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Sample records for ags accelerator complex

  1. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

  2. Polarized proton acceleration program at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.

    1981-01-01

    The unexpected importance of high energy spin effects and the success of the ZGS in correcting many intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances led us to attempt to accelerate polarized protons in the AGS. A multi-university/laboratory collaborative effort involving Argonne, Brookhaven, Michigan, Rice and Yale is underway to improve and modify to accelerate polarized protons. From the experience at the ZGS and careful studies made us confident of the feasibility of achieving a polarization of over 60 percent up to 26 GeV/c with an intensity of 10/sup 11/ approx. 10/sup 12/ per pulse. The first polarized proton acceleration at the AGS is expected in 1983.

  3. Acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E.; Glenn, J.W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Zeno, K.

    2010-02-25

    The high energy (s{sup 1/2} = 500 GeV) polarized proton beam experiments performed in RHIC, require high polarization of the proton beam. With the AGS used as the pre-injector to RHIC, one of the main tasks is to preserve the polarization of the proton beam, during the beam acceleration in the AGS. The polarization preservation is accomplished by the two partial helical magnets [1,2,3,4,5,6,7] which have been installed in AGS, and help overcome the imperfection and the intrinsic spin resonances which occur during the acceleration of protons. This elimination of the intrinsic resonances is accomplished by placing the vertical tune Q{sub y} at a value close to 8.98, within the spin-tune stop-band created by the snake. At this near integer tune the perturbations caused by the partial helical magnets is large resulting in large beta and dispersion waves. To mitigate the adverse effect of the partial helices on the optics of the AGS, we have introduced compensation quads[2] in the AGS. In this paper we present the beam optics of the AGS which ameliorates this effect of the partial helices.

  4. Injection and acceleration of Au31+ in the BNL AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer,W.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, W.; Huang, H.; Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Thieberger, P.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, S.Y.; Zeno, K.; Omet, C.; Spiller, P.

    2008-06-23

    Injection and acceleration of ions in a lower charge state reduces space charge effects, and, if further elcctron stripping is needed, may allow elimination of a stripping stage and the associated beam losses. The former is of interest to the accelerators in the GSI FAIR complex, the latter for BNL RHIC collider operation at energies lower than the current injection energy. Lower charge state ions, however, have a higher likelihood of electron stripping which can lead to dynamic pressures rises and subsequent beam losses. We report on experiments in the AGS where Au{sup 31+} ions were injected and accelerated instead of the normally used Au{sup 77+} ions. Beam intensities and the average pressure in the AGS ring are recorded, and compared with calculations for dynamic pressures and beam losses. The experimental results will be used to benchmark the StrahlSim dynamic vacuum code and will be incorporated in the GSI FAIR SIS100 design.

  5. Communication: Structure, formation, and equilibration of ensembles of Ag-S complexes on an Ag surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Selena M.; Kim, Yousoo; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2013-02-15

    We have utilized conditions of very low temperature (4.7 K) and very low sulfur coverage to isolate and identify Ag-S complexes that exist on the Ag(111) surface. The experimental conditions are such that the complexes form at temperatures above the temperature of observation. These complexes can be regarded as polymeric chains of varying length, with an Ag4S pyramid at the core of each monomeric unit. Steps may catalyze the formation of the chains and this mechanism may be reflected in the chain length distribution.

  6. Synthesis, Structure and Catalytic Activity of NHC-Ag(I) Carboxylate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Valerie H L; Vummaleti, Sai V C; Cavallo, Luigi; White, Andrew J P; Nolan, Steven P; Hii, King Kuok Mimi

    2016-09-01

    A general synthetic route was used to prepare 15 new N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-Ag(I) complexes bearing anionic carboxylate ligands [Ag(NHC)(O2 CR)], including a homologous series of complexes of sterically flexible ITent ligands, which permit a systematic spectroscopic and theoretical study of the structural and electronic features of these compounds. The complexes displayed a significant ligand-accelerated effect in the intramolecular cyclisation of propargylic amides to oxazolidines. The substrate scope is highly complementary to that previously achieved by NHC-Au and pyridyl-Ag(I) complexes. PMID:27483036

  7. Evidence for surface Ag + complexes as the SERS-active sites on Ag electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Kawanami, O.; Honda, K.; Pettinger, B.

    1983-12-01

    Evidence is given that SERS-active sites at Ag electrodes are associated with Ag + ions, forming sparingly soluble surface complexes with ligands such as pyridine molecules and halide ions. Such surface Ag + complexes contribute a factor of >800 to the overall (10 7-fold) enhancement, possibly via a resonance Raman effect.

  8. Acceleration of polarized protons in the IHEP accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Anferov, V.A.; Ado, Yu.M.; Shoumkin, D.

    1995-04-01

    The paper considers possibility to accelerate polarized beam in the IHEP accelerator complex (including first stage of the UNK). The scheme of preserving beam polarization is described for all acceleration stages up to 400 GeV beam energy. Polarization and intensity of the polarized proton beam are estimated. The suggested scheme includes using two Siberian snakes in opposite straight sections of the UNK-1, where each snake consists of five dipole magnets. In the U-70 it is suggested to use one helical Siberian snake, which is turned on adiabatically at 10 GeV, and four pulsed quadrupoles. To incorporate the snake into the accelerator lattice it is proposed to make modification of one superperiod. This would make a 13 m long straight section. Spin depolarization in the Booster is avoided by decreasing the extraction energy to 0.9 GeV. Then no additional hardware is required in the Booster.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and antimycobacterial activity of Ag(I)-aspartame, Ag(I)-saccharin and Ag(I)-cyclamate complexes.

    PubMed

    Cavicchioli, Maurício; Leite, Clarice Q F; Sato, Daisy N; Massabni, Antonio C

    2007-10-01

    The present work describes the synthesis and antimycobacterial activity of three Ag(I)-complexes with the sweeteners aspartame, saccharin, and cyclamate as ligands, with the aim of finding new candidate substances for fighting tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections. The minimal inhibitory concentration of these three complexes was investigated in order to determine their in-vitro antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium malmoense, and Mycobacterium kansasii. The MIC values were determined using the Microplate Alamar Blue Assay. The best MIC values found for the complexes were 9.75 microM for Ag(I)-aspartame against M. kansasii and 15.7 microM for Ag(I)-cyclamate against M. tuberculosis.

  10. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS IN THE AGS WITH TWO HELICAL PARTIAL SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, H.; AHRENS, L.A.; BAI, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BROWN, K.; COURANT, E.D.; GARDNER, C.; GLENN, J.W.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MACKAY, W.W.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TSOUPAS, N.; WOOD, J.; YIP, K.; ZELENSKI, A.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-26

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult: the depolarizing resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions and are not feasible in the AGS since straight sections are too short. Recently, two helical partial snakes with double pitch design have been built and installed in the AGS. With careful setup of optics at injection and along the ramp, this combination can eliminate the intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances encountered during acceleration. This paper presents the accelerator setup and preliminary results.

  11. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  12. Ag-DNA Emitter: Metal Nanorod or Supramolecular Complex?

    PubMed

    Ramazanov, Ruslan R; Sych, Tomash S; Reveguk, Zakhar V; Maksimov, Dmitriy A; Vdovichev, Artem A; Kononov, Alexei I

    2016-09-15

    Ligand-stabilized luminescent metal clusters, in particular, DNA-based Ag clusters, are now employed in a host of applications such as sensing and bioimaging. Despite their utility, the nature of their excited states as well as detailed structures of the luminescent metal-ligand complexes remain poorly understood. We apply a new joint experimental and theoretical approach based on QM/MM-MD simulations of the fluorescence excitation spectra for three Ag clusters synthesized on a 12-mer DNA. Contrary to a previously proposed "rod-like" model, our results show that (1) three to four Ag atoms suffice to form a partially oxidized nanocluster emitting in visible range; (2) charge transfer from Ag cluster to DNA contributes to the excited states of the complexes; and (3) excitation spectra of the clusters are strongly affected by the bonding of Ag atoms to DNA bases. The presented approach can also provide a practical way to determine the structure and properties of other luminescent metal clusters. PMID:27564452

  13. Complexation and phase evolution at dimethylformamide-Ag(111) interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Wentao; Leung, Kevin; Shao, Qian; Gaskell, Karen J.; Reutt-Robey, Janice E.

    2016-09-15

    The interaction of solvent molecules with metallic surfaces impacts many interfacial chemical processes. We investigate the chemical and structure evolution that follows adsorption of the polar solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) on Ag(111). An Ag(DMF)2 coordination complex forms spontaneously by DMF etching of Ag(111), yielding mixed films of the complexes and DMF. Utilizing ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM), in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) computations, we map monolayer phases from the 2-D gas regime, consisting of a binary mixture of DMF and Ag(DMF)2, through the saturation monolayer limit, in which these two chemical species phasemore » separate into ordered islands. Structural models for the near-square DMF phase and the chain-like Ag(DMF)2 phase are presented and supported by DFT computation. Interface evolution is summarized in a surface pressure-composition phase diagram, which allows structure prediction over arbitrary experimental conditions. In conclusion, this work reveals new surface coordination chemistry for an important electrolyte-electrode system, and illustrates how surface pressure can be used to tune monolayer phases.« less

  14. AgPO2F2 and Ag9(PO2F2)14: the first Ag(i) and Ag(i)/Ag(ii) difluorophosphates with complex crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Przemysław J; Kurzydłowski, Dominik; Grochala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    The reaction of AgF2 with P2O3F4 yields a mixed valence Ag(I)/Ag(II) difluorophosphate salt with AgAg(PO2F2)14 stoichiometry - the first Ag(ii)-PO2F2 system known. This highly moisture sensitive brown solid is thermally stable up to 120 °C, which points at further feasible extension of the chemistry of Ag(ii)-PO2F2 systems. The crystal structure shows a very complex bonding pattern, comprising of polymeric Ag(PO2F2)14(4-) anions and two types of Ag(I) cations. One particular Ag(II) site present in the crystal structure of Ag9(PO2F2)14 is the first known example of square pyramidal penta-coordinated Ag(ii) in an oxo-ligand environment. Ag(i)PO2F2 - the product of the thermal decomposition of Ag9(PO2F2)14 - has also been characterized by thermal analysis, IR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. It has a complicated crystal structure as well, which consists of infinite 1D [Ag(I)O4/2] chains which are linked to more complex 3D structures via OPO bridges. The PO2F2(-) anions bind to cations in both compounds as bidentate oxo-ligands. The terminal F atoms tend to point inside the van der Waals cavities in the crystal structure of both compounds. All important structural details of both title compounds were corroborated by DFT calculations. PMID:26200921

  15. 1,10-Phenanthroline as an accelerator for Ag nanoparticle-catalysed electroless copper deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Ru; Chou, Nan-Kuang; Li, Cheng-Hsing; Chen, Ho-Rei; Lee, Chien-Liang

    2014-10-01

    1,10-Phenanthroline (phen) can be successfully used as an accelerator for Ag-catalysed electroless copper deposition (ECD) processes. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance analyses indicate that the mass activity in terms of thickness of deposited Cu layer and average ECD rate within a deposition time of 110 s for Ag nanoparticles activated by phen are 7.86 × 10-3 μm μg-1 and 1.43 × 10-4 μm μg-1 s-1, respectively, whereas Ag nanoparticles without phen cannot catalyse the reaction. Furthermore, Tafel and cyclic voltammetric results show that the addition of phen to the ECD bath significantly enhances the ability of the Ag nanoparticles to catalyse the oxidation of HCHO and suppresses the formation of CuO.

  16. Exposure-dependent Ag+ release from silver nanoparticles and its complexation in AgS2 sites in primary murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronesi, G.; Aude-Garcia, C.; Kieffer, I.; Gallon, T.; Delangle, P.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Rabilloud, T.; Carrière, M.

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity is related to their dissolution in biological environments and to the binding of the released Ag+ ions in cellulo; the chemical environment of recombined Ag+ ions is responsible for their toxicological outcome, moreover it is indicative of the cellular response to AgNP exposure, and can therefore shed light on the mechanisms governing AgNP toxicity. This study probes the chemistry of Ag species in primary murine macrophages exposed to AgNPs by making use of X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy under cryogenic conditions: the linear combination analysis of the near-edge region of the spectra provides the fraction of Ag+ ions released from the AgNPs under a given exposure condition and highlights their complexation with thiolate groups; the ab initio modelling of the extended spectra allows measuring the Ag-S bond length in cellulo. Dissolution rates depend on the exposure scenario, chronicity leading to higher Ag+ release than acute exposure; Ag-S bond lengths are 2.41 +/- 0.03 Å and 2.38 +/- 0.01 Å in acute and chronic exposure respectively, compatible with digonal AgS2 coordination. Glutathione is identified as the most likely putative ligand for Ag+. The proposed method offers a scope for the investigation of metallic nanoparticle dissolution and recombination in cellular models.Silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity is related to their dissolution in biological environments and to the binding of the released Ag+ ions in cellulo; the chemical environment of recombined Ag+ ions is responsible for their toxicological outcome, moreover it is indicative of the cellular response to AgNP exposure, and can therefore shed light on the mechanisms governing AgNP toxicity. This study probes the chemistry of Ag species in primary murine macrophages exposed to AgNPs by making use of X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy under cryogenic conditions: the linear combination analysis of the near-edge region of the spectra provides

  17. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ultra-Low-Level 129I in Carrier-Free AgI-AgCl Sputter Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Fu, Yunchong

    2015-05-01

    Separation of carrier-free iodine from low-level iodine samples and accurate measurement of ultra-low-level 129I in microgram iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geology and environment research using naturally produced 129I. This article presents a detection technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for accurate determination of ultra-low-level 129I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets. Copper instead of aluminum was selected as the suitable sample holder material to avoid the reaction of AgI-AgCl powder with aluminum. Niobium powder was selected as thermally and electrically conductive matrix to be mixed with AgI-AgCl powder, in order to obtain and maintain a stable and high iodine ion current intensity, as well as less memory effect and low background level of 129I. The most optimal ratio of the Nb matrix to the AgI-AgCl powder was found to be 5:1 by mass. The typical current of 127I5+ using AgI-AgCl targets with iodine content from 5 to 80 μg was measured to be 5 to 100 nA. Four-year AMS measurements of the 129I/127I ratios in standards of low iodine content and the machine blanks showed a good repeatability and stability.

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of ultra-low-level (129)I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Fu, Yunchong

    2015-05-01

    Separation of carrier-free iodine from low-level iodine samples and accurate measurement of ultra-low-level (129)I in microgram iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geology and environment research using naturally produced (129)I. This article presents a detection technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for accurate determination of ultra-low-level (129)I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets. Copper instead of aluminum was selected as the suitable sample holder material to avoid the reaction of AgI-AgCl powder with aluminum. Niobium powder was selected as thermally and electrically conductive matrix to be mixed with AgI-AgCl powder, in order to obtain and maintain a stable and high iodine ion current intensity, as well as less memory effect and low background level of (129)I. The most optimal ratio of the Nb matrix to the AgI-AgCl powder was found to be 5:1 by mass. The typical current of (127)I(5+) using AgI-AgCl targets with iodine content from 5 to 80 μg was measured to be 5 to 100 nA. Four-year AMS measurements of the (129)I/(127)I ratios in standards of low iodine content and the machine blanks showed a good repeatability and stability. PMID:25743113

  19. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis

    2014-07-01

    After a 16 month shutdown to reconfigure the Fermilab Accelerators for high power operations, the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is again providing beams for numerous Physics Experiments. By using the Recycler to slip stack protons while the Main Injector is ramping, the beam power at 120 GeV can reach 700 KW, a factor of 2 increase. The progress towards doubling the Fermilab's Accelerator complex beam power will be presented.

  20. High luminosity operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar Mishra

    2003-07-15

    Run-II at Fermilab is progressing steadily. In the Run-II scheme, 36 antiproton bunches collide with 36 proton bunches at the CDF and D0 interaction regions in the Tevatron at 980 GeV per beam. The current status and performance of the Fermilab Accelerator complex is reviewed. The plan for Run-II, accelerator upgrades and integration of the Recycler in the accelerator chain will be presented.

  1. The Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE accelerator complex of LNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, C. A.

    2013-07-18

    Heavy ion beams are delivered at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro by the accelerator complex Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE. The Tandem XTU is a Van de Graaff accelerator normally operated at terminal voltages of up to about 15 MV. The Tandem accelerator can be operated in stand-alone mode or as an injector for the linac booster ALPI. The linear accelerator ALPI is built of superconducting resonant cavities and consists of a low-beta branch, particularly important for the acceleration of the heavier mass ions, a medium-beta branch, and a high-beta branch. ALPI can be operated also with the PIAVE injector that consists of a superconducting linac and an ECR source. The PIAVE source was mainly used for the acceleration of intense noble gas beams but most recently also a first metallic beam was delivered to the users. The accelerator complex delivers beams of ions from protons to gold in three experimental areas on 11 different beam lines. A rich scientific activity is ongoing at the Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE accelerator complex, beam time being shared between nuclear physics research and applied and interdisciplinary physics research. An overview of the present status and perspectives of the Tandem-ALPI-PIAVE complex and its physics program is given in the present paper.

  2. Exploration of complex multilayer film growth morphologies: STM analysis and predictive atomistic modeling for Ag on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Maozhi; Chung, P.W.; Cox, E.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.; Evans, J.W.

    2008-01-03

    Scanning tunneling microscopy studies are integrated with development of a realistic atomistic model to both characterize and elucidate the complex mounded morphologies formed by deposition of Ag on Ag(111) at 150 and 180 K. Threefold symmetric lateral shapes of islands and mounds are shown to reflect the influence of a nonuniform step edge barrier inhibiting interlayer transport. Modeling of structure at the mound peaks leads to a sensitive estimate of the magnitude of this large barrier.

  3. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  4. Distribution of computer functionality for accelerator control at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, A.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1985-01-01

    A set of physical and functional system components and their interconnection protocols have been established for all controls work at the AGS. Portions of these designs were tested as part of enhanced operation of the AGS as a source of polarized protons and additional segments will be implemented during the continuing construction efforts which are adding heavy ion capability to our facility. Included in our efforts are the following computer and control system elements: a broad band local area network, which embodies MODEMS; transmission systems and branch interface units; a hierarchical layer, which performs certain data base and watchdog/alarm functions; a group of work station processors (Apollo's) which perform the function of traditional minicomputer host(s) and a layer, which provides both real time control and standardization functions for accelerator devices and instrumentation. Data base and other accelerator functionality is assigned to the most correct level within our network for both real time performance, long-term utility, and orderly growth.

  5. Software Accelerates Computing Time for Complex Math

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Ames Research Center awarded Newark, Delaware-based EM Photonics Inc. SBIR funding to utilize graphic processing unit (GPU) technology- traditionally used for computer video games-to develop high-computing software called CULA. The software gives users the ability to run complex algorithms on personal computers with greater speed. As a result of the NASA collaboration, the number of employees at the company has increased 10 percent.

  6. β-Cyclodextrin as a Metal-anionic Porphyrin Complexation Accelerator in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Takao; Yokoyama, Aya; Konno, Mitsuyuki; Ohno, Osamu; Igarashi, Shukuro; Takagai, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    The rate of the complexation reaction between anionic porphyrins and 11 metal ions was found to be accelerated by the presence of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in aqueous media at room temperature without the need for additional heating or sonication. The porphyrin complexation reaction with metal ions under aqueous conditions can be difficult due to the strong hydration energy between the metal ions and water. In this study, the specific role of β-CD as an accelerator was determined and found to enhance the typically slow reaction of the porphyrin with metal ions. A significant acceleration effect was exhibited when the model anionic porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine-tetrasulfonic acid, and Pb(II) ions were combined in the presence of β-CD. Other than for Hg ion, the addition of β-CD decreased the metalation reaction time from 30 to 2 min. The order in the degree of acceleration was Pb > Zn, Cd > Cu > Fe, Pd > Sn > Ag, Co, Mn. Using Pb(II) as the model ion, it was determined that the complexation rate constant was enhanced by a factor of 2.4, while the dissociation rate constant was diminished by a factor of 135 in the presence of added β-CD relative to that in its absence. Overall, the complex was much more stable (formation equilibrium constant 324-fold greater in the β-CD medium. The formation of a ternary complex (cf. bicapped complex; (β-CD)2-porphyrin-metal ion) was demonstrated through the use of nuclear magnetic-resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. This acceleration effect is expected to be applicable systems in which porphyrin ligands are employed for determining of metal ions in chemical analysis and separation science. PMID:27302582

  7. β-Cyclodextrin as a Metal-anionic Porphyrin Complexation Accelerator in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Takao; Yokoyama, Aya; Konno, Mitsuyuki; Ohno, Osamu; Igarashi, Shukuro; Takagai, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    The rate of the complexation reaction between anionic porphyrins and 11 metal ions was found to be accelerated by the presence of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in aqueous media at room temperature without the need for additional heating or sonication. The porphyrin complexation reaction with metal ions under aqueous conditions can be difficult due to the strong hydration energy between the metal ions and water. In this study, the specific role of β-CD as an accelerator was determined and found to enhance the typically slow reaction of the porphyrin with metal ions. A significant acceleration effect was exhibited when the model anionic porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine-tetrasulfonic acid, and Pb(II) ions were combined in the presence of β-CD. Other than for Hg ion, the addition of β-CD decreased the metalation reaction time from 30 to 2 min. The order in the degree of acceleration was Pb > Zn, Cd > Cu > Fe, Pd > Sn > Ag, Co, Mn. Using Pb(II) as the model ion, it was determined that the complexation rate constant was enhanced by a factor of 2.4, while the dissociation rate constant was diminished by a factor of 135 in the presence of added β-CD relative to that in its absence. Overall, the complex was much more stable (formation equilibrium constant 324-fold greater in the β-CD medium. The formation of a ternary complex (cf. bicapped complex; (β-CD)2-porphyrin-metal ion) was demonstrated through the use of nuclear magnetic-resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. This acceleration effect is expected to be applicable systems in which porphyrin ligands are employed for determining of metal ions in chemical analysis and separation science.

  8. The AGS (alternating gradient synchrotron): Performance and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Brookhaven AGS: basic parameters, description of the accelerator complex and proton operation; operation with heavy ions and polarized protons; AGS upgrades and expanded potential. (LSP)

  9. Nano-Ag complexes prepared by γ-radiolysis and their structures and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwa-Jung; Choi, Seong-Ho; Park, Hae-Jun

    2012-10-01

    In this study, nano-silver (nano-Ag) complexes showing different properties have been synthesized as follows. Polypyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized silver colloids (NAg), nano-Ag bound to silica (SiO2) (NSS), and nano-Ag bound to a complex of SiO2 and polyaniline (PANI) (NSSPAI) were prepared via γ-irradiation at room temperature. NAg and NSS used PVP as a colloidal stabilizer, while NSSPAI did not use PVP as a colloidal stabilizer. Interesting bonding properties occurred in the nano-Ag complex and anticipated structural changes were clearly shown through a surface analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphologies by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) analysis showed that nano-Ag complexes have various particle sizes ranging from 10 to 30 nm. NSS (average, 10 nm) and NSSPAI (average, 30 nm) showed a uniformly spherical shape and size, while NAg did not. From the reflection peaks in the x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, surface crystallinity of the nano-Ag complexes was indicated to be in the same degree as that of NSSPAI>NSS>NAg. Also, in the contact angle (CA) determination, surface hydrophobicity of NSSPAI was stronger than those of NSS and NAg, relatively. The different nano-Ag complexes prepared by γ-irradiation can be applicable in various industry fields due to the increase in specific property.

  10. Neural prediction of complex accelerations for object interception.

    PubMed

    de Rugy, Aymar; Marinovic, Welber; Wallis, Guy

    2012-02-01

    To intercept or avoid moving objects successfully, we must compensate for the sensorimotor delays associated with visual processing and motor movement. Although straightforward in the case of constant velocity motion, it is unclear how humans compensate for accelerations, as our visual system is relatively poor at detecting changes in velocity. Work on free-falling objects suggests that we are able to predict the effects of gravity, but this represents the most simple, limiting case in which acceleration is constant and motion linear. Here, we show that an internal model also predicts the effects of complex, varying accelerations when they result from lawful interactions with the environment. Participants timed their responses with the arrival of a ball rolling within a tube of various shapes. The pattern of errors indicates that participants were able to compensate for most of the effects of the ball acceleration (∼85%) within a relatively short practice (∼300 trials). Errors on catch trials in which the ball velocity was unexpectedly maintained constant further confirmed that participants were expecting the effect of acceleration induced by the shape of the tube. A similar effect was obtained when the visual scene was projected upside down, indicating that the mechanism of this prediction is flexible and not confined to ecologically valid interactions. These findings demonstrate that the brain is able to predict motion on the basis of prior experience of complex interactions between an object and its environment. PMID:22090456

  11. Neural prediction of complex accelerations for object interception.

    PubMed

    de Rugy, Aymar; Marinovic, Welber; Wallis, Guy

    2012-02-01

    To intercept or avoid moving objects successfully, we must compensate for the sensorimotor delays associated with visual processing and motor movement. Although straightforward in the case of constant velocity motion, it is unclear how humans compensate for accelerations, as our visual system is relatively poor at detecting changes in velocity. Work on free-falling objects suggests that we are able to predict the effects of gravity, but this represents the most simple, limiting case in which acceleration is constant and motion linear. Here, we show that an internal model also predicts the effects of complex, varying accelerations when they result from lawful interactions with the environment. Participants timed their responses with the arrival of a ball rolling within a tube of various shapes. The pattern of errors indicates that participants were able to compensate for most of the effects of the ball acceleration (∼85%) within a relatively short practice (∼300 trials). Errors on catch trials in which the ball velocity was unexpectedly maintained constant further confirmed that participants were expecting the effect of acceleration induced by the shape of the tube. A similar effect was obtained when the visual scene was projected upside down, indicating that the mechanism of this prediction is flexible and not confined to ecologically valid interactions. These findings demonstrate that the brain is able to predict motion on the basis of prior experience of complex interactions between an object and its environment.

  12. Charge-transfer optical absorption mechanism of DNA:Ag-nanocluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuinhos, R.; Lúcio, A. D.; Chacham, H.; Alexandre, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Optical properties of DNA:Ag-nanoclusters complexes have been successfully applied experimentally in Chemistry, Physics, and Biology. Nevertheless, the mechanisms behind their optical activity remain unresolved. In this work, we present a time-dependent density functional study of optical absorption in DNA:Ag4. In all 23 different complexes investigated, we obtain new absorption peaks in the visible region that are not found in either the isolated Ag4 or isolated DNA base pairs. Absorption from red to green are predominantly of charge-transfer character, from the Ag4 to the DNA fragment, while absorption in the blue-violet range are mostly associated to electronic transitions of a mixed character, involving either DNA-Ag4 hybrid orbitals or intracluster orbitals. We also investigate the role of exchange-correlation functionals in the calculated optical spectra. Significant differences are observed between the calculations using the PBE functional (without exact exchange) and the CAM-B3LYP functional (which partly includes exact exchange). Specifically, we observe a tendency of charge-transfer excitations to involve purines bases, and the PBE spectra error is more pronounced in the complexes where the Ag cluster is bound to the purines. Finally, our results also highlight the importance of adding both the complementary base pair and the sugar-phosphate backbone in order to properly characterize the absorption spectrum of DNA:Ag complexes.

  13. Chemical mechanism of surface-enhanced Raman scattering via charge transfer in fluorenone–Ag complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Yafei; Wu, Shiwei; Song, Peng; Xia, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    The intermolecular interaction between fluorenone (FN) and silver surfaces was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The structural, electronic and optical properties of the FN–Ag complex indicate that the carbonyl group O atom in FN molecules is the adsorbed position site to attach the silver substrate through the weak bond O…Ag. The analysis of vibrational modes and Raman activity of the largely enhanced Raman peaks using two FN–Ag4-x (x  =  l, s) complex models reveals that only the a1 vibrational modes with C 2v symmetry are selectively enhanced, from the point view of the change of dipole moment and polarizability induced by the interaction between FN and Ag4 substrate. Furthermore, the direct visualized evidence of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) chemical enhancement mechanism for the FN–Ag complex is presented. The results reveal that only the intermolecular charge transfer with π–π transition characterization between FN and an Ag4 cluster facilitates the resonance Raman process and is directly responsible for chemical enhancement of Raman scattering of the FN–Ag complex.

  14. Synthesis, structure, characterization and fluorescent properties of Ag+ complexes with extended π⋯π interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ting-Hong; Yan, Jie; Yang, Hu; Qiang, Liu; Du, Huai-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Two mixed-ligand Ag (I) complexes, [Ag2(Phterpy)2(NO3)2(dppe)]·CH3CN (1) and [Ag4(Phterpy)2(NO3)2(dppp)2](NO3)2·6H2O (2) (dppe = 1, 2-bis (diphenylphosphino) ethane, dppp = 1, 3-bis (diphenylphosphino) propane, Phterpy = 4‧-phenyl-2, 2‧:6‧, 2″-terpyridine), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by IR, 1H-NMR, 31P-NMR, elemental analysis and X-ray crystal structure analysis. Structural analysis reveals that the change of bridging ligands from dppe to dppp lead to the formation of centrosymmetric cations [Ag2(Phterpy)2(NO3)2(dppe)] and [Ag4(Phterpy)2 (NO3)2(dppp)2]2+, especially complex 2 containing two independent centrosymmetric tetramers with the central (obligate) Ag2O2 planes. Complexes 1 and 2 consist of the 1D infinite chains, with different variations in π-stacking patterns. Crystal structure of 1 contains 1D infinite chains constructed by π⋯π interactions between Phterpy, while 2 is built by π⋯π interaction of phenylene rings from dppp. All these reveal that the change of phosphine ligands might be the key of construction of different types of polynuclear structures and 1D π-stacking chain. Moreover, the solid-state emission spectra of complexes 1 and 2 display broad emission bands at 420-600 nm.

  15. Analysis of unsaturated compounds by Ag+ coordination ionspray mass spectrometry: studies of the formation of the Ag+/lipid complex.

    PubMed

    Seal, Jennifer R; Havrilla, Christine M; Porter, Ned A; Hachey, David L

    2003-08-01

    Coordination ionspray mass spectrometry (CIS-MS) is a useful tool in the detection and identification of cholesterol ester and phospholipid hydroperoxides and diacyl peroxides. Extensive studies of a series of cholesterol esters using CIS-MS revealed the following: (1) Cholesterol esters with equal number of double bonds as the internal standard showed a linear relative response in the mass spectrometer while compounds with non-equal numbers of double bonds gave a nonlinear relative response. (2) Complex adducts containing cholesterol ester, silver ion, AgF, AgBF(4), and 2-propanoxide form when silver is in molar excess of cholesterol esters, reducing the [M + Ag](+) signal. (3) In a mixture of cholesterol esters where silver is limiting, Ch22:6 and Ch20:4 bind to silver at the expense of Ch18:2 and have a higher signal in the mass spectrometer. (4) In a mixture of cholesterol esters where silver concentration is twofold greater than total cholesterol ester concentration, Ch22:6 and Ch20:4 form large complex adducts more frequently than Ch18:2 and have a lower signal in the mass spectrometer. PMID:12892911

  16. Accelerated CO2 transport on surface of AgO nanoparticles in ionic liquid BMIMBF4

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Dahye; Kang, Yong Soo; Kang, Sang Wook

    2015-01-01

    The AgO nanoparticles were utilized for a CO2 separation membrane. The AgO nanoparticles were successfully generated in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIMBF4) by favorable interaction between the surface of particles and the counteranion of BMIMBF4. The generated AgO nanoparticles were confirmed by TEM, and the average size was 20 nm. Coordinative interactions of dissociated AgO particles with BMIM+BF4− were investigated by FT-Raman spectroscopy. When the ionic liquid BMIMBF4 containing AgO nanoparticles was utilized as a CO2 separation membrane, the separation performance was largely enhanced. PMID:26549605

  17. Electron acceleration and radiation in evolving complex active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, A.; Gontikakis, C.; Vilmer, N.; Vlahos, L.

    2004-07-01

    We present a model for the acceleration and radiation of solar energetic particles (electrons) in evolving complex active regions. The spatio - temporal evolution of active regions is calculated using a cellular automaton model, based on self-organized criticality. The acceleration of electrons is due to the presence of randomly placed, localized electric fields produced by the energy release process, simulated by the cellular automaton model. We calculate the resulting kinetic energy distributions of the particles and their emitted X-ray radiation spectra using the thick target approximation, and we perform a parametric study with respect to number of electric fields present and thermal temperature of the injected distribution. Finally, comparing our results with the existing observations, we find that they are in a good agreement with the observed X-ray spectra in the energy range 100-1000 keV.

  18. Antibacterial, antifungal, phytotoxic, and genotoxic properties of two complexes of Ag(I) with sulfachloropyridazine (SCP): X-ray diffraction of [Ag(SCP)]n.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Natalia; Giulidori, Cecilia; Velluti, Francesca; Hure, Estela; Postigo, Agustina; Borthagaray, Graciela; Back, Davi Fernando; Torre, María H; Rizzotto, Marcela

    2014-06-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and antifungal activities, phytotoxicity, and genotoxicity of two new complexes of silver(I) with sulfachloropyridazine (SCP), one of which is heteroleptic with SCP and SCN(-) ligands (Ag-SCP-SCN), the other of which is homoleptic (Ag-SCP); furthermore, the crystal structure of the homoleptic complex is disclosed. The heterocyclic N atom nearest to the Cl atom and the N(sulfonamide) atom could be coordination sites for the silver ion in the Ag-SCP-SCN complex. The Ag-SCP complex is a polymeric compound with metal-metal bonds, and the heterocyclic and sulfonamide N atoms are points of coordination for Ag(I) . Both complexes showed activity against all the tested bacteria, and in the cases of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the action was better than that of SCP. In all cases, both silver-SCP complexes showed better antifungal activity than SCP, which was inactive against the tested fungi. Notably, the activity against P. aeruginosa, a nosocomial multidrug-resistant pathogen, was better than that of the reference antibiotic cefotaxim. Both silver-sulfa complexes displayed moderate activity against the tested yeast, especially for C. neoformans, which is an important fact considering the incidence of cryptococcosis, mainly in immune-deficient patients. No chromosomal aberrations were observed with the Allium cepa test, which is auspicious for further study of these complexes as potential drugs.

  19. Ag(I)-cysteamine complex based electrochemical stripping immunoassay: ultrasensitive human IgG detection.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hui-Bog; Rahman, Md Aminur; Yang, Jee Eun; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2011-07-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor for a protein using a Ag (I)-cysteamine complex (Ag-Cys) as a label was fabricated. The low detection of a protein was based on the electrochemical stripping of Ag from the adsorbed Ag-Cys complex on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated human immunoglobulin G (anti-IgG) antibody (AuNPs-anti-IgG). The electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated by immobilizing anti-IgG antibody on a poly-5,2':5',2''-terthiophene-3'-carboxylic acid (polyTTCA) film grown on the glassy carbon electrode through the covalent bond formation between amine groups of anti-IgG and carboxylic acid groups of polyTTCA. The target protein, IgG was sandwiched between the anti-IgG antibody that covalently attached onto the polyTTCA layer and AuNPs-anti-IgG. Using square wave voltammetry, well defined Ag stripping voltammograms were obtained for the each target concentration. Various experimental parameters were optimized and interference effects from other proteins were checked out. The immunosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range with the detection limit of 0.4 ± 0.05 fg/mL. To evaluate the analytical reliability, the proposed immunosensor was applied to human IgG spiked serum samples and acceptable results were obtained indicating that the method can be readily extended to other bioaffinity assays of clinical or environmental significance.

  20. Solid and solution NMR studies of the complexation of Ag + with the trans isomer of captopril: Biological activities of this high blood pressure drug along with its Ag + complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isab, Anvarhusein A.; Wazeer, Mohamed I. M.

    2006-09-01

    Complexation of Ag + with captopril, 1-[(2 S)-3-mercapto-2-methylpropionyl]- L-proline, has been studied by 1H and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constants for the trans to cis isomers of captopril bound to Ag + were measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy. It is observed that the trans isomer of the drug binds more strongly to Ag + between pH 5 and 8, as shown by the broadening of the trans isomer's resonances in 13C NMR spectra on complexation. A monodentate complexation of the trans captopril with Ag + via the thiol site is proposed based on the solid-state NMR and IR data. A superior antimicrobial activity is exhibited by the Cap-Ag(I) complex compared to captopril ligand itself against Heterotrotropic Plate Counts (HPC), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Fecal streptococcus bacteria.

  1. Destabilization of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) by adsorbed sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Russell, Selena M.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2011-10-17

    Sulfur accelerates coarsening of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) at 300 K, and this effect is enhanced with increasing sulfur coverage over a range spanning a few hundredths of a monolayer, to nearly 0.25 monolayers. We propose that acceleration of coarsening in this system is tied to the formation of AgS{sub 2} clusters primarily at step edges. These clusters can transport Ag more efficiently than can Ag adatoms (due to a lower diffusion barrier and comparable formation energy). The mobility of isolated sulfur on Ag(100) is very low so that formation of the complex is kinetically limited at low sulfur coverages, and thus enhancement is minimal. However, higher sulfur coverages force the population of sites adjacent to step edges, so that formation of the cluster is no longer limited by diffusion of sulfur across terraces. Sulfur exerts a much weaker effect on the rate of coarsening on Ag(100) than it does on Ag(111). This is consistent with theory, which shows that the difference between the total energy barrier for coarsening with and without sulfur is also much smaller on Ag(100) than on Ag(111).

  2. Accelerated Biofluid Filling in Complex Microfluidic Networks by Vacuum-Pressure Accelerated Movement (V-PAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Zeta Tak For; Cheung, Mei Ki; Liu, Shirley Xiaosu; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Rapid fluid transport and exchange are critical operations involved in many microfluidic applications. However, conventional mechanisms used for driving fluid transport in microfluidics, such as micropumping and high pressure, can be inaccurate and difficult for implementation for integrated microfluidics containing control components and closed compartments. Here, a technology has been developed termed Vacuum-Pressure Accelerated Movement (V-PAM) capable of significantly enhancing biofluid transport in complex microfluidic environments containing dead-end channels and closed chambers. Operation of the V-PAM entails a pressurized fluid loading into microfluidic channels where gas confined inside can rapidly be dissipated through permeation through a thin, gas-permeable membrane sandwiched between microfluidic channels and a network of vacuum channels. Effects of different structural and operational parameters of the V-PAM for promoting fluid filling in microfluidic environments have been studied systematically. This work further demonstrates the applicability of V-PAM for rapid filling of temperature-sensitive hydrogels and unprocessed whole blood into complex irregular microfluidic networks such as microfluidic leaf venation patterns and blood circulatory systems. Together, the V-PAM technology provides a promising generic microfluidic tool for advanced fluid control and transport in integrated microfluidics for different microfluidic diagnosis, organs-on-chips, and biomimetic studies. PMID:27409528

  3. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix. PMID:27141819

  4. Surface structure of the Ag-In-(rare earth) complex intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hars, S. S.; Sharma, H. R.; Smerdon, J. A.; Yadav, T. P.; Al-Mahboob, A.; Ledieu, J.; Fournée, V.; Tamura, R.; McGrath, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of the surface structure of the Ag-In-RE (RE: rare-earth elements Gd, Tb, and Yb) complex intermetallics using scanning tunneling microscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The surface of the Ag-In-Yb approximant prepared by sputter-annealing methods under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions produces a flat (100) surface with no facets. However, the Ag-In-Gd and Ag-In-Tb 1/1 approximants, which have a surface miscut of about 12∘ relative to the (100) plane, develop surface facets along various crystallographic directions. The structure of each facet can be explained as a truncation of the rhombic triacontahedral clusters, i.e., the main building blocks of these systems. Despite their differences in atomic structure, symmetry, and density, the facets show common features. The facet planes are In rich. The analysis of the nearest-neighbor atom distances suggests that In atoms form bonds with the RE atoms, which we suggest is a key factor that stabilizes even low-density facet planes.

  5. Synthesis, structures and properties of Ag+ complexes containing polyphosphine ligands with extended Ag⋯C, N-O⋯π and C-H⋯π interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ting-Hong; Yang, Hu; Yang, Guo; Li, Yanfen; Huang, Li-Li

    2016-08-01

    Based on ligands of N,N-bis((diphenylphosphino)methyl)benzenamine (pba), 4-(4-(bis((diphenylphosphino)methyl)amino)benzyl)-N-((diphenylphosphino)methyl)benzenamine (dptp) and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetrakis((diphenylphosphino)methyl)benzene-1,4-diamine (pbaa), three new silver(I) complexes [Ag(pba)2]ClO4 (1), [Ag2(dptp)2](ClO4)2·2DMF (2) and [Ag4(pbaa)(NO3)4]n (3), have been synthesized and characterized. Structural analysis reveals that all of these complexes contain the 1D infinite chains, with different variations in the weak interactions. Complexes 1 and 2 are interconnected by intermolecular C-H⋯π interactions to form 1D infinite chains and 2D networks, and the ordered-layer-lattic ClO4- and DMF in 2 are between 2D networks. For 3, the pbaa ligand adopts a tetradentate coordination mode to link two adjacent stair-like [Ag4O4] cores resulting in a 1D chain, respectively, with Ag⋯C, N-O⋯π and C-H⋯π interactions. All these show that phosphine ligands play an important role in the construction of interesting topological structures with different types of the weak interactions.

  6. Unexpected Generation and Observation of a T-Shaped Complex of H_{2}C_{2}\\cdotsAgCCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, N. R.; Stephens, S. L.; Mizukami, W.; Tew, D. P.; Legon, A. C.

    2013-06-01

    An experiment to probe species generated within a supersonically-expanding jet consisting of SF_{6}, Ag, C_{2}H_{2} and argon by broadband rotational spectroscopy revealed the existence of a T-shaped complex of hitherto unknown origin. Empirical tests revealed that this complex requires the presence of C_{2}H_{2} and Ag within the gas sample. While the intensity of the associated transitions are enhanced by the presence of SF_{6}, theoretical calculations and empirical tests implied that the identified complex is H_{2}C_{2}\\cdotsAgCCH rather than the original target of the experiment, H_{2}C_{2}\\cdotsAgF. This deduction is now supported by evidence acquired through experiments exploiting ^{13}C-enriched isotopic samples. Transitions have been assigned for the H_{2}^{13}C_{2}\\cdotsAg^{13}C^{13}CH isotopologue. Data acquired from each isotopologue allows determination of the rotational constants (B}_{0}, C}_{0}) and centrifugal distortion constant, Δ_J}. The data are consistent with a T-shaped complex in which the Ag atom of AgCCH binds to electrons within the {π}-orbitals of ethyne. Preliminary determinations of bond lengths will be presented. Experiments are in progress to measure the spectra of deuterated isotopologues.

  7. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, ioanis

    2014-06-01

    After a 14 month shutdown accelerator modifications and upgrades are in place to allow us doubling of the Main Injector beam power. We will discuss the past MI high power operation and the current progress towards doubling the power.

  8. Antifungal Activity of Ag(I) and Zn(II) Complexes of Sulfacetamide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2000-01-01

    Reaction of sulfacetamide with arylsulfonyl isocyanates afforded a series of derivatives which were used as ligands (as conjugate bases) for the preparation of metal complexes containing Ag(I) and Zn(II). The newly synthesized complexes, unlike the free ligands, act as effective antifungal agents against Aspergillus and Candida spp., some of them showing activities comparable to ketoconazole, with minimum inhibitory concentrations in the range of 0.3 – 0.5 μg/mL. The mechanism of antifungal action of these complexes seems to be not connected with the inhibition of lanosterol-14-α-demethylase, since the levels of sterols assessed in the fungi cultures were equal in the absence or in the presence of the tested compounds. Probably the new complexes act as inhibitors of phosphomannose isomerase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of yeast cell walls. PMID:18475922

  9. Cyclometalated heteronuclear Pt/Ag and Pt/Tl complexes: a structural and photophysical study.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Sirous; Ghazfar, Reza; Lalinde, Elena; Jamshidi, Zahra; Samouei, Hamidreza; Shahsavari, Hamid R; Moreno, M Teresa; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Milic, Dalibor

    2014-01-21

    To investigate the factors influencing the luminescent properties of polymetallic cycloplatinated complexes a detailed study of the photophysical and structural properties of the heteronuclear complexes [Pt2Me2(bhq)2(μ-dppy)2Ag2(μ-acetone)](BF4)2, 2, [PtMe(bhq)(dppy)Tl]PF6, 3, and [Pt2Me2(bhq)2(dppy)2Tl]PF6, 4, [bhq = benzo[h]quinoline, dppy = 2-(diphenylphosphino)pyridine] was conducted. Complexes 3 and 4 synthesized by the reaction of [PtMe(bhq)(dppy)], 1, with TlPF6 (1 or 1/2 equiv.) and stabilized by unsupported Pt-Tl bonds as revealed by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and confirmed by X-ray crystallography for 3. DFT calculations for the previously reported butterfly Pt2Ag2 cluster 2 reveal that in the optimized geometry the bridging acetone molecule is removed and the metal core displays a planar-shaped geometry in which according to a QTAIM calculation and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis the Ag···Ag metallophilic interaction is strengthened. In contrast to the precursor 1, which is only emissive in glassy solutions ((3)MLCT 485 nm), all 2-4 heteropolynuclear complexes display intense emissions in the solid state and in glassy solutions. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used to elucidate the origin of the electronic transitions in the heteronuclear complexes 2 and 3. The low energy absorption and intense orange emission for cluster 2 (solid 77 K and glass) are attributed to metal-metal to ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT) with a minor L'LCT contribution. For 3 and 4 two different bands are developed: the high energy band (602-630 nm) observed for 4 at 77 K (solid, glass) and in diluted glasses for 3 is ascribed to emission from discrete Pt2Tl units of mixed (3)L'LCT/(3)LM'CT origin. However, the low energy band (670-690 nm) observed at room temperature (solid) for both complexes and also in concentrated glasses for 3 is assigned to (3)ππ excited states arising from intermolecular interactions. PMID:24165802

  10. H{sub 2}—AgCl: A spectroscopic study of a dihydrogen complex

    SciTech Connect

    Grubbs, G. S.; Obenchain, Daniel A.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Novick, Stewart E.

    2014-09-21

    H{sub 2}—AgCl has been observed on a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer equipped with laser ablation source and determined to be a dihydrogen complex. Transitions up to J = 3–2 have been measured and analyzed for four isotopologues of the complex containing ortho and para H{sub 2}. The ortho and para spin states have been included in one fit, a deviation from the typical H{sub 2} complex. Rotational constants B and C, centrifugal distortion constants Δ{sub J} and Δ{sub JK}, nuclear electric quadrupole coupling constants χ{sub aa}, χ{sub bb}, and χ{sub cc} for {sup 35}Cl and {sup 37}Cl have been fit for both spin states while nuclear spin-nuclear spin constants D{sub aa}, D{sub bb}, and D{sub cc}, and nuclear spin-rotation constant C{sub aa} have been reported for the ortho spin state. Quantum chemical calculations predict a strong bonding interaction and the strength of the complex has been related to reported χ{sub aa} and Δ{sub J} values amongst a host of comparable species, including the AgCl monomer itself. Bond lengths have been determined for Ag—Cl, Ag—H{sub 2} center-of-mass, and H—H and are reported.

  11. Preparation and self-sterilizing properties of Ag@TiO2-styrene-acrylic complex coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang-dong; Chen, Feng; Yang, Jin-tao; Yan, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Ming-qiang

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we report a simple and cost-effective method for self-sterilized complex coatings obtained by Ag@TiO2 particle incorporation into styrene-acrylic latex. The Ag@TiO2 particles were prepared via a coupling agent modification process. The composite latices characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study were highly homogeneous at the nanometric scale, and the Ag@TiO2 particles were well dispersed and exhibited an intimate contact between both the organic and inorganic components. The Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles significantly enhanced the absorption in the visible region and engendered a good heat-insulating effect of the complex coatings. Moreover, the Ag@TiO2 nanoparticle incorporation into this polymer matrix renders self-sterilized nanocomposite materials upon light excitation, which are tested against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The complex coatings display an impressive performance in the killing of all micro-organisms with a maximum for a Ag@TiO2 loading concentration of 2-5 wt.%. The weathering endurance of the complex coating was also measured.

  12. The AGS Booster control system

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, R.; Auerbach, E.; Culwick, B.; Clifford, T.; Mandell, S.; Mariotti, R.; Salwen, C.; Schumburg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Although moderate in size, the Booster construction project requires a comprehensive control system. There are three operational modes: as a high intensity proton injector for the AGS, as a heavy ion accelerator and injector supporting a wide range of ions and as a polarized proton storage injector. These requirements are met using a workstation based extension of the existing AGS control system. Since the Booster is joining a complex of existing accelerators, the new system will be capable of supporting multiuser operational scenarios. A short discussion of this system is discussed in this paper.

  13. Novel amphiphilic cationic porphyrin and its Ag(II) complex as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Babayan, Nelli; Poghosyan, David; Margaryan, Kristine; Harutyunyan, Boris; Grigoryan, Rusanna; Sarkisyan, Natalia; Spasojevic, Ivan; Mamyan, Suren; Sahakyan, Lida; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Ghazaryan, Robert; Gasparyan, Gennadi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study we have synthesized a novel amphiphilic porphyrin and its Ag(II) complex through modification of water-soluble porphyrinic structure in order to increase its lipophilicity and in turn pharmacological potency. New cationic non-symmetrical meso-substituted porphyrins were characterized by UV-visible, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), (1)H NMR techniques, lipophilicity (thin-layer chromatographic retention factor, Rf), and elemental analysis. The key toxicological profile (i.e. cytotoxicity and cell line- (cancer type-) specificity; genotoxicity; cell cycle effects) of amphiphilic Ag porphyrin was studied in human normal and cancer cell lines of various tissue origins and compared with its water-soluble analog. Structural modification of the molecule from water-soluble to amphiphilic resulted in a certain increase in the cytotoxicity and a decrease in cell line-specificity. Importantly, Ag(II) porphyrin showed less toxicity to normal cells and greater toxicity to their cancerous counterparts as compared to cisplatin. The amphiphilic complex was also not genotoxic and demonstrated a slight cytostatic effect via the cell cycle delay due to the prolongation of S-phase. As expected, the performed structural modification affected also the photocytotoxic activity of metal-free amphiphilic porphyrin. The ligand tested on cancer cell line revealed a dramatic (more than 70-fold) amplification of its phototoxic activity as compared to its water-soluble tetracationic metal-free analog. The compound combines low dark cytotoxicity with 5 fold stronger phototoxicity relative to Chlorin e6 and could be considered as a potential photosensitizer for further development in photodynamic therapy.

