. PMID:26755474

  11. 78 FR 36784 - Survey of Nanomaterial Risk Management Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Survey of Nanomaterial Risk Management... of Nanomaterial Risk Management Practices; Notice of Public Meeting and Request for Comments. SUMMARY... establishments, who would be the person best suited to respond to questions addressing risk management...

  12. Managing Self-Access Language Learning: Principles and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David; Miller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project looking at the management of self-access language learning (SALL) from the perspective of the managers of self-access centres. It looks at the factors which influence the practice of seven managers of self-access language learning in tertiary institutions in Hong Kong. The discussion centres around five…

  13. Building and Managing Your Private Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Daniel L.

    The number of clinicians entering private practice is growing each day. This book presents a step-by-step process for prospective entrepreneurs who wish to become a private practitioner. The text is divided into eight sections. Section 1 looks at the rationale for private practice and addresses the personal questions involving clinical skills,…

  14. Using an effective business model for group practice management.

    PubMed

    Hoerl, R

    1999-11-01

    Managing a group practice effectively can improve the practice's bottom line as well as attract a capital partner, if necessary. By addressing issues such as culture, values, governance, role definition, and expectations, group practices can clarify their vision and goals and run their business in an organized, efficient manner. When a group practice's physicians are committed to the success of the practice, they can work as a team to implement efficient operational procedures and optimize revenues. Effective business model components should be considered by both fledgling and mature practices. PMID:11066683

  15. A preliminary report of an educational intervention in practice management

    PubMed Central

    Crites, Gerald E; Schuster, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    Background Practice management education continues to evolve, and little information exists regarding its curriculum design and effectiveness for resident education. We report the results of an exploratory study of a practice management curriculum for primary care residents. Methods After performing a needs assessment with a group of primary care residents at Wright State University, we designed a monthly seminar series covering twelve practice management topics. The curriculum consisted of interactive lectures and practice-based application, whenever possible. We descriptively evaluated two cognitive components (practice management knowledge and skills) and the residents' evaluation of the curriculum. Results The mean correct on the knowledge test for this group of residents was 74% (n = 12) and 91% (n = 12) before and after the curriculum, respectively. The mean scores for the practice management skill assessments were 2.62 before (n = 12), and 3.65 after (n = 12) the curriculum (modified Likert, 1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree). The residents rated the curriculum consistently high. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that this curriculum may be useful in developing knowledge and skills in practice management for primary care residents. This study suggests further research into evaluation of this curriculum may be informative for practice-based education. PMID:15380023

  16. Limitations and barriers for adopting sustainable management practices in different farm types across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Portero, Ángela; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Pedrera, Ana; Jesús Gaitán, Antonio; Ten Berge, Hein

    2014-05-01

    Although apparently the conservation of natural resources such as water and soil does not represent important concerns for our society, the evolution of the world population and the degradation of these resources pose a challenge to improving agricultural food production capacity and conserving, and in some cases restoring, the environmental quality. Unfortunately, the history contains numerous examples of abandonment of these resources (McNeill 1992, Montgomery 2007). Although most of the agronomic conservation practices have been known for millennia, their implementation has often been hindered by non-agricultural motives (Davis et al. 2012). The European project CATCH-C (ten Berge 2011) started last year with the aim of evaluating sustainable soil management practices and exploring the difficulties for their adoption, both at farm and institutional level, to overcome them in the near future. As a first step with that purpose, a selection of best management practices (BMPs) based on interviews with advisors and scientific knowledge were proposed for each of the considered farm typologies: arable crops, permanent crops and pasture. These farm types are representative of the Mediterranean area in terms of agroecological properties, extension, economical importance and soil degradation problems. Semi-structured interviews were carried out by addressing different profiles of farmers to identify in a qualitative way the main limitations for adopting these BMPs on their farms. Different questionnaires were prepared based on the farmers' responses and launched at a larger scale, with the aim of achieving approximately 100 responses per each farm typology. Finally, responses from the questionnaires will be analyzed to explore the causes that hinder or impede the adoption of BMPs in different farm typologies. References: Davis A.S. et al. 2012. Plos ONE 7(10): e4719. doi:10.1371/journalpone.0047149. McNeill, J.R. 1992. The mountains of the Mediterranean world. Cambridge

  17. Hospital administrative characteristics and volunteer resource management practices.

    PubMed

    Intindola, Melissa; Rogers, Sean; Flinchbaugh, Carol; Della Pietra, Doug

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the links between various characteristics of hospital administration and the utilization of classes of volunteer resource management (VRM) practices. Design/methodology/approach - This paper uses original data collected via surveys of volunteer directors in 122 hospitals in five Northeastern and Southern US states. Findings - Structural equation modeling results suggest that number of paid volunteer management staff, scope of responsibility of the primary volunteer administrator, and hospital size are positively associated with increased usage of certain VRM practices. Research limitations/implications - First, the authors begin the exploration of VRM antecedents, and encourage others to continue this line of inquiry; and second, the authors assess dimensionality of practices, allowing future researchers to consider whether specific dimensions have a differential impact on key individual and organizational outcomes. Practical implications - Based on the findings of a relationship between administrative characteristics and the on-the-ground execution of VRM practice, a baseline audit comparing current practices to those VRM practices presented here might be useful in determining what next steps may be taken to focus investments in VRM that can ultimately drive practice utilization. Originality/value - The exploration of the dimensionality of volunteer management adds a novel perspective to both the academic study, and practice, of volunteer management. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first empirical categorization of VRM practices. PMID:27119392

  18. Temporal variability of CO2 and N2O emissions in an agricultural long-term field trial regarding effects of different management practices and extreme weather effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koal, Philipp; Schilling, Rolf; Gerl, Georg; Pritsch, Karin; Munch, Jean Charles

    2016-04-01

    In order to achieve a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, modern agronomic management practices need to be established. Therefore, to assess the effect of different farming practices on greenhouse gas emissions, reliable data are required. The experiment covers and compares main aspects of agricultural management for a better implementation of sustainable land use. The focus lies on the determination and interpretation of greenhouse gas emissions, where the effects of diverse tillage systems and fertilisation practices of an integrated farming system as well as the impacts of extreme weather conditions are observed. In addition, with analysis of the alterable biological, physical and chemical soil properties a link between the impact of different management systems on greenhouse gas emissions and the observed cycle of matter in the soil, especially the nitrogen and carbon cycle, is enabled. Measurements have been carried out on long-term field trials at the Research Farm Scheyern located in a Tertiary hilly landscape approximately 40 km north of Munich (South Germany). The long-term integrated farming system trial was started in 1992. Since then parcels of land (each around 0.2-0.4 ha) with a particular interior plot set-up have been conducted with the same crop rotation, tillage and fertilisation practice referring to integrated farming management. Thus, the management impacts on the soil of more than 20 years have been examined. Fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 have been monitored since 2007 for the integrated farming system trial using an automated system which consists of chambers (0.4 m2 area) with a motor-driven lid, an automated gas sampling unit, an on-line gas chromatographic analysis system, and a control and data logging unit. Precipitation and temperature data have been observed for the experimental field to include weather effects. The main outcomes are the analysis of temporal and spatial dynamics of greenhouse gas emissions influenced by management

  19. Electronic Resource Management Systems in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogg, Jill E.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic resource management (ERM) systems have inundated the library marketplace. Both integrated library systems (ILS) vendors and subscription agents are now offering products and service enhancements that claim to help libraries efficiently manage their electronic resources. Additionally, some homegrown and open-source solutions have emerged…

  20. Critical Reflexive Practice in Teaching Management Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Prue; Cockburn-Wootten, Cheryl; Motion, Judith; Zorn, Theodore E.; Roper, Juliet

    2005-01-01

    Critical theory has been a distinguishing feature of the communication research program at the Waikato Management School, but significant reflection is required to translate the theory into meaningful classroom experiences. The need for reflection comes from two key tensions in teaching management communication: One is the tension between teaching…

  1. Analysis of Management Practices in Lagos State Tertiary Institutions through Total Quality Management Structural Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AbdulAzeez, Abbas Tunde

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated total quality management practices and quality teacher education in public tertiary institutions in Lagos State. The study was therefore designed to analyse management practices in Lagos state tertiary institutions through total quality management structural framework. The selected public tertiary institutions in Lagos…

  2. Forty project management strategies for the medical practice staff.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2010-01-01

    Most every medical practice will embark at one time or another on a large and complex new project. The practice may, for instance, undertake a project in office construction or renovation, practice expansion, new technology, or a new large-scale event. The medical practice staff may find itself creating the project plan, overseeing its execution, and working through the plan day to day until its completion. In short, the staff may find itself responsible for project management. This article contains 40 specific, easy-to-implement project management strategies medical practice employees can use to manage both the large and small projects they undertake on behalf of the practice. It suggests effective project management strategies the staff can use before the onset of a new project as well as strategies to help define the project, to deliver the project, and to close and review the project. This article also describes five reasons medical practices often fail at project management and suggests more effective approaches that will ensure that the projects the medical practice undertakes are completed well, on time, and within budget. PMID:20480774

  3. Emergency management training program: Guide to good practice

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The Emergency Management Training Program Guide to Good Practice is a project of the Training Resources and Data Exchange (TRADE) Emergency Management Issues Special Interest Group (EMI SIG). EMI SIG members expressed interest in a resource to assist in development of a comprehensive emergency management training program. This publication provides guidelines, methods, and materials for EMI SIG members to use, assisting in complete and effective emergency management programs. The purposes of the Emergency Management Training Program Guide to Good Practice are: Provide guidance in the development and management of Emergency Management (EM) training programs; Assist EM trainers to incorporate components of the DOE Emergency Management System philosophy of planning, preparedness, readiness assurance, and response into EM training programs; Help EM training managers meet EM training requirements and conditions established by current regulations and policies; Supplement other TRADE EMI SIG documents and complement individual facility training documents. This program is designed for emergency management personnel who are responsible for providing or overseeing EM training but who do not necessarily possess expertise in developing training. It provides good practices from the manager`s point of view on how to produce, administer, and document facility EM training programs in the spirit of the DOE EM system philosophy. Basic guidance is also included for personnel who design, develop, deliver, and/or evaluate EM training programs or parts. This guidance includes key points of EM training programs and identifies other documents that contain useful and/or more detailed training information.

  4. Computer-Aided Evaluation of Forage Management: Forage Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panciera, M. T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents the Forage Manager spreadsheet, developed as a forage management teaching tool to integrate agronomic, livestock, and cost data to demonstrate the impact of forage management on livestock production costs. Teaching applications, examples involving agronomic data and conventional agronomic evaluation, and limitations of the program are…

  5. Laser spectrofluorometry of agronomic plants in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posudin, Yuri I.

    1997-05-01

    Laser spectrofluorometry of agronomic plants in vivo at the single leaf level permits to investigate the effects of the growth phase, part, nodal position and age of the leaf, agrochemical treatment, external physical factors and plant diseases on the chlorophyll fluorescence. Such a spectroscopic approach can give the possibility to monitoring the development and health status of agronomic plants during ontogenesis and under different stresses. The relevant spectral wavelengths and criteria which correlate with status of the plant were determined.

  6. Effective Best Management Practices for Nitrogen Removal in Aquatic Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated nitrate levels in streams and groundwater are detrimental to human and ecosystem health. The Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD) of the USEPA investigates best management practices (BMP’s) that enhance nitrogen removal in aquatic ecosystems througho...

  7. Performance Evaluation of Best Management Practices Monitoring and Sampling Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will increase the performance knowledge of Best Management Practices (BMP) and to assess BMP operation and maintenance effects on the performance of BMPs. There are currently no maintenance criteria for pollutants other than solids.

  8. 40 CFR 430.58 - Best management practices (BMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.58 Best management practices (BMPs). The definitions and requirements set forth in 40...

  9. 40 CFR 430.58 - Best management practices (BMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.58 Best management practices (BMPs). The definitions and requirements set forth in 40 CFR...

  10. 40 CFR 430.58 - Best management practices (BMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.58 Best management practices (BMPs). The definitions and requirements set forth in 40...

  11. 40 CFR 430.58 - Best management practices (BMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.58 Best management practices (BMPs). The definitions and requirements set forth in 40 CFR...

  12. 40 CFR 430.58 - Best management practices (BMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Papergrade Sulfite Subcategory § 430.58 Best management practices (BMPs). The definitions and requirements set forth in 40...

  13. 5 ways physician practices can more effectively manage payer contracts.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Rob

    2014-09-01

    Physician practices tend to manage contracts ineffectively for five reasons: Lack of organization. Ineffective use of payment accuracy tools. Inadequate financial modeling. Blind acceptance of discounts. Disregard of mandatory participation provisions. PMID:25647894

  14. SOCIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN THE ADOPTION OF AGRICULTURAL BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary goal of this research was to determine the relevant socioeconomic, demographic and agricultural factors that influence the adoption and maintenance of agricultural best management practices. A general theoretic model describing the adoption of technology was modified ...

  15. Effective and Innovative Practices for Stronger Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banick, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Describes the five winners of the APPA's Effective & Innovative Practices Award. These facilities management programs and processes were recognized for enhancing service delivery, lowering costs, increasing productivity, improving customer service, generating revenue, or otherwise benefiting the educational institution. (EV)

  16. Emergency management training program: Guide to good practice

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The Emergency Management Training Program Guide to Good Practice is a project of the Training Resources and Data Exchange (TRADE) Emergency Management Issues Special Interest Group (EMI SIG). EMI SIG members expressed interest in a resource to assist in development of a comprehensive emergency management training program. This publication provides guidelines, methods, and materials for EMI SIG members to use, assisting in complete and effective emergency management programs. The purposes of the Emergency Management Training Program Guide to Good Practice are: Provide guidance in the development and management of Emergency Management (EM) training programs; Assist EM trainers to incorporate components of the DOE Emergency Management System philosophy of planning, preparedness, readiness assurance, and response into EM training programs; Help EM training managers meet EM training requirements and conditions established by current regulations and policies; Supplement other TRADE EMI SIG documents and complement individual facility training documents. This program is designed for emergency management personnel who are responsible for providing or overseeing EM training but who do not necessarily possess expertise in developing training. It provides good practices from the manager's point of view on how to produce, administer, and document facility EM training programs in the spirit of the DOE EM system philosophy. Basic guidance is also included for personnel who design, develop, deliver, and/or evaluate EM training programs or parts. This guidance includes key points of EM training programs and identifies other documents that contain useful and/or more detailed training information.

  17. Best practices in nursing homes. Clinical supervision, management, and human resource practices.

    PubMed

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2008-07-01

    Human resource practices including supervision and management are associated with organizational performance. Evidence supportive of such an association in nursing homes is found in the results of numerous research studies conducted during the past 17 years. In this article, best practices related to this topic have been culled from descriptive, explanatory, and intervention studies in a range of interdisciplinary research journals published between 1990 and 2007. Identified best practices include implementation of training programs on supervision and management for licensed nurses, certified nursing assistant job enrichment programs, implementation of consistent nursing assignments, and the use of electronic documentation. Organizational barriers and facilitators of these best practices are described. PMID:20077964

  18. Teachers' Professional Learning: The Role of Knowledge Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niehoff, Karissa

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the degree to which knowledge management strategies addressed teacher professional learning at the high school level. In the setting of a Connecticut public high school, interviews were conducted which explored teacher perceptions of knowledge sharing practices in the school and how those practices influenced their…

  19. Technology transfer: Promoting irrigation progress and best management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Educational efforts promoting irrigation best management practices are designed to increase adoption of these practices and increase public understanding of the importance of irrigation. They increase visibility and the impact of the Ogallala Aquifer Program and promote affiliated research and exten...

  20. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facility pest management practice standard. 205.271 Section 205.271 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...

  1. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facility pest management practice standard. 205.271 Section 205.271 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...

  2. Reverse quality management: developing evidence-based best practices in health emergency management.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tim; Cox, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Health's Framework for Core Functions in Public Health was the catalyst that inspired this review of best practices in health emergency management. The fieldwork was conducted in the fall of 2005 between hurricane Katrina and the South Asia earthquake. These tragedies, shown on 24/7 television news channels, provided an eyewitness account of disaster management, or lack of it, in our global village world. It is not enough to just have best practices in place. There has to be a governance structure that can be held accountable. This review of best practices lists actions in support of an emergency preparedness culture at the management, executive, and corporate/governance levels of the organization. The methodology adopted a future quality management approach of the emergency management process to identify the corresponding performance indictors that correlated with practices or sets of practices. Identifying best practice performance indictors needed to conduct a future quality management audit is described as reverse quality management. Best practices cannot be assessed as stand-alone criteria; they are influenced by organizational culture. The defining of best practices was influenced by doubt about defining a practice it is hoped will never be performed, medical staff involvement, leadership, and an appreciation of the resources required and how they need to be managed. Best practice benchmarks are seen as being related more to "measures" of performance defined locally and agreed on by 2 or more parties rather than to achieving industrial standards. Relating practices to performance indicators and then to benchmarks resulted in the development of a Health Emergency Management Best Practices Matrix that lists specific practice in the different phases of emergency management. PMID:16622359

  3. Impact of Land Management Practices on Carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and Other Arthropods on the Western High Plains of North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work was done in plots that had been subjected to three successive years of an agronomic experiment that evaluated the effects of a wheat cover crop or no cover crop on weed and water management. After the third growing season, pitfall traps were installed and arthropods were collected and iden...

  4. Teaching practice management skills to pediatric residents.

    PubMed

    Babitch, Leland A

    2006-11-01

    To satisfy the core competencies required by the Pediatric Residency Review Committee, the author describes an educational program for the residents in a large pediatric training program. The course provides a year-long overview of multiple medical management topics. The sessions cover nonclinical subjects usually missed in other educational settings, with particular focus on areas of finance, compliance, personnel management, career advancement, and leadership. The series is currently in its third year, with a positive response from the participants, and demonstrated improvement in resident knowledge of the covered areas. PMID:17041173

  5. The Virtual Practice: Using the Residents' Continuity Clinic to Teach Practice Management and Systems-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose A.; Faust, Cheryl; Kenyon, Angie

    2009-01-01

    Background Education in systems-based practice is a required component of all postgraduate medical education programs in the United States. Competency in this area requires that trainees have an understanding of the health care system sufficient to provide optimal care to patients. Most trainees in residency programs have little understanding of the complexities and challenges of present-day practice in the current system of care and consider themselves unprepared to undertake this activity following completion of training. Training in practice management in residency programs has not been emphasized as an important component of systems-based practice. Historically, practice management training in residency programs has been done using a fully didactic model, and residents have expressed a desire to learn this skill by becoming more directly involved in the operations and management of a practice. The patient visit touches many aspects of the health care system, including clinic operations, insurance, quality, and finances. Approach At our institution, we used the residents' continuity clinic practices as a vehicle to provide education in practice management and systems-based practice by creating a curriculum that included the residents' perceived gaps in knowledge regarding going into practice. This is known as the virtual practice. This curriculum is taught using data obtained from residents' practice to illustrate concepts in many areas, including primary practice operations, malpractice insurance, financial benchmarks, and career planning. Results Resident self-assessed knowledge of these areas increased after participating in the curriculum, and resident testimonials indicate satisfaction with the project. In addition, residents have become engaged and interested in how their effort translates into performance and how they participate in the health care system. PMID:21975715

  6. Knowledge Management in E-Learning Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Yucel

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to extension of IT in educational activities, the difficulties based on time and space are disappearing and the management and the execution of these activities can be implemented more effectively and beneficially. Even though there are significant developments about e-learning both in academic and professional platforms, there are some…

  7. SOIL CARBON SEQUESTRATION UNDER DIFFERENT MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five management systems: continuous corn (CC), cropland to woodland (CW), cropland to pastures (CP), no-till (NT), and conservation reserve program (CRP), were selected to evaluate their long-term impacts (5, 10 and 15 yr) on soil C sequestration. Nine soil cores from each system were randomly colle...

  8. Solid Waste Management Practices in EBRP Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Nadine L.

    1994-01-01

    A Louisiana school district has made tremendous progress toward developing and implementing an environmentally friendly solid waste management program. Packaging changes in school food service, newspaper and aluminum can recycling, and composting of leaf and yard waste have contributed to reduced waste sent to the local landfill. (MLF)

  9. Doc practice management set to explode.

    PubMed

    Jaklevic, M C

    1995-08-14

    An industry that barely existed give years ago is emerging as a prime mechanism to organize doctors. Independent physician management companies are uniquely situated to do the job as HMOs rethink the strategy of employing physicians and as hospitals find doctors reluctant to come under their control. PMID:10144707

  10. Learning Culture, Line Manager and HR Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the role of line management and learning culture in the development of professional practice for the human resource (HR) practitioner. Design/methodology/approach: Three-year longitudinal, matched-pair study involving five participants and their line managers. Findings: Two of the five participants experienced…

  11. VET Manager Identities: Culture, Philosophy and Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Using a post-structural approach this article investigates the working lives of frontline managers in VET and how they negotiate change in their day to day practices and decision making. The article is organised around accounts made by managers from different types of Vocational Education and Training (VET) organisations, namely: Technical and…

  12. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES DESIGN GUIDE VOLUME 1 - GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is Volume 1 of a three volume series that provides guidance on the selection and design of stormwater management Best Management Practices (BMPs). This first volume provides general considerations associated with the selection and design of BMPs.
    Volume I provi...

  13. An Examination of Assistant Professors' Project Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson; Hartshorne, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify factors that influence the use of project management in higher education research projects by investigating the project management practices of assistant professors. Design/methodology/approach: Using a grounded theory approach that included in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 22…

  14. Reducing watershed scale phosphorus export through integrated management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus losses from golf course have been documented and are comparable to losses from agriculture and urban areas. Integrated management practices are required to address the problem. An integrated management approach using filter socks and limiting the amount of phosphorus applied to the golf c...

  15. Risk Management Practices of University Based Adventure Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Todd M.

    A survey of 652 adventure recreation agencies in higher education settings examined the use of risk management practices and the relationships between agency characteristics and risk management techniques. The survey contained 27 Likert Scale questions divided into four categories (agency guidance, staff development, participant education, and…

  16. Managing for change. Models and questions for group practice leaders.

    PubMed

    Talbot, J F

    1999-01-01

    The health care environment continues to be characterized by rapid change and unpredictability. Perhaps the only constant is change itself. Managing successfully in this environment demands an increasing level of sophistication. In a rapidly changing environment, the manager must provide focus and direction and at the same time stay flexible so that the organization can quickly adjust to environmental demands. This article describes models for successful change management, followed by questions for the leader in a group practice. PMID:10662464

  17. QuickBird Satellite and Ground-based Multispectral Data Correlations with Agronomic Parameters of Irrigated Maize Grown in Small Plots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Satellite remote sensing has not been practical for agronomic research conducted in small plots due to spatial resolution issues. Objectives were to determine (1) the potential use of QuickBird high resolution digital images for estimating agronomic parameters of irrigated maize (Zea mays L.) grown...

  18. Effects of Privately Owned Land Management Practices on Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getson, J. M.; Hutyra, L.; Short, A. G.; Templer, P. H.; Kittredge, D.

    2014-12-01

    An increasing fraction of the global population lives in urban settings. Understanding how the human-natural system couple and decouple biogeochemical cycles across urbanization gradients is crucial for human health and environmental sustainability. Natural processes of nutrient deposition, export, uptake, and internal cycling can be disrupted by human activities. Residential landscape management (e.g. composting, leaf litter collection, fertilizer application) interrupts these natural biogeochemical cycles; therefore, it is key to characterize these practices and their impacts. This study looks at private land management practices along a rural to urban gradient in Boston, Massachusetts. We used a mail survey instrument coupled with biogeochemical measurements and remote sensing derived estimates of aboveground biomass to estimate biogeochemical modifications associated with residential landscape management practices. We find parcel size influences management behavior, management practices differ for leaf litter and lawn clippings, and fertilizer application is unrelated to parcel size or degree of urban-ness. These management practices result in nutrient redistribution that differs with residential characteristics.

  19. Trophic ulcers-Practical management guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Vinita; Venkateshwaran, N; Khare, Nishant

    2012-01-01

    The management of patients with trophic ulcers and their consequences is difficult not only because it is a recurrent and recalcitrant problem but also because the pathogenesis of the ulcer maybe different in each case. Methodically and systematically evaluating and ruling out concomitant pathologies helps to address each patient's specific needs and hence bring down devastating complications like amputation. With incidence of diabetes being high in our country, and leprosy being endemic too the consequences of neuropathy and angiopathy are faced by most wound care specialists. This article presents a review of current English literature available on this subject. The search words were entered in PubMed central and appropriate abstracts reviewed. Relevant full text articles were retrieved and perused. Cross references from these articles were also reviewed. Based on these articles and the authors’ experiences algorithms for management have been presented to facilitate easier understanding. It is hoped that the information presented in this article will help in management of this recalcitrant problem. PMID:23162234

  20. Building an exceptional imaging management team: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    Building a strong, cohesive, and talented managerial team is a critical endeavor for imaging administrators, as the job will be enhanced if supported by a group of high-performing, well-developed managers. For the purposes of this article, leadership and management are discussed as two separate, yet equally important, components of an imaging administrator's role. The difference between the two is defined as: leadership relates to people, management relates to process. There are abundant leadership and management theories that can help imaging administrators develop managers and ultimately build a better team. Administrators who apply these theories in practical and meaningful ways will improve their teams' leadership and management aptitude. Imaging administrators will find it rewarding to coach and develop managers and witness transformations that result from improved leadership and management abilities. PMID:22292237

  1. Evidence-Based Practices in Classroom Management: Considerations for Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonsen, Brandi; Fairbanks, Sarah; Briesch, Amy; Myers, Diane; Sugai, George

    2008-01-01

    Classroom management is a critical skill area. Teachers should be trained and supported in implementing practices that are likely to be successful; that is, practices that are backed by evidence. The purpose of this paper is to describe the outcomes of a systematic literature search conducted to identify evidence-based classroom management…

  2. Variability of Total Below Ground Carbon Allocation amongst Common Agricultural Land Management Practices: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacha, K. M.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wilson, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    Field measurements and numerical models are currently being used to estimate quantities of Total Belowground Carbon Allocation (TBCA) for three representative land uses, viz. corn, soybeans, and prairie bromegrass for CRP (Conservation Reserve Program) of an agricultural Iowa sub-watershed, located within the Clear Creek Watershed (CCW). Since it is difficult to measure TBCA directly, a mass balance approach has been implemented to estimate TBCA as follows: TBCA = FS + FE+ Δ(CS + CR + CL) - FA , where the term Fs denotes soil respiration; FE is the carbon content of the eroded/deposited soil; ΔCS, ΔCR, ΔCL denote the changes in carbon content of the mineral soil, plant roots, and litter layer, respectively; and FA is the above ground litter fall of dead plant material to the soil. The terms are hypothesized to have a huge impact on TBCA within agricultural settings due to intensive tillage practices, water-driven soil erosion/deposition, and high usage of fertilizer. To test our hypothesis, field measurements are being performed at the plot scale, replicating common agricultural land management practices. Soil respiration (FS) is being measured with an EGM-4 CO2 Gas Analyzer and SRC-1 Soil Respiration Chamber (PP Systems), soil moisture and temperature are recorded in the top 20 cm for each respective soil respiration measurement, and litter fall rates (FA) are acquired by collecting the residue in a calibrated pan. The change in carbon content of the soil (ΔCS), roots (ΔCR) and litter layer (ΔCL) are being analyzed by collecting soil samples throughout the life cycle of the plant. To determine the term FE for the three representative land management practices, a funnel collection system located at the plot outlet was used for collecting the eroded material after natural rainfall events. Field measurements of TBCA at the plot scale via the mass balance approach are used to calibrate the numerical agronomic process model DAYCENT, which simulates the daily

  3. The Principles and Practice of Educational Management. Educational Management: Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Tony, Ed.; Bell, Les, Ed.

    This book examines the main themes in educational management and leadership, including strategy, human resources, teaching and learning, finance, external relations, and quality. The 19 chapters are divided into 7 sections: "The Context of Educational Management,""Leadership and Strategic Management,""Human Resource Management,""Managing Learning…

  4. Best practices: applying management analysis of excellence to immunization.

    PubMed

    Wishner, Amy; Aronson, Jerold; Kohrt, Alan; Norton, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The authors applied business management tools to analyze and promote excellence and to evaluate differences between average and above-average immunization peformers in private practices. The authors conducted a pilot study of 10 private practices in Pennsylvania using tools common in management to assess practices' organizational climate and managerial style. Authoritative and coaching styles of physician leaders were common to both groups. Managerial styles that emphasized higher levels of clarity and responsibility managerial styles were evident in the large practices; and rewards and flexibility styles were higher in the small above-average practices. The findings of this pilot study match results seen in high performers in other industries. It concludes that the authoritative style appears to have the most impact on performance. It has interesting implications for training/behavior change to improve immunization rates, along with traditional medical interventions. PMID:15921143

  5. Management Practices and Tools: 2000-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This custom bibliography from the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program lists a sampling of records found in the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database. The scope of this topic is divided into four parts and covers the adoption of proven personnel and management reforms to implement the national space exploration vision, including the use of "system-of-systems" approach; policies of spiral, evolutionary development; reliance upon lead systems integrators; and independent technical and cost assessments. This area of focus is one of the enabling technologies as defined by NASA s Report of the President s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, published in June 2004.