  14. Vacuum chamber eddy current self-correction for the AGS Booster Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The large sextupole and other multipoles induced by eddy currents in the vacuum chamber (VC) designed for the AGS Booster dipoles have been cancelled by simple coils attached to the VC surface. A two turns per pole back leg winding provides the mmf required to power the correction coil by transformer action, automatically correcting even for the variable {dot B} magnet excitation. Much larger VC positional errors of translation and rotation are acceptable because the coils follow the VC contour: the aberrations and their corrections locally have the same misplaced coordinate system. The self-correction concept could be applied to quadrupoles. However, Booster quadrupole measurements show that induced higher harmonics from VC and other eddy current sources are very small. Thus, with self-correction of the dipole VC eddy current fields, {dot B} effects on the proton rapid cycling Booster optics are reduced to tracking of the fundamental dipole and quadrupole fields. This can be automatically controlled using field monitoring transducers located in a dipole and quadrupole operated in series with the Booster magnets. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Aniline chlorination by in situ formed Ag-Cl complexes under simulated solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuefeng; Wang, Xiaowen; Dong, Liuliu; Chang, Fei; Luo, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Ag speciation in a chloride medium was dependent upon the Cl/Ag ratio after releasing into surface water. In this study, the photoreaction of in situ formed Ag-Cl species and their effects on aniline photochlorination were systematically investigated. Our results suggested that formation of chloroaniline was strongly relevant to the Cl/Ag ratio and could be interpreted using the thermodynamically expected speciation of Ag in the presence of Cl-. AgCl was the main species responsible for the photochlorination of aniline. Both photoinduced hole and •OH drove the oxidation of Cl- to radical •Cl, which promoted the chlorination of aniline. Ag0 formation was observed from the surface plasmon resonance absorption during AgCl photoreaction. This study revealed that Ag+ released into Cl--containing water may result in the formation of chlorinated intermediates of organic compounds under solar light irradiation.

  16. Accelerating procelain formation by incorporating a complex additive

    SciTech Connect

    Maslennikova, G.N.; Dubovitskii, S.A.; Moroz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    The authors studied the influence of a complex additive consisting of oxides of calcium, zinc, and magnesium on the formaton of porcelain. In order to achieve a more uniform distribution of the complex additive in the porcelain body it was incorporated in the form of water soluble salts-nitrates, which ensured comparability of results and excluded the effect of the different types of anions. The study of the main parameters of sintering (porosity, shrinkage, and mechanical strength) for the test bodies showed that they sinter at lower temperatures and attain zero porosity, maximum shrinkage, and mechanical strength. The most typical bodies indentified in this way were investigated by methods of complex differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. Thus, the introduction of complex additives consisting of calcium, zinc, and magnesium oxides contributes to the earlier formation of porcelain. With the reduction of firing temperatures by 100/sup 0/C the authors observe an improvement in the basic properties of porcelain.

  17. Analysis of complex cardiovascular flow with three-component acceleration-encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Barker, Alex J; Staehle, Felix; Bock, Jelena; Jung, Bernd A; Markl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Functional information regarding cardiac performance, pressure gradients, and local flow derangement are available from blood acceleration fields. Thus, this study examines a 2D and 3D phase contrast sequence optimized to efficiently encode three-directional, time-resolved acceleration in vitro and in vivo. Stenosis phantom acceleration measurements were compared to acceleration derived from standard velocity encoded phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (i.e., "velocity-derived acceleration"). For in vivo analysis, three-directional 2D acceleration maps were compared to velocity-derived acceleration using regions proximal and distal to the aortic valve in six healthy volunteers at 1.5 and 3.0 T (voxel size = 1.4 × 2.1 × 8 mm, temporal resolution = 16-20 ms). In addition, a 4D acceleration sequence was evaluated for feasibility in a healthy volunteer and postrepair biscuspid aortic valve patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm. The phantom magnetic resonance acceleration measurements were more accurate (nonturbulent root mean square error = 2.2 vs. 5.1 m/s(2) for phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging) and 10 times less noisy (nonturbulent σ = 0.9 vs. 13.6 m/s(2) for phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging) than velocity-derived acceleration. Acceleration mapping of the left ventricular outflow tract and aortic arch exhibited signal voids colocated with complex flow events such as vortex formation and high order motion. 4D acceleration data, visualized in combination with the velocity data, may provide new insight into complex flow phenomena.

  18. Formation of complex wedding-cake morphologies during homoepitaxial film growth of Ag on Ag(111): atomistic, step-dynamics, and continuum modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maozhi; Han, Yong; Thiel, P. A.; Evans, J. W.

    2009-02-01

    An atomistic lattice-gas model is developed which successfully describes all key features of the complex mounded morphologies which develop during deposition of Ag films on Ag(111) surfaces. We focus on this homoepitaxial thin film growth process below 200 K. The unstable multilayer growth mode derives from the presence of a large Ehrlich-Schwoebel step-edge barrier, for which we characterize both the step-orientation dependence and the magnitude. Step-dynamics modeling is applied to further characterize and elucidate the evolution of the vertical profiles of these wedding-cake-like mounds. Suitable coarse-graining of these step-dynamics equations leads to instructive continuum formulations for mound evolution.

  19. A nanosized Ag-silica hybrid complex prepared by γ-irradiation activates the defense response in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hyosub; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Su Kim, Joong; Kim, Min-Soo; Yoon, Byung-Dae; Park, Hae-Jun; Kim, Cha Young

    2012-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles have antimicrobial activity against many pathogenic microbes. Here, the preparation of a nanosized Ag-silica hybrid complex (NSS) prepared by γ-irradiation is described. The effects of both NSS and reduced Ag nanoparticles (Ag 0) on the growth of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana were tested. The application of 1-10 ppm NSS complex improved Arabidopsis growth in soil, whereas 100 ppm NSS resulted in weakly curled leaves. In addition, supplementation of Murashige and Skoog (MS) growth medium with 1 ppm NSS promoted the root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings, but root growth was inhibited by supplementation with 10 ppm NSS. To investigate whether the NSS complex could induce plant defense responses, the expression of pathogenesis-related ( PR) genes that are implicated in systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis plants was examined. PR1, PR2 and PR5 were significantly up-regulated by each application of 10 ppm NSS complex or Ag 0 to the rosette leaves. Furthermore, pretreatment with the NSS complex induced more pathogen resistance to the virulent pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 ( Pst) compared to water treatment in Arabidopsis plants.

  20. The operation of the LHC accelerator complex (2/2)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    These lectures will give an overview of what happens when the LHC is in running mode. They are aimed at students working on the LHC experiments, but all those who are curious about what happens behind the scenes of the LHC are welcomed. You will learn all you always wanted to know about the LHC, and never had the courage to ask! The only pre-requisite is a basic, college-level, knowledge of EM and of the principles that allow to steer charged beams. Topics covered will include, among others: - the description of the injector chain, from the generation of the protons, to the delivery of bunches to the LHC. - the discussion of the steps required to accelerate the beams in the LHC, to bring them into collision, and to control the luminosity at the interaction points. - the description of the monitoring tools available to the LHC operators, and an explanation of the various plots and panels that can be found on the LHC web pages. o Lecture 1: Wednesday April 7, 10-11am o Lecture 2: Friday April 9, 10-11am The lectures will be webcast, recorded and archived. Coffee will be served before the lectures, starting at 9:45

  1. The operation of the LHC accelerator complex (1/2)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    These lectures will give an overview of what happens when the LHC is in running mode. They are aimed at students working on the LHC experiments, but all those who are curious about what happens behind the scenes of the LHC are welcomed. You will learn all you always wanted to know about the LHC, and never had the courage to ask! The only pre-requisite is a basic, college-level, knowledge of EM and of the principles that allow to steer charged beams. Topics covered will include, among others: - the description of the injector chain, from the generation of the protons, to the delivery of bunches to the LHC. - the discussion of the steps required to accelerate the beams in the LHC, to bring them into collision, and to control the luminosity at the interaction points. - the description of the monitoring tools available to the LHC operators, and an explanation of the various plots and panels that can be found on the LHC web pages. o Lecture 1: Wednesday April 7, 10-11am o Lecture 2: Friday April 9, 10-11am The lectures will be webcast, recorded and archived. Coffee will be served before the lectures, starting at 9:45

  2. The operation of the LHC accelerator complex (1/2)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-07

    These lectures will give an overview of what happens when the LHC is in running mode. They are aimed at students working on the LHC experiments, but all those who are curious about what happens behind the scenes of the LHC are welcomed. You will learn all you always wanted to know about the LHC, and never had the courage to ask! The only pre-requisite is a basic, college-level, knowledge of EM and of the principles that allow to steer charged beams. Topics covered will include, among others: - the description of the injector chain, from the generation of the protons, to the delivery of bunches to the LHC. - the discussion of the steps required to accelerate the beams in the LHC, to bring them into collision, and to control the luminosity at the interaction points. - the description of the monitoring tools available to the LHC operators, and an explanation of the various plots and panels that can be found on the LHC web pages. o Lecture 1: Wednesday April 7, 10-11am o Lecture 2: Friday April 9, 10-11am The lectures will be webcast, recorded and archived. Coffee will be served before the lectures, starting at 9:45

  3. The operation of the LHC accelerator complex (2/2)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-09

    These lectures will give an overview of what happens when the LHC is in running mode. They are aimed at students working on the LHC experiments, but all those who are curious about what happens behind the scenes of the LHC are welcomed. You will learn all you always wanted to know about the LHC, and never had the courage to ask! The only pre-requisite is a basic, college-level, knowledge of EM and of the principles that allow to steer charged beams. Topics covered will include, among others: - the description of the injector chain, from the generation of the protons, to the delivery of bunches to the LHC. - the discussion of the steps required to accelerate the beams in the LHC, to bring them into collision, and to control the luminosity at the interaction points. - the description of the monitoring tools available to the LHC operators, and an explanation of the various plots and panels that can be found on the LHC web pages. o Lecture 1: Wednesday April 7, 10-11am o Lecture 2: Friday April 9, 10-11am The lectures will be webcast, recorded and archived. Coffee will be served before the lectures, starting at 9:45

  4. Preparation of Novel Europium Complex Doped Ag@SiO2 Nanoparticles with Intense Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Yin, Dongguang; Song, Kailin; Yang, Juan Ou; Wang, Chengcheng; Wu, Minghong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new europium complex of 4,4'-bis (1",1",1",2",2",3",3"-heptafluoro-4",6"- hexanedion-6"-yl)-o-terpheny-Eu(3+)-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid-(3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (BHHT-Eu(3+)-DPPDA-APTMS) was prepared first. Then novel core-shell Ag@SiO2 nanoparticles with BHHT-Eu(3+)-DPPDA-APTMS doped in shell were synthesized by a facile water-in-oil microemulsion method. The properties of the prepared complex and nanoparticles, and the effect of metal enhanced fluorescence for the nanoparticles were investigated. The prepared nanopartilces exhibited intense fluorescence, uniform morphology and good water-solubility. The fluorescent intensities of silver core-present nanopartciles were significant higher than that of silver core-absent nanoparticles owing to the metal enhanced fluorescence of silver core. It is expectable that the as-prepared nanoparticles can serve as a potential fluorescent nanoprobe, applying in high sensitive biological and medical detections.

  5. Future Development Of The Flerov Laboratory Accelerator Complex (Project DRIBs-III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbekian, G. G.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Popeko, A. G.

    2010-04-01

    Future development of the FLNR accelerator complex (project DRIBs-III) includes modernization of existing cyclotrons, construction of a new experimental hall, creation of a new high current cyclotron and of next generation experimental set-ups. Realization of the project is planned for 2010-2016.

  6. The effect of 1:2 Ag(I) thiocyanate complexes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Eloise; Munyaneza, Appollinaire; Omondi, Bernard; Meijboom, Reinout; Cronjé, Marianne J

    2015-08-01

    There is much interest currently in the design of metal compounds as drugs and various metal compounds are already in clinical use. These include gold(I) compounds such as auranofin and the anti-cancer platinum(II) complex, cisplatin. Bis-chelated gold(I) phosphine complexes have also shown great potential as anticancer agents, however, their efficacy has been limited by their high toxicity. In this study, silver(I) thiocyanate compounds linked to four specific ligands, were synthesized and characterized. These silver-phosphine adducts included [AgSCN{P(4-MeC6H4)3}2]2 (1); [AgSCN{P(4-ClC6H4)3}2]2 (2); [AgSCN{P(4-MeOC6H4)3}2]2 (3); [AgSCN(PPh3)2]2 (4). The compounds were found to be toxic to MCF-7 breast cancer cells while the ligands on their own were not toxic. Our findings further indicate that the silver(I) phosphine compounds induce apoptotic cell death in these breast cancer cells. In addition, the compounds were not toxic to nonmalignant fibroblast cells at the IC50 concentrations. This is an indication that the compounds show selectivity towards the cancer cells. PMID:26049979

  7. Core–shell Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles of different silica shell thicknesses: Preparation and their effects on photoluminescence of lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jie; Li, Yuan; Chen, Yingnan; Wang, Ailing; Yue, Bin; Qu, Yanrong; Zhao, Yongliang; Chu, Haibin

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles of different silica shell thicknesses were prepared via the Stöber process. • Sm and Dy complexes with benzoate, 1,10-phenanthroline and 2,2′-bipyridine were synthesized. • The complex-doped Ag@SiO{sub 2} composites show stronger luminescent intensities than pure complexes. • The luminescent intensities of the composites strongly depend on the SiO{sub 2} shell thickness. - Abstract: Three kinds of almost spherical core–shell Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles of different silica shell thicknesses (10, 25 and 80 nm) were prepared via the Stöber process. The Ag core nanoparticles were prepared by reducing silver nitrate with sodium citrate. The size, morphology and structure of core–shell Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Subsequently, eight kinds of lanthanide complexes with benzoate, 1,10-phenanthroline and 2,2′-bipyridine were synthesized. The composition of the lanthanide complexes was characterized by elemental analysis, IR and UV spectra. Finally, lanthanide complexes were attached to the surface of Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles to form lanthanide-complex-doped Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites. The results show that the complex-doped Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites display much stronger luminescence intensities than the lanthanide complexes. Furthermore, the luminescence intensities of the lanthanide-complex-doped Ag@SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites with SiO{sub 2} shell thickness of 25 nm are stronger than those of the nanocomposites with SiO{sub 2} shell thickness of 10 and 80 nm.

  8. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  9. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  10. Complex System for Ground-Based and Accelerated Simulation of Six Extremal Space Factors (KIFK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraimov, V. V.; Kolybaev, L. K.; Verkhovtseva, E. T.; Nekludov, I. M.; Rybalko, V. F.; Borts, B. V.

    This work was aimed at 1. Development and construction of a complex SF simulator for simultaneous and accelerated simulation of six SF (unparalleled in the GUS and ESA countries): artificial Sun radiation (200..2500 nm) + VUV radiation (5..200 nm) + proton (p+) and electron (e-) radiation (50..200 keV) + vacuum (10-6 Torr) + thermocycling (4.2..400 K). 2.Development of new physical techniques of accelerated laboratory simulation of the basic space factors adequate to natural factors influencing materials, components, units and scale models of spacecraft. In our opinion, this work solves a number of topical problems of ground-based simulation of space factors. 1.Simultaneous impact of six SF on spacecraft materials and models. 2.Simulation of the complete electromagnetic solar radiation (including VUV) spectrum in the wavelength range 5..2500 nm. 3.Accelerated simulation of the electron and proton flows of the Earth's radiation belts (the energy 50..200 keV, intensity 1012 particle/cm2s), i.e. with the acceleration coefficient 500..1000. 4.Accelerated simulation of the VUV component of the Sun's spectrum with the maximum intensity 3000 erg/cm2s) (i.e., the acceleration coefficient 300) 5.Simultaneous thermocycling of test objects in a wide range of temperatures 4.2..400 K in the vacuum of 10-6 Torr.

  11. Accelerated chemical aging of crystalline nuclear waste forms: A density functional theory study of 109Cdx 109Ag1-x S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado, B.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Marks, N. A.; Stanek, C. R.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a combined experimental-theoretical approach to assess the effect of daughter product formation on the stability of crystalline compounds comprised of radioisotopes has been developed. This methodology was motivated by the potential impact on crystalline nuclear waste form stability of a significant fraction of the constituent atoms undergoing transmutation. What is particularly novel about this approach is the experimental use of very short-lived isotopes to accelerate the chemical evolution that occurs during decay. In this paper, we present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations that have been performed in support of corresponding experiments on the 109Cdx 109Ag1-x S material system. 109Cd has been selected in order to simulate the decay of important "short-lived" fission products 137Cs or 90Sr (which decay via β - to 137Ba and 90Zr respectively with ≈ 30-year half-lives). By comparison, 109Cd decays by electron capture with a half-life of 109 days to 109Ag. DFT results predict the formation of heretofore unobserved CdxAg1-x S structures, which support corresponding experiments and ultimately may have implications for waste form stability.

  12. A remote Lewis acid trigger dramatically accelerates biaryl reductive elimination from a platinum complex.

    PubMed

    Liberman-Martin, Allegra L; Bergman, Robert G; Tilley, T Don

    2013-07-01

    A strategy for the control of electron density at a metal center is reported, which uses a remote chemical switch involving second-sphere Lewis acid binding that modulates electron density in the first coordination sphere. Binding of the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 at remote nitrogen positions of a bipyrazine-diarylplatinum(II) complex accelerates biaryl reductive elimination by a factor of 64,000. PMID:23789917

  13. A prototype transition-metal olefin complex C2H4⋯AgCl synthesised by laser ablation and characterised by rotational spectroscopy and ab initio methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Susanna L.; Tew, David P.; Mikhailov, Victor A.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Legon, Anthony C.

    2011-07-01

    C2H4⋯Ag-Cl has been synthesised in the gas phase in a pulsed-jet, Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer by the reaction of laser-ablated metallic silver with carbon tetrachloride to give AgCl, which subsequently reacts with ethene to give the complex. The ground-state rotational spectra of six isotopologues (C2H4⋯107Ag35Cl, C2H4⋯109Ag35Cl, C2H4⋯107Ag37Cl, C2H4⋯109Ag37Cl, 13C2H4⋯107Ag35Cl, and 13C2H4⋯109Ag35Cl) were recorded and analysed to give rotational constants A0, B0, and C0, centrifugal distortion constants ΔJ and ΔJK, and Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling constants χaa(Cl) and χbb(Cl) - χcc(Cl). These spectroscopic constants were interpreted in terms of a geometry for C2H4⋯Ag-Cl of C2V symmetry in which the AgCl molecule lies along the C2 axis of ethene that is perpendicular to the C2H4 plane. The Ag atom forms a bond to the midpoint (*) of the ethene π bond. A partial rs-geometry and a r0-geometry were determined, with the values r(*⋯Ag) = 2.1719(9) Å, r(C-C) = 1.3518(4) Å, and r(Ag-Cl) = 2.2724(8) Å obtained in the latter case. The C-C bond lengthens on formation of the complex. Detailed ab initio calculations carried out at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ level of theory give results in good agreement with experiment and also reveal that the ethene molecule undergoes a small angular distortion. The distortion is such that the four H atoms move in a direction away from Ag but remain coplanar. The two C atoms are no longer contained in this plane, however. The electric charge redistribution when C2H4⋯Ag-Cl is formed and the strength of the π⋯Ag bond are discussed.

  14. Synthesis and structural characterization of mixed-metal complexes of Cu(I) with MOS3 cores (M = Mo, W) and of an unusual polymeric AgI/mercaptoimidazole complex with five different Ag(I) coordination environments.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Azizollah; Clegg, William; Khorramdin, Rahman; Nobakht, Valiollah; Russo, Luca

    2011-03-28

    Reaction of (NH(4))(2)[MO(2)S(2)] (M = Mo or W) with KI, CuCl and 1,3-diazepane-2-thione (Diap) in acetone affords air- and moisture-stable mixed-metal cluster compounds [MOS(3)(CuDiap)(3)]I (1 and 2). Attempts to produce [WS(4)Ag(2)(Mim(Ph))(4)] (Mim(Ph) = 2-mercapto-1-phenylimidazole) led to the unexpected polymeric compound [Ag(5)I(5)(Mim(Ph))(4)](n) (4), subsequently obtained from a rational direct reaction between AgI and Mim(Ph) in chloroform. The complexes have been characterized by IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal diffraction. 1 and 2 have crystallographic threefold rotation symmetry, with an incomplete distorted cube MS(3)Cu(3) core bearing terminal oxo and Diap ligands on M and Cu, respectively. The cube vertex opposite M is empty, giving an overall +1 cationic cluster and a separate I(-) anion too distant from the three Cu atoms to be considered as covalently bonded and resulting in discrete ion pairs in the crystal structures. This arrangement is different from previously reported related OMS(3)(CuL)(3)X complexes (L = monodentate ligand, X = halide), in which X, when present, is directly bonded to one, two or three Cu atoms. 4 has a one-dimensional polymeric chain structure in which silver displays five different approximately tetrahedral coordination environments, iodide ions serve as μ(2), μ(3) and μ(4) bridges, and the thione ligands are each either terminal or bridging. This unusually complex structure for a relatively simple chemical formula represents only the fifth example of a complex (AgI)(n)L(m) in which L is a neutral S-donor ligand, and the five structures display a wide range of individual features. In all three of the new structures, N-H···S and/or N-H···I hydrogen bonds are found.

  15. Shedding Light on the Photochemistry of Coinage-Metal Phosphorescent Materials: A Time-Resolved Laue Diffraction Study of an AgI–CuI Tetranuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kamiński, Radosław; Fournier, Bertrand; Trzop, Elżbieta; Sokolow, Jesse D.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yang; Coppens, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The triplet excited state of a new crystalline form of a tetranuclear coordination d10–d10-type complex, Ag2Cu2L4 (L = 2-diphenylphosphino-3-methylindole ligand), containing AgI and CuI metal centers has been explored using the Laue pump–probe technique with ≈80 ps time resolution. The relatively short lifetime of 1 μs is accompanied by significant photoinduced structural changes, as large as the Ag1···Cu2 distance shortening by 0.59(3) Å. The results show a pronounced strengthening of the argentophilic interactions and formation of new Ag···Cu bonds on excitation. Theoretical calculations indicate that the structural changes are due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) strengthening the Ag···Ag interaction, mainly occurring from the methylindole ligands to the silver metal centers. QM/MM optimizations of the ground and excited states of the complex support the experimental results. Comparison with isolated molecule optimizations demonstrates the restricting effect of the crystalline matrix on photoinduced distortions. The work represents the first time-resolved Laue diffraction study of a heteronuclear coordination complex and provides new information on the nature of photoresponse of coinage metal complexes, which have been the subject of extensive studies. PMID:25238405

  16. AGS II

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in rare K decays, neutrino oscillations and other fields have generated an increasing demand for running, and improved intensity and duty cycle, at the AGS. Current projects include acceleration of polarized protons and light ions (up to mass 32). Future plans are for a booster to increase intensity and allow heavy ions (up to mass 200), and a stretcher to give 100% duty cycle. A later upgrade could yield an average current of 32 ..mu.. amps. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Adjustable coordination of a hybrid phosphine-phosphine oxide ligand in luminescent Cu, Ag and Au complexes.

    PubMed

    Dau, Thuy Minh; Asamoah, Benjamin Darko; Belyaev, Andrey; Chakkaradhari, Gomathy; Hirva, Pipsa; Jänis, Janne; Grachova, Elena V; Tunik, Sergey P; Koshevoy, Igor O

    2016-09-28

    A potentially tridentate hemilabile ligand, PPh2-C6H4-PPh(O)-C6H4-PPh2 (P(3)O), has been used for the construction of a family of bimetallic complexes [MM'(P(3)O)2](2+) (M = M' = Cu (1), Ag (2), Au (3); M = Au, M' = Cu (4)) and their mononuclear halide congeners M(P(3)O)Hal (M = Cu (5-7), Ag (8-10)). Compounds 1-10 have been characterized in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to reveal a variable coordination mode of the phosphine-oxide group of the P(3)O ligand depending on the preferable number of coordination vacancies on the metal center. According to the theoretical studies, the interaction of the hard donor P[double bond, length as m-dash]O moiety with d(10) ions becomes less effective in the order Cu > Ag > Au. 1-10 exhibit room temperature luminescence in the solid state, and the intensity and energy of emission are mostly determined by the nature of metal atoms. The photophysical characteristics of the monometallic species were compared with those of the related compounds M(P(3))Hal (11-16) with the non-oxidized ligand P(3). It was found that in the case of the copper complexes 5-7 the P(3)O hybrid ligand introduces effective non-radiative pathways of the excited state relaxation leading to poor emission, while for the silver luminophores the P[double bond, length as m-dash]O group leads mainly to the modulation of luminescence wavelength. PMID:27530362

  18. Multi-cavity complex controller with vector simulator for TESLA technology linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Szewinski, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A digital control, as the main part of the Low Level RF system, for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented. The FPGA based controller, supported by MATLAB system, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The complex control algorithm based on the non-linear system identification is the proposal verified by the preliminary experimental results. The general idea is implemented as the Multi-Cavity Complex Controller (MCC) and is still under development. The FPGA based controller executes procedure according to the prearranged control tables: Feed-Forward, Set-Point and Corrector unit, to fulfill the required cavity performance: driving in the resonance during filling and field stabilization for the flattop range. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for the feed-forward and feedback modes. The vector Simulator table has been introduced for an efficient verification of the FPGA controller structure. Experimental results of the internal simulation, are presented for a cavity representative condition.

  19. Spectroscopic properties of Ar(x)-Zn and Ar(x)-Ag(+) (x = 1,2) van der Waals complexes.

    PubMed

    Oyedepo, Gbenga A; Peterson, Charles; Schoendorff, George; Wilson, Angela K

    2013-03-14

    Potential energy curves have been constructed using coupled cluster with singles, doubles, and perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)) in combination with all-electron and pseudopotential-based multiply augmented correlation consistent basis sets [m-aug-cc-pV(n + d)Z; m = singly, doubly, triply, n = D,T,Q,5]. The effect of basis set superposition error on the spectroscopic properties of Ar-Zn, Ar2-Zn, Ar-Ag(+), and Ar2-Ag(+) van der Waals complexes was examined. The diffuse functions of the doubly and triply augmented basis sets have been constructed using the even-tempered expansion. The a posteriori counterpoise scheme of Boys and Bernardi and its generalized variant by Valiron and Mayer has been utilized to correct for basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the calculated spectroscopic properties for diatomic and triatomic species. It is found that even at the extrapolated complete basis set limit for the energetic properties, the pseudopotential-based calculations still suffer from significant BSSE effects unlike the all-electron basis sets. This indicates that the quality of the approximations used in the design of pseudopotentials could have major impact on a seemingly valence-exclusive effect like BSSE. We confirm the experimentally determined equilibrium internuclear distance (re), binding energy (De), harmonic vibrational frequency (ωe), and C(1)Π ← X(1)Σ transition energy for ArZn and also predict the spectroscopic properties for the low-lying excited states of linear Ar2-Zn (X(1)Σg, (3)Πg, (1)Πg), Ar-Ag(+) (X(1)Σ, (3)Σ, (3)Π, (3)Δ, (1)Σ, (1)Π, (1)Δ), and Ar2-Ag(+) (X(1)Σg, (3)Σg, (3)Πg, (3)Δg, (1)Σg, (1)Πg, (1)Δg) complexes, using the CCSD(T) and MR-CISD + Q methods, to aid in their experimental characterizations.

  20. Comparative modular analysis of two complex sulfosalt structures: sterryite, Cu(Ag,Cu)3Pb19(Sb,As)22(As-As)S56, and parasterryite, Ag4Pb20(Sb,As)24S58.

    PubMed

    Moëlo, Yves; Guillot-Deudon, Catherine; Evain, Michel; Orlandi, Paolo; Biagioni, Cristian

    2012-10-01

    The crystal structures of two very close, but distinct complex minerals of the lead sulfosalt group have been solved: sterryite, Cu(Ag,Cu)(3)Pb(19)(Sb,As)(22)(As-As)S(56), and parasterryite, Ag(4)Pb(20)(Sb,As)(24)S(58). They are analyzed and compared according to modular analysis. The fundamental building block is a complex column centred on a Pb(6)S(12) triangular prismatic core, with two additional long and short arms. The main chemical and topological differences relate to the short arm, which induces a relative a/4 shift (~2 Å along the elongation parameter) of the constitutive rod layers, as illustrated by distinct cell settings within the same space group (P2(1)/n and P2(1)/c, respectively). Selection of the shortest (i.e. strongest) (Sb,As)-S bonds permitted to enhance the polymeric organization of (Sb,As) atoms with triangular pyramidal coordination. These two quasi-homeotypic structures are expanded derivatives of owyheeite, Ag(3)Pb(10)Sb(11)S(28). The hierarchy of organization levels from zero- to three-dimensional entities is subordinated to building operators, which appear as the driving force for the construction of such complex structures. Minor cations (Ag, Cu) or the As-As pair in sterryite secure the final locking, which favours the formation of one or the other compound. PMID:22992793

  1. An application of Ag(III) complex chemiluminescence system for the determination of enoxacin in capsule and biological fluid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiyun; Sun, Hanwen

    2010-01-01

    Ag(III) complex chemiluminescence (CL) system was applied for the determination of enoxacin (ENX). The CL conditions of [Ag(HIO(6))(2)](5-)-H(2)SO(4)-ENX systems without any luminescence reagent were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the CL intensity was proportional to the concentration of ENX in the range from 6.6 × 10(-5) to 3.3 × 10(-3) g/L. The limit of detection (s/n = 3) was 2.0 × 10(-5) g/L. The recovery of ENX from the spiked pharmaceutical preparations was in the range of 82.9-108% with a relative standard deviation of 1.9-3.0%. For spiked serum and urine samples the recovery of ENX was in the range of 83.7-110% with a relative standard deviation of 1.1-2.8%. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of the drug in capsule, serum and urine samples.

  2. Microstructural studies of AgNbO{sub 3} ceramic by using complex impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gangaprasad, K.; Rao, T. Durga; Niranjan, Manish K.; Asthana, Saket

    2015-06-24

    Lead-free piezoelectric silver niobate ceramic was synthesized by conventional solid state route. Room temperature X-ray diffraction pattern revealed that the sample crystallizes in single phase orthorhombic perovskite structure. Scanning electron micrographs of AgNbO{sub 3} ceramic showed that the average grain size is in the range 2–3 µm. The electrical properties were investigated by using impedance spectroscopy. Appearance of single semicircular arc in the Nyquist plot indicated the presence of grain contribution in the sample. Single RC parallel circuit model was employed to extract bulk capacitance (C{sub b}), resistance (R{sub b}) and electrical conductivity (σ{sub b}). The activation energy calculated from impedance and modulus data indicate that same types of charge carriers (oxygen vacancy movements) are responsible for conduction and relaxation.

  3. Microstructural studies of AgNbO3 ceramic by using complex impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangaprasad, K.; Rao, T. Durga; Niranjan, Manish K.; Asthana, Saket

    2015-06-01

    Lead-free piezoelectric silver niobate ceramic was synthesized by conventional solid state route. Room temperature X-ray diffraction pattern revealed that the sample crystallizes in single phase orthorhombic perovskite structure. Scanning electron micrographs of AgNbO3 ceramic showed that the average grain size is in the range 2-3 µm. The electrical properties were investigated by using impedance spectroscopy. Appearance of single semicircular arc in the Nyquist plot indicated the presence of grain contribution in the sample. Single RC parallel circuit model was employed to extract bulk capacitance (Cb), resistance (Rb) and electrical conductivity (σb). The activation energy calculated from impedance and modulus data indicate that same types of charge carriers (oxygen vacancy movements) are responsible for conduction and relaxation.

  4. Accelerating the Computation of Detailed Chemical Reaction Kinetics for Simulating Combustion of Complex Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, Ray W

    2012-01-01

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels has been a very challenging scientific and engineering problem due to the complexity of turbulent flows and hydrocarbon reaction kinetics. There is an urgent need to develop an efficient modeling capability to accurately predict the combustion of complex fuels. Detailed chemical kinetic models for the surrogates of fuels such as gasoline, diesel and JP-8 consist of thousands of chemical species and Arrhenius reaction steps. Oxygenated fuels such as bio-fuels and heavier hydrocarbons, such as from newer fossil fuel sources, are expected to have a much more complex chemistry requiring increasingly larger chemical kinetic models. Such models are beyond current computational capability, except for homogeneous or partially stirred reactor type calculations. The advent of highly parallel multi-core processors and graphical processing units (GPUs) promises a steep increase in computational performance in the coming years. This paper will present a software framework that translates the detailed chemical kinetic models to high- performance code targeted for GPU accelerators.

  5. Accelerated acidification by inoculation with a microbial consortia in a complex open environment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiadong; Zhao, Ye; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Yubin; Wu, Jingwei; Yuan, Xufeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Cui, Zongjun

    2016-09-01

    Bioaugmentation using microbial consortia is helpful in some anaerobic digestion (AD) systems, but accelerated acidification to produce methane has not been performed effectively with corn stalks and cow dung. In this study, the thermophilic microbial consortia MC1 was inoculated into a complex open environment (unsterilized and sterilized systems) to evaluate the feasibility of bioaugmentation to improve acidification efficiency. The results indicated that MC1 itself degraded lignocellulose efficiently, and accumulated more organic acids within 3days. Similar trends were also observed in the unsterilized system, where the hemicellulose degradation rate and organic acid concentrations increased significantly by two-fold and 20.1% (P<0.05), respectively, and clearly reduced the loss of product. Microbial composition did not change obviously after inoculating MC1, but the abundance of members of MC1, such as Bacillus and Clostridium, increased clearly on day 3. Finally, the acidogenic fluid improved methane yield significantly (P<0.05) via bioaugmentation. PMID:27253477

  6. Synthesis, characterization of Ag(I), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of a triazine-3-thione and their interactions with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Shuyan; Yang, Lin; Fan, Changqing

    2007-11-01

    Ag(I), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of 5-methoxy-5,6-diphenyl-4,5-dihydro-2H-[1,2,4]triazine-3-thione (LH(2)OCH(3)) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, (1)H NMR, IR spectra, UV spectra and thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The components of the three complexes are [Ag(C(15)H(10)N(3)S)](6), Pd(C(15)H(10)N(3)S)(2) and Pt(C(15)H(10)N(3)S)(2).C(3)H(6)O.2H(2)O, respectively. All the complexes are nonelectrolyte and have high thermodynamic stability. The ligand may act as bidentate NS donor for Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes, while it seems to be bidentate NS bridging via sulphur atom for Ag(I) complex. A planar quadrangular structure is proposed for Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes and Ag(I) complex may be a hexanuclear cluster. Their interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) are investigated using steady state fluorescence technology. It is observed that all of them can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through static quenching procedure. The binding constants (K(A)) at different temperatures, thermodynamic parameters enthalpy changes (DeltaH) and entropy changes (DeltaS) between BSA and the compounds are calculated. Based on the values of DeltaH and DeltaS, it is judged that the main acting force of PtL(2).C(3)H(6)O.2H(2)O with BSA may be electrostatic interaction, and for the LH(2)OCH(3), Ag(6)L(6) and PdL(2), hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions may be involved in their binding processes.

  7. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy of pyridine on Ag electrodes. Surface complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinger, B.; Wtzel, H.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental evidence is given for surface complexes consisting of metal-adatom, pyridine and halide ions with which the surface enhanced Raman process can occur. A large part of the enhanced continuum turns out to result from a super-position of numerous extremely weak SER lines attributed to these complexes.

  8. Chitosan oligosaccharide-Ca complex accelerates the depuration of cadmium from Chlamys ferrari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoqing; Sun, Jipeng; Wang, Dongfeng; Xu, Ying; Xu, Wei

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of a chitosan oligosaccharide-Ca complex (COS-Ca) on the depuration of cadmium (Cd) from Chlamys ferrari. After exposure to 0.5 mg L-1 CdCl2 for 3 or 7 d, the scallops were treated by COS-Ca prior to determination of Cd, calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) contents, Cd distribution in organs, malondialdehyde (MDA) content and antioxidant variables. Results showed that COS-Ca reduced Cd content in the viscera of the scallops, with highest Cd depuration rate (47%) observed on day 3. The COS-Ca concentration substantially affected Cd depuration, and the exposure to 8.75 mg L-1 COS-Ca led to significantly higher Cd depuration rate compared with those of lower COS-Ca concentrations (1.75, 3.5, 5.25, and 7.00 mg L-1). Distribution analysis of Cd in scallop organs indicated that COS-Ca significantly reduced Cd content in the kidney throughout the 5-d experiment, as well as in the gill during the early stage of Cd depuration. In addition, COS-Ca treatment decreased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and MDA content while increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities on different days. Our work suggested COS-Ca complex treatment as an effective method for acceleration of Cd depuration from Cd-contaminated bivalves.

  9. Stable -ESiMe3 Complexes of Cu(I) and Ag(I) (E=S, Se) with NHCs: Synthons in Ternary Nanocluster Assembly.

    PubMed

    Azizpoor Fard, Mahmood; Levchenko, Tetyana I; Cadogan, Carolyn; Humenny, William J; Corrigan, John F

    2016-03-18

    As a part of efforts to prepare new "metallachalcogenolate" precursors and develop their chemistry for the formation of ternary mixed-metal chalcogenide nanoclusters, two sets of thermally stable, N-heterocyclic carbene metal-chalcogenolate complexes of the general formula [(IPr)Ag-ESiMe3] (IPr=1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazolin-2-ylidene; E=S, 1; Se, 2) and [(iPr2-bimy)Cu-ESiMe3]2 (iPr2-bimy=1,3-diisopropylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene; E=S, 4; Se, 5) are reported. These are prepared from the reaction between the corresponding carbene metal acetate, [(IPr)AgOAc] and [(iPr-bimy)CuOAc] respectively, and E(SiMe3 )2 at low temperature. The reaction of [(IPr)Ag-ESiMe3] 1 with mercury(II) acetate affords the heterometallic complex [{(IPr)AgS}2Hg] 3 containing two (IPr)Ag-S(-) fragments bonded to a central Hg(II), representing a mixed mercury-silver sulfide complex. The reaction of [(iPr2-bimy)Cu-SSiMe3]2, which contains a smaller N-heterocyclic-carbene, with mercuric(II) acetate affords the high nuclearity cluster, [(iPr2-bimy)6Cu10S8Hg3]6. The new N-heterocyclic carbene metal-chalcogenolate complexes 1, 2, 4, 5 and the ternary mixed-metal chalcogenolate complex 3 and cluster 6 have been characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy ((1)H and (13)C), elemental analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. PMID:26865473

  10. Photoinduced electron transfer of DNA/Ag nanoclusters modulated by G-quadruplex/hemin complex for the construction of versatile biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libing; Zhu, Jinbo; Guo, Shaojun; Li, Tao; Li, Jing; Wang, Erkang

    2013-02-20

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) has been observed for the first time between DNA/Ag fluorescent nanoclusters (NCs) and G-quadruplex/hemin complexes, accompanied by a decrease in the fluorescence of the DNA/Ag NCs. In this PET process, a parallel G-quadruplex and the sensing sequences are blocked by a duplex. The specific combination of targets with the sensing sequence triggers the release of the G-quadruplex and allows it to fold properly and bind hemin to form a stable G-quadruplex/hemin complex. The complex proves favorable for PET because it makes the G-quadruplex bind hemin tightly, which promotes the electron transfer from the DNA/Ag NCs to the hemin Fe(III) center, thus resulting in a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of the DNA/Ag NCs. This novel PET system enables the specific and versatile detection of target biomolecules such as DNA and ATP with high sensitivity based on the choices of different target sequences.

  11. Multi-core CPU or GPU-accelerated Multiscale Modeling for Biomolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tao; Zhang, Yongjie; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Cheng, Yuhui; Michailova, Anushka; McCulloch, Andrew D; Holst, Michael; McCammon, J Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Multi-scale modeling plays an important role in understanding the structure and biological functionalities of large biomolecular complexes. In this paper, we present an efficient computational framework to construct multi-scale models from atomic resolution data in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), which is accelerated by multi-core CPU and programmable Graphics Processing Units (GPU). A multi-level summation of Gaus-sian kernel functions is employed to generate implicit models for biomolecules. The coefficients in the summation are designed as functions of the structure indices, which specify the structures at a certain level and enable a local resolution control on the biomolecular surface. A method called neighboring search is adopted to locate the grid points close to the expected biomolecular surface, and reduce the number of grids to be analyzed. For a specific grid point, a KD-tree or bounding volume hierarchy is applied to search for the atoms contributing to its density computation, and faraway atoms are ignored due to the decay of Gaussian kernel functions. In addition to density map construction, three modes are also employed and compared during mesh generation and quality improvement to generate high quality tetrahedral meshes: CPU sequential, multi-core CPU parallel and GPU parallel. We have applied our algorithm to several large proteins and obtained good results.

  12. Applying accelerator mass spectrometry for low-level detection of complex engineered nanoparticles in biological media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binghui; Jackson, George S; Yokel, Robert A; Grulke, Eric A

    2014-08-01

    Complex engineered nanoparticles (CENPs), which have different core and surface components, are being developed for medicinal, pharmaceutical and industrial applications. One of the key challenges for environmental health and safety assessments of CENPs is to identify and quantity their transformations in biological environments. This study reports the effects of in vivo exposure of citrate-coated nanoalumina with different rare isotope labels on each component. This CENP was dosed to the rat and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to quantify (26)Al, (14)C, and their ratio in the dosing material and tissue samples. For CENPs detected in the liver, the rare isotope ratio, (14)C/(26)Al, was 87% of the dosing material's ratio. The citrate coating on the nanoalumina in the liver was stable or, if it degraded, its metabolites were incorporated with nearby tissues. However, in brain and bone where little alumina was detected, the rare isotope ratio greatly exceeded that of the dosing material. Therefore, in the animal, citrate dissociated from CENPs and redistributed to brain and bone. Tracking both the core and surface components by AMS presents a new approach for characterizing transformations of CENPs components in biological milieu or environments.

  13. A new slip stacking RF system for a twofold power upgrade of Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Madrak, Robyn

    2014-09-11

    Fermilab@?s Accelerator Complex has been recently upgraded, in order to increase the 120GeV proton beam power on target from about 400kW to over 700kW for NO@nA and other future intensity frontier experiments. One of the key ingredients of the upgrade is the offloading of some Main Injector synchrotron operations - beam injection and RF manipulation called ''slip stacking'' - to the 8GeV Recycler Ring, which had until recently been used only for low-intensity antiproton storage and cooling. This required construction of two new 53MHz RF systems for the slip-stacking manipulations. The cavities operate simultaneously at V_p_e_a_k@?150kV, but at slightly different frequencies (@Df=1260Hz). Their installation was completed in September 2013. This paper describes the novel solutions used in the design of the new cavities, their tuning system, and the associated high power RF system. First results showing effective operation of the RF system, beam capture and successful slip-stacking in the Recycler Ring are presented.

  14. Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Increases Protein Acetylation and Accelerates Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Karamanlidis, Georgios; Lee, Chi Fung; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Suthammarak, Wichit; Gong, Guohua; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Morgan, Philip G.; Wang, Wang; Tian, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of multiple diseases including heart failure but the specific mechanisms for this link remain largely elusive. We modeled the impairment of mitochondrial respiration by inactivation of the Ndufs4 gene, a protein critical for Complex I (C-I) assembly, in the mouse heart (cKO). While C-I supported respiration decreased by >40%, the cKO mice maintained normal cardiac function in vivo and high-energy phosphate content in isolated perfused hearts. However, the cKO mice developed accelerated heart failure after pressure overload or repeated pregnancy. Decreased NAD+/NADH ratio by C-I deficiency inhibited Sirt3 activity, leading to increase in protein acetylation, and sensitization of the permeability transition in mitochondria (mPTP). NAD+ precursor supplementation to cKO mice partially normalized the NAD+/NADH ratio, protein acetylation and mPTP sensitivity. These findings describe a mechanism connecting mitochondrial dysfunction to the susceptibility to diseases and propose a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23931755

  15. New Models of Solar Wind Acceleration and Stream Interactions in the Sun's Topologically Complex Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, S. R.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Woolsey, L. N.

    2012-12-01

    The last decade has seen significant progress toward identifying and characterizing the processes that heat the corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is believed that the low-speed solar wind comes from a wide range of source regions in the corona, including streamers, pseudostreamers, active regions, and small coronal holes. These source regions tend to be associated with the most topologically complex magnetic fields, and it is unclear how the coronal field lines connect to the large-scale open heliospheric field. To learn more about these connections, we present new models of turbulence-driven coronal heating and solar wind acceleration along empirically constrained field lines. To begin, we chose a time period during which the footpoints linked to the ecliptic plane were rooted in Quiet Sun (QS) regions away from both large coronal holes and strong-field active regions. The weak and mixed-polarity QS field was observed at high resolution by the VSM instrument of SOLIS, and we extrapolated this field into the corona using the potential field source surface method. Time-steady 1D models of individual flux tubes were created with the ZEPHYR code (Cranmer et al. 2007) that solves the one-fluid equations of mass, momentum, and energy conservation from the photosphere to 4 AU. Then, to take account of stream-stream interactions between the flux tubes, we solved a 2D time-steady set of MHD conservation equations to determine the corotating longitudinal structure in the ecliptic plane. We aim to understand the extent to which fine-scale inter-tube plasma structures in the corona survive to large distances. In other words, we want to know how much of the coronal flux tube "spaghetti" is either shredded by turbulence or smeared out by stream interactions. We also plan to evaluate the level of high-resolution detail that is needed in coronal flux tube modeling in order to accurately predict the space weather consequences of various kinds of corotating structures in the

  16. Significant contribution of subtype G to HIV-1 genetic complexity in Nigeria identified by a newly developed subtyping assay specific for subtype G and CRF02_AG

    PubMed Central

    Heipertz, Richard A.; Ayemoba, Ojor; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Poltavee, Kultida; Pham, Phuc; Kijak, Gustavo H.; Lei, Esther; Bose, Meera; Howell, Shana; O'Sullivan, Anne Marie; Bates, Adam; Cervenka, Taylor; Kuroiwa, Janelle; Akintunde, Akindiran; Ibezim, Onyekachukwu; Alabi, Abraham; Okoye, Obumneke; Manak, Mark; Malia, Jennifer; Peel, Sheila; Maisaka, Mohammed; Singer, Darrell; O’Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Njoku, Ogbonnaya; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract While abundant sequence information is available from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE for HIV-1 vaccine design, sequences from West Africa are less represented. We sought to augment our understanding of HIV-1 variants circulating in 6 Nigerian cities as a step to subsequent HIV-1 vaccine development. The G/CRF02_AG multi-region hybridization assay (MHA) was developed to differentiate subtype G, CRF02_AG and their recombinants from other subtypes based on 7 HIV-1 segments. Plasma from 224 HIV-1 infected volunteers enrolled in a cohort examining HIV-1 prevalence, risk factor, and subtype from Makurdi (30), Abuja (18), Enugu (11), Kaduna (12), Tafa (95), and Ojo/Lagos (58) was analyzed using MHA. HIV-1 genomes from 42 samples were sequenced to validate the MHA and fully explore the recombinant structure of G and CRF02_AG variants. The sensitivity and specificity of MHA varied between 73–100% and 90–100%, respectively. The subtype distribution as identified by MHA among 224 samples revealed 38% CRF02_AG, 28% G, and 26% G/CRF02_AG recombinants while 8% remained nontypeable strains. In envelope (env) gp120, 38.84% of the samples reacted to a G probe while 31.25% reacted to a CRF02 (subtype A) probe. Full genome characterization of 42 sequences revealed the complexity of Nigerian HIV-1 variants. CRF02_AG, subtype G, and their recombinants were the major circulating HIV-1 variants in 6 Nigerian cities. High proportions of samples reacted to a G probe in env gp120 confirms that subtype G infections are abundant and should be considered in strategies for global HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27512845

  17. Significant contribution of subtype G to HIV-1 genetic complexity in Nigeria identified by a newly developed subtyping assay specific for subtype G and CRF02_AG.