  6. Penicillin allergy: a practical approach to management.

    PubMed

    Sussman, G L; Davis, K; Kohler, P F

    1986-06-15

    Although penicillin is nontoxic, it is highly immunogenic and is the most common drug that causes allergic reactions. A previous reaction to penicillin has been shown to be unreliable in predicting sensitivity in 75% to 90% of patients. To more accurately test for penicillin allergy, diagnostic skin test reagents have been developed; these include the major determinant (benzylpenicilloyl-polylysine) and the minor determinant mixture (penicillin G potassium, benzylpenicilloate sodium and benzylpenicilloyl-N-propylamine). Penicillin skin testing has been shown to be safe and useful in predicting immediate IgE-mediated reactions (overall predictive value 99%). Reactions that occur when patients are challenged with penicillin are mild or accelerated urticarial reactions. We outline a practical and rational therapeutic approach based on the current understanding of penicillin allergy. PMID:3518897

  7. Participatory approaches to understanding practices of flood management across borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, L. J.; Forrester, J.; Oughton, E. A.; Cinderby, S.; Donaldson, A.; Anness, L.; Passmore, D.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to outline and present initial results from a study designed to identify principles of and practices for adaptive co-management strategies for resilience to flooding in borderlands using participatory methods. Borderlands are the complex and sometimes undefined spaces existing at the interface of different territories and draws attention towards messy connections and disconnections (Strathern 2004; Sassen 2006). For this project the borderlands concerned are those between professional and lay knowledge, between responsible agencies, and between one nation and another. Research was focused on the River Tweed catchment, located on the Scottish-English border. This catchment is subject to complex environmental designations and rural development regimes that make integrated management of the whole catchment difficult. A multi-method approach was developed using semi-structured interviews, Q methodology and participatory GIS in order to capture wide ranging practices for managing flooding, the judgements behind these practices and to 'scale up' participation in the study. Professionals and local experts were involved in the research. The methodology generated a useful set of options for flood management, with research outputs easily understood by key management organisations and the wider public alike. There was a wide endorsement of alternative flood management solutions from both managers and local experts. The role of location was particularly important for ensuring communication and data sharing between flood managers from different organisations and more wide ranging stakeholders. There were complex issues around scale; both the mismatch between communities and evidence of flooding and the mismatch between governance and scale of intervention for natural flood management. The multi-method approach was essential in capturing practice and the complexities around governance of flooding. The involvement of key flood management organisations was

  8. Nutritional management of newborn infants: Practical guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ben, Xiao-Ming

    2008-01-01

    The requirements of growth and organ development create a challenge in nutritional management of newborn infants, especially premature newborn and intestinal-failure infants. Since their feeding may increase the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, some high-risk infants receive a small volume of feeding or parenteral nutrition (PN) without enteral feeding. This review summarizes the current research progress in the nutritional management of newborn infants. Searches of MEDLINE (1998-2007), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2007), abstracts and conference proceedings, references from relevant publications in the English language were performed, showing that breast milk is the preferred source of nutrients for enteral feeding of newborn infants. The number of nutrients found in human milk was recommended as a guideline in establishing the minimum and maximum levels in infant formulas. The fear of necrotizing enterocolitis and feeding intolerance are the major factors limiting the use of the enteral route as the primary means of nourishing premature infants. PN may help to meet many of the nutritional needs of these infants, but has significant detrimental side effects. Trophic feedings (small volume of feeding given at the same rate for at least 5 d) during PN are a strategy to enhance the feeding tolerance and decrease the side effects of PN and the time to achieve full feeding. Human milk is a key component of any strategy for enteral nutrition of all infants. However, the amounts of calcium, phosphorus, zinc and other nutrients are inadequate to meet the needs of the very low birth weight (VLBW) infants during growth. Therefore, safe and effective means to fortify human milk are essential to the care of VLBW infants. PMID:18985802

  9. Judging adaptive management practices of U.S. agencies.

    PubMed

    Fischman, Robert L; Ruhl, J B

    2016-04-01

    All U.S. federal agencies administering environmental laws purport to practice adaptive management (AM), but little is known about how they actually implement this conservation tool. A gap between the theory and practice of AM is revealed in judicial decisions reviewing agency adaptive management plans. We analyzed all U.S. federal court opinions published through 1 January 2015 to identify the agency AM practices courts found most deficient. The shortcomings included lack of clear objectives and processes, monitoring thresholds, and defined actions triggered by thresholds. This trio of agency shortcuts around critical, iterative steps characterizes what we call AM-lite. Passive AM differs from active AM in its relative lack of management interventions through experimental strategies. In contrast, AM-lite is a distinctive form of passive AM that fails to provide for the iterative steps necessary to learn from management. Courts have developed a sophisticated understanding of AM and often offer instructive rather than merely critical opinions. The role of the judiciary is limited by agency discretion under U.S. administrative law. But courts have overturned some agency AM-lite practices and insisted on more rigorous analyses to ensure that the promised benefits of structured learning and fine-tuned management have a reasonable likelihood of occurring. Nonetheless, there remains a mismatch in U.S. administrative law between the flexibility demanded by adaptive management and the legal objectives of transparency, public participation, and finality. PMID:26306648

  10. Innovation in Managing the Learning of Management Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotlar, Morton; Green, Thad B.

    1976-01-01

    A Video-Audio-Participative (VAP) system was developed to teach management innovation to large classes using a role playing branched programed film in the classroom. An experimental study confirmed that VAP allowed for teaching more information better in a shorter time while requiring less preparation by instructors but retaining flexibility for…

  11. Management of sarcoidosis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Jeny, Florence; Bouvry, Diane; Freynet, Olivia; Soussan, Michael; Brauner, Michel; Planes, Carole; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown cause with very diverse presentation, outcome, severity and need for treatments. While some presentations may be very typical, for many patients, the presentation is nonspecific, with shared associations with other diseases at times being by far more frequent or misleading, which can be a cause of significant delay and often several consultations before a diagnosis of sarcoidosis can be confirmed. This is particularly the case when pulmonary manifestations are in the forefront. The diagnosis relies on three well-known criteria. In clinical practice, these criteria are not easily implemented, particularly by physicians without expertise in sarcoidosis, which can lead to a risk of either under- or over-diagnosis. Qualifying the presentation according to sarcoidosis diagnosis is essential. However, it is often not easy to classify the presentation as typical versus compatible or compatible versus inconsistent. Further investigations are needed before any other hypothesis is to be considered. It is important to detect events and to determine whether or not they are indicative of a flare of sarcoidosis. Eventually, treatment needs to be related to the correct indications. The evaluation of the efficacy and safety of treatments is crucial. To address such issues, we present five emblematic cases that illustrate this. PMID:27246591

  12. SIAD: practical recommendations for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, M; Garrahy, A; Thompson, C J

    2016-09-01

    Hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte disturbance encountered in hospitalized patients, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD) is the most frequent underlying disorder. There is a well-recognized relationship between hyponatremia and increased morbidity and mortality. Therefore, to provide appropriate treatment is critical to improve the clinical outcome related to SIAD-hyponatremia. There have been important advances in the treatment of SIAD over the last decade, leading to the publication of several clinical guidelines. In particular, the introduction of the vasopressin-2 receptor antagonists provides a potent pharmacological tool to target the underlying pathophysiology of SIAD. The evidence base recommendations of the available therapies for SIAD are discussed in this study. Fluid restriction is considered the first-line therapy by the recent published guidelines, but it is certainly ineffective or unfeasible in many patients with SIAD. We discuss a number of relevant points to the use of fluid restriction in this study, including the lack of good evidence-based recommendations to support its use. Conversely, the clinical efficacy of oral tolvaptan in SIAD supported by good quality randomized, placebo controlled, clinical trials. However, the cost of the therapy and the need for long-term safety data may limit its widespread use. Finally, new recommendations for the management of acute hyponatremia with a focus on the use of bolus therapy with 3 % hypertonic sodium chloride are described in this study. PMID:27094044

  13. Performance Management Practices, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Adoption and Managed Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagaari, James R. K.; Munene, John C.; Ntayi, Joseph Mpeera

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the need for managers of public universities to pay attention to performance management practices and information communication technology (ICT) adoption in order to achieve successful managed performance. Design/methodology/approach: Using a disproportionate stratified purposive approach, a…

  14. Practical management of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is relentless progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) of unknown etiology. Main pathogenesis is aberrant recovery of epithelial injury and collagen deposition. Majority of IPF patients have been elderly men with smokers. However, there are important differential diagnosis such as fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), Connective Tissue Disease (CTD) associated ILD, chronic hypersensitivity pneumonia (CHP). Clinical point of view, non-productive cough and progressive exertional dyspnea are main symptoms. In addition, scalene muscle hypertrophy, fine crackles and finger clubbing are key findings. Serum marker such as lactate deydrogenase (LDH), Krebs von den Lungeng-6 (KL-6) are sensitive for ILD detection and activity. Pulmonary function test and 6 minute walk test (6MWT) are quite meaningful physiological examination. Serial change of forced vital capacity 6MWT distance predict mortality of IPF. International IPF guideline published recently and highlighted on the importance of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings. Key findings of IPF are honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and subpleural reticular opacity. IPF is chronic progressive disease. Therefore, tracing disease behavior is crucial and unifying clinical, physiological, imaging information over time provide useful information for physicians.In management, many candidate agent failed to have positive result. Pirfenidone which is anti-fibrotic agent showed to slow the decline of vital capacity and prevent of acute exacerbation. Molecular agent such as nintedanib is promising agent for prevention of progression of IPF. In this review, we review the clinical information of IPF and IPF guideline. Lastly, we show the clinical algorithm of this devastated disease. PMID:26278687

  15. Effects of tillage practices on drainage and nitrate leaching from winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management strategies for winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the mid-Atlantic must balance agronomic production with practices to reduce nitrate-N (NO3-N) leaching. In the mid-Atlantic winter wheat is commonly grown using no-tillage (NT), but few studies have evaluated the effects of NT on NO3-...

  16. Diffusion of pain management research into nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dooks, P

    2001-04-01

    The promotion of evidence based practice is a challenge within nursing. Pain management is a prime example of this practice research gap. There is solid evidence for 20 years to promote positive change in our methods of pain management, yet outdated approaches are still amazingly evident. Even among oncology nurses, who place a high value on promoting patient comfort, there is a lack of evidence-based pain management. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory provides an interesting framework for examining the issues and possible solutions to this complex problem. Rogers' theory examines how changes diffuse through a social system over time and also exposes some of the barriers and facilitators to this process. The theory looks at adopters, the nature of the innovation, the social system, and communication patterns. Identifying the barriers of the past will help nursing to overcome these same barriers and increase the adoption of evidence-based pain management approaches in the future. PMID:11318267

  17. Initial development of a practical safety audit tool to assess fleet safety management practices.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Friswell, Rena; Mooren, Lori

    2012-07-01

    Work-related vehicle crashes are a common cause of occupational injury. Yet, there are few studies that investigate management practices used for light vehicle fleets (i.e. vehicles less than 4.5 tonnes). One of the impediments to obtaining and sharing information on effective fleet safety management is the lack of an evidence-based, standardised measurement tool. This article describes the initial development of an audit tool to assess fleet safety management practices in light vehicle fleets. The audit tool was developed by triangulating information from a review of the literature on fleet safety management practices and from semi-structured interviews with 15 fleet managers and 21 fleet drivers. A preliminary useability assessment was conducted with 5 organisations. The audit tool assesses the management of fleet safety against five core categories: (1) management, systems and processes; (2) monitoring and assessment; (3) employee recruitment, training and education; (4) vehicle technology, selection and maintenance; and (5) vehicle journeys. Each of these core categories has between 1 and 3 sub-categories. Organisations are rated at one of 4 levels on each sub-category. The fleet safety management audit tool is designed to identify the extent to which fleet safety is managed in an organisation against best practice. It is intended that the audit tool be used to conduct audits within an organisation to provide an indicator of progress in managing fleet safety and to consistently benchmark performance against other organisations. Application of the tool by fleet safety researchers is now needed to inform its further development and refinement and to permit psychometric evaluation. PMID:22342958

  18. Risk Management Techniques and Practice Workshop Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, T; Zosel, M

    2008-12-02

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted a two-day Risk Management Techniques and Practice (RMTAP) workshop held September 18-19 at the Hotel Nikko in San Francisco. The purpose of the workshop, which was sponsored by the SC/Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, was to assess current and emerging techniques, practices, and lessons learned for effectively identifying, understanding, managing, and mitigating the risks associated with acquiring leading-edge computing systems at high-performance computing centers (HPCCs). Representatives from fifteen high-performance computing (HPC) organizations, four HPC vendor partners, and three government agencies attended the workshop. The overall workshop findings were: (1) Standard risk management techniques and tools are in the aggregate applicable to projects at HPCCs and are commonly employed by the HPC community; (2) HPC projects have characteristics that necessitate a tailoring of the standard risk management practices; (3) All HPCC acquisition projects can benefit by employing risk management, but the specific choice of risk management processes and tools is less important to the success of the project; (4) The special relationship between the HPCCs and HPC vendors must be reflected in the risk management strategy; (5) Best practices findings include developing a prioritized risk register with special attention to the top risks, establishing a practice of regular meetings and status updates with the platform partner, supporting regular and open reviews that engage the interests and expertise of a wide range of staff and stakeholders, and documenting and sharing the acquisition/build/deployment experience; and (6) Top risk categories include system scaling issues, request for proposal/contract and acceptance testing, and

  19. Strategies for searching and managing evidence-based practice resources.

    PubMed

    Robb, Meigan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2014-10-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice requires the use of effective search strategies to locate relevant resources to guide practice change. Continuing education and staff development professionals can assist nurses to conduct effective literature searches. This article provides suggestions for strategies to aid in identifying search terms. Strategies also are recommended for refining searches by using controlled vocabulary, truncation, Boolean operators, PICOT (Population/Patient Problem, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, Time) searching, and search limits. Suggestions for methods of managing resources also are identified. Using these approaches will assist in more effective literature searches and may help evidence-based practice decisions. PMID:25221988

  20. Clinical practice guideline: tonsillitis II. Surgical management.

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Toepfner, Nicole; Steffen, Gregor; Waldfahrer, Frank; Berner, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, a total of 84,332 patients had undergone extracapsular tonsillectomies (TE) and 11,493 a tonsillotomy (TT) procedure in Germany. While the latter is increasingly performed, the number of the former is continually decreasing. However, a constant number of approximately 12,000 surgical procedures in terms of abscess-tonsillectomies or incision and drainage are annually performed in Germany to treat patients with a peritonsillar abscess. The purpose of this part of the clinical guideline is to provide clinicians in any setting with a clinically focused multi-disciplinary guidance through the surgical treatment options to reduce inappropriate variation in clinical care, improve clinical outcome and reduce harm. Surgical treatment options encompass intracapsular as well as extracapsular tonsil surgery and are related to three distinct entities: recurrent episodes of (1) acute tonsillitis, (2) peritonsillar abscess and (3) infectious mononucleosis. Conservative management of these entities is subject of part I of this guideline. (1) The quality of evidence for TE to resolve recurrent episodes of tonsillitis is moderate for children and low for adults. Conclusions concerning the efficacy of TE on the number of sore throat episodes per year are limited to 12 postoperative months in children and 5-6 months in adults. The impact of TE on the number of sore throat episodes per year in children is modest. Due to the heterogeneity of data, no firm conclusions on the effectiveness of TE in adults can be drawn. There is still an urgent need for further research to reliably estimate the value of TE compared to non-surgical therapy of tonsillitis/tonsillo-pharyngitis. The impact of TE on quality of life is considered as being positive, but further research is mandatory to establish appropriate inventories and standardized evaluation procedures, especially in children. In contrast to TE, TT or comparable procedures are characterized by a substantially lower postoperative

  1. Independent practice associations and physician-hospital organizations can improve care management for smaller practices.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Wu, Frances M; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs place pressures on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide. But physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes. We used data from a unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care. Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients. On average, practices participating in these organizations provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did (10.4 versus 3.8). Half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs. These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations. PMID:23918481

  2. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Lemus, Rocky; Baldwin, Brian; Lang, David

    2011-10-01

    ‚€Ã‚¢ How will these crops affect fertilizer use and water quality? • What kind of water management is needed to maintain a productive crop? The answers to these questions will help supporting institutions across the state to improve land assessment and agronomic management practices for biomass production. In the last decade, energy supply has become a worldwide problem. Bioenergy crops could supply energy in the future. Bioenergy crops are plants, usually perennial grasses and trees, that produce a lot of biomass that can be converted into energy. Bioenergy crops can be grown for two energy markets: power generation, such as heat and electricity, or liquid fuel, such as cellulosic ethanol. These resources could reduce petroleum dependency and greenhouse gas production. Woody plants and herbaceous warm-season grasses, such as switchgrass, giant miscanthus,energy cane, and high yielding sorghums, could be major sources of biomass in Mississippi.

  3. 75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... AGENCY Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities AGENCY... guidance document entitled, Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities... been studying unused pharmaceutical disposal practices at health care facilities, prompted by...

  4. Managing agricultural phosphorus for water quality protection: principles for progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eutrophication of aquatic systems due to diffuse pollution of agricultural phosphorus (P) is a local, even regional, water quality problem that can be found world-wide. Sustainable management of P requires prudent tempering of agronomic practices, recognizing that additional steps are often requ...

  5. 40 CFR 440.148 - Best Management Practices (BMP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Best Management Practices (BMP). 440.148 Section 440.148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Gold Placer...

  6. 40 CFR 440.148 - Best Management Practices (BMP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Best Management Practices (BMP). 440.148 Section 440.148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Gold Placer...

  7. 40 CFR 440.148 - Best Management Practices (BMP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Best Management Practices (BMP). 440.148 Section 440.148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Gold Placer...

  8. ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION: MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR PROTECTING AND ENHANCING AQUATIC RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster describes research that addresses the question: Which management practices are most successful for protection and restoration of ecological resources? The Ecosystem Restoration Research Program of EPA/ORD is designed to conduct basic and applied field research to eva...

  9. Chemical composition of cottonseed affected by cropping management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed is a valuable raw material for a range of food, animal feed, and industrial (such as adhesives) products. Chemical composition is one of the critical parameters to evaluate cottonseed's quality and potential end use. However, the information on the impacts of cropping management practices...

  10. A Practical Approach to Osteoporosis Management in the Geriatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Dan; Cheung, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition that is seen commonly in elderly patients, and it is associated with a large burden of morbidity and mortality. This article provides a practical approach to the workup and management of osteoporosis in patients 65 years or older. PMID:25825609

  11. Reducing Pesticide and Nutrient Runoff from Fairways Using Management Practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We designed experiments to measure the quantity of fertilizers and pesticides transported with runoff from golf course fairway turf, and to evaluate the ability of management practices to reduce the transport of applied chemicals with runoff. Overall aeratation of fairway turf with hollow tines redu...

  12. A Practical Guide to Strategic Enrollment Management Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, R. B.; Taylor, James S.; Peterson, Ange; Machado-Taylor, Maria de Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, strategic enrollment management (SEM) has become a major force in the organization and practice of higher education. With limited financial resources for financial aid, institutions must balance the need to attract and admit a freshman class that fits well with the institution and also provide the necessary financial support…

  13. COST ESTIMATING EQUATIONS FOR BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (BMP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the development of an interactive internet-based cost-estimating tool for commonly used urban storm runoff best management practices (BMP), including: retention and detention ponds, grassed swales, and constructed wetlands. The paper presents the cost data, c...

  14. Targeting of Watershed Management Practices for Water Quality Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensuring a clean and adequate water supply implies conservative use of water and protecting water resources from pollution. Sediment, nutrient, and pesticide losses in runoff are major pollutants of surface waters in the Midwest. This publication addresses the targeting of best management practices ...

  15. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Schechter

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame by application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. A secondary and synergistic objective is purification and injection of produced water into Spraberry reservoirs.

  16. Strategic Enrollment Management: Core Strategies and Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontrager, Bob

    2004-01-01

    This second of a two-part series builds on the core concepts and structural considerations discussed in the first part (in the Winter 2004 issue of "College and University") to identify the core strategies and best practices that characterize successful enrollment management (SEM) organizations. Successful SEM operations place a high premium on…

  17. Enrollment Management Administrators' Perceptions of Community College Student Retention Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Merle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was three-fold: (a) to determine the retention practices most frequently used by community colleges to retain full-time, associate degree-seeking students from their first-to-second year of enrollment as perceived by enrollment management administrators; (b) to determine the level of importance placed on these practices…

  18. Baseline Management Practices at Providers in Better Jobs Better Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stott, Amy L.; Brannon, S. Diane; Vasey, Joseph; Dansky, Kathryn H.; Kemper, Peter

    2007-01-01

    High turnover and difficult recruitment of direct care workers are challenges for long-term care providers. This study reports the extent and variation of the use of management practices for direct care workers and their supervisors across four long-term care settings in the Better Jobs Better Care demonstration. Overall, there is limited use of…

  19. Biodetention: A best management practice for nonpoint source pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Murfee, G.; Scaief, J.; Whelan, M.

    1998-07-01

    Biodetention is an innovative nonpoint source (NPS) pollution control best management practice (BMP) developed as an alternative to sedimentation/filtration ponds. Biodetention is applicable as a runoff treatment system for concentrated point discharges from stormwater collection facilities. Treatment is facilitated by vegetative filter strips and stiff grass hedges.

  20. Classroom Management: Teacher Training, Attitudes and Beliefs, and Intervention Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladner, Margaret Catherine Davis

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factors that are associated with teacher classroom management with regard to training, attitudes and beliefs, and intervention practices of general and special education teachers in dealing with classroom control. These factors were examined in general and special education classrooms. The participants for this study were…

  1. Trajectories of Family Management Practices and Early Adolescent Behavioral Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ming-Te; Dishion, Thomas J.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; Willett, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Stage-environment fit theory was used to examine the reciprocal lagged relations between family management practices and early adolescent problem behavior during the middle school years. In addition, the potential moderating roles of family structure and of gender were explored. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to describe patterns of growth…

  2. 40 CFR 440.148 - Best Management Practices (BMP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Best Management Practices (BMP). 440.148 Section 440.148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Gold Placer Mine Subcategory §...

  3. 40 CFR 440.148 - Best Management Practices (BMP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Best Management Practices (BMP). 440.148 Section 440.148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Gold Placer Mine Subcategory §...

  4. Teacher Management Practices for First Graders with Attention Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Desiree W.; Rabiner, David L.; Hardy, Kristina K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether teacher reports of accommodations and interventions for inattentive first graders are consistent with best practice guidelines. Method: A total of 36 teachers completed the Teacher Management Questionnaire (TMQ) for 92 students in five predominantly low-income, minority schools. The TMQ is a newly developed measure…

  5. The Survey of College Marketing Programs. Volume 1: Management Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primary Research Group, Inc., New York, NY.

    This report presents 228 tables detailing findings concerning management practices of marketing programs at 68 colleges and universities. Highlights of this report include: a mean of 5 employees regularly visit high school guidance counselors; only 5 percent of the colleges sponsor campus visits for select applicants; 24 percent of the colleges…

  6. Practices of Management Development: A Malaysian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Kian Aun

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with a case study of Management Development (MD) practices at Malaysian Assurance Alliance (MAA). The aim of this research is to investigate how a large Malaysian insurance corporation developed and integrated MD initiatives with current organizational needs and tasks. Attempts were made to map and categorize the MD initiatives…

  7. Information Security Management Practices of K-12 School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyachwaya, Samson

    2013-01-01

    The research problem addressed in this quantitative correlational study was the inadequacy of sound information security management (ISM) practices in K-12 school districts, despite their increasing ownership of information assets. Researchers have linked organizational and sociotechnical factors to the implementation of information security…

  8. Successful Tutoring: Good Practice for Managers and Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Muriel

    This document, which draws on the findings of a survey of further education (FE) colleges in the United Kingdom and case studies of 9 FE colleges, presents good practices for managers of tutoring programs and tutors. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the changing role of tutors in the post-16 sector and the importance of recruiting, training, and…

  9. Design in Practice: Scenarios for Improving Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Lee; Chantelot, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing attention given to design in business, Design Thinking has had little impact on the quality of business school education. Building upon the foundations of long-standing critiques of management education and the potential for student-centric learning, the authors propose that the use of Design in Practice can significantly…

  10. Improving Leadership and Management Practices: One Step at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bella, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Taking small steps toward change is a sensible way to improve the leadership and management practices in an early care and education program. A director must be able to make continuous improvements without alienating staff by asking them to make drastic changes that seem overwhelming and unachievable. Taking on change one step at a time is a way…

  11. Total Quality Management Practices in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toremen, Fatih; Karakus, Mehmet; Yasan, Tezcan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of total quality management (TQM) practices in primary schools based on teachers' perceptions, and how their perceptions are related to different variables. Design/methodology/approach: In this study, a survey based descriptive scanning model was used. This study was carried out in…

  12. Teachers' Practical Knowledge about Classroom Management in Multicultural Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Tartwijk, Jan; den Brok, Perry; Veldman, Ietje; Wubbels, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Creating a positive working atmosphere in the classroom is the first concern of many student and beginning teachers in secondary education. Teaching in multicultural classrooms provides additional challenges for these teachers. This study identified shared practical knowledge about classroom management strategies of teachers who were successful in…

  13. Integrating leadership into a practice management curriculum for dental students.

    PubMed

    Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Skoulas, Angelique; Timothé, Peggy; Friedland, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    Curriculum evaluations by recent graduates of the Harvard School of Dental Medicine suggested the need for additional coursework in practice management. Given the complex challenges facing practitioners, the course design was expanded beyond the suggested practice management to include leadership theory and skills. Students were able to distinguish and assess their level of various leadership skills at the end of the course. The course received an overall rating of 4.23 on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent), with 84 percent of responding students indicating that their interest-specifically in the areas of clinical efficiency, practice management, reducing medical errors, communication, business, team building, leadership, and access to care-was enhanced. The responding students assessed their current leadership skills overall at 3.84. They assessed themselves best at "Integrity" (4.48) and worst at "Managing Conflict" (3.12). They felt that "Ability to Build Trust with Others" is the most beneficial skill for a dentist, while "Ability to Influence" is the least beneficial. Eighty-eight percent of students responding indicated that it is "Very Likely" they will continue to practice developing their leadership skills. Qualitative feedback was overwhelmingly positive and indicated that students found the course life-altering and highly valued its breadth of topics. PMID:20442423

  14. Long term management practices influenced soil aggregation and carbon dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil aggregation protects soil organic C (SOC) against rapid decomposition, improves soil quality, and reduces soil erosion potential. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of long-term (21 yrs.) management practices on SOC, water stable aggregate (WSA), and aggregate-associated ...

  15. ISSUES OF BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE DESIGN TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today, many municipalities are implementing low-cost best management practices (BMPs). Structural control BMPs involve building a structure of some kind to store stormwater until it can be discharged into a nearby receiving water. Commonly used structural treatment BMPs include...

  16. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Organic Production and Handling Requirements § 205.271 Facility pest management practice standard. (a) The producer or handler of an organic... habitat, food sources, and breeding areas; (2) Prevention of access to handling facilities; and...

  17. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Organic Production and Handling Requirements § 205.271 Facility pest management practice standard. (a) The producer or handler of an organic... habitat, food sources, and breeding areas; (2) Prevention of access to handling facilities; and...

  18. Reflecting on Hospitality Management Education through a Practice Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stierand, Marc; Zizka, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect on hospitality management education from a "practice epistemology" and discuss how a connecting of savoir (theoretical knowledge or "knowing"), savoir-faire (knowing how to do tasks, i.e. task-related skills) and savoir-être (knowing how to be, i.e. behavior) can develop into…

  19. Trajectories of family management practices and early adolescent behavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Te; Dishion, Thomas J; Stormshak, Elizabeth A; Willett, John B

    2011-09-01

    Stage-environment fit theory was used to examine the reciprocal lagged relations between family management practices and early adolescent problem behavior during the middle school years. In addition, the potential moderating roles of family structure and of gender were explored. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to describe patterns of growth in family management practices and adolescents' behavioral outcomes and to detect predictors of interindividual differences in initial status and rate of change. The sample comprised approximately 1,000 adolescents between ages 11 years and 15 years. The results indicated that adolescents' antisocial behaviors and substance use increased and their positive behavioral engagement decreased over time. As adolescent age increased, parental knowledge of their adolescent's activities decreased, as did parental rule making and support. The level and rate of change in family management and adolescent behavioral outcomes varied by family structure and by gender. Reciprocal longitudinal associations between parenting practices and adolescent problem behavior were found. Specifically, parenting practices predicted subsequent adolescent behavior, and adolescent behavior predicted subsequent parenting practices. In addition, parental warmth moderated the effects of parental knowledge and rule making on adolescent antisocial behavior and substance use over time. PMID:21688899

  20. Management of obstructive sleep apnea in children: A practical approach.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Kevin D; Jon, Cindy K; Szmuk, Peter; Lazar, Rande H; Mitchell, Ron B

    2016-07-01

    The management of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in children differs between institutions, and there is a need for an updated review of current practice. Literature was reviewed using the PubMed database from 1995 to 2015 by four tertiary care providers experienced in the management of children with SDB. Articles were selected for clinical applicability, strength of evidence, and practicality for practicing clinicians. Fifty-five articles were identified by tertiary care providers in pediatric anesthesiology, pediatric pulmonology, sleep medicine, and pediatric otolaryngology. Each reviewed and analyzed literature independently based on their specialties, and a consensus document was created. The consensus was that the majority of children with SDB do not undergo polysomnography (PSG) before adenotonsillectomy (T&A). Indications for PSG are presented, with a practical approach recommended for the otolaryngologist. Clinical practice guidelines are available from leading national societies, but their recommendations differ. T&A is the first-line treatment and is highly effective in normal-weight but not in obese children. The perioperative management of children is challenging and needs to be individualized. Young children, those with severe obstructive sleep apnea, and those with significant comorbidities need to be observed overnight. PMID:27434480

  1. Pediatric nurses' beliefs and pain management practices: an intervention pilot.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Wilkie, Diana J; Wang, Edward

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated feasibility of the Internet-based Relieve Children's Pain (RCP) protocol to improve nurses' management of children's pain. RCP is an interactive, content-focused, and Kolb's experiential learning theory-based intervention. Using a one-group, pretest-posttest design, we evaluated feasibility of RCP and pretest-posttest difference in scores for nurses' beliefs, and simulated and actual pain management practices. Twenty-four RNs completed an Internet-based Pain Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire (PBPQ, alpha=.83) before and after they completed the RCP and an Acceptability Scale afterward. Mean total PBPQ scores significantly improved from pretest to posttest as did simulated practice scores. After RCP in actual hospital practice, nurses administered significantly more ibuprofen and ketorolac and children's pain intensity significantly decreased. Findings showed strong evidence for the feasibility of RCP and study procedures and significant improvement in nurses' beliefs and pain management practices. The 2-hr RCP program is promising and warrants replication with an attention control group and a larger sample. PMID:21172923

  2. Fever management practices of neuroscience nurses: what has changed?

    PubMed

    Rockett, Hannah; Thompson, Hilaire J; Blissitt, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Current evidence shows that fever and hyperthermia are especially detrimental to patients with neurologic injury, leading to higher rates of mortality, greater disability, and longer lengths of stay. Although clinical practice guidelines exist for ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury, they lack specificity in their recommendations for fever management, making it difficult to formulate appropriate protocols for care. Using survey methods, the aims of this study were to (a) describe how nursing practices for fever management in this population have changed over the last several years, (b) assess if institutional protocols and nursing judgment follow published national guidelines for fever management in neuroscience patients, and (c) explore whether nurse or institutional characteristics influence decision making. Compared with the previous survey administered in 2007, there was a small increase (8%) in respondents reporting having an institutional fever protocol specific to neurologic patients. Temperatures to initiate treatment either based on protocols or nurse determination did not change from the previous survey. However, nurses with specialty certification and/or working in settings with institutional awards (e.g., Magnet status or Stroke Center Designation) initiated therapy at a lower temperature. Oral acetaminophen continues to be the primary choice for fever management, followed by ice packs and fans. This study encourages the development of a stepwise approach to neuro-specific protocols for fever management. Furthermore, it shows the continuing need to promote further education and specialty training among nurses and encourage collaboration with physicians to establish best practices. PMID:25634653

  3. Integrating behavior change theory into geriatric case management practice.

    PubMed

    Enguidanos, S

    2001-01-01

    Case management practices have continued to grow despite a lack of clear evidence of their efficacy. With the expanding segment of the elderly population, there is a critical need to develop and identify programs that will address the many needs of the aging. Geriatric Case Management has been the avenue selected by many health care providers to address these issues, focusing on maintaining health status and improving linkages with medical and community resources. Studies testing the effectiveness of these models have failed to demonstrate their effectiveness in reducing depression, reducing acute care service use, and improving or maintaining health status. The Geriatric Case Management models presented in these lack an evidence-based, theoretical framework that provides definition and direction for case management practice. This article introduces behavior change theories as a method of structuring and delineating the case management intervention. The Transtheoretical Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior are discussed and methods of integrating these theories into practice are discussed. PMID:11878076

  4. Using evidence-based management in a medical practice.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based management (EBMa) is the application of the evidence-based medicine process to making management decisions. EBMa has been described in a number of publications, which note the advantages of utilizing EBMa and offer generic guidance on the nature of EBMa evidence. This paper provides a specific EBMa pathway for physician practice and health system mangers to use to conduct EBMa database searches. It provides an example of conducting an EBMa search for a practice-based management problem. It describes how to do database searches using Advance Google Scholar, PubMed, and other data sources. It discusses challenges to conducting quality searches, including access to paid subscription databases, and offers suggestions to improve searches. Finally, the paper discusses the importance of establishing a culture of inquiry and using rapid cycle improvement methods to develop organizational EBMa support so health systems will devote adequate resources to information acquisition. PMID:20222263

  5. TelePain: A Community of Practice for Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Meins, Alexa R.; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Eaton, Linda; Gordon, Debra; Theodore, Brian; Tauben, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensive pain management services are primarily located in urban areas, limiting specialist consultation opportunities for community healthcare providers. A community of practice (CoP) for pain management could create opportunities for consultation by establishing professional relationships between community healthcare providers and pain management specialists. A CoP is a group of people with a common concern, set of problems, or a passion for something they do. Members of a CoP for pain management increase their knowledge of evidence-based pain management strategies in a way that is meaningful and relevant. In this article, we provide evidence that TelePain, an interdisciplinary, case-based pain management teleconference consultation program through the University of Washington, qualifies as a CoP and present preliminary evidence of TelePain's effectiveness as a CoP for pain management. Methods Specific behaviors and conversations gathered through participant observation during TelePain sessions were analyzed based on the 14 indicators Wegner developed to evaluate the presence of a CoP. To demonstrate preliminary effectiveness of TelePain as a CoP for pain management, descriptive statistics were used to summarize TelePain evaluation forms. Results TelePain is an example of a successful CoP for pain management as demonstrated by the presence of Wegner's 14 indicators. Additionally, evaluation forms showed that TelePain enhanced community healthcare providers' knowledge of pain management strategies and that continued participation in TelePain lead to community healthcare providers' increased confidence in their ability to provide pain management. Conclusion TelePain, a CoP for pain management, facilitates multidisciplinary collaboration and allows members to develop interdisciplinary care plans for complex pain patients through case study discussions. Evidence-based pain management strategies gained through CoP membership could be disseminated to

  6. Fever management practices of neuroscience nurses: national and regional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Kirkness, Catherine J; Mitchell, Pamela H; Webb, Deborah J

    2007-06-01

    Neuroscience patients with fever may have worse outcomes than those who are afebrile. However, neuroscience nurses who encounter this common problem face a translational gap between patient-outcomes research and bedside practice because there is no current evidence-based standard of care for fever management of the neurologically vulnerable patient. The aim of this study was to determine if there are trends in national practices for fever and hyperthermia management of the neurologically vulnerable patient. A 15-item mailed questionnaire was used to determine national and regional trends in fever and hyperthermia management and decision making by neuroscience nurses. Members of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses were surveyed (N = 1,225) and returned 328 usable surveys. Fewer than 20% of respondents reported having an explicit fever management protocol in place for neurologic patients, and 12.5% reported having a nonspecific patient protocol available for fever management. Several clear and consistent patterns in interventions for fever and hyperthermia management were seen nationally, including acetaminophen administration at a dose of 650 mg every 4 hours, ice packs, water cooling blankets, and tepid bathing. However, regional differences were seen in intervention choices and initial temperature to treat. PMID:17591411

  7. Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

    2001-08-01

    Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain

  8. Agronomic recycling of pig slurry and pig sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Garrido, Melisa; Sánchez García, Pablo; Faz Cano, Ángel; Büyükkılıç Yanardag, Asuman; Yanardag, Ibrahim; Kabas, Sebla; Ángeles Múñoz García, María; María Rosales Aranda, Rosa; Segura Ruíz, Juan Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Recycling pig slurry as organic fertilizer is a convenient and suitable way of waste elimination due to its low cost and high agronomic benefits. The objectives of this two year study are focused on improving and recycling pig slurry appropriately, and monitoring the soil-plant system at the same time. The evaluation of the agronomic effectiveness of different types of pig slurry (raw, solid, treated and depurated) in different doses (170 kg N ha-1 (legislated dose), 340 and 510 kg N ha-1) is innovative because the fertilizer value of each amendment can be balanced. Furthermore environmental issues such us volatilisation, leaching and salinisation have been considered for each treatment in order to set the viability of the study and to justify the treatments applied. Electrical conductivity, Kjeldhal nitrogen, sodium and potassium are the physico-chemical parameters most influenced in soils treated with doses 340 and 510 kg N ha-1. Additionally plant samples, especially halophyte, have shown the highest major and minor nutrients contents. Finally, pig slurry application in legislated doses could be considered a useful environmental practice; however, the development of the crop will be very influenced by the type of dose and amendment selected.

  9. The frontline clinical manager identifying direct reports' level of practice.

    PubMed

    Longo, M Anne; Roussel, Linda; Pennington, Sandra L; Hoying, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Patricia Benner applied the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to describe and interpret skill acquisition and clinical judgment in nursing practice. Operational definitions for the 5 levels of her original Novice to Expert Theory were used by the study participants in a large Midwestern pediatric hospital to self-identify their level of practice. The frontline clinical managers of these direct care registered nurses (RNs) used the same tool to rate their direct reports. The aim of this portion of a larger study was to determine if the clinical manager's perception of their direct reports was the same as that of the RNs. The results of this study are being used by one study unit's clinical managers as the basis for implementing the Hersey and Blanchard Situational Leadership Model. The clinical managers work with their direct reports depending on the level of practice and the details of the task to be performed. One example is creating therapeutic relationships with each other and with families to ensure a safe environment for all. PMID:23934257

  10. Management Documentation: Indicators & Good Practice at Cultural Heritage Places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppich, R.; Garcia Grinda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation for cultural heritage places usually refers to describing the physical attributes, surrounding context, condition or environment; most of the time with images, graphics, maps or digital 3D models in their various forms with supporting textural information. Just as important as this type of information is the documentation of managerial attributes. How do managers of cultural heritage places collect information related to financial or economic well-being? How are data collected over time measured, and what are significant indicators for improvement? What quality of indicator is good enough? Good management of cultural heritage places is essential for conservation longevity, preservation of values and enjoyment by the public. But how is management documented? The paper will describe the research methodology, selection and description of attributes or indicators related to good management practice. It will describe the criteria for indicator selection and why they are important, how and when they are collected, by whom, and the difficulties in obtaining this information. As importantly it will describe how this type of documentation directly contributes to improving conservation practice. Good practice summaries will be presented that highlight this type of documentation including Pamplona and Ávila, Spain and Valletta, Malta. Conclusions are drawn with preliminary recommendations for improvement of this important aspect of documentation. Documentation of this nature is not typical and presents a unique challenge to collect, measure and communicate easily. However, it is an essential category that is often ignored yet absolutely essential in order to conserve cultural heritage places.

  11. Prioritizing lean management practices in public and private hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Matloub; Malik, Mohsin

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to prioritize 21 healthcare wastes in public and private hospitals of United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design/methodology/approach - Seven healthcare wastes linked with lean management are further decomposed in to sub-criteria and to deal with this complexity of multi criteria decision-making process, analytical hierarchical process (AHP) method is used in this research. Findings - AHP framework for this study resulted in a ranking of 21 healthcare wastes in public and private hospitals of UAE. It has been found that management in private healthcare systems of UAE is putting more emphasis on the inventory waste. On the other hand, over processing waste has got highest weight in public hospitals of UAE. Research limitations/implications - The future directions of this research would be to apply a lean set of tools for the value stream optimization of the prioritized key improvement areas. Practical implications - This is a contribution to the continuing research into lean management, giving practitioners and designers a practical way for measuring and implementing lean practices across health organizations. Originality/value - The contribution of this research, through successive stages of data collection, measurement analysis and refinement, is a set of reliable and valid framework that can be subsequently used in conceptualization, prioritization of the waste reduction strategies in healthcare management. PMID:27119397

  12. A Digital Curate's Egg: A Risk Management Approach to Enhancing Data Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a case study of work performed at King's College London to survey information management practices, policies, and procedures applied by data creators and managers within three research units and three business units, and to determine the risk factors that may limit access and use of their digital assets over time. The…

  13. Chinese hotel general managers' perspectives on energy-saving practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yidan

    As hotels' concern about sustainability and budget-control is growing steadily, energy-saving issues have become one of the important management concerns hospitality industry face. By executing proper energy-saving practices, previous scholars believed that hotel operation costs can decrease dramatically. Moreover, they believed that conducting energy-saving practices may eventually help the hotel to gain other benefits such as an improved reputation and stronger competitive advantage. The energy-saving issue also has become a critical management problem for the hotel industry in China. Previous research has not investigated energy-saving in China's hotel segment. To achieve a better understanding of the importance of energy-saving, this document attempts to present some insights into China's energy-saving practices in the tourist accommodations sector. Results of the study show the Chinese general managers' attitudes toward energy-saving issues and the differences among the diverse hotel managers who responded to the study. Study results indicate that in China, most of the hotels' energy bills decrease due to the implementation of energy-saving equipments. General managers of hotels in operation for a shorter period of time are typically responsible for making decisions about energy-saving issues; older hotels are used to choosing corporate level concerning to this issue. Larger Chinese hotels generally have official energy-saving usage training sessions for employees, but smaller Chinese hotels sometimes overlook the importance of employee training. The study also found that for the Chinese hospitality industry, energy-saving practices related to electricity are the most efficient and common way to save energy, but older hotels also should pay attention to other ways of saving energy such as water conservation or heating/cooling system.

  14. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Prairie Falcon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, John P.; Steenhof, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 4,000 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the breeding, year-round, and nonbreeding ranges in the United States and southern Canada. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates of cowbird parasitism, host responses to parasitism, and

  15. Practical considerations in the management of large multiinstitutional databases.

    PubMed

    Edwards, F H; Clark, R E; Schwartz, M

    1994-12-01

    Large multiinstitutional databases are excellent sources of information that provide clinically useful insight into the practice of cardiac surgery. Fully informed subscribers should be aware of the practical concerns associated with the management and interpretation of database results. During development of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database, three such areas have become particularly important: the database population, the database quality, and the significance of results. Appreciation of the real and philosophical problems associated with these issues will allow for greater appreciation of the intricacies of the database and will enhance the users' ability to interpret information gained from the database. PMID:7979779

  16. Physician practice management organizations: their prospects and performance.

    PubMed

    Conrad, D A; Koos, S; Harney, A; Haase, M

    1999-09-01

    As physician organizations adapt their incentives, processes, and structures to accommodate the demands of an increasingly competitive and performance-sensitive external environment, the development of more effective administrative and managerial mechanisms becomes critical to success. The emergence of physician practice management companies (PPMCs) represents a potentially positive step for physician practices seeking increased economies of scale through consolidation, as well as enhanced access to financial capital. However, economic and finance theory, coupled with some empirical "arithmetic" regarding the financial and operational performance of leading publicly traded PPMCs, suggest caution in one's forecasts of the future prospects for these evolving corporate forms. PMID:10510607

  17. Practical management and treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yasuharu

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are uncommon disease, about which little is known. Pancreatic NETs are usually slow growing and their malignant potential are often underestimated. The management of this disease poses a challenge because of the heterogeneous clinical presentation and varying degrees of aggressiveness. Recently, several guidelines for the management of pancreatic NETs have been established and help to devise clinical strategy. In the treatment algorithms, however, a lot of uncertain points are included. Practical treatment decisions of pancreatic NETs are still sometimes made in a patient- and/or physicians-oriented manner. The tumor grading system proposed by the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) gives important prognostic information, however, the implication of grading regarding medical treatment strategies to choose has not yet been clarified. Moreover, the place of surgical treatment is unclear in the overall management course of advanced pancreatic NETs. In some cases, practical management and treatment have to be individualized depending on predominant symptoms, tumor spread, and general health of the patients. Current issues and a few points to make a strategy in the management of pancreatic NETs would be reviewed. PMID:25493259

  18. Management of Periprocedural Anticoagulation: A Survey of Contemporary Practice.

    PubMed

    Flaker, Greg C; Theriot, Paul; Binder, Lea G; Dobesh, Paul P; Cuker, Adam; Doherty, John U

    2016-07-12

    Interruption of oral anticoagulation (AC) for surgery or an invasive procedure is a complicated process. Practice guidelines provide only general recommendations, and care of such patients occurs across multiple specialties. The availability of direct oral anticoagulants further complicates decision making and guidance here is limited. To evaluate current practice patterns in the United States for bridging AC, a survey was developed by the American College of Cardiology Anticoagulation Work Group. The goal of the survey was to assess how general and subspecialty cardiologists, internists, gastroenterologists, and orthopedic surgeons currently manage patients who receive AC and undergo surgery or an invasive procedure. The survey was completed by 945 physicians involved in the periprocedural management of AC. The results provide a template for educational and research projects geared toward the development of clinical pathways and point-of-care tools to improve this area of health care. PMID:27386777

  19. Physician practice management companies: should physicians be scared?

    PubMed

    Scott-Rotter, A E; Brown, J A

    1999-01-01

    Physician practice management companies (PPMCs) manage nonclinical aspects of physician care and control physician groups by buying practice assets. Until recently, PPMCs were a favorite of Wall Street. Suddenly, in early 1998, the collapse of the MedPartners-PhyCor merger led to the rapid fall of most PPMC stock, thereby increasing wariness of physicians to sell to or invest in PPMCs. This article explores not only the broken promises made by and false assumptions about PPMCs, but also suggests criteria that physicians should use and questions would-be PPMC members should ask before joining. Criteria include: demonstrated expertise, a company philosophy that promotes professional autonomy, financial stability, freedom from litigation, and satisfied physicians already in the PPMC. The authors recommend that physicians seek out relatively small, single-specialty PPMCs, which hold the best promise of generating profits and permitting professional control over clinical decisions. PMID:10623415

  20. Quality Management of the Immunohistochemistry Laboratory: A Practical Guide.

    PubMed

    Cates, Justin M M; Troutman, K Ashley

    2015-08-01

    Governmental regulations and most published guidelines do not provide specific guidance on implementation of quality management (QM) programs for immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays in Anatomic Pathology. QM of IHC consists of 3 main components: quality control, quality assurance, and quality improvement initiatives, each entailing distinctive but interrelated objectives. Discussion of the principles and some specific practices involved in these phases of QM of the IHC laboratory are therefore offered in this review, with an admitted emphasis on pragmatism. PMID:25203427

  1. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Schechter

    2003-03-31

    The objective of this report is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend.

  2. Practical approach to endoscopic management for bleeding gastric varices.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices is generally more severe than bleeding from esophageal varices, although it occurs less frequently. Recently, new endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have broadened the therapeutic armamentarium for gastric varices. This review provides an overview of the classification and pathophysiology of gastric varices, an introduction to current endoscopic and interventional radiological management options for gastric varices, and details of a practical approach to endoscopic variceal obturation using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. PMID:22563286

  3. Hearing conservation and noise management practices in professional orchestras.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ian; Driscoll, Tim; Ackermann, Bronwen

    2012-01-01

    Hearing conservation and noise exposure management for professional orchestras is a difficult issue resistant to standard control measures as used in other industries with excessive noise problems. Although there has been a great deal of research into this area in terms of the audiological status of musicians and their exposure to noise, there are relatively few industry-specific strategies that can be adopted by an orchestra looking to address these issues. Australia does not have a uniform approach to hearing conservation management in its orchestras; however, each orchestra actively grapples with the challenges of balancing legal, practical, and artistic concerns. This study systematically investigated hearing conservation practices, noise exposure management, and audiological screening protocols in eight professional orchestras. The research involved personal interviews with staff at each orchestra, including inspection of venues and facilities. While all these orchestras were aware of the risks and were actively taking significant steps to reduce noise exposure, a range of approaches, with varying degrees of effectiveness and understanding of the issue, were found across the sector. There was limited evidence of educational programs for either the musicians at risk of excessive noise exposure or the staff responsible for devising and implementing control measures. In addition, the reported use of adequate personal hearing protection by musicians was poor. As Australia has recently introduced a national approach to workplace health and safety, a similar approach to noise and audiological management across the country's orchestral sector is proposed, drawn from existing research and practice. This will enable both consistent procedures and meaningful dialogue between the orchestras on the topics of hearing conservation, audiological monitoring, and educational practices. PMID:22937950

  4. Influence of crop management practices on bean foliage arthropods.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J L; Picanço, M C; Pereira, E J G; Silva, A A; Jakelaitis, A; Pereira, R R; Xavier, V M

    2010-12-01

    Crop management practices can affect the population of phytophagous pest species and beneficial arthropods with consequences for integrated pest management. In this study, we determined the effect of no-tillage and crop residue management on the arthropod community associated with the canopy of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Abundance and species composition of herbivorous, detritivorous, predaceous and parasitoid arthropods were recorded during the growing seasons of 2003 and 2004 in Coimbra County, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Arthropod diversity and guild composition were similar among crop management systems, but their abundance was higher under no-tillage relative to conventional cultivation and where residues from the preceding crop were maintained in the field. Thirty-four arthropod species were recorded, and those most representative of the impact of the crop management practices were Hypogastrura springtails, Empoasca kraemeri and Circulifer leafhoppers, and Solenopsis ants. The infestation levels of major insect-pests, especially leafhoppers (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), was on average seven-fold lower under no-tillage with retention of crop residues relative to the conventional system with removal of residues, whereas the abundance of predatory ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and springtails (Collembola: Hypogastruridae) were, respectively, about seven- and 15-fold higher in that treatment. Importantly, a significant trophic interaction among crop residues, detritivores, predators and herbivores was observed. Plots managed with no-tillage and retention of crop residues had the highest bean yield, while those with conventional cultivation and removal of the crop residues yielded significantly less beans. This research shows that cropping systems that include zero tillage and crop residue retention can reduce infestation by foliar insect-pests and increase abundance of predators and detritivores, thus having direct consequences for insect pest management

  5. Practice implications and recommendations for managing codeine misuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Michael; Norman, Ian; Foley, Michelle; Harris, Richard; Rapca, Anna; Rich, Eileen; Van Hout, Marie-Claire

    2015-12-01

    Codeine, a weak opiate, requires increased pharmacovigilance relating to availability, heterogeneous nature of misuse, dependence and associated harm. A scoping review of literature on codeine was conducted using Arksey & O'Malley's framework (1). Databases searched included PubMed, EBSCO Host, Science Direct, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane library and Medline from 1994 to 2014. Follow-up search strategies involved hand searching and searching of pharmaceutical, health, medical and drug related websites. Initial zscreening identified 3,105 articles with 475 meeting the inclusion criteria. Eight broad categories organised the literature, data charting and qualitative synthesis. This paper presents implications for practice and makes recommendations to address these issues. Themes identified relate to raising public and practitioner awareness, risk management, dispensing practices and monitoring and surveillance of codeine. Evidence to inform law enforcement, drug surveillance, public health initiatives, harm reduction approaches, pharmacy, clinical and treatment practices is warranted. PMID:26677894

  6. Industrial Management Practices and Management Education in West Pakistan; A Study of Their Relationship in the Industrial Development Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Sandra Clayton

    A study was made of relationships of industrial management practices to management education in West Pakistan's industrial development. Directors of institutions having management education courses, and over 69 managers at 30 family, government, and foreign controlled plants in Karachi were interviewed on policies, practices, and problems in…

  7. Earthworm Preference Bioassays to Evaluate Land Management Practices.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, Jennifer L; Klasky, John W P; Green, V Steven

    2016-06-01

    Earthworm preference tests, especially in soil-dosed exposures, can be an informative tool for assessing land management practices. Agricultural management intended to increase crop yield and improve soil sustainability includes physical manipulation of topsoil through conventional tillage, reduced or no-tillage, and/or winter cover crops. Soil amendments include the addition of inorganic nitrogen or organic nitrogen derived from soil amendments including biosolids from sewage treatment plants, poultry litter, or locally available industrial effluent. This study used 48-h Eisenia fetida preference tests to assess impacts of agricultural management practices on soil macrofauna. Although in laboratory-dosed exposures, E. fetida preferred biosolid-dosed soils (80 %-95 % recovery) over control soils, the same results were not found with field soils receiving biosolid amendments (33 % recovery). Poultry litter-amended soils (68 % recovery) were preferred over control soils. No differences were measured between tilled fields and controls, and earthworms preferred control soils over those from fields with no-tillage and cover crops. Soil assessments through laboratory exposures such as these allows science-based agricultural management decisions to maintain or improve soil health. PMID:26873732

  8. Assessment of management in general practice: validation of a practice visit method.

    PubMed Central

    van den Hombergh, P; Grol, R; van den Hoogen, H J; van den Bosch, W J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practice management (PM) in general practice is as yet ill-defined; a systematic description of its domain, as well as a valid method to assess it, are necessary for research and assessment. AIM: To develop and validate a method to assess PM of general practitioners (GPs) and practices. METHOD: Relevant and potentially discriminating indicators were selected from a systematic framework of 2410 elements of PM to be used in an assessment method (VIP = visit instrument PM). The method was first tested in a pilot study and, after revision, was evaluated in order to select discriminating indicators and to determine validity of dimensions (factor and reliability analysis, linear regression). RESULTS: One hundred and ten GPs were assessed with the practice visit method using 249 indicators; 208 of these discriminated sufficiently at practice level or at GP level. Factor analysis resulted in 34 dimensions and in a taxonomy of PM. Dimensions and indicators showed marked variation between GPs and practices. Training practices scored higher on five dimensions; single-handed and dispensing practices scored lower on delegated tasks, but higher on accessibility and availability. CONCLUSION: A visit method to assess PM has been developed and its validity studied systematically. The taxonomy and dimensions of PM were in line with other classifications. Selection of a balanced number of useful and relevant indicators was nevertheless difficult. The dimensions could discriminate between groups of GPs and practices, establishing the value of the method for assessment. The VIP method could be an important contribution to the introduction of continuous quality improvement in the profession. PMID:10198481

  9. Current UK practices in the management of subacromial impingement

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Colin; Tait, Gavin R

    2015-01-01

    Background Controversy presently exists surrounding the management of patients with subacromial impingement. This study aims to highlight current UK practices in the management of these patients. Methods BESS members were invited to complete a questionnaire and responses were received from 157 consultant shoulder surgeons. Results Physiotherapy is an integral part of management for 93% of surgeons with a minimum period of 12 weeks being most popular prior to consideration of arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Subacromial steroid injection is used by 95% and 86% repeat this if the patient has failed to respond to a previous injection by the general practioner. From initial presentation, 77% felt there should be at least 3 months of conservative management before proceeding to surgery. Good but transient response to subacromial injection was considered the best predictor of good surgical outcome by 77%. The coracoacromial ligament is fully released by 78%, although there was greater variation in how aggressive surgeons were with acromioplasty. Most (59%) do not include the nontender acromioclavicular joint to any extent in routine acromioplasty. Hospital physiotherapy protocols are used by 63% for postoperative rehabilitation. Conclusions Variation exists in the management regimes offered to patients with subacromial impingement, but most employ a minimum period of 12 weeks of conservative management incorporating physiotherapy and at least 2 subacromial steriod injections.

  10. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  11. Enlightenment from ancient Chinese urban and rural stormwater management practices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Che; Qiao, Mengxi; Wang, Sisi

    2013-01-01

    Hundreds of years ago, the ancient Chinese implemented several outstanding projects to cope with the changing climate and violent floods. Some of these projects are still in use today. These projects evolved from the experience and knowledge accumulated through the long coexistence of people with nature. The concepts behind these ancient stormwater management practices, such as low-impact development and sustainable drainage systems, are similar to the technology applied in modern stormwater management. This paper presents the cases of the Hani Terrace in Yunnan and the Fushou drainage system of Ganzhou in Jiangxi. The ancient Chinese knowledge behind these cases is seen in the design concepts and the features of these projects. These features help us to understand better their applications in the contemporary environment. In today's more complex environment, integrating traditional and advanced philosophy with modern technologies is extremely useful in building urban and rural stormwater management systems in China. PMID:23552234

  12. Recommended Practice for Patch Management of Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Tom; Dale Christiansen; Dan Berrett

    2008-12-01

    A key component in protecting a nation’s critical infrastructure and key resources is the security of control systems. The term industrial control system refers to supervisory control and data acquisition, process control, distributed control, and any other systems that control, monitor, and manage the nation’s critical infrastructure. Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) consists of electric power generators, transmission systems, transportation systems, dam and water systems, communication systems, chemical and petroleum systems, and other critical systems that cannot tolerate sudden interruptions in service. Simply stated, a control system gathers information and then performs a function based on its established parameters and the information it receives. The patch management of industrial control systems software used in CIKR is inconsistent at best and nonexistent at worst. Patches are important to resolve security vulnerabilities and functional issues. This report recommends patch management practices for consideration and deployment by industrial control systems owners.