    PubMed

    Heipertz, Richard A; Ayemoba, Ojor; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Poltavee, Kultida; Pham, Phuc; Kijak, Gustavo H; Lei, Esther; Bose, Meera; Howell, Shana; OʼSullivan, Anne Marie; Bates, Adam; Cervenka, Taylor; Kuroiwa, Janelle; Akintunde, Akindiran; Ibezim, Onyekachukwu; Alabi, Abraham; Okoye, Obumneke; Manak, Mark; Malia, Jennifer; Peel, Sheila; Maisaka, Mohammed; Singer, Darrell; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Njoku, Ogbonnaya; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2016-08-01

    While abundant sequence information is available from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE for HIV-1 vaccine design, sequences from West Africa are less represented. We sought to augment our understanding of HIV-1 variants circulating in 6 Nigerian cities as a step to subsequent HIV-1 vaccine development.The G/CRF02_AG multi-region hybridization assay (MHA) was developed to differentiate subtype G, CRF02_AG and their recombinants from other subtypes based on 7 HIV-1 segments. Plasma from 224 HIV-1 infected volunteers enrolled in a cohort examining HIV-1 prevalence, risk factor, and subtype from Makurdi (30), Abuja (18), Enugu (11), Kaduna (12), Tafa (95), and Ojo/Lagos (58) was analyzed using MHA. HIV-1 genomes from 42 samples were sequenced to validate the MHA and fully explore the recombinant structure of G and CRF02_AG variants.The sensitivity and specificity of MHA varied between 73-100% and 90-100%, respectively. The subtype distribution as identified by MHA among 224 samples revealed 38% CRF02_AG, 28% G, and 26% G/CRF02_AG recombinants while 8% remained nontypeable strains. In envelope (env) gp120, 38.84% of the samples reacted to a G probe while 31.25% reacted to a CRF02 (subtype A) probe. Full genome characterization of 42 sequences revealed the complexity of Nigerian HIV-1 variants.CRF02_AG, subtype G, and their recombinants were the major circulating HIV-1 variants in 6 Nigerian cities. High proportions of samples reacted to a G probe in env gp120 confirms that subtype G infections are abundant and should be considered in strategies for global HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27512845

  18. Ab initio nonadiabatic dynamics of multichromophore complexes: a scalable graphical-processing-unit-accelerated exciton framework.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Aaron; Glowacki, David R; Martinez, Todd J

    2014-09-16

    ("fragmenting") a molecular system and then stitching it back together. In this Account, we address both of these problems, the first by using graphical processing units (GPUs) and electronic structure algorithms tuned for these architectures and the second by using an exciton model as a framework in which to stitch together the solutions of the smaller problems. The multitiered parallel framework outlined here is aimed at nonadiabatic dynamics simulations on large supramolecular multichromophoric complexes in full atomistic detail. In this framework, the lowest tier of parallelism involves GPU-accelerated electronic structure theory calculations, for which we summarize recent progress in parallelizing the computation and use of electron repulsion integrals (ERIs), which are the major computational bottleneck in both density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The topmost tier of parallelism relies on a distributed memory framework, in which we build an exciton model that couples chromophoric units. Combining these multiple levels of parallelism allows access to ground and excited state dynamics for large multichromophoric assemblies. The parallel excitonic framework is in good agreement with much more computationally demanding TDDFT calculations of the full assembly. PMID:25186064

  19. [(B3O3H3)(n)M]+ (n = 1, 2;M = Cu, Ag, Au): a new class of metal-cation complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Zhi; Dong, Chen-Chu; Zhang, Shi-Guo

    2013-08-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) investigation into the structures and bonding characteristics of [(B3O3H3)nM](+)(n = 1, 2;M = Cu, Ag, Au) complexes was performed. DFT calculations and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses indicate that the ΙB metal complexes of boroxine exhibit intriguing bonding characteristics, different from the typical cation-π interactions between ΙB metal-cations and benzene. The complexes of [B3O3H3M](+) and [(B3O3H3)2 M](+) (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) favor the conformation of perfectly planar structures with the C2v and D2h symmetry along one of the threefold molecular axes of boroxine, respectively. Detailed natural resonance theory (NRT) and canonical molecular orbitals (CMOs) analyses show that interaction between the metal cation and the boroxine in [B3O3H3M](+) (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) is mainly ionic, while the ΙB metal-cations←π donation effect is responsible for the binding site. In these complexes, boroxine serves as terminals η(1)-B3O3H3 with one O atom of the B3O3 ring. The infra-red (IR) spectra of [B3O3H3M](+) were simulated to facilitate their future experimental characterization. The complexes all give two IR active modes at about 1,300 and 2,700 cm(-1), which are inactive in pure boroxine. Simultaneously, the B-H stretching modes of the complexes are red-shifted due to the interaction between the metal-cation and boroxine. To explore the possibility of the structural pattern developed in this work forming mesoporous materials, complexes [(B3O3H3M)6](6+) (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) were also studied, which appear to be unique and particular interesting: they are all true minima with D6h symmetries and pore sizes ranging from 12.04 Å to 13.65 Å. PMID:23636641

  20. Prototype of a test bench for applied research on Extracted beams of the nuclotron accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Bradnova, V.; Butenko, A. V.; Fedorov, A. N.; Kudashkin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    The results of the development and testing of elements of a test bench for investigating the impact of accelerated particle beams on biological objects, electronics, and other targets are presented. The systems for beam monitoring and target positioning were tested on extracted argon beams in the framework of experiments on studying the radiation hardness of electronic components.

  1. Particle acceleration in a complex solar active region modelled by a Cellular automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2004-12-01

    The models of cellular automat allowed to reproduce successfully several statistical properties of the solar flares. We use a cellular automat model based on the concept of self-organised critical system to model the evolution of the magnetic energy released in an eruptive active area. Each burst of magnetic energy released is assimilated to a process of magnetic reconnection. We will thus generate several current layers (RCS) where the particles are accelerated by a direct electric field. We calculate the energy gain of the particles (ions and electrons) for various types of magnetic configuration. We calculate the distribution function of the kinetic energy of the particles after their interactions with a given number of RCS for each type of configurations. We show that the relative efficiency of the acceleration of the electrons and the ions depends on the selected configuration.

  2. Particle acceleration and radiation in flaring complex solar active regions modeled by cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2007-06-01

    Context: We study the acceleration and radiation of electrons and ions interacting with multiple small-scale dissipation regions resulting from the magnetic energy release process. Aims: We aim to calculate the distribution functions of the kinetic energy of the particles and the X-ray spectra and γ-ray fluxes produced by the accelerated particles. Methods: The evolution of the magnetic energy released in an active region is mimicked by a cellular automaton model based on the concept of self-organized criticality. Each burst of magnetic energy release is associated with a reconnecting current sheet (RCS) in which the particles are accelerated by a direct electric field. Results: We calculate the energy gain of the particles (ions and electrons) for three different magnetic configurations of the RCS after their interactions with a given number of RCS. We finally compare our results with existing observations. Conclusions: The results of our simulation can reproduce several properties of the observations such as variable electron and ion energy contents and γ-ray line ratio. Even if very flat X-ray spectra have been reported in a few events, the X-ray spectra produced in this model are too flat when compared to most X-ray observations.

  3. Polynuclear Gold [AuI]4, [AuI]8, and Bimetallic [AuI 4AgI] Complexes: C−H Functionalization of Carbonyl Compounds and Homogeneous Carbonylation of Amines

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Ekaterina S.; Muñoz Molina, José M.; Johnson, Alice; Bandeira, Nuno A. G.; Bo, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis of tetranuclear gold complexes, a structurally unprecedented octanuclear complex with a planar [AuI 8] core, and pentanuclear [AuI 4MI] (M=Cu, Ag) complexes is presented. The linear [AuI 4] complex undergoes C−H functionalization of carbonyl compounds under mild reaction conditions. In addition, [AuI 4AgI] catalyzes the carbonylation of primary amines to form ureas under homogeneous conditions with efficiencies higher than those achieved by gold nanoparticles. PMID:27167611

  4. Different structural preference of Ag(I) and Au(I) in neutral and cationic luminescent heteropolynuclear platinum(II) complexes: Z (U)-shaped Pt2M2 type vs. trinuclear PtM2 type.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Kazuki; Ueda, Misa; Higashitani, Ami; Nakao, Yoshihide; Arikawa, Yasuhiro; Horiuchi, Shinnosuke; Sakuda, Eri; Umakoshi, Keisuke

    2016-03-28

    The reactions of monocationic Pt(II) complexes bearing N^C chelate ligands and Me2pzH, [Pt(N^C)(Me2pzH)2]PF6 (N^C = 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy(-)), 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridinate (dfppy(-)), benzo[h]quinolinate (bzq(-)); Me2pzH = 3,5-dimethylpyrazole), with Ag(I) ions gave Z (or U)-shaped neutral tetranuclear Pt2Ag2 complexes [Pt2Ag2(N^C)2(Me2pz)4], while those with Au(I) ions gave neutral trinuclear PtAu2 complexes [PtAu2(N^C)(Me2pz)3]. On the contrary, the reactions of the dicationic Pt(II) complex bearing a N^N chelate ligand and Me2pzH, [Pt(bpy)(Me2pzH)2](PF6)2 (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), with Ag(I) and Au(I) ions both gave Z (or U)-shaped dicationic tetranuclear Pt2M2 complexes, [Pt2M2(bpy)2(Me2pz)4](PF6)2 (M = Ag, Au). The structures of heteropolynuclear Pt(II) complexes were dominated by the nature of incorporated group 11 metal ions and the charge of complexes.

  5. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  6. Shedding Light on the Photochemistry of Coinage-Metal Phosphorescent Materials: A Time-Resolved Laue Diffraction Study of an AgI-CuI Tetranuclear Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kami,; #324; ski, Radoslaw; Fournier, Bertrand; Trzop, El; #380; bieta,; Sokolow, Jesse D.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yang; Coppens, Philip

    2014-11-14

    The triplet excited state of a new crystalline form of a tetranuclear coordination d10–d10-type complex, Ag2Cu2L4 (L = 2-diphenylphosphino-3-methylindole ligand), containing AgI and CuI metal centers has been explored using the Laue pump–probe technique with ≈80 ps time resolution. The relatively short lifetime of 1 μs is accompanied by significant photoinduced structural changes, as large as the Ag1···Cu2 distance shortening by 0.59(3) Å. The results show a pronounced strengthening of the argentophilic interactions and formation of new Ag···Cu bonds on excitation. Theoretical calculations indicate that the structural changes are due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) strengthening the Ag···Ag interaction, mainly occurring from the methylindole ligands to the silver metal centers. QM/MM optimizations of the ground and excited states of the complex support the experimental results. Comparison with isolated molecule optimizations demonstrates the restricting effect of the crystalline matrix on photoinduced distortions. The work represents the first time-resolved Laue diffraction study of a heteronuclear coordination complex and provides new information on the nature of photoresponse of coinage metal complexes, which have been the subject of extensive studies.

  7. Tsallis entropy and complexity theory in the understanding of physics of precursory accelerating seismicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, Filippos; Chatzopoulos, George

    2014-05-01

    Strong observational indications support the hypothesis that many large earthquakes are preceded by accelerating seismic release rates which described by a power law time to failure relation. In the present work, a unified theoretical framework is discussed based on the ideas of non-extensive statistical physics along with fundamental principles of physics such as the energy conservation in a faulted crustal volume undergoing stress loading. We derive the time-to-failure power-law of: a) cumulative number of earthquakes, b) cumulative Benioff strain and c) cumulative energy released in a fault system that obeys a hierarchical distribution law extracted from Tsallis entropy. Considering the analytic conditions near the time of failure, we derive from first principles the time-to-failure power-law and show that a common critical exponent m(q) exists, which is a function of the non-extensive entropic parameter q. We conclude that the cumulative precursory parameters are function of the energy supplied to the system and the size of the precursory volume. In addition the q-exponential distribution which describes the fault system is a crucial factor on the appearance of power-law acceleration in the seismicity. Our results based on Tsallis entropy and the energy conservation gives a new view on the empirical laws derived by other researchers. Examples and applications of this technique to observations of accelerating seismicity will also be presented and discussed. This work was implemented through the project IMPACT-ARC in the framework of action "ARCHIMEDES III-Support of Research Teams at TEI of Crete" (MIS380353) of the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" and is co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national funds

  8. Accelerating the Association of the Most Stable Protein-Ligand Complex by More than Two Orders of Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Giese, Christoph; Eras, Jonathan; Kern, Anne; Schärer, Martin A; Capitani, Guido; Glockshuber, Rudi

    2016-08-01

    The complex between the bacterial type 1 pilus subunit FimG and the peptide corresponding to the N-terminal extension (termed donor strand, Ds) of the partner subunit FimF (DsF) shows the strongest reported noncovalent molecular interaction, with a dissociation constant (KD ) of 1.5×10(-20)  m. However, the complex only exhibits a slow association rate of 330 m(-1)  s(-1) that limits technical applications, such as its use in affinity purification. Herein, a structure-based approach was used to design pairs of FimGt (a FimG variant lacking its own N-terminal extension) and DsF variants with enhanced electrostatic surface complementarity. Association of the best mutant FimGt/DsF pairs was accelerated by more than two orders of magnitude, while the dissociation rates and 3D structures of the improved complexes remained essentially unperturbed. A KD  value of 8.8×10(-22)  m was obtained for the best mutant complex, which is the lowest value reported to date for a protein/ligand complex. PMID:27351462

  9. Accelerating the Association of the Most Stable Protein-Ligand Complex by More than Two Orders of Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Giese, Christoph; Eras, Jonathan; Kern, Anne; Schärer, Martin A; Capitani, Guido; Glockshuber, Rudi

    2016-08-01

    The complex between the bacterial type 1 pilus subunit FimG and the peptide corresponding to the N-terminal extension (termed donor strand, Ds) of the partner subunit FimF (DsF) shows the strongest reported noncovalent molecular interaction, with a dissociation constant (KD ) of 1.5×10(-20)  m. However, the complex only exhibits a slow association rate of 330 m(-1)  s(-1) that limits technical applications, such as its use in affinity purification. Herein, a structure-based approach was used to design pairs of FimGt (a FimG variant lacking its own N-terminal extension) and DsF variants with enhanced electrostatic surface complementarity. Association of the best mutant FimGt/DsF pairs was accelerated by more than two orders of magnitude, while the dissociation rates and 3D structures of the improved complexes remained essentially unperturbed. A KD  value of 8.8×10(-22)  m was obtained for the best mutant complex, which is the lowest value reported to date for a protein/ligand complex.

  10. BaFe12O19-chitosan Schiff-base Ag (I) complexes embedded in carbon nanotube networks for high-performance electromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Xie, Yu; Guan, Dongsheng; Hua, Helin; Zhong, Rong; Qin, Yuancheng; Fang, Jing; Liu, Huilong; Chen, Junhong

    2015-07-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes/BaFe12O19-chitosan (MCNTs/BF-CS) Schiff base Ag (I) complex composites were synthesized successfully by a chemical bonding method. The morphology and structures of the composites were characterized with electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Their conductive properties were measured using a four-probe conductivity tester at room temperature, and their magnetic properties were tested by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The results show that the BF-CS Schiff base Ag (I) complexes are embedded into MCNT networks. When the mass ratio of MCNTs and BF-CS Schiff base is 0.95:1, the conductivity, Ms (saturation magnetization), Mr (residual magnetization), and Hc (coercivity) of the BF-CS Schiff base composites reach 1.908 S cm-1, 28.20 emu g-1, 16.66 emu g-1 and 3604.79 Oe, respectively. Finally, a possible magnetic mechanism of the composites has also been proposed.

  11. BaFe12O19-chitosan Schiff-base Ag (I) complexes embedded in carbon nanotube networks for high-performance electromagnetic materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie; Xie, Yu; Guan, Dongsheng; Hua, Helin; Zhong, Rong; Qin, Yuancheng; Fang, Jing; Liu, Huilong; Chen, Junhong

    2015-01-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes/BaFe12O19-chitosan (MCNTs/BF-CS) Schiff base Ag (I) complex composites were synthesized successfully by a chemical bonding method. The morphology and structures of the composites were characterized with electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Their conductive properties were measured using a four-probe conductivity tester at room temperature, and their magnetic properties were tested by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The results show that the BF-CS Schiff base Ag (I) complexes are embedded into MCNT networks. When the mass ratio of MCNTs and BF-CS Schiff base is 0.95:1, the conductivity, Ms (saturation magnetization), Mr (residual magnetization), and Hc (coercivity) of the BF-CS Schiff base composites reach 1.908 S cm−1, 28.20 emu g−1, 16.66 emu g−1 and 3604.79 Oe, respectively. Finally, a possible magnetic mechanism of the composites has also been proposed. PMID:26218269

  12. Using Narrative Intervention to Accelerate Canonical Story Grammar and Complex Language Growth in Culturally Diverse Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Douglas B.; Spencer, Trina D.

    2016-01-01

    Oral narratives are a commonly used, meaningful means of communication that reflects academic language. New state curriculum standards include narrative-related language expectations for young school-age children, including story grammar and complex language. This article provides a review of preschool narrative-based language intervention…

  13. Finite difference method accelerated with sparse solvers for structural analysis of the metal-organic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, A. A.; Guda, S. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Bugaev, A. L.; Lamberti, C.; Gawelda, W.; Bressler, C.; Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A. V.; Joly, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) implemented in the FDMNES software [Phys. Rev. B, 2001, 63, 125120] was revised. Thorough analysis shows, that the calculated diagonal in the FDM matrix consists of about 96% zero elements. Thus a sparse solver would be more suitable for the problem instead of traditional Gaussian elimination for the diagonal neighbourhood. We have tried several iterative sparse solvers and the direct one MUMPS solver with METIS ordering turned out to be the best. Compared to the Gaussian solver present method is up to 40 times faster and allows XANES simulations for complex systems already on personal computers. We show applicability of the software for metal-organic [Fe(bpy)3]2+ complex both for low spin and high spin states populated after laser excitation.

  14. HDF5-FastQuery: Accelerating Complex Queries on HDF Datasets usingFast Bitmap Indices

    SciTech Connect

    Gosink, Luke; Shalf, John; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng; Bethel,Wes

    2006-03-30

    Large scale scientific data is often stored in scientific data formats such as FITS, netCDF and HDF. These storage formats are of particular interest to the scientific user community since they provide multi-dimensional storage and retrieval. However, one of the drawbacks of these storage formats is that they do not support semantic indexing which is important for interactive data analysis where scientists look for features of interests such as ''Find all supernova explosions where energy > 10{sup 5} and temperature > 10{sup 6}''. In this paper we present a novel approach called HDF5-FastQuery to accelerate the data access of large HDF5 files by introducing multi-dimensional semantic indexing. Our implementation leverages an efficient indexing technology called bitmap indexing that has been widely used in the database community. Bitmap indices are especially well suited for interactive exploration of large-scale read only data. Storing the bitmap indices into the HDF5 file has the following advantages: (a) Significant performance speedup of accessing subsets of multi-dimensional data and (b) portability of the indices across multiple computer platforms. We will present an API that simplifies the execution of queries on HDF5 files for general scientific applications and data analysis. The design is flexible enough to accommodate the use of arbitrary indexing technology for semantic range queries. We will also provide a detailed performance analysis of HDF5-FastQuery for both synthetic and scientific data. The results demonstrate that our proposed approach for multi-dimensional queries is up to a factor of 2 faster than HDF5.

  15. HDF5-FastQuery: Accelerating Complex Queries on HDF Datasets UsingFast Bitmap Indices

    SciTech Connect

    Gosink, Luke; Shalf, John; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng; Bethel,Wes

    2005-12-07

    Large scale scientific data is often stored in scientific data formats such as FITS, netCDF and HDF. These storage formats are of particular interest to the scientific user community since they provide multi-dimensional storage and retrieval. However, one of the drawbacks of these storage formats is that they do not support semantic indexing which is important for interactive data analysis where scientists look for features of interests such as ''Find all supernova explosions where energy >105 and temperature >106''. In this paper we present a novel approach called HDF5-FastQuery to accelerate the data access of large HDF5 files by introducing multi-dimensional semantic indexing. Our implementation leverages an efficient indexing technology called ''bitmapindexing'' that has been widely used in the database community. Bitmapindices are especially well suited for interactive exploration of large-scale read-only data. Storing the bitmap indices into the HDF5 file has the following advantages: (a) Significant performance speedup of accessing subsets of multi-dimensional data and (b) portability of the indices across multiple computer platforms. We will present an API that simplifies the execution of queries on HDF5 files for general scientific applications and data analysis. The design is flexible enough to accommodate the use of arbitrary indexing technology for semantic range queries. We will also provide a detailed performance analysis of HDF5-FastQuery for both synthetic and scientific data. The results demonstrate that our proposed approach for multi-dimensional queries is up to a factor of 2 faster than HDF5.

  16. Development of a cryogenic load frame for the neutron diffractometer at Takumi in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Harjo, Stefanus; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Umeno, Takahiro; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sugano, Michinaka; Aizawa, Kazuya; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki

    2013-06-01

    To prepare for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider upgrade, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Demonstration reactor, it is important to form a clear understanding of stress-strain properties of the materials that make up superconducting magnets. Thus, we have been studying the mechanical properties of superconducting wires using neutron diffraction measurements. To simulate operational conditions such as temperature, stress, and strain, we developed a cryogenic load frame for stress-strain measurements of materials using a neutron diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Takumi beam line. The maximum load that can be applied to a sample using an external driving machine is 50 kN. Using a Gifford-MacMahon cryocooler, samples can be measured down to temperatures below 10 K when loaded. In the present paper, we describe the details of the cryogenic load frame with its test results by using type-304 stainless steel wire.

  17. Development of a cryogenic load frame for the neutron diffractometer at Takumi in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sugano, Michinaka; Harjo, Stefanus; Aizawa, Kazuya; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Umeno, Takahiro

    2013-06-15

    To prepare for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider upgrade, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Demonstration reactor, it is important to form a clear understanding of stress-strain properties of the materials that make up superconducting magnets. Thus, we have been studying the mechanical properties of superconducting wires using neutron diffraction measurements. To simulate operational conditions such as temperature, stress, and strain, we developed a cryogenic load frame for stress-strain measurements of materials using a neutron diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Takumi beam line. The maximum load that can be applied to a sample using an external driving machine is 50 kN. Using a Gifford-MacMahon cryocooler, samples can be measured down to temperatures below 10 K when loaded. In the present paper, we describe the details of the cryogenic load frame with its test results by using type-304 stainless steel wire.

  18. Synthesis and the crystal and molecular structure of the silver(I)-germanium(IV) polymeric complex with citrate anions {[Ag2Ge(H Cit)2(H2O)2] • 2H2O} n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, V. S.; Martsinko, E. E.; Seifullina, I. I.; Churakov, A. V.; Chebanenko, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of compound {[Ag2Ge(H Cit)2(H2O)2] • 2H2O} n , where H4 Cit is the citric acid, are performed. In the polymeric structure, the H Cit 3- ligand fulfils the tetradentate chelate-μ4-bridging (3Ag, Ge) function (tridentate with respect to Ge and Ag atoms). The Ge atom is octahedrally coordinated by six O atoms of two H Cit 3-ligands. The coordination polyhedron of the Ag atom is an irregular five-vertex polyhedron [four O atoms of four H Cit 3- ligands and the O(H2O) atom]. An extended system of O-H···O hydrogen bonds connects complex molecules into a supramolecular 3D-framework.

  19. Multiple Partial Siberian Snakes in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Hattori, T.; Lin, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized protons are accelerated up to 24.3 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). To accelerate the beam with preserving the polarization, two different types of helical dipole partial Siberian snake have been installed to the AGS. One is a superconducting magnet (Cold Snake, CSNK), and the other is a normal conducting one (Warm Snake, WSNK). With these snake magnets, the polarization at the AGS extraction achieved 65%. However, the AGS has spin mismatches at the injection and extraction. This description shows calculated results to have better spin matching with using two or three snakes.

  20. Photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on the structure and chemical binding of the mixed-ligand M(I) complexes, [HMSH]⁻ (M = Cu, Ag, and Au).

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhengbo; Liu, Zhiling; Cong, Ran; Xie, Hua; Tang, Zichao; Fan, Hongjun

    2014-03-21

    We have reported a combined photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on gaseous mixed-ligand M(I) complexes of [HMSH](-) (M = Cu, Ag, and Au). With the aid of Franck-Condon simulations, vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra yield accurate electron affinities of 3.269(6), 3.669(10), and 3.591(6) eV for [HCuSH], [HAgSH], and [HAuSH], respectively. And low-frequency modes are observed: 368(12) cm(-1) for [HCuSH], 286(12) cm(-1) for [HAgSH], and 327(12) cm(-1) for [HAuSH], respectively. Extensive theoretical calculations are performed to aid in the spectral assignments and the calculated values agree well with the experimental observations. Although the S and H atoms have little discrepancy in electronegativity (2.20 for H and 2.54 for S), distinct bonding properties are demonstrated between H-M and M-S bond. It is revealed that there exists significant ionic bonding between M-S in [HMSH](-) (M = Cu, Ag, and Au), while a gradual transition from ionic behavior between H-Cu in [HCuSH](-) to quite strong covalent bonding between H-Au in [HAuSH](-), supported by a variety of chemical bonding analyses.

  1. Photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on the structure and chemical binding of the mixed-ligand M(I) complexes, [HMSH]- (M = Cu, Ag, and Au)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhengbo; Liu, Zhiling; Cong, Ran; Xie, Hua; Tang, Zichao; Fan, Hongjun

    2014-03-01

    We have reported a combined photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on gaseous mixed-ligand M(I) complexes of [HMSH]- (M = Cu, Ag, and Au). With the aid of Franck-Condon simulations, vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra yield accurate electron affinities of 3.269(6), 3.669(10), and 3.591(6) eV for [HCuSH], [HAgSH], and [HAuSH], respectively. And low-frequency modes are observed: 368(12) cm-1 for [HCuSH], 286(12) cm-1 for [HAgSH], and 327(12) cm-1 for [HAuSH], respectively. Extensive theoretical calculations are performed to aid in the spectral assignments and the calculated values agree well with the experimental observations. Although the S and H atoms have little discrepancy in electronegativity (2.20 for H and 2.54 for S), distinct bonding properties are demonstrated between H-M and M-S bond. It is revealed that there exists significant ionic bonding between M-S in [HMSH]- (M = Cu, Ag, and Au), while a gradual transition from ionic behavior between H-Cu in [HCuSH]- to quite strong covalent bonding between H-Au in [HAuSH]-, supported by a variety of chemical bonding analyses.

  2. AGS preinjector improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, H.N.; Brodowski, J.; Gough, R.; Kponou, A.; Prelec, K.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Witkover, R.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, a polarized H/sup -/ source was installed to permit the acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS, using a low current, 750 keV RFQ Linear Accelerator as the preinjector. This RFQ was designed by LANL and has proved to be quite satisfactory and reliable. In order to improve the reliability and simplify maintenance of the overall AGS operations, it has been decided to replace one of the two 750 keV Cockcroft-Waltons (C-W) with an RFQ. The design of a new high current RFQ has been carried out by LBL and is also being constructed there. This paper describes the preinjector improvement project, centered around that RFQ, which is underway at BNL.

  3. Complex Stoichiometry-Dependent Reordering of 3,4,9,10-Perylenetetracarboxylic Dianhydride on Ag(111) upon K Intercalation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alkali metal atoms are frequently used for simple yet efficient n-type doping of organic semiconductors and as an ingredient of the recently discovered polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors. However, the incorporation of dopants from the gas phase into molecular crystal structures needs to be controlled and well understood in order to optimize the electronic properties (charge carrier density and mobility) of the target material. Here, we report that potassium intercalation into the pristine 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer domains on a Ag(111) substrate induces distinct stoichiometry-dependent structural reordering processes, resulting in highly ordered and large KxPTCDA domains. The emerging structures are analyzed by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy (ST[H]M), and low-energy electron diffraction as a function of the stoichiometry. The analysis of the measurements is corroborated by density functional theory calculations. These turn out to be essential for a correct interpretation of the experimental ST[H]M data. The epitaxy types for all intercalated stages are determined as point-on-line. The K atoms adsorb in the vicinity of the oxygen atoms of the PTCDA molecules, and their positions are determined with sub-Ångström precision. This is a crucial prerequisite for the prospective assessment of the electronic properties of such composite films, as they depend rather sensitively on the mutual alignment between donor atoms and acceptor molecules. Our results demonstrate that only the combination of experimental and theoretical approaches allows for an unambiguous explanation of the pronounced reordering of KxPTCDA/Ag(111) upon changing the K content. PMID:26718635

  4. Complex Stoichiometry-Dependent Reordering of 3,4,9,10-Perylenetetracarboxylic Dianhydride on Ag(111) upon K Intercalation.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Christian; Baby, Anu; Gruenewald, Marco; Verwüster, Elisabeth; Hofmann, Oliver T; Forker, Roman; Fratesi, Guido; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Zojer, Egbert; Fritz, Torsten

    2016-02-23

    Alkali metal atoms are frequently used for simple yet efficient n-type doping of organic semiconductors and as an ingredient of the recently discovered polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors. However, the incorporation of dopants from the gas phase into molecular crystal structures needs to be controlled and well understood in order to optimize the electronic properties (charge carrier density and mobility) of the target material. Here, we report that potassium intercalation into the pristine 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer domains on a Ag(111) substrate induces distinct stoichiometry-dependent structural reordering processes, resulting in highly ordered and large KxPTCDA domains. The emerging structures are analyzed by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy (ST[H]M), and low-energy electron diffraction as a function of the stoichiometry. The analysis of the measurements is corroborated by density functional theory calculations. These turn out to be essential for a correct interpretation of the experimental ST[H]M data. The epitaxy types for all intercalated stages are determined as point-on-line. The K atoms adsorb in the vicinity of the oxygen atoms of the PTCDA molecules, and their positions are determined with sub-Ångström precision. This is a crucial prerequisite for the prospective assessment of the electronic properties of such composite films, as they depend rather sensitively on the mutual alignment between donor atoms and acceptor molecules. Our results demonstrate that only the combination of experimental and theoretical approaches allows for an unambiguous explanation of the pronounced reordering of KxPTCDA/Ag(111) upon changing the K content.

  5. Oligo-nuclear silver thiocyanate complexes with monodentate tertiary phosphine ligands, including novel 'cubane' and 'step' tetramer forms of AgSCN : PR3 (1:1)4.

    PubMed

    Bowmaker, Graham A; Di Nicola, Corrado; Effendy; Hanna, John V; Healy, Peter C; King, Scott P; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Robinson, Ward T; Skelton, Brian W; Sobolev, Alexandre N; Tăbăcaru, Aurel; White, Allan H

    2013-01-01

    Adducts of a number of tertiary pnicogen ligands ER(3) (triphenyl-phosphine and -arsine (PPh(3),AsPh(3)), diphenyl,2-pyridylphosphine (PPh(2)py), tris(4-fluorophenyl)phosphine (P(C(6)H(4)-4F)(3)), tris(2-tolyl)phosphine (P(o-tol)(3)), tris(cyclohexyl)phosphine (PCy(3))), with silver(I) thiocyanate, AgSCN are structurally and spectroscopically characterized. The 1:3 AgSCN : ER(3) complexes structurally defined (for PPh(3),AsPh(3) (diversely solvated)) take the form [(R(3)E)(3)AgX], the thiocyanate X = NCS being N-bound, thus [(Ph(3)E)Ag(NCS)]. A 1:2 complex with PPh(2)py, takes the binuclear form [(pyPh(2)P)(2)Ag()Ag(PPh(2)py)(2)] with an eight-membered cyclic core. 1:1 complexes are defined with PPh(2)py, P(o-tol)(3) and PCy(3); binuclear forms [(R(3)P)Ag()Ag(PR(3))] are obtained with P(o-tol)(3) (two polymorphs), while novel isomeric tetranuclear forms, which may be envisaged as dimers of dimers, are obtained with PPh(2)py, and, as further polymorphs, with PCy(3); these latter may be considered as extensions of the 'cubane' and 'step' forms previously described for [(R(3)E)AgX](4) (X = halide) complexes. Solvent-assisted mechanochemical or solvent-assisted solid-state synthesis methods were employed in some cases, where complexes could not be obtained by conventional solution methods, or where such methods yielded a mixture of polymorphs unsuitable for solid-state spectroscopy. The wavenumbers of the ν(CN) bands in the IR spectra are in broad agreement with the empirical rule that distinguishes bridging from terminal bonding, but exceptions occur for compounds that have a double SCN bridged dimeric structure, and replacement of PPh(3) with PPh(2)py apparently causes a significant decrease in ν(CN) to well below the range expected for bridging SCN in these structures. (31)P CP MAS NMR spectra yield additional parameters that allow a correlation between the structures and spectra.

  6. Single cell genome amplification accelerates identification of the apratoxin biosynthetic pathway from a complex microbial assemblage.

    PubMed

    Grindberg, Rashel V; Ishoey, Thomas; Brinza, Dumitru; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Coates, R Cameron; Liu, Wei-ting; Gerwick, Lena; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Pevzner, Pavel; Lasken, Roger; Gerwick, William H

    2011-04-12

    Filamentous marine cyanobacteria are extraordinarily rich sources of structurally novel, biomedically relevant natural products. To understand their biosynthetic origins as well as produce increased supplies and analog molecules, access to the clustered biosynthetic genes that encode for the assembly enzymes is necessary. Complicating these efforts is the universal presence of heterotrophic bacteria in the cell wall and sheath material of cyanobacteria obtained from the environment and those grown in uni-cyanobacterial culture. Moreover, the high similarity in genetic elements across disparate secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways renders imprecise current gene cluster targeting strategies and contributes sequence complexity resulting in partial genome coverage. Thus, it was necessary to use a dual-method approach of single-cell genomic sequencing based on multiple displacement amplification (MDA) and metagenomic library screening. Here, we report the identification of the putative apratoxin. A biosynthetic gene cluster, a potent cancer cell cytotoxin with promise for medicinal applications. The roughly 58 kb biosynthetic gene cluster is composed of 12 open reading frames and has a type I modular mixed polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS) organization and features loading and off-loading domain architecture never previously described. Moreover, this work represents the first successful isolation of a complete biosynthetic gene cluster from Lyngbya bouillonii, a tropical marine cyanobacterium renowned for its production of diverse bioactive secondary metabolites.

  7. Accelerated fluctuation analysis by graphic cards and complex pattern formation in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Tobias; Virnau, Peter; Paul, Wolfgang; Schneider, Johannes J.

    2009-09-01

    The compute unified device architecture is an almost conventional programming approach for managing computations on a graphics processing unit (GPU) as a data-parallel computing device. With a maximum number of 240 cores in combination with a high memory bandwidth, a recent GPU offers resources for computational physics. We apply this technology to methods of fluctuation analysis, which includes determination of the scaling behavior of a stochastic process and the equilibrium autocorrelation function. Additionally, the recently introduced pattern formation conformity (Preis T et al 2008 Europhys. Lett. 82 68005), which quantifies pattern-based complex short-time correlations of a time series, is calculated on a GPU and analyzed in detail. Results are obtained up to 84 times faster than on a current central processing unit core. When we apply this method to high-frequency time series of the German BUND future, we find significant pattern-based correlations on short time scales. Furthermore, an anti-persistent behavior can be found on short time scales. Additionally, we compare the recent GPU generation, which provides a theoretical peak performance of up to roughly 1012 floating point operations per second with the previous one. .

  8. The SM protein Sly1 accelerates assembly of the ER–Golgi SNARE complex

    PubMed Central

    Demircioglu, F. Esra; Burkhardt, Pawel; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) and Sec1/Munc18 (SM) proteins constitute the core of an ancient vesicle fusion machine that diversified into distinct sets that now function in different trafficking steps in eukaryotic cells. Deciphering their precise mode of action has proved challenging. SM proteins are thought to act primarily through one type of SNARE protein, the syntaxins. Despite high structural similarity, however, contrasting binding modes have been found for different SM proteins and syntaxins. Whereas the secretory SM protein Munc18 binds to the ‟closed conformation” of syntaxin 1, the ER–Golgi SM protein Sly1 interacts only with the N-peptide of Sed5. Recent findings, however, indicate that SM proteins might interact simultaneously with both syntaxin regions. In search for a common mechanism, we now reinvestigated the Sly1/Sed5 interaction. We found that individual Sed5 adopts a tight closed conformation. Sly1 binds to both the closed conformation and the N-peptide of Sed5, suggesting that this is the original binding mode of SM proteins and syntaxins. In contrast to Munc18, however, Sly1 facilitates SNARE complex formation by loosening the closed conformation of Sed5. PMID:25189771

  9. The SM protein Sly1 accelerates assembly of the ER-Golgi SNARE complex.

    PubMed

    Demircioglu, F Esra; Burkhardt, Pawel; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2014-09-23

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) and Sec1/Munc18 (SM) proteins constitute the core of an ancient vesicle fusion machine that diversified into distinct sets that now function in different trafficking steps in eukaryotic cells. Deciphering their precise mode of action has proved challenging. SM proteins are thought to act primarily through one type of SNARE protein, the syntaxins. Despite high structural similarity, however, contrasting binding modes have been found for different SM proteins and syntaxins. Whereas the secretory SM protein Munc18 binds to the ‟closed conformation" of syntaxin 1, the ER-Golgi SM protein Sly1 interacts only with the N-peptide of Sed5. Recent findings, however, indicate that SM proteins might interact simultaneously with both syntaxin regions. In search for a common mechanism, we now reinvestigated the Sly1/Sed5 interaction. We found that individual Sed5 adopts a tight closed conformation. Sly1 binds to both the closed conformation and the N-peptide of Sed5, suggesting that this is the original binding mode of SM proteins and syntaxins. In contrast to Munc18, however, Sly1 facilitates SNARE complex formation by loosening the closed conformation of Sed5.

  10. Structural insights into how Yrb2p accelerates the assembly of the Xpo1p nuclear export complex.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Masako; Shirai, Natsuki; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Proteins and ribonucleoproteins containing a nuclear export signal (NES) assemble with the exportin Xpo1p (yeast CRM1) and Gsp1p-GTP (yeast Ran-GTP) in the nucleus and exit through the nuclear pore complex. In the cytoplasm, Yrb1p (yeast RanBP1) displaces NES from Xpo1p. Efficient export of NES-cargoes requires Yrb2p (yeast RanBP3), a primarily nuclear protein containing nucleoporin-like phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats and a low-affinity Gsp1p-binding domain (RanBD). Here, we show that Yrb2p strikingly accelerates the association of Gsp1p-GTP and NES to Xpo1p. We have solved the crystal structure of the Xpo1p-Yrb2p-Gsp1p-GTP complex, a key assembly intermediate that can bind cargo rapidly. Although the NES-binding cleft of Xpo1p is closed in this intermediate, our data suggest that preloading of Gsp1p-GTP onto Xpo1p by Yrb2p, conformational flexibility of Xpo1p, and the low affinity of RanBD enable active displacement of Yrb2p RanBD by NES to occur effectively. The structure also reveals the major binding sites for FG repeats on Xpo1p.

  11. Facile synthesis of S-Ag nanocomposites and Ag2S short nanorods by the interaction of sulfur with AgNO3 in PEG400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Xie, Xin-Yuan; Liang, Ming; Xie, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jie-Mei; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    A facile, eco-friendly and inexpensive method to prepare Ag2S short nanorods and S-Ag nanocomposites using sublimed sulfur, AgNO3, PVP and PEG400 was studied. According to x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of the Ag2S, the products are highly crystalline and pure Ag2S nanorods with diameters of 70-160 nm and lengths of 200-360 nm. X-ray diffraction of the S-Ag nanocomposites shows that we obtained cubic Ag and S nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ plays an important role in controlling the size and morphology of the S-Ag nanocomposites. When the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ was 10:1, smaller sizes, better dispersibility and narrower distribution of S-Ag nanocomposites with diameters of 10-40 nm were obtained. The formation mechanism of the S-Ag nanocomposites was studied by designing a series of experiments using ultraviolet-visible measurement, and it was found that S nanoparticles are produced first and act as seed crystals; then Ag+ becomes Ag nanocrystals on the surfaces of the S nanoparticles by the reduction of PVP. PEG400 acts as a catalyzer, accelerating the reaction rate, and protects the S-Ag nanocomposites from reacting to produce Ag2S. The antimicrobial experiments show that the S-Ag nanocomposites have greater antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and blue mold than Ag nanoparticles.

  12. Facile synthesis of S–Ag nanocomposites and Ag2S short nanorods by the interaction of sulfur with AgNO3 in PEG400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Xie, Xin-Yuan; Liang, Ming; Xie, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jie-Mei; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    A facile, eco-friendly and inexpensive method to prepare Ag2S short nanorods and S–Ag nanocomposites using sublimed sulfur, AgNO3, PVP and PEG400 was studied. According to x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of the Ag2S, the products are highly crystalline and pure Ag2S nanorods with diameters of 70–160 nm and lengths of 200–360 nm. X-ray diffraction of the S–Ag nanocomposites shows that we obtained cubic Ag and S nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ plays an important role in controlling the size and morphology of the S–Ag nanocomposites. When the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ was 10:1, smaller sizes, better dispersibility and narrower distribution of S–Ag nanocomposites with diameters of 10–40 nm were obtained. The formation mechanism of the S–Ag nanocomposites was studied by designing a series of experiments using ultraviolet–visible measurement, and it was found that S nanoparticles are produced first and act as seed crystals; then Ag+ becomes Ag nanocrystals on the surfaces of the S nanoparticles by the reduction of PVP. PEG400 acts as a catalyzer, accelerating the reaction rate, and protects the S–Ag nanocomposites from reacting to produce Ag2S. The antimicrobial experiments show that the S–Ag nanocomposites have greater antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and blue mold than Ag nanoparticles.

  13. Assessment and acceleration of binding energy calculations for protein-ligand complexes by the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Takao; Okimoto, Noriaki; Taiji, Makoto

    2015-11-15

    In the field of drug discovery, it is important to accurately predict the binding affinities between target proteins and drug applicant molecules. Many of the computational methods available for evaluating binding affinities have adopted molecular mechanics-based force fields, although they cannot fully describe protein-ligand interactions. A noteworthy computational method in development involves large-scale electronic structure calculations. Fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method, which is one of such large-scale calculation techniques, is applied in this study for calculating the binding energies between proteins and ligands. By testing the effects of specific FMO calculation conditions (including fragmentation size, basis sets, electron correlation, exchange-correlation functionals, and solvation effects) on the binding energies of the FK506-binding protein and 10 ligand complex molecule, we have found that the standard FMO calculation condition, FMO2-MP2/6-31G(d), is suitable for evaluating the protein-ligand interactions. The correlation coefficient between the binding energies calculated with this FMO calculation condition and experimental values is determined to be R = 0.77. Based on these results, we also propose a practical scheme for predicting binding affinities by combining the FMO method with the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. The results of this combined method can be directly compared with experimental binding affinities. The FMO and QSAR combined scheme shows a higher correlation with experimental data (R = 0.91). Furthermore, we propose an acceleration scheme for the binding energy calculations using a multilayer FMO method focusing on the protein-ligand interaction distance. Our acceleration scheme, which uses FMO2-HF/STO-3G:MP2/6-31G(d) at R(int) = 7.0 Å, reduces computational costs, while maintaining accuracy in the evaluation of binding energy.

  14. Characterization of the intermediate-range order in new superionic conducting AgI-Ag2S-AgPO3 glasses by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartini, E.; Kennedy, S. J.; Itoh, K.; Fukunaga, T.; Suminta, S.; Kamiyama, T.

    Superionic conducting glasses are of considerable technological interest because of their use in batteries, sensors, and displays. We have investigated the new ternary systems AgI-Ag2S-AgPO3 where the ratio AgI:Ag2S is 1:1. The system (AgI)x(Ag2S)x(AgPO3)1-2x, for a AgI+Ag2S fraction less than 82mol%, yields glasses. We have used a neutron-diffraction technique to obtain the total scattering structure factor S(Q) of this system at room temperature by using the HIT spectrometer at the High Energy Accelerator (KEK), Tsukuba, Japan. As for AgI-AgPO3 glasses, S(Q) shows a peak at anomalously low Q in the range from 0.6 to 0.9 Å-1. This peak is not observed in the corresponding glass Ag2S-AgPO3 or pure AgPO3. The peak depends strongly on the dopant salt. Its intensity increases as the amount of (AgI+Ag2S) increases and its position shifts to lower Q, while the number density of the glasses decreases with x. This peak can be associated with an intermediate structure of particles lying inside a continuous host with the characteristic length between 5 and 10 Å [1].

  15. The cardiovascular response to the AGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, David; Mctaggart, Wesley G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of experiments on human subjects conducted to study the cardiovascular response to various g-levels and exposure times using an artificial gravity simulator (AGS). The AGS is a short arm centrifuge consisting of a turntable, a traction system, a platform and four beds. Data collection hardware is part of the communication system. The AGS provides a steep acceleration gradient in subjects in the supine position.

  16. σ-Aromatic cyclic M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) clusters and their complexation with dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole, furan, noble gases and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Saha, Ranajit; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2016-04-28

    The σ-aromaticity of M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) is analyzed and compared with that of Li3(+) and a prototype σ-aromatic system, H3(+). Ligands (L) like dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole and furan are employed to stabilize these monocationic M3(+) clusters. They all bind M3(+) with favorable interaction energy. Dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene forms the strongest bond with M3(+) followed by pyridine, isoxazole and furan. Electrostatic contribution is considerably more than that of orbital contribution in these M-L bonds. The orbital interaction arises from both L → M σ donation and L ← M back donation. M3(+) clusters also bind noble gas atoms and carbon monoxide effectively. In general, among the studied systems Au3(+) binds a given L most strongly followed by Cu3(+) and Ag3(+). Computation of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and its different extensions like the NICS-rate and NICS in-plane component vs. NICS out-of-plane component shows that the σ-aromaticity in L bound M3(+) increases compared to that of bare clusters. The aromaticity in pyridine, isoxazole and furan bound Au3(+) complexes is quite comparable with that in the recently synthesized Zn3(C5(CH3)5)3(+). The energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital also increases upon binding with L. The blue-shift and red-shift in the C-O stretching frequency of M3(CO)3(+) and M3(OC)3(+), respectively, are analyzed through reverse polarization of the σ- and π-orbitals of CO as well as the relative amount of OC → M σ donation and M → CO π back donation. The electron density analysis is also performed to gain further insight into the nature of interaction. PMID:26624276

  17. Investigation of induced radioactivity in the Linac-Adone accelerator complex for the management of the decommissioned material.

    PubMed

    Mora, Juan Carlos; Bedogni, Roberto; Esposito, Adolfo; Cancio, David

    2007-03-01

    The LINAC-ADONE accelerator complex of the INFN-LNF Frascati National Laboratories, operating for 27 y prior to the commissioning of DAPhiNE, was dismantled in 1993. The scraps resulting from the decommissioning of LINAC-ADPhiNE have been temporarily stored in the same Frascati laboratory, waiting for definitive disposal. Relying on recommendations of the IAEA, European Commission and Italian committees, an experimental characterization study of the LNF repository was performed. The main objective was a classification of the scraps on the basis of internationally recognized "clearance levels," which are 0.1 Bq g(-1) for the isotopes of interest for this work. Secondly, a measurement of the materials suspected to be above 0.1 Bq g(-1) was planned. Activation isotopes were expected from the aluminum, copper, steel, and iron of the LINAC and the ADONE ring sections. For screening purposes, the repository area has been divided into zones, where in-situ measurements with a portable HP-Ge detector have been performed. In addition, small samples have been cut from a representative number of pieces, and accurate laboratory measurements have been made with a low background HP-Ge spectrometer. The experimental results are in good agreement with other studies and show that a large part of the material is below the mentioned specific activity level.

  18. Investigation of induced radioactivity in the Linac-Adone accelerator complex for the management of the decommissioned material.

    PubMed

    Mora, Juan Carlos; Bedogni, Roberto; Esposito, Adolfo; Cancio, David

    2007-03-01

    The LINAC-ADONE accelerator complex of the INFN-LNF Frascati National Laboratories, operating for 27 y prior to the commissioning of DAPhiNE, was dismantled in 1993. The scraps resulting from the decommissioning of LINAC-ADPhiNE have been temporarily stored in the same Frascati laboratory, waiting for definitive disposal. Relying on recommendations of the IAEA, European Commission and Italian committees, an experimental characterization study of the LNF repository was performed. The main objective was a classification of the scraps on the basis of internationally recognized "clearance levels," which are 0.1 Bq g(-1) for the isotopes of interest for this work. Secondly, a measurement of the materials suspected to be above 0.1 Bq g(-1) was planned. Activation isotopes were expected from the aluminum, copper, steel, and iron of the LINAC and the ADONE ring sections. For screening purposes, the repository area has been divided into zones, where in-situ measurements with a portable HP-Ge detector have been performed. In addition, small samples have been cut from a representative number of pieces, and accurate laboratory measurements have been made with a low background HP-Ge spectrometer. The experimental results are in good agreement with other studies and show that a large part of the material is below the mentioned specific activity level. PMID:17293695

  19. A 2-pyridyl (py) attached phosphine imine [P(Npy)(NHpy)3] and an imido phosphinate ion [P(Npy)2)(NHpy)2]- in its Ag(I) complex.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arvind K; Chipem, Francis A S; Boomishankar, Ramamoorthy

    2012-02-14

    A new phosphine imine 3, [P(Npy)(NHpy)(3)] (py = 2-pyridyl), was synthesized from the phosphonium salt 1, [P(NHpy)(4)]Cl. Subsequent reaction of 1 or 3 with AgClO(4) lead to an unprecedented penta-nuclear Ag(I) complex 4 stabilized by two [P(Npy)(2)(NHpy)(2)](-) anions [L](-). The packing diagram of 4 shows an interesting channel structure which contains solvated molecules of methanol and toluene. The diimine ligand [L](-), which represents the N-analogue of a phosphinate ion (H(2)PO(4)(-)), was obtained in situ under the mild reaction conditions in the absence of a base. PMID:22167162

  20. The alloying effect and AgCl-directing growth for synthesizing a trimetallic nanoring with improved SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuhua; Zhou, Guangju; Fu, Yunzhi; Ma, Ying; Xu, Li; Zou, Chao; Chen, Wei; Yang, Yun; Huang, Shaoming

    2015-12-01

    We report the synthesis of high quality trimetallic Au/Ag/Pt nanorings (TAAPNs) by using Au/Ag alloy decahedra (AAAD) as templates. The alloying effect and AgCl-directing growth have been investigated in detail during the formation of TAAPN. It was found that the doping of Ag in AAAD changes the surrounding environment of Au atoms and decreases the oxidization reduction potential (ORP) of [AuCl2]-/Au because of the alloying effect, resulting in the dissolved O2 molecules that serve as an effective etchant for oxidizing Au to Au(i). Ascorbic acid (AA) and chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) are weak acids which can accelerate the etching by increasing the concentration of H+. The AgCl selectively absorbs on {100} of the decahedra and induces the preferential deposition of H2PtCl6 here via their complexing interaction. AA reduces Pt(iv) and Ag(i) to atoms which grow on {100} facets. The formed Pt/Ag layer changes the etching direction from along [100] to [111] and generates the TAAPN. Besides, it has been noted that the TAAPNs exhibit good Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) performance.We report the synthesis of high quality trimetallic Au/Ag/Pt nanorings (TAAPNs) by using Au/Ag alloy decahedra (AAAD) as templates. The alloying effect and AgCl-directing growth have been investigated in detail during the formation of TAAPN. It was found that the doping of Ag in AAAD changes the surrounding environment of Au atoms and decreases the oxidization reduction potential (ORP) of [AuCl2]-/Au because of the alloying effect, resulting in the dissolved O2 molecules that serve as an effective etchant for oxidizing Au to Au(i). Ascorbic acid (AA) and chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) are weak acids which can accelerate the etching by increasing the concentration of H+. The AgCl selectively absorbs on {100} of the decahedra and induces the preferential deposition of H2PtCl6 here via their complexing interaction. AA reduces Pt(iv) and Ag(i) to atoms which grow on {100} facets. The formed

  1. Spin dynamics simulations at AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    To preserve proton polarization through acceleration, it is important to have a correct model of the process. It has been known that with the insertion of the two helical partial Siberian snakes in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the MAD model of AGS can not deal with a field map with offset orbit. The stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi provides a tool to represent the real electromagnetic fields in the modeling of the optics and spin dynamics for the AGS. Numerical experiments of resonance crossing, including spin dynamics in presence of the snakes and Q-jump, have been performed in AGS lattice models, using Zgoubi. This contribution reports on various results so obtained.

  2. THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-10-08

    After more than 40 years of operation, the AGS is still at the heart of the Brookhaven hadron accelerator complex. This system of accelerators presently comprises a 200 MeV linac for the pre-acceleration of high intensity and polarized protons, two Tandem Van der Graaffs for the pre-acceleration of heavy ion beams, a versatile Booster that allows for efficient injection of all three types of beams into the AGS and, most recently, the two RHIC collider rings that produce high luminosity heavy ion and polarized proton collisions. For several years now, the AGS has held the world intensity record with more than 7 x 10{sup 13} protons accelerated in a single pulse. The requirements for the proton beam for the super neutrino beam are summarized and a schematic of the upgraded AGS is shown. Since the present number of protons per fill is already close to the required number, the upgrade is based on increasing the repetition rate and reducing beam losses (to avoid excessive shielding requirements and to maintain activation of the machine components at workable level). It is also important to preserve all the present capabilities of the AGS, in particular its role as injector to RHIC. The AGS Booster was built not only to allow the injection of any species of heavy ion into the AGS but to allow a fourfold increase of the AGS intensity. It is one-quarter the circumference of the AGS with the same aperture. However, the accumulation of four Booster loads in the AGS takes about 0.6 s, and is therefore not well suited for high average beam power operation. To minimize the injection time to about 1 ms, a 1.2 GeV linac will be used instead. This linac consists of the existing warm linac of 200 MeV and a new superconducting linac of 1.0 GeV. The multi-turn H{sup -} injection from a source of 30 mA and 720 {micro}s pulse width is sufficient to accumulate 9 x 10{sup 13} particle per pulse in the AGS[10]. The minimum ramp time of the AGS to full energy is presently 0.5 s; this must

  3. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  4. AGS slow extracted beam improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Marneris, I.; Danowski, G.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.

    1997-07-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is a strong focusing accelerator which is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to an equivalent proton energy of 29 GeV. Since the late 1960`s it has been serving high energy physics (HEP - proton beam) users of both slow and fast extracted beams. The AGS fixed target program presently uses primary proton and heavy ion beams (HIP) in slowly extracted fashion over spill lengths of 1.5 to 4.0 seconds. Extraction is accomplished by flattoping the main and extraction magnets and exciting a third integer resonance in the AGS. Over the long spill times, control of the subharmonic amplitude components up to a frequency of 1 kilohertz is very crucial. One of the most critical contributions to spill modulation is due to the AGS MMPS. An active filter was developed to reduce these frequencies and it`s operation is described in a previous paper. However there are still frequency components in the 60-720 Hz sub-harmonic ripple range, modulating the spill structure due to extraction power supplies and any remaining structures on the AGS MMPS. A recent scheme is being developed to use the existing tune-trim control horizontal quadrupole magnets and power supply to further reduce these troublesome noise sources. Feedback from an external beam sensor and overcoming the limitations of the quadrupole system by lead/lag compensation techniques will be described.

  5. Complexation of Cd2+, Ni2+, and Ag+ metal ions with 4,13-didecyl-l,7,10,16-tetraoxa-4,13-diazacyclooctadecane in acetonitrile-ethylacetate binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadyar, M.; Rounaghi, G. H.; Tarahomi, S.; Mohajeri, M.

    2013-12-01

    Conductometric titrations have been performed in acetonitrile-ethylacetate (AN-EtOAc) binary solutions at 288, 298, 308, and 318 K to obtain the stoichiometry, the complex stability constants and the standard thermodynamic parameters for the complexation of Cd2+, Ni2+, and Ag+ cations with 4,13-didecyl-1,7,10,16-tetraoxa-4,13-diazacyclooctadecane (cryptand 22DD). The stability constants of the resulting 1: 1 complexes formed between the metal cations and the ligand were determined by computer fitting of the conductance-mole ratio data. There is a non-linear relationship between the log K f values of complexes and the mole fraction of ethylacetate in the mixed solvent system. In addition, the conductometric data show that the stoichiometry of the complexes formed between the Cd2+, Ni2+, and Ag+ cations with the ligand changes with the nature of the solvent. The standard enthalpy and entropy values for the 1: 1 [ML] complexation reactions were evaluated from the temperature dependence of the formation constants. Thermodynamically, the complexation processes of the metal cations with the C22DD, is mainly entropy governed and the values of thermodynamic parameters are influenced by the nature and composition of the binary mixed solvent solutions.

  6. Silver nanoparticles coated with natural polysaccharides as models to study AgNP aggregation kinetics using UV-Visible spectrophotometry upon discharge in complex environments.

    PubMed

    Lodeiro, Pablo; Achterberg, Eric P; Pampín, Joaquín; Affatati, Alice; El-Shahawi, Mohammed S

    2016-01-01

    This study provides quantitative information on the aggregation and dissolution behaviour of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) upon discharge in fresh and sea waters, represented here as NaCl solutions of increasing ionic strength (up to 1M) and natural fjord waters. Natural polysaccharides, sodium alginate (ALG) and gum Arabic (GA), were used as coatings to stabilize the AgNPs and the compounds acted as models to study AgNP aggregation kinetics. The DLVO theory was used to quantitatively describe the interactions between the AgNPs. The stability of AgNPs was established using UV-Visible spectrophotometry, including unique information collected during the first seconds of the aggregaton process. Alginate coating resulted in a moderate stabilization of AgNPs in terms of critical coagulation concentration (~82mM NaCl) and a low dissolution of <10% total Ag in NaCl solutions up to 1M. Gum Arabic coated AgNPs were more strongly stabilized, with ~7-30% size increase up to 77mM NaCl, but only when the silver ion content initially present in solution was low (<10% total Ag). The ALG and GA coated AgNPs showed a strongly enhanced stability in natural fjord waters (ca. 5h required to reduce the area of the surface plasmon resonance band (SPRB) by two fold) compared with NaCl at an equivalent ionic strength (1-2min period for a two fold SPRB reduction). This is ascribed to a stabilizing effect from dissolved organic matter present in natural fjord waters. Interestingly, for AgNP-GA solutions with 40% of total silver present as unreacted silver ions in the NP stock solution, fast aggregation kinetics were observed in NaCl solutions (SPRB area was reduced by ca. 50% within 40-150min), with even more rapid removal in fjord waters, attributed to the high amount of silver-chloride charged species, that interact with the NP coating and/or organic matter and reduce the NPs stabilization.

  7. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  8. Capacitive deionization of seawater effected by nano Ag and Ag@C on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cai, P-F; Su, C-J; Chang, W-T; Chang, F-C; Peng, C-Y; Sun, I-W; Wei, Y-L; Jou, C-J; Wang, H Paul

    2014-08-30

    Drinking water shortage has become worse in recent decades. A new capacitive deionization (CDI) method for increasing water supplies through the effective desalination of seawater has been developed. Silver as nano Ag and Ag@C which was prepared by carbonization of the Ag(+)-β-cyclodextrin complex at 573 K for 30 min can add the antimicrobial function into the CDI process. The Ag@C and Ag nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (Ag@C/rGO and nano Ag/rGO) were used as the CDI electrodes. The nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can reduce the charging resistant, and enhance the electrosorption capability. Better CDI efficiencies with the nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can therefore be obtained. When reversed the voltage, the electrodes can be recovered up to 90% within 5 min. This work presents the feasibility for the nano Ag and Ag@C on rGO electrodes applied in CDI process to produce drinking water from seawater or saline water.

  9. Capacitive deionization of seawater effected by nano Ag and Ag@C on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cai, P-F; Su, C-J; Chang, W-T; Chang, F-C; Peng, C-Y; Sun, I-W; Wei, Y-L; Jou, C-J; Wang, H Paul

    2014-08-30

    Drinking water shortage has become worse in recent decades. A new capacitive deionization (CDI) method for increasing water supplies through the effective desalination of seawater has been developed. Silver as nano Ag and Ag@C which was prepared by carbonization of the Ag(+)-β-cyclodextrin complex at 573 K for 30 min can add the antimicrobial function into the CDI process. The Ag@C and Ag nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (Ag@C/rGO and nano Ag/rGO) were used as the CDI electrodes. The nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can reduce the charging resistant, and enhance the electrosorption capability. Better CDI efficiencies with the nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can therefore be obtained. When reversed the voltage, the electrodes can be recovered up to 90% within 5 min. This work presents the feasibility for the nano Ag and Ag@C on rGO electrodes applied in CDI process to produce drinking water from seawater or saline water. PMID:24928455

  10. Acceleration of Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration in complex heterogeneous media using Intel many-integrated core architecture.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Anton V; Kirillin, Mikhail Yu

    2015-08-01

    Over two decades, the Monte Carlo technique has become a gold standard in simulation of light propagation in turbid media, including biotissues. Technological solutions provide further advances of this technique. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is a new type of accelerator for highly parallel general purpose computing, which allows execution of a wide range of applications without substantial code modification. We present a technical approach of porting our previously developed Monte Carlo (MC) code for simulation of light transport in tissues to the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. We show that employing the accelerator allows reducing computational time of MC simulation and obtaining simulation speed-up comparable to GPU. We demonstrate the performance of the developed code for simulation of light transport in the human head and determination of the measurement volume in near-infrared spectroscopy brain sensing. PMID:26249663

  11. Real-time dual-mode standard/complex Fourier-domain OCT system using graphics processing unit accelerated 4D signal processing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kang; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-03-01

    We realized a real-time dual-mode standard/complex Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) system using graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated 4D (3D+time) signal processing and visualization. For both standard and complex FD-OCT modes, the signal processing tasks were implemented on a dual-GPUs architecture that included λ-to-k spectral re-sampling, fast Fourier transform (FFT), modified Hilbert transform, logarithmic-scaling, and volume rendering. The maximum A-scan processing speeds achieved are >3,000,000 line/s for the standard 1024-pixel-FD-OCT, and >500,000 line/s for the complex 1024-pixel-FD-OCT. Multiple volumerendering of the same 3D data set were preformed and displayed with different view angles. The GPU-acceleration technique is highly cost-effective and can be easily integrated into most ultrahigh speed FD-OCT systems to overcome the 3D data processing and visualization bottlenecks.

  12. Synthesis, structures and DFT calculations of 2-(4,6-dimethyl pyrimidyl)selenolate complexes of Cu(I), Ag(I) and Au(I) and their conversion into metal selenide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh K; Wadawale, Amey; Kedarnath, G; Manna, Debashree; Ghanty, Tapan K; Vishwanadh, B; Jain, Vimal K

    2014-05-01

    The complexes [M{SeC4H(Me-4,6)2N2}]6 (M = Cu (1), Ag (2)) and [Au{SeC4H(Me-4,6)2N2}(PEt3)] (3) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, UV-vis, NMR ((1)H, (13)C, (77)Se) spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures of [Cu{SeC4H(Me-4,6)2N2}]6·H2O (1·H2O), [Ag{SeC4H(Me-4,6)2N2}]6·6MeOH·H2O (2·6MeOH·H2O) and [Au{SeC4H(Me-4,6)2N2}(PEt3)] (3) revealed that their metal centers acquire distorted square-pyramidal, trigonal and linear geometries, respectively. DFT calculations have been carried out to rationalize nuclearity in copper(i) chalcogenolate complexes. The calculations suggest that there is hardly any energy difference between the tetrameric and hexameric forms. Thermal behavior of [Cu{SeC4H(Me-4,6)2N2}]6 was studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Thermolysis of [M{SeC4H(Me-4,6)2N2}]6 (M = Cu, Ag) in 1-dodecanethiol (DDT) at 150 °C gave a cubic phase of Cu7Se4 and an orthorhombic phase of Ag2Se, respectively. Copper selenide (Cu7Se4) thin films were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by using [Cu{SeC4H(Me-4,6)2N2}]6 at 400 °C by AACVD. PMID:24623060

  13. Photon emission intensities in the decay of 108mAg and 110mAg.

    PubMed

    Ferreux, L; Lépy, M-C; Bé, M-M; Isnard, H; Lourenço, V

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on two radioisotopes of silver, (108m)Ag and (110m)Ag, characterized by a complex decay scheme. Each isotope has two disintegration modes, the isomeric transition leading to the daughter isotope ((108)Ag and (110)Ag, respectively) with a short half-life. The radioactive solution was obtained by neutron activation on silver powder enriched in (109)Ag. Gamma-spectrometry was carried out using a calibrated high purity germanium detector. The main relative photon emission intensities for both radionuclides were obtained and compared with previously published values.

  14. Potential of silver against human colon cancer: (synthesis, characterization and crystal structures of xylyl (Ortho, meta, &Para) linked bis-benzimidazolium salts and Ag(I)-NHC complexes: In vitro anticancer studies)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the first successful synthesis of Ag(I)-N-heterocyclic carbene complex in 1993, this class of compounds has been extensively used for transmetallation reactions where the direct synthesis using other metal ions was either difficult or impossible. Initially, silver(I)-NHC complexes were tested for their catalytic potential but could not get fame because of lower potential compare to other competent compounds in this field; however, these compounds proved to have vital antimicrobial activities. These encouraging biomedical applications further convinced researchers to test these compounds against cancer. The current work has been carried out with this aim. Results N-ipropylbenzimidazole was synthesized by reaction of benzimidazole with ipropyl bromide. The subsequent treatment of the resulting N-alkylbenzimidazole with ortho/meta/para-(bromomethylene) benzene afforded corresponding bis-benzimidazolium bromides (5-7). The counter anion (Br-) of each salt was replaced by hexaflourophosphate (PF6-) for the ease of handling and further purification (8-10). Each salt (Ligand), in halide form, was further allowed to react with Ag2O with stirring at room temperature for a period of two days to synthesize dinuclear Ag(I)-NHC complexes (11-13). All synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic techniques and microanalysis. Molecular structures of compounds 5, 9 &10 were established through single crystal x-ray diffraction technique. All the compounds were assessed for their anti-proliferation test on human colorectal cancer cell line (HCT 116). Results showed that the ligands (5-10) showed mild to negligible cytotoxicity on HCT 116 cells whereas respective silver complexes (11-13) exhibited dose dependent cytotoxicity towards the colon cancer cells with IC50 ranges between 9.7 to 44.5 μM. Interestingly, the complex 13 having para-xylyl spacer was found the most active (IC50 9.7 μM) that verifies our previously reported results. Conclusions All

  15. Influence of terminal acryloyl arms on the coordination chemistry of a ditopic pyrimidine-hydrazone ligand: comparison of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), and Ag(I) complexes.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Daniel J; Hanton, Lyall R; Moratti, Stephen C

    2013-03-01

    A new ditopic pyrimidine-hydrazone ligand, 6-hydroxymethylacryloyl-2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, 2,2'-[2,2'-(2-methyl-4,6-pyrimidinediyl)bis(1-methylhydrazone)] (L2), was synthesized with terminal acryloyl functional groups to allow incorporation into copolymer gel actuators. NMR spectroscopy was used to show that L2 adopted a horseshoe shape with transoid-transoid pym-hyz-py linkages. Metal complexation studies were performed with L2 and salts of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), and Ag(I) ions in CH3CN in a variety of metal to ligand ratios. Reacting L2 with an excess amount of any of the metal ions resulted in linear complexes where the pym-hyz-py linkages were rotated to a cisoid-cisoid conformation. NMR spectroscopy showed that the acryloyl arms of L2 did not interact with the bound metal ions in solution. Seven of the linear complexes (1-7) were crystallized and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Most of these complexes (4-7) also showed no coordination between the acryloyl arms and the metal ions; however, complexes 1-3 showed some interactions. Both of the acryloyl arms were coordinated to Pb(II) ions in [Pb2L2(SO3CF3)4] (1), one through the carbonyl oxygen donor and the other through the alkoxy oxygen donor. One of the acryloyl arms of [Cu2L2(CH3CN)3](SO3CF3)4 (2) was coordinated to one of the Cu(II) ions through the carbonyl oxygen donor. There appeared to be a weak association between the alkoxy donors of the acryloyl arms and the Pb(II) ions of [Pb2L2(ClO4)4]·CH3CN (3). Reaction of excess AgSO3CF3 with L2 was repeated in CD3NO2, resulting in crystals of {[Ag7(L2)2(SO3CF3)6(H2O)2] SO3CF3}∞ (8), the polymeric structure of which resulted from coordination between the carbonyl donors of the acryloyl arms and the Ag(I) ions. In all cases the coordination and steric effects of the acryloyl arms did not inhibit isomerization of the pym-hyz bonds of L2 or the core shape of the linear complexes.

  16. 20% PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKE IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H; Bai, M; Brown, K A; Glenn, W; Luccio, A U; Mackay, W W; Montag, C; Ptitsyn, V; Roser, T; Tsoupas, N; Zeno, K; Ranjbar, V; Spinka, H; Underwood, D

    2002-11-06

    An 11.4% partial Siberian snake was used to successfully accelerate polarized proton through a strong intrinsic depolarizing spin resonance in the AGS. No noticeable depolarization was observed. This opens up the possibility of using a 20% to 30% partial Siberian snake in the AGS to overcome all weak and strong depolarizing spin resonances. Some design and operation issues of the new partial Siberian snake are discussed.

  17. The problems associated with the monitoring of complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities.

    PubMed

    Bilski, P; Blomgren, J; d'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2007-01-01

    The European Commission is funding within its Sixth Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organisational framework for this project is provided by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. One task within the CONRAD project, Work Package 6 (WP6), was to provide a report outlining research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterisation of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators, but also at the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities. The paper provides an overview of the report, which will be available as CERN Yellow Report.

  18. RHIC injector complex online model status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Schoefer,V.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.

    2009-05-04

    An online modeling system is being developed for the RHIC injector complex, which consists of the Booster, the AGS and the transfer lines connecting the Booster to the AGS and the AGS to RHIC. Historically the injectors have been operated using static values from design specifications or offline model runs, but tighter beam optics constraints required by polarized proton operations (e.g, accelerating with near-integer tunes) have necessitated a more dynamic system. An online model server for the AGS has been implemented using MAD-X [1] as the model engine, with plans to extend the system to the Booster and the injector transfer lines and to add the option of calculating optics using the Polymorphic Tracking Code (PTC [2]) as the model engine.

  19. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  20. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  1. Complexation of the vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide and related molecules with zinc compounds including zinc oxide clusters (Zn4O4).

    PubMed

    Steudel, Ralf; Steudel, Yana; Wong, Ming Wah

    2008-01-01

    Zinc chemicals are used as activators in the vulcanization of organic polymers with sulfur to produce elastic rubbers. In this work, the reactions of Zn(2+), ZnMe(2), Zn(OMe)(2), Zn(OOCMe)(2), and the heterocubane cluster Zn(4)O(4) with the vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) and with the related radicals and anions Me(2)NCS(2)(*), Me(2)NCS(3)(*), Me(2)NCS(2)(-), and Me(2)NCS(3)(-) have been studied by quantum chemical methods at the MP2/6-31+G(2df,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G* level of theory. More than 35 zinc complexes have been structurally characterized and the energies of formation from their components calculated for the first time. The binding energy of TMTD as a bidendate ligand increases in the order ZnMe(2)complexes with the radicals Me(2)NCS(2)(*) and Me(2)NCS(3)(*). Dissociation of the TMTD molecule at the S-S bond on reaction with the Zn(4)O(4) cluster is predicted to be strongly exothermic, in sharp contrast to the endothermic S-S bond dissociation of the free molecule. The same holds for tetramethylthiuram trisulfide (TMTT). Surprisingly, the resulting complexes contain Zn-S as well as S-O bonds. The Zn(4)O(4) nanocluster serves here as a model for bulk zinc oxide used as an activator in rubber vulcanization by sulfur. The further uptake of sulfur atoms by the various complexes from S(8) or TMTD with formation of species derived from the radical Me(2)NCS(3)(*) or the trithiocarbamate anion Me(2)NCS(3)(-) is endothermic for mono- and dinuclear zinc dithiocarbamate (dtc) complexes such as [Zn(dtc)(2)] and [Zn(2)(dtc)(4)], but exothermic in the case of polynuclear zinc oxide species containing bridging ligands as in [Zn(4)O(4)(mu-S(2)CNMe(2))] and [Zn(4)O(4)(mu-dtc)]. Therefore, zinc oxide as a polynuclear species is predicted to promote the formation of trisulfido complexes, which are generally assumed to serve as catalysts for the transfer of

  2. Complexation of the vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide and related molecules with zinc compounds including zinc oxide clusters (Zn4O4).

    PubMed

    Steudel, Ralf; Steudel, Yana; Wong, Ming Wah

    2008-01-01

    Zinc chemicals are used as activators in the vulcanization of organic polymers with sulfur to produce elastic rubbers. In this work, the reactions of Zn(2+), ZnMe(2), Zn(OMe)(2), Zn(OOCMe)(2), and the heterocubane cluster Zn(4)O(4) with the vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) and with the related radicals and anions Me(2)NCS(2)(*), Me(2)NCS(3)(*), Me(2)NCS(2)(-), and Me(2)NCS(3)(-) have been studied by quantum chemical methods at the MP2/6-31+G(2df,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G* level of theory. More than 35 zinc complexes have been structurally characterized and the energies of formation from their components calculated for the first time. The binding energy of TMTD as a bidendate ligand increases in the order ZnMe(2)complexes with the radicals Me(2)NCS(2)(*) and Me(2)NCS(3)(*). Dissociation of the TMTD molecule at the S-S bond on reaction with the Zn(4)O(4) cluster is predicted to be strongly exothermic, in sharp contrast to the endothermic S-S bond dissociation of the free molecule. The same holds for tetramethylthiuram trisulfide (TMTT). Surprisingly, the resulting complexes contain Zn-S as well as S-O bonds. The Zn(4)O(4) nanocluster serves here as a model for bulk zinc oxide used as an activator in rubber vulcanization by sulfur. The further uptake of sulfur atoms by the various complexes from S(8) or TMTD with formation of species derived from the radical Me(2)NCS(3)(*) or the trithiocarbamate anion Me(2)NCS(3)(-) is endothermic for mono- and dinuclear zinc dithiocarbamate (dtc) complexes such as [Zn(dtc)(2)] and [Zn(2)(dtc)(4)], but exothermic in the case of polynuclear zinc oxide species containing bridging ligands as in [Zn(4)O(4)(mu-S(2)CNMe(2))] and [Zn(4)O(4)(mu-dtc)]. Therefore, zinc oxide as a polynuclear species is predicted to promote the formation of trisulfido complexes, which are generally assumed to serve as catalysts for the transfer of

  3. Laser-induced transformation of supramolecular complexes: approach to controlled formation of hybrid multi-yolk-shell Au-Ag@a-C:H nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Manshina, A A; Grachova, E V; Povolotskiy, A V; Povolotckaia, A V; Petrov, Y V; Koshevoy, I O; Makarova, A A; Vyalikh, D V; Tunik, S P

    2015-01-01

    In the present work an efficient approach of the controlled formation of hybrid Au-Ag-C nanostructures based on laser-induced transformation of organometallic supramolecular cluster compound is suggested. Herein the one-step process of the laser-induced synthesis of hybrid multi-yolk-shell Au-Ag@a-C:H nanoparticles which are bimetallic gold-silver subnanoclusters dispersed in nanospheres of amorphous hydrogenated a-C:H carbon is reported in details. It has been demonstrated that variation of the experimental parameters such as type of the organometallic precursor, solvent, deposition geometry and duration of laser irradiation allows directed control of nanoparticles' dimension and morphology. The mechanism of Au-Ag@a-C:H nanoparticles formation is suggested: the photo-excitation of the precursor molecule through metal-to-ligand charge transfer followed by rupture of metallophilic bonds, transformation of the cluster core including red-ox intramolecular reaction and aggregation of heterometallic species that results in the hybrid metal/carbon nanoparticles with multi-yolk-shell architecture formation. It has been found that the nanoparticles obtained can be efficiently used for the Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy label-free detection of human serum albumin in low concentration solution. PMID:26153347

  4. Laser-induced transformation of supramolecular complexes: approach to controlled formation of hybrid multi-yolk-shell Au-Ag@a-C:H nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manshina, A. A.; Grachova, E. V.; Povolotskiy, A. V.; Povolotckaia, A. V.; Petrov, Y. V.; Koshevoy, I. O.; Makarova, A. A.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Tunik, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    In the present work an efficient approach of the controlled formation of hybrid Au-Ag-C nanostructures based on laser-induced transformation of organometallic supramolecular cluster compound is suggested. Herein the one-step process of the laser-induced synthesis of hybrid multi-yolk-shell Au-Ag@a-C:H nanoparticles which are bimetallic gold-silver subnanoclusters dispersed in nanospheres of amorphous hydrogenated a-C:H carbon is reported in details. It has been demonstrated that variation of the experimental parameters such as type of the organometallic precursor, solvent, deposition geometry and duration of laser irradiation allows directed control of nanoparticles’ dimension and morphology. The mechanism of Au-Ag@a-C:H nanoparticles formation is suggested: the photo-excitation of the precursor molecule through metal-to-ligand charge transfer followed by rupture of metallophilic bonds, transformation of the cluster core including red-ox intramolecular reaction and aggregation of heterometallic species that results in the hybrid metal/carbon nanoparticles with multi-yolk-shell architecture formation. It has been found that the nanoparticles obtained can be efficiently used for the Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy label-free detection of human serum albumin in low concentration solution.

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  7. Effect of cysteine and humic acids on bioavailability of Ag from Ag nanoparticles to a freshwater snail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Tasha Stoiber,; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Isabelle Romer,; Ruth Merrifeild,; Jamie Lead,

    2016-01-01

    Metal-based engineered nanoparticles (NPs) will undergo transformations that will affect their bioavailability, toxicity and ecological risk when released to the environment, including interactions with dissolved organic material. The purpose of this paper is to determine how interactions with two different types of organic material affect the bioavailability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Silver uptake rates by the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis were determined after exposure to 25 nmol l-1 of Ag as PVP AgNPs, PEG AgNPs or AgNO3, in the presence of either Suwannee River humic acid or cysteine, a high-affinity thiol-rich organic ligand. Total uptake rate of Ag from the two NPs was either increased or not strongly affected in the presence of 1 – 10 mg 1-1 humic acid. Humic substances contain relatively few strong ligands for Ag explaining their limited effects on Ag uptake rate. In contrast, Ag uptake rate was substantially reduced by cysteine. Three components of uptake from the AgNPs were quantified in the presence of cysteine using a biodynamic modeling approach: uptake of dissolved Ag released by the AgNPs, uptake of a polymer or large (>3kD) Ag-cysteine complex and uptake of the nanoparticle itself. Addition of 1:1 Ag:cysteine reduced concentrations of dissolved Ag, which contributed to, but did not fully explain the reductions in uptake. A bioavailable Ag-cysteine complex (> 3kD) appeared to be the dominant avenue of uptake from both PVP AgNPs and PEG AgNPs in the presence of cysteine. Quantifying the different avenues of uptake sets the stage for studies to assess toxicity unique to NPs.

  8. Syntheses, crystal structures and electrochemical properties of Zn(II), Ag(I) and Cu(II) complexes based on 2-[(4,6-dimethylpyrimidinyl)-2-thio] acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Degang; Xie, Lixia; Fan, Yaoting; Wang, Yuling; Hou, Hongwei

    2009-02-01

    Three inorganic-organic supramolecular networks based on 2-[(4,6-dimethylpyrimidinyl)-2-thio] acetic acid (HL) and Zn(II), Ag(I) and Cu(II) salts have been prepared and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions. Mononuclear complex [ZnL 2(1,2-DAP)]·2H 2O ( 1) (1,2-DAP = 1,2-diaminopropane) exhibits a three-dimensional cavity architecture through hydrogen bonds and π-π interaction. The crystal structure of (AgL) n ( 2) consists of two-dimensional brick-wall framework. [Cu 2L 4(CH 3OH) 2]·3CH 3OH ( 3) contains dinuclear copper units, which are bridged by four acetate groups. Electrochemical behaviors have been systematically investigated by different electrochemical methods. Complex 3 shows a pair of quasi-reversible redox peaks. The electrode process is controlled by diffusion. The diffusion coefficient ( D) for 3 is about 10 -6 cm 2 s -1. The electron transfer number ( n) and the transfer coefficient ( α) are 2 and 0.33, respectively.

  9. Antibacterial Activity and Cytotoxicity of Silver(I) Complexes of Pyridine and (Benz)Imidazole Derivatives. X-ray Crystal Structure of [Ag(2,6-di(CH2OH)py)2]NO3.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska-Lis, Urszula; Felczak, Aleksandra; Chęcińska, Lilianna; Szabłowska-Gadomska, Ilona; Patyna, Emila; Małecki, Maciej; Lisowska, Katarzyna; Ochocki, Justyn

    2016-01-28

    Selected aspects of the biological activity of a series of six nitrate silver(I) complexes with pyridine and (benz)imidazole derivatives were investigated. The present study evaluated the antibacterial activities of the complexes against three Gram-negative strains: Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Proteus hauseri ATCC 13315. The results were compared with those of silver nitrate, a silver sulfadiazine drug and appropriate ligands. The most significant antibacterial properties were exerted by silver(I) complexes containing benzimidazole derivatives. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes was examined against B16 (murine melanoma) and 10T1/2 (murine fibroblasts) cells. All of the tested silver(I) compounds were not toxic to fibroblast cells in concentration inhibited cancer cell (B16) viability by 50%, which ranged between 2.44-28.65 µM. The molecular and crystal structure of silver(I) complex of 2,6-di(hydroxymethyl)pyridine was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The most important features of the crystal packing and intermolecular non-covalent interactions in the Ag(I) complex were quantified via Hirshfeld surface analysis.

  10. Agent planning in AgScala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Saša; Mitrović, Dejan; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2013-10-01

    Agent-oriented programming languages are designed to simplify the development of software agents, especially those that exhibit complex, intelligent behavior. This paper presents recent improvements of AgScala, an agent-oriented programming language based on Scala. AgScala includes declarative constructs for managing beliefs, actions and goals of intelligent agents. Combined with object-oriented and functional programming paradigms offered by Scala, it aims to be an efficient framework for developing both purely reactive, and more complex, deliberate agents. Instead of the Prolog back-end used initially, the new version of AgScala relies on Agent Planning Package, a more advanced system for automated planning and reasoning.

  11. Preparation, characterization, and photocatalytic activity of porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong; Xiong, Tianqing; Wang, Tingting

    2014-02-01

    Porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts were synthesized by a multistep route, including a dealloying method to prepare porous Ag, a transformation from Ag to AgBr and AgBrI, and a photo-reduction process to form Ag nanoparticles on the surface of AgBr and AgBrI. It was found that the porous structure kept unchanged during Ag was transferred into AgBr, AgBrI, AgBr@Ag, and AgBrI@Ag. Both porous AgBr@Ag and porous AgBrI@Ag showed much higher visible-light photocatalytic activity than cubic AgBr@Ag for the degradation of methyl orange, which is because the interconnected pore channels not only provide more reactive sites but also favor the transportation of photo-generated electrons and holes. For AgBrI@Ag, AgBrI solid solution formed at the interface of AgBr and AgI, and the phase junction can effectively separate the photo-generated electrons and holes, favorable to the improvement of photocatalytic activity. The optimal I content for obtaining the highest activity is ∼10 at.%.

  12. New insight into daylight photocatalysis of AgBr@Ag: synergistic effect between semiconductor photocatalysis and plasmonic photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Li, Hao; Zhang, Lizhi

    2012-05-14

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) are often used as electron scavengers in conventional semiconductor photocatalysis to suppress electron-hole (e(-)-h(+) ) recombination and promote interfacial charge transfer, and thus enhance photocatalytic activity of semiconductors. In this contribution, it is demonstrated that noble metal NPs such as Ag NPs function as visible-light harvesting and electron-generating centers during the daylight photocatalysis of AgBr@Ag. Novel Ag plasmonic photocatalysis could cooperate with the conventional AgBr semiconductor photocatalysis to enhance the overall daylight activity of AgBr@Ag greatly because of an interesting synergistic effect. After a systematic investigation of the daylight photocatalysis mechanism of AgBr@Ag, the synergistic effect was attributed to surface plasmon resonance induced local electric field enhancement on Ag, which can accelerate the generation of e(-)-h(+) pairs in AgBr, so that more electrons are produced in the conduction band of AgBr under daylight irradiation. This study provides new insight into the photocatalytic mechanism of noble metal/semiconductor systems as well as the design and fabrication of novel plasmonic photocatalysts.

  13. High binding yet accelerated guest rotation within a cucurbit[7]uril complex. Toward paramagnetic gyroscopes and rolling nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Casano, G; Poulhès, F; Tran, T K; Ayhan, M M; Karoui, H; Siri, D; Gaudel-Siri, A; Rockenbauer, A; Jeschke, G; Bardelang, D; Tordo, P; Ouari, O

    2015-07-28

    The (15-oxo-3,7,11-triazadispiro[5.1.5.3]hexadec-7-yl)oxidanyl, a bis-spiropiperidinium nitroxide derived from TEMPONE, can be included in cucurbit[7]uril to form a strong (K(a)∼ 2 × 10(5) M(-1)) CB[7]@bPTO complex. EPR and MS spectra, DFT calculations, and unparalleled increased resistance (a factor of ∼10(3)) toward ascorbic acid reduction show evidence of deep inclusion of bPTO inside CB[7]. The unusual shape of the CB[7]@bPTO EPR spectrum can be explained by an anisotropic Brownian rotational diffusion, the global tumbling of the complex being slower than rotation of bPTO around its "long molecular axis" inside CB[7]. The CB[7] (stator) with the encapsulated bPTO (rotator) behaves as a supramolecular paramagnetic rotor with increased rotational speed of the rotator that has great potential for advanced nanoscale machines requiring wheels such as cucurbiturils with virtually no friction between the wheel and the axle for optimum wheel rotation (i.e. nanopulleys and nanocars).

  14. Laser-induced transformation of supramolecular complexes: approach to controlled formation of hybrid multi-yolk-shell Au-Ag@a-C:H nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Manshina, A. A.; Grachova, E. V.; Povolotskiy, A. V.; Povolotckaia, A. V.; Petrov, Y. V.; Koshevoy, I. O.; Makarova, A. A.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Tunik, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work an efficient approach of the controlled formation of hybrid Au–Ag–C nanostructures based on laser-induced transformation of organometallic supramolecular cluster compound is suggested. Herein the one-step process of the laser-induced synthesis of hybrid multi-yolk-shell Au-Ag@a-C:H nanoparticles which are bimetallic gold-silver subnanoclusters dispersed in nanospheres of amorphous hydrogenated a-C:H carbon is reported in details. It has been demonstrated that variation of the experimental parameters such as type of the organometallic precursor, solvent, deposition geometry and duration of laser irradiation allows directed control of nanoparticles’ dimension and morphology. The mechanism of Au-Ag@a-C:H nanoparticles formation is suggested: the photo-excitation of the precursor molecule through metal-to-ligand charge transfer followed by rupture of metallophilic bonds, transformation of the cluster core including red-ox intramolecular reaction and aggregation of heterometallic species that results in the hybrid metal/carbon nanoparticles with multi-yolk-shell architecture formation. It has been found that the nanoparticles obtained can be efficiently used for the Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy label-free detection of human serum albumin in low concentration solution. PMID:26153347

  15. Hydrogen in Ag-doped ZnO: theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    He, H Y; Hu, J; Pan, B C

    2009-05-28

    Based on density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the behaviors of a H atom in Ag-doped ZnO involving the preference sites, diffusion behaviors, the electronic structures, and vibrational properties. We find that a H atom can migrate to the doped Ag to form a Ag-H complex by overcoming energy barriers of 0.3-1.0 eV. The lowest-energy site for H location is the bond center of a Ag-O in the basal plane. Moreover, H can migrate between this site and its equivalent sites with energy cost of less than 0.5 eV. In contrast, dissociation of such a Ag-H complex needs energy of about 1.1-1.3 eV. This implies that the Ag-H complexes can commonly exist in the Ag-doped ZnO, which have a negative effect on the desirable p-type carrier concentrations of Ag-doped ZnO. In addition, based on the frozen phonon calculation, the vibrational properties of ZnO with a Ag-H complex are predicted. Some new vibrational modes associated with the Ag-H complex present in the vibrational spectrum of the system.

  16. Ag nanotubes and Ag/AgCl electrodes in nanoporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Siwy, Zuzanna S.

    2011-04-01

    Miniaturization of the entire experimental setup is a key requirement for widespread application of nanodevices. For nanopore biosensing, integrating electrodes onto the nanopore membrane and controlling the pore length is important for reducing the complexity and improving the sensitivity of the system. Here we present a method to achieve these goals, which relies on electroless plating to produce Ag nanotubes in track-etched polymer nanopore templates. By plating from one side only, we create a conductive nanotube that does not span the full length of the pore, and thus can act as a nanoelectrode located inside the nanopore. To give optimal electrochemical behavior for sensing, we coat the Ag nanotube with a layer of AgCl. We characterize the behavior of this nanoelectrode by measuring its current-voltage response and find that, in most cases, the response is asymmetric. The plated nanopores have initial diameters between 100 and 300 nm, thus a range suitable for detection of viruses.

  17. Near integer tune for polarization preservation in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Glenn, J.W.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Zeno, K.

    2012-05-20

    The high energy (T = 250 GeV) polarized proton beam experiments performed in RHIC, require high polarization of the beam. In order to preserve the polarization of the proton beam, during the acceleration in the AGS, which is the pre-injector to RHIC, we have installed in AGS two partial helical magnets which minimize the loss of the beam polarization caused by the various intrinsic spin resonances occurring during the proton acceleration. The minimization of the polarization loss during the acceleration cycle, requires that the vertical tune of the AGS is between the values of 8.97 and 8.985 during the acceleration. With the AGS constrained to run at near integer tune {approx}8.980, the perturbations to the beam caused by the partial helical magnets are large and also result in large beta and dispersion waves. To mitigate the adverse effect of the partial helices on the optics of the AGS, we have installed in specified straight sections of the AGS compensation quads and we have also generated a beam bump at the location of the cold partial helix. In this paper we present the beam optics of the AGS which ameliorates the adverse effect of the two partial helices on the beam optics.

  18. Silencing SlELP2L, a tomato Elongator complex protein 2-like gene, inhibits leaf growth, accelerates leaf, sepal senescence, and produces dark-green fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingku; Li, Yali; Chen, Guoping; Ren, Lijun; Xie, Qiaoli; Zhao, Zhiping; Hu, Zongli

    2015-01-09

    The multi-subunit complex Elongator interacts with elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and is thought to facilitate transcription through histone acetylation. Elongator is highly conserved in eukaryotes, yet has multiple kingdom-specific functions in diverse organisms. Recent genetic studies performed in Arabidopsis have demonstrated that Elongator functions in plant growth and development, and in response to biotic and abiotic stress. However, little is known about its roles in other plant species. Here, we study the function of an Elongator complex protein 2-like gene in tomato, here designated as SlELP2L, through RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Silencing SlELP2L in tomato inhibits leaf growth, accelerates leaf and sepal senescence, and produces dark-green fruit with reduced GA and IAA contents in leaves, and increased chlorophyll accumulation in pericarps. Gene expression analysis indicated that SlELP2L-silenced plants had reduced transcript levels of ethylene- and ripening-related genes during fruit ripening with slightly decreased carotenoid content in fruits, while the expression of DNA methyltransferase genes was up-regulated, indicating that SlELP2L may modulate DNA methylation in tomato. Besides, silencing SlELP2L increases ABA sensitivity in inhibiting seedling growth. These results suggest that SlELP2L plays important roles in regulating plant growth and development, as well as in response to ABA in tomato.

  19. Phosphorylation of CDC25A on SER283 in late S/G2 by CDK/cyclin complexes accelerates mitotic entry.

    PubMed

    Mazzolini, Laurent; Broban, Anaïs; Froment, Carine; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Besson, Arnaud; Manenti, Stéphane; Dozier, Christine

    2016-10-17

    The Cdc25A phosphatase is an essential activator of CDK-cyclin complexes at all steps of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The activity of Cdc25A is itself regulated in part by positive and negative feedback regulatory loops performed by its CDK-cyclin substrates that occur in G1 as well as during the G1/S and G2/M transitions. However, the regulation of Cdc25A during G2 phase progression before mitotic entry has not been intensively characterized. Here, we identify by mass spectrometry analysis a new phosphorylation event of Cdc25A on Serine283. Phospho-specific antibodies revealed that the phosphorylation of this residue appears in late S/G2 phase of an unperturbed cell cycle and is performed by CDK-cyclin complexes. Overexpression studies of wild-type and non-phosphorylatable mutant forms of Cdc25A indicated that Ser283 phosphorylation increases the G2/M-promoting activity of the phosphatase without impacting its stability or subcellular localization. Our results therefore identify a new positive regulatory loop between Cdc25A and its CDK-cyclin substrates which contributes to accelerate entry into mitosis through the regulation of Cdc25A activity in G2. PMID:27580187

  20. Structure Determination of an Ag(I) -Mediated Cytosine-Cytosine Base Pair within DNA Duplex in Solution with (1) H/(15) N/(109) Ag NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dairaku, Takenori; Furuita, Kyoko; Sato, Hajime; Šebera, Jakub; Nakashima, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Jiro; Yamanaka, Daichi; Kondo, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Itaru; Ono, Akira; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Kojima, Chojiro; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    The structure of an Ag(I) -mediated cytosine-cytosine base pair, C-Ag(I) -C, was determined with NMR spectroscopy in solution. The observation of 1-bond (15) N-(109) Ag J-coupling ((1) J((15) N,(109) Ag): 83 and 84 Hz) recorded within the C-Ag(I) -C base pair evidenced the N3-Ag(I) -N3 linkage in C-Ag(I) -C. The triplet resonances of the N4 atoms in C-Ag(I) -C demonstrated that each exocyclic N4 atom exists as an amino group (-NH2 ), and any isomerization and/or N4-Ag(I) bonding can be excluded. The 3D structure of Ag(I) -DNA complex determined with NOEs was classified as a B-form conformation with a notable propeller twist of C-Ag(I) -C (-18.3±3.0°). The (109) Ag NMR chemical shift of C-Ag(I) -C was recorded for cytidine/Ag(I) complex (δ((109) Ag): 442 ppm) to completed full NMR characterization of the metal linkage. The structural interpretation of NMR data with quantum mechanical calculations corroborated the structure of the C-Ag(I) -C base pair. PMID:27505707

  1. Structure Determination of an Ag(I) -Mediated Cytosine-Cytosine Base Pair within DNA Duplex in Solution with (1) H/(15) N/(109) Ag NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dairaku, Takenori; Furuita, Kyoko; Sato, Hajime; Šebera, Jakub; Nakashima, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Jiro; Yamanaka, Daichi; Kondo, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Itaru; Ono, Akira; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Kojima, Chojiro; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    The structure of an Ag(I) -mediated cytosine-cytosine base pair, C-Ag(I) -C, was determined with NMR spectroscopy in solution. The observation of 1-bond (15) N-(109) Ag J-coupling ((1) J((15) N,(109) Ag): 83 and 84 Hz) recorded within the C-Ag(I) -C base pair evidenced the N3-Ag(I) -N3 linkage in C-Ag(I) -C. The triplet resonances of the N4 atoms in C-Ag(I) -C demonstrated that each exocyclic N4 atom exists as an amino group (-NH2 ), and any isomerization and/or N4-Ag(I) bonding can be excluded. The 3D structure of Ag(I) -DNA complex determined with NOEs was classified as a B-form conformation with a notable propeller twist of C-Ag(I) -C (-18.3±3.0°). The (109) Ag NMR chemical shift of C-Ag(I) -C was recorded for cytidine/Ag(I) complex (δ((109) Ag): 442 ppm) to completed full NMR characterization of the metal linkage. The structural interpretation of NMR data with quantum mechanical calculations corroborated the structure of the C-Ag(I) -C base pair.

  2. Progress with the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Rare K-decay, neutrino and heavy ion physics demands that a rapid- cycling high vacuum and high intensity Booster be built for the AGS at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues needing special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. Finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione incorporated into a collagen matrix as a base for the design of drugs accelerating skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shekhter, Anatoly B; Rudenko, Tatyana G; Istranov, Leonid P; Guller, Anna E; Borodulin, Rostislav R; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2015-10-12

    Composites of a collagen matrix and dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione (DNIC-GS) (in a dose of 4.0 μmoles per item) in the form of spongy sheets (DNIC-Col) were prepared and then topically applied in rat excisional full-thickness skin wound model. The effects of DNIC-Col were studied in comparison with spontaneously healing wounds (SpWH) and wounds treated with collagen sponges (Col) without DNIC-GS. The composites induced statistically and clinically significant acceleration of complete wound closure (21±1 day versus 23±1 day and 26±1 day for DNIC-Col, Col and SpWH, respectively). Histological examination of wound tissues on days 4, 14, 18 and 21 after surgery demonstrated that this improvement was supported by enhanced growth, maturation and fibrous transformation of granulation tissue and earlier epithelization of the injured area in rats treated with DNIC-Col composites benchmarked against Col and SpWH. It is suggested that the positive effect of the new pharmaceutical material on wound healing is based on the release of NO from decomposing DNIC. This effect is believed to be potentiated by the synergy of DNIC and collagen.

  4. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  5. Commissioning the polarized beam in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.; Brown, H.; Chiang, I.H.; Courant, E.; Gardner, C.; Lazarus, D.; Lee, Y.Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Sidhu, S.; Skelly, J.

    1985-01-01

    After the successful operation of a high energy polarized proton beam at the Argonne Laboratory Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) was terminated, plans were made to commission such a beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). On February 23, 1984, 2 ..mu..A of polarized H/sup -/ was accelerated through the Linac to 200 MeV with a polarization of about 65%. 1 ..mu..A was injected into the AGS and acceleration attempts began. Several relatively short runs were then made during the next three months. Dedicated commissioning began in early June, and on June 26 the AGS polarized beam reached 13.8 GeV/c to exceed the previous ZGS peak momentum of 12.75 GeV/c. Commissioning continued to the point where 10/sup 10/ polarized protons were accelerated to 16.5 GeV/c with 40% polarization. Then, two experiments had a short polarized proton run. We plan to continue commissioning efforts in the fall of this year to reach higher energy, higher intensity, and higher polarization levels. We present a brief description of the facility and of the methods used for preserving the polarization of the accelerating beam.

  6. Hyperdynamics: Accelerated Molecular Dynamics of Infrequent Events

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.

    1997-05-01

    I derive a general method for accelerating the molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation of infrequent events in solids. A bias potential ({Delta}V{sub b}) raises the energy in regions other than the transition states between potential basins. Transitions occur at an accelerated rate and the elapsed time becomes a statistical property of the system. {Delta}V{sub b} can be constructed without knowing the location of the transition states and implementation requires only first derivatives. I examine the diffusion mechanisms of a 10-atom Ag cluster on the Ag(111) surface using a 220 {mu}s hyper-MD simulation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Ab inito study of Ag-related defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qixin; Xiong, Zhihua; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Guodong

    2008-12-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the structure and electronic properties of Ag-related defects in ZnO. The calculation results indicate that AgZn behaves as acceptor. Simultaneously, by comparing the formation energy and electronic structure of Ag-related defects in ZnO, Oi-AgZn behaves as acceptor in Ag-doped ZnO and it is better to gain p-type ZnO. However, Hi-AgZn complex has the lowest formation energy. Thus, the formation of the other point defects is greatly suppressed by the formation of Hi in Ag-doped ZnO. Moreover, the H atoms can be easily dissociated from hydrogen-passivated complexes by post-annealing at moderate temperatures, thus, codoping Ag with H may be a good method to achieve p-type in Ag-doped ZnO.

  8. Silver Complexes of Dihalogen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Przemysław J; Himmel, Daniel; Krossing, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    The perfluorohexane-soluble and donor-free silver compound Ag(A) (A=Al(OR(F) )4 ; R(F) =C(CF3 )3 ) prepared using a facile novel route has unprecedented capabilities to form unusual and weakly bound complexes. Here, we report on the three dihalogen-silver complexes Ag(Cl2 )A, Ag(Br2 )A, and Ag(I2 )A derived from the soluble silver compound Ag(A) (characterized by single-crystal/powder XRD, Raman spectra, and quantum-mechanical calculations). PMID:27404568

  9. Synthesis of {beta}-phase Ag{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}I (x = 0-0.5) solid solutions nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xianli; Zhang, Jinghong; Zhang, Guilan; Jiang, Zhonghao; Jin, Dezhen

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Wet-chemical-chelating reaction processing has been used to synthesized A series of single {beta}-phase nano-Ag{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}I (x = 0-0.5) solid solutions powders. {yields} Citric acid as complexing agent takes part in the process of chemical reaction and the chemical reactions can be described in this paper. {yields} The lattice parameters have been ascertained by the results of XRD. {yields} Crystalline sizes, which decrease with copper iodide concentration increasing, have been demonstrated by XRD and TEM. -- Abstract: A series of single {beta}-phase nano-Ag{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}I (x = 0-0.5) solid solutions powders were synthesized by wet-chemical-chelating reaction processing and citric acid used as complexing agent. The Ag{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}I powders were determined by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It was demonstrated that the crystalline size and lattice parameter of the Ag{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}I powders decrease with an increase in the amount of CuI substitution. The copper in the lattice of the Ag{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}I can effectively prevent the crystalline growth of the Ag{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}I powders and citrate used in the Ag{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}I powders synthesized process can accelerate single {beta}-phase crystalline structure formation.