  13. Changing clinical practice: views about the management of adult asthma

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, S.; Sutherland, K.; Dopson, S.; Miller, R.

    1999-01-01

    A case study of clinical practice in adult asthma is presented. The case is part of a larger project, funded by the North Thames NHS Executive Research and Development Programme, that sought to explore the part played by clinicians in the implementation of research and development into practice in two areas: adult asthma and glue ear in children. The first case of glue ear in children was reported in a previous issue of this journal (Quality in Health Care 1999;8:99-107). Background information from secondary sources on the condition, treatment, and organisation and location of care is followed by an account of the results of semistructured interviews with 159 clinicians. The findings are reported in two sections: clinical management and the organisation of care, and clinicians' accounts of what, why, and how they introduce changes into their practice. The way clinicians talk about their learning, their expressed views on acceptable practice, and their willingness to change were shown to be informed by construction of legitimate and sufficient evidence, respected colleagues, and accumulated individual experience. There was little open acknowledgment of the influence of organisational factors in influencing practice. To investigate whether relationships between task performance and organisational arrangements found in other sectors apply to UK health, more robust measures by which performance can be evaluated are needed. PMID:10847888

  14. Safety Management Practices in Small and Medium Enterprises in India

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Seema; Iqbal, Rauf; Singh, Anju; Nimkar, Indrayani M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are often the main pillar of an economy. Minor accidents, ergonomics problems, old and outdated machinery, and lack of awareness have created a need for implementation of safety practices in SMEs. Implementation of healthy working conditions creates positive impacts on economic and social development. Methods In this study, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 30 randomly chosen SMEs in and around Mumbai, Maharashtra, and other states in India to evaluate safety practices implemented in their facilities. The study also looked into the barriers and drivers for technology innovation and suggestions were also received from the respondent SMEs for best practices on safety issues. Results In some SMEs, risks associated with safety issues were increased whereas risks were decreased in others. Safety management practices are inadequate in most SMEs. Market competitiveness, better efficiency, less risk, and stringent laws were found to be most significant drivers; and financial constraints, lack of awareness, resistance to change, and lack of training for employees were found to be main barriers. Conclusion Competition between SMEs was found to be major reason for implementation of safety practices in the SMEs. The major contribution of the study has been awareness building on safety issues in the SMEs that participated in the project. PMID:25830070

  15. Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice ... of Physicians The full report is titled “Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice ...

  16. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Willet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  17. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Lark Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  18. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Sedge Wren

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  19. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Mountain Plover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  20. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Baird's Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  1. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: American Bittern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  2. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Field Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  3. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Ferruginous Hawk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  4. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Bobolink

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  5. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Brewer's sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, Brett L.

    2004-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  6. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Golden eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 4,000 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to the breeding, year-round, and nonbreeding ranges in the United States and southern Canada. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates of cowbird parasitism, host responses to parasitism, and factors that

  7. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Dickcissel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  8. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Grasshopper Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  9. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Sprague's Pipit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah F.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  10. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Burrowing Owl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Rabie, Paul A.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  11. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Marbled Godwit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1998-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  12. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Vesper Sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Dinkins, Meghan F.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  13. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Upland Sandpiper

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Dinkins, Meghan F.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Parkin, Barry D.; Euliss, Betty R.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  14. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Horned Lark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinkins, Meghan F.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Dechant, Jill A.; Parkin, Barry D.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  15. Effects of management practices on grassland birds: Swainson's Hawk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Dinkins, Meghan F.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on grassland birds were summarized from information in more than 5,500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. A special section on prey habitat is included for those predatory species that have more specific prey requirements. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is an obligate brood parasite of many grassland birds. The section on cowbird brood parasitism summarizes rates

  16. Integrating policy, disintegrating practice: water resources management in Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swatuk, Larry A.; Rahm, Dianne

    Botswana is generally regarded as an African ‘success story’. Nearly four decades of unabated economic growth, multi-party democracy, conservative decision-making and low-levels of corruption have made Botswana the darling of the international donor community. One consequence of rapid and sustained economic development is that water resources use and demands have risen dramatically in a primarily arid/semi-arid environment. Policy makers recognize that supply is limited and that deliberate steps must be taken to manage demand. To this end, and in line with other members of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), Botswana devised a National Water Master Plan (NWMP) and undertook a series of institutional and legal reforms throughout the 1990s so as to make water resources use more equitable, efficient and sustainable. In other words, the stated goal is to work toward Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in both policy and practice. However, policy measures have had limited impact on de facto practice. This paper reflects our efforts to understand the disjuncture between policy and practice. The information presented here combines a review of primary and secondary literatures with key informant interviews. It is our view that a number of constraints-cultural, power political, managerial-combine to hinder efforts toward sustainable forms of water resources use. If IWRM is to be realized in the country, these constraints must be overcome. This, however, is no small task.

  17. Guidelines for the nonpharmacologic management of migraine in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Pryse-Phillips, W E; Dodick, D W; Edmeads, J G; Gawel, M J; Nelson, R F; Purdy, R A; Robinson, G; Stirling, D; Worthington, I

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide physicians and allied health care professionals with guidelines for the nonpharmacologic management of migraine in clinical practice. OPTIONS: The full range and quality of nonpharmacologic therapies available for the management of migraine. OUTCOMES: Improvement in the nonpharmacologic management of migraine. EVIDENCE AND VALUES: The creation of the guidelines followed a needs assessment by members of the Canadian Headache Society and included a statement of objectives; development of guidelines by multidisciplinary working groups using information from literature reviews and other resources; comparison of alternative clinical pathways and description of how published data were analysed; definition of the level of evidence for data in each case; evaluation and revision of the guidelines at a consensus conference held in Ottawa on Oct. 27-29, 1995; redrafting and insertion of tables showing key variables and data from various studies and tables of data with recommendations; and reassessment by all conference participants. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Augmentation of the use of nonpharmacologic therapies for the acute and prophylactic management of migraine is likely to lead to substantial benefits in both human and economic terms. RECOMMENDATIONS: Both the avoidance of migraine trigger factors and the use of nonpharmacologic therapies have a part to play in overall migraine management. VALIDATION: The guidelines are based on consensus of Canadian experts in neurology, emergency medicine, psychiatry, psychology and family medicine, and consumers. Previous guidelines did not exist. Field testing of the guidelines is in progress. PMID:9679487

  18. Fifty years of federal radioactive waste management: Policies and practices

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.G.

    1997-04-01

    This report provides a chronological history of policies and practices relating to the management of radioactive waste for which the US Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Department of Energy, have been responsible since the enactment of the Atomic Energy Act in 1946. The defense programs and capabilities that the Commission inherited in 1947 are briefly described. The Commission undertook a dramatic expansion nationwide of its physical facilities and program capabilities over the five years beginning in 1947. While the nuclear defense activities continued to be a major portion of the Atomic Energy Commission`s program, there was added in 1955 the Atoms for Peace program that spawned a multiplicity of peaceful use applications for nuclear energy, e.g., the civilian nuclear power program and its associated nuclear fuel cycle; a variety of industrial applications; and medical research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. All of these nuclear programs and activities generated large volumes of radioactive waste that had to be managed in a manner that was safe for the workers, the public, and the environment. The management of these materials, which varied significantly in their physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics, involved to varying degrees the following phases of the waste management system life cycle: waste characterization, storage, treatment, and disposal, with appropriate transportation linkages. One of the benefits of reviewing the history of the waste management program policies and practices if the opportunity it provides for identifying the lessons learned over the years. Examples are summarized at the end of the report and are listed in no particular order of importance.

  19. Evaluating practice patterns for managing moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Yves; Wasel, Norman; Chan, Daphne; Bernstein, Geula; Andrew, Robin; Fraquelli, Elisa; Papp, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe practice patterns for care of Canadian patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Design Online survey of a consumer panel. Setting Participants were drawn from a population-wide Canadian consumer database. Participants To be eligible to participate, respondents had to have been diagnosed with plaque psoriasis within the past 5 years, and to have had body surface area involvement of 3% or greater in the past 5 years, or to have psoriasis on a sensitive area of the body (hands, feet, scalp, face, or genitals), or to be currently receiving treatment with systemic agents or phototherapy for psoriasis. Main outcome measures Proportion of respondents with psoriasis managed by FPs and other specialists, psoriasis therapies, comorbidities, and patient satisfaction. Results Invitations were sent to 3845 panelists with self-reported psoriasis, of which 514 qualified to complete the survey. Family physicians were reported to be the primary providers for diagnosis and ongoing care of psoriasis in all provinces except Quebec. Overall physician care was reported to be satisfactory by 62% of respondents. Most respondents receiving over-the-counter therapies (55%) or prescribed topical therapies (61%) reported that their psoriasis was managed by FPs. Respondents receiving prescription oral or injectable medications or phototherapy were mainly managed by dermatologists (42%, 74%, and 71% of respondents, respectively). Ongoing management of respondents with body surface area involvement of 10% or greater was mainly split between dermatologists (47%) and FPs (45%), compared with rheumatologists (4%) or other health care professionals (4%). Of those respondents receiving medications for concomitant health conditions, treatment for high blood pressure was most common (92%), followed by treatment for heart disease (75%) and elevated cholesterol and lipid levels (68%). Conclusion Patient-reported practice patterns for the diagnosis and management

  20. Effects of management practices on wetland birds: American Avocet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dechant, Jill A.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Jamison, Brent E.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2002-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on wetland birds were summarized from information in more than 500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although the BBS may not capture the presence of elusive waterbird species, the BBS is a standardized survey and the range maps, in many cases, represent the most consistent information available on species’ distributions. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The section on brood parasitism summarizes

  1. Effects of management practices on wetland birds: Virginia rail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Amy L.; Dechant, Jill A.; Jamison, Brent E.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Church, James O.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2002-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on wetland birds were summarized from information in more than 500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although the BBS may not capture the presence of elusive waterbird species, the BBS is a standardized survey and the range maps, in many cases, represent the most consistent information available on species’ distributions. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The section on brood parasitism summarizes

  2. Effects of management practices on wetland birds: Yellow Rail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldade, Christopher M.; Dechant, Jill A.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Zimmerman, Amy L.; Jamison, Brent E.; Church, James O.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2002-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on wetland birds were summarized from information in more than 500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although the BBS may not capture the presence of elusive waterbird species, the BBS is a standardized survey and the range maps, in many cases, represent the most consistent information available on species’ distributions. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The section on brood parasitism summarizes

  3. Effects of management practices on wetland birds: Black tern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Amy L.; Dechant, Jill A.; Johnson, Douglas A.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Jamison, Brent E.; Euliss, Betty R.

    2002-01-01

    Information on the habitat requirements and effects of habitat management on wetland birds were summarized from information in more than 500 published and unpublished papers. A range map is provided to indicate the relative densities of the species in North America, based on Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. Although the BBS may not capture the presence of elusive waterbird species, the BBS is a standardized survey and the range maps, in many cases, represent the most consistent information available on species’ distributions. Although birds frequently are observed outside the breeding range indicated, the maps are intended to show areas where managers might concentrate their attention. It may be ineffectual to manage habitat at a site for a species that rarely occurs in an area. The species account begins with a brief capsule statement, which provides the fundamental components or keys to management for the species. A section on breeding range outlines the current breeding distribution of the species in North America, including areas that could not be mapped using BBS data. The suitable habitat section describes the breeding habitat and occasionally microhabitat characteristics of the species, especially those habitats that occur in the Great Plains. Details on habitat and microhabitat requirements often provide clues to how a species will respond to a particular management practice. A table near the end of the account complements the section on suitable habitat, and lists the specific habitat characteristics for the species by individual studies. The area requirements section provides details on territory and home range sizes, minimum area requirements, and the effects of patch size, edges, and other landscape and habitat features on abundance and productivity. It may be futile to manage a small block of suitable habitat for a species that has minimum area requirements that are larger than the area being managed. The section on brood parasitism summarizes

  4. Management practices on organic and conventional dairy herds in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Sorge, U S; Moon, R; Wolff, L J; Michels, L; Schroth, S; Kelton, D F; Heins, B

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and compare husbandry practices on organic and conventional dairy farms of similar sizes in Minnesota. Organic (ORG, n=35), same-sized conventional (SC, n=15, <200 cows) and medium-sized conventional (MC, n=13, ≥200 cows) dairy herds were visited in 2012, and farmers were interviewed once about their farm, herd demographics, and herd management practices concerning nutrition, housing, and reproductive programs. Organic farms had been established as long as conventional farms, and ORG producers had most commonly selected ORG farming because of a negative perception of pesticides for human health. The distribution of cattle breeds and ages differed across farm types. Organic farms had more crossbred cows and a greater number of older cows than conventional farms, who had mainly Holstein cattle. Organic farms did not dock tails, were more likely to use breeding bulls, and were less likely to conduct pregnancy diagnoses in cattle. All conventional farmers fed corn, corn silage, and hay, but no forage or feed supplement was fed by all ORG farms with the exception of pasture. Kelp was supplemented on most ORG farms but on none of the conventional farms. In summary, although there were differences across farm types regarding the use of pasture, feeds, and feed additives, breed and age distribution, reproductive management, and the use of tail docking, observations in other management areas showed large overlap across herd types. PMID:26830734

  5. Cost-Effective Allocation of Agricultural Best Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabi, M.; Govindaraju, R. S.; Engel, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    Implementation of conservation programs is perceived as being crucial for restoring and protecting waters and watersheds from nonpoint source pollution. Success of these programs depends to a great extent on planning tools that can assist the watershed management process. Herein, a novel optimization methodology is presented for deriving watershed-scale sediment and nutrient control plans that incorporate multiple, and often conflicting, objectives. The method combines the use of a watershed model (SWAT), representation of best management practices, an economic component, and a genetic algorithm-based spatial search procedure. For a small watershed in Indiana located in the Midwestern portion of the United States, selection and placement of best management practices by optimization was found to be nearly three times more cost-effective than targeting strategies for the same level of protection specified in terms of maximum monthly sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen loads. Conversely, for the same cost, the optimization plan reduced the maximum monthly loads by a factor of two when compared to the targeting plan. The optimization methodology developed in this paper can facilitate attaining water quality goals at significantly lower costs than commonly used cost-share and targeting strategies.

  6. Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.

    PubMed

    Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

    2013-01-01

    Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce. PMID:23691748

  7. Best management practices for soft engineering of shoreline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caulk, Andrew D., (Edited By); Gannon, John E.; Shaw, John R.; Hartig, John H.

    2000-01-01

    Historically, many river shorelines were stabilized and hardened with concrete and steel to protect developments from flooding and erosion, or to accommodate commercial navigation or industry. Typically shorelines were developed for a single purpose. Today, there is growing interest in developing shorelines for multiple purposes so that additional benefits can be accrued. Soft engineering is the use of ecological principles and practices to reduce erosion and achieve the stabilization and safety of shorelines, while enhancing habitat, improving aesthetics, and saving money. The purpose of this best management practices manual is to provide insights and technical advice to local governments, developers, planners, consultants, and industries on when, where, why, and how to incorporate soft engineering of shorelines into shoreline redevelopment projects and reap subsequent benefits. More specific technical advice and contact information can be found in the soft engineering case studies presented in this manual.

  8. A New Approach to Teaching Veterinary Economics--Practice Management and Veterinary Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, David A.

    1976-01-01

    The procedure of having veterinary students enrolled in a course in Veterinary Economics and Practice Management visit a veterinary practice to obtain practice management data and to prepare a written analysis for the practice is described. This project has been continued for nine years at two different universities, involving 692 students and 624…

  9. Agronomic options for improving rainfall-use efficiency of crops in dryland farming systems.

    PubMed

    Turner, Neil C

    2004-11-01

    Yields of dryland (rainfed) wheat in Australia have increased steadily over the past century despite rainfall being unchanged, indicating that the rainfall-use efficiency has increased. Analyses suggest that at least half of the increase in rainfall-use efficiency can be attributed to improved agronomic management. Various methods of analysing the factors influencing dryland yields and rainfall-use efficiency, such as simple rules and more complex models, are presented and the agronomic factors influencing water use, water-use efficiency, and harvest index of crops are discussed. The adoption of agronomic procedures such as minimum tillage, appropriate fertilizer use, improved weed/disease/insect control, timely planting, and a range of rotation options, in conjunction with new cultivars, has the potential to increase the yields and rainfall-use efficiency of dryland crops. It is concluded that most of the agronomic options for improving rainfall-use efficiency in rainfed agricultural systems decrease water losses by soil evaporation, runoff, throughflow, deep drainage, and competing weeds, thereby making more water available for increased water use by the crop. PMID:15361527

  10. REFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2004-02-13

    This report describes the work performed during the first semi-annual third year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on analyzing production and injection data to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study address the reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflooding project and propose alternatives of development of the current and future conditions of the reservoir to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and the pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period.

  11. Codes of practice and related issues in biomedical waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, D.; Watt, C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines the development of a National Code of Practice for biomedical waste management in Australia. The 10 key areas addressed by the code are industry mission statement; uniform terms and definitions; community relations - public perceptions and right to know; generation, source separation, and handling; storage requirements; transportation; treatment and disposal; disposal of solid and liquid residues and air emissions; occupational health and safety; staff awareness and education. A comparison with other industry codes in Australia is made. A list of outstanding issues is also provided; these include the development of standard containers, treatment effectiveness, and reusable sharps containers.

  12. Resource file: practical publications for energy management, edition III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The Resource File is an in-depth bibliography of 166 practical and action-oriented energy conservation publications and materials. It is a reference tool, designed for Federal, state, and local energy managers or people who are asked to recommend how-to conservation guides to the public. Each listing describes a publication's intended audience and provides a summary of its contents. Included are operations and maintenance manuals, life-cycle costing handbooks, home insulation manuals, films on fuel-saving driving techniques, and courses devoted exclusively to home weatherization. 166 items.

  13. Robust data enables managers to promote good practice.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-11-01

    This is the third in a series of articles examining the components of good corporate governance. The effective and efficient use of information and sources of information is crucial for good governance. This article explores the ways in which boards and management can obtain and use information to monitor performance and promote good practice, and how boards can be assured about the quality of information on which they rely. The final article in this series will look at the role of accountability in corporate governance. PMID:23189532

  14. Life cycle optimisation for highway best management practices.

    PubMed

    Lee, J G; Heaney, J P; Rapp, D N; Pack, C A

    2006-01-01

    Highway runoff can cause a number of water quantity and quality problems. Stormwater management systems for highways have been developed based on a fast drainage for large storm situations. Non-point source pollution from highway runoff is a growing water quality concern. Stormwater quality control needs to be integrated into highway drainage design and operation to reduce the stormwater impacts on the receiving water. A continuous simulation/optimisation model for analysing integrated highway best management practices (BMPs) is presented. This model can evaluate the life cycle performance of infiltration and/or storage oriented highway BMPs. It can be directly integrated with spreadsheet optimisation tools to find the least cost options for implementing BMPs throughout a specified life cycle. PMID:17120683

  15. Municipal solid waste management in Nepal: practices and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhrel, D.; Viraraghavan, T. . E-mail: t.viraraghavan@uregina.ca

    2005-07-01

    Solid waste management in Kathmandu valley of Nepal, especially concerning the siting of landfills, has been a challenge for over a decade. The current practice of the illegal dumping of solid waste on the river banks has created a serious environmental and public health problem. The focus of this study was to carry out an evaluation of solid waste management in Nepal based on published information. The data showed that 70% of the solid wastes generated in Nepal are of organic origin. As such, composting of the solid waste and using it on the land is the best way of solid waste disposal. This will reduce the waste volume transported to the landfill and will increase its life.

  16. Management practices for used treated wood. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, K.V.

    1995-06-01

    Pentachlorophenol, creosote, and other chemicals are used to preserve poles, crossarms, and railroad ties for the electric, telecommunications, and railroad industries. Each year, millions of pieces of treated wood are retired. This report provides information on current and potential options for management of used treated wood. Researchers conducted a literature search to acquire information on preservatives and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure data. They conducted a telephone survey of selected state agencies, landfill and incinerator/cogeneration operations, and utilities to obtain information on costs, availability of landfill disposal options, and restrictions associated with land disposal of treated wood. Simulations to evaluate the effects of landfill disposal on groundwater using EPRI`s MYGRT{trademark} analytical transport model were conducted. Current utility and railroad industry management practices for treated wood include primary reuse, disposal in nonhazardous landfills, and cogeneration. The most likely future options are increased cogeneration, with continued reuse and disposal in landfills.

  17. A Pharmacy Business Management Simulation Exercise as a Practical Application of Business Management Material and Principles

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Brent L.; Gunturi, Rahul; Sullivan, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To implement a pharmacy business management simulation exercise as a practical application of business management material and principles and assess students’ perceived value. Design. As part of a pharmacy management and administration course, students made various calculations and management decisions in the global categories of hours of operation, inventory, pricing, and personnel. The students entered the data into simulation software and a realistic community pharmacy marketplace was modeled. Course topics included accounting, economics, finance, human resources, management, marketing, and leadership. Assessment. An 18-item posttest survey was administered. Students’ slightly to moderately agreed the pharmacy simulation program enhanced their knowledge and understanding, particularly of inventory management, cash flow statements, balance sheets, and income statements. Overall attitudes toward the pharmacy simulation program were also slightly positive and students also slightly agreed the pharmacy simulation program enhanced their learning of pharmacy business management. Inventory management was the only area in which students felt they had at least “some” exposure to the assessed business management topics during IPPEs/internship, while all other areas of experience ranged from “not at all” to “a little.” Conclusion. The pharmacy simulation program is an effective active-learning exercise and enhanced students’ knowledge and understanding of the business management topics covered. PMID:24761023

  18. Evaluation of Evidence-Based Nursing Pain Management Practice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H.; Gordon, Debra B.; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. Aims This study aimed to (a) modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and (b) describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via electronic medical system. Design and Setting A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Methods Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May of 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. Results The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. Conclusions The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  19. Adapting Project Management Practices to Research-Based Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, P.; Baker, T.; Corbin, B.; Keith, L.; Loerch, L.; Mullenax, C.; Myers, R.; Rhodes, B.; Skytland, N.

    2007-01-01

    From dealing with the inherent uncertainties in outcomes of scientific research to the lack of applicability of current NASA Procedural Requirements guidance documentation, research-based projects present challenges that require unique application of classical project management techniques. If additionally challenged by the creation of a new program transitioning from basic to applied research in a technical environment often unfamiliar with the cost and schedule constraints addressed by project management practices, such projects can find themselves struggling throughout their life cycles. Finally, supplying deliverables to a prime vehicle customer, also in the formative stage, adds further complexity to the development and management of research-based projects. The Biomedical Research and Countermeasures Projects Branch at NASA Johnson Space Center encompasses several diverse applied research-based or research-enabling projects within the newly-formed Human Research Program. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the organizational structure and environment in which these projects operate and how the projects coordinate to address and manage technical requirements. We will identify several of the challenges (cost, technical, schedule, and personnel) encountered by projects across the Branch, present case reports of actions taken and techniques implemented to deal with these challenges, and then close the session with an open forum discussion of remaining challenges and potential mitigations.

  20. Adaptive management and the USDA-NRCS Nutrient Management (590) conservation practice standard

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the USDA-NRCS Nutrient Management (590) conservation practice standard is to budget and supply nutrients for plant production, to properly utilize organic amendments as plant nutrient sources, to minimize pollution from application of nutrients, and to maintain or improve the conditio...

  1. Managing chronic illness: physician practices increased the use of care management and medical home processes.

    PubMed

    Wiley, James A; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ramsay, Patricia P; Bibi, Salma; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    The effective management of patients with chronic illnesses is critical to bending the curve of health care spending in the United States and is a crucial test for health care reform. In this article we used data from three national surveys of physician practices between 2006 and 2013 to determine the extent to which practices of all sizes have increased their use of evidence-based care management processes associated with patient-centered medical homes for patients with asthma, congestive heart failure, depression, and diabetes. We found relatively large increases over time in the overall use of these processes for small and medium-size practices as well as for large practices. However, the large practices used fewer than half of the recommended processes, on average. We also identified the individual processes whose use increased the most and show that greater use of care management processes is positively associated with public reporting of patient experience and clinical quality and with pay-for-performance. PMID:25561647

  2. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  3. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  4. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  5. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  6. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  7. Current Clinical Practice Scenario of Osteoporosis Management in India

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Shailesh; Upashani, Tejas; Bhadauria, Jitendra; Patel, Kamlesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Various osteoporosis guidelines are available for practice. Aim To understand the current clinical practice scenario from the perspective of Indian orthopaedicians, especially about the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, approach to diagnosis and management and patient compliance patterns to long term treatment. Materials and Methods A pre-validated structured questionnaire containing questions (mostly objective, some open-ended) catering to various objectives of the study was circulated amongst orthopaedic surgeons across India by means of post/courier, after giving a brief overview of the study telephonically. Data was extracted from the completed questionnaires, and analysed using Microsoft Excel software. Results The questionnaire was filled by a total of 84 orthopaedicians throughout India. The prevalence of osteoporosis in India according to the orthopaedic surgeons was 38.4% and there was a female preponderance. Most of the respondents felt out of every 100 osteoporosis patients in India, less than 20 patients are actually diagnosed and treated for osteoporosis. The most common initial presenting feature of established osteoporosis cases was general symptoms. Most respondents preferred Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) as the initial investigation for the diagnosis of osteoporosis in a patient presenting with typical features. While most respondents preferred once-a-month oral over intravenous (IV) bisphosphonates, they agreed that IV administration had advantages such as lower gastrointestinal side effects and improved compliance. The average duration of therapy of oral bisphosphonates was the longest (27.04 months) among the other anti- osteoporosis therapies that they used. On an average, the patient compliance rate in osteoporosis management was around 64%. IV Zoledronic acid (ZA) and intranasal calcitonin were infrequently used than other anti- osteoporosis therapies. While concerns about cost and availability deterred more frequent

  8. A survey of silage management practices on California dairies.

    PubMed

    Heguy, J M; Meyer, D; Silva-del-Río, N

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to gather baseline information on corn silage-management practices to develop an outreach curriculum for dairy producers and growers. In spring 2013, dairy producers in the San Joaquin Valley (California) were surveyed on their silage-management practices. Response rate was 14.5% (n=160) and herd size averaged 1,512 milking cows. Harvest date was set solely by the dairy producer (53.4%) or with the assistance of the crop manager, custom chopper, or nutritionist (23.3%). On some dairies (23.3%), the dairy producer delegated the harvest date decision. Most dairies (75.0%) estimated crop dry matter before harvest, and the preferred method was milk line evaluation. Dairy producers were mostly unfamiliar with harvest rate but the number [1 (35.9%), 2 (50.3%), or 3 to 5 (13.8%)] and size [6-row (17.7%), 8-row (67.3%), or 10-row (15.0%)] of choppers working simultaneously was reported. Most dairies used a single packing tractor (68.8%) and weighed every load of fresh chopped corn delivered to the silage pit (62%). During harvest, dry matter (66.9%), particle length (80.4%), and kernel processing (92.5%) were monitored. Most dairies completed filling their largest silage structure in less than 3 d (48.5%) or in 4 to 7 d (30.9%). Silage covering was completed no later than 7 2h after structure completion in all dairies, and was often completed within 24 h (68.8%). Packed forage was covered as filled in 19.6% of dairies. Temporary covers were used on some dairies (51.0%), with filling durations of 1 to 60 d. When temporary covers were not used, structures were filled in no more than 15 d. After structure closure, silage feedout started in 1 to 3 wk (44.4%), 4 to 5 wk (31.4%), or 8 or more wk (24.2%). Future considerations included increasing the silage storage area (55.9%), increasing the number of packing tractors (37.0%), planting brown mid-rib varieties (34.4%), buying a defacer to remove silage (33.1%), and creating drive-over piles (32

  9. Practical salinity management for leachate irrigation to poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Smesrud, Jason K; Duvendack, George D; Obereiner, James M; Jordahl, James L; Madison, Mark F

    2012-01-01

    Landfill leachate can be beneficially reused for irrigation of fiber crops with appropriate attention to nutrient and salinity management. The Riverbend Landfill in Western Oregon has been effectively practicing irrigation of landfill leachate to poplar trees since 1993. Over that time, the site has been adaptively managed to control salinity impacts to the tree crop while beneficially utilizing the applied water and nutrients during each growing season. Representative leachate irrigation water has ranged in concentration of total dissolved solids from 777 to 6,940 mg/L, chloride from 180 to 1,760 mg/L and boron from 3.2 to 7.3 mg/L. Annual leachate irrigation applications have also ranged between 102 and 812 mm/yr. Important conclusions from this site have included: 1) Appropriate tree clone selection and tree stand spacing, thinning, and harvest rotations are critical to maintaining a productive tree stand that is resilient and resistant to salt stress. The most effective combinations have included clones DN-34, OP-367, 184-411, 49-177, and 15-29 planted at spacing of 3.7-m x 1.8-m to 3.7-m x 3.7-m; 2) Leaf tissue boron levels are closely correlated to soil boron levels and can be managed with leaching. When leaf tissue boron levels exceed 200 to 250 mg/kg, signs of salt stress may emerge and should be monitored closely; 3) Salinity from leachate irrigation can be managed to sustain a healthy tree crop by controlling mass loading rates and providing appropriate irrigation blending if necessary. Providing freshwater irrigation following each leachate irrigation and targeting freshwater irrigation as 30 percent of total irrigation water applied has successfully controlled salt impacts to vegetation; and 4) Drip irrigation generally requires more careful attention to long-term soil salinity management than spray irrigation. Moving drip irrigation tubes periodically to prevent the formation of highly saline zones within the soil profile is important. In this paper, a

  10. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, Michel; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to facilitate clinical decisions regarding dysphagia management in this patient population. Methods: This algorithm is based on 30 years of clinical experience with DMD in a specialised Centre for Neuromuscular Disorders (Inkendaal Rehabilitation Hospital, Belgium) and is supported by literature where available. Results: Dysphagia can worsen the condition of ageing patients with DMD. Apart from the difficulties of chewing and oral fragmentation of the food bolus, dysphagia is rather a consequence of an impairment in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. By contrast with central neurologic disorders, dysphagia in DMD accompanies solid rather than liquid intake. Symptoms of dysphagia may not be clinically evident; however laryngeal food penetration, accumulation of food residue in the pharynx and/or true laryngeal food aspiration may occur. The prevalence of these issues in DMD is likely underestimated. Conclusions: There is little guidance available for clinicians to manage dysphagia and improve feeding for young men with DMD. This report aims to provide a clinical algorithm to facilitate the diagnosis of dysphagia, to identify the symptoms and to propose practical recommendations to treat dysphagia in the adult DMD population.Implications for RehabilitationLittle guidance is available for the management of dysphagia in Duchenne dystrophy.Food can penetrate the vestibule, accumulate as residue or cause aspiration.We propose recommendations and an algorithm to guide management of

  11. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Schechter

    2004-08-31

    The naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area is one of the largest reservoirs in the domestic U.S. and is the largest reservoir in area extent in the world. Production from Spraberry sands is found over a 2,500 sq. mile area and Spraberry reservoirs can be found in an eight county area in west Texas. Over 150 operators produce 65,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) from the Spraberry Trend Area from more than 9,000 production wells. Recovery is poor, on the order of 7-10% due to the profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, yet billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain. We estimate over 15% of remaining reserves in domestic Class III reservoirs are in Spraberry Trend Area reservoirs. This tremendous domestic asset is a prime example of an endangered hydrocarbon resource in need of immediate technological advancements before thousands of wells are permanently abandoned. This report describes the final work of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area.'' The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. This objective has been accomplished through research in three areas: (1) detail historical review and extensive reservoir characterization, (2) production data management, and (3) field demonstration. This provides results of the final year of the three-year project for each of the three areas.