  10. Oxidase-like mimic of Ag@Ag3PO4 microcubes as a smart probe for ultrasensitive and selective Hg(2+) detection.

    PubMed

    Chai, Dong-Feng; Ma, Zhuo; Qiu, Yunfeng; Lv, Yu-Guang; Liu, Hong; Song, Chao-Yu; Gao, Guang-Gang

    2016-02-21

    An oxidase-like mimic system based on facilely synthesized Ag@Ag3PO4 microcubes (Ag@Ag3PO4MCs) was designed and utilized to detect mercury ions with high selectivity and ultrasensitivity. Ag@Ag3PO4MCs with an average size of ca. 1.6 μm were synthesized by the reaction of [Ag(NH3)2](+) complex and Na2HPO4 and subsequent photoreduction under ultraviolet light. The as-prepared Ag@Ag3PO4MCs can effectively catalyze the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of dissolved oxygen in slightly acidic solution, exhibiting oxidase-like activities rather than peroxidase-like activity. Interestingly, the introduction of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the surfaces of Ag3PO4MCs can dramatically enhance the oxidase-like activities due to a synergistic effect between AgNPs and Ag3PO4MCs, as evidenced by the faster oxidation speed of TMB and OPD than that of native Ag3PO4MCs in the presence of dissolved oxygen. The enzyme kinetics can be well-explained by the Michaelis-Menten equation. As "poisoning" inhibitor, Hg(2+) ions can inhibit the enzyme reaction catalyzed by Ag3PO4MCs or Ag@Ag3PO4MCs. On the basis of this effect, a colorimetric Hg(2+) sensor was developed by the enzyme inhibition reaction of Ag3PO4MCs or Ag@Ag3PO4MCs. The excellent specific interaction of Hg-Ag or Hg(2+)-Ag(+) provides high selectivity for Hg(2+) over interfering metal ions. Meanwhile, the sensitivity of this sensor to Hg(2+) is extremely excellent with a limit of detection as low as 0.253 nM for Ag@Ag3PO4MCs. Considering the advantages of low detection limit, low cost, facile preparation, and visualization, the colorimetric Ag@Ag3PO4MCs sensor shows high promise for the testing of Hg(2+) in water samples. PMID:26763181

  11. Self-assembled hetero-bimetallic sandwich with Ag-Ag bridging using a flexible two-arm ferrocene amide linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jia; Wei, Kai-Ju; Chen, Yao-Wen; Liu, Yangzhong

    2012-03-01

    The tetradentate ferrocenyl sandwich molecule N,N'-bis(di-2-pyridylamine)-1,1'-ferrocenedicarboxamine (bdpfa) has been designed and synthesized as an organometallic ligand in order to construct hetero-bimetallic architectures. By combining the flexibility from the arm-like molecule bdpfa with AgI ions, a novel complex [Ag2(bdpfa)](ClO4)2·(H2O)2 (1) was obtained. Single crystal X-ray analysis has revealed that complex 1 forms a hetero-trinuclear sandwich-type complex with Ag-Ag bridging. Furthermore, the preliminary electrochemical properties of the ligand and complex were investigated.

  12. EDDY CURRENT EFFECT OF THE BNL-AGS VACUUM CHAMBER ON THE OPTICS OF THE BNL-AGS SYNCHROTRON.

    SciTech Connect

    TSOUPAS,N.; AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.A.; GLENN,J.W.; GARDNER,K.

    1999-03-29

    During the acceleration cycle of the AGS synchrotron, eddy currents are generated within the walls of the vacuum chambers of the AGS main magnets. The vacuum chambers have elliptical cross section, are made of inconel material with a wall thickness of 2 mm and are placed within the gap of the combined-function main magnets of the AGS synchrotron. The generation of the eddy currents in the walls of the vacuum chambers, creates various magnetic multipoles, which affect the optics of the AGS machine. In this report these magnetic multipoles are calculated for various time interval starting at the acceleration cycle, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is {approx}0.1 T, and ending before the beam extraction process, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is almost constant at {approx}1.1 T. The calculations show that the magnetic multipoles generated by the eddy-currents affect the optics of the AGS synchrotron during the acceleration cycle and in particular at low magnetic fields of the main magnet. Their effect is too weak to affect the optics of the AGS machine during beam extraction at the nominal energies.

  13. A polysaccharide-peptide complex from abalone mushroom (Pleurotus abalonus) fruiting bodies increases activities and gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and reduces lipid peroxidation in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Ng, T B; Song, M; Yuan, F; Liu, Z K; Wang, C L; Jiang, Y; Fu, M; Liu, F

    2007-06-01

    The antioxidant effects of a polysaccharide-peptide complex (F22) from mushroom (Pleurotus abalonus)-fruiting bodies were studied. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the liver, kidney, and brain of senescence-accelerated mice showed a marked increase after treatment with the polysaccharide-peptide complex. Concurrently, the gene expression levels of SOD, CAT, and GPx, as determined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, were up-regulated in the liver, kidney, and brain, whereas the MDA content in these organs declined. The maximal lifespan of the mice was prolonged.

  14. AgRISTARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    An introduction to the overall AgRISTARS program, a general statement on progress, and separate summaries of the activities of each project, with emphasis on the technical highlights are presented. Organizational and management information on AgRISTARS is included in the appendices, as is a complete bibliography of publication and reports.

  15. AGS experiments: 1993 - 1994 - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains: FY 1995 AGS Schedule as Run; FY 1996-97 AGE Schedule (working copy); AGS Beams 1995; AGS Experimental Area FY 1993 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1994 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1995 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1996 Physics Program (In progress); A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and Listing of AGS experimenters begins here. This is the twelfth edition.

  16. Double dumbbell shaped AgNi alloy by pulsed electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanapal, K.; Vasumathi, M.; Santhi, Kalavathy; Narayanan, V. Stephen, A.

    2014-01-28

    Silver-Nickel is the well-known thermally immiscible system that makes them quite complex for the formation of alloy. This kind of alloy can be attained from electrodeposition method. In the present work, AgNi alloy was synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition in a single bath two electrode system with the use of anodic alumina membrane. The prepared AgNi alloy and pure Ag were characterized with X-ray Diffraction (XRD) for structural confirmation, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for morphological, and magnetic properties by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer, respectively. The X-ray Diffraction study shows the formation of cubic structure for pure Ag. SEM analysis reveals the double dumbbell morphology for AgNi alloy and spherically agglomeration for pure silver. Hysteresis behaviour from VSM measurement indicates that the AgNi alloy have good ferro-magnetic properties.

  17. Effect of Accelerator in Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Darroudi, Majid; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Shameli, Kamyar

    2010-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were successfully synthesized in the natural polymeric matrix. Silver nitrate, gelatin, glucose, and sodium hydroxide have been used as silver precursor, stabilizer, reducing agent, and accelerator reagent, respectively. This study investigated the role of NaOH as the accelerator. The resultant products have been confirmed to be Ag-NPs using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-vis spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The colloidal sols of Ag-NPs obtained at different volumes of NaOH show strong and different surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks, which can be explained from the TEM images of Ag-NPs and their particle size distribution. Compared with other synthetic methods, this work is green, rapid, and simple to use. The newly prepared Ag-NPs may have many potential applications in chemical and biological industries. PMID:21152307

  18. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  19. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  20. Accelerating Corrosion in Solar-Cell Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalaby, H. M.

    1986-01-01

    In simple electrochemical cell, two silicon solar cells serve as anode and cathode, respectively. Electrolytic medium and voltage between them accelerate corrosion and migration interactions between cell metal contacts and plastic encapsulant. Degradation of metal contacts becomes evident in few hours. Although developed specifically for cells with Ti/Pd/Ag contacts, technique readily adapted to other metal combinations.

  1. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  2. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  3. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  4. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  5. Overcoming an intrinsic depolarizing resonance with a partial snake at the Brookhaven AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K. A.; Glenn, W.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zeno, K.; Ranjbar, V.; Cadman, R. V.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.; High Energy Physics; BNL; Indiana Univ.

    2004-06-01

    An 11.4% partial Siberian snake was used to successfully accelerate polarized protons through a strong intrinsic depolarizing spin resonance in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). No noticeable depolarization was observed. This opens up the possibility of using a 20% to 30% partial Siberian snake in the AGS or other medium energy proton synchrotrons to overcome all weak and strong depolarizing spin resonances.

  6. Geometry optimization and structural distribution of silver clusters from Ag 170 to Ag 310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xueguang; Yang, Xiaoli; Cai, Wensheng

    2008-07-01

    Silver clusters in the size range of 170-310 were optimized with a modified dynamic lattice search (DLS) method. Considering the computational complexity, only 21 clusters of several tens and magic numbers of atoms were investigated. The interaction of silver atoms is modeled by the Gupta potential. Results show that, between the 21 clusters, nine fcc and twelve m-Dh structures are obtained. Compared with the structures adopted by Ag 13 to Ag 160, the main motif is still m-Dh in the range of Ag 170-Ag 310, but the ratio of fcc structures obviously increases. It can, therefore, be deduced that the fcc motif is more stable for larger size silver clusters.

  7. Instrumentation and control of the AGS Booster vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Gabusi, J.; Geller, J.; Hseuh, H.C.; Rosas, P.; Sandburg, J.; Shen, B.; Stattel, P.; Zapasek, R.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS Booster is a synchrotron for the acceleration of both protons and heavy ions. A pressure of low 10{sup {minus}11} Torr is required for the acceleration of the partially stripped, low {Beta}, very heavy ions. This paper describes the power supplies and controls for this ultra-high vacuum system with the emphasis on the operation of the ion gauge system over long cable length and on equipment interlock 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Alex

    2011-10-01

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  9. Accelerator Facilities for Radiation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    HSRP Goals in Accelerator Use and Development are: 1.Need for ground-based heavy ion and proton facility to understand space radiation effects discussed most recently by NAS/NRC Report (1996). 2. Strategic Program Goals in facility usage and development: -(1) operation of AGS for approximately 600 beam hours/year; (2) operation of Loma Linda University (LLU) proton facility for approximately 400 beam hours/year; (3) construction of BAF facility; and (4) collaborative research at HIMAC in Japan and with other existing or potential international facilities. 3. MOA with LLU has been established to provide proton beams with energies of 40-250 important for trapped protons and solar proton events. 4. Limited number of beam hours available at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS).

  10. Impedance studies of the cell Ag/AgI/Ag beta alumina/AgI/Ag. Technical report No. 15, August 1987-August 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Breiter, M.W.; Drstak, H.; Maly-Schreiber, M.

    1988-07-01

    The construction of the cell Ag/AgI/Ag beta alumina/AgI/Ag is described. The impedance of this cell was measured between .001 and 10000 Hz at temperatures between 20 and 550 C. At temperatures below 100 C the cell impedance is determined to a large extent by the bulk resistance of the AgI layer and to a smaller extent by the impedance of the interface Ag/Agi. At temperatures between 160 and 350 C the impedance is controlled by the bulk resistance of the Ag beta alumina and an impedance due to contact problems between Ag and AgI. The bulk resistance of the beta' alumina becomes predominant between 350 and 550 C. A hindrance due to the transfer of silver ions from AgI to Ag beta' alumina was not observable in the whole temperature range.

  11. Aligning "TextEvaluator"® Scores with the Accelerated Text Complexity Guidelines Specified in the Common Core State Standards. Research Report. ETS RR-15-21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    The "TextEvaluator"® text analysis tool is a fully automated text complexity evaluation tool designed to help teachers, curriculum specialists, textbook publishers, and test developers select texts that are consistent with the text complexity guidelines specified in the Common Core State Standards.This paper documents the procedure used…

  12. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  13. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  14. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  15. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  16. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  17. A comparative study about electronic structures at rubrene/Ag and Ag/rubrene interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Sumona Mukherjee, M.

    2015-10-15

    The contact between the electrode and the organic semiconductor is one of the most crucial factors in determining the organic device performance. The development and production technology of different organic devices require the understanding of different types of metal/organic semiconducting thin film interfaces. Comparisons about the electronic structures at Rubrene/Ag and Ag/Rubrene interfaces have been studied using photoemission spectroscopy. The Ag on rubrene interfaces is found to show more interesting and complex natures than its counterpart. The vacuum level (VL) was shifted about 0.51 eV from push back effect for deposition of 5 Å rubrene onto Ag film whereas the electronic features of silver was only suppressed and no energy shift was resulted. While the deposition of 5 Å Ag onto rubrene film leads to the diffusion of the Ag atoms, as a cluster with quantum size effect, inside the film. Angle dependent XPS measurement indicates that diffused metal clusters were present at entire probed depth of the film. Moreover these clusters dope the uppermost surface of the rubrene film which consequences a shift of the electronic states of thick organic film towards higher binding energy. The VL was found to shift about 0.31 eV toward higher binding energy whereas the shift was around 0.21 eV for the electronic states of rubrene layer.

  18. A comparative study about electronic structures at rubrene/Ag and Ag/rubrene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sumona; Mukherjee, M.

    2015-10-01

    The contact between the electrode and the organic semiconductor is one of the most crucial factors in determining the organic device performance. The development and production technology of different organic devices require the understanding of different types of metal/organic semiconducting thin film interfaces. Comparisons about the electronic structures at Rubrene/Ag and Ag/Rubrene interfaces have been studied using photoemission spectroscopy. The Ag on rubrene interfaces is found to show more interesting and complex natures than its counterpart. The vacuum level (VL) was shifted about 0.51 eV from push back effect for deposition of 5 Å rubrene onto Ag film whereas the electronic features of silver was only suppressed and no energy shift was resulted. While the deposition of 5 Å Ag onto rubrene film leads to the diffusion of the Ag atoms, as a cluster with quantum size effect, inside the film. Angle dependent XPS measurement indicates that diffused metal clusters were present at entire probed depth of the film. Moreover these clusters dope the uppermost surface of the rubrene film which consequences a shift of the electronic states of thick organic film towards higher binding energy. The VL was found to shift about 0.31 eV toward higher binding energy whereas the shift was around 0.21 eV for the electronic states of rubrene layer.

  19. Properties of a new type Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy composite anode for zinc electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-tao; Liu, Huan-rong; Zhang, Yong-chun; Chen, Bu-ming; Guo, Zhong-cheng; Xu, Rui-dong

    2013-10-01

    An Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy composite anode was produced via composite casting. Its electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction and corrosion resistance was evaluated by anodic polarization curves and accelerated corrosion test, respectively. The microscopic morphologies of the anode section and anodic oxidation layer during accelerated corrosion test were obtained by scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the composite anode (hard anodizing) displays a more compact interfacial combination and a better adhesive strength than plating tin. Compared with industrial Pb-0.3%Ag anodes, the oxygen evolution overpotentials of Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing) and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) at 500 A·m-2 were lower by 57 and 14 mV, respectively. Furthermore, the corrosion rates of Pb-0.3%Ag alloy, Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing), and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) were 13.977, 9.487, and 11.824 g·m-2·h-1, respectively, in accelerated corrosion test for 8 h at 2000 A·m-2. The anodic oxidation layer of Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (hard anodizing) is more compact than Pb-0.3%Ag alloy and Al/Pb-0.3%Ag alloy (plating tin) after the test.

  20. Novel durable bio-photocatalyst purifiers, a non-heterogeneous mechanism: accelerated entrapped dye degradation into structural polysiloxane-shield nano-reactors.

    PubMed

    Dastjerdi, Roya; Montazer, Majid; Shahsavan, Shadi; Böttcher, Horst; Moghadam, M B; Sarsour, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    This research has designed innovative Ag/TiO(2) polysiloxane-shield nano-reactors on the PET fabric to develop novel durable bio-photocatalyst purifiers. To create these very fine nano-reactors, oppositely surface charged multiple size nanoparticles have been applied accompanied with a crosslinkable amino-functionalized polysiloxane (XPs) emulsion. Investigation of photocatalytic dye decolorization efficiency revealed a non-heterogeneous mechanism including an accelerated degradation of entrapped dye molecules into the structural polysiloxane-shield nano-reactors. In fact, dye molecules can be adsorbed by both Ag and XPs due to their electrostatic interactions and/or even via forming a complex with them especially with silver NPs. The absorbed dye and active oxygen species generated by TiO(2) were entrapped by polysiloxane shelter and the presence of silver nanoparticles further attract the negative oxygen species closer to the adsorbed dye molecules. In this way, the dye molecules are in close contact with concentrated active oxygen species into the created nano-reactors. This provides an accelerated degradation of dye molecules. This non-heterogeneous mechanism has been detected on the sample containing all of the three components. Increasing the concentration of Ag and XPs accelerated the second step beginning with an enhanced rate. Further, the treated samples also showed an excellent antibacterial activity.

  1. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  2. Bunched beam echos in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kewisch, J.; Brennan, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    Beam echos have been measured at FNAL and CERN in coasting beams. A coherent oscillation introduced by a short RF burst decoheres quickly, but a coherent echo of this oscillation can be observed if the decohered oscillation is bounced off a second RF burst. In this report the authors describe first longitudinal echo measurements of bunched beam in the AGS accelerator. They applied a method proposed by Stupakov for transverse beam echos, where the initial oscillation is produced by a dipole kick and is bounced off a quadrupole kick. In the longitudinal case the dipole and quadrupole kicks are produced by cavities operating at a 90 and 0{degree} phase shift, respectively.

  3. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  4. Ag microtubes with novel pentagon pores templated by fivefold symmetric Cu microrods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Teng, Fei; Zhang, Tongyu; Kan, Yandong; Yang, Liming; Gu, Wenhao; Liu, Zailun; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, An; Teng, Yiran

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we report a green, simple and fast method to fabricate novel Cu@Ag core@shell and Ag microstructures. According to galvanic replacement, the novel pentagon-shaped pores of Ag can form from the shape memory effect of fivefold symmetric Cu template. Additionally, the Ag and Cu@Ag crystals with different microstructures can be controlled by changing the complexing agent, solvent, as well as the ion concentration and source of silver. This work suggests that a shape memory of template can be used for micro/nanostructure control.

  5. X-ray diffraction structure of the 1,1{prime}-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene (dppf)-bridged complex [(dppf)AgCl]{sub 2}: An unexpected product from the reaction between cis-(bpy){sub 2}RuCl{sub 2} and dppf in the presence of AgBF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.; Bott, S.G.; Richmond, M.G.

    1995-05-01

    The reaction between cis-Ru(bpy){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(where bpy = bipyridine) and the diphosphine ligand 1,1 {prime} - bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene (dppf) in the presence of AgBF{sub 4} has led to the isolation of the title compound [Ag(dppf)Cl]{sub 2}. [Ag(dppf)Cl]{sub 2} has been structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, which confirms the bridging mode adopted by the ancillary dppf ligand and the centrosymmetric nature of this molecule. Dimeric [Ag(dppf)Cl]{sub 2} crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1, a = 11.426(1) {angstrom}, b = 11.509(1) {angstrom}, c = 12.786(1) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 68.96(2){degrees}, {beta} = 70.66(2){degrees} = {gamma} = 71.24(2){degrees}, V = 1441(1) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 1, d{sub calc} = 1.608 g {center_dot} cm{sup {minus}3}; R = 0.0445, R{sub 2} = 0.0566 for 4486 observed reflections with l {ge} 3{sigma}(l).

  6. Quantification of HBsAg: basic virology for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Min; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2011-01-21

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is produced and secreted through a complex mechanism that is still not fully understood. In clinical fields, HBsAg has long served as a qualitative diagnostic marker for hepatitis B virus infection. Notably, advances have been made in the development of quantitative HBsAg assays, which have allowed viral replication monitoring, and there is an opportunity to make maximal use of quantitative HBsAg to elucidate its role in clinical fields. Yet, it needs to be underscored that a further understanding of HBsAg, not only from clinical point of view but also from a virologic point of view, would enable us to deepen our insights, so that we could more widely expand and apply its utility. It is also important to be familiar with HBsAg variants and their clinical consequences in terms of immune escape mutants, issues resulting from overlap with corresponding mutation in the P gene, and detection problems for the HBsAg variants. In this article, we review current concepts and issues on the quantification of HBsAg titers with respect to their biologic nature, method principles, and clinically relevant topics.

  7. Effects of Ag addition on FePt L1{sub 0} ordering transition: A direct observation of ordering transition and Ag segregation in FePtAg alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Yu, Youxing; Gao, Tenghua

    2015-12-21

    FePt and (FePt){sub 91.2}Ag{sub 8.8} alloy films were deposited by magnetron sputtering. The average coercivity of (FePt){sub 91.2}Ag{sub 8.8} films reaches 8.51 × 10{sup 5} A/m, which is 0.63 × 10{sup 5} A/m higher than that of the corresponding FePt films. Ag addition effectively promotes the FePt L1{sub 0} ordering transition at a relatively low annealing temperature of 400 °C. The promotion mechanism was investigated by using in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and ex situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The concurrence of ordering transition and Ag segregation in FePtAg alloy films was first observed by using in situ heating HRTEM. The time-resolved evolution reveals more details on the role of Ag addition in FePt low-temperature ordering. Ex situ XAFS results further confirm that Ag replaces Fe sites in the as-deposited films and segregates from FePt-Ag solid solution phase through annealing at elevated temperatures. The segregation of Ag atoms leaves vacancies in the grain. The vacancy formation is believed to accelerate the diffusion of Fe and Pt atoms, which is critical for the L1{sub 0} ordering transition.

  8. Investigation of the chaperone function of the small heat shock protein — AgsA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A small heat shock protein AgsA was originally isolated from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We previously demonstrated that AgsA was an effective chaperone that could reduce the amount of heat-aggregated proteins in an Escherichia coli rpoH mutant. AgsA appeared to promote survival at lethal temperatures by cooperating with other chaperones in vivo. To investigate the aggregation prevention mechanisms of AgsA, we constructed N- or C-terminal truncated mutants and compared their properties with wild type AgsA. Results AgsA showed significant overall homology to wheat sHsp16.9 allowing its three-dimensional structure to be predicted. Truncations of AgsA until the N-terminal 23rd and C-terminal 11th amino acid (AA) from both termini preserved its in vivo chaperone activity. Temperature-controlled gel filtration chromatography showed that purified AgsA could maintain large oligomeric complexes up to 50°C. Destabilization of oligomeric complexes was observed for N-terminal 11- and 17-AA truncated AgsA; C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA could not form large oligomeric complexes. AgsA prevented the aggregation of denatured lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and citrate synthase (CS) but did not prevent the aggregation of insulin at 25°C. N-terminal 17-AA truncated AgsA showed no chaperone activity towards MDH. C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA showed weak or no chaperone activity towards lysozyme, MDH and CS although it prevented the aggregation of insulin at 25°C. When the same amount of AgsA and C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA were mixed (half of respective amount required for efficient chaperone activities), good chaperone activity for all substrates and temperatures was observed. Detectable intermolecular exchanges between AgsA oligomers at 25°C were not observed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis; however, significant exchanges between AgsA oligomers and C-terminal truncated AgsA were observed at 25°C. Conclusions Our data

  9. The AGS Ggamma Meter and Calibrating the Gauss Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, Leif

    2014-03-31

    During AGS Polarized Proton acceleration periods, one output from the AGS Ggamma Meter, namely the energy (or Ggamma) calculated from the magnetic field in the AGS main magnets and the beam radius- both measured in particular instant, is used to figure out the times in the AGS magnet acceleration cycle when the beam passes through a particular set of depolarizing resonances. The resonance set occur whenever a particle’s Ggamma (energy*(G/m) becomes nearly equal to n*Qx (i.e. any integer multiplied by the horizontal betatron tune). This deliverable is why the machinery is referred to as the ''Ggamma Meter'' rather than the AGS energy meter. The Ggamma Meter takes as inputs a set of measurements of frequency (F(t)), radius (r(t)), and gauss clock counts (GCC(t)). The other energy (GgammaBr) assumes the field when the gauss clock starts counting is known. The change in field to time t is given by the measured accumulated gauss clock counts multiplied by the gauss clock calibration (gauss/GCC). In order to deal with experimental data, this calibration factor gets an added ad hoc complication, namely a correction dependent on the rate of change the counting rate. The Ggamma meter takes GCC(t) and together with the past history for this cycle calculates B(t).

  10. Progress and status of the AGS Booster project

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T. )

    1989-01-01

    New physics opportunities, such as: rare K-decay, neutrino and heavy ion physics demand that a rapid-cycling high vacuum and high intensity Booster be built for the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The circumference of the Booster ring is one-quarter that of the AGS. Three modes of operation for various particles are envisioned. For unpolarized protons, four Booster pulses would be injected at a 7.5 Hz repetition rate within a 400 ms flat bottom of the AGS, enabling the present 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp to be increased to 6 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp. The protons would be accelerated to 1.5 GeV although the bending capability provided for heavy ions would eventually allow protons to be accelerated to 2.5 GeV. For heavy ions the rep rates is about 1 Hz and only one pulse would be injected into the AGS. For polarized protons 20 or so pulses can be stored in the Booster ring before injecting them into the AGS. Provisions for mixed modes of operation into a super cycle has been provided for future needs. In this paper, the lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed and major design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. Finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Insertion of Ag atoms into layered MoO{sub 3} via a template route

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Ke; Wang, Hao

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: PVP–Ag{sup +} complex self-assembled with inorganic (Mo{sub x}O{sub y}){sub ∞}{sup n−} chains into a layered hybrid, in which the PVP–Ag complex was intercalated between the (Mo{sub x}O{sub y}){sub ∞}{sup n−} layers. Calcinations of this hybrid at 500 °C lead to formation of Ag/MoO{sub 3} nanohybrid. By this method we have successfully inserted Ag atoms into the semiconductor MoO{sub 3} lattice. Display Omitted Highlights: ► We fabricated a PVP–Ag/polyoxomolybdate layered hybrid via in situ self-assembly. ► The PVP–Ag complex has been inserted between the molybdenum oxide layers. ► This layered hybrid transformed into Ag/MoO{sub 3} nanocomposite after calcinations. ► HR-TEM images show that Ag atoms of about 1 nm have been inserted in the MoO{sub 3} layers. -- Abstract: We report insertion of Ag atoms into layered MoO{sub 3} via an in situ template route. PVP–Ag{sup +} complex self-assembled with inorganic (Mo{sub x}O{sub y}){sub ∞}{sup n−} chains into a layered hybrid, in which the PVP–Ag complex was intercalated between the (Mo{sub x}O{sub y}){sub ∞}{sup n−} layers. Calcinations of this hybrid at 500 °C lead to formation of Ag/MoO{sub 3} hybrid, in which Ag nanoparticles of about 1 nm have been inserted between the MoO{sub 3} layers. By this method pillared MoO{sub 3} has been obtained very easily. We believe that this research opens new routes to fabricate novel intercalation compounds and metal/semiconductor nanohybrids via an efficient and green route.

  12. Communication: UV photoionization of cytosine catalyzed by Ag+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccone, Martín I.; Féraud, Geraldine; Berdakin, Matías; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Pino, Gustavo A.

    2015-07-01

    The photo-induced damages of DNA in interaction with metal cations, which are found in various environments, still remain to be characterized. In this paper, we show how the complexation of a DNA base (cytosine (Cyt)) with a metal cation (Ag+) changes its electronic properties. By means of UV photofragment spectroscopy of cold ions, it was found that the photoexcitation of the CytAg+ complex at low energy (315-282) nm efficiently leads to ionized cytosine (Cyt+) as the single product. This occurs through a charge transfer state in which an electron from the p orbital of Cyt is promoted to Ag+, as confirmed by ab initio calculations at the TD-DFT/B3LYP and RI-ADC(2) theory level using the SV(P) basis set. The low ionization energy of Cyt in the presence of Ag+ could have important implications as point mutation of DNA upon sunlight exposition.

  13. Communication: UV photoionization of cytosine catalyzed by Ag(+).

    PubMed

    Taccone, Martín I; Féraud, Geraldine; Berdakin, Matías; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Pino, Gustavo A

    2015-07-28

    The photo-induced damages of DNA in interaction with metal cations, which are found in various environments, still remain to be characterized. In this paper, we show how the complexation of a DNA base (cytosine (Cyt)) with a metal cation (Ag(+)) changes its electronic properties. By means of UV photofragment spectroscopy of cold ions, it was found that the photoexcitation of the CytAg(+) complex at low energy (315-282) nm efficiently leads to ionized cytosine (Cyt(+)) as the single product. This occurs through a charge transfer state in which an electron from the p orbital of Cyt is promoted to Ag(+), as confirmed by ab initio calculations at the TD-DFT/B3LYP and RI-ADC(2) theory level using the SV(P) basis set. The low ionization energy of Cyt in the presence of Ag(+) could have important implications as point mutation of DNA upon sunlight exposition.

  14. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  15. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  16. Direct in situ observation of the electron-driven synthesis of Ag filaments on α-Ag2WO4 crystals.

    PubMed

    Longo, E; Cavalcante, L S; Volanti, D P; Gouveia, A F; Longo, V M; Varela, J A; Orlandi, M O; Andrés, J

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, we report, for the first time, the real-time in situ nucleation and growth of Ag filaments on α-Ag2WO4 crystals driven by an accelerated electron beam from an electronic microscope under high vacuum. We employed several techniques to characterise the material in depth. By using these techniques combined with first-principles modelling based on density functional theory, a mechanism for the Ag filament formation followed by a subsequent growth process from the nano- to micro-scale was proposed. In general, we have shown that an accelerated electron beam from an electronic microscope under high vacuum enables in situ visualisation of Ag filaments with subnanometer resolution and offers great potential for addressing many fundamental issues in materials science, chemistry, physics and other fields of science.

  17. Metal and elastomer seal tests for accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.M.; McIntyre, G.T.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Skelton, R.; Pate, D.J.; Gill, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The vacuum system of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has more than a thousand metal vacuum seals. Also, numerous elastomer seals are used throughout the AGS to seal large beam component chambers. An accelerator upgrade program is being implemented to reduce the AGS operating pressure by x100 and improve the reliability of the vacuum system. This paper describes work in progress on metal and elastomer vacuum seals to help meet those two objectives. Tests are reported on the sealing properties of a variety of metal seals used on different sealing surfaces. Results are also given on reversible sorption properties of certain elastomers. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Fighting the Residual Polarization Loss in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2009-08-04

    A dual partial snake scheme has been used for AGS polarized proton operation for several years. It has provided polarized proton beams with 1.5x10{sup 11} protons per bunch and 65% polarization for the RHIC spin program. There is still residual polarization loss due to both snake resonances and horizontal resonances as shown in the data. Several schemes were tested or proposed in the AGS to mitigate the loss, such as putting horizontal tune into the spin tune gap, injection into a accelerating bucket, and tune jump across the horizontal resonances. This paper presents the experiment and simulation results and analyses.

  19. Ag Division States Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The discussion which took place during the American Vocational Association's (AVA) Agriculture Division meeting at the 1975 AVA Convention is summarized, and the statement of vo-ag education philosophy (including 13 key concepts), which was passed during the convention, is presented. (AJ)

  20. Acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2015-07-16

    The presentation begins with colorful depictions of solar x-ray flares and references to pulsar phenomena. Plasma reconnection is complex, could be x-point dominated or turbulent, field lines could break due to either resistivity or non-ideal effects, such as electron pressure anisotropy. Electron acceleration is sometimes observed, and sometimes not. One way to study this complex problem is to have many examples of the process (reconnection) and compare them; the other way is to simplify and come to something robust. Ideal MHD (E=0) turbulence driven by magnetic energy is assumed, and the first-order acceleration is sought. It is found that dissipation in big (length >100 ion skin depths) current sheets is universal and independent on microscopic resistivity and the mean imposed field; particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. One example of such flow is spontaneous reconnection. This explains hot electrons with a power-law tail in solar flares, as well as ultrashort time variability in some astrophysical sources.

  1. A complex of YlbF, YmcA and YaaT regulates sporulation, competence and biofilm formation by accelerating the phosphorylation of Spo0A

    PubMed Central

    Carabetta, Valerie J.; Tanner, Andrew W.; Greco, Todd M.; Defrancesco, Melissa; Cristea, Ileana M.; Dubnau, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bacillus subtilis has adopted a bet-hedging strategy to ensure survival in changing environments. From a clonal population, numerous sub-populations can emerge, expressing different sets of genes that govern the developmental processes of sporulation, competence and biofilm formation. The master transcriptional regulator Spo0A controls the entry into all three fates and the production of the phosphorylated active form of Spo0A is precisely regulated via a phosphorelay, involving at least four proteins. Two proteins, YmcA and YlbF were previously shown to play an unidentified role in the regulation of biofilm formation, and in addition, YlbF was shown to regulate competence and sporulation. Using an unbiased proteomics screen, we demonstrate that YmcA and YlbF interact with a third protein, YaaT to form a tripartite complex. We show that all three proteins are required for proper establishment of the three above-mentioned developmental states. We show that the complex regulates the activity of Spo0A in vivo and, using in vitro reconstitution experiments, determine that they stimulate the phosphorelay, probably by interacting with Spo0F and Spo0B. We propose that the YmcA-YlbF-YaaT ternary complex is required to increase Spo0A~P levels above the thresholds needed to induce development. PMID:23490197

  2. Freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ precursors to novel AgBr/AgCl-Ag hybrid nanocrystals for visible-light-driven photodegradation of organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deliang; Chen, Qianqian; Zhang, Wenjie; Ge, Lianfang; Shao, Gang; Fan, Bingbing; Lu, Hongxia; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Daoyuan; Shao, Guosheng

    2015-04-01

    AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals with various molar Br-to-Ag ratios (RBr/Ag = 0, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 1) and different photoreduction times (0-20 min) were synthesized via stepwise liquid-solid reactions using the freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ hybrid as the Ag source, followed by a photoreduction reaction. The AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals obtained take on a spherical morphology with a particle-size range of 58 ± 15 nm. The photocatalytic performance of AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals was evaluated by photodegrading organic dyes, 4-chlorophenol and isopropanol under artificial visible light (λ ⩾ 420 nm, 100 mW cm-2). For the decomposition of rhodamine B, the AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals has a photodegradation rate of ∼0.87 min-1, ∼159 times higher than that (∼0.0054 min-1) of TiO2 (P25), whereas the AgCl-Ag and AgBr-Ag nanocrystals have photodegradation rates of 0.35 min-1 and 0.45 min-1, respectively. The efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs in the ternary system consisting of AgBr, AgCl and Ag species plays a key role in the enhancement of photocatalytic performance.

  3. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION PHYSICS : RESULTS FROM AGS TO RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.

    2002-06-20

    High-energy collisions of heavy ions provide a means to study QCD in a regime of high parton density, and may provide insight into its phme structure. Results from the four experiments at RHIC (BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR) are presented, and placed in context with the lower energy data from the AGS and SPS accelerators. The focus is on the insights these measurements provide into the time history of the collision process. Taken together, the data point to the creation of a deconfined state of matter that forms quickly, expands rapidly and freezes out suddenly. With the new RHIC data, systematic data now exists for heavy ion collisions as a function of {radical}s over several orders of magnitude and as a function of impact parameter. These data test the interplay between hard and soft processes in a large-volume system where nucleons are struck multiple times. The data is consistent with creating a deconfined state (jet quenching) that forms quickly (saturation models), expands rapidly (radial and elliptic flow) and freezes out suddenly (single freezeout and blast wave fits). There are also intriguing connections with particle production in elementary systems, which point to the role of the energy available for particle production on the features of the final state. Many in this field are optimistic that the careful understanding of this experimental data may lead t o the theoretical breakthroughs that will connect these complex systems to the fundamental lattice predict ions.

  4. Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements Induced in Vivo by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Ando, K.; Furusawa, G.; Obe, G.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the ratio complex/simple exchanges can be used as a biomarker of exposure to high-LET radiation. We tested this hypothesis in vivo, by considering data from several studies that measured complex exchanges in peripheral blood from humans exposed to mixed fields of low- and high-LET radiation. In particular, we studied data from astronauts involved in long-term missions in low-Earth-orbit, and uterus cancer patients treated with accelerated carbon ions. Data from two studies of chromosomal aberrations in astronauts used blood samples obtained before and after space flight, and a third study used blood samples from patients before and after radiotherapy course. Similar methods were used in each study, where lymphocytes were stimulated to grow in vitro, and collected after incubation in either colcemid or calyculin A. Slides were painted with whole-chromosome DNA fluorescent probes (FISH), and complex and simple chromosome exchanges in the painted genome were classified separately. Complex-type exchanges were observed at low frequencies in control subjects, and in our test subjects before the treatment. No statistically significant increase in the yield of complex-type exchanges was induced by the space flight. Radiation therapy induced a high fraction of complex exchanges, but no significant differences could be detected between patients treated with accelerated carbon ions or X-rays. Complex chromosomal rearrangements do not represent a practical biomarker of radiation quality in our test subjects. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. RHIC Sextant Test - Accelerator Systems and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Connolly, R.; dell, G. F.; Fischer, W.; Kewisch, J.; Mackay, W.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wei, J.

    1997-05-01

    One sextant of the RHIC collider and the full AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line have been commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the design and performance of the accelerator systems during the test, such as the magnet and power supply systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. After reviewing the main milestones of the commissioning we describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems preformance and their impact on the plannig for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  6. Generic device controller for accelerator control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mariotti, R.; Buxton, W.; Frankel, R.; Hoff, L.

    1987-01-01

    A new distributed intelligence control system has become operational at the AGS for transport, injection, and acceleration of heavy ions. A brief description of the functionality of the physical devices making up the system is given. An attempt has been made to integrate the devices for accelerator specific interfacing into a standard microprocessor system, namely, the Universal Device Controller (UDC). The main goals for such a generic device controller are to provide: local computing power; flexibility to configure; and real time event handling. The UDC assemblies and software are described. (LEW)

  7. AGS experiments -- 1995, 1996 and 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.; Presti, P.L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains (1) FY 1995 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; (3) FY 1997 AGS schedule as run; (4) FY 1998--1999 AGS schedule (proposed); (5) AGS beams 1997; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program; (9) AGS experimental area FY 1998--1999 physics program (proposed); (10) a listing of experiments by number; (11) two-page summaries of each experiment, in order by number; and (12) listing of publications of AGS experiments.

  8. AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993. Tenth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments {ge} FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments.

  9. Contribution of Eu ions on the precipitation of silver nanoparticles in Ag-Eu co-doped borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Qing; Qiu, Jianbei; Zhou, Dacheng; Xu, Xuhui

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles are precipitated from the borate glasses during the melting process without any further heat treatment. • The reduction of Eu{sup 3+} ions to Eu{sup 2+} ions is presented in this material. • The intensity of Ag{sup +} luminescence. • The introduction of Eu ions accelerated the reaction between Eu{sup 2+} ions and silver ions inducing the silver clusters formation. - Abstract: Ag{sup +} doped sodium borate glasses with different Eu ions concentration were prepared by the melt-quenching method. The absorption at about 410 nm which was caused by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) is promoted with increasing of Eu ions concentration. Meanwhile, the luminescent spectra showed that the emission intensity of Ag{sup +} decreased while that of the Ag aggregates increased simultaneously. The results indicated that the Ag ions intend to form the high-polymeric state such as Ag aggregates and nanoparticles with increasing of europium ions. Owing to the self-reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} in our glass system, it revealed that Ag{sup +} has been reduced by the neighboring Eu{sup 2+} which leads to the formation of Ag aggregates and the precipitation of Ag NPs in the matrix. In addition, energy transfer (ET) process from Ag{sup +}/Ag aggregates to the Eu{sup 3+} was investigated for the enhancement of Eu{sup 3+} luminescence.

  10. High-throughput Ru(III) analysis using the hydrothermal flow reactor-mediated FIA by the extreme acceleration of Ru(III) complexation with 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio; Nakai, Takayuki; Ikoma, Keisuke; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2012-09-15

    A new type of flow injection analysis (FIA) combined with a high-temperature reactor maintained at 100-400 °C, namely hydrothermal flow injection analysis (HT-FIA), has been successfully applied to high throughput determination of Ru(III) on the basis of a conventional chromogenic reaction with 1,10-phenothroline (phen). Although this classical chromogenic reaction using phen is sensitive and selective for Ru(III), the complex formation of Ru(phen)(3) requires 2 h. The acceleration using HT-FIA is extraordinary high so that the determination reaction of Ru(III) was successfully shortened to 5 s at 150 °C, where the analytical procedure was accelerated more than 1000-fold. This enabled a high-throughput analysis of Ru(III) with 100 μL sample, of which at least 10 samples can be analyzed within 10 min. The detection limit of Ru(III) determined on the basis of 3 times of standard deviation was 5.3×10(-7) M (53 pmol or 5.4 ng Ru in 100 μL sample). The present study emphasizes the importance of the revival of classical chromogenic reactions, which are potentially valuable but not regarded anymore as useful because they are time-consuming and tedious, to fit for the demand for environmentally harmless analytical techniques.

  11. EM Structure Based and Vacuum Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The importance of particle acceleration may be judged from the number of applications which require some sort of accelerated beam. In addition to accelerator-based high energy physics research, non-academic applications include medical imaging and treatment, structural biology by x-ray diffraction, pulse radiography, cargo inspection, material processing, food and medical instrument sterilization, and so on. Many of these applications are already well served by existing technologies and will profit only marginally from developments in accelerator technology. Other applications are poorly served, such as structural biology, which is conducted at synchrotron radiation facilities, and medical treatment using proton accelerators, the machines for which are rare because they are complex and costly. Developments in very compact, high brightness and high gradient accelerators will change how accelerators are used for such applications, and potentially enable new ones. Physical and technical issues governing structure-based and vacuum acceleration of charged particles are reviewed, with emphasis on practical aspects.

  12. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  13. Rare Kaon Decays, KEK experiment E391 and E14 at the Japan Physics and Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC)

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Yau Wai

    2012-12-06

    The goal of the J-PARC neutral kaon experiment (E14/KOTO) is to discover and measure the rate of the kaon rare decay to pi-zero and two neutrinos. This flavor changing neutral current decay proceeds through second-order weak interactions. Other, as yet undiscovered particles, which can mediate the decay could provide an enhancement (or depletion) to the branching ratio which in the Standard Model is accurately predicted within a few percent to be 2.8x10-11. The experiment is designed to observe more than 100 events at the Standard Model branching. It is a follow-up of the KEK E391a experiment and has stage-2 approval by J-PARC PAC in 2007. E14/KOTO has collaborators from Japan (Kyoto, Osaka, Yamagata, Saga), US (Arizona State, Chicago, Michigan Ann Arbor), Taiwan (National Taiwan), Korea, and Russia (Dubna). The experiment exploits the 300kW 30-50 GeV proton delivery of the J-PARC accelerator with a hermetic high acceptance detector with a fine grained Cesium Iodide (CsI) crystal calorimeter, and state of the art electronic front end and data acquisition system. With the recovery of the tsunami disaster on March 11th 2011, E14 is scheduled to start collecting data in December 2012. During the detector construction phase, Chicago focuses on the front end electronics readout of the entire detector system, particularly the CsI calorimeter. The CsI crystals together with its photomultipliers were previously used at the Fermilab KTeV experiment (E832/E799), and were loaned to E14 via this Chicago DOE support. The new readout electronics includes an innovative 10-pole pulse-shaping technique coupled with high speed digitization (14-bit 125MHz and 12-bit 500MHz). This new instrument enables us to measure both energy and timing, particularly with timing resolution better than 100 psec. Besides the cost saving by elimination of the standard time to digital converters, it is now possible to measure the momenta of the final state photons for additional background suppression

  14. Copper and silver complexes containing organic azide ligands: syntheses, structures, and theoretical investigation of [HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]CuNNN(1-Ad) and [HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]AgN(1-Ad)NN (where Pz = pyrazolyl and 1-Ad = 1-adamantyl).

    PubMed

    Dias, H V; Polach, S A; Goh, S K; Archibong, E F; Marynick, D S

    2000-08-21

    Treatment of [HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]Na(THF) with CF3SO3Cu followed by 1-azidoadamantane affords [HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]CuNNN(1-Ad) in 65% yield. The solid state structure shows that the copper atom is coordinated to the terminal nitrogen atom (NT) of the azidoadamantane ligand. The related silver(I) adduct can be prepared in 80% yield by the treatment of [HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]Ag(THF) with 1-azidoadamantane. However, [HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]AgN(1-Ad)NN shows a different bonding mode where the silver atom coordinates to the alkylated nitrogen atom (NA) of the azidoadamantane ligand. Asymmetric stretching bands of the azido group for copper and silver adducts appear at 2143 and 2120 cm-1, respectively. Theoretical investigation shows that steric effects do not play a dominant role in determining the bonding mode of the azide ligand in these two metal complexes. Although the copper(I) ion affinity for the two coordinating sites NT and NA is nearly identical, copper-azide back-bonding interactions favor the copper-NT mode of bonding over the copper-NA mode. Silver (a very poor back-bonding metal) prefers the NA site for coordination. The NA site has a significantly higher proton affinity and slightly higher sodium ion affinity. Important structural parameters for [HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]CuNNN(1-Ad) and [HB(3,5-(CF3)2Pz)3]AgN(1-Ad)NN are as follows: Cu-NT 1.861(3) A, NT-N 1.136(4) A, N-NA 1.219(4) A, NT-N-NA 173.1(3) degrees; Ag-NA 2.220(5) A, NT-N 1.143(12) A, N-NA 1.227(10) A, NT-N-NA 176.8(12) degrees. Overall, the azidoadamantane ligand does not undergo any significant changes upon coordination to Cu(I) or Ag(I) ions.

  15. Molecular-dynamics study of ionic motions and neutron inelastic scattering in α-AgI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarotti, Guido L.; Jacucci, G.; Rahman, A.

    1986-11-01

    Contrary to the current interpretation of inelastic-neutron-scattering data on α-AgI, molecular-dynamics calculations show that inelastic neutron scattering is dominated by coherent scattering from Ag+ ions. The calculations agree with the available data. Ag+ ions diffuse by jumps between tetrahedral sites, the consequences being in complete accord with the Chudley-Elliot model only if the full geometrical complexity of these sites is included. Phonon modes due to I- motions are predicted for certain wave vectors.

  16. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  17. SETUP AND PERFORMANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS FOR THE 2007 RUN WITH GOLD IONS

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER,C.; AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; BENJAMIN, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Gold ions for the 2007 run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are accelerated in the Tandem, Booster and AGS prior to injection into RHIC. The setup and performance of this chain of accelerators is reviewed with a focus on improvements in the quality of beam delivered to RHIC. In particular, more uniform stripping foils between Booster and AGS7 and a new bunch merging scheme in AGS have provided beam bunches with reduced longitudinal emittance for RHIC.

  18. ESS Accelerator Cryoplant Process Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Arnold, P.; Hees, W.; Hildenbeutel, J.; Weisend, J. G., II

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a neutron-scattering facility being built with extensive international collaboration in Lund, Sweden. The ESS accelerator will deliver protons with 5 MW of power to the target at 2.0 GeV, with a nominal current of 62.5 mA. The superconducting part of the accelerator is about 300 meters long and contains 43 cryomodules. The ESS accelerator cryoplant (ACCP) will provide the cooling for the cryomodules and the cryogenic distribution system that delivers the helium to the cryomodules. The ACCP will cover three cryogenic circuits: Bath cooling for the cavities at 2 K, the thermal shields at around 40 K and the power couplers thermalisation with 4.5 K forced helium cooling. The open competitive bid for the ACCP took place in 2014 with Linde Kryotechnik AG being selected as the vendor. This paper summarizes the progress in the ACCP development and engineering. Current status including final cooling requirements, preliminary process design, system configuration, machine concept and layout, main parameters and features, solution for the acceptance tests, exergy analysis and efficiency is presented.

  19. Preparation and antibacterial activities of Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites made by pomegranate (Punica granatum) rind extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Ren, Yan-yu; Wang, Tao; Wang, Chuang

    Nano-silver and its composite materials are widely used in medicine, food and other industries due to their strong conductivity, size effect and other special performances. So far, more microbial researches have been applied, but a plant method is rarely reported. In order to open up a new way to prepare AgNP composites, pomegranate peel extract was used in this work to reduce Ag+ to prepare Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. UV-Vis was employed to detect and track the reduction of Ag+ and the forming process of AgNPs. The composition, structure and size of the crystal were analyzed by XRD and TEM. Results showed that, under mild conditions, pomegranate peel extract reacted with dilute AgNO3 solution to produce Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. At pH = 8 and 10 mmol/L of AgNO3 concentration, the size of the achieved composites ranged between 15 and 35 nm with spherical shapes and good crystallinity. The bactericidal experiment indicated that the prepared Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles had strong antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria. FTIR analysis revealed that biological macromolecules with groups of sbnd NH2, sbnd OH, and others were distributed on the surface of the newly synthesized Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles. This provided a useful clue to further study the AgNP biosynthesis mechanism.

  20. Reversible modulated mid-infrared absorption of Ag/TiO{sub 2} by photoinduced interfacial charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S. C. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn; Li, L.; Pan, S. S.; Luo, Y. Y.; Zhang, Y. X.; Li, G. H. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn

    2014-10-06

    An enhanced mid-infrared absorption in Ag nanoparticles-decorated TiO{sub 2} microflowers was reported. It was found that the mid-infrared absorption of the Ag/TiO{sub 2} complex depends strongly on the content and size of Ag nanoparticles, the higher the Ag nanoparticles content, the stronger the infrared absorption. The average reflectivity in the entire mid-infrared region of the microflowers drops from 57.6% to 10.5% after Ag nanoparticles decoration. Reversible modulated mid-infrared absorption properties were found in the Ag/TiO{sub 2} complexes upon alternative illumination of visible and UV light due to the photoinduced interfacial electron transfer between TiO{sub 2} semiconductor and Ag nanoparticles.