  12. Survey of dairy housing and manure management practices in California.

    PubMed

    Meyer, D; Price, P L; Rossow, H A; Silva-del-Rio, N; Karle, B M; Robinson, P H; DePeters, E J; Fadel, J G

    2011-09-01

    In 2007, a descriptive survey was mailed to all dairies in Glenn (G) and Tulare (T) Counties to identify current and future opportunities of manure management practices on California dairies. The purpose was to provide baseline information for development of outreach curriculum and a decision support tool to quantify potential benefits of various N management options on dairy farms. Such baseline information is valuable to staff regulating dairy facilities (e.g., San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District and Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board), dairy trade association representatives, and technology vendors. Response rates for each county were similar at 29.7% (n=19; G) and 26.7% (n=88; T). Mean milking herd size averaged 570 (range 50 to 3,000) cows in G and 1,800 (range 196 to 9,286) cows in T. Survey data are reported by location due to differences between counties in herd size, housing facilities, and climate. Freestalls are common housing facilities (63.2%, G; 38.6%, T) and separated solids and corral scrapings are commonly used as bedding in freestalls (81.8% G and 79.4% T). The most common methods of manure collection were flushing and scraping (18.8%, G; 44.7%, T), only flushing (43.8%, G; 34.1%, T), or only scraping daily or less frequently than daily (37.5%, G; 20.0%, T). Most dairy farms in G (63.2%) and T (70.5%) used some method of separating solids from liquids. However, mechanical separation systems alone were used by 5.3% G and 11.4% T of dairy farms. Storage or treatment ponds were found on 95.9% of dairies. Respondents identified existing manure management practices and did not indicate any new technologies were in use or being considered for manure management. Survey results were used to describe the 2 predominant manure management pathways of manure collection, storage, treatment, and utilization. Survey results will be used to develop and disseminate targeted information on manure treatment technologies, and on

  13. Changing farmers' land management practices in the hills of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Paudel, G S; Thapa, G B

    2001-12-01

    This paper sheds light on changing farmers' land management practices in two mountain watersheds, with and without extemal assistance, in the western hills of Nepal. Information used in the analysis were obtained through a survey of 300 households, group discussion, key informant interviews, and field observation conducted during April-September 1999. Confronted with ever-decreasing landholding size due to a steadily growing population and scarcity of nonfarming employment opportunities, farmers in both watersheds have increasingly adopted assorted types of structural and biological measures to control soil erosion, landslides, gully expansion, and soil nutrient loss to maintain or even enhance land productivity. Adoption of guly control measures, construction of the retention walls, alley cropping, use of vegetative measures for landslide control, mulching, and use of green manure and chemical fertilizers are found significantly high in the project area due to the provision of technical and financial support, whereas composting is found significantly high in the nonproject area. Different from the traditionally held beliefs, population pressure on a finite land resource has brought positive change in land management. However, the experience from both watersheds indicates that there is limit to the extent that resource poor farmers can respond to land degradation without any extemal assistance. Required is the arrangement for appropriate polices and support services and facilities enabling farmers to adopt locationally suitable and economically attractive land management technologies. PMID:11915967

  14. Changing Farmers' Land Management Practices in the Hills of Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Giridhari Sharma; Thapa, Gopal B.

    2001-12-01

    This paper sheds light on changing farmers' land management practices in two mountain watersheds, with and without external assistance, in the western hills of Nepal. Information used in the analysis were obtained through a survey of 300 households, group discussion, key informant interviews, and field observation conducted during April-September 1999. Confronted with ever-decreasing landholding size due to a steadily growing population and scarcity of nonfarming employment opportunities, farmers in both watersheds have increasingly adopted assorted types of structural and biological measures to control soil erosion, landslides, gully expansion, and soil nutrient loss to maintain or even enhance land productivity. Adoption of gully control measures, construction of the retention walls, alley cropping, use of vegetative measures for landslide control, mulching, and use of green manure and chemical fertilizers are found significantly high in the project area due to the provision of technical and financial support, whereas composting is found significantly high in the nonproject area. Different from the traditionally held beliefs, population pressure on a finite land resource has brought positive change in land management. However, the experience from both watersheds indicates that there is limit to the extent that resource poor farmers can respond to land degradation without any external assistance. Required is the arrangement for appropriate polices and support services and facilities enabling farmers to adopt locationally suitable and economically attractive land management technologies.

  15. Know your community - Biochar: agronomic and environmental uses community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The “Biochar: Agronomic and Environmental Uses” Community was formed in November 2010 (https://www.agronomy.org/membership/communities/biochar-agronomic-and-environmental-uses). The community’s initial function has been providing a forum at the tri-society’s national meetings to fill the need for a ...

  16. Agronomic characterization of the Argentina Indicator Region. [U.S. corn belt and Argentine pampas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, D. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the Argentina indicator region including information on topography, climate, soils and vegetation is presented followed by a regionalization of crop livestock land use. Corn/soybean production and exports as well as agricultural practices are discussed. Similarities and differences in the physical agronomic scene, crop livestock land use and agricultural practices between the U.S. corn belt and the Argentine pampa are considered. The Argentine agricultural economy is described. Crop calendars for the Argentina indicator region, an accompanying description, notes on crop-livestock zones, wheat production, field size, and agricultural problems and practices are included.

  17. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2003-08-13

    This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased

  18. APPLICATION OF RISK MANAGEMENT PRACTICES TO NNSA TRITIUM READINESS SUBPROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Shete, S; Srini Venkatesh, S

    2007-01-31

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Stockpile Technology (NNSA/NA-123) chartered a risk assessment of the Tritium Readiness (TR) Subprogram to identify risks and to develop handling strategies with specific action items that could be scheduled and tracked to completion in order to minimize program failures. This assessment was performed by a team of subject matter experts (SMEs) comprised of representatives from various organizations participating in the TR Subprogram. The process was coordinated by Savannah River Site, Systems Engineering (SRS/SE) with support from Subprogram Team. The Risk Management Process steps performed during this risk assessment were: Planning, Identification, Grading, Handling, and Impact Determination. All of the information captured during the risk assessment was recorded in a database. The team provided estimates for the cost and schedule impacts of implementing the recommended handling strategies and facilitated the risk based cost contingency analysis. The application of the Risk Management Practices to the NNSA Tritium Readiness Subprogram resulted in: (1) The quarterly review and update of the Risk Management Database to include an evaluation of all existing risks and the identification/evaluation of any potential new risks. (2) The risk status and handling strategy action item tracking mechanism that has visibility and buy-in throughout the Tritium Readiness Subprogram to ensure that approved actions are completed as scheduled and that risk reduction is being achieved. (3) The generation of a risk-based cost contingency estimate that may be used by the Tritium Readiness Subprogram Manager in establishing future year program budgets.

  19. Use of safety management practices for improving project performance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Eddie W L; Kelly, Stephen; Ryan, Neal

    2015-01-01

    Although site safety has long been a key research topic in the construction field, there is a lack of literature studying safety management practices (SMPs). The current research, therefore, aims to test the effect of SMPs on project performance. An empirical study was conducted in Hong Kong and the data collected were analysed with multiple regression analysis. Results suggest that 3 of the 15 SMPs, which were 'safety committee at project/site level', 'written safety policy', and 'safety training scheme' explained the variance in project performance significantly. Discussion about the impact of these three SMPs on construction was provided. Assuring safe construction should be an integral part of a construction project plan. PMID:24134413

  20. COPD management: role of symptom assessment in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    van der Molen, Thys; Miravitlles, Marc; Kocks, Janwillem WH

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present with a variety of symptoms that significantly impair health-related quality of life. Despite this, COPD treatment and its management are mainly based on lung function assessments. There is increasing evidence that conventional lung function measures alone do not correlate well with COPD symptoms and their associated impact on patients’ everyday lives. Instead, symptoms should be assessed routinely, preferably by using patient-centered questionnaires that provide a more accurate guide to the actual burden of COPD. Numerous questionnaires have been developed in an attempt to find a simple and reliable tool to use in everyday clinical practice. In this paper, we review three such patient-reported questionnaires recommended by the latest Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, ie, the modified Medical Research Council questionnaire, the clinical COPD questionnaire, and the COPD Assessment Test, as well as other symptom-specific questionnaires that are currently being developed. PMID:24143085

  1. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 75: Management of alloimmunization during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2006-08-01

    When any fetal blood group factor inherited from the father is not possessed by the mother, antepartum or intrapartum fetal-maternal bleeding may stimulate an immune reaction in the mother Maternal immune reactions also can occur from blood product transfusion. The formation of maternal antibodies, or"alloimmunization,' may lead to various degrees of transplacental passage of these antibodies into the fetal circulation. Depending on the degree of antigenicity and the amount and type of antibodies involved, this transplacental passage may lead to hemolytic disease in the fetus and neonate. Undiagnosed and untreated, alloimmunization can lead to significant perinatal morbidity and mortality. Advances in Doppler ultrasonography have led to the development of noninvasive methods of management of alloimmunization in pregnant women. Together with more established protocols, Doppler ultrasound evaluation may allow for a more thorough and less invasive workup with fewer risks to the mother and fetus. Prevention of alloimmunization is addressed in another Practice Bulletin (1). PMID:16880320

  2. Energy management systems in buildings: The practical lessons

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, P.

    1984-01-01

    Dramatic reductions in energy consumption in buildings can now be achieved by the use of automated energy management systems (EMS). This book draws on the results of an official programme of twenty five EMS installations in widely differing organisations. It provides detailed guidance on how to determine whether such a system represents a good investment for them; how to approach the project and write a good specification; how to select suitable prospective equipment suppliers; how to assess tenders and set up contracts; and how to train and educate supervisors and staff. Further chapters cover the practicalities of installing and commissioning the equipment and making best use of the system, including action in response to the information output and solutions to problems of handling the data.

  3. Organizational management practices for achieving software process improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandt, Ronald Kirk

    2004-01-01

    The crisis in developing software has been known for over thirty years. Problems that existed in developing software in the early days of computing still exist today. These problems include the delivery of low-quality products, actual development costs that exceed expected development costs, and actual development time that exceeds expected development time. Several solutions have been offered to overcome out inability to deliver high-quality software, on-time and within budget. One of these solutions involves software process improvement. However, such efforts often fail because of organizational management issues. This paper discusses business practices that organizations should follow to improve their chances of initiating and sustaining successful software process improvement efforts.

  4. Impacts of management practices on microbial dynamics in a semi-arid agroecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding how interactions between management practices and soil biota within agroecosytems can help to develop practices that will maximize crop productivity while helping to reduce human input. A key indicator to how agricultural management practices are affecting soil microbial dynamics of th...

  5. Perceptions of Health Information Management Educational and Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Mari; Black, Clarence; Blair, Franchesica; Davis, Laquanda; Ingram, Steven; Lane, DaQuandra; McElderry, Alicia; Peagler, Bianca; Pickett, Jamie; Plettenberg, Cheryl; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Undergraduate students’ progress toward achievement of learning outcomes and entry-level competencies is an essential ingredient in efforts to meet the needs of the evolving national healthcare information infrastructure. Therefore, studies to evaluate variance in outcome assessment methods and perceived adequacy of educational curricula used by health information management (HIM) programs are vital. This study examined perceptions of HIM students, faculty, and individuals employed in healthcare regarding educational experiences and career preparation. Methods A convenience sample of attendees from the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) national conference in Atlanta, Georgia, was obtained. A survey was developed on the basis of a review of current literature related to the assessment of HIM educational programming. The authors used a prepared script to describe the study purpose and survey when approaching potential respondents. Completion of the survey was voluntary. Results Of the 100 surveys distributed, 58 were returned. Twenty-six respondents were employed in healthcare, 25 were students, and 7 were HIM faculty members; no respondents were HIM program directors. Ninety-six percent of the student respondents indicated that the programs’ HIM curriculum prepared them for an entry-level position, while 86 percent of the faculty respondents and 70 percent of the respondents employed in healthcare agreed with this statement. More than half (56 percent) of the respondents who were employed in healthcare indicated that they needed additional training when they entered their first entry-level position. The majority of the respondents indicated that they were not matched with a mentor during their educational experience. Conclusions This research supports the complementary roles that educational coursework and practical experiences provide individuals within the HIM field. However, additional research is needed to assess the

  6. Public participation in watershed management: International practices for inclusiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Patricia E. (Ellie)

    This paper outlines a number of examples from around the world of participatory processes for watershed decision-making, and discusses how they work, why they are important, their social and ecological potential, and the practical details of how to start, expand and develop them. Because of long-standing power differentials in all societies along gender, class and ethnic lines, equitable public participation requires the recognition that different members of society have different kinds of relationships with the environment in general, and with water in particular. From a range of political perspectives, inclusive participatory governance processes have many benefits. The author has recently completed a 5 year project linking universities and NGOs in Brazil and Canada to develop methods of broadening public engagement in local watershed management committees, with a special focus on gender and marginalized communities. The innovative environmental education and multi-lingual international public engagement practices of the Centre for Socio-Environmental Knowledge and Care of the La Plata Basin (which spans Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay and Bolivia) are also discussed in this paper.

  7. Certifying leaders? high-quality management practices and healthy organisations: an ISO-9000 based standardisation approach

    PubMed Central

    MONTANO, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The present study proposes a set of quality requirements to management practices by taking into account the empirical evidence on their potential effects on health, the systemic nature of social organisations, and the current conceptualisations of management functions within the framework of comprehensive quality management systems. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses focusing on the associations between leadership and/or supervision and health in occupational settings are evaluated, and the core elements of an ISO 9001 standardisation approach are presented. Six major occupational health requirements to high-quality management practices are identified pertaining to communication processes, organisational justice, role clarity, decision making, social influence processes and management support. It is concluded that the quality of management practices may be improved by developing a quality management system of management practices that ensures not only conformity to product but also to occupational safety and health requirements. Further research may evaluate the practicability of the proposed approach. PMID:26860787

  8. Certifying leaders? high-quality management practices and healthy organisations: an ISO-9000 based standardisation approach.

    PubMed

    Montano, Diego

    2016-08-01

    The present study proposes a set of quality requirements to management practices by taking into account the empirical evidence on their potential effects on health, the systemic nature of social organisations, and the current conceptualisations of management functions within the framework of comprehensive quality management systems. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses focusing on the associations between leadership and/or supervision and health in occupational settings are evaluated, and the core elements of an ISO 9001 standardisation approach are presented. Six major occupational health requirements to high-quality management practices are identified pertaining to communication processes, organisational justice, role clarity, decision making, social influence processes and management support. It is concluded that the quality of management practices may be improved by developing a quality management system of management practices that ensures not only conformity to product but also to occupational safety and health requirements. Further research may evaluate the practicability of the proposed approach. PMID:26860787

  9. 40 CFR 63.11516 - What are my standards and management practices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are my standards and management... What are my standards and management practices? (a) Dry abrasive blasting standards. If you own or....11522, “What definitions apply to this subpart?”, you must implement management practices to...

  10. 40 CFR 63.11516 - What are my standards and management practices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are my standards and management... What are my standards and management practices? (a) Dry abrasive blasting standards. If you own or....11522, “What definitions apply to this subpart?”, you must implement management practices to...

  11. Managing space for managed care: the challenge for a multispecialty group practice.

    PubMed

    Berkoff, M J; Burns, L A

    1996-07-01

    A project that began as an architectural study to determine space requirements and remedy space deficiencies for an academic medical center's faculty multispecialty group practice led to development of an analytical methodology for assessing real space needs and viable options for solutions in the context of the group's operational policies, physician practice patterns, and business goals. Major facility investments for new or renovated construction demand significant capital expenditure, which can severely affect a group's ability to complete as a financially viable player in a marketplace environment of increasingly competitive managed care delivery systems. The methodology created during this project helped the group practice to understand how they could optimize the use of existing space, minimize capital costs, and provide flexibility for future developments. PMID:10158956

  12. Practice Bulletin No. 159: Management of Preterm Labor.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and the most common reason for antenatal hospitalization . In the United States, approximately 12% of all live births occur before term, and preterm labor preceded approximately 50% of these preterm births . Although the causes of preterm labor are not well understood, the burden of preterm births is clear-preterm births account for approximately 70% of neonatal deaths and 36% of infant deaths as well as 25-50% of cases of long-term neurologic impairment in children . A 2006 report from the Institute of Medicine estimated the annual cost of preterm birth in the United States to be $26.2 billion or more than $51,000 per premature infant . However, identifying women who will give birth preterm is an inexact process. The purpose of this document is to present the various methods proposed to manage preterm labor and to review the evidence for the roles of these methods in clinical practice. Identification and management of risk factors for preterm labor are not addressed in this document. PMID:26695585

  13. Practice Bulletin No. 159 Summary: Management of Preterm Labor.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and the most common reason for antenatal hospitalization (1-4). In the United States, approximately 12% of all live births occur before term, and preterm labor preceded approximately 50% of these preterm births (5, 6). Although the causes of preterm labor are not well understood, the burden of preterm births is clear-preterm births account for approximately 70% of neonatal deaths and 36% of infant deaths as well as 25-50% of cases of long-term neurologic impairment in children (7-9). A 2006 report from the Institute of Medicine estimated the annual cost of preterm birth in the United States to be $26.2 billion or more than $51,000 per premature infant (10). However, identifying women who will give birth preterm is an inexact process. The purpose of this document is to present the various methods proposed to manage preterm labor and to review the evidence for the roles of these methods in clinical practice. Identification and management of risk factors for preterm labor are not addressed in this document. PMID:26695580

  14. Solid waste management in Kolkata, India: Practices and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Tumpa; Goel, Sudha

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents an overview of current solid waste management (SWM) practices in Kolkata, India and suggests solutions to some of the major problems. More than 2920 ton/d of solid waste are generated in the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) area and the budget allocation for 2007-2008 was Rs. 1590 million (US$40 million), which amounts to Rs. 265/cap-y (US$6.7/cap-d) on SWM. This expenditure is insufficient to provide adequate SWM services. Major deficiencies were found in all elements of SWM. Despite 70% of the SWM budget being allocated for collection, collection efficiency is around 60-70% for the registered residents and less than 20% for unregistered residents (slum dwellers). The collection process is deficient in terms of manpower and vehicle availability. Bin capacity provided is adequate but locations were found to be inappropriate, thus contributing to the inefficiency of the system. At this time, no treatment is provided to the waste and waste is dumped on open land at Dhapa after collection. Lack of suitable facilities (equipment and infrastructure) and underestimates of waste generation rates, inadequate management and technical skills, improper bin collection, and route planning are responsible for poor collection and transportation of municipal solid wastes.

  15. Solid waste management in Kolkata, India: practices and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Tumpa; Goel, Sudha

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of current solid waste management (SWM) practices in Kolkata, India and suggests solutions to some of the major problems. More than 2920ton/d of solid waste are generated in the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) area and the budget allocation for 2007-2008 was Rs. 1590 million (US$40 million), which amounts to Rs. 265/cap-y (US$6.7/cap-d) on SWM. This expenditure is insufficient to provide adequate SWM services. Major deficiencies were found in all elements of SWM. Despite 70% of the SWM budget being allocated for collection, collection efficiency is around 60-70% for the registered residents and less than 20% for unregistered residents (slum dwellers). The collection process is deficient in terms of manpower and vehicle availability. Bin capacity provided is adequate but locations were found to be inappropriate, thus contributing to the inefficiency of the system. At this time, no treatment is provided to the waste and waste is dumped on open land at Dhapa after collection. Lack of suitable facilities (equipment and infrastructure) and underestimates of waste generation rates, inadequate management and technical skills, improper bin collection, and route planning are responsible for poor collection and transportation of municipal solid wastes. PMID:18434129

  16. Multidisciplinary Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cannita, Katia; Giordano, Aldo Victor; Manetta, Rosa; Vicentini, Roberto; Carducci, Sergio; Saltarelli, Patrizia; Iapadre, Nerio; Coletti, Gino; Ficorella, Corrado; Ricevuto, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients require different treatment strategies according to disease extension, liver function, and patient's fitness. We evaluated HCC multidisciplinary management in clinical practice. Methods. Consecutive patients were followed and treated with tailored medical, locoregional, and surgical treatments, according to disease stage and patient's fitness (age, Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS)). Activity, efficacy, and safety were evaluated. Results. Thirty-eight patients were evaluated: median age, 74; elderly 92%; CIRS secondary 28 (74%); Child-Pugh A 20 (53%), B 11 (29%); and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) 0 2 (5%), A 9 (24%), B 10 (26%), C 13 (34%), and D 4 (11%). Overall survival (OS) was 30 months. At 9 months median follow-up, among 25 unresectable HCC, OS was 10 months; BCLC B–D unfit for sorafenib showed OS 3 months. Ten patients (40%) received sorafenib: Child-Pugh A 5 (50%) and B 5 (50%) and disease control rate 89%, progression-free survival 7 months, and OS 9 months. G3-4 toxicities: anorexia, hypertransaminaemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and hypercreatininemia. Limiting toxicity syndromes were 40%, all multiple sites. Conclusion. HCC patients require multidisciplinary clinical management to properly select tailored treatments according to disease stage, fitness, and liver function. Patients suitable for sorafenib should be carefully selected, monitored for individual safety, and prevalently characterized by limiting toxicity syndromes multiple sites. PMID:24900987

  17. Modeling the Connectedness Between best Management Practices and Vulnerability Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandhi, A.; Bailey, N.; Thomas, M.; Bartnick, B.

    2015-12-01

    The overall goal of this study is to better understand the connectedness between Best management practices (BMPs) and vulnerability assessments (VA) in a changing landuse. Developing this connectedness will help understand key vulnerabilities and improve adaptive capacity important for ecosystem sustainability. BMPs are practical management practices or systems designed and installed in watersheds to provide a wide range of effects to protect or restore the physical, chemical, and biological condition of waterbodies (e.g. changing hydrology; improving vegetative habitat; mitigate adverse environmental change). VAs can be defined as "the degree to which the system is susceptible to and is unable to cope with adverse effects of change" and are often characterized as a function of exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity. There are many variables and factors used in calculating the impact of BMPs and VAs. The event mean concentration or load (e.g. nutrient, sediment,) associated with the specific landuse is an important variable. There is much data that predicts the loads associated with the major landuses (urban, agricultural). Loads greatly vary with region; rainfall characteristics (e.g. rainfall intensity, rainfall frequency); soil characteristics (e.g. soil type, hydrologic soil groups); hydrologic characteristics (e.g. runoff potential). A concern also exists that possibly all of the variables associated with changes in an individual land use have not been identified and distinguished for their impact on land use. For example, the loads associated with a high density residential with much green space may be more similar to medium density than loads associated with high rise apartment buildings. Other factors may include age of construction, % of families with children, % of families with pets, level of transiency, and construction activity The objective of our study is to develop an initial framework using multiple variables and factors to represent the

  18. Enhancing the strategic management of practice learning through the introduction of the role of Learning Environment Manager.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Graham; Baker, Tracey; Cheesman, Amanda

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a process evaluation project designed to enhance the strategic management of practice learning within a large Hospital in the North of England. The aim of the project was to introduce the role of the Learning Environment Manager with dedicated responsibility for practice learning of undergraduate student nurses within the Hospital's 49 practice-settings. Whilst aspects of this role were already evident in several of these settings, the project sought to locate and standardise responsibilities related to the organisation and management of learning and teaching in practice explicitly within the existing staffing structure of each practice-setting. Focus group interviews were used to explore significant aspects of the project with key stakeholder groups comprising Learning Environment Managers, the Hospital Clinical Educator, Hospital Department Managers, Ward Managers, Mentors, University Link Lecturers and undergraduate Student Nurses. Interview data were analysed using thematic content analysis. The findings of the project suggest that the Learning Environment Manager role affords providers of practice learning with a robust approach to establish organisation-wide benchmarks that standardise the strategic management of practice learning in collaboration with partner Universities. The role incorporated many operational activities previously undertaken by the Hospital Clinical Educator, thus enabling the Hospital Clinical Educator to make a more strategic contribution to the on-going quality monitoring and enhancement of practice learning across the Hospital. The Learning Environment Manager role was found to provide mentors with high levels of support which in turn helped to promote consistent, positive and holistic practice learning experiences for undergraduate student nurses across the Hospital. Importantly, the role offers a potent catalyst for nurses in practice to regain responsibility for practice learning and re-establish the value of

  19. Managing the culturally diverse medical practice team: twenty-five strategies.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A common misconception is that the phrase workplace diversity means meeting certain quotas in employee race or gender categories. In fact, diversity is much more than that. This article explores the unique benefits and challenges of managing a culturally diverse medical practice team and offers practice managers 25 practical strategies. It describes the two types of diversity training that are beneficial to practice managers and the kinds of policies, practices, and procedures that foster and promote diversity. This article also explores ethnocentrism, racism, ageism, sexism, stereotyping, and other potentially divisive issues among a diverse medical practice team. It provides an assessment instrument practice managers can use to evaluate their own diversity management skills. Finally, this article defines specifically what is meant by the term diversity and explores the top 10 diversity issues in workplaces today. PMID:24873132

  20. Traditional vs. Contemporary Management Control Practices for Developing Public Health Policies.

    PubMed

    Naranjo-Gil, David; Sánchez-Expósito, María Jesús; Gómez-Ruiz, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Public health policies must address multiple goals and complex community health needs. Recently, management control practices have emerged to provide a broader type of information for evaluating the effectiveness of healthcare policies, and relate activities and processes to multiple strategic outcomes. This study compares the effect of traditional and contemporary management control practices on the achievement of public health policies. It is also analyzed how two different uses of such practices (enabling vs. coercive) facilitate the achievement of public health policies. Relationships are explored using data collected from managers from public health agencies and public hospitals in Spain. The findings show that contemporary management control practices are more suitable than traditional practices to achieve public health policies. Furthermore, results show that public health policies are better achieved when managers use management control practices in an enabling way rather than in a coercive way. PMID:27428985

  1. Traditional vs. Contemporary Management Control Practices for Developing Public Health Policies

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo-Gil, David; Sánchez-Expósito, María Jesús; Gómez-Ruiz, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Public health policies must address multiple goals and complex community health needs. Recently, management control practices have emerged to provide a broader type of information for evaluating the effectiveness of healthcare policies, and relate activities and processes to multiple strategic outcomes. This study compares the effect of traditional and contemporary management control practices on the achievement of public health policies. It is also analyzed how two different uses of such practices (enabling vs. coercive) facilitate the achievement of public health policies. Relationships are explored using data collected from managers from public health agencies and public hospitals in Spain. The findings show that contemporary management control practices are more suitable than traditional practices to achieve public health policies. Furthermore, results show that public health policies are better achieved when managers use management control practices in an enabling way rather than in a coercive way. PMID:27428985

  2. The Influence of Perceptions of Practice Characteristics: An Examination of Agricultural Best Management Practice Adoption in Two Indiana Watersheds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Adam P.; Weinkauf, Denise Klotthor; Prokopy, Linda Stalker

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural best management practices (BMPs), or conservation practices, can help reduce nonpoint source pollution from agricultural lands, as well as provide valuable wildlife habitat. There is a large literature exploring factors that lead to a producer's voluntary adoption of BMPs, but there have been inconsistent findings. Generally, this…

  3. 40 CFR 63.11223 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the work practice and management practice standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the work practice and management practice standards? 63.11223 Section 63.11223 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS...

  4. An Overview of Stream Ecological Responses to Urban Effects and Management Practices in New England

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many recent studies have found large changes in ecological conditions related to small increases in watershed development. Future development and restoration practices will benefit from better documenting the effectiveness of management practices. We present (1) a brief summary o...

  5. Chronic fatigue syndrome. A practical guide to assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, M; Chalder, T; Palmer, I; Wessely, S

    1997-05-01

    Chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have become increasingly recognized as a common clinical problem, yet one that physicians often find difficult to manage. In this review we suggest a practical, pragmatic, evidence-based approach to the assessment and initial management of the patient whose presentation suggests this diagnosis. The basic principles are simple and for each aspect of management we point out both potential pitfalls and strategies to overcome them. The first, and most important task is to develop mutual trust and collaboration. The second is to complete an adequate assessment, the aim of which is either to make a diagnosis of CFS or to identify an alternative cause for the patient's symptoms. The history is most important and should include a detailed account of the symptoms, the associated disability, the choice of coping strategies, and importantly, the patient's own understanding of his/her illness. The assessment of possible comorbid psychiatric disorders such as depression or anxiety is mandatory. When the physician is satisfied that no alternative physical or psychiatric disorder can be found to explain symptoms, we suggest that a firm and positive diagnosis of CFS be made. The treatment of CFS requires that the patient is given a positive explanation of the cause of his symptoms, emphasizing the distinction among factors that may have predisposed them to develop the illness (lifestyle, work stress, personality), triggered the illness (viral infection, life events) and perpetuated the illness (cerebral dysfunction, sleep disorder, depression, inconsistent activity, and misunderstanding of the illness and fear of making it worse). Interventions are then aimed to overcoming these illness-perpetuating factors. The role of antidepressants remains uncertain but may be tried on a pragmatic basis. Other medications should be avoided. The only treatment strategies of proven efficacy are cognitive behavioral ones. The most important

  6. Out-of-Hospital Surgical Airway Management: Does Scope of Practice Equal Actual Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Molly; Kohn, Melissa; Overberger, Ryan; Jaslow, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pennsylvania, among other states, includes surgical airway management, or cricothyrotomy, within the paramedic scope of practice. However, there is scant literature that evaluates paramedic perception of clinical competency in cricothyrotomy. The goal of this project is to assess clinical exposure, education and self-perceived competency of ground paramedics in cricothyrotomy. Methods Eighty-six paramedics employed by four ground emergency medical services agencies completed a 22-question written survey that assessed surgical airway attempts, training, skills verification, and perceptions about procedural competency. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate responses. Results Only 20% (17/86, 95% CI [11–28%]) of paramedics had attempted cricothyrotomy, most (13/17 or 76%, 95% CI [53–90%]) of whom had greater than 10 years experience. Most subjects (63/86 or 73%, 95% CI [64–82%]) did not reply that they are well-trained to perform cricothyrotomy and less than half (34/86 or 40%, 95% CI [30–50%]) felt they could correctly perform cricothyrotomy on their first attempt. Among subjects with five or more years of experience, 39/70 (56%, 95% CI [44–68%]) reported 0–1 hours per year of practical cricothyrotomy training within the last five years. Half of the subjects who were able to recall (40/80, 50% 95% CI [39–61%]) reported having proficiency verification for cricothyrotomy within the past five years. Conclusion Paramedics surveyed indicated that cricothyrotomy is rarely performed, even among those with years of experience. Many paramedics felt that their training in this area is inadequate and did not feel confident to perform the procedure. Further study to determine whether to modify paramedic scope of practice and/or to develop improved educational and testing methods is warranted. PMID:27330674

  7. Determining the Effectiveness of Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration, Conservation, and Management Practices.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The science of aquatic ecosystem restoration and management is still in its infancy, largely because most projects are inadequately tracked and monitored for assessing their success. Historically, evaluating the effectiveness of best management practices (BMPs) has relied heavily...

  8. Glucosinolates in collard greens grown under three soil management practices.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs, β-D-thioglucoside-N-hydroxysulfates) are polar compounds present in varying amounts in members of the Brassicaceae family. They suppress soil-borne pests due to the biofumigant properties of the highly toxic isothiocyanates present in Brassica vegetables. The objectives of this investigation were to: (1) assess variation in GSLs concentrations among collard plants grown under three soil management practices: sewage sludge (SS) mixed with native soil, chicken manure (CM) mixed with native soil, and no-mulch (NM) native soil, (2) quantify GSLs concentrations in collard roots, leaves, and stems at harvest for potential use of their crude extracts in plant protection, and (3) assess myrosinase activity in soil amended with CM and SS mixed with native soil. Separation of GSLs was accomplished by adsorption on a DEAE-Sephadex ion exchange resin using disposable pipette tips filled with DEAE, a weak base, with a net positive charge when ionized and exchange anions such as GSLs (hydrophilic plant secondary metabolites). Quantification of total GSLs was based on inactivation of collard endogenous myrosinase and liberation of the glucose moiety from the GSLs molecule by addition of standardized myrosinase and colorimetric determination of the liberated glucose moiety. Across all treatments, SS and CM increased soil organic matter content from 2.2% in native soil to 4.2 and 6.5%, respectively. GSLs concentrations were significantly greater in collard leaves (30.9 µmoles g(-1) fresh weight) compared to roots and stems (7.8 and 1.2 µmoles g(-1) fresh weight), respectively. Leaves of collard grown in soil amended with SS contained the greatest concentrations of GSLs compared to leaves of plants grown in CM and NM treatments. Accordingly, leaves of collard plants grown in soil amended with SS could play a significant role in sustainable agriculture as alternative tools for soil-borne disease management in conventional and organic agriculture. PMID

  9. [Quality management in private practice. A nationwide survey in Germany].

    PubMed

    Obermann, K; Müller, P

    2007-08-01

    Quality management (QM) will soon become mandatory for private practice physicians in Germany. We aimed to assess the knowledge about and state of implementation of QM in German private practices. In cooperation with the Stiftung Gesundheit (Foundation for Health), Hamburg, a stratified sample of 15,383 physicians was requested via e-mail in 2006 to participate in the online survey. The survey covered sources of information and experiences with QM, cost of implementing QM, and general attitudes towards QM in private health care. A total of 787 doctors (5.1% response rate) rendered useful data sets; 16% of doctors had not yet familiarized themselves with QM. The DIN-ISO QM System is by far the best-known system, with 86% of doctors having heard about it. All other systems are known by only 30% or less of the physicians. Only about 20% of private practices have already implemented QM or are about to have it implemented. The cost of QM depends heavily on the system used with DIN-ISO (5600 euros) and EFQM (2800 euros) being the more expensive, while EPA (1800 euros) and QEP (850 euros) are much less costly. All QM systems require roughly the same amount of time from staff to be implemented and maintained. Two thirds of all doctors have not yet decided which QM system to use and contacts during seminars and recommendations from colleagues are most important when selecting a system. The level of satisfaction with QM service providers is generally high. In general, the study revealed a very heterogeneous picture. As with other new technologies or organizational changes there is a group of enthusiastic "early adopters," but we also found a substantial number of physicians (about 25%) who are highly skeptical about implementing QM. They posed a challenge for health policy and service providers alike and careful market segmentation will be needed to cater for the different needs of the different groups of doctors. Moreover, the still rather technical approach towards QM

  10. Managing visitor impacts in parks: A multi-method study of the effectiveness of alternative management practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, L.O.; Marion, J.L.; Manning, R.E.; Lawson, S.R.; Jacobi, C.

    2008-01-01

    How can recreation use be managed to control associated environmental impacts? What management practices are most effective and why? This study explored these and related questions through a series of experimental ?treatments? and associated ?controls? at the summit of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park, a heavily used and environmentally fragile area. The treatments included five management practices designed to keep visitors on maintained trails, and these practices ranged from ?indirect? (information/education) to ?direct? (a fence bordering the trail). Research methods included unobtrusive observation of visitors to determine the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail and a follow-up visitor survey to explore why management practices did or didn?t work. All of the management practices reduced the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail. More aggressive applications of indirect practices were more effective than less aggressive applications, and the direct management practice of fencing was the most effective of all. None of the indirect management practices reduced walking off-trail to a degree that is likely to control damage to soil and vegetation at the study site. Study findings suggest that an integrated suite of direct and indirect management practices be implemented on Cadillac Mountain (and other, similar sites) that includes a) a regulation requiring visitors to stay on the maintained trail, b) enforcement of this regulation as needed, c) unobtrusive fencing along the margins of the trail, d) redesign of the trail to extend it, widen it in key places, and provide short spur trails to key ?photo points?, and e) an aggressive information/education program to inform visitors of the regulation to stay on the trail and the reasons for it. These recommendations are a manifestation of what may be an emerging principle of park and outdoor recreation management: intensive use requires intensive management.

  11. Student Affairs Case Management: Merging Social Work Theory with Student Affairs Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Sharrika D.; Hazelwood, Sherry; Hayden, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Case management is a functional area in higher education and student affairs that emerged after the mass shootings at Virginia Tech in 2007. Although new to higher education, case management emerged from established social work practice. This article compares social work theory and case management standards with a new case management model for…

  12. 40 CFR 430.03 - Best management practices (BMPs) for spent pulping liquor, soap, and turpentine management, spill...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... spent pulping liquor, soap, and turpentine management, spill prevention, and control. 430.03 Section 430... management practices (BMPs) for spent pulping liquor, soap, and turpentine management, spill prevention, and... Liquor, Soap, and Turpentine Service: Any process vessel, storage tank, pumping system, evaporator,...

  13. 40 CFR 430.03 - Best management practices (BMPs) for spent pulping liquor, soap, and turpentine management, spill...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... spent pulping liquor, soap, and turpentine management, spill prevention, and control. 430.03 Section 430... management practices (BMPs) for spent pulping liquor, soap, and turpentine management, spill prevention, and... Liquor, Soap, and Turpentine Service: Any process vessel, storage tank, pumping system, evaporator,...

  14. Management of cryptorchidism: a survey of clinical practice in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An evidence-based Consensus on the treatment of undescended testis (UT) was recently published, recommending to perform orchidopexy between 6 and 12 months of age, or upon diagnosis and to avoid the use of hormones. In Italy, current practices on UT management are little known. Our aim was to describe the current management of UT in a cohort of Italian children in comparison with the Consensus guidelines. As management of retractile testis (RT) differs, RT cases were described separately. Methods Ours is a retrospective, multicenter descriptive study. An online questionnaire was filled in by 140 Italian Family Paediatricians (FP) from Associazione Culturale Pediatri (ACP), a national professional association of FP. The questionnaire requested information on all children with cryptorchidism born between 1/01/2004 and 1/01/2006. Data on 169 children were obtained. Analyses were descriptive. Results Overall 24% of children were diagnosed with RT, 76% with UT. Among the latter, cryptorchidism resolved spontaneously in 10% of cases at a mean age of 21.6 months. Overall 70% of UT cases underwent orchidopexy at a mean age of 22.8 months (SD 10.8, range 1.2-56.4), 13% of whom before 1 year. The intervention was performed by a paediatric surgeon in 90% of cases, with a success rate of 91%. Orchidopexy was the first line treatment in 82% of cases, while preceded by hormonal treatment in the remaining 18%. Hormonal treatment was used as first line therapy in 23% of UT cases with a reported success rate of 25%. Overall, 13 children did not undergo any intervention (mean age at last follow up 39.6 months). We analyzed the data from the 5 Italian Regions with the largest number of children enrolled and found a statistically significant regional difference in the use of hormonal therapy, and in the use of and age at orchidopexy. Conclusions Our study showed an important delay in orchidopexy. A quarter of children with cryptorchidism was treated with hormonal therapy

  15. CrossVit: enhancing canopy monitoring management practices in viticulture.

    PubMed

    Matese, Alessandro; Vaccari, Francesco Primo; Tomasi, Diego; Di Gennaro, Salvatore Filippo; Primicerio, Jacopo; Sabatini, Francesco; Guidoni, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    A new wireless sensor network (WSN), called CrossVit, and based on MEMSIC products, has been tested for two growing seasons in two vineyards in Italy. The aims are to evaluate the monitoring performances of the new WSN directly in the vineyard and collect air temperature, air humidity and solar radiation data to support vineyard management practices. The WSN consists of various levels: the Master/Gateway level coordinates the WSN and performs data aggregation; the Farm/Server level takes care of storing data on a server, data processing and graphic rendering; Nodes level is based on a network of peripheral nodes consisting of a MDA300 sensor board and Iris module and equipped with thermistors for air temperature, photodiodes for global and diffuse solar radiation, and an HTM2500LF sensor for relative humidity. The communication levels are: WSN links between gateways and sensor nodes by ZigBee, and long-range GSM/GPRS links between gateways and the server farm level. The system was able to monitor the agrometeorological parameters in the vineyard: solar radiation, air temperature and air humidity, detecting the differences between the canopy treatments applied. The performance of CrossVit, in terms of monitoring and reliability of the system, have been evaluated considering: its handiness, cost-effective, non-invasive dimensions and low power consumption. PMID:23765273

  16. CrossVit: Enhancing Canopy Monitoring Management Practices in Viticulture

    PubMed Central

    Matese, Alessandro; Vaccari, Francesco Primo; Tomasi, Diego; Di Gennaro, Salvatore Filippo; Primicerio, Jacopo; Sabatini, Francesco; Guidoni, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    A new wireless sensor network (WSN), called CrossVit, and based on MEMSIC products, has been tested for two growing seasons in two vineyards in Italy. The aims are to evaluate the monitoring performances of the new WSN directly in the vineyard and collect air temperature, air humidity and solar radiation data to support vineyard management practices. The WSN consists of various levels: the Master/Gateway level coordinates the WSN and performs data aggregation; the Farm/Server level takes care of storing data on a server, data processing and graphic rendering; Nodes level is based on a network of peripheral nodes consisting of a MDA300 sensor board and Iris module and equipped with thermistors for air temperature, photodiodes for global and diffuse solar radiation, and an HTM2500LF sensor for relative humidity. The communication levels are: WSN links between gateways and sensor nodes by ZigBee, and long-range GSM/GPRS links between gateways and the server farm level. The system was able to monitor the agrometeorological parameters in the vineyard: solar radiation, air temperature and air humidity, detecting the differences between the canopy treatments applied. The performance of CrossVit, in terms of monitoring and reliability of the system, have been evaluated considering: its handiness, cost-effective, non-invasive dimensions and low power consumption. PMID:23765273

  17. Sedimentation retention basin utilization for best management practice.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Iqbal; Cui, Guang-Bai; Zhang, Li-Qiong

    2003-09-01

    Approaches to the artificial impoundment and theoretical design of sedimentation retention basin are reviewed with particular attention to best management practice (BMP) to control agriculture and surface runoff. Sediments retention basins are the small version of farm pond used where a criteria of farm pond is not met. Such basin traps the pollutants and suspended solids prior to entry into streams and lakes. The study is focused with special reference to the assessment and control of non-point source pollution (NPSP) from the sub-basin area of Tai Lake in the Xishan County of Wuxi City of China. The author suggested two different approaches to conduct this study including theoretical design for sedimentation retention basin and computation of flow, sediment transport and deposition during the artificial impoundment of retention basin for BMP's utilization. Theoretical design will provide a useful function as a first line defense against the movement of sediments and transport of pollutants into the Tai Lake while the assessment of sediments deposition will help to make its proper use and periodic cleanup. PMID:14562928

  18. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Saigal, Saurabh; Sharma, Jai Prakash; Dhurwe, Ritika; Kumar, Sanjay; Gurjar, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Targeted temperature management (TTM) in today's modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI), meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios. PMID:26430341

  19. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-09-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager's job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  20. Genetic diversity analysis in Tunisian perennial ryegrass germplasm as estimated by RAPD, ISSR, and morpho-agronomical markers.

    PubMed

    Ghariani, S; Elazreg, H; Chtourou-Ghorbel, N; Chakroun, M; Trifi-Farah, N

    2015-01-01

    Tunisia is rich in diverse forage and pasture species including perennial ryegrass. In order to enhance forage production and improve agronomic performance of this local germplasm, a molecular analysis was undertaken. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and morpho-agronomical traits markers were used for genetic diversity estimation of ryegrass germplasm after screening 20 spontaneous accessions, including a local and an introduced cultivars. Same mean polymorphism information content values were obtained (0.37) for RAPD and ISSR suggesting that both marker systems were equally effective in determining polymorphisms. The average pairwise genetic distance values were 0.57 (morpho-agronomical traits), 0.68 (RAPD), and 0.51 (ISSR) markers data sets. A higher Shannon diversity index was obtained with ISSR marker (0.57) than for RAPD (0.54) and morpho-agronomical traits (0.36). The Mantel test based on genetic distances of a combination of molecular markers and morpho-agronomical data exhibited a significant correlation between RAPD and ISSR data, suggesting that the use of a combination of molecular techniques was a highly efficient method of estimating genetic variability levels among Tunisian ryegrass germplasm. In summary, results showed that combining molecular and morpho-agronomical markers is an efficient way in assessing the genetic variability among Tunisian ryegrass genotypes. In addition, the combined analysis provided an exhaustive coverage for the analyzed diversity and helped us to identify suitable accessions showed by Beja and Jendouba localities, which present large similarities with cultivated forms and can be exploited for designing breeding programmes, conservation of germplasm and management of ryegrass genetic resources. PMID:26782500

  1. A Survey of Fertilizer Dealers: I. Sources of Agronomic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a survey of fertilizer dealers which was conducted to: assess where and from whom local fertilizer dealers obtain agronomic training; evaluate the effectiveness of various dealer training; and determine the needs and objectives of future training programs. (TW)

  2. A Survey of Fertilizer Dealers: II. Sources of Agronomic Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a survey of fertilizer dealers that was conducted to assess how the dealers were obtaining their agronomic information, aside from formal training sessions, and determine if these sources of information were satisfactory in fulfilling the dealers' needs. (TW)

  3. Agronomic improvements can make future cereal systems in South Asia far more productive and result in a lower environmental footprint.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Jagdish Kumar; Rao, Adusumilli Narayana; Raman, Anitha K; Padre, Agnes Tirol; Dobermann, Achim; Gathala, Mahesh; Kumar, Virender; Saharawat, Yashpal; Sharma, Sheetal; Piepho, Hans Peter; Alam, Md Mursedul; Liak, Ranjan; Rajendran, Ramasamy; Reddy, Chinnagangannagari Kesava; Parsad, Rajender; Sharma, Parbodh C; Singh, Sati Shankar; Saha, Abhijit; Noor, Shamsoon

    2016-03-01

    South Asian countries will have to double their food production by 2050 while using resources more efficiently and minimizing environmental problems. Transformative management approaches and technology solutions will be required in the major grain-producing areas that provide the basis for future food and nutrition security. This study was conducted in four locations representing major food production systems of densely populated regions of South Asia. Novel production-scale research platforms were established to assess and optimize three futuristic cropping systems and management scenarios (S2, S3, S4) in comparison with current management (S1). With best agronomic management practices (BMPs), including conservation agriculture (CA) and cropping system diversification, the productivity of rice- and wheat-based cropping systems of South Asia increased substantially, whereas the global warming potential intensity (GWPi) decreased. Positive economic returns and less use of water, labor, nitrogen, and fossil fuel energy per unit food produced were achieved. In comparison with S1, S4, in which BMPs, CA and crop diversification were implemented in the most integrated manner, achieved 54% higher grain energy yield with a 104% increase in economic returns, 35% lower total water input, and a 43% lower GWPi. Conservation agriculture practices were most suitable for intensifying as well as diversifying wheat-rice rotations, but less so for rice-rice systems. This finding also highlights the need for characterizing areas suitable for CA and subsequent technology targeting. A comprehensive baseline dataset generated in this study will allow the prediction of extending benefits to a larger scale. PMID:26527502

  4. Responses of Crop Water Use Efficiency to Climate Change and Agronomic Measures in the Semiarid Area of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingting; Ren, Wei; An, Pingli; Pan, Zhihua; Wang, Liwei; Dong, Zhiqiang; He, Di; Yang, Jia; Pan, Shufen; Tian, Hanqin

    2015-01-01

    It has long been concerned how crop water use efficiency (WUE) responds to climate change. Most of existing researches have emphasized the impact of single climate factor but have paid less attention to the effect of developed agronomic measures on crop WUE. Based on the long-term field observations/experiments data, we investigated the changing responses of crop WUE to climate variables (temperature and precipitation) and agronomic practices (fertilization and cropping patterns) in the semi-arid area of northern China (SAC) during two periods, 1983-1999 and 2000-2010 (drier and warmer). Our results suggest that crop WUE was an intrinsical system sensitive to climate change and agronomic measures. Crops tend to reach the maximum WUE (WUEmax) in warm-dry environment while reach the stable minimum WUE (WUEmin) in warm-wet environment, with a difference between WUEmax and WUEmin ranging from 29.0%-55.5%. Changes in temperature and precipitation in the past three decades jointly enhanced crop WUE by 8.1%-30.6%. Elevated fertilizer and rotation cropping would increase crop WUE by 5.6-11.0% and 19.5-92.9%, respectively. These results indicate crop has the resilience by adjusting WUE, which is not only able to respond to subsequent periods of favorable water balance but also to tolerate the drought stress, and reasonable agronomic practices could enhance this resilience. However, this capacity would break down under impact of climate changes and unconscionable agronomic practices (e.g. excessive N/P/K fertilizer or traditional continuous cropping). Based on the findings in this study, a conceptual crop WUE model is constructed to indicate the threshold of crop resilience, which could help the farmer develop appropriate strategies in adapting the adverse impacts of climate warming. PMID:26336098

  5. Responses of Crop Water Use Efficiency to Climate Change and Agronomic Measures in the Semiarid Area of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingting; Ren, Wei; An, Pingli; Pan, Zhihua; Wang, Liwei; Dong, Zhiqiang; He, Di; Yang, Jia; Pan, Shufen; Tian, Hanqin

    2015-01-01

    It has long been concerned how crop water use efficiency (WUE) responds to climate change. Most of existing researches have emphasized the impact of single climate factor but have paid less attention to the effect of developed agronomic measures on crop WUE. Based on the long-term field observations/experiments data, we investigated the changing responses of crop WUE to climate variables (temperature and precipitation) and agronomic practices (fertilization and cropping patterns) in the semi-arid area of northern China (SAC) during two periods, 1983–1999 and 2000–2010 (drier and warmer). Our results suggest that crop WUE was an intrinsical system sensitive to climate change and agronomic measures. Crops tend to reach the maximum WUE (WUEmax) in warm-dry environment while reach the stable minimum WUE (WUEmin) in warm-wet environment, with a difference between WUEmax and WUEmin ranging from 29.0%-55.5%. Changes in temperature and precipitation in the past three decades jointly enhanced crop WUE by 8.1%-30.6%. Elevated fertilizer and rotation cropping would increase crop WUE by 5.6–11.0% and 19.5–92.9%, respectively. These results indicate crop has the resilience by adjusting WUE, which is not only able to respond to subsequent periods of favorable water balance but also to tolerate the drought stress, and reasonable agronomic practices could enhance this resilience. However, this capacity would break down under impact of climate changes and unconscionable agronomic practices (e.g. excessive N/P/K fertilizer or traditional continuous cropping). Based on the findings in this study, a conceptual crop WUE model is constructed to indicate the threshold of crop resilience, which could help the farmer develop appropriate strategies in adapting the adverse impacts of climate warming. PMID:26336098

  6. The acrylamide problem: a plant and agronomic science issue.

    PubMed

    Halford, Nigel G; Curtis, Tanya Y; Muttucumaru, Nira; Postles, Jennifer; Elmore, J Stephen; Mottram, Donald S

    2012-05-01

    Acrylamide, a chemical that is probably carcinogenic in humans and has neurological and reproductive effects, forms from free asparagine and reducing sugars during high-temperature cooking and processing of common foods. Potato and cereal products are major contributors to dietary exposure to acrylamide and while the food industry reacted rapidly to the discovery of acrylamide in some of the most popular foods, the issue remains a difficult one for many sectors. Efforts to reduce acrylamide formation would be greatly facilitated by the development of crop varieties with lower concentrations of free asparagine and/or reducing sugars, and of best agronomic practice to ensure that concentrations are kept as low as possible. This review describes how acrylamide is formed, the factors affecting free asparagine and sugar concentrations in crop plants, and the sometimes complex relationship between precursor concentration and acrylamide-forming potential. It covers some of the strategies being used to reduce free asparagine and sugar concentrations through genetic modification and other genetic techniques, such as the identification of quantitative trait loci. The link between acrylamide formation, flavour, and colour is discussed, as well as the difficulty of balancing the unknown risk of exposure to acrylamide in the levels that are present in foods with the well-established health benefits of some of the foods concerned. PMID:22345642

  7. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager’s job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  8. The Impact of Trust on the Practice of Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iivonen, Mirja; Huotari, Maija-Leena

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of trust in managing knowledge in organizations. Topics include the problematic nature of the concept of knowledge management; human resource management and information management; personal knowledge and organizational knowledge; collaboration and knowledge sharing; and organizational culture and climate. (Contains 25…

  9. Agronomic use of biotechnologically processed grape wastes.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, J; Páez, G; Mármol, Z; Ramones, E; Chandler, C; Marín, M; Ferrer, A

    2001-01-01

    Grape waste was composted by biodegradation and subsequently used as an organic fertilizer for 20 day-corn. Combinations of recently compressed grape waste and hen droppings (10% w/w) were prepared to study the activating effect of hen droppings and the effect of aeration on the composting process. The final hydrogen potential (pH), %C, %N and C/N ratio, indicated an adequate development of the bioprocess. Satisfactory results were observed when the products were applied at several doses (1,000-4,000 kg/ ha) as a soil conditioner for corn seed germination in greenhouses. Only the addition of hen droppings had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on corn dry matter (14% increase). A dose of 3000 kg/ha was considered as optimal and was used supplemented with triple superphosphate (TSP) in agronomic trials. All the treatments produced greater corn dry matter (P < 0.05) than the chemical industrial fertilizer used as a control (0.52-0.71 g/pot for the organic fertilizers vs 0.45 g/pot for the control). Anaerobic conditions and hen droppings addition significantly produced (P < 0.05) higher corn dry matter. PMID:11315808

  10. 9 CFR 147.26 - Procedures for establishing isolation and maintaining sanitation and good management practices...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... rodent population and other pests under control; (6) Tailor vaccination programs to needs of farm and... and maintaining sanitation and good management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma... management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infections. (a) The following...

  11. 9 CFR 147.26 - Procedures for establishing isolation and maintaining sanitation and good management practices...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... rodent population and other pests under control; (6) Tailor vaccination programs to needs of farm and... and maintaining sanitation and good management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma... management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infections. (a) The following...

  12. 9 CFR 147.26 - Procedures for establishing isolation and maintaining sanitation and good management practices...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... rodent population and other pests under control; (6) Tailor vaccination programs to needs of farm and... and maintaining sanitation and good management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma... management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infections. (a) The following...