  1. Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

    2012-05-11

    In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

  2. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC gold run

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    2014-08-18

    This note describes longitudinal emittance measurements that were made in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC Gold run. It also contains an overview of the longitudinal aspects of their setup during this run. Each bunch intended for RHIC is composed of beam from 4 Booster cycles, and there are two of them per AGS cycle. For each of the 8 Booster cycles required to produce the 2 bunches in the AGS, a beam pulse from EVIS is injected into the Booster and captured in four h=4 buckets. Then those bunches are accelerated to a porch where they are merged into 2 bunches and then into 1 bunch.

  3. Bio-nano complexes of ZVFeNPs/Fe-s-M13 and Cd (II)/Cd-s-M13 accelerate Cd (II) reduction by FeNPs through dual dispersing and separate deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Yu, Huimin; Shen, Zhongyao

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of Cd (II) in liquor by solid zero valent Fe nanoparticles (ZVFeNPs) is a liquid-solid biphasic reaction in which the reduction efficiency was often lowered by either aggregation of ZVFeNPs or coating of the generated ZVCd. In light of the filamentous nanostructure of bacteriophage M13 with ˜2700 copies of pVIII protein in delicate distribution at the coat, a novel dual dispersing reduction route was designed by introducing two different kinds of M13 with Fe-binding specificity (Fe-s-M13) and Cd-binding specificity (Cd-s-M13) to disperse ZVFeNPs and Cd (II) ions, respectively. The Fe-s-M13 was used for synthesis of the ZVFeNPs/Fe-s-M13 complex, where ZVFeNPs were uniformly dispersed into small nanoparticles (5-10 nm) on Fe-s-M13. The engineered Cd-s-M13, constructed by genetic recombination of pVIII through inserting the gene of a biopanned 7-mer Cd-specific peptide (SCPICPG) into the N-terminus of pVIII gene, was used for Cd (II) dispersion before reduction. The dispersed complex of Cd(II)/Cd-s-M13 was rapidly reduced by complex of ZVFeNPs/Fe-s-M13. Kinetics results showed that the initial reduction rate and final reduction ratio of Cd (II) increased by 35.7% and 16.4%, respectively, through dispersion of ZVFeNPs by Fe-s-M13; they improved again by 53.6% and 37.0%, respectively, through further dispersion of Cd (II) by Cd-s-M13. TEM and EDS results revealed that the acceleration effect of the dual dispersing reduction was arising from uniform dispersion of the small ZVFeNPs and separate deposition of the reduced ZVCd on the two different M13 phages.

  4. Ag-Air Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Econ, Inc.'s agricultural aerial application, "ag-air," involves more than 10,000 aircraft spreading insecticides, herbicides, fertilizer, seed and other materials over millions of acres of farmland. Difficult for an operator to estimate costs accurately and decide what to charge or which airplane can handle which assignment most efficiently. Computerized service was designed to improve business efficiency in choice of aircraft and determination of charge rates based on realistic operating cost data. Each subscriber fills out a detailed form which pertains to his needs and then receives a custom-tailored computer printout best suited to his particular business mix.

  5. Measurement of Coriolis Acceleration with a Smartphone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaku, Asif; Kraft, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate physics laboratories seldom have experiments that measure the Coriolis acceleration. This has traditionally been the case owing to the inherent complexities of making such measurements. Articles on the experimental determination of the Coriolis acceleration are few and far between in the physics literature. However, because modern…

  6. Laser-induced reconstruction of Ag clusters in helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Luis F.; O'Connell, Sean M. O.; Jones, Curtis F.; Kwok, Justin; Vilesov, Andrey F.

    2016-09-01

    Silver clusters were assembled in helium droplets of different sizes ranging from 105 to 1010 atoms. The absorption of the clusters was studied upon laser irradiation at 355 nm and 532 nm, which is close to the plasmon resonance maximum in spherical Ag clusters and in the range of the absorption of the complex, branched Ag clusters, respectively. The absorption of the pulsed (7 ns) radiation at 532 nm shows some pronounced saturation effects, absent upon the continuous irradiation. This phenomenon has been discussed in terms of the melting of the complex Ag clusters at high laser fluence, resulting in a loss of the 532 nm absorption. Estimates of the heat transfer also indicate that a bubble may be formed around the hot cluster at high fluences, which may result in ejection of the cluster from the droplet, or disintegration of the droplet entirely.

  7. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  8. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  9. Evaluation of an immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Manel; Kahla, Imen Ben; Hannachi, Naila; Ferjeni, Asma; Salma, Walid Ben; Ghezal, Samira; Boukadida, Jalel

    2011-04-01

    Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) remains slow. Over the years, several new technologies have been proposed to accelerate and simplify the detection of MTC. In this context, we evaluated an immunochromatographic assay (ICA) (BIO-LINE SD Ag MPT64 TB) for rapid identification of MTC, based on detection of a specific MPT64 antigen of MTC. We have tested it on i) mycobacterial cultures: 210 MTC strains and 28 nontuberculous mycobacteria; ii) M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin strain SSI (Statens Serum Institut, Denmark); and iii) 22 microorganisms other than mycobacteria, isolated from cultures. We concluded that this kit has an excellent specificity (100%) and sensitivity (99%) from isolated cultures. The ICA (BIO-LINE SD Ag MPT64 TB) allows excellent MTC identification from clinical isolates. It is a rapid, simple, and inexpensive test, and has a definite contribution in the rapid laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:21396535

  10. Application of a new coordination compound for the preparation of AgI nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandes, Fatemeh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Silver iodide nanoparticles have been sonochemically synthesized by using silver salicylate complex, [Ag(HSal)], as silver precursor. A series of control experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of solvent, surfactant concentration, sonication time and temperature on the morphology of AgI nanostructures. - Highlights: • Silver salicylate as a new precursor was applied to fabricate γ-AgI nanoparticles. • To further decrease the particle size of AgI, SDS was used as surfactant. • The effect of preparation parameters on the particle size of AgI was investigated. - Abstract: AgI nanoparticles have been sonochemically synthesized by using silver salicylate, [Ag(HSal)], as silver precursor. To investigate the effects of solvent, surfactant concentration, sonication time and temperature on the morphology of AgI nanostructures, several experiments were carried out. The products were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, TGA/DTA, UV–vis, and FT-IR. Based on the experimental findings in this research, it was found that the size of AgI nanoparticles was dramatically dependent on the silver precursor, sonochemical irradiation, and surfactant concentration. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was applied as surfactant. When the concentration of SDS was 0.055 mM, very uniform sphere-like AgI nanoparticles with grain size of about 25–30 nm were obtained. These results indicated that the high concentration of SDS could prevent the aggregation between colloidal nanoparticles due to its steric hindrance effect.

  11. Effect of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles on SERS spectral variance of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Li; Chen, Shaode; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-02-01

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively utilized in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for bacterial identification. However, Ag NPs are toxic to bacteria. Whether such toxicity can affect SERS features of bacteria and interfere with bacterial identification is still unknown and needed to explore. Here, by carrying out a comparative study on non-toxic Au NPs with that on toxic Ag NPs, we investigated the influence of nanoparticle concentration and incubation time on bacterial SERS spectral variance, both of which were demonstrated to be closely related to the toxicity of Ag NPs. Sensitive spectral alterations were observed on Ag NPs with increase of NPs concentration or incubation time, accompanied with an obvious decrease in number of viable bacteria. In contrast, SERS spectra and viable bacterial number on Au NPs were rather constant under the same conditions. A further analysis on spectral changes demonstrated that it was cell response (i.e. metabolic activity or death) to the toxicity of Ag NPs causing spectral variance. However, biochemical responses to the toxicity of Ag were very different in different bacteria, indicating the complex toxic mechanism of Ag NPs. Ag NPs are toxic to a great variety of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa etc., therefore, this work will be helpful in guiding the future application of SERS technique in various complex biological systems.

  12. Effect of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles on SERS spectral variance of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Chen, Shaode; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-02-25

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively utilized in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for bacterial identification. However, Ag NPs are toxic to bacteria. Whether such toxicity can affect SERS features of bacteria and interfere with bacterial identification is still unknown and needed to explore. Here, by carrying out a comparative study on non-toxic Au NPs with that on toxic Ag NPs, we investigated the influence of nanoparticle concentration and incubation time on bacterial SERS spectral variance, both of which were demonstrated to be closely related to the toxicity of Ag NPs. Sensitive spectral alterations were observed on Ag NPs with increase of NPs concentration or incubation time, accompanied with an obvious decrease in number of viable bacteria. In contrast, SERS spectra and viable bacterial number on Au NPs were rather constant under the same conditions. A further analysis on spectral changes demonstrated that it was cell response (i.e. metabolic activity or death) to the toxicity of Ag NPs causing spectral variance. However, biochemical responses to the toxicity of Ag were very different in different bacteria, indicating the complex toxic mechanism of Ag NPs. Ag NPs are toxic to a great variety of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa etc., therefore, this work will be helpful in guiding the future application of SERS technique in various complex biological systems. PMID:25291503

  13. Formation Mechanism and Characterization of Ag-Metal Chelate Polymer Prepared by a Wet Chemical Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chueh-Jung; Lin, Jiang-Jen; Shieu, Fuh-Sheng

    2005-08-01

    In this study, a metal chelate polymer (MCP) contained Ag(0) was prepared from commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) and silver nitrate (AgNO3) by a wet chemical method using concentrate formic acid (HCOOH) as solvent. The characterization of these MCP materials, and the formation mechanism that involved in the MCP system, were studied by the analyses of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The Ag(I) cations of silver nitrate (AgNO3) were found coordinated with polymer functional groups to form polymer-Ag(I) complexes. The XRD analysis revealed that these complexed Ag(I) ions were in-situ reduced to generate Ag(0) metal by HCOOH solvent in MCP system. The results of FTIR and NMR analyses demonstrated that there are hydrolyzed hydroxyl groups present in the MCP chains. The XPS analysis showed that the oxygen ligands that interacted with the Ag(0) were mostly contributed from the OH groups. The interaction between the reduced Ag(0) metal and the polymer chains was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation on the MCP materials.

  14. Immune complex processing in C1q-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nash, J T; Taylor, P R; Botto, M; Norsworthy, P J; Davies, K A; Walport, M J

    2001-02-01

    Complement and Fcgamma receptors are known to mediate the processing of immune complexes (IC), and abnormalities in these mechanisms may predispose to the development of lupus. We explored the processing of IC in mice deficient in complement component C1q. 125I-labelled IC comprising Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)/human anti-HBsAg (HBsAg/Ab) were injected intravenously and the sites of IC clearance determined by direct counting of organ uptake at various time points. The liver and spleen were the main sites of IC uptake in all mice. The splenic uptake of IC was significantly reduced in the C1q-deficient mice compared with the control mice. C1q-deficient mice also exhibited an initial accelerated hepatic uptake of IC similar to that seen in human subjects with hypocomplementaemia. The hepatic localization of IC at later time points was similar in both groups of mice. These data in mice are consistent with previous observations in humans that confirm that the classical pathway of complement plays an important role in the appropriate processing of IC in vivo.

  15. The AGS Booster beam loss monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.; Bennett, G.W.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A beam loss monitor system has been developed for the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster accelerator, and is designed for use with intensities of up to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons and carbon to gold ions at 50-3 {times} 10{sup 9} ions per pulse. This system is a significant advance over the present AGS system by improving the sensitivity, dynamic range, and data acquisition. In addition to the large dynamic range achievable, it is adaptively shifted when high losses are detected. The system uses up to 80 argon filled ion chambers as detectors, as well as newly designed electronics for processing and digitizing detector outputs. The hardware simultaneously integrates each detector output, interfaces to the beam interrupt systems, and digitizes all 80 channels to 21 bits at 170 KHz. This paper discuses the design, construction, and operation of the system. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  16. An MCNPX accelerator beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Durkee, Joe W.; Elson, Jay S.; Jason, Andrew; Johns, Russell C.; Waters, Laurie S.

    2009-06-04

    MCNPX is a powerful Monte Carlo code that can be used to conduct sophisticated radiation-transport simulations involving complex physics and geometry. Although MCNPX possesses a wide assortment of standardized modeling tools, there are instances in which a user's needs can eclipse existing code capabilities. Fortunately, although it may not be widely known, MCNPX can accommodate many customization needs. In this article, we demonstrate source-customization capability for a new SOURCE subroutine as part of our development to enable simulations involving accelerator beams for active-interrogation studies. Simulation results for a muon beam are presented to illustrate the new accelerator-source capability.

  17. Unusual coordination modes of ligand 2-chloro-5-nitrobenzene sulfonate: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal and X-ray structural studies of metal 2-chloro-5-nitrobenzene sulfonate complexes, metal = Tl(I), Cu(II), Ag(I) and Pb(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Raj Pal; Kumar, Santosh; Venugopalan, Paloth; Aree, Thammarat; Starynowicz, Przemysław

    2016-03-01

    Using metal ions thallium(I), copper(II), silver(I) and lead(II) and ligand 2-chloro-5-nitrobenzenesulfonate(cnb), four new metal complexes [Tl(cnb)]n(1), [Cu(en)2(H2O)2](cnb)2.2H2O(2), where en = ethylenediamine, [Ag(cnb)]n(3) and [Pb(cnb)2]n(4) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, multinuclear NMR), single crystal X-ray structure analyses (except 4) and TGA analyses. Complexes 1 and 3 crystallize in monoclinic crystal system in P21/c space group having unit cell dimensions, a = 13.849(2) Å, b = 9.449(2) Å, c = 7.506(2)Å, β = 105.3°, V = 947.1 Å3, Z = 4 and a = 15.197(13)Å, b = 5.136(4)Å, c = 24.058(18)Å, β = 106.86°, V = 1797.1 Å3, Z = 4 respectively. Complex 2, crystallizes in triclinic crystal system with PI bar having unit cell parameters; a = 6.888 Å, b = 7.835 Å, c = 13.227 Å, α = 80.20°, β = 83.15°, γ = 78.18°, V = 945.6 Å3, Z = 1. X-ray structure determination revealed that complexes 1 and 3 are polymeric in nature, whereas complex 2 has ionic structure. Remarkably, cnb ligand is coordinating through sulfonato oxygen atoms and nitro oxygen atoms in thallium complex but coordinates through sulfonato oxygen atoms and chloro group in silver complex, thereby showing the flexible/versatile coordinating behaviour of anionic ligand. This is unusual.

  18. Localised Ag(+) vibrations at the origin of ultralow thermal conductivity in layered thermoelectric AgCrSe2.

    PubMed

    Damay, F; Petit, S; Rols, S; Braendlein, M; Daou, R; Elkaïm, E; Fauth, F; Gascoin, F; Martin, C; Maignan, A

    2016-01-01

    In materials science, the substructure approach consists in imagining complex materials in which a particular property is associated with a distinct structural feature, so as to combine different chosen physical characteristics, which otherwise have little chance to coexist. Applied to thermoelectric materials, it has been used to achieve simultaneously phonon-glass and electron-crystal properties. Mostly studied for its superionic conductivity, AgCrSe2 is a naturally layered compound, which achieves very low thermal conductivity, ~0.4 W.K(-1).m(-1) at RT (room temperature), and is considered a promising thermoelectric. The Cr atoms of the [CrSe2]∞ layer bear a spin S = 3/2, which orders below TN = 55 K. Here we report low temperature inelastic neutron scattering experiments on AgCrSe2, alongside the magnetic field evolution of its thermal and electrical transport. We observe a very low frequency mode at 3 meV, ascribed to large anharmonic displacements of the Ag(+) ions in the [Ag]∞ layer, and 2D magnetic fluctuations up to 3 TN in the chromium layer. The low thermal conductivity of AgCrSe2 is attributed to acoustic phonon scattering by a regular lattice of Ag(+) oscillating in quasi-2D potential wells. These findings highlight a new way to achieve localised phonon modes in a perfectly crystalline solid. PMID:27000414

  19. Localised Ag+ vibrations at the origin of ultralow thermal conductivity in layered thermoelectric AgCrSe2

    PubMed Central

    Damay, F.; Petit, S.; Rols, S.; Braendlein, M.; Daou, R.; Elkaïm, E.; Fauth, F.; Gascoin, F.; Martin, C.; Maignan, A.

    2016-01-01

    In materials science, the substructure approach consists in imagining complex materials in which a particular property is associated with a distinct structural feature, so as to combine different chosen physical characteristics, which otherwise have little chance to coexist. Applied to thermoelectric materials, it has been used to achieve simultaneously phonon-glass and electron-crystal properties. Mostly studied for its superionic conductivity, AgCrSe2 is a naturally layered compound, which achieves very low thermal conductivity, ~0.4 W.K−1.m−1 at RT (room temperature), and is considered a promising thermoelectric. The Cr atoms of the [CrSe2]∞ layer bear a spin S = 3/2, which orders below TN = 55 K. Here we report low temperature inelastic neutron scattering experiments on AgCrSe2, alongside the magnetic field evolution of its thermal and electrical transport. We observe a very low frequency mode at 3 meV, ascribed to large anharmonic displacements of the Ag+ ions in the [Ag]∞ layer, and 2D magnetic fluctuations up to 3 TN in the chromium layer. The low thermal conductivity of AgCrSe2 is attributed to acoustic phonon scattering by a regular lattice of Ag+ oscillating in quasi-2D potential wells. These findings highlight a new way to achieve localised phonon modes in a perfectly crystalline solid. PMID:27000414

  20. Localised Ag+ vibrations at the origin of ultralow thermal conductivity in layered thermoelectric AgCrSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damay, F.; Petit, S.; Rols, S.; Braendlein, M.; Daou, R.; Elkaïm, E.; Fauth, F.; Gascoin, F.; Martin, C.; Maignan, A.

    2016-03-01

    In materials science, the substructure approach consists in imagining complex materials in which a particular property is associated with a distinct structural feature, so as to combine different chosen physical characteristics, which otherwise have little chance to coexist. Applied to thermoelectric materials, it has been used to achieve simultaneously phonon-glass and electron-crystal properties. Mostly studied for its superionic conductivity, AgCrSe2 is a naturally layered compound, which achieves very low thermal conductivity, ~0.4 W.K‑1.m‑1 at RT (room temperature), and is considered a promising thermoelectric. The Cr atoms of the [CrSe2]∞ layer bear a spin S = 3/2, which orders below TN = 55 K. Here we report low temperature inelastic neutron scattering experiments on AgCrSe2, alongside the magnetic field evolution of its thermal and electrical transport. We observe a very low frequency mode at 3 meV, ascribed to large anharmonic displacements of the Ag+ ions in the [Ag]∞ layer, and 2D magnetic fluctuations up to 3 TN in the chromium layer. The low thermal conductivity of AgCrSe2 is attributed to acoustic phonon scattering by a regular lattice of Ag+ oscillating in quasi-2D potential wells. These findings highlight a new way to achieve localised phonon modes in a perfectly crystalline solid.

  1. Hydroxyapatite supported Ag3PO4 nanoparticles with higher visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaoting; Wu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Qiuyun; Xiao, Mingfeng; Yang, Gelin; Qiu, Meirong; Han, Guocheng

    2012-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite supported Ag3PO4 nanocomposites have been synthesized by a wet impregnation process. UV-vis absorption spectra show a red shift of the absorption edges for the composite systems compared to pure hydroxyapatite support. The surface structure and morphology of the nanocomposites were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) apparatus, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results suggest that Ag3PO4 nanoparticles (6-17 nm in diameter) are well dispersed on the hydroxyapatite support and Ag3PO4 nanoparticles density is larger for the higher Ag+ loading sample. The as-prepared nanocomposite photocatalysts showed a pronounced photocatalytic activity upon decomposition of methylene blue dye in aqueous solution under both visible light (wavelength > 400 nm) and UV-vis light irradiation. A synergic mechanism of inherent photocatalytic capability of Ag3PO4 and the accelerated electron/hole separation resulting from the photoinduced electrons captured by the slow-released Ag+ at the interface of Ag3PO4 and hydroxyapatite is proposed for the nanocomposites on the enhancement of photocatalytic performance in comparison to that of pure Ag3PO4 nanoparticles. The support of hydroxyapatite may also act as an absorbent which favors the mass transfer in heterogeneous photocatalysis reaction.

  2. Oxygen reduction reaction on Cu-doped Ag cluster for fuel-cell cathode.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenqiang; Chen, Fuyi; Zhang, Nan; Wu, Xiaoqiang

    2014-10-01

    The development of fuel cells as clean-energy technologies is largely limited by the prohibitive cost of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of catalyst design principle that links material structures to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant bimetallic catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we present a first-principles study of ORR on Ag12Cu cluster in alkaline environment. The adsorptions of O2, OOH, and OH on Cu-doped Ag13 are stronger than on Ag13. The d-band centers of adsorption sites show the Cu-doping makes d-electrons transferred to higher energy state, and improves O2 dissociation. ORR processes on Ag12Cu and Ag13 indicate Cu-doping can strongly promote ORR, and ORR process can be better preformed on Ag12Cu than on Ag13. For four-electron transfer, the effective reversible potential is 0.401 V/RHE on Ag12Cu in alkaline medium. PMID:25227449

  3. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-09-26

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

  4. AG Dra monitoring requested for multiwavelength campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-06-01

    Dr. Andrea Dupree (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) has requested AAVSO monitoring (visual and photometric) of the symbiotic variable AG Draconis from June 20 through at least September 2013 for correlation with upcoming Chandra x-ray and HST ultraviolet observations. The purpose of their observations is to determine the dynamics of the gas and the temperatures and densities in various parts of this complex system. Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database.

  5. Beam loss caused by edge focusing of injection bump magnets and its mitigation in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchi, H.; Tani, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Harada, H.; Kato, S.; Okabe, K.; Saha, P. K.; Tamura, F.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, transverse injection painting is utilized not only to suppress space-charge induced beam loss in the low energy region but also to mitigate foil scattering beam loss during charge-exchange injection. The space-charge induced beam loss is well minimized by the combination of modest transverse painting and full longitudinal painting. But, for sufficiently mitigating the foil scattering part of beam loss, the transverse painting area has to be further expanded. However, such a wide-ranging transverse painting had not been realized until recently due to beta function beating caused by edge focusing of pulsed injection bump magnets during injection. This beta function beating additionally excites random betatron resonances through a distortion of the lattice superperiodicity, and its resultant deterioration of the betatron motion stability causes significant extra beam loss when expanding the transverse painting area. To solve this issue, we newly installed pulse-type quadrupole correctors to compensate the beta function beating. This paper presents recent experimental results on this correction scheme for suppressing the extra beam loss, while discussing the beam loss and its mitigation mechanisms with the corresponding numerical simulations.

  6. Microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Ag2(W1 -xMox)O4 heterostructures: Nucleation of Ag, morphology, and photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. D. P.; Gonçalves, R. F.; Nogueira, I. C.; Longo, V. M.; Mondoni, L.; Moron, M. G.; Santana, Y. V.; Longo, E.

    2016-01-01

    Ag2W1 -xMoxO4 (x = 0.0 and 0.50) powders were synthesized by the co-precipitation (drop-by-drop) method and processed using a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. We report the real-time in situ formation and growth of Ag filaments on the Ag2W1 -xMoxO4 crystals using an accelerated electron beam under high vacuum. Various techniques were used to evaluate the influence of the network-former substitution on the structural and optical properties, including photoluminescence (PL) emission, of these materials. X-ray diffraction results confirmed the phases obtained by the synthesis methods. Raman spectroscopy revealed significant changes in local order-disorder as a function of the network-former substitution. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the shape as well as dimensions of the Ag2W1 -xMoxO4 heterostructures. The PL spectra showed that the PL-emission intensities of Ag2W1 -xMoxO4 were greater than those of pure Ag2WO4, probably because of the increase of intermediary energy levels within the band gap of the Ag2W1 -xMoxO4 heterostructures, as evidenced by the decrease in the band-gap values measured by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy.

  7. Structural and electronic analysis of the atomic scale nucleation of Ag on α-Ag2WO4 induced by electron irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, Juan; Gracia, Lourdes; Gonzalez-Navarrete, Patricio; Longo, Valeria M.; Avansi, Waldir; Volanti, Diogo P.; Ferrer, Mateus M.; Lemos, Pablo S.; La Porta, Felipe A.; Hernandes, Antonio C.; Longo, Elson

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we utilise a combination of theory, computation and experiments to understand the early events related to the nucleation of Ag filaments on α-Ag2WO4 crystals, which is driven by an accelerated electron beam from an electron microscope under high vacuum. The growth process and the chemical composition and elemental distribution in these filaments were analysed in depth at the nanoscale level using TEM, HAADF, EDS and XPS; the structural and electronic aspects were systematically studied in using first-principles electronic structure theory within QTAIM framework. The Ag nucleation and formation on α-Ag2WO4 is a result of the order/disorder effects generated in the crystal by the electron-beam irradiation. Both experimental and theoretical results show that this behavior is associated with structural and electronic changes of the [AgO2] and [AgO4] clusters and, to a minor extent, to the [WO6] cluster; these clusters collectively represent the constituent building blocks of α-Ag2WO4. PMID:24953210

  8. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Cary, J.; McInnes, L.C.; Mori, W.; Ng, C.; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization

  9. Understanding the dispersion of Ag on high surface area TiO2 supports using XPS intensity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zenda D.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2015-10-01

    Silver-titania (Ag/TiO2) adsorbents, in the range of 4 wt% Ag, display high selectivity toward sulfur heterocyclic compounds from complex fuel streams containing other aromatics. An experimental investigation of Ag on TiO2 has been undertaken to understand the state of dispersion and growth of Ag. XPS is one of the more promising characterization tools for the state of dispersion. Silver loading from 1 wt% to 20 wt% on 150 m2/g titania was investigated. Ag/Ti intensity ratios increased linearly with Ag content up to 4 wt% and increased less significantly thereafter from 8 wt% to 20 wt% indicating nucleation and growth of Ag crystallites. Inelastic mean free path (IMFP) calculations were used to estimate Ag crystallite size based on the attenuation of the Ag signal, realizing in this regime there is insufficient Ag to attenuate background titania. At 4, 8, 12, and 20 wt% the estimated average crystallite sizes were 0.35, 0.71, 0.84, and 1.11 nm respectively. Ag loadings up to 4 wt% were present in the form of Ag+1 adatoms presumably occupying TiO2 surface defects. Saturation of surface TiO2 defects is in good agreement with quantitative sulfur heterocycle adsorption.

  10. Three stages of the NICA accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekelidze, V. D.; Lednicky, R.; Matveev, V. A.; Meshkov, I. N.; Sorin, A. S.; Trubnikov, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) project is under development at JINR (Dubna). The general goals of the project are to provide colliding beams for experimental studies of both hot and dense strongly interacting baryonic matter and spin physics (in collisions of polarized protons and deuterons). The first program will require the running of heavy-ion mode in the energy range of √{s_{NN}} = 4-11 GeV at luminosities up to L = 1\\cdot 10^{27} cm-2 s-1 for 197Au79 nuclei (see details in sect. 4). This stage of the project will be preceded by fixed target experiments with the heavy-ion beam to be extracted from the Nuclotron at kinetic energies up to 4.5 GeV/u. The polarized beam mode is proposed to be used in the energy range of √{s_{NN}} = 12-27 GeV (protons) at luminosities up to 1\\cdot 10^{32} cm-2 s-1. This report contains a brief description of the facility scheme and characteristics in the heavy-ion operation mode, the description of the MultiPurpose Detector (MPD), and characteristics of the reactions of the colliding ions, which will allow us to detect the mixed phase formation. The plans and status of the project development are presented.

  11. APT accelerator. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D.

    1995-03-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  12. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  13. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  14. Accelerator science in medical physics.

    PubMed

    Peach, K; Wilson, P; Jones, B

    2011-12-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered since they will become increasingly available with time; however, there are still many technical problems with these that require solving. This article serves as an introduction to this complex area of physics, and will be of benefit to those engaged in cancer therapy, or who intend to acquire such technologies in the future.

  15. Accelerator science in medical physics

    PubMed Central

    Peach, K; Wilson, P; Jones, B

    2011-01-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered since they will become increasingly available with time; however, there are still many technical problems with these that require solving. This article serves as an introduction to this complex area of physics, and will be of benefit to those engaged in cancer therapy, or who intend to acquire such technologies in the future. PMID:22374548

  16. Experimental and theoretical study on gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of silver trimer cation, Ag{sub 3}{sup +}, with 12-crown-4

    SciTech Connect

    Kumondai, Kousuke; Toyoda, Michisato; Ishihara, Morio; Katakuse, Itsuo; Takeuchi, Takae; Ikeda, Mai; Iwamoto, Kenichi

    2005-07-08

    The reaction mechanisms of silver trimer cation, Ag{sub 3}{sup +}, with 12-crown-4 (12C4) were studied experimentally and theoretically. Using a cylindrical ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer, gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of Ag{sub 3}{sup +} with 12C4 were observed. Metal-ligand complexes of [Ag(12C4)]{sup +}, [Ag{sub 3}(12C4)]{sup +} and [Ag{sub 3}(12C4){sub 2}]{sup +}, and of [Ag(12C4){sub 2}]{sup +} and [Ag{sub 3}(12C4){sub 3}]{sup +}, were observed as the reaction intermediates and terminal products, respectively. The formations of the [Ag(12C4)]{sup +} and [Ag(12C4){sub 2}]{sup +} complexes indicated that the neutral dimer (Ag{sub 2}) had been eliminated from the trimer cation. From the results of ab initio calculations at the HF/LanL2DZ level of theory and the experiments, it is suggested that three 12C4 molecules can attach to Ag{sub 3}{sup +} through consecutive reactions and that neutral Ag{sub 2} can be easily eliminated from [Ag{sub 3}(12C4)]{sup +}.

  17. Pros and Cons of the Acceleration Scheme (NF-IDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Alex; Bogacz, Slawomir

    2008-07-01

    The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and beam shaping can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a nonâ scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. Pros and cons of various stages are discussed here in detail. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. Close proximity of strong solenoids and superc

  18. Tyrosine-assisted preparation of Ag/ZnO nanocomposites with enhanced photocatalytic performance and synergistic antibacterial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weiwei; Liu, Guosheng; Gao, Shuyan; Xing, Shantao; Wang, Jianji

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, Ag/ZnO metal-semiconductor nanocomposites were prepared through a facile one-pot hydrothermal method with the assistance of tyrosine. The synthesized samples were structurally characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was shown that the added tyrosine served both as a shape conductor for the formation of ZnO faceted nanorods and as a reducing agent of Ag+ ions. In the reaction process, the complexation of Ag+ with NH3 and OH- decreased the redox potential of Ag+/Ag, which prevented the formation of isolated Ag nanoparticles in solution. The prepared Ag/ZnO nanocomposites showed potential applications in photodegradation of organic dye pollutants and destruction of bacteria.

  19. Microscopy investigation of Ag-TCNQ micro/nanostructures synthesized via two solution routes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guanying; Fang, Fang; Ye, Chunnuan; Xing, Xiaoyan; Xu, Huahua; Sun, Dalin; Chen, Guorong

    2005-01-01

    The micro/nanostructures of metal-organic complex Ag-TCNQ were successfully synthesized by the reaction between Ag film and TCNQ dissolved in acetonitrile via two solution routes, i.e. immerging and dipping reaction. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the obtained Ag-TCNQ micro/nanostructures were crystalline. The morphology of the as-grown structures varied from straight nanowires and microtubes to complex fractals and dendrites. The growth mechanism of the mainly dendrites may be considered within the framework of DLA model. PMID:15725599

  20. Coordination Chemistry of Diiodine and Implications for the Oxidation Capacity of the Synergistic Ag(+) /X2 (X=Cl, Br, I) System.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Przemysław J; Himmel, Daniel; Krossing, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    The synergistic Ag(+) /X2 system (X=Cl, Br, I) is a very strong, but ill-defined oxidant-more powerful than X2 or Ag(+) alone. Intermediates for its action may include [Agm (X2 )n ](m+) complexes. Here, we report on an unexpectedly variable coordination chemistry of diiodine towards this direction: (A)Ag-I2 -Ag(A), [Ag2 (I2 )4 ](2+) (A(-) )2 and [Ag2 (I2 )6 ](2+) (A(-) )2 ⋅(I2 )x≈0.65 form by reaction of Ag(A) (A=Al(OR(F) )4 ; R(F) =C(CF3 )3 ) with diiodine (single crystal/powder XRD, Raman spectra and quantum-mechanical calculations). The molecular (A)Ag-I2 -Ag(A) is ideally set up to act as a 2 e(-) oxidant with stoichiometric formation of 2 AgI and 2 A(-) . Preliminary reactivity tests proved this (A)Ag-I2 -Ag(A) starting material to oxidize n-C5 H12 , C3 H8 , CH2 Cl2 , P4 or S8 at room temperature. A rough estimate of its electron affinity places it amongst very strong oxidizers like MF6 (M=4d metals). This suggests that (A)Ag-I2 -Ag(A) will serve as an easily in bulk accessible, well-defined, and very potent oxidant with multiple applications. PMID:27411163

  1. Dusty-Plasma Particle Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A dusty-plasma apparatus is being investigated as means of accelerating nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. Applications for the dusty-plasma particle accelerators fall into two classes: Simulation of a variety of rapidly moving dust particles and micrometeoroids in outer-space environments that include micrometeoroid streams, comet tails, planetary rings, and nebulae and Deposition or implantation of nanoparticles on substrates for diverse industrial purposes that could include hardening, increasing thermal insulation, altering optical properties, and/or increasing permittivities of substrate materials. Relative to prior apparatuses used for similar applications, dusty-plasma particle accelerators offer such potential advantages as smaller size, lower cost, less complexity, and increased particle flux densities. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator exploits the fact that an isolated particle immersed in plasma acquires a net electric charge that depends on the relative mobilities of electrons and ions. Typically, a particle that is immersed in a low-temperature, partially ionized gas, wherein the average kinetic energy of electrons exceeds that of ions, causes the particle to become negatively charged. The particle can then be accelerated by applying an appropriate electric field. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator (see figure) includes a plasma source such as a radio-frequency induction discharge apparatus containing (1) a shallow cup with a biasable electrode to hold the particles to be accelerated and (2) a holder for the substrate on which the particles are to impinge. Depending on the specific design, a pair of electrostatic-acceleration grids between the substrate and discharge plasma can be used to both collimate and further accelerate particles exiting the particle holder. Once exposed to the discharge plasma, the particles in the cup quickly acquire a negative charge. Application of a negative voltage pulse to the biasable electrode results in the

  2. Polarized beams at the ZGS and the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    I have had, and still do, a feeling of deja Vu as I have gone through the development of the polarized beam at the AGS. There were many similarities both scientifically and sociologically, and of course, some significant differences between the AGS and the ZGS. We traded the 12 GeV ZGS for the 28 GeV AGS, we traded Ron Martin for Derek Lowenstein, but having the lowest energy, high energy machine did not change. Paraphrasing some remarks of Bob Sachs, the AGS replaced the ZGS as the tail of the dog, and it appears that now the tail loppers are again on the loose. You will probably see them again somewhere in the world using body english to help polarize a beam. Basically, I would like to describe a little of the progression of events and the hardware in both accelerators that allowed Kent and his colleagues to do a great deal of very interesting spin physics. 6 refs., 30 figs.

  3. Ice nucleation efficiency of AgI: review and new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, Claudia; Nagare, Baban; Welti, André; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    AgI is one of the best-investigated ice-nucleating substances. It has relevance for the atmosphere since it is used for glaciogenic cloud seeding. Theoretical and experimental studies over the last 60 years provide a complex picture of silver iodide as an ice-nucleating agent with conflicting and inconsistent results. This review compares experimental ice nucleation studies in order to analyze the factors that influence the ice nucleation ability of AgI. The following picture emerges from this analysis: the ice nucleation ability of AgI seems to be enhanced when the AgI particle is on the surface of a droplet, which is indeed the position that a particle takes when it can freely move in a droplet. The ice nucleation by particles with surfaces exposed to air depends on water adsorption. AgI surfaces seem to be most efficient at nucleating ice when they are exposed to relative humidity at or even above water saturation. For AgI particles that are completely immersed in water, the freezing temperature increases with increasing AgI surface area. Higher threshold freezing temperatures seem to correlate with improved lattice matches as can be seen for AgI-AgCl solid solutions and 3AgI·NH4I·6H2O, which have slightly better lattice matches with ice than AgI and also higher threshold freezing temperatures. However, the effect of a good lattice match is annihilated when the surfaces have charges. Also, the ice nucleation ability seems to decrease during dissolution of AgI particles. This introduces an additional history and time dependence for ice nucleation in cloud chambers with short residence times.

  4. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  5. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  6. Community petascale project for accelerator science and simulation : Advancing computational science for future accelerators and accelerator technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Cary, J.; McInnes, L. C.; Mori, W.; Ng, C.; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.

    2008-01-01

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R & D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  7. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  8. Synthesis of Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms and their use as DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ma, Zhanfang

    2011-06-01

    A simple synthetic route to prepare Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms consists of the facile addition of Na(2) S to a solution of triangular Ag nanoprisms. The resulting Ag(2) S-Ag nanoparticles are more stable in solution than the original Ag nanoprisms, and two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of the original Ag nanoprisms still remain. In addition, the SPR bands of the Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms are tunable over a wide range. The Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms can be directly bioconjugated via well-established stable Ag(2) S surface chemistry with readily available sulfur coupling agents. The nanoprisms are used in the hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides, and show promise as probes for future biosensing applications. PMID:21538868

  9. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  10. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  11. Linear accelerator: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutzberg, J.

    1972-01-01

    Design is proposed for inexpensive accelerometer which would work by applying pressure to fluid during acceleration. Pressure is used to move shuttle, and shuttle movement is sensed and calibrated to give acceleration readings.

  12. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  13. Study of the oxygen transport through Ag (110), Ag (poly), and Ag 2.0 Zr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Wu, D.; Davidson, M. R.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    1992-01-01

    The transport of oxygen through high-purity membranes of Ag (110), Ag (poly), Ag (nano), and Ag 2.0 Zr has been studied by an ultrahigh vacuum permeation method over the temperature range of 400-800 C. The data show that there are substantial deviations from ordinary diffusion-controlled transport. A surface limitation has been confirmed by glow-discharge studies where the upstream O2 supply has been partially converted to atoms, which, for the same temperature and pressure, gave rise to over an order of magnitude increase in transport flux. Further, the addition of 2.0 wt percent Zr to the Ag has provided increased dissociative adsorption rates, which, in turn, increased the transport flux by a factor of 2. It was also observed that below a temperature of 630 C, the diffusivity exhibits an increase in activation energy of over 4 kcal/mol, which has been attributed to trapping of the atomic oxygen and/or kinetic barriers at the surface and subsurface of the vacuum interface. Above 630 C, the activation barrier decreases to the accepted value of about 11 kcal/mol for Ag (poly), consistent with zero concentration at the vacuum interface.

  14. MEQALAC rf accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J.; Brodowski, J.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype MEQALAC capable of replacing the Cockcroft Walton pre-injector at BNL is being fabricated. Ten milliamperes of H/sup -/ beam supplied from a source sitting at a potential of -40 kilovolt is to be accelerated to 750 keV. This energy gain is provided by a 200 Megahertz accelerating system rather than the normal dc acceleration. Substantial size and cost reduction would be realized by such a system over conventional pre-accelerator systems.

  15. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  16. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  17. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  18. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  19. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  20. Patterned PPy Polymer and PPy/Ag Nanocomposites Thin Films by Photo-DLICVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manole, C. C.; Maury, F.; Demetrescu, I.

    This work deals with the deposition of both undoped (insulator) and extrinsically Ag-doped (conductive) polypyrrole (PPy) coatings by an original Photo-DLICVD process. The uniform and conformal coverage of PPy thin films on both Si(100) wafer and liquid micro-droplets forming blisters is investigated. A self-ordered surface patterning of the blisters is achieved and discussed in relation with the substrate nature. By changing the precursor chemistry in this CVD process, conductive PPy/Ag nanocomposite films are grown. First evidence for conductive behavior of these Ag-doped PPy coatings was found. The Ag nanoparticles (NPs) reveal 1D assembly at the ledges of crystal-like facets of micron size nanocomposite particles leading to more complex arrangements of the metal NPs in the hybrid PPy/Ag coatings.

  1. The Silver Complexes of Porphyrins, Corroles, and Carbaporphyrins: Silver in the Oxidation States II and III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruckner, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Studies in relation to the silver complexes of porphyrins, corroles and carbaporphyrins are presented especially with relation to silver in the oxidation states II and III. It is seen that the Ag(sub III) complex was electrochemically readily and reversibly reduced to the corresponding Ag(sub II) complex, thus indicating that the complex could be…

  2. Laser irradiation of ZnO:Al/Ag/ZnO:Al multilayers for electrical isolation in thin film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, Isodiana; Boscarino, Stefano; Torrisi, Giacomo; Scapellato, Giorgia; Mirabella, Salvatore; Piccitto, Giovanni; Simone, Francesca; Terrasi, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Laser irradiation of ZnO:Al/Ag/ZnO:Al transparent contacts is investigated for segmentation purposes. The quality of the irradiated areas has been experimentally evaluated by separation resistance measurements, and the results are complemented with a thermal model used for numerical simulations of the laser process. The presence of the Ag interlayer plays two key effects on the laser scribing process by increasing the maximum temperature reached in the structure and accelerating the cool down process. These evidences can promote the use of ultra-thin ZnO:Al/Ag/ZnO:Al electrode in large-area products, such as for solar modules.

  3. Laser irradiation of ZnO:Al/Ag/ZnO:Al multilayers for electrical isolation in thin film photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Laser irradiation of ZnO:Al/Ag/ZnO:Al transparent contacts is investigated for segmentation purposes. The quality of the irradiated areas has been experimentally evaluated by separation resistance measurements, and the results are complemented with a thermal model used for numerical simulations of the laser process. The presence of the Ag interlayer plays two key effects on the laser scribing process by increasing the maximum temperature reached in the structure and accelerating the cool down process. These evidences can promote the use of ultra-thin ZnO:Al/Ag/ZnO:Al electrode in large-area products, such as for solar modules. PMID:24053228

  4. The hardware accelerator array for logic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, N H

    1991-05-01

    Hardware acceleration exploits the parallelism inherent in large circuit simulations to achieve significant increases in performance. Simulation accelerators have been developed based on the compiled code algorithm or the event-driven algorithm. The greater flexibility of the event-driven algorithm has resulted in several important developments in hardware acceleration architecture. Some popular commercial products have been developed based on the event-driven algorithm and data-flow architectures. Conventional data-flow architectures require complex switching networks to distribute operands among processing elements resulting in considerable overhead. An accelerator array architecture based on a nearest-neighbor communication has been developed in this thesis. The design is simulated in detail at the behavioral level. Its performance is evaluated and shown to be superior to that of a conventional data-flow accelerator. 14 refs., 48 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Communication: UV photoionization of cytosine catalyzed by Ag{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Taccone, Martín I.; Berdakin, Matías; Pino, Gustavo A.; Féraud, Geraldine; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-07-28

    The photo-induced damages of DNA in interaction with metal cations, which are found in various environments, still remain to be characterized. In this paper, we show how the complexation of a DNA base (cytosine (Cyt)) with a metal cation (Ag{sup +}) changes its electronic properties. By means of UV photofragment spectroscopy of cold ions, it was found that the photoexcitation of the CytAg{sup +} complex at low energy (315-282) nm efficiently leads to ionized cytosine (Cyt{sup +}) as the single product. This occurs through a charge transfer state in which an electron from the p orbital of Cyt is promoted to Ag{sup +}, as confirmed by ab initio calculations at the TD-DFT/B3LYP and RI-ADC(2) theory level using the SV(P) basis set. The low ionization energy of Cyt in the presence of Ag{sup +} could have important implications as point mutation of DNA upon sunlight exposition.

  6. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  7. Accelerating, hyperaccelerating, and decelerating networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagen, M. J.; Mattick, J. S.

    2005-07-01

    Many growing networks possess accelerating statistics where the number of links added with each new node is an increasing function of network size so the total number of links increases faster than linearly with network size. In particular, biological networks can display a quadratic growth in regulator number with genome size even while remaining sparsely connected. These features are mutually incompatible in standard treatments of network theory which typically require that every new network node possesses at least one connection. To model sparsely connected networks, we generalize existing approaches and add each new node with a probabilistic number of links to generate either accelerating, hyperaccelerating, or even decelerating network statistics in different regimes. Under preferential attachment for example, slowly accelerating networks display stationary scale-free statistics relatively independent of network size while more rapidly accelerating networks display a transition from scale-free to exponential statistics with network growth. Such transitions explain, for instance, the evolutionary record of single-celled organisms which display strict size and complexity limits.

  8. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  9. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  10. Beam emittance control by changing injection painting area in a pulse-to-pulse mode in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P. K.; Harada, H.; Hayashi, N.; Horino, K.; Hotchi, H.; Kinsho, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Tani, N.; Togashi, T.; Ueno, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Irie, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) simultaneously delivers high intensity beam to the Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) as well as to the main ring (MR) at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The RCS is designed for a beam power of 1 MW. RCS has to meet not only the need of power upgrade but also the specific requirement of each downstream facility. One of the issues, especially for high intensity operation, is to maintain two different transverse sizes of the extracted beam for MLF and MR; namely, a wider beam for MLF in order to reduce damage on the neutron production target but reversely a narrower one for the MR in order to ensure a permissible beam loss in the beam transport line of 3-GeV to MR and also in the MR. We proposed pulse-to-pulse direct control of the transverse painting area during the RCS beam injection process in order to get an extracted beam profile as desired. In addition to two existing dc septum magnets used for fixing injected beam trajectory for MLF beam, two additional dipoles named pulse steering magnets are designed for that purpose in order to control injected beam trajectory for a smaller painting area for the MR. The magnets are already installed in the injection beam transport line and successfully commissioned well in advance before they will be put in normal operation in 2014 for the 400 MeV injected beam energy upgraded from that of the present 181 MeV. Their parameters are found to be consistent to those expected in the corresponding numerical simulations. A trial one cycle user operation run for a painting area of 100πmmmrad for the MR switching from the MLF painting area of 150πmmmrad has also been successfully carried out. The extracted beam profile for the MR is measured to be sufficiently narrower as compared to that for the MLF, consistent with numerical simulation successfully demonstrating validity of the present principle.

  11. Ag(I)-Catalyzed C-H Activation: The Role of the Ag(I) Salt in Pd/Ag-Mediated C-H Arylation of Electron-Deficient Arenes.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Daniel; Burés, Jordi; Larrosa, Igor

    2016-07-13

    The use of stoichiometric Ag(I)-salts as additives in Pd-catalyzed C-H functionalization reactions is widespread. It is commonly proposed that this additive acts as an oxidant or as a halide scavenger promoting Pd-catalyst turnover. We demonstrate that, contrary to current proposals, phosphine ligated Ag(I)-carboxylates can efficiently carry out C-H activation on electron-deficient arenes. We show through a combination of stoichiometric and kinetic studies that a (PPh3)Ag-carboxylate is responsible for the C-H activation step in the Pd-catalyzed arylation of Cr(CO)3-complexed fluorobenzene. Furthermore, the reaction rate is controlled by the rate of Ag(I)-C-H activation, leading to an order zero on the Pd-catalyst. H/D scrambling studies indicate that this Ag(I) complex can carry out C-H activation on a variety of aromatic compounds traditionally used in Pd/Ag-mediated C-H functionalization methodologies. PMID:27303956

  12. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  13. A new Schiff base based on vanillin and naphthalimide as a fluorescent probe for Ag+ in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanmei; Zhou, Hua; Ma, Tongsen; Zhang, Junli; Niu, Jingyang

    2012-03-01

    A new Schiff base based on vanillin and naphthalimide was designed and synthesized as fluorescent probe. The probe showed high selectivity for Ag+ over other metal ions such as Pb2+, Na+, K+, Cd2+, Ba2+, Cr3+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Ca2+, Al3+ and Mg2+ in aqueous solution. A new fluorescence emission was observed at 682 nm in the presence of Ag+ ion. The fluorescence intensity quenched with increasing the concentration of Ag+ at 682 nm. The method of job's plot confirmed the 1:2 complex between Ag+ and probe, and the mechanism was proposed.

  14. Artificial silver sulfide Ag2S: Crystal structure and particle size in deposited powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Chemical deposition from aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and sodium sulfide was used for synthesis of coarse-crystalline and nanocrystalline silver sulfide Ag2S powders. Sodium citrate was used as a complexing and stabilizing agent during synthesis. X-ray diffraction study shows that synthesized Ag2S powders have monoclinic (space group P21/c) α-Ag2S acanthite type crystal structure. The unit cell of artificial monoclinic silver sulfide Ag2S contains four Ag2S formula units and has the following parameters: a = 0.42264 nm, b = 0.69282 nm, c = 0.95317 nm and β = 125.554°. The size of silver sulfide particles in deposited powders was estimated by the X-ray diffraction and BET methods. By varying the ratio between the concentrations of reagents in the initial reaction mixture it is possible to deposit Ag2S nanoparticles with average size ranging in the interval from ∼1000 to ∼30 nm. Ag2S nanopowders have no deformation distortions of the crystal lattice practically because the microstrains ε in the synthesized powders do not exceed 0.15%. All the Ag2S powders with different particle size have an identical morphology.