  13. 9 CFR 147.26 - Procedures for establishing isolation and maintaining sanitation and good management practices...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... rodent population and other pests under control; (6) Tailor vaccination programs to needs of farm and... and maintaining sanitation and good management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma... management practices for the control of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infections. (a) The following...

  14. Teaching Residents Practice-Management Knowledge and Skills: An "in Vivo" Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Laurel Lyn

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the relevant data regarding teaching psychiatric residents practice management knowledge and skills. This article also introduces a unique program for teaching practice management to residents. Methods: A literature search was conducted through PubMed and "Academic Psychiatry". Additionally residents involved in…

  15. Loneliness at the Top: Ten Ways Medical Practice Administrators Can Manage the Isolation of Leadership.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Medical practice.managers spend their days surrounded by people, so the last thing they may expect to feel is lonely. Yet for many, being the manager of a medical practice can lead to feelings of isolation from the rest of the staff, and loneliness. This article explores the many reasons that managing a medical practice can be a lonely business. It considers the risks when a practice manager's loneliness goes unchecked, both to the individual and to the practice. It suggests 10 effective and healthy strategies for preventing and managing the leadership loneliness that medical practice managers sometimes experience. Next, this article argues that acceptance is the first step in overcoming loneliness in the workplace. It offers guidance for medical practice managers who wish to help lonely members of their teams. It describes the benefits of having a confidant to help support the medical practice manager, and the characteristics of an ideal confidant. Finally, this article suggests a strategy for combatting loneliness by interacting with the staff more frequently. PMID:27249880

  16. Practice parameter for the assessment and management of youth involved with the child welfare system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Terry; Fouras, George; Brown, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    This Practice Parameter presents principles for the mental health assessment and management of youth involved with the child welfare system. Important definitions, background, history, epidemiology, mental health care use, and functional outcomes are described. Practical guidance regarding child welfare-related considerations for evaluation and management are discussed. PMID:26004666

  17. A Survey of Current Disability Management Practice: Emerging Trends and Implications for Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, David A.; Hursh, Norman; Lui, John; Isom, Rodney; Sasson, Joy

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a recent role and function study completed in 2004 to determine the prevailing domains of disability management practice. The study also sought to establish an empirical basis for a certification exam for disability management specialists consistent with evolving standards of practice. Based on the expert…

  18. Model for Prioritizing Best Management Practice Implementation: Sediment Load Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Taeil; Vellidis, George; Hyman, Jeffrey B.; Brooks, Erin; Kurkalova, Lyubov A.; Boll, Jan; Cho, Jaepil

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the best way to allocate limited resources is a constant challenge for water quality improvement efforts. The synoptic approach is a tool for geographic prioritization of these efforts. It uses a benefit-cost framework to calculate indices for functional criteria in subunits (watersheds, counties) of a region and then rank the subunits. The synoptic approach was specifically designed to incorporate best professional judgment in cases where information and resources are limited. To date, the synoptic approach has been applied primarily to local or regional wetland restoration prioritization projects. The goal of this work was to develop a synoptic model for prioritizing watersheds within which suites of agricultural best management practices (BMPs) can be implemented to reduce sediment load at the watershed outlets. The model ranks candidate watersheds within an ecoregion or river basin so that BMP implementation within the highest ranked watersheds will result in the most sediment load reduction per conservation dollar invested. The model can be applied anywhere and at many scales provided that the selected suite of BMPs is appropriate for the evaluation area's biophysical and climatic conditions. The model was specifically developed as a tool for prioritizing BMP implementation efforts in ecoregions containing watersheds associated with the USDA-NRCS conservation effects assessment project (CEAP). This paper presents the testing of the model in the little river experimental watershed (LREW) which is located near Tifton, Georgia, USA and is the CEAP watershed representing the southeastern coastal plain. The application of the model to the LREW demonstrated that the model represents the physical drivers of erosion and sediment loading well. The application also showed that the model is quite responsive to social and economic drivers and is, therefore, best applied at a scale large enough to ensure differences in social and economic drivers across the

  19. Interactive effects of altitude and management on resistance and resilience of permanent grasslands to drought: combining agronomic, functional and ecophysiological approaches Buttler, A., Deleglise, C., Signarbieux, C., Meisser, M., Mosimann, E., Mills, R.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, A.; Deléglise, C.; Signarbieux, C.; Meisser, M.; Mosimann, E.; Mills, R.; Risch, A.; Vitra, A.; Delzon, S.

    2015-12-01

    The expected increase in extreme climatic events will cause significant constraints on grassland systems and, as a result, farmers must adapt grassland management. Identifying potential interactive effects of factors such as altitude and management, with different water availability scenarios is therefore a major challenge to anticipate the performance of mountain grasslands. Using rain shelters across grassland systems in the Swiss Jura, we simulated the effects of severe droughts in spring and summer periods, at different altitudes, and compared realistic management types such as grazing by sheep, and intensive and extensive mowing. When comparing grazing and mowing management under an extreme drought event at a similar altitude, minor short-term changes of species composition, and almost no persistent effects were observed. However, significant changes were observed in plant functional traits, reflecting a strong decline in plant growth during the drought, and a partial recovery two months later. Forage yields, and its nutritive value, thus declined during the drought period, and both were still affected in the following months, but had recovered in the following spring. Negative drought effects were stronger in the grazing management, although recovery was slightly improved in this management. Concerning soil biogeochemistry, we compared microbial biomass C and N, as well as the activity of extracellular enzymes at peak drought, and during the rewet phase. Both indices remained comparable to control treatments under drought. During the rewet phase, some enzymes were stimulated in the grazed-control, but microbial biomass remained comparable. These systems showed considerable resistance to extreme drought, with only minor short term impacts due to management. However, cascading effects from the aboveground to belowground function may be observed if such events increase in frequency and these processes are expected to be different at the various altitudes.

  20. Performance comparison of structural stormwater best management practices.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a method for comparing the pollutant removal of a number of structural stormwater treatment devices, commonly referred to as best management practices (BMPs). Historically, the pollutant removal ability of a BMP has been expressed as a percent reduction in concentration or load. Unfortunately, the calculated percent reduction in pollutant concentration is strongly affected by the influent concentration, with the calculated reduction generally being much lower when the event mean concentrations (EMCs) in the untreated runoff from the test watershed are low. The objective of the proposed methodology is to eliminate this problem by predicting BMP performance for an arbitrary influent concentration, so that BMPs evaluated in different watersheds can be compared as if the influent quality at all sites were the same. This method allows BMPs to be compared based on the quality of effluent produced and the mass reduction. The proposed method uses linear regression as the primary tool to compute the expected effluent concentration from a BMP, given a specific influent concentration of interest and was developed using data collected in the California Department of Transportation BMP Retrofit Pilot Program. This technique reveals that for media filters, the concentration of sediment and other particle-associated pollutants in treated runoff is generally unrelated to influent quality and is relatively constant. Wet basins with large permanent pool volumes also have effluent concentrations that are constant for most constituents and unrelated to influent concentrations. In these situations, the "percent reduction" in a pollutant EMC is not an inherent characteristic of the BMP, but a function of the influent EMC, because the quality of effluent produced is constant. Predicting the effluent quality of several types of conventional BMPs based on a common influent concentration allows an objective comparison of their performance and the selection of a BMP that

  1. Management practices to overcome the incidence of grass tetany.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D L; Kappel, L C; Boling, J A

    1989-12-01

    To minimize the incidence of grass tetany, winter pastures should be established on soils containing Mg-rich minerals, drainage should be improved on five-textured soils, legumes should be included in the sward and soil pH should be at least 5.5. Liming acid soils with dolomitic lime increases forage Mg by supplying Mg and by raising soil pH. Calcitic lime applications also can increase Mg availability to plants on soils with adequate Mg. Low rates of application of soluble Mg salts (less than 100 kg/ha of Mg) effectively increase Mg uptake from noncalcareous soils with low cation exchange capacity. Potassium levels in soils and plants should be kept in the lower range of recommended values. Nitrogen application should be regulated to provide the desired level of forage production. Nitrogen fertilizers, especially the nitrate form, stimulate plant Mg uptake if Mg is available in the soil. The most practical and cost-efficient method of supplementing dietary Mg intake is to provide free-choice Mg. Supplements must be palatable and placed in locations frequently used by cow herds. Including a high-energy feed in the supplement may at times increase its preventive effectiveness by increasing Mg absorption and reducing lipolysis. Regardless of the supplement formulation, Mg intake should be monitored on a regular basis, and formulation or management changes should be initiated if Mg consumption is below required levels. In severe grass tetany outbreaks, foliar application of Mg or administration of Mg via the drinking water may be warranted. PMID:2693422

  2. Focusing on the software of managing health workers: what can we learn from high commitment management practices?

    PubMed

    Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of what constitutes best practice in human resource management (HRM) in public-oriented services is limited and the operational aspects of managing health workers at provision level have been poorly studied. The magnet hospital concept offers some insights into HRM practices that are leading to high commitment. These have been shown to lead to superior performance in not only industrial business firms, but also service industries and the public service. The mechanisms that drive these practices include positive psychological links between managers and staff, organizational commitment and trust. Conditions for successful high commitment management (HiCoM) include health service managers with a strong vision and able to transmit this vision to their staff, appropriate decision spaces for healthcare managers and a pool of reasonable well-trained health workers. For this, adequate remuneration is the first condition. Equally important are the issues of cultural fit and of 'commitment'. What would staff expect from management in return for their commitment to the organization? Salary buys indeed time of employees, but other practices ensure their commitment. Only if these drivers are understood will managers be able to make their HRM practices more responsive to the needs and expectations of the health workers. PMID:17624868

  3. Risk Management in Australian Science Education: A Model for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlin, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Provides a framework that incorporates the diverse elements of risk management in science education into a systematic process and is adaptable to changing circumstances. Appendix contains risk management checklist for management, laboratory and storage, extreme biological and chemical hazards, protective equipment, waste disposal, electrical…

  4. Transforming labor-management practices through real-time analytics.

    PubMed

    Nippert, Kathye Habig; Graves, Brian

    2012-06-01

    Catholic Health Partners (CHP) decentralized productivity management, giving its regional executives greater control over their productivity tools and data. CHP retained centralized management of its benchmarking and analytics and created an enterprise database with standardized information. CHP's stakeholders shared accountability and accepted greater responsibility for labor-management decisions. PMID:22734327

  5. Reconceptualizing case management in theory and practice: a frontline perspective.

    PubMed

    Yarmo Roberts, Deborah

    2002-08-01

    'Case management' in the health and social service sector is controversial, highly political and saturated with conflicting agendas among stakeholders. Research was conducted recently to explore the role of case managers in three evolving, Australian-based, long-term care, case management models. The findings have relevance to countries worldwide that contend with delivering quality care that is cost effective. The research captures the perspectives of 51 open-ended interviews with front-line case managers who have first-hand knowledge of the models' effect on their clients and on their own roles. Contrary to the rhetoric that case management is client-centred, case management is concluded to be 'system centred' based on a unilateral approach taken by each of the three models. Case managers had a limited ability to attain necessary services for clients. Success was dependent on the range of case managers' skills and experience, relationship with the client, degree of job satisfaction, level of influence in the health and social system and ability to collaborate with relevant professionals. The relationship between the three primary influences (system, model, client) affecting case managers' pursuit of achieving appropriate client services was also reviewed. A reconceptualized multidimensional approach, or 'neo-process-centred' case management, is proposed. The revised approach can be applied to existing and new models and has direct implications for policy makers, management and practitioners aspiring to improve client care within existing constraints. PMID:12184835

  6. The Nerf Ball: A Useful Technique for Management Education and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Bill; Lockwood, Chris A.; Anderson, Joe S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a technique the first author imported from management practice to (a) develop students' meeting management skills, (b) improve students' listening skills and conflict management abilities and (c) encourage student participation and create a supportive learning environment. The technique uses a tangible prop (i.e., a Nerf ball)…

  7. 75 FR 62809 - Transmission Vegetation Management Practices; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Transmission Vegetation Management Practices; Notice of Technical Conference... Technical Conference on Transmission Vegetation Management Programs on Tuesday, October 26, 2010 from 1 p.m... attend the conference. The purpose of the conference is to discuss current vegetation management...

  8. Analysing Mentoring Dialogues for Developing a Preservice Teacher's Classroom Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sempowicz, Tracey; Hudson, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A key concern for preservice teachers is classroom management, including student behaviour management, which also has been a factor associated with teachers leaving the profession within the first five years. This study investigates the mentoring practices used to guide the mentee's classroom management. Using multiple data sources (e.g., lesson…

  9. Management Practices of Soybean Producers in Marion County, Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William A.; And Others

    The purposes of the study were to: (1) determine some major characteristics of Marion County soybean producers and their farms; (2) more accurately determine which recommended production practices soybean producers were using in 1968 and 1969; (3) study the relation between use of recommended production practices and yield levels; and (4) identify…

  10. School Indoor Air Quality Best Management Practices Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Richard; Ellis, Richard; Hardin, Tim

    This manual, written in response to requirements of the Washington State legislature, focuses on practices which can be undertaken during the siting, design, construction, or renovation of a school, recommends practices to help ensure good indoor air quality during building occupancy, and suggests protocols and useful reference documents for…

  11. The Management of Student Administration: A Guide to Good Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for Wales, Cardiff.

    This report is intended to help institutions review their arrangements for student administration through comparisons with generally recognized good practice and with specific developments and experience in the sector. This study from which the information on good practices was derived was conducted through visits to 11 pilot institutions to…

  12. Simulating and evaluating best management practices for integrated landscape management scenarios in biofuel feedstock production

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Miae; Wu, May

    2015-09-08

    Sound crop and land management strategies can maintain land productivity and improve the environmental sustainability of agricultural crop and feedstock production. With this study, it evaluates a strategy of incorporating landscape design and management concepts into bioenergy feedstock production. It examines the effect of land conversion and agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on water quality (nutrients and suspended sediments) and hydrology. The strategy was applied to the watershed of the South Fork Iowa River in Iowa, where the focus was on converting low-productivity land to provide cellulosic biomass and implementing riparian buffers. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was employed to simulate the impact at watershed and sub-basin scales. The study compared the representation of buffers by using trapping efficiency and area ratio methods in SWAT. Landscape design and management scenarios were developed to quantify water quality under (i) current land use, (ii) partial land conversion to switchgrass, and (iii) riparian buffer implementation. Results show that implementation of vegetative barriers and riparian buffer can trap the loss of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and sediment significantly. The effect increases with the increase of buffer area coverage. Implementing riparian buffer at 30 m width is able to produce 4 million liters of biofuels. When low-productivity land (15.2% of total watershed land area) is converted to grow switchgrass, suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and nitrate loadings are reduced by 69.3%, 55.5%, 46.1%, and 13.4%, respectively. The results highlight the significant role of lower-productivity land and buffers in cellulosic biomass and provide insights into the design of an integrated landscape with a conservation buffer for future bioenergy feedstock production.

  13. Simulating and evaluating best management practices for integrated landscape management scenarios in biofuel feedstock production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ha, Miae; Wu, May

    2015-09-08

    Sound crop and land management strategies can maintain land productivity and improve the environmental sustainability of agricultural crop and feedstock production. With this study, it evaluates a strategy of incorporating landscape design and management concepts into bioenergy feedstock production. It examines the effect of land conversion and agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on water quality (nutrients and suspended sediments) and hydrology. The strategy was applied to the watershed of the South Fork Iowa River in Iowa, where the focus was on converting low-productivity land to provide cellulosic biomass and implementing riparian buffers. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) wasmore » employed to simulate the impact at watershed and sub-basin scales. The study compared the representation of buffers by using trapping efficiency and area ratio methods in SWAT. Landscape design and management scenarios were developed to quantify water quality under (i) current land use, (ii) partial land conversion to switchgrass, and (iii) riparian buffer implementation. Results show that implementation of vegetative barriers and riparian buffer can trap the loss of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and sediment significantly. The effect increases with the increase of buffer area coverage. Implementing riparian buffer at 30 m width is able to produce 4 million liters of biofuels. When low-productivity land (15.2% of total watershed land area) is converted to grow switchgrass, suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and nitrate loadings are reduced by 69.3%, 55.5%, 46.1%, and 13.4%, respectively. The results highlight the significant role of lower-productivity land and buffers in cellulosic biomass and provide insights into the design of an integrated landscape with a conservation buffer for future bioenergy feedstock production.« less

  14. Managing interdisciplinary health research--theoretical and practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Aagaard-Hansen, Jens; Ouma, John Henry

    2002-01-01

    Interdisciplinary health research can offer valuable evidence for health care managers. However, there are specific challenges regarding the management of such projects. Based on 7 years of experience from a project in western Kenya, the authors point to the need for a sufficient time horizon, a high level of communication, equity between the disciplines and the identification of appropriate evaluation criteria as issues to be considered. The theoretical framework of Rosenfield was modified to comply with the complexities of field management. PMID:12298143

  15. Veterinary involvement in management practices of beef cow-calf producers.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, M W; Gay, J M

    1996-02-15

    Management practices of 53 beef cow-calf producers were surveyed by use of a mail questionnaire. Producers were randomly selected from those who employ veterinarians to perform herd pregnancy examinations. Questions were asked about animal management, grazing and feeding, vaccination, and record-keeping practices. Median herd size was 250 breeding cows, and 2,329 of 2,491 (93%) randomly sampled cows in these herds were pregnant. Less than half of producers associated with these herds reported adoption of many beneficial practices related to bull management, infectious disease management, nutrition, and individual-animal record keeping, suggesting that a considerable number of producers are missing opportunities to optimize production and, thus, economic return. Use of individual-animal production records, which would enable more objective decision making on the basis of production and economic data, was not widespread. These findings suggested that veterinarians serving beef ranches have opportunities to provide additional services incorporating these management practices. PMID:8603893

  16. 40 CFR 430.03 - Best management practices (BMPs) for spent pulping liquor, soap, and turpentine management, spill...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Best management practices (BMPs) for spent pulping liquor, soap, and turpentine management, spill prevention, and control. 430.03 Section 430.03 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD...

  17. The Campus Environmental Management System Cycle in Practice: 15 Years of Environmental Management, Education and Research at Dalhousie University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Amelia

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To challenge the deliberate strategy approach of the environmental management system (EMS) cycle, and offer a model based on both the practical reality experienced at Dalhousie University and emergent strategy theory. Also, to share some of the lessons learned in the 15 years of environmental management at Dalhousie University.…

  18. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Management of environmental factors, such as temperature, light, humidity, atmosphere, and air circulation... controls including but not limited to traps, light, or sound; or (2) Lures and repellents...

  19. Agronomic characteristics of five different urban waste digestates.

    PubMed

    Tampio, Elina; Salo, Tapio; Rintala, Jukka

    2016-03-15

    The use of digestate in agriculture is an efficient way to recycle materials and to decrease the use of mineral fertilizers. The agronomic characteristics of the digestates can promote plant growth and soil properties after digestate fertilization but also harmful effects can arise due to digestate quality, e.g. pH, organic matter and heavy metal content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the differences and similarities in agronomic characteristics and the value of five urban waste digestates from different biogas plants treating either food waste, organic fraction of organic solid waste or a mixture of waste-activated sludge and vegetable waste. The digestate agronomic characteristics were studied with chemical analyses and the availability of nutrients was also assessed with growth experiments and soil mineralization tests. All studied urban digestates produced 5-30% higher ryegrass yields compared to a control mineral fertilizer with a similar inorganic nitrogen concentration, while the feedstock source affected the agronomic value. Food waste and organic fraction of municipal solid waste digestates were characterized by high agronomic value due to the availability of nutrients and low heavy metal load. Waste-activated sludge as part of the feedstock mixture, however, increased the heavy metal content and reduced nitrogen availability to the plant, thus reducing the fertilizer value of the digestate. PMID:26773433

  20. Teacher Progress Monitoring of Instructional and Behavioral Management Practices: An Evidence-Based Approach to Improving Classroom Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Linda A.; Dudek, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    In the era of teacher evaluation and effectiveness, assessment tools that identify and monitor educators' instruction and behavioral management practices are in high demand. The Classroom Strategies Scale (CSS) Observer Form is a multidimensional teacher progress monitoring tool designed to assess teachers' usage of instructional and behavioral…

  1. Protocol and practice in the adaptive management of waterfowl harvests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, F.; Williams, K.

    1999-01-01

    Waterfowl harvest management in North America, for all its success, historically has had several shortcomings, including a lack of well-defined objectives, a failure to account for uncertain management outcomes, and inefficient use of harvest regulations to understand the effects of management. To address these and other concerns, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began implementation of adaptive harvest management in 1995. Harvest policies are now developed using a Markov decision process in which there is an explicit accounting for uncontrolled environmental variation, partial controllability of harvest, and structural uncertainty in waterfowl population dynamics. Current policies are passively adaptive, in the sense that any reduction in structural uncertainty is an unplanned by-product of the regulatory process. A generalization of the Markov decision process permits the calculation of optimal actively adaptive policies, but it is not yet clear how state-specific harvest actions differ between passive and active approaches. The Markov decision process also provides managers the ability to explore optimal levels of aggregation or "management scale" for regulating harvests in a system that exhibits high temporal, spatial, and organizational variability. Progress in institutionalizing adaptive harvest management has been remarkable, but some managers still perceive the process as a panacea, while failing to appreciate the challenges presented by this more explicit and methodical approach to harvest regulation. Technical hurdles include the need to develop better linkages between population processes and the dynamics of landscapes, and to model the dynamics of structural uncertainty in a more comprehensive fashion. From an institutional perspective, agreement on how to value and allocate harvests continues to be elusive, and there is some evidence that waterfowl managers have overestimated the importance of achievement-oriented factors in setting hunting

  2. Using evidence-based practice for managing clinical outcomes in advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Glanville, I; Schirm, V; Wineman, N M

    2000-10-01

    Preparation of advanced practice nurses to assume leadership positions for clinical decision making requires that traditional ways of solving clinical problems be augmented with information from relevant, research-derived evidence. In this article, the authors describe how one graduate program prepares advanced practice nurses to use the best scientific evidence with clinical expertise to influence patient outcomes. The assignments that students complete in their program provide examples of evidence-based practice that apply quality improvement principles and science-based nursing interventions to create best practices. PMID:11008434

  3. Environmental management practices and engineering science: a review and typology for future research.

    PubMed

    Evangelinos, Konstantinos I; Allan, Stuart; Jones, Keith; Nikolaou, Ioannis E

    2014-04-01

    Current literature describes a number of environmental management practices and cleaner production methods that facilitate different industrial sectors to address their various environmental impacts. The high number of present practices makes their use especially difficult and complicated. This paper aims to shed light on this field by providing a typology of those environmental management practices (such as environmental management systems, environmental indicators assessment methodologies, and cleaner productions methods) and their limitations. It also describes the strengths and weaknesses of using such tools and thoughts for future research. PMID:24243581

  4. Managing the Right Projects: Best Practices to Align Project and Corporate Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Bobby

    2012-01-01

    If there's a human endeavor that exemplifies teamwork, it is space exploration. And that teamwork absolutely cannot happen effectively if the boots on the ground the people doing the work - don't understand how their work aligns with the larger goal. This presentation will discuss some best management practices from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center that have succeeded in helping employees become informed, engaged and committed to the space agency's important missions. Specific topics include: Alignment Criteria: Linking Projects To Corporate Strategy. Resource Management: Best Practices For Resource Management. Strategic Analysis: Supporting Decision Making In A Changing Environment. Communication Strategies: Best Practices To Communicate Change. Benefits Achieved And Lessons Learned.

  5. Handbook of Classroom Management: Research, Practice, and Contemporary Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evertson, Carolyn M., Ed.; Weinstein, Carol S., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Classroom management is a topic of enduring concern for teachers, administrators, and the public. It consistently ranks as the first or second most serious educational problem in the eyes of the general public, and beginning teachers consistently rank it as their most pressing concern during their early teaching years. Management problems continue…

  6. For Performance through Learning, Knowledge Management Is Critical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorelick, Carol; Tantawy-Monsou, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper proposes that knowledge management is a system that integrates people, process and technology for sustainable results by increasing performance through learning. Definitions of knowledge, knowledge management and performance serve as a foundation. Design/methodology/approach: The model for the knowledge era proposed in this…

  7. Linking theory and practice in ecological weed management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models of management effects on weed demography and the experience of successful organic and low-external-input farmers point in the same direction: long-term weed management success depends on diversified strategies that attack multiple weed life stages. In an era of declining research b...

  8. Municipal solid waste management in Malaysia: practices and challenges.

    PubMed

    Manaf, Latifah Abd; Samah, Mohd Armi Abu; Zukki, Nur Ilyana Mohd

    2009-11-01

    Rapid economic development and population growth, inadequate infrastructure and expertise, and land scarcity make the management of municipal solid waste become one of Malaysia's most critical environmental issues. The study is aimed at evaluating the generation, characteristics, and management of solid waste in Malaysia based on published information. In general, the per capita generation rate is about 0.5-0.8 kg/person/day in which domestic waste is the primary source. Currently, solid waste is managed by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, with the participation of the private sector. A new institutional and legislation framework has been structured with the objectives to establish a holistic, integrated, and cost-effective solid waste management system, with an emphasis on environmental protection and public health. Therefore, the hierarchy of solid waste management has given the highest priority to source reduction through 3R, intermediate treatment and final disposal. PMID:19540745

  9. Municipal solid waste management in Malaysia: Practices and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Manaf, Latifah Abd Samah, Mohd Armi Abu; Zukki, Nur Ilyana Mohd

    2009-11-15

    Rapid economic development and population growth, inadequate infrastructure and expertise, and land scarcity make the management of municipal solid waste become one of Malaysia's most critical environmental issues. The study is aimed at evaluating the generation, characteristics, and management of solid waste in Malaysia based on published information. In general, the per capita generation rate is about 0.5-0.8 kg/person/day in which domestic waste is the primary source. Currently, solid waste is managed by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, with the participation of the private sector. A new institutional and legislation framework has been structured with the objectives to establish a holistic, integrated, and cost-effective solid waste management system, with an emphasis on environmental protection and public health. Therefore, the hierarchy of solid waste management has given the highest priority to source reduction through 3R, intermediate treatment and final disposal.

  10. The ABC's required for establishing a practical computerized plant engineering management data base system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiocco, F. R.; Hume, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    A system's approach is outlined in the paper to assist facility and Plant Engineers improve their organization's data management system. The six basic steps identified may appear somewhat simple; however, adequate planning, proper resources, and the involvement of management will determine the success of a computerized facility management data base. Helpful suggestions are noted throughout the paper to insure the development of a practical computerized data management system.

  11. Management practices in Australian healthcare: can NSW public hospitals do better?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Renu; Green, Roy; Agarwal, Neeru; Randhawa, Krithika

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of best management practices in an Australian state-run healthcare system, namely New South Wales (NSW), and studies the impact of a range of hospital factors in driving best management practices as a means of enhancing healthcare delivery. Design/methodology/approach - This study adapts a unique survey instrument globally tested to quantify the multi-dimensional nature of hospital management practices in 42 acute care public hospitals of NSW. The authors then analysed the role of hospital-specific characteristics in driving best management practices, namely hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds, employees and doctors), level of skill and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy. Findings - The findings of this study show the areas of strength and potential areas of improvement in NSW hospitals. The authors find a positive association between the adoption of better management practices and hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds and employees), level of skills and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy. However, hospital size as measured by the number of doctors did not have a statistically significant relationship. Practical implications - This paper is of interest to both hospital administrators, clinical doctors and healthcare policy-makers who want to improve and develop strategies for better management in the healthcare sector. Originality/value - This study provides an internationally comparable robust measure of management capability in public hospitals, and contributes to the evidence-base of management practices and performance in hospitals. PMID:27119390

  12. Guide to good practices for line and training manager activities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide direction for line and training managers in carrying out their responsibilities for training and qualifying personnel and to verify that existing training activities are effective.

  13. Sustainable-energy managment practices in an energy economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darkwa, K.

    2001-10-01

    The economic survival of any nation depends upon its ability to produce and manage sufficient supplies of low-cost safe energy. The world's consumption of fossil fuel resources currently increasing at 3% per annum is found to be unsustainable. Projections of this trend show that mankind will exhaust all known reserves in the second half of the coming century. Governments, industrialists, commercial organizations, public sector departments and the general public have now become aware of the urgent requirements for the efficient management of resources and energy-consuming activities. Most organizations in the materials, manufacturing and retail sectors and in the service industries have also created energy management departments, or have employed consultants, to monitor energy consumption and to reduce wastage. Conversely, any sustained attempt to reduce rates of energy consumption even by as little as 0.1% per annum ensures relatively an eternal future supply as well as reduction on environmental and ecological effect. Thus, there is no long- term solution to energy flow problem other than systematic and effective energy management and the continuous application of the techniques of energy management. Essential energy management strategies in support of a sustainable energy- economy are discussed.