  15. A novel polythreading Ag(I) coordination polymer with blue photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Xian-Ying; Yao, Jing; Lu, Chang-Sheng; Meng, Qing-Jin

    2013-04-15

    One new compound, [Ag(p-bix)]{sub 3}[Ag(Hbtc){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O (H{sub 3}btc=1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylate, p-bix=1,4-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-benzene), has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, PXRD, luminescent analysis, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. X-ray structural analysis revealed that 0-D unit [Ag(Hbtc){sub 2}]{sup 3−} and two kinds of 1-D linear chain [Ag(p-bix)]{sub ∞}{sup +}, can be found within the crystal structure. The combination of 0-D [Ag(Hbtc){sub 2}]{sup 3−} unit and 1-D undulated chain [Ag1(p{sub 1}-bix)]{sub ∞}{sup +} through weak Ag–O bond gave rise to 2-D anionic supramolecular doublelayer. Then the grids of the 2-D layer are threaded by 1-D linear cationic chain [Ag2(p{sub 2}-bix)]{sub ∞}{sup +} to generate entangled 3-D architecture with unusual poly(pseudo-rotaxane)-type arrangements. Luminescent properties of the title complex were also studied in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Novel 3D polythreading supramolecular architecture was constructed, in which 1D linear cationic chains [Ag(p{sub 2}-bix)]{sub ∞}{sup +} threaded into the grid of weak Ag–O bonded anionic 2D sheet. Highlights: ► Novel 1D{sup +}+2D{sup −}→3D polythreading coordination complex was reported. ► Diverse conformations of p-bix result in different 1D [Ag(p-bix)]{sub ∞}{sup +} chains. ► The title complex displayed blue photoluminescence at room temperature.

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy of AgCl, AgBr, and AgI vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Batson, C.H.; Goodman, G.L.

    1980-06-01

    He I photoelectron spectra of AgCl, AgBr and AgI vapors have been obtained which differ significantly from earlier work. In each instance, the characteristic features of the diatomic molecule are prominent. The spectral features separate into a valence region, predominantly halogen p-like, and a deeper region, predominantly of Ag 4d character. The latter is split by spin--orbit and ligand field interactions, which are parametrized from the experimental data. Relativistic calculations of the X/sub ..cap alpha../--DVM--SCC type have been performed for these species. At the transition state level, they agree very well with the experimental peak positions. Nonrelativistic calculations of this type have been performed for CuCl and cyclic Cu/sub 3/Cl/sub 3/. Unlike the AgX species, the CuCl and Cu/sub 3/Cl/sub 3/ exhibit strong mixing of metal d and halogen p orbitals for the uppermost occupied orbital, and other Cu 3d-like orbitals above the Cl 3p-like orbitals. It is suggested that the occurrence of Cu 3d orbitals in the valence region may play a role in the anomalous diagmagnetic signal and large conductivity changes of CuCl condensed from the vapor.

  17. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of silver(I) sulfanylcarboxylates. Structural isomers with identically or unequally coordinated Ag centers in an Ag4S4 ring.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Elena; Casas, José S; Couce, María D; Sánchez, Agustín; Seoane, Rafael; Sordo, José; Varela, José M; Vázquez-López, Ezequiel M

    2007-07-28

    We have investigated the reactions of silver nitrate and 3-(aryl)-2-sulfanylpropenoic acids [H(2)xspa, x: p = 3-phenyl-, f = 3-(2-furyl)-, t = 3-(2-thienyl)-, py = 3-(2-pyridyl)-] and 2-cyclopentylidene-2-sulfanylacetic acid (H(2)L) in 1 : 1 and 2 : 1 molar ratios. The 1 : 1 molar ratio gave compounds of type [Ag(HL)]; reaction of these compounds with diisopropylamine and NaOH gave [HQ][Ag(L)] (HQ = diisopropylammonium) and Na[Ag(L)] x H(2)O, respectively. These compounds, as well as those of type [Ag(2)(L)] obtained with the 1 : 2 molar ratio, were isolated and characterized by IR and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) spectroscopy. (109)Ag NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS spectrometry were also used in some cases. The crystal structures of [HQ][Ag(pspa)] (11), in which the presence of structural isomers was detected, and [HQ][Ag(cpa)] (15) were determined by X-ray diffractometry. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes against E. coli, S. aureus, B. subtilis, P. aeruginosa/Resistant P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans was tested. PMID:17622425

  18. AG Draconis - a symbiotic mystery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galis, R.; Hric, L.; Smelcer, L.

    2015-02-01

    Symbiotic system AG Draconis regularly undergoes quiescent and active stages which consist of the series of individual outbursts. The period analysis of new and historical photometric data, as well as radial velocities, confirmed the presence of the two periods. The longer one (~550 d) is related to the orbital motion and the shorter one (~355 d) could be due to pulsation of the cool component of AG Dra. In addition, the active stages change distinctively, but the outbursts are repeated with periods from 359 - 375 d.

  19. Biotic and abiotic interactions in aquatic microcosms determine fate and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles. Part 1. Aggregation and dissolution.

    PubMed

    Unrine, Jason M; Colman, Benjamin P; Bone, Audrey J; Gondikas, Andreas P; Matson, Cole W

    2012-07-01

    To better understand their fate and toxicity in aquatic environments, we compared the aggregation and dissolution behavior of gum arabic (GA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated Ag nanoparticles (NPs) in aquatic microcosms. There were four microcosm types: surface water; water and sediment; water and aquatic plants; or water, sediment, and aquatic plants. Dissolution and aggregation behavior of AgNPs were examined using ultracentrifugation, ultrafiltration, and asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation coupled to ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dynamic and static laser light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Plants released dissolved organic matter (DOM) into the water column either through active or passive processes in response to Ag exposure. This organic matter fraction readily bound Ag ions. The plant-derived DOM had the effect of stabilizing PVP-AgNPs as primary particles, but caused GA-AgNPs to be removed from the water column, likely by dissolution and binding of released Ag ions on sediment and plant surfaces. The destabilization of the GA-AgNPs also corresponded with X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy results which suggest that 22-28% of the particulate Ag was associated with thiols and 5-14% was present as oxides. The results highlight the potential complexities of nanomaterial behavior in response to biotic and abiotic modifications in ecosystems, and may help to explain differences in toxicity of Ag observed in realistic exposure media compared to simplified laboratory exposures.

  20. Nano-Nucleation Characteristic of Cu-Ag Alloy Directly Electrodeposited on W Diffusion Barrier for Microelectronic Device Interconnect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang O; Kim, Sunjung

    2016-05-01

    Cu-Ag alloy interconnect is promising for ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) microelectronic system of which device dimension keeps shrinking. In this study, seedless electrodeposition of Cu-Ag alloy directly on W diffusion barrier as interconnect technology is presented in respect of nano-nucleation control. Chemical equilibrium state of electrolyte was fundamentally investigated according to the pH of electrolyte because direct nano-nucleation of Cu-Ag alloy on W surface is challenging. Chelation behavior of Cu2+ and Ag+ ions with citrate (Cit) and ammonia ligands was dependent on the pH of electrolyte. The amount and kind of Cu- and Ag-based complexes determine the deposition rate, size, elemental composition, and surface morphology of Cu-Ag alloy nano-nuclei formed on W surface. PMID:27483895

  1. Dynamically Reconfigurable Systolic Array Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasu, Aravind; Barnes, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A polymorphic systolic array framework has been developed that works in conjunction with an embedded microprocessor on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), which allows for dynamic and complimentary scaling of acceleration levels of two algorithms active concurrently on the FPGA. Use is made of systolic arrays and a hardware-software co-design to obtain an efficient multi-application acceleration system. The flexible and simple framework allows hosting of a broader range of algorithms, and is extendable to more complex applications in the area of aerospace embedded systems. FPGA chips can be responsive to realtime demands for changing applications needs, but only if the electronic fabric can respond fast enough. This systolic array framework allows for rapid partial and dynamic reconfiguration of the chip in response to the real-time needs of scalability, and adaptability of executables.

  2. Ag-Ag2S Hybrid Nanoprisms: Structural versus Plasmonic Evolution.

    PubMed

    Shahjamali, Mohammad M; Zhou, Yong; Zaraee, Negin; Xue, Can; Wu, Jinsong; Large, Nicolas; McGuirk, C Michael; Boey, Freddy; Dravid, Vinayak; Cui, Zhifeng; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-05-24

    Recently, Ag-Ag2S hybrid nanostructures have attracted a great deal of attention due to their enhanced chemical and thermal stability, in addition to their morphology- and composition-dependent tunable local surface plasmon resonances. Although Ag-Ag2S nanostructures can be synthesized via sulfidation of as-prepared anisotropic Ag nanoparticles, this process is poorly understood, often leading to materials with anomalous compositions, sizes, and shapes and, consequently, optical properties. In this work, we use theory and experiment to investigate the structural and plasmonic evolution of Ag-Ag2S nanoprisms during the sulfidation of Ag precursors. The previously observed red-shifted extinction of the Ag-Ag2S hybrid nanoprism as sulfidation occurs contradicts theoretical predictions, indicating that the reaction does not just occur at the prism tips as previously speculated. Our experiments show that sulfidation can induce either blue or red shifts in the extinction of the dipole plasmon mode, depending on reaction conditions. By elucidating the correlation with the final structure and morphology of the synthesized Ag-Ag2S nanoprisms, we find that, depending on the reaction conditions, sulfidation occurs on the prism tips and/or the (111) surfaces, leading to a core(Ag)-anisotropic shell(Ag2S) prism nanostructure. Additionally, we demonstrate that the direction of the shift in the dipole plasmon is a function of the relative amounts of Ag2S at the prism tips and Ag2S shell thickness around the prism.

  3. Transverse impedance measurement in RHIC and the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Biancacci, Nicolo; Blaskiewicz, M.; Dutheil, Y.; Liu, C.; Mernick, M.; Minty, M.; White, S. M.

    2014-05-12

    The RHIC luminosity upgrade program aims for an increase of the polarized proton luminosity by a factor 2. To achieve this goal a significant increase in the beam intensity is foreseen. The beam coupling impedance could therefore represent a source of detrimental effects for beam quality and stability at high bunch intensities. For this reason it is essential to quantify the accelerator impedance budget and the major impedance sources, and possibly cure them. In this MD note we summarize the results of the 2013 transverse impedance measurements in the AGS and RHIC. The studies have been performed measuring the tune shift as a function of bunch intensity and deriving the total accelerator machine transverse impedance. For RHIC, we could obtain first promising results of impedance localization measurements as well.

  4. Photoreduction of Ag+ in Ag/Ag2S/Au memristor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, N. I.; Tabib-Azar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Silver halides and chalcogenides are excellent memristor materials that have been extensively used in the past as photosensitive layers in photography. Here we examine the effect of illumination on the operating voltages and switching speed of Ag/Ag2S/Au memristors using a green laser (473-523 nm). Our results indicate that illumination decreases the average switching time from high to low resistance states by ∼19% and decreases the turn-off voltages dramatically from -0.8 V to -0.25 V that we attribute to the change in sulfur valency and a photo-induced change in its oxidation/reduction potential. Photo-induced reduction of silver in Ag2S may be used in three dimensional optical memories that can be electronically read and reset.

  5. Ag-Ag dispersive interaction and physical properties of Ag3Co(CN)6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hong; Dove, Martin T.; Refson, Keith

    2014-08-01

    We report a density functional theory (DFT) study of Ag3Co(CN)6, a material noted for its colossal positive and negative thermal expansion, and its giant negative linear compressibility. Here, we explicitly include the dispersive interaction within the DFT calculation, and find that it is essential to reproduce the ground state, the high-pressure phase, and the phonons of this material, and hence essential to understand this material's remarkable physical properties. New exotic properties are predicted. These include heat enhancement of the negative linear compressibility, a large reduction in the coefficient of thermal expansion on compression with change of sign of the mode Grüneisen parameters under pressure, and large softening of the material on heating. Our results suggest that these are associated with the weak Ag-Ag dispersive interactions acting with an efficient hinging mechanism in the framework structure.

  6. Complexation of silver and dissolved organic matter in soil water extracts.

    PubMed

    Settimio, Lara; McLaughlin, Mike J; Kirby, Jason K; Langdon, Kate A; Janik, Les; Smith, Scott

    2015-04-01

    An important aspect of the behaviour and fate of silver (Ag) in soils is the interaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM). The complexation and strength of binding of Ag(+) with DOM in soil water extracts was examined and modelled based on a range of chemical and quality DOM measurements. Silver ion binding measured by addition of the (110m)Ag radioisotope in addition to a cation exchange resin technique were used to determine strongly complexed Ag in solutions. Silver was found to be up to 70% strongly complexed. The variability in Ag(+) binding by DOM across different soils was closely related (R(2) = 0.8) to the mid-infrared spectra of these extracts. The affinity of Ag(+) for DOM was stronger in solutions containing a greater content of humic and aromatic structures. The ability of Ag(+) to complex with DOM could result in increased mobilisation of this metal in the soil environment. PMID:25660071

  7. Complexation of silver and dissolved organic matter in soil water extracts.

    PubMed

    Settimio, Lara; McLaughlin, Mike J; Kirby, Jason K; Langdon, Kate A; Janik, Les; Smith, Scott

    2015-04-01

    An important aspect of the behaviour and fate of silver (Ag) in soils is the interaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM). The complexation and strength of binding of Ag(+) with DOM in soil water extracts was examined and modelled based on a range of chemical and quality DOM measurements. Silver ion binding measured by addition of the (110m)Ag radioisotope in addition to a cation exchange resin technique were used to determine strongly complexed Ag in solutions. Silver was found to be up to 70% strongly complexed. The variability in Ag(+) binding by DOM across different soils was closely related (R(2) = 0.8) to the mid-infrared spectra of these extracts. The affinity of Ag(+) for DOM was stronger in solutions containing a greater content of humic and aromatic structures. The ability of Ag(+) to complex with DOM could result in increased mobilisation of this metal in the soil environment.

  8. Infrared spectra and stability of CO and H 2O sorption over Ag-exchanged ZSM-5 zeolite: DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shujun; Huang, Shiping; Tu, Weixia; Zhu, Jiqin

    2009-03-01

    The infrared spectra and stability of CO and H 2O sorption over Ag-exchanged ZSM-5 zeolite were investigated by using density function theory (DFT). The changes of NBO charge show that the electron transfers from CO molecule to the Ag + cation to form an σ-bond, and it accompanies by the back donation of d-electrons from Ag + cation to the CO (π*) orbital as one and two CO molecules are adsorbed on Ag-ZSM-5. The free energy changes Δ G, -5.55 kcal/mol and 6.52 kcal/mol for one and two CO molecules, illustrate that the Ag +(CO) 2 complex is unstable at the room temperature. The vibration frequency of C-O stretching of one CO molecule bonded to Ag + ion at 2211 cm -1 is in good agreement with the experimental results. The calculated C-O symmetric and antisymmetric stretching frequencies in the Ag +(CO) 2 complex shift to 2231 cm -1 and 2205 cm -1 when the second CO molecule is adsorbed. The calculated C-O stretching frequency in CO-Ag-ZSM-5-H 2O complex shifts to 2199 cm -1, the symmetric and antisymmetric O-H stretching frequencies are 3390 cm -1 and 3869 cm -1, respectively. The Gibbs free energy change (ΔGO) is -6.58 kcal/mol as a H 2O molecule is adsorbed on CO-Ag-ZSM-5 complex at 298 K. The results show that CO-Ag-ZSM-5-H 2O complex is more stable at room temperature.

  9. Laser-based synthesis of core Ag-shell AgI nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hua; Fan, Wai Yip

    2005-05-01

    A laser-controlled synthesis of silver iodide (AgI) nanoparticles with isolable AgI shell-Ag core stable intermediates is achieved via molecular iodine photodissociation in the presence of pure Ag nanoparticles dispersed in water. Ag nanoparticles were introduced into the solution containing sodium dodecylsulphate surfactants and iodine by ablating a piece of silver foil with a 532 nm pulsed Nd-YAG laser. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that different AgI shell-Ag core sizes could be achieved by controlling the photolysis of I 2 in solution. These nanoparticles were also found to catalyse an atom-economy Grignard-Barbier organic reaction.

  10. Quasi-Instantaneous Bacterial Inactivation on Cu-Ag Nanoparticulate 3D Catheters in the Dark and Under Light: Mechanism and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rtimi, Sami; Sanjines, Rosendo; Pulgarin, Cesar; Kiwi, John

    2016-01-13

    The first evidence for Cu-Ag (50%/50%) nanoparticulate hybrid coatings is presented leading to a complete and almost instantaneous bacterial inactivation in the dark (≤5 min). Dark bacterial inactivation times on Cu-Ag (50%/50%) were observed to coincide with the times required by actinic light irradiation. This provides the evidence that the bimetal Cu-Ag driven inactivation predominates over a CuO/Cu2O and Ag2O oxides inducing a semiconductor driven behavior. Cu- or Ag-coated polyurethane (PU) catheters led to bacterial inactivation needing about ∼30 min. The accelerated bacterial inactivation by Cu-Ag coated on 3D catheters sputtered was investigated in a detailed way. The release of Cu/Ag ions during bacterial inactivation was followed by inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS) and the amount of Cu and Ag-ions released were below the cytotoxicity levels permitted by the sanitary regulations. By stereomicroscopy the amount of live/dead cells were followed during the bacterial inactivation time. By Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), the systematic shift of the -(CH2) band stretching of the outer lipo-polysaccharide bilayer (LPS) was followed to monitor the changes leading to cell lysis. A hydrophobic to hydrophilic transformation of the Cu-Ag PU catheter surface under light was observed within 30 min followed concomitantly to a longer back transformation to the hydrophobic initial state in the dark. Physical insight is provided for the superior performance of Cu-Ag films compared to Cu or Ag films in view of the drastic acceleration of the bacterial inactivation observed on bimetal Cu-Ag films coating PU catheters. A mechanism of bacterial inactivation is suggested that is consistent with the findings reported in this study. PMID:26699928

  11. AGS experiments: 1990, 1991, 1992. Ninth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains a description of the following: AGS Experimental Area - High Energy Physics FY 1993 and Heavy Ion Physics FY 1993; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ``as run``; Proposed 1993 Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS Experiments; and List of AGS Experimenters.

  12. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  13. Switched matrix accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H.; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We also provide an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392 GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  14. Switched Matrix Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H

    2000-10-04

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm-wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We provide also an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392. GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high-power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  15. Template-Directed Directionally Solidified 3D Mesostructured AgCl-KCl Eutectic Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinwoo; Aagesen, Larry K; Choi, Jun Hee; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Ha Seong; Liu, Jinyun; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Kang, Jin Gu; Ramazani, Ali; Thornton, Katsuyo; Braun, Paul V

    2015-08-19

    3D mesostructured AgCl-KCl photonic crystals emerge from colloidal templating of eutectic solidification. Solvent removal of the KCl phase results in a mesostructured AgCl inverse opal. The 3D-template-induced confinement leads to the emergence of a complex microstructure. The 3D mesostructured eutectic photonic crystals have a large stop band ranging from the near-infrared to the visible tuned by the processing.

  16. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  17. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  18. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  19. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  20. An efficient photocatalyst for degradation of various organic dyes: Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Yang; Lu, Yi; Liu, Jin-Ku

    2016-04-15

    The Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite was prepared by a facile in-situ anion-exchange method, then the Ag nanoparticles were coated on this composite through photodeposition route to form a novel Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite. The in-situ Br(-) replacement in a crystal lattice node position of Ag2MoO4 crystal allows for overcoming the resistance of electron transition effectively. Meanwhile silver nano-particles on the surface of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite could act as electron traps to intensify the photogeneration electron-hole separation and the subsequent transfer of the trapped electron to the adsorbed O2 as an electron acceptor. As an efficient visible light catalyst, the Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity for the degradation of various organic dyes. The experimental results demonstrated superior photocatalytic rate of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite compared to pure AgBr and Ag2MoO4 crystals (37.6% and 348.4% enhancement respectively). The Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite cloud degraded Rhodamin B, bromophenol blue, and amino black 10b completed in 7min. PMID:26775100

  1. An efficient photocatalyst for degradation of various organic dyes: Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Yang; Lu, Yi; Liu, Jin-Ku

    2016-04-15

    The Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite was prepared by a facile in-situ anion-exchange method, then the Ag nanoparticles were coated on this composite through photodeposition route to form a novel Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite. The in-situ Br(-) replacement in a crystal lattice node position of Ag2MoO4 crystal allows for overcoming the resistance of electron transition effectively. Meanwhile silver nano-particles on the surface of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite could act as electron traps to intensify the photogeneration electron-hole separation and the subsequent transfer of the trapped electron to the adsorbed O2 as an electron acceptor. As an efficient visible light catalyst, the Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity for the degradation of various organic dyes. The experimental results demonstrated superior photocatalytic rate of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite compared to pure AgBr and Ag2MoO4 crystals (37.6% and 348.4% enhancement respectively). The Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite cloud degraded Rhodamin B, bromophenol blue, and amino black 10b completed in 7min.

  2. Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2001-12-11

    At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

  3. AGS 20th anniversary celebration

    SciTech Connect

    Baggett, N.V.

    1980-05-22

    On May 22, 1980, a symposium was held at Brookhaven to celebrate the 20th birthday of the AGS, to recall its beginnings, and to review major discoveries that have been made with its beams. The talks at the symposium are recorded in this volume.

  4. AGS experiments: 1985, 1986, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout, table of beam parameters and fluxes, experiment schedule ''as run,'' experiment long range schedule, a listing of experiments by number, two-page summaries of each experiment, also ordered by number, and publications of AGS experiments, 1982-1987.

  5. Correcting the AGS depolarizing resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    For the 1986 AGS run, the technique of correcting an imperfection resonance using a beat harmonic instead of the direct harmonic was applied and found to be useful in achieving a 22 GeV/c polarized beam. Both conventional and modified techniques are explained. (LEW)

  6. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linley, Judy; Mylne, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Ag-Ed, an agricultural education project for upper elementary students, was held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show in Queensland, Australia. Agriculture industry representatives provided 20 interactive agricultural presentations for class groups, which were supplemented with a teacher resource-package containing a directory and 13 sections of…

  7. AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

  8. A comparison of metallophilic interactions in group 11[X-M-PH 3] n ( n = 2-3) complex halides (M = Cu, Ag, Au; X = Cl, Br, I) from density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadollahzadeh, Behnam; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Metallophilic interactions in dimeric and trimeric [X-M-PH 3] n ( n = 2-3) complexes are studied using density functional and second order Møller Plesset perturbation theory together with energy-consistent, small-core scalar-relativistic pseudopotentials and corresponding large sized valence basis sets. A many-body decomposition of the interaction energy shows that the three-body contribution to the metallophilic interaction is repulsive at all levels of theory and non-negligible. However, the two-body contribution of the two end units dominates over the three-body effect, giving a net stabilizing effect in the metal-metal interaction from the dimer to the trimer, and resulting in a further contraction of the trimer metal-metal bond.

  9. Investigating the pharmacokinetics and biological distribution of silver-loaded polyphosphoester-based nanoparticles using 111Ag as a radiotracer

    PubMed Central

    Aweda, Tolulope A.; Zhang, Shiyi; Mupanomunda, Chiedza; Burkemper, Jennifer; Heo, Gyu Seong; Bandara, Nilantha; Lin, Mai; Cutler, Cathy S.; Cannon, Carolyn L.; Youngs, Wiley; Wooley, Karen L.; Lapi, Suzanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Purified 111Ag was used as a radiotracer to investigate silver loading and release, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of polyphosphoester-based degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles as a comparison to the previously reported small molecule, N-heterocyclic silver carbene complex analogue (SCC1) for the delivery of therapeutic silver ions in mouse models. Biodistribution studies were conducted by aerosol administration of 111Ag acetate, [111Ag]SCC1 and [111Ag]SCK doses directly into the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. Nebulization of the 111Ag antimicrobials resulted in an average uptake of 1.07 ± 0.12% of the total aerosolized dose given per mouse. The average dose taken into the lungs of mice was estimated to be 2.6 ± 0.3% of the dose inhaled per mouse for [111Ag]SCC1 and twice as much dose was observed for the [111Ag]SCKs (5.0 ± 0.3% and 5.9 ± 0.8% for [111Ag]aSCK and [111Ag]zSCK, respectively) at 1 h post administration (p.a.). [111Ag]SCKs also exhibited higher dose retention in the lungs; 62 – 68% for [111Ag]SCKs and 43% for [111Ag]SCC1 of the initial 1 h dose was observed in the lungs at 24 h post administration (p.a.). This study demonstrates the utility of 111Ag as a useful tool for monitoring the pharmacokinetics of silver loaded antimicrobials in vivo. PMID:25952472

  10. Investigating the pharmacokinetics and biological distribution of silver-loaded polyphosphoester-based nanoparticles using (111) Ag as a radiotracer.

    PubMed

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Zhang, Shiyi; Mupanomunda, Chiedza; Burkemper, Jennifer; Heo, Gyu Seong; Bandara, Nilantha; Lin, Mai; Cutler, Cathy S; Cannon, Carolyn L; Youngs, Wiley J; Wooley, Karen L; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2015-05-30

    Purified (111) Ag was used as a radiotracer to investigate silver loading and release, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution of polyphosphoester-based degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles as a comparison to the previously reported small molecule, N-heterocyclic silver carbene complex analog (SCC1) for the delivery of therapeutic silver ions in mouse models. Biodistribution studies were conducted by aerosol administration of (111) Ag acetate, [(111) Ag]SCC1, and [(111) Ag]SCK doses directly into the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. Nebulization of the (111) Ag antimicrobials resulted in an average uptake of 1.07 ± 0.12% of the total aerosolized dose given per mouse. The average dose taken into the lungs of mice was estimated to be 2.6 ± 0.3% of the dose inhaled per mouse for [(111) Ag]SCC1 and twice as much dose was observed for the [(111) Ag]SCKs (5.0 ± 0.3% and 5.9 ± 0.8% for [(111) Ag]aSCK and [(111) Ag]zSCK, respectively) at 1 h post administration (p.a.). [(111) Ag]SCKs also exhibited higher dose retention in the lungs; 62-68% for [(111) Ag]SCKs and 43% for [(111) Ag]SCC1 of the initial 1 h dose were observed in the lungs at 24 h p.a.. This study demonstrates the utility of (111) Ag as a useful tool for monitoring the pharmacokinetics of silver-loaded antimicrobials in vivo.

  11. Investigating the pharmacokinetics and biological distribution of silver-loaded polyphosphoester-based nanoparticles using (111) Ag as a radiotracer.

    PubMed

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Zhang, Shiyi; Mupanomunda, Chiedza; Burkemper, Jennifer; Heo, Gyu Seong; Bandara, Nilantha; Lin, Mai; Cutler, Cathy S; Cannon, Carolyn L; Youngs, Wiley J; Wooley, Karen L; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2015-05-30

    Purified (111) Ag was used as a radiotracer to investigate silver loading and release, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution of polyphosphoester-based degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles as a comparison to the previously reported small molecule, N-heterocyclic silver carbene complex analog (SCC1) for the delivery of therapeutic silver ions in mouse models. Biodistribution studies were conducted by aerosol administration of (111) Ag acetate, [(111) Ag]SCC1, and [(111) Ag]SCK doses directly into the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. Nebulization of the (111) Ag antimicrobials resulted in an average uptake of 1.07 ± 0.12% of the total aerosolized dose given per mouse. The average dose taken into the lungs of mice was estimated to be 2.6 ± 0.3% of the dose inhaled per mouse for [(111) Ag]SCC1 and twice as much dose was observed for the [(111) Ag]SCKs (5.0 ± 0.3% and 5.9 ± 0.8% for [(111) Ag]aSCK and [(111) Ag]zSCK, respectively) at 1 h post administration (p.a.). [(111) Ag]SCKs also exhibited higher dose retention in the lungs; 62-68% for [(111) Ag]SCKs and 43% for [(111) Ag]SCC1 of the initial 1 h dose were observed in the lungs at 24 h p.a.. This study demonstrates the utility of (111) Ag as a useful tool for monitoring the pharmacokinetics of silver-loaded antimicrobials in vivo. PMID:25952472

  12. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  13. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  14. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  15. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  16. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  17. Novel Asymmetric Wettable AgNPs/Chitosan Wound Dressing: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Donghui; Lu, Zhong; Yang, Hao; Gao, Jingting; Chen, Rong

    2016-02-17

    A novel silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/chitosan composite dressing with asymmetric wettability surfaces was successfully prepared via a simple two-step method for biomedical applications as wound healing materials. First, AgNPs were assembled into the chitosan sponge which was prepared by lyophilization process. Then one side of the sponge was modified by a thin layer of stearic acid. The incorporation of AgNPs into chitosan dressing could enhance the antibacterial activity against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. The asymmetric surface modification endows the dressing with both highly hydrophobic property and inherent hydrophilic nature of chitosan. The hydrophobic surface of the dressing shows waterproof and antiadhesion for contaminant properties, whereas the hydrophilic surface preserves its water-absorbing capability and efficiently inhibits the growth of bacteria. Furthermore, the AgNPs/chitosan composite dressing displays improved moisture retention and blood clotting ability compared to the unmodified dressings. Cytocompatibility test evaluated in vitro and in a wound infection model illustrates the nontoxic nature of the composite dressing. More importantly, the in vivo wound healing model evaluation in mice reveals that the asymmetric AgNPs/chitosan dressing promotes the wound healing and accelerates the reepithelialization and collagen deposition. The silver accumulation in mice body treated by the composite dressing is far lower than that of the clinically used Acasin nanosilver dressing treated mice. This work indicates the huge potential of the novel AgNPs/chitosan wound dressing with asymmetrical wettability for clinical use. PMID:26800283

  18. Determinants of oxygen consumption during exercise on cycle ergometer: the effects of gravity acceleration.

    PubMed

    Bonjour, Julien; Capelli, Carlo; Antonutto, Guglielmo; Calza, Stefano; Tam, Enrico; Linnarsson, Dag; Ferretti, Guido

    2010-04-30

    The hypothesis that changes in gravity acceleration (a(g)) affect the linear relationships between oxygen consumption VO2 and mechanical power (w ) so that at any w, VO2 increases linearly with a(g) was tested under conditions where the weight of constant-mass legs was let to vary by inducing changes in a(g) in a human centrifuge. The effects of a(g) on the VO2/w relationship were studied on 14 subjects at two pedalling frequencies (f(p), 1.0 and 1.5 Hz), during four work loads on a cycle ergometer (25, 50, 75 and 100 W) and at four a(g) levels (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 times normal gravity). VO2 increased linearly with w. The slope did not differ significantly at various a(g) and f(p), suggesting invariant mechanical efficiency during cycling, independent of f(p) and a(g). Conversely, the y-intercept of the VO2/w relationship, defined as constant b, increased linearly with a(g). Constant b is the sum of resting VO2 plus internal metabolic power (E (i)). Since the former was the same at all investigated a(g), the increase in constant b was entirely due to an increase in E (i). Since the VO2 versus w lines had similar slopes, the changes in E (i) entirely explained the higher VO2 at each w, as a(g) was increased. In conclusion, the effects of a(g) on VO2 are mediated through changes in E (i), and not in w or in resting VO2.

  19. Antibacterial activity and reusability of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Dang; Yun, Hyosuk; Kim, Gwui Cheol; Lee, Chul Won; Choi, Hyun Chul

    2013-10-01

    A facile approach to the synthesis of novel CNT-Ag and GO-Ag antibacterial materials, in which thiol groups are utilized as linkers to secure silver (Ag) nanoparticles to the CNT and GO surfaces without agglomeration, is reported. The resulting CNT-Ag and GO-Ag samples were characterized by performing TEM, XRD, Auger, XPS, and Raman measurements, which revealed that in these antibacterial materials size-similar and quasi-spherical Ag nanoparticles are anchored to the CNT and GO surfaces. The Ag nanoparticles in CNT-Ag and GO-Ag have narrow size distributions with average diameters of 2.6 and 3.5 nm respectively. The antibacterial activities of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag against Escherichia coli were assessed with the paper-disk diffusion method and by determining the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). CNT-Ag was found to have higher antibacterial activity than the reference Ag colloid. Moreover, both CNT-Ag and GO-Ag retain more than 50% of their original antibacterial activities after 20 washes with detergent, which indicates their potential as antibacterial materials for laboratory and medical purposes.

  20. Comparative Study of Antimicrobial Activity of AgBr and Ag Nanoparticles (NPs)

    PubMed Central

    Suchomel, Petr; Kvitek, Libor; Panacek, Ales; Prucek, Robert; Hrbac, Jan; Vecerova, Renata; Zboril, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The diverse mechanism of antimicrobial activity of Ag and AgBr nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and also against several strains of candida was explored in this study. The AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by simple precipitation of silver nitrate by potassium bromide in the presence of stabilizing polymers. The used polymers (PEG, PVP, PVA, and HEC) influence significantly the size of the prepared AgBr NPs dependently on the mode of interaction of polymer with Ag+ ions. Small NPs (diameter of about 60–70 nm) were formed in the presence of the polymer with low interaction as are PEG and HEC, the polymers which interact with Ag+ strongly produce nearly two times bigger NPs (120–130 nm). The prepared AgBr NPs were transformed to Ag NPs by the reduction using NaBH4. The sizes of the produced Ag NPs followed the same trends – the smallest NPs were produced in the presence of PEG and HEC polymers. Prepared AgBr and Ag NPs dispersions were tested for their biological activity. The obtained results of antimicrobial activity of AgBr and Ag NPs are discussed in terms of possible mechanism of the action of these NPs against tested microbial strains. The AgBr NPs are more effective against gram-negative bacteria and tested yeast strains while Ag NPs show the best antibacterial action against gram-positive bacteria strains. PMID:25781988

  1. Evidence for avoidance of Ag nanoparticles by earthworms (Eisenia fetida).

    PubMed

    Shoults-Wilson, W A; Zhurbich, Oksana I; McNear, David H; Tsyusko, Olga V; Bertsch, Paul M; Unrine, Jason M

    2011-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been incorporated into a wide variety of consumer products, ideally acting as antimicrobial agents. Silver exposure has long been known to cause toxic effects to a wide variety of organisms, making large scale production of silver nanoparticles a potential hazard to environmental systems. Here we describe the first evidence that an organism may be able to sense manufactured nanoparticles in a complex, environmentally relevant exposure and that the presence of nanoparticles alters the organism's behavior. We found that earthworms (Eisenia fetida) consistently avoid soils containing silver nanoparticles and AgNO(3) at similar concentrations of Ag. However, avoidance of silver nanoparticles occurred over 48 h, while avoidance of AgNO(3) was immediate. It was determined that avoidance of silver nanoparticles could not be explained by release of silver ions or any changes in microbial communities caused by the introduction of Ag. This leads us to conclude that the earthworms were in some way sensing the presence of nanoparticles over the course of a 48 h exposure and choosing to avoid exposure to them. Our results demonstrate that nanoparticle interactions with organisms may be unpredictable and that these interactions may result in ecologically significant effects on behavior at environmentally relevant concentrations. PMID:21229389

  2. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  3. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  4. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-29

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?.

  5. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  6. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  7. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  8. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  9. Accelerators (5/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-09

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  10. Accelerators (4/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-08

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  11. Accelerators (3/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-07

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  12. Ion Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10) such as Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), High Energy Density Physics (HEDP), and spallation neutron sources. Most ion induction accelerators constructed to date have been limited scale facilities built for feasibility studies for HIF and HEDP where a large numbers of ions are required on target in short pulses. Because ions are typically non-relativistic or weakly relativistic in much of the machine, space-charge effects can be of crucial importance. This contrasts the situation with electron machines, which are usually strongly relativistic leading to weaker transverse space-charge effects and simplified longitudinal dynamics. Similarly, the bunch structure of ion induction accelerators relative to RF machines results in significant differences in the longitudinal physics.

  13. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  14. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  15. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  16. KEK digital accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, T.; Adachi, T.; Takayama, K.; Leo, K. W.; Arai, T.; Arakida, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Kadokura, E.; Kawai, M.; Kawakubo, T.; Kubo, Tomio; Koyama, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Okazaki, K.; Okamura, K.; Someya, H.; Takagi, A.; Tokuchi, A.; Wake, M.

    2011-07-01

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK digital accelerator (KEK-DA) is a renovation of the KEK 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron, which was shut down in 2006. The existing 40 MeV drift tube linac and rf cavities have been replaced by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source embedded in a 200 kV high-voltage terminal and induction acceleration cells, respectively. A DA is, in principle, capable of accelerating any species of ion in all possible charge states. The KEK-DA is characterized by specific accelerator components such as a permanent magnet X-band ECR ion source, a low-energy transport line, an electrostatic injection kicker, an extraction septum magnet operated in air, combined-function main magnets, and an induction acceleration system. The induction acceleration method, integrating modern pulse power technology and state-of-art digital control, is crucial for the rapid-cycle KEK-DA. The key issues of beam dynamics associated with low-energy injection of heavy ions are beam loss caused by electron capture and stripping as results of the interaction with residual gas molecules and the closed orbit distortion resulting from relatively high remanent fields in the bending magnets. Attractive applications of this accelerator in materials and biological sciences are discussed.

  17. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  18. Cascaded radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Lingang; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-07-15

    A cascaded radiation-pressure acceleration scheme is proposed. When an energetic proton beam is injected into an electrostatic field moving at light speed in a foil accelerated by light pressure, protons can be re-accelerated to much higher energy. An initial 3-GeV proton beam can be re-accelerated to 7 GeV while its energy spread is narrowed significantly, indicating a 4-GeV energy gain for one acceleration stage, as shown in one-dimensional simulations and analytical results. The validity of the method is further confirmed by two-dimensional simulations. This scheme provides a way to scale proton energy at the GeV level linearly with laser energy and is promising to obtain proton bunches at tens of gigaelectron-volts.

  19. Measurement of Coriolis Acceleration with a Smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Kraft, Jakob

    2016-05-01

    Undergraduate physics laboratories seldom have experiments that measure the Coriolis acceleration. This has traditionally been the case owing to the inherent complexities of making such measurements. Articles on the experimental determination of the Coriolis acceleration are few and far between in the physics literature. However, because modern smartphones come with a raft of built-in sensors, we have a unique opportunity to experimentally determine the Coriolis acceleration conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment at modest cost by using student-owned smartphones. Here we employ the gyroscope and accelerometer in a smartphone to verify the dependence of Coriolis acceleration on the angular velocity of a rotatingtrack and the speed of the sliding smartphone.

  20. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Liu; Jeffrey S. Bull; John Drozdoff; Robert May; Vaclav Vylet

    2001-10-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  1. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  2. GPU-Accelerated Text Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Mueller, Frank; Zhang, Yongpeng; Potok, Thomas E

    2009-01-01

    Accelerating hardware devices represent a novel promise for improving the performance for many problem domains but it is not clear for which domains what accelerators are suitable. While there is no room in general-purpose processor design to significantly increase the processor frequency, developers are instead resorting to multi-core chips duplicating conventional computing capabilities on a single die. Yet, accelerators offer more radical designs with a much higher level of parallelism and novel programming environments. This present work assesses the viability of text mining on CUDA. Text mining is one of the key concepts that has become prominent as an effective means to index the Internet, but its applications range beyond this scope and extend to providing document similarity metrics, the subject of this work. We have developed and optimized text search algorithms for GPUs to exploit their potential for massive data processing. We discuss the algorithmic challenges of parallelization for text search problems on GPUs and demonstrate the potential of these devices in experiments by reporting significant speedups. Our study may be one of the first to assess more complex text search problems for suitability for GPU devices, and it may also be one of the first to exploit and report on atomic instruction usage that have recently become available in NVIDIA devices.

  3. Photostimulated Luminescence and Dynamics of AgI and Ag Nanoclusters in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Joly, Alan G.; Roark, Joel

    2002-06-15

    The photoluminescence and photostimulated luminescence of Ag and AgI nanoclusters formed in zeolite-Y are studied using fluorescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectra of AgI nanoclusters show emission from both AgI and Ag nanoclusters, while the in the photostimulated luminescence, only the emission of Ag clusters is observed. While the photoluminescence from both Ag and AgI particles displays both sub-nanosecond and microsecond lifetimes, the emission from photostimulated luminescence shows very short, picosecond lifetimes. A model which ascribes the photostimulated luminescence to recombination of electrons trapped in the zeolite with Ag in close proximity to the trap site is proposed. The appearance of strong photostimulated luminescence with short decays in these systems demonstrates that nanoparticles have potential for digital storage and medical radiology applications.

  4. Chemically-inactive interfaces in thin film Ag/AgI systems for resistive switching memories

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Deok-Yong; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Waser, Rainer; Valov, Ilia

    2013-01-01

    AgI nanoionics-based resistive switching memories were studied in respect to chemical stability of the Ag/AgI interface using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The apparent dissolution of Ag films of thickness below some tens of nanometers and the loss of electrode/electrolyte contact was critically addressed. The results evidently show that there are no chemical interactions at the interface despite the high ionic mobility of Ag ions. Simulation results further show that Ag metal clusters can form in the AgI layer with intermediate-range order at least up to next-next nearest neighbors, suggesting that Ag can permeate into the AgI only in an aggregated form of metal crystallite. PMID:23378904

  5. Hydrodynamic chromatography coupled to single-particle ICP-MS for the simultaneous characterization of AgNPs and determination of dissolved Ag in plasma and blood of burn patients.

    PubMed

    Roman, Marco; Rigo, Chiara; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Munivrana, Ivan; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Mičetić, Ivan; Benetti, Federico; Manodori, Laura; Cairns, Warren R L

    2016-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly used in medical devices as innovative antibacterial agents, but no data are currently available on their chemical transformations and fate in vivo in the human body, particularly on their potential to reach the circulatory system. To study the processes involving AgNPs in human plasma and blood, we developed an analytical method based on hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in single-particle detection mode. An innovative algorithm was implemented to deconvolute the signals of dissolved Ag and AgNPs and to extrapolate a multiparametric characterization of the particles in the same chromatogram. From a single injection, the method provides the concentration of dissolved Ag and the distribution of AgNPs in terms of hydrodynamic diameter, mass-derived diameter, number and mass concentration. This analytical approach is robust and suitable to study quantitatively the dynamics and kinetics of AgNPs in complex biological fluids, including processes such as agglomeration, dissolution and formation of protein coronas. The method was applied to study the transformations of AgNP standards and an AgNP-coated dressing in human plasma, supported by micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and micro X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (μXANES) speciation analysis and imaging, and to investigate, for the first time, the possible presence of AgNPs in the blood of three burn patients treated with the same dressing. Together with our previous studies, the results strongly support the hypothesis that the systemic mobilization of the metal after topical administration of AgNPs is driven by their dissolution in situ. Graphical Abstract Simplified scheme of the combined analytical approach adopted for studying the chemical dynamics of AgNPs in human plasma/blood.

  6. Preparation of Ag-coated hollow microspheres via electroless plating for application in lightweight microwave absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wook-Joong; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2015-02-01

    Highly conductive Ag film is coated on hollow silica microspheres via electroless plating for application in lightweight microwave absorbers. The Ag plating is conducted using a two-step process of sensitizing and subsequent plating. The complex permeability and permittivity are determined using the reflection/transmission technique in the composite specimens of Ag-coated microspheres and silicone rubber matrix. Due to the large surface area of the microspheres, a relatively high concentration of AgNO3 is required in order to achieve a uniform Ag coating. In addition, a low concentration of fructose reducing agent is recommended for slow plating. The apparent electrical resistance of the Ag-coated microspheres is strongly dependent on the grain morphology. The thin and uniform Ag-coated particles are characterized by their low electrical resistance, which is as low as 0.1 Ω. The lower the electrical resistance of the microspheres, the higher the dielectric constant of the composite specimens, which results from the enhanced space-charge polarization between the conductive microspheres. The microwave absorbance is enhanced with decreases in the electrical resistance of microspheres due to the increased dielectric loss.

  7. Selective Growth of Ag Nanodewdrop on Au Nanostructure: A New Type of Bimetallic Heterostructure

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li

    2009-01-01

    A new type of bimetallic Au-Ag heterostructured material was prepared by a selective growing strategy of Ag nanodewdrop on the petal tip of Au flower using electrochemical method. The whole process was strictly controlled by forming the reactive tip of flower petal and passivating the facet along the body of metal petal using poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)(PVP) coating film. The formed Au-Ag HSFs were observed to be about 2 μm in diameter and have the Ag particles of about 50 nm settled on the tips of Au petals. The Au-Ag HSFs were found to display the superior properties on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The presence of Ag nanodewdrops could also facilitate the oxidation of Ru(bpy)32+ complex in electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) measurements and dramatically enhance the emission intensity. The features of Au-Ag HSFs can promise a new type of heterogeneous bimetallic alloy material for the potential applications in chemical and biological sensors. PMID:19788230

  8. Surface plasmon resonance in nanostructured Ag incorporated ZnS films

    SciTech Connect

    Chalana, S. R.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Ganesan, V.

    2015-10-15

    Silver incorporated zinc sulfide thin films are prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique and the influence of silver incorporation on the structural, optical and luminescence properties is analyzed using techniques like grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and laser photoluminescence spectroscopy. XRD analysis presents hexagonal wurtzite structure for the films. A reduction of crystallinity of the films is observed due to Ag incorporation. The Raman spectral analysis confirms the reduction of crystallinity and increase of strain due to the Ag incorporation. AFM analysis reveals a rough surface morphology for the undoped film and Ag incorporation makes the films uniform, dense and smooth. A blue shift of band gap energy with increase in Ag incorporation is observed due to quantum confinement effect. An absorption band (450-650 nm region) due to surface plasmon resonance of the Ag clusters present in the ZnS matrix is observed for the samples with higher Ag incorporation. The complex dielectric constant, loss factor and distribution of volume and surface energy loss of the ZnS thin films are calculated. Laser photoluminescence measurements gives an intense bluish green emission from the ZnS films and a quenching of the PL emission is observed which can be due to the metal plasmonic absorption and non-radiative energy transfer due to Ag incorporation.

  9. Accelerated testing of space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. Frank; Heshmat, Hooshang

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of various existing life prediction techniques used for a wide range of space mechanisms. Life prediction techniques utilized in other non-space fields such as turbine engine design are also reviewed for applicability to many space mechanism issues. The development of new concepts on how various tribological processes are involved in the life of the complex mechanisms used for space applications are examined. A 'roadmap' for the complete implementation of a tribological prediction approach for complex mechanical systems including standard procedures for test planning, analytical models for life prediction and experimental verification of the life prediction and accelerated testing techniques are discussed. A plan is presented to demonstrate a method for predicting the life and/or performance of a selected space mechanism mechanical component.

  10. Highly active Ag clusters stabilized on TiO2 nanocrystals for catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Zhe; Ou, Dingrong; Tu, Baofeng; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Cheng, Mojie

    2016-11-01

    Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites comprising of Ag clusters on TiO2 nanocrystal surfaces are of great significance in catalysts and advanced functional materials. Herein a novel method to synthesize Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites with Ag clusters under 2 nm on TiO2 nanocrystal surfaces have been developed. The success of this method relies on a silver mirror reaction in toluene, which refers to the reduction of silver-dodecylamine complexes by acetaldehyde in the presence of mono-dispersed TiO2 nanocrystals. The prepared Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites have been characterized by FT-IR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, ultra high resolution scanning electron microscope (Ultra-HRSEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). Catalytic activity of Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites is evaluated for the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) into p-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4. Results demonstrate that Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites have shown an outstanding catalytic activity as well as a good stability in successive reduction of 4-NP. Noticeably, TOF of Ag/TiO2-0.75 nanocomposites obtained in this work is the highest among Ag based catalysts previously reported.

  11. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  12. Analyzing radial acceleration with a smartphone acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    This paper continues the sequence of experiments using the acceleration sensor of smartphones (for description of the function and the use of the acceleration sensor, see Ref. 1) within this column, in this case for analyzing the radial acceleration.

  13. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.; Bottke, I.; Fernow, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package.

  14. Ag diffusion in cubic silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, David; Khalil, Sarah M.; Gerczak, Tyler; Allen, Todd R.; Heim, Andrew J.; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2011-01-01

    The diffusion of Ag impurities in bulk 3C-SiC is studied using ab initio methods based on density functional theory. This work is motivated by the desire to reduce transport of radioactive Ag isotopes through the SiC boundary layer in the Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) fuel pellet, which is a significant concern for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) nuclear reactor concept. The structure and stability of charged Ag and Ag-vacancy clusters in SiC are calculated. Relevant intrinsic SiC defect energies are also determined. The most stable state for the Ag impurity in SiC is found to be a Ag atom substituting on the Si sub-lattice and bound to a C vacancy. Bulk diffusion coefficients are estimated for different impurity states and values are all found to have very high activation energy. The impurity state with the lowest activation energy for diffusion is found to be the Ag interstitial, with an activation energy of approximately 7.9 eV. The high activation energies for Ag diffusion in bulk 3C-SiC cause Ag transport to be very slow in the bulk and suggests that observed Ag transport in this material is due to an alternative mechanism (e.g., grain boundary diffusion).

  15. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2016-02-01

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described.

  16. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2016-02-01

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described.

  17. Confronting Twin Paradox Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2016-05-01

    The resolution to the classic twin paradox in special relativity rests on the asymmetry of acceleration. Yet most students are not exposed to a satisfactory analysis of what exactly happens during the acceleration phase that results in the nonaccelerated observer's more rapid aging. The simple treatment presented here offers both graphical and quantitative solutions to the problem, leading to the correct result that the acceleration-induced age gap is 2Lβ years when the one-way distance L is expressed in light-years and velocity β ≡v/c .

  18. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  19. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  20. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  1. Generation of attosecond electron packets via conical surface plasmon electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, S. R.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for the generation of high kinetic energy attosecond electron packets via magnetostatic and aperture filtering of conical surface plasmon (SP) accelerated electrons. The conical SP waves are excited by coupling an ultrafast radially polarized laser beam to a conical silica lens coated with an Ag film. Electromagnetic and particle tracking models are employed to characterize the ultrafast electron packets.

  2. UV irradiated PVA-Ag nanocomposites for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, Rishi Pal; Mahendia, Suman; Tomar, A. K.; Kumar, Shyam

    2015-07-01

    The present paper is focused on the in-situ prepared Poly (vinyl alcohol)-Silver (PVA-Ag) nanocomposites and tailoring their optical properties by means of UV irradiation in such a way that these can be used for anti-reflective coatings and bandpass filters. The reflectance from these irradiated nanocomposites has been found to decrease leading to the increase in refractive index (RI), with increasing UV exposure time, in the entire visible region. Decrease in optical energy gap of PVA film from 4.92 to 4.57 eV on doping with Ag nanoparticles has been observed which reduces further to 4.1 eV on exposure to UV radiations for 300 min. This decrease in optical energy gap can be correlated to the formation of charge transfer complexes within the base polymer network on embedding Ag nanoparticles, which further enhances with increasing exposure time. Such complexes may also be responsible for increased molecular density of the composite films which corresponds to decrease in reflectance corroborating the observed results.

  3. Conversion of the BNL 200 MeV Linac to H/sup -/ and polarized H/sup -/ acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Witkover, R.L.; Alessi, J.; Barton, D.; Kponou, A.; Makdisi, Y.; McNerney, A.

    1984-01-01

    Planning for the conversion of the AGS Linac to H/sup -/ acceleration was begun in 1979; installation was completed in 1983. Discussion of this work and of the operational experience will be presented. The AGS Polarized Beam Project was begun in 1980. The design of the new H/sup -/ polarized source, the low Energy Beam Transport line (LEBT), and Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) will be described. Current status and future plans will be presented. 14 references, 5 figures.

  4. Ag/AgBr/TiO2 visible light photocatalyst for destruction of azodyes and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chun; Lan, Yongqing; Qu, Jiuhui; Hu, Xuexiang; Wang, Aimin

    2006-03-01

    Ag/AgBr/TiO2 was prepared by the deposition-precipitation method and was found to be a novel visible light driven photocatalyst. The catalyst showed high efficiency for the degradation of nonbiodegradable azodyes and the killing of Escherichia coli under visible light irradiation (lambda>420 nm). The catalyst activity was maintained effectively after successive cyclic experiments under UV or visible light irradiation without the destruction of AgBr. On the basis of the characterization of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy, the surface Ag species mainly exist as Ag0 in the structure of all samples before and after reaction, and Ag0 species scavenged hVB+ and then trapped eCB- in the process of photocatalytic reaction, inhibiting the decomposition of AgBr. The studies of ESR and H2O2 formation revealed that *OH and O2*- were formed in visible light irradiated aqueous Ag/AgBr/TiO2 suspension, while there was no reactive oxygen species in the visible light irradiated Ag0/TiO2 system. The results indicate that AgBr is the main photoactive species for the destruction of azodyes and bacteria under visible light. In addition, the bactericidal efficiency and killing mechanism of Ag/AgBr/TiO2 under visible light irradiation are illustrated and discussed. PMID:16509698

  5. An overwhelmingly selective colorimetric sensor for Ag(+) using a simple modified polyacrylonitrile fiber.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaoli; Yang, Huixiao; Tao, Minli; Zhang, Wenqin

    2015-10-30

    A carboxymethyl-dithiocarbamate immobilized polyacrylonitrile fiber colorimetric sensor has been synthesized. This fiber sensor exhibits excellent selectivity and sensitivity for Ag(+) in aqueous solution with a remarkable color change from light pink to red-brown over a wide pH range of 2-12. The sensor responds selectively to Ag(+) in the presence of other ions, including Mg(2+), Al(3+), Ca(2+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+). The colorimetric sensor has an extremely fast response time (10s) and a low visual limit of detection (5.53×10(-12) mol/L). The fiber sensor also undergoes an obvious color change in the presence of Ag(+) solutions containing EDTA, NaCl or NaBr. Density functional theory optimization reveals that the sensor and Ag(+) interact via a seven-membered ring complexation mechanism.

  6. An overwhelmingly selective colorimetric sensor for Ag(+) using a simple modified polyacrylonitrile fiber.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaoli; Yang, Huixiao; Tao, Minli; Zhang, Wenqin

    2015-10-30

    A carboxymethyl-dithiocarbamate immobilized polyacrylonitrile fiber colorimetric sensor has been synthesized. This fiber sensor exhibits excellent selectivity and sensitivity for Ag(+) in aqueous solution with a remarkable color change from light pink to red-brown over a wide pH range of 2-12. The sensor responds selectively to Ag(+) in the presence of other ions, including Mg(2+), Al(3+), Ca(2+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+). The colorimetric sensor has an extremely fast response time (10s) and a low visual limit of detection (5.53×10(-12) mol/L). The fiber sensor also undergoes an obvious color change in the presence of Ag(+) solutions containing EDTA, NaCl or NaBr. Density functional theory optimization reveals that the sensor and Ag(+) interact via a seven-membered ring complexation mechanism. PMID:25967097

  7. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    High energy physics, perhaps more than any other branch of science, is driven by technology. It is not the development of theory, or consideration of what measurements to make, which are the driving elements in our science. Rather it is the development of new technology which is the pacing item. Thus it is the development of new techniques, new computers, and new materials which allows one to develop new detectors and new particle-handling devices. It is the latter, the accelerators, which are at the heart of the science. Without particle accelerators there would be, essentially, no high energy physics. In fact. the advances in high energy physics can be directly tied to the advances in particle accelerators. Looking terribly briefly, and restricting one's self to recent history, the Bevatron made possible the discovery of the anti-proton and many of the resonances, on the AGS was found the {mu}-neutrino, the J-particle and time reversal non-invariance, on Spear was found the {psi}-particle, and, within the last year the Z{sub 0} and W{sup {+-}} were seen on the CERN SPS p-{bar p} collider. Of course one could, and should, go on in much more detail with this survey, but I think there is no need. It is clear that as better acceleration techniques were developed more and more powerful machines were built which, as a result, allowed high energy physics to advance. What are these techniques? They are very sophisticated and ever-developing. The science is very extensive and many individuals devote their whole lives to accelerator physics. As high energy experimental physicists your professional lives will be dominated by the performance of 'the machine'; i.e. the accelerator. Primarily you will be frustrated by the fact that it doesn't perform better. Why not? In these lectures, six in all, you should receive some appreciation of accelerator physics. We cannot, nor do we attempt, to make you into accelerator physicists, but we do hope to give you some insight into the

  8. Code comparison for accelerator design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1988-01-01

    We present a comparison between results obtained from standard accelerator physics codes used for the design and analysis of synchrotrons and storage rings, with programs SYNCH, MAD, HARMON, PATRICIA, PATPET, BETA, DIMAD, MARYLIE and RACE-TRACK. In our analysis we have considered 5 (various size) lattices with large and small angles including AGS Booster (10/degree/ bend), RHIC (2.24/degree/), SXLS, XLS (XUV ring with 45/degree/ bend) and X-RAY rings. The differences in the integration methods used and the treatment of the fringe fields in these codes could lead to different results. The inclusion of nonlinear (e.g., dipole) terms may be necessary in these calculations specially for a small ring. 12 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Bioelectrochemical regulation accelerates facultatively syntrophic proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Kengo; Morita, Masahiko; Hirano, Shin-ichi; Matsumoto, Norio; Ohmura, Naoya

    2012-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems can affect microbial metabolism by controlling the redox potential. We constructed bioelectrochemical cultures of the proteolytic bacterium, Coprothermobacter proteolyticus strain CT-1, both as a single-culture and as a co-culture with the hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain ∆H, to investigate the influences of bioelectrochemical regulation on facultatively syntrophic proteolysis. The co-culture and single-culture were cultivated at 55°C with an anaerobic medium containing casein as the carbon source. The working electrode potential of the bioelectrochemical system was controlled at -0.8V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for bioelectrochemical cultures and was not controlled for non-bioelectrochemical cultures. The cell densities of hydrogenotrophic methanogen and methane production in the bioelectrochemical co-culture were 3.6 and 1.5 times higher than those in the non-bioelectrochemical co-culture after 7 days of cultivation, respectively. Contrastingly, the cell density of Coprothermobacter sp. in the bioelectrochemical co-culture was only 1.3 times higher than that in the non-bioelectrochemical co-culture. The protein decomposition rates were nearly proportional to the cell density of Coprothermobacter sp. in the all types of cultures. These results indicate that bioelectrochemical regulation, particularly, affected the carbon fixation of the hydrogenotrophic methanogen and that facultatively syntrophic proteolysis was accelerated as a result of hydrogen consumption by the methanogens growing well in bioelectrochemical co-cultures. PMID:22421636

  10. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  11. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  12. Non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses several topics which can be investigated without the use of accelerators. Topics covered are: (1) proton decay, (2) atmospheric neutrinos, (3) neutrino detection, (4) muons from Cygnus X-3, and (5) the double-beta decay.

  13. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  14. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  15. Rare Isotope Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy

    2002-04-01

    The next frontier for low-energy nuclear physics involves experimentation with accelerated beams of short-lived radioactive isotopes. A new facility, the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), is proposed to produce large amount of these rare isotopes and post-accelerate them to energies relevant for studies in nuclear physics, astrophysics and the study of fundamental interactions at low energy. The basic science motivation for this facility will be introduced. The general facility layout, from the 400 kW heavy-ion superconducting linac used for production of the required isotopes to the novel production and extraction schemes and the highly efficient post-accelerator, will be presented. Special emphasis will be put on a number of technical breakthroughs and recent R&D results that enable this new facility.

  16. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  17. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  18. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  20. AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids with highly efficient visible-light driven photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Masanao; Suzuki, Tohru; Kaneco, Satoshi

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid was prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} displays the excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transforms to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system. • h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization over AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The activity enhancement is ascribed to a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI. - Abstract: Highly efficient visible-light-driven AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid photocatalysts with different mole ratios of AgI were prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) technique. Under visible light irradiation (>420 nm), the AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} photocatalysts displayed the higher photocatalytic activity than pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and AgI for the decolorization of acid orange 7 (AO 7). Among the hybrid photocatalysts, AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with 80% of AgI exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity for the decolorization of AO 7. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transformed to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system while the photocatalytic activity of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} remained after 5 recycling runs. In addition, the quenching effects of different scavengers displayed that the reactive h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization. The photocatalytic activity enhancement of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids can be ascribed to the efficient separation of electron–hole pairs through a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI, in which Ag nanoparticles act as the charge separation center.

  1. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  2. Collective field accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Luce, John S.

    1978-01-01

    A collective field accelerator which operates with a vacuum diode and utilizes a grooved cathode and a dielectric anode that operates with a relativistic electron beam with a .nu./.gamma. of .about. 1, and a plurality of dielectric lenses having an axial magnetic field thereabout to focus the collectively accelerated electrons and ions which are ejected from the anode. The anode and lenses operate as unoptimized r-f cavities which modulate and focus the beam.

  3. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Briner, Clifton F.; Martin, Samuel B.

    1993-01-01

    A rolamite acceleration sensor which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently.

  4. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  5. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  6. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. B.; Marshall, T. C.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM01 fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5πmm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM01 mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line.

  7. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  8. Visible-light-driven photocatalysts Ag/AgCl dispersed on mesoporous Al2O3 with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhouzhou; Yu, Jiajie; Sun, Dongping; Wang, Tianhe

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, Ag/AgCl and Ag/AgCl/Al2O3 photocatalysts were synthesized via a precipitation reaction between NaCl and CH3COOAg or Ag(NH3)2NO3, wherein Ag/AgCl was immobilized into mesoporous Al2O3 medium. The Ag/AgCl-based nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and so on. The photocatalysts displayed excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradations of methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) pollutants under visible light irradiation. The Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg)/Al2O3 sample exhibited the best photocatalytic performance, degrading 99% MO after 9min of irradiation, which was 1.1 times, 1.22 times and 1.65 times higher than that of Ag/AgCl(Ag(NH3)2NO3)/Al2O3, Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg) and Ag/AgCl(Ag(NH3)2NO3) photocatalyst, respectively. Meanwhile, Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg)/Al2O3 also showed excellent capability of MB degradation. Compared to the data reported for Ag/AgCl/TiO2, the Ag/AgCl/Al2O3 prepared in this work exhibited a good performance for the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The results suggest that the dispersion of Ag/AgCl on mesoporous Al2O3 strongly affected their photocatalytic activities. O2(-), OH radicals and Cl(0) atoms are main active species during photocatalysis. PMID:27442145

  9. Excitons in AgI-BASED-GLASSES and -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, Fumito; Mochizuki, Shosuke

    2007-01-01

    We summarize our recent optical studies on different pristine AgI films, different AgI-based glasses and different AgI-oxide fine particle composites. The exciton spectra of these specimens give useful information about the ionic and electronic structures at the AgI/glass and AgI/oxide particle interfaces.

  10. Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    The continuing development of powerful laser systems has permitted to extend the interaction of laser beams with matter far into the relativistic domain, and to demonstrate new approaches for producing energetic particle beams. The extremely large electric fields, with amplitudes exceeding the TV/m level, that are produced in plasma medium are of relevance particle acceleration. Since the value of this longitudinal electric field, 10,000 times larger than those produced in conventional radio-frequency cavities, plasma accelerators appear to be very promising for the development of compact accelerators. The incredible progresses in the understanding of laser plasma interaction physic, allows an excellent control of electron injection and acceleration. Thanks to these recent achievements, laser plasma accelerators deliver today high quality beams of energetic radiation and particles. These beams have a number of interesting properties such as shortness, brightness and spatial quality, and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine, radio-biology, chemistry, physics and material science,security (material inspection), and of course in accelerator science.

  11. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  12. Accelerators for America's Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  13. Diffusive Shock Acceleration and Reconnection Acceleration Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Li, Gang; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A.; Stone, E.; Decker, R.

    2015-12-01

    Shock waves, as shown by simulations and observations, can generate high levels of downstream vortical turbulence, including magnetic islands. We consider a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes as an energization mechanism for charged particles. Observations of electron and ion distributions downstream of interplanetary shocks and the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) are frequently inconsistent with the predictions of classical DSA. We utilize a recently developed transport theory for charged particles propagating diffusively in a turbulent region filled with contracting and reconnecting plasmoids and small-scale current sheets. Particle energization associated with the anti-reconnection electric field, a consequence of magnetic island merging, and magnetic island contraction, are considered. For the former only, we find that (i) the spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed, and (ii) the downstream solution is constant. For downstream plasmoid contraction only, (i) the accelerated spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed; (ii) the particle intensity for a given energy peaks downstream of the shock, and the distance to the peak location increases with increasing particle energy, and (iii) the particle intensity amplification for a particular particle energy, f(x,c/{c}0)/f(0,c/{c}0), is not 1, as predicted by DSA, but increases with increasing particle energy. The general solution combines both the reconnection-induced electric field and plasmoid contraction. The observed energetic particle intensity profile observed by Voyager 2 downstream of the HTS appears to support a particle acceleration mechanism that combines both DSA and magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes.

  14. AgRP Neurons Regulate Bone Mass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Geun; Sun, Ben-Hua; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Koch, Marco; Yao, Gang-Qing; Diano, Sabrina; Insogna, Karl; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-10-01

    The hypothalamus has been implicated in skeletal metabolism. Whether hunger-promoting neurons of the arcuate nucleus impact the bone is not known. We generated multiple lines of mice to affect AgRP neuronal circuit integrity. We found that mice with Ucp2 gene deletion, in which AgRP neuronal function was impaired, were osteopenic. This phenotype was rescued by cell-selective reactivation of Ucp2 in AgRP neurons. When the AgRP circuitry was impaired by early postnatal deletion of AgRP neurons or by cell autonomous deletion of Sirt1 (AgRP-Sirt1(-/-)), mice also developed reduced bone mass. No impact of leptin receptor deletion in AgRP neurons was found on bone homeostasis. Suppression of sympathetic tone in AgRP-Sirt1(-/-) mice reversed osteopenia in transgenic animals. Taken together, these observations establish a significant regulatory role for AgRP neurons in skeletal bone metabolism independent of leptin action. PMID:26411686

  15. NiAg catalysts prepared by reduction of Ni2+ ions in aqueous hydrazine II. Support effect.

    PubMed

    Bettahar, M M; Wojcieszak, R; Monteverdi, S

    2009-04-15

    A series of bimetallic NiAg (Ni + Ag = 1% wt) catalysts supported on amorphous silica was synthesized via chemical reduction using hydrazine as the reducing agent at 353 K. Catalysts were prepared via impregnation or precipitation technique. It was found that the reduction of the Ni(2+) ions occurred only in the presence of silver, otherwise a stable blue [Ni(N(2)H(4))(3)](2+) complex was formed. Comparisons with similar NiAg catalysts supported on crystallized silica as prepared in our previous work indicated that the Ni(2+) ions weakly interacted with acidic crystallized silica on which they were readily reduced. For both supports, the combination of silver and nickel gave rise to a synergistic effect due to the existence of NiAg groupings. The surface and catalytic properties of the metal particles formed depended on the Ni:Ag ratio, method of preparation, and acidity of the support.

  16. Toxicokinetics of Ag in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus exposed to Ag NPs and AgNO₃ via soil and food.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Svendsen, Claus; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been used in numerous consumer products and may enter the soil through the land application of biosolids. However, little is known about the relationship between Ag NP exposure and their bioavailability for soil organisms. This study aims at comparing the uptake and elimination kinetics of Ag upon exposures to different Ag forms (NPs and ionic Ag (as AgNO3)) in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus. Isopods were exposed to contaminated Lufa 2.2 soil or alder leaves as food. Uptake and elimination rate constants for soil exposure did not significantly differ between Ag NPs and ionic Ag at 30 and 60 mg Ag/kg. For dietary exposure, the uptake rate constant was up to 5 times higher for Ag NPs than for AgNO3, but this was related to feeding activity and exposure concentrations, while no difference in the elimination rate constants was found. When comparing both routes, dietary exposure resulted in lower Ag uptake rate constants but elimination rate constants did not differ. A fast Ag uptake was observed from both routes and most of the Ag taken up seemed not to be eliminated. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence showed Ag in the S-cells of the hepatopancreas, thus supporting the observations from the kinetic experiment (i.e. low elimination). In addition, our results show that isopods have an extremely high Ag accumulation capacity, suggesting the presence of an efficient Ag storage compartment. PMID:26581474

  17. Toxicokinetics of Ag in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus exposed to Ag NPs and AgNO₃ via soil and food.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Svendsen, Claus; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been used in numerous consumer products and may enter the soil through the land application of biosolids. However, little is known about the relationship between Ag NP exposure and their bioavailability for soil organisms. This study aims at comparing the uptake and elimination kinetics of Ag upon exposures to different Ag forms (NPs and ionic Ag (as AgNO3)) in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus. Isopods were exposed to contaminated Lufa 2.2 soil or alder leaves as food. Uptake and elimination rate constants for soil exposure did not significantly differ between Ag NPs and ionic Ag at 30 and 60 mg Ag/kg. For dietary exposure, the uptake rate constant was up to 5 times higher for Ag NPs than for AgNO3, but this was related to feeding activity and exposure concentrations, while no difference in the elimination rate constants was found. When comparing both routes, dietary exposure resulted in lower Ag uptake rate constants but elimination rate constants did not differ. A fast Ag uptake was observed from both routes and most of the Ag taken up seemed not to be eliminated. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence showed Ag in the S-cells of the hepatopancreas, thus supporting the observations from the kinetic experiment (i.e. low elimination). In addition, our results show that isopods have an extremely high Ag accumulation capacity, suggesting the presence of an efficient Ag storage compartment.

  18. Single step electrochemical synthesis of hydrophilic/hydrophobic Ag5 and Ag6 blue luminescent clusters.

    PubMed

    Santiago González, Beatriz; Blanco, M C; López-Quintela, M Arturo

    2012-12-21

    Well-defined Ag(5) and Ag(6) dodecanethiol/tetrabutyl ammonium-protected clusters were prepared by a one-pot electrochemical method. Ag clusters show bright and photostable emissions. The presence of a dual capping renders the silver clusters soluble in both organic and aqueous solvents.

  19. 78 FR 30965 - AG Valley Railroad, LLC-Operation Exemption-Ag Valley Holdings, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... Surface Transportation Board AG Valley Railroad, LLC--Operation Exemption--Ag Valley Holdings, LLC AG... original and 10 copies of all pleadings, referring to Docket No. FD 35736, must be filed with the Surface.... Board decisions and notices are available on our Web site at www.stb.dot.gov . Decided: May 20, 2013....

  20. The upgraded ring loss radiation monitorinng system at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.W.; Beadle, E.; Castille, V.; Witkover, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    With the Booster the AGS will accelerate protons to 3 /times/ 10/sup 13/ per cycle, polarized protons at 10/sup 12/, and ions from Carbon to Gold at intensities from 50 to 3 /times/ 10/sup 9/. A loss monitoring system is being developed to facilitate tuning, and to reduce personnel radiation exposure by minimizing residual induced activity and by allowing remote monitoring of activity in the accelerator enclosure. The monitoring system must have a large dynamic range to monitor high intensity beam losses and to measure induced activity down to the level of a few mrad/hour. Various detectors are being evaluated, including ion chambers, proportional counters, and aluminium cathode electronmultipliers. Measurements of the prompt ionization distribution in the median plane at various energies from point targets at two representative locations in the accelerator lattice have been completed. Details of the monitoring system will be presented, as well as the experimental measurements of the prompt radiation field, and a comparable Monte Carlo calculation. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Hypernuclear research at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Although the field of hypernuclear research is over 30 years old, progress in exploring the detailed behavior of hypernuclei has been slow. This fact is due mainly to the technical problems of producing and studying these strange objects. Indeed each step in the improvement of technique has been accompanied by a breakthrough in our understanding of this fascinating subject. In this paper, the aim is to describe the evolution of hypernuclear research, stressing especially the contributions of the program based on the Brookhaven AGS. 23 references, 17 figures, 1 table.

  2. The AgroEcoSystem (AgES) response-function model simulates layered soil water dynamics in semi-arid Colorado: sensitivity and calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation of vertical soil hydrology is a critical component of simulating even more complex soil water dynamics in space and time, including land-atmosphere and subsurface interactions. The AgroEcoSystem (AgES) model is defined here as a single land unit implementation of the full AgES-W (Watershe...

  3. Centrifuge Study of Pilot Tolerance to Acceleration and the Effects of Acceleration on Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creer, Brent Y.; Smedal, Harald A.; Wingrove, Rodney C.

    1960-01-01

    A research program the general objective of which was to measure the effects of various sustained accelerations on the control performance of pilots, was carried out on the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory centrifuge, U.S. Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, PA. The experimental setup consisted of a flight simulator with the centrifuge in the control loop. The pilot performed his control tasks while being subjected to acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a forward-facing pilot flying an atmosphere entry vehicle. The study was divided into three phases. In one phase of the program, the pilots were subjected to a variety of sustained linear acceleration forces while controlling vehicles with several different sets of longitudinal dynamics. Here, a randomly moving target was displayed to the pilot on a cathode-ray tube. For each combination of acceleration field and vehicle dynamics, pilot tracking accuracy was measured and pilot opinion of the stability and control characteristics was recorded. Thus, information was obtained on the combined effects of complexity of control task and magnitude and direction of acceleration forces on pilot performance. These tests showed that the pilot's tracking performance deteriorated markedly at accelerations greater than about 4g when controlling a lightly damped vehicle. The tentative conclusion was also reached that regardless of the airframe dynamics involved, the pilot feels that in order to have the same level of control over the vehicle, an increase in the vehicle dynamic stability was required with increases in the magnitudes of the acceleration impressed upon the pilot. In another phase, boundaries of human tolerance of acceleration were established for acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a pilot flying an orbital vehicle. A special pilot restraint system was developed to increase human tolerance to longitudinal decelerations. The results of the tests showed that human tolerance

  4. Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genomics of the Broad Host-Range Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG8

    PubMed Central

    Hane, James K.; Anderson, Jonathan P.; Williams, Angela H.; Sperschneider, Jana; Singh, Karam B.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a soil-borne basidiomycete fungus with a necrotrophic lifestyle which is classified into fourteen reproductively incompatible anastomosis groups (AGs). One of these, AG8, is a devastating pathogen causing bare patch of cereals, brassicas and legumes. R. solani is a multinucleate heterokaryon containing significant heterozygosity within a single cell. This complexity posed significant challenges for the assembly of its genome. We present a high quality genome assembly of R. solani AG8 and a manually curated set of 13,964 genes supported by RNA-seq. The AG8 genome assembly used novel methods to produce a haploid representation of its heterokaryotic state. The whole-genomes of AG8, the rice pathogen AG1-IA and the potato pathogen AG3 were observed to be syntenic and co-linear. Genes and functions putatively relevant to pathogenicity were highlighted by comparing AG8 to known pathogenicity genes, orthology databases spanning 197 phytopathogenic taxa and AG1-IA. We also observed SNP-level “hypermutation” of CpG dinucleotides to TpG between AG8 nuclei, with similarities to repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). Interestingly, gene-coding regions were widely affected along with repetitive DNA, which has not been previously observed for RIP in mononuclear fungi of the Pezizomycotina. The rate of heterozygous SNP mutations within this single isolate of AG8 was observed to be higher than SNP mutation rates observed across populations of most fungal species compared. Comparative analyses were combined to predict biological processes relevant to AG8 and 308 proteins with effector-like characteristics, forming a valuable resource for further study of this pathosystem. Predicted effector-like proteins had elevated levels of non-synonymous point mutations relative to synonymous mutations (dN/dS), suggesting that they may be under diversifying selection pressures. In addition, the distant relationship to sequenced necrotrophs of the Ascomycota suggests the

  5. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  6. Advanced accelerator theory development

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Houck, T.L.; Poole, B.; Tishchenko, N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wang, I.

    1998-02-09

    A new accelerator technology, the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA), is potentially an ultra compact accelerator/pulsed power driver. This new accelerator relies on three new components: the ultra-high gradient insulator, the asymmetric Blumlein and low jitter switches. In this report, we focused our attention on the first two components of the DWA system the insulators and the asymmetric Blumlein. First, we sought to develop the necessary design tools to model and scale the behavior of the high gradient insulator. To perform this task we concentrated on modeling the discharge processes (i.e., initiation and creation of the surface discharge). In addition, because these high gradient structures exhibit favorable microwave properties in certain accelerator configurations, we performed experiments and calculations to determine the relevant electromagnetic properties. Second, we performed circuit modeling to understand energy coupling to dynamic loads by the asymmetric Blumlein. Further, we have experimentally observed a non-linear coupling effect in certain asymmetric Blumlein configurations. That is, as these structures are stacked into a complete module, the output voltage does not sum linearly and a lower than expected output voltage results. Although we solved this effect experimentally, we performed calculations to understand this effect more fully to allow better optimization of this DWA pulse-forming line system.

  7. Synthesis and Optical Responses of Ag@Au/Ag@Au Double Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Li; Yang, Da-Jie; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2015-02-01

    We synthesize hollow-structured Ag@Au nanoparticles with single porous shell and Ag@Au/Ag@Au double shells by using the galvanic replacement reaction and investigate their linear and nonlinear optical properties. Our results show that the surface plasmon resonance wavelength of the hollow porous nanoparticles could be easily tuned in a wide range in the visible and near infrared region by controlling the volume of HAuCl4. The nonlinear optical refraction of the double-shelled Ag@Au/Ag@Au nanoparticles is prominently enhanced by the plasmon resonance. Our findings may find applications in biosensors and nonlinear optical nanodevices.

  8. Pd@Ag Nanosheets in Combination with Amphotericin B Exert a Potent Anti-Cryptococcal Fungicidal Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Mei; Wang, Guizhen; Fang, Wei; Ye, Chen; Hu, Hanhua; Fa, Zhenzong; Yi, Jiu; Liao, Wan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles have received considerable interest as new "nanoantibiotics" with the potential to kill drug-resistant microorganisms. Recently, a class of new core-shell nanostructures, Pd@Ag nanosheets (Pd@Ag NSs), were created using deposition techniques and demonstrated excellent inhibitory effects on various bacteria in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the antifungal activity of Pd@Ag NSs against common invasive fungal pathogens. Among these organisms, Cryptococcus neoformans complex species was most susceptible to Pd@Ag NSs, which exhibited potent antifungal activity against various molecular types or sources of cryptococcal strains including fluconazole-resistant isolates. The anticryptococcal activity of Pd@Ag NSs was significantly greater than fluconazole and similar to that of amphotericin B (AmB). At relatively high concentrations, Pd@Ag NSs exhibited fungicidal activity against Cryptococcus spp., which can likely be attributed to the disruption of cell integrity, intracellular protein synthesis, and energy metabolism. Intriguingly, Pd@Ag NSs also exhibited strong synergistic anti-cryptococcal fungicidal effects at low concentrations in combination with AmB but exhibited much better safety in erythrocytes than AmB, even at the minimal fungicidal concentration. Therefore, Pd@Ag NSs may be a promising adjunctive agent for treating cryptococcosis, and further investigation for clinical applications is required. PMID:27271376

  9. Pd@Ag Nanosheets in Combination with Amphotericin B Exert a Potent Anti-Cryptococcal Fungicidal Effect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guizhen; Fang, Wei; Ye, Chen; Hu, Hanhua; Fa, Zhenzong; Yi, Jiu; Liao, Wan-qing

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles have received considerable interest as new “nanoantibiotics” with the potential to kill drug-resistant microorganisms. Recently, a class of new core-shell nanostructures, Pd@Ag nanosheets (Pd@Ag NSs), were created using deposition techniques and demonstrated excellent inhibitory effects on various bacteria in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the antifungal activity of Pd@Ag NSs against common invasive fungal pathogens. Among these organisms, Cryptococcus neoformans complex species was most susceptible to Pd@Ag NSs, which exhibited potent antifungal activity against various molecular types or sources of cryptococcal strains including fluconazole-resistant isolates. The anticryptococcal activity of Pd@Ag NSs was significantly greater than fluconazole and similar to that of amphotericin B (AmB). At relatively high concentrations, Pd@Ag NSs exhibited fungicidal activity against Cryptococcus spp., which can likely be attributed to the disruption of cell integrity, intracellular protein synthesis, and energy metabolism. Intriguingly, Pd@Ag NSs also exhibited strong synergistic anti-cryptococcal fungicidal effects at low concentrations in combination with AmB but exhibited much better safety in erythrocytes than AmB, even at the minimal fungicidal concentration. Therefore, Pd@Ag NSs may be a promising adjunctive agent for treating cryptococcosis, and further investigation for clinical applications is required. PMID:27271376

  10. Visible light driven photocatalysis and antibacterial activity of AgVO{sub 3} and Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anamika; Dutta, Dimple P.; Ballal, A.; Tyagi, A.K.; Fulekar, M.H.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag/AgVO{sub 3} and pure AgVO{sub 3} nanowires synthesized by sonochemical process. • Characterization done using XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX and BET analysis. • Visible light degradation of RhB by Ag/AgVO{sub 3} within 45 min. • Antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} demonstrated. - Abstract: Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires and AgVO{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized in aqueous media via a facile sonochemical route. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy together with an energy dispersion X-ray spectrum analysis, transmission electron microscopy and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The results revealed that inert atmosphere promotes the formation of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires. The photocatalytic studies revealed that the Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires exhibited complete photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B within 45 min under visible light irradiation. The antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires was tested against Escherechia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The minimum growth inhibitory concentration value was found to be 50 and 10 folds lower than for the antibiotic ciprofloxacin for E. coli and B. subtilis, respectively. The antibacterial properties of the β-AgVO{sub 3} nanorods prove that in case of the Ag dispersed Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires, the enhanced antibacterial action is also due to contribution from the AgVO{sub 3} support.

  11. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  12. Effects of soil and dietary exposures to Ag nanoparticles and AgNO₃ in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Ag-NPs and AgNO3 on the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus were determined upon soil and dietary exposures. Isopods avoided Ag in soil, with EC50 values of ∼16.0 and 14.0 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. Feeding inhibition tests in soil showed EC50s for effects on consumption ratio of 127 and 56.7 mg Ag/kg, respectively. Although similar EC50s for effects on biomass were observed for nanoparticulate and ionic Ag (114 and 120 mg Ag/kg dry soil, respectively), at higher concentrations greater biomass loss was found for AgNO3. Upon dietary exposure, AgNO3 was more toxic, with EC50 for effects on biomass change being >1500 and 233 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. The difference in toxicity between Ag-NPs and AgNO3 could not be explained from Ag body concentrations. This suggests that the relation between toxicity and bioavailability of Ag-NPs differs from that of ionic Ag in soils.

  13. Microwave Spectroscopy and Structure Determination of H_2S-MI (M=Cu,Ag,Au)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medcraft, Chris; Legon, Anthony; Walker, Nick

    2016-06-01

    A series of hydrogen sulphide-metal iodide complexes (H_2S-MI, M=Cu, Ag and Au) have been measured via chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy between 7.5-18 GHz. The complexes were generated in a supersonic expansion via laser ablation of the metal and decomposition of CF_3I. Experimental structures were obtained by least squares fitting of structural parameters to the rotational constants of deuterium and metal (63Cu / 65Cu and 107Ag / 109Ag) isotopologues. Interestingly K-1=1 transitions were observed in the spectra containing D_2S, these were not observed in previous studies of similar molecules (H_2S-MCl). This allowed for the determination of an extra rotational constant and, consequently, extra structural information could be obtained. The structures are compared to high level coupled cluster theory calculations.

  14. Beamlets from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Perri, Silvia; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a realization of the stochastic Fermi acceleration mechanism. The model consists of test particles moving between two oscillating magnetic clouds and differs from the usual Fermi-Ulam model in two ways. (i) Particles can penetrate inside clouds before being reflected. (ii) Particles can radiate a fraction of their energy during the process. Since the Fermi mechanism is at work, particles are stochastically accelerated, even in the presence of the radiated energy. Furthermore, due to a kind of resonance between particles and oscillating clouds, the probability density function of particles is strongly modified, thus generating beams of accelerated particles rather than a translation of the whole distribution function to higher energy. This simple mechanism could account for the presence of beamlets in some space plasma physics situations.

  15. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  16. Acceleration radioisotope production simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-12-31

    We have identified 96 radionuclides now being used or under consideration for use in medical applications. Previously, we calculated the production of {sup 99}Mo from enriched and depleted uranium targets at the 800-MeV energy used in the LAMPF accelerator at Los Alamos. We now consider the production of isotopes using lower energy beams, which may become available as a result of new high-intensity spallation target accelerators now being planned. The production of four radionuclides ({sup 7}Be, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 99}Mo, and {sup 195m}Pt) in a simplified proton accelerator target design is being examined. The LAHET, MCNP, and CINDER90 codes were used to model the target, transport a beam of protons and secondary produced particles through the system, and compute the nuclide production from spallation and low-energy neutron interactions. Beam energies of 200 and 400 MeV were used, and several targets were considered for each nuclide.

  17. Laser acceleration with open waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1999-03-01

    A unified framework based on solid-state open waveguides is developed to overcome all three major limitations on acceleration distance and hence on the feasibility of two classes of laser acceleration. The three limitations are due to laser diffraction, acceleration phase slippage, and damage of waveguide structure by high power laser. The two classes of laser acceleration are direct-field acceleration and ponderomotive-driven acceleration. Thus the solutions provided here encompass all mainstream approaches for laser acceleration, either in vacuum, gases or plasmas.

  18. Uniform acceleration in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Yaakov; Scarr, Tzvi

    2015-10-01

    We extend de la Fuente and Romero's (Gen Relativ Gravit 47:33, 2015) defining equation for uniform acceleration in a general curved spacetime from linear acceleration to the full Lorentz covariant uniform acceleration. In a flat spacetime background, we have explicit solutions. We use generalized Fermi-Walker transport to parallel transport the Frenet basis along the trajectory. In flat spacetime, we obtain velocity and acceleration transformations from a uniformly accelerated system to an inertial system. We obtain the time dilation between accelerated clocks. We apply our acceleration transformations to the motion of a charged particle in a constant electromagnetic field and recover the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation.

  19. Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS, T.L.

    2003-02-01

    Among the highest priorities for action under the ''Hanford Federal Facility and Agreement and Consent Order'', hereafter referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement, is the retrieval, treatment and disposal of Hanford Site tank waste. Tank waste is recognized as one of the primary threats to the Columbia River and one of the most complex technical challenges. Progress has been made in resolving safety issues, characterizing tank waste and past tank leaks, enhancing double-shell tank waste transfer and operations systems, retrieving single-shell tank waste, deploying waste treatment facilities, and planning for the disposal of immobilized waste product. However, limited progress has been made in developing technologies and providing a sound technical basis for tank system closure. To address this limitation the Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project was created to develop information through technology demonstrations in support of waste retrieval and closure decisions. To complete its mission the Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project has adopted performance objectives that include: protecting human health and the environment; minimizing/eliminating potential waste releases to the soil and groundwater; preventing water infiltration into the tank; maintaining accessibility of surrounding tanks for future closure; maintaining tank structural integrity; complying with applicable waste retrieval, disposal, and closure regulations; and maintaining flexibility for final closure options in the future.

  20. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  1. Tribological properties of ag-based amphiphiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most ag-based materials are amphiphilic because they comprise polar and non-polar groups within the same molecule. One of the major categories of amphiphilic ag-based materials are seed oils, which are actively investigated as substitutes for petroleum in a wide variety of consumer and industrial a...

  2. AgRISTARS documents tracking list report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A quarterly listing of documents issued and placed in the AgRISTARS tracking system is provided. The technical publications are arranged by type of documents. The reference AgRISTARS document number, title and date of publication, the issuing organization, and the National Technical Information Service reference number is given.

  3. Recent hypernuclear research at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Recent AGS experiments contributing to our knowledge of hypernuclei are reviewed. These experiments have suggested new areas of research on hypernuclei. With the proper beam line facilities, the AGS will be able to perform experiments in these areas and provide a transition to the future era of ''kaon factories''. 20 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Robb M.; Shul, Randy J.; Polosky, Marc A.; Hoke, Darren A.; Vernon, George E.

    2006-12-12

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  5. Label-Free Detection of Ag+ Based on Gold Nanoparticles and Ag+-Specific DNA.

    PubMed

    Pu, Wendan; Zhao, Zhao; Wu, Liping; Liu, Yue; Zhao, Huawen

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive label-free method was presented for the determination of silver ion (Ag+) in this paper. Cytosine-rich DNA (C-DNA) was used as Ag+ specific DNA. Without Ag+ in the solution, fluorescence of fluorescein (FAM) is quenched by C-DNA stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in high salt environment. When Ag+ is present in the solution, however, Ag+-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine (C-Ag+-C) base pairs induced the C-DNA folding into a hairpin structure, which can not stabilize AuNPs in high salt environment, thus causing AuNPs aggregation. After centrifugation to remove the aggregated AuNPs, the quenching ability of the supernatant for FAM is decreased and the fluorescence intensity of solution increases with increasing the Ag+ concentration. Due to the highly specific interaction of the C-DNA towards Ag+ and the strong fluorescent quenching ability of AuNPs for FAM, the method has high selectivity and sensitivity for Ag+. Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescence intensity at 515 nm increased linearly with the concentration of Ag+ ranging from 15 nM to 700 nM, and the detection limit was determined as 6 nM based on 3 σ/slope. This method is simple, sensitive, and may be applied to other detection systems by selecting the appropriate DNA sequences. PMID:26369112

  6. Ag nanocluster/DNA hybrids: functional modules for the detection of nitroaromatic and RDX explosives.

    PubMed

    Enkin, Natalie; Sharon, Etery; Golub, Eyal; Willner, Itamar

    2014-08-13

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (NCs) stabilized by nucleic acids are implemented as optical labels for the detection of the explosives picric acid, trinitrotoluene (TNT), and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The sensing modules consist of two parts, a nucleic acid with the nucleic acid-stabilized Ag NCs and a nucleic acid functionalized with electron-donating units, including L-DOPA, L-tyrosine and 6-hydroxy-L-DOPA, self-assembled on a nucleic acid scaffold. The formation of donor-acceptor complexes between the nitro-substituted explosives, exhibiting electron-acceptor properties, and the electron-donating sites, associated with the sensing modules, concentrates the explosives in close proximity to the Ag NCs. This leads to the electron-transfer quenching of the luminescence of the Ag NCs by the explosive molecule. The quenching of the luminescence of the Ag NCs provides a readout signal for the sensing process. The sensitivities of the analytical platforms are controlled by the electron-donating properties of the donor substituents, and 6-hydroxy-L-DOPA was found to be the most sensitive donor. Picric acid, TNT, and RDX are analyzed with detection limits corresponding to 5.2 × 10(-12) M, 1.0 × 10(-12) M, and 3.0 × 10(-12) M, respectively, using the 6-hydroxy-L-DOPA-modified Ag NCs sensing module.

  7. Bioinspired synthesis of polydopamine/Ag nanocomposite particles with antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengjiao; Zhang, Guoxing; Xia, Tian; Li, Zhenni; Zhao, Kai; Deng, Ziwei; Guo, Dingzong; Peng, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Mussel-inspired chemistry (polydopamine) offers great opportunities to develop inexpensive and efficient process for many types of materials with complex shapes and functions in a mild and friendly environment. This paper describes a facile, yet green approach to synthesize polydopamine/silver (PDA/Ag) nanocomposite particles with a combination use of polydopamine chemistry and electroless metallization of Ag. In this approach, monodisperse spherical polydopamine particles are first synthesized by the oxidation and self-polymerization of dopamine (monomer) in an alkaline water-ethanol solution at room temperature, which are served as the active templates for secondary reactions due to the abundant catechol and amine groups on the surface. Subsequently, the silver precursor-[Ag(NH3)2](+) ions introduced are easily absorbed onto the surface of the PDA particles, and are immediately in situ reduced to metallic Ag nanoparticles with the help of these active catechol and amine groups. During the preparation, no additional reductants, toxic reagents and intricate instruments are needed. These as-synthesized PDA/Ag nanocomposite particles are ideal candidates for antibacterial application because they do not show significant cytotoxicity against HEK293T human embryonic kidney cells in the in vitro cytotoxicity assay, whereas demonstrate enhanced antibacterial abilities against Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacteria) in the antibacterial assays. Owing to their excellent cytocompatibilities and antibacterial activities, these PDA/Ag nanocomposite particles can be considered as the promising antibacterial materials for future biomedical applications.

  8. Structure and morphology variation at annealing of self assembled Ag nanodots on HOPG under ambient conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senevirathne, Indrajith; Pautz, Matthew; Parks, Jeffrey; Goonewardene, Anura

    2010-03-01

    Self assembly of noble metal nanostructures on surface support under ambient conditions is interesting due to various possible plasmonic and catalytic applications. These nanostructures have altered and complex characteristics due to their outer oxide layer resulting from ambient exposure. RT (˜300K) Magnetron sputter deposited Ag, on clean, freshly cleaved HOPG was studied using ambient Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), contact mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microcopy (SEM). Surface elemental composition and distribution on the deposited system was measured with Energy Dispersive X ray Spectroscopy (EDX). Self assembled Ag nano dot structures on the surface was observed with Volmer - Weber growth mode at incremental Ag coverage. At Ag coverage of ˜32 ML nucleated nano dots observed to have ˜25nm diameter and ˜4nm in height. At an increased Ag coverage of ˜128ML, micron size super clusters were observed to coexist with the primary nano dots. Surface morphological and elemental (O and Ag) variations at annealing under successively higher temperatures will also be discussed.

  9. Raman scattering enhanced within the plasmonic gap between an isolated Ag triangular nanoplate and Ag film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kuanguo; Jiang, Kang; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Yong; Mao, Lei; Zeng, Jie; Lu, Yonghua; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced electromagnetic field in the tiny gaps between metallic nanostructures holds great promise in optical applications. Herein, we report novel out-of-plane nanogaps composed of micrometer-sized Ag triangular nanoplates (AgTN) on Ag films. Notably, the new coupled plasmonic structure can dramatically enhance the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by visible laser excitation, although the micrometer-sized AgTN has localized plasmon resonance at infrared wavelength. This enhancement is derived from the gap plasmon polariton between the AgTN and Ag film, which is excited via the antenna effect of the corner and edge of the AgTN. Systematic SERS studies indicated that the plasmon enhancement was on the order of corner > edge > face. These results were further verified by theoretical simulations. Our device paves the way for rational design of sensitive SERS substrates by judiciously choosing appropriate nanoparticles and optimizing the gap distance.

  10. Atomic-level observation of Ag-ion hopping motion in AgI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Komatsuda, S.; Mizuuchi, R.; Irioka, N.; Kawata, S.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Applicability of the 111mCd(→111Cd) and 111In(→111Cd) probes to the study of dynamics in polycrystalline silver iodide (AgI) was examined by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation technique. It was found that the 111mCd(→111Cd) probe occupies a unique site in γ-AgI and exhibits nuclear relaxation caused by dynamic perturbation arising from Ag + hopping motion in α-AgI; while the residential sites of 111In(→111Cd) vary, suggesting that 111In ions can not settle themselves in a fixed site in the AgI crystal structure. We here demonstrate that 111mCd(→111Cd) can be a potential nucleus to probe the Ag +-ion dynamic motion in α-AgI.

  11. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  12. Photocathodes in accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Gray, E.R.; Giles, P.M.; Springer, R.W.; Loebs, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Some electron accelerator applications require bursts of short pulses at high microscopic repetition rates and high peak brightness. A photocathode, illuminated by a mode-locked laser, is well suited to filling this need. The intrinsic brightness of a photoemitter beam is high; experiments are under way at Los Alamos to study the brightness of short bunches with high space charge after acceleration. A laser-illuminated Cs/sub 3/Sb photoemitter is located in the first rf cavity of an injector linac. Diagnostics include a pepper-pot emittance analyzer, a magnetic spectrometer, and a streak camera.

  13. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed.

  14. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  15. 'Light Sail' Acceleration Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2009-08-21

    The dynamics of the acceleration of ultrathin foil targets by the radiation pressure of superintense, circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. By addressing self-induced transparency and charge separation effects, it is shown that for 'optimal' values of the foil thickness only a thin layer at the rear side is accelerated by radiation pressure. The simple 'light sail' model gives a good estimate of the energy per nucleon, but overestimates the conversion efficiency of laser energy into monoenergetic ions.

  16. Multileaf collimator for Coline medical accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Plebański, Grzegorz; Sajna, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) allows advanced field shaping for radiation therapy delivered with medical accelerators. In this paper theoretical considerations and scientific studies of a new MLC design are described. Considered multileaf collimator model comprises of a multiplicity of tungsten leaves of 1 cm width projected at isocenter plane. To ensure compatibility of a new MLC solution with different accelerator types as well as to assure high reliability in irradiated environment and presence of strong magnetic field, a complex and independent control system had to be developed. It comprises of two modules - one placed in the accelerator treatment head and the other one placed in the control room. Both of them ensure high reliability and treatment quality while working in harsh conditions. Mechanical design and leaf shape optimization algorithm based on a ray tracing method are also described in details. Adapted solutions allowed providing minimized and uniform radiation penumbrae in the full range of leaves positions which is crucial for modern advanced radiotherapy.

  17. Generalized radially self-accelerating helicon beams.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-10-31

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a new class of optical beams that are radially self-accelerating and nondiffracting. These beams continuously evolve on spiraling trajectories while maintaining their amplitude and phase distribution in their rotating rest frame. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of radial self-acceleration and prove our findings experimentally. As radially self-accelerating beams are nonparaxial and a solution to the full scalar Helmholtz equation, they can be implemented in many linear wave systems beyond optics, from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and soft matter. Our work generalized the study of classical helicon beams to a complete set of solutions for rotating complex fields. PMID:25396370

  18. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys.

    PubMed

    Tie, D; Feyerabend, F; Müller, W D; Schade, R; Liefeith, K; Kainer, K U; Willumeit, R

    2013-06-16

    The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4) and aging (T6) heat treatment. The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH)₂ and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7), revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269), and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials.

  19. MICROWAVE SPECTRA AND GEOMETRIES OF C2H_{2\\cdots AgI} and C2H_{4\\cdots AgI}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Susanna L.; Tew, David Peter; Walker, Nick; Legon, Anthony

    2015-06-01

    A chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer has been used to measure the microwave spectra of both C2H_{2\\cdots AgI} and C2H_{4\\cdots AgI}. These complexes are generated via laser ablation at 532 nm of a silver surface in the presence of CF3I and either C2H_{2} or C2H_{4} and argon and are stabilized by a supersonic expansion. Rotational (A0, B0, C0) and centrifugal distortion constants (ΔJ and ΔJK) of each molecule have been determined as well the nuclear electric quadrupole coupling constants the iodine atom (χaa(I) and χbb-χcc(I)). The spectrum of each molecule is consistent with a C2v structure in which the metal atom interacts with the π-orbital of the ethene or ethyne molecule. Isotopic substitutions of atoms within the C2H_{2} or C2H_{4} subunits are in progress and in conjunction with high level ab initio calculations will allow for accurate determination of the geometry of each molecule. These to complexes are put in the context of the recently studied H2S\\cdots AgI, OC\\cdotsAgI, H3N\\cdots AgI and (CH3)_{3N\\cdots AgI}. S.Z. Riaz, S.L. Stephens, W. Mizukami, D.P. Tew, N.R. Walker, A.C. Legon, Chem. Phys. Let., 531, 1-12 (2012) S.L. Stephens, W. Mizukami, D.P. Tew, N.R. Walker, A.C. Legon, J. Chem. Phys., 136(6), 064306 (2012) D.M. Bittner, D.P. Zaleski, S.L. Stephens, N.R. Walker, A.C. Legon, Study in progress.

  20. Spectral investigation of nonlinear local field effects in Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Rodrigo Takeda, Yoshihiko; Ohnuma, Masato; Oyoshi, Keiji

    2015-03-21

    The capability of Ag nanoparticles to modulate their optical resonance condition, by optical nonlinearity, without an external feedback system was experimentally demonstrated. These optical nonlinearities were studied in the vicinity of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), using femtosecond pump-and-probe spectroscopy with a white-light continuum probe. Transient transmission changes ΔT/T exhibited strong photon energy and particle size dependence and showed a complex and non-monotonic change with increasing pump light intensity. Peak position and change of sign redshift with increasing pump light intensity demonstrate the modulation of the LSPR. These features are discussed in terms of the intrinsic feedback via local field enhancement.