  14. Evaluation of Soil Media for Stormwater Infiltration Best Management Practices (BMPs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will improve the performance of structural management practices, and provide guidance that will allow designers to balance infiltration rates with sorption capacity. This project will also perform a standard column test procedure for evaluating candidate soil media.

  15. ROLE OF WATERSHED SUBDIVISION ON MODELING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES WITH SWAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributed parameter watershed models are often used for evaluating the effectiveness of various best management practices (BMPs). Streamflow, sediment, and nutrient yield predictions of a watershed model can be affected by spatial resolution as dictated by watershed subdivisio...

  16. A practical approach to perioperative management of cardiac implantable electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pow-Li; Foo, David

    2015-01-01

    With the increased use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), it is increasingly important to recognise the unique challenges involved in the management of patients with CIEDs who are undergoing surgery. Practice advisories and consensus statements have been issued by the American Society of Anesthesiologists and the Heart Rhythm Society, advocating a multidisciplinary approach. This review discusses and presents a practical approach to perioperative CIED management in the Singapore context. PMID:26512144

  17. A practical approach to perioperative management of cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Chia, Pow-Li; Foo, David

    2015-10-01

    With the increased use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), it is increasingly important to recognise the unique challenges involved in the management of patients with CIEDs who are undergoing surgery. Practice advisories and consensus statements have been issued by the American Society of Anesthesiologists and the Heart Rhythm Society, advocating a multidisciplinary approach. This review discusses and presents a practical approach to perioperative CIED management in the Singapore context. PMID:26512144

  18. Threats in Schools: A Practical Guide for Managing Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Joseph T.

    In the wake of several highly publicized school shootings, the problem of school violence has increasingly become a focus of concern for the general public as well as teachers, school officials, and students. Drawing on case studies from publicized violent incidents as well as from the authors private practice, this book provides techniques for…

  19. Communities of Practice: A Learning Strategy for Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Catherine H.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching students self-directed learning skills provides benefits that outlast individual courses. An individual self-directed approach is insufficient, however, given the fast pace of change students encounter in their professional lives. Communities of practice combine self-directed and collaborative learning to meet the challenges of today's…

  20. An Approach to Ethical Practice in Management and Trainer Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Rita

    1992-01-01

    Concern with ethics has given rise to two educational approaches, one derived from philosophical principles of social ethics, the other based on case studies of practical issues. A combination of these is necessary to ensure situational applicability and to avoid moral relativism and expediency. (SK)

  1. Soil Aggregation and Enzyme Activities as affected by Management Practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The predominant cropping system in the Central Great Plains, winter Wheat-Fallow (W-F) rotation, is associated with decreases in Soil Organic Matter (SOM) primarily because of tillage during the fallow period. Intensive cropping with reduced tillage and fallow are practices that provide more residue...

  2. Management Practices of Cotton Producers in Lauderdale County, Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peal, Charles T.; Dotson, Robert S.

    Eighty-one randomly selected cotton producers in Lauderdale County were interviewed for the purposes of: (1) characterizing those in different cotton yield groups, (2) determining which practices were being used by those in different yield groups, and (3) identifying some of the factors influencing the farmers to use or not to use the 12 practices…

  3. Network Framing of Pest Management Knowledge and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Keith M.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional technology transfer is based on the assumption that autonomous individuals independently make behavioral decisions. In contrast, Actor-Network Theory (ANT) suggests that people and technologies are interconnected in ways that reinforce and reproduce some types of knowledge and consequent behavioral practices, but not others. Research…

  4. Language Practices and Language Management in a UK Yemeni Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Gibson Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Through observation, questionnaires and, particularly, ethnographic interviews with parents, pupils, teachers and community organisers associated with a Yemeni complementary school, this paper develops a portrait of language repertoires, practices and preferences in a Yemeni diasporic community in a northern English city. Also investigated are the…

  5. Management practices affects soil carbon dioxide emission and carbon storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural practices contribute about 25% of total anthropogenic carbon dioxide emission, a greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Soil can act both as sink or source of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide fixed in plant biomass through photosynthesis can be stored in soil as organi...

  6. Anxiety disorders in family practice. Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W. W.; Borins, M.; Audet, D.

    1994-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common in family practice. Although not ideal, the DSM 3-R definitions of anxiety disorders provide a framework for diagnostic precision that assists physicians in choosing the best treatment. Assessing functional status helps determine the need for psychotherapeutic or pharmacologic intervention. We evaluate specific interventions and suggest the risks and benefits for each disorder. PMID:8312758

  7. Translating reference doses into allergen management practice: challenges for stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Crevel, René W R; Baumert, Joseph L; Luccioli, Stefano; Baka, Athanasia; Hattersley, Sue; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B; Ronsmans, Stefan; Timmermans, Frans; Ward, Rachel; Chung, Yong-joo

    2014-05-01

    Risk assessment describes the impact of a particular hazard as a function of dose and exposure. It forms the foundation of risk management and contributes to the overall decision-making process, but is not its endpoint. This paper outlines a risk analysis framework to underpin decision-making in the area of allergen cross-contact. Specifically, it identifies challenges relevant to each component of the risk analysis: risk assessment (data gaps and output interpretation); risk management (clear and realistic objectives); and risk communication (clear articulation of risk and benefit). Translation of the outputs from risk assessment models into risk management measures must be informed by a clear understanding of the model outputs and their limitations. This will lead to feasible and achievable risk management objectives, grounded in a level of risk accepted by the different stakeholders, thereby avoiding potential unintended detrimental consequences. Clear, consistent and trustworthy communications actively involving all stakeholders underpin these objectives. The conclusions, integrating the perspectives of different stakeholders, offer a vision where clear, science-based benchmarks form the basis of allergen management and labelling, cutting through the current confusion and uncertainty. Finally, the paper recognises that the proposed framework must be adaptable to new and emerging evidence. PMID:24491260

  8. Strengthening affective organizational commitment: the influence of fairness perceptions of management practices and underlying employee cynicism.

    PubMed

    English, Brian; Chalon, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between cynicism, the perceived fairness of change management and personnel practices, and affective organizational commitment. High levels of affective organizational commitment have been shown to reduce voluntary turnover in the nursing workforce. Previous research suggests that "unfair" management practices and employee cynicism lead to lower commitment. It is not clear, however, whether the perceived fairness of particular practices influences affective commitment beyond that accounted for by underlying employee cynicism. Data were obtained from a study involving 1104 registered nurses that formed part of a larger investigation of the general well-being of nurses in Western Australia. Only nurses who were permanent or employed on fixed term or temporary contracts were included. Findings indicated that although higher levels of cynicism among nurses were associated with lower levels of affective commitment, their perception of the fairness of change management and personnel practices influenced their affective commitment over and above their cynicism. The perceived fairness of management practices is an important influence on nurses' affective commitment beyond that accounted for by cynicism. The implication for managers is that the affective organizational commitment of nurses is likely to be strengthened by addressing the perceived fairness of change management and personnel practices notwithstanding their beliefs about the integrity of the organization. PMID:21248545

  9. Sustaining Higher Education Using Wal-Mart's Best Supply Chain Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comm, Clare L.; Mathaisel, Dennis F. X.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The costs in higher education are increasing and need to be controlled. This paper aims to demonstrate what lessons higher education could learn from Wal-Mart's reasons for its financial success with its focus on efficient and effective supply chain management (SCM) best practices. Design/methodology/approach: Wal-Mart's best practices in…

  10. State University of New York at Albany--Financial Management Practices. Report 94-S-85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This report is the result of an audit of selected financial management practices of the State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany for the period April 1, 1992 through July 31, 1994. The audit addressed the following practices: cash, payroll, purchasing, revenue accounting, accounts receivable, and computer contingency plans. The report…

  11. CONSIDERATION IN THE DESIGN OF TREATMENT BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (BMPS) TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today, many municipalities are implementing low-cost best management practices (BMPs). The lowest cost BMPs, termed non-structural or source control BMPs, include practices such as limiting pesticide use in agricultural areas. There are a set of higher cost BMPs, which involve ...

  12. 40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous compliance with the management practice requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped... practice standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether each sterilization cycle contains a full load of items, and if not, a statement from a hospital central...

  13. CONSIDERATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF TREATMENT BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (BMPS) TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory


    Today, many municipalities are implementing low-cost best management practices (BMPs). The lowest cost BMPs, termed non-structural or source control BMPs, include practices such as limiting pesticide use in agricultural areas. There are a set of higher cost BMPs, which in...

  14. Monitoring Pasture Best Management Practices in the Spring Creek Watershed of Central Pennsylvania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) for grazing farms such as streambank fencing, cattle crossings and conservation buffers are intended to reduce sediment and nutrient movement into streams, but the effects of these practices are difficult to measure. A large interdisciplinary team is exa...

  15. Behavior Management Strategies: Beliefs and Practices of Male and Female Early Childhood Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sak, Ramazan; Sahin Sak, Ikbal Tuba; Yerlikaya, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a comparison of male and female early childhood teachers' beliefs and self-reported practices related to behavior management (BM). The respondents comprised 46 male and 46 female teachers, and independent-samples t-tests were conducted to compare beliefs and self-reported practices about BM strategies across these two…

  16. IMPACT OF SOIL HEALTH MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON SOILBORNE PATHOGENS AND ROOT DISEASES OF VEGETABLES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various cultural practices, including the use of cover and rotational crops, composts, tillage systems, and others have been promoted as management options for enhancing soil quality and health. All cultural practices are known to directly or indirectly affect populations of soilborne pathogens and...

  17. 40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Oxide Sterilizers Monitoring-Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.10420 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped... practice standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether...

  18. 40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Oxide Sterilizers Monitoring-Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.10420 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped... practice standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether...

  19. 40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Oxide Sterilizers Monitoring-Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.10420 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped... practice standard in § 63.10390 by recording the date and time of each sterilization cycle, whether...

  20. 7 CFR 205.206 - Crop pest, weed, and disease management practice standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Crop pest, weed, and disease management practice standard. 205.206 Section 205.206 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION...

  1. Total Quality Management in Secondary Schools in Kenya: Extent of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngware, Moses Waithanji; Wamukuru, David Kuria; Odebero, Stephen Onyango

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent to which secondary schools practiced aspects of total quality management (TQM). Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional research design was used in this study. A sample of 300 teachers in a residential session during a school holiday provided their perceptions on the practice of TQM in their schools. Data…

  2. Applied Mathematics for agronomical engineers in Spain at UPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, J. M.; Grau, J. B.; Tarquis, A. M.; Fabregat, J.; Sanchez, M. E.

    2009-04-01

    Mathematics, created or discovered, are a global human conceptual endowment, containing large systems of knowledge, and varied skills to use definite parts of them, in creation or discovery, or for applications, e.g. in Physics, or notably in engineering behaviour. When getting upper intellectual levels in the 19th century, the agronomical science and praxis was noticeably or mainly organised in Spain in agronomical engineering schools and also in institutes, together with technician schools, also with different lower lever centres, and they have evolved with progress and they are much changing at present to a EEES schema (Bolonia process). They work in different lines that need some basis or skills from mathematics. The vocation to start such careers, that have varied curriculums, contains only some mathematics, and the number of credits for mathematics is restrained because time is necessary for other initial sciences such as applied chemistry, biology, ecology and soil sciences, but some basis and skill of maths are needed, also with Physics, at least for electricity, machines, construction, economics at initial ground levels, and also for Statistics that are here considered part of Applied Mathematics. The ways of teaching mathematical basis and skills are especial, and are different from the practical ways needed e. g. for Soil Sciences, and they involve especial efforts from students, and especial controls or exams that guide much learning. The mathematics have a very large accepted content that uses mostly a standard logic, and that is remarkably stable and international, rather similar notation and expressions being used with different main languages. For engineering the logical basis is really often not taught, but the use of it is transferred, especially for calculus that requires both adapted somehow simplified schemas and the learning of a specific skill to use it, and also for linear algebra. The basic forms of differential calculus in several

  3. Pediatric airway management: current practices and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sunder, Rani A; Haile, Dawit T; Farrell, Patrick T; Sharma, Anshuman

    2012-10-01

    Management of a pediatric airway can be a challenge, especially for the non-pediatric anesthesiologists. Structured algorithms for an unexpected difficult pediatric airway have been missing so far. A recent step wise algorithm, based on the Difficult Airway society (DAS) adult protocol, is a step in the right direction. There have been some exciting advances in development of pediatric extra-glottic devices for maintaining ventilation, and introduction of pediatric versions of new 'non line of sight' laryngoscopes and optical stylets. The exact role of these devices in routine and emergent situations is still evolving. Recent advances in simulation technology has become a valuable tool in imparting psychomotor and procedural skills to trainees and allied healthcare workers. Moving toward the goal of eliminating serious adverse events during the management of routine and difficult pediatric airway, authors propose that institutions develop a dedicated Difficult Airway Service comprising of a team of experts in advanced airway management. PMID:22967160

  4. Application of Knowledge Management: Pressing questions and practical answers

    SciTech Connect

    FROMM-LEWIS,MICHELLE

    2000-02-11

    Sandia National Laboratory are working on ways to increase production using Knowledge Management. Knowledge Management is: finding ways to create, identify, capture, and distribute organizational knowledge to the people who need it; to help information and knowledge flow to the right people at the right time so they can act more efficiently and effectively; recognizing, documenting and distributing explicit knowledge (explicit knowledge is quantifiable and definable, it makes up reports, manuals, instructional materials, etc.) and tacit knowledge (tacit knowledge is doing and performing, it is a combination of experience, hunches, intuition, emotions, and beliefs) in order to improve organizational performance and a systematic approach to find, understand and use knowledge to create value.

  5. Emerging geomorphic approaches to guide river management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brierley, Gary; Hooke, Janet

    2015-12-01

    Humans have been modifying river systems across much of the world for many thousands of years. Initially, piecemeal impacts inadvertently affected particular parts of landscapes. Subsequently, many rivers have been subjected to multiple layers of human disturbance, and changes have become widespread and systematic. Increasingly, human impacts reflect deliberative actions as part of river management programmes. These activities entail significant choices in determining the desirable (or acceptable) state and behavioural regime of a river. Typically, contemporary decision-making reflects negotiations among multiple stakeholders, seeking to provide balanced approaches to the management of socio-economic, cultural, and environmental values (e.g. Jähnig et al., 2011).

  6. The Operational Manager - Enemy or Hero of Secure Business Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goucher, Wendy

    This paper will investigate the role of the non-IT manager in information security. He can, for example, be the reason why sensitive work is carried out on the move and security focused spending is given a low priority in the budget. Alternatively, he can also be the driving force behind empowering the team to have a dynamic attitude to protecting data both at work and at home. Now is the time for managers to stop pushing information security issues away from their desk and into the in-tray of the IT department.

  7. [Practical management of nutritional and food problems in crisis situations].

    PubMed

    Belchior-Bellino, V

    2002-01-01

    This article deals with one of the most consistent problems arising during crisis situations, i.e., food shortage. The author first presents the international context conducive to natural or man-made famine. He emphasizes the importance of early detection and the need for an evaluation phase using public health survey skills to determine the objectives of relief. He then describes strategies for management of alimentary and nutritional requirements in famine-stricken populations in function of the different types of malnutrition encountered. The article ends with a presentation of preventive measures that must be implemented in association with crisis management. PMID:12534175

  8. Best Practice in Motivation and Management in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Dennis G.; Hunt, Gilbert H.

    This book is designed to help teachers become more knowledgeable, skilled, and effective in their work, explaining the importance of understanding students' interests, learning styles, and backgrounds in order to meet their unique needs and describing why having the ability to manage the learning environment, motivate students, and teach is itself…

  9. Practical approaches for healthcare: Indoor air quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, A.R.; Poulakos, E.M.

    1996-12-31

    The management of indoor air quality (IAQ) is of interest to building occupants, managers, owners, and regulators alike. Whether by poor design, improper attention, inadequate maintenance or the intent to save energy, many buildings today have significantly degraded IAQ levels. Considering the increase of facilities and occupants in the non-industrial sector of the nation`s workforce, the consequences of inadequate IAQ, as related to productivity, human wellness and healthcare costs in the commercial (healthcare) environment, have become increasingly urgent issues to design professionals, building owners and managers, safety and health professionals, interior product manufacturers, and HVAC control vendors. The first step of proper IAQ management is to fully understand the issue of IAQ and to a certain elemental degree, the extent of the problem(s), causes and possible solution applications. The second step is to conduct a performance review of the HVAC systems based on equipment design specifications and guidelines for acceptable IAQ. And the third step is to identify potential chemical, physical and biological sources that are known to contribute to adverse air quality.

  10. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords "Upper cervical epidural abscess," "C1 osteomyelitis," "C2 osteomyelitis," "C1 epidural abscess," "C2 epidural abscess." We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  11. Municipal waste management in Sicily: Practices and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Messineo, Antonio Panno, Domenico

    2008-07-01

    There are numerous problems yet to be solved in waste management and although efforts towards waste recovery and recycling have been made, landfills are still the most common method used in the EU and many other industrialised countries. Thermal disposal, particularly incineration, is a tested and viable alternative. In 2004, only 11% of the annual waste production of Italy was incinerated. Sicily, with over five million inhabitants, is the second largest region in Italy where waste management is now a critical problem. The use of landfills can no longer be considered a satisfactory environmental solution; therefore, new methods have to be chosen and waste-to-energy plants could provide an answer. This paper gives details of municipal solid waste management in Sicily following a new Waste Management Plan. Four waste-to-energy plants will generate electricity through a steam cycle; the feedstock will become the residue after material recovery, which is calculated as 20-40% weight of the collected municipal solid waste.

  12. Applying Corporate Knowledge Management Practices in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Jillinda J.; Vander Linde, Karen; Johnson, Sandra L.

    2000-01-01

    Asserting that there is tremendous value to higher education institutions that develop initiatives to share knowledge to achieve business objectives, this article outlines the basic concepts of knowledge management as it is applied in the corporate sector, considers trends, and explores how it might be applied in higher education and whether…

  13. Municipal waste management in Sicily: practices and challenges.

    PubMed

    Messineo, Antonio; Panno, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous problems yet to be solved in waste management and although efforts towards waste recovery and recycling have been made, landfills are still the most common method used in the EU and many other industrialised countries. Thermal disposal, particularly incineration, is a tested and viable alternative. In 2004, only 11% of the annual waste production of Italy was incinerated. Sicily, with over five million inhabitants, is the second largest region in Italy where waste management is now a critical problem. The use of landfills can no longer be considered a satisfactory environmental solution; therefore, new methods have to be chosen and waste-to-energy plants could provide an answer. This paper gives details of municipal solid waste management in Sicily following a new Waste Management Plan. Four waste-to-energy plants will generate electricity through a steam cycle; the feedstock will become the residue after material recovery, which is calculated as 20-40% weight of the collected municipal solid waste. PMID:17604152

  14. Employability and Talent Management: Challenges for HRD Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Staffan; Ellstrom, Per-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this conceptual paper is to illuminate the problems that are associated with defining and identifying talent and to discuss the development of talent as a contributor to employability. Design/methodology/approach: The world of work is characterised by new and rapidly changing demands. Talent management has recently been the…

  15. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  16. Water, weed, and nutrient management practices in organic blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the effects of organic management on plant and soil water and nutrient relations, plant growth, yield, and fruit quality in an organic trailing blackberry production system. Treatments include: cultivar ('Marion' and 'Black Diamond'); irrigation (post-harve...

  17. Managing Educator Talent: Promising Practices and Lessons from Midwestern States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Monica P.; Behrstock, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This policy analysis explains the need for a system approach to educator talent management. The report analyzes how state policies in the Midwest support the development of effective teachers and leaders throughout their career. The report focuses on state policies in teacher preparation including certification and licensure, recruitment and…

  18. Managing Smallness: Promising Fiscal Practices for Rural School District Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitas, Deborah Inman

    Based on a mail survey of over 100 rural school administrators in 34 states, this handbook outlines common problems and successful strategies in the financial management of rural, small school districts. Major problems are related to revenue and cash flow, increasing expenditures, providing quality education programs, and staffing to handle the…

  19. Competencies for health management practice: a practitioner's perspective.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, F J; Grady, R; Freedman, T J

    1995-01-01

    The current health care environment will require executive leadership with a new set of management competencies to effectively lead and manage the various components of a restructured health care delivery system. The traditional management skills of planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and staffing resources will remain relevant, but the true measure of professional success will be the development of conceptual skills. This means the ability to look at the health care enterprise as a whole, and recognize how changes in the environment shape your strategic mission, goals, and objectives. The successful health care leader will have a demonstrated ability to apply these conceptual skills to the development of information systems and integrated networks that position their organization to accept capitated risks. This paper examines the United States and Canadian health care systems from the perspective of both the more traditional hospital and the emerging medical care organizations. New importance of the team approach to leadership and management and all that entails is stressed. PMID:10156840

  20. Life cycle greenhouse gas impacts of grassland management practice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass from conservation and dedicated grasslands could be an important feedstock for biofuels. Estimating the carbon (C) intensity of biofuel production pathways is important in order to meet greenhouse gas (GHG) targets set by government policy. Management decisions made during feedstock producti...

  1. Certain Hospital Waste Management Practices in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ferdowsi, Ali; Ferdosi, Masoud; Mehrani, Zeinab; Narenjkar, Parisa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Infected hospital wastes are among hazardous wastes, and special treatment methods are needed for their disposal. Having information about present status of medical waste management systems is of great importance in finding weak, and for future planning. Such studies have not been done for most of the hospitals in Iran. Methods: This paper reports the results of a study on the present status of medical waste management in Isfahan hospitals. A ten page researcher made questionnaire was used to collect data in terms of collection, transportation, segregation, treatment and disposal. For assessment of autoclaves, standard tests including TST (Time, Steam, and Temperature) strip test and spore tests were used. Samples were made of stack gases of incinerators. Quantity and composition of hospital wastes in Isfahan were also measured manually. Results: Of all wastes in selected hospitals, 40% were infected wastes (1.59 kg/day/bed), which is 15 to 20% higher than World Health Organization (WHO) standards. TST and Spore test results were negative in all samples. Stack gases analysis showed high concentration of CO in some samples. Besides, the combustion efficiency in some samples is less than 99.5%, which is the standard criterion in Iran. Conclusions: This study may create awareness regarding the magnitude of the problem of waste management in hospitals of Isfahan and may stimulate interests for systematic control efforts for hospital waste disposal. Hospital waste management cannot succeed without documented plans, certain equipment, defined staff trainings, and periodic evaluations. PMID:22826762

  2. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  3. NICKEL PLATING: INDUSTRY PRACTICES, CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES, AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared under the direction of EPA's ORD to assist the metal finishing community with the management of nickel plating environmental issues. This report provides the rationale for developing the document, identifies the intended user audience, and presents the fr...

  4. Pain Management: A Practical Approach to Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, Margaret S.; Pawasauskas, Joyce

    2002-01-01

    Nine brief onsite educational sessions of 10-20 minutes each trained nurses in pain management techniques. Participants recognized the value of brief presentations, but wanted more time to learn the material. The content was made available on disk for further study. (SK)

  5. Preparing Physicians for Practice in Managed Care Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nicole

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of managed health care looks at its evolution and characteristics, implications for medical education, and the competencies needed by physicians in this new environment, including epidemiological thinking, understanding of human and organizational behavior, familiarity with information technology, quality control skills, knowledge of…

  6. Invasive plant ecology and management: Linking processes to practice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book brings together 10 chapters from renowned researchers that study how ecosystems operate and how to adopt the principles of ecology to manage invasive plants. This book taps this expertise by seeking to bridge the inherent disconnect between processes operating within ecosystems and the pr...

  7. Developing Instructional Technology Products Using Effective Project Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Stephanie; Hardin, Paul C.

    2008-01-01

    Delivering a successful instructional technology (IT) product depends on more than just having an extremely creative instructional solution or following an instructional systems design (ISD) model. Proper planning, direction, and execution of the project are require, as well. We present a model of management that encompasses the ISD process. Five…

  8. Knowledge, attitude and practice of hospital staff management.

    PubMed

    Lakbala, Parvin; Lakbala, Mahboobeh

    2013-07-01

    The proper handling and disposal of biomedical waste (BMW) is very imperative. There is a defined set of rules for handling BMW worldwide. Unfortunately, laxity and lack of adequate training and awareness in the execution of these rules leads to staid health and environment apprehension. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge and attitude of hospital staff to BMW management. The cross-sectional study was conducted on 261 healthcare workers from 9 hospitals, which were randomized from 32 hospitals. The most important finding was a significant (P < 0.05) relationship between the level of education attainments and training in BMW management. Twenty-nine (19.9%) members of government hospital staff and 37 (32.2%) members of staff from the private sector agreed that BMW management is not just the government's responsibility, but one that every member of personnel should share. This finding will help to address the issue more appropriately, and plan for better training programs and monitoring of BMW management systems in hospitals. PMID:23585502

  9. Total Quality Management: Empirical, Conceptual, and Practical Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackman, J. Richard; Wageman, Ruth

    1995-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM) has become a U.S. social movement. This commentary analyzes the writings of W. Edwards Deming, Joseph Juran, and Kaoru Ishikawa to assess TQM's coherence, distinctiveness, and likely perseverance. Rhetoric is winning over substance, unrelated interventions are being herded under the TQM banner, and research is not…

  10. Biomass-fired plant practices total resource management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This article examines the utilization of woodwaste as power plant fuel, the town's wastewater discharge as cooling water, and flyash as a conditioner for local farmland. The topics of the article include woodwaste management, furnace and boiler details, air pollution control of flyash and nitrogen oxides, water treatment, and equipment changes.

  11. Management Practices to Improve Productivity of Degraded/Eroded Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productivity of degraded/eroded soils can be restored by using organic amendment, such as manure, and improved soil management. A study is being conducted near Hays, KS, to investigate and compare restorative potential of two nitrogen (N) sources. Dried beef manure and urea fertilizer were each appl...

  12. Knowledge Management Model: Practical Application for Competency Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustri, Denise; Miura, Irene; Takahashi, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to present a knowledge management (KM) conceptual model for competency development and a case study in a law service firm, which implemented the KM model in a competencies development program. Design/methodology/approach: The case study method was applied according to Yin (2003) concepts, focusing a six-professional group…

  13. Total Quality Management Practices and Their Effects on Organizational Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Richard Yu-Yuan; Lien, Bella Ya-Hui

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study designed to examine the key concepts of Total Quality Management (TQM) implementation and their effects on organizational performance. Process Alignment and People Involvement are two key concepts for successful implementation of TQM. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how these two constructs affect organizational…

  14. Transformational Leadership: Practicing What We Teach in the Management Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pounder, James S.

    2008-01-01

    In a Hong Kong study, the author examined the effect on undergraduate business students of university business school instructors' exhibiting a transformational leadership style in the classroom. Transformational leadership is one of the central concepts in management, and research has indicated that a positive association exists between this…

  15. Assessment of Corporate Management Practices in Public Universities in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waswa, Fuchaka; Ombuki, Charles; Migosi, Joash; Metet, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    In order to continue attracting and retaining high-class intellectual power and hence guarantee quality service delivery, public university management will need to change and adjust in line with increasing local democratisation and globalisation pressures. Scenarios that depict participatory decision-making and respect of divergent viewpoints will…

  16. EFFECTIVENESS OF FORESTRY BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN PROTECTING FISH RESOURCES OF TWO NATIONAL FORESTS IN WESTERN WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is part of the National Network for Environmental Management Studies conducted under the auspices of the Office of Cooperative Environmental Management--U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This study investigates whether Forestry Best Management Practices (BMP's) fun...

  17. 71 FR 75294 - Concentrations in Commercial Real Estate Lending, Sound Risk Management Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-12-14

    ..., ``Concentrations in Commercial Real Estate Lending, Sound Risk Management Practices,'' 71 FR 2302 (January 13, 2006... Office of Thrift Supervision Concentrations in Commercial Real Estate Lending, Sound Risk Management... is issuing final guidance: Concentrations in Commercial Real Estate (CRE) Lending, Sound...

  18. An Exploration of Supply Chain Management Practices in the Central District Municipality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambe, I. M.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the paper is to explore supply chain management practices in the Central District Municipality, North West province of South Africa, using the grounded theory methodology. Supply chain management was introduced in the South African public sector to alleviate deficiencies related to governance, interpretation and…

  19. MONITORING OF A BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE POND IN THE STATEN ISLAND BLUEBELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's Urban Stormwater Management Branch has monitored stormwater drainage and best management practices (BMP) as part of its research program. One BMP being monitored, a wetland/retention pond, is in the Richmond Creek (RC) watershed in the New York City Department of Envi...

  20. Carbon sequestration and rangelands: Effects of length of management practice and precipitation gradients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of rangelands can aid in the mitigation of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations via carbon (C) storage in plant biomass and soil organic matter, a process termed C sequestration. Management practices that increase soil nitrogen (N), such as interseeding of N-fixing legumes, have the grea...