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Sample records for ags booster synchrotron

  1. First results of proton injection commissioning of the AGS Booster synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Luccio, A.; Skelly, J.; Soukas, A.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.; Witkover, R.

    1991-01-01

    Beam performance for the injection phase of proton beam commissioning of the AGS Booster synchrotron will be presented. The beam from the 200 MeV Linac is transported through a new beam line into the Booster. This Linac-to Booster (LTB) beam line includes a 126{degree} bend and brings the injected beam onto the Booster injection orbit through the backleg of a main ring dipole magnet. Transfer of beam from the Linac to the Booster, spiralling beam and closing the orbit in the Booster ring are discussed. Injection and transport through one sector of the ring has been accomplished. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  2. AGS Booster prototype magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.; Jackson, J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Phillips, R.; Brodowski, J.; Jablonski, E.; Keohane, G.; McDowell, B.; Rodger, E.

    1987-03-19

    Prototype magnets have been designed and constructed for two half cells of the AGS Booster. The lattice requires 2.4m long dipoles, each curved by 10/sup 0/. The multi-use Booster injector requires several very different standard magnet cycles, capable of instantaneous interchange using computer control from dc up to 10 Hz.

  3. The AGS Booster vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, H.C.

    1989-01-01

    The AGS Booster is a synchrotron for the acceleration of both protons and heavy ions. The design pressure of low 10{sup {minus}11} mbar is required to minimize beam loss of the partially stripped heavy ions. To remove contaminants and to reduce outgassing, the vacuum chambers and the components located in them will be chemically cleaned, vacuum fired, baked then treated with nitric oxide. The vacuum sector will be insitu baked to a minimum of 200{degree}C and pumped by the combination of sputter ion pumps and titanium sublimation pumps. This paper describes the design and the processing of this ultra high vacuum system, and the performance of some half-cell vacuum chambers. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  4. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  5. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-06-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  6. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  7. Progress with the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Rare K-decay, neutrino and heavy ion physics demands that a rapid- cycling high vacuum and high intensity Booster be built for the AGS at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues needing special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. Finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-09-26

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

  9. The ultra high vacuum system of the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, H.C.; Sadinsky, S.; Savino, J.; Schnitzenbaumer, P.; Sattel, P.; Van Zwienen, W.; Xiuhua, Cui

    1989-01-01

    The AGS Booster currently under construction at Brookhaven is a synchrotron for the acceleration of both protons and heavy ions. The design pressure of 3 /times/ 10/sup /minus/11/ Torr is required to minimize beam loss of the partially stripped heavy ions. This paper described the design and processing of the ultra high vacuum system, and the performance of the prototype vacuum half cells. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Instrumentation and control of the AGS Booster vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Gabusi, J.; Geller, J.; Hseuh, H.C.; Rosas, P.; Sandburg, J.; Shen, B.; Stattel, P.; Zapasek, R.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS Booster is a synchrotron for the acceleration of both protons and heavy ions. A pressure of low 10{sup {minus}11} Torr is required for the acceleration of the partially stripped, low {Beta}, very heavy ions. This paper describes the power supplies and controls for this ultra-high vacuum system with the emphasis on the operation of the ion gauge system over long cable length and on equipment interlock 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A tool for model based diagnostics of the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1993-12-31

    A model-based algorithmic tool was developed to search for lattice errors by a systematic analysis of orbit data in the AGS Booster synchrotron. The algorithm employs transfer matrices calculated with MAD between points in the ring. Iterative model fitting of the data allows one to find and eventually correct magnet displacements and angles or field errors. The tool, implemented on a HP-Apollo workstation system, has proved very general and of immediate physical interpretation.

  12. RESONANT EXTRACTION PARAMETERS FOR THE AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,K.A.; CULLEN,J.; GLENN,J.W.; MAPES,M.; MARNERIS,I.; TSOUPAS,N.; SNYDSTRUP,L.; VAN ASSELT,W.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven's AGS Booster is the injector for the AGS. It is being modified to send resonant extracted heavy ions to a new beam line, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The design of the resonant extraction system for BAF was described in [1]. This note will give a more detailed description of the system and describe the predicted resonant beam time structure. We will describe tune space manipulations necessary to extract the resonant beam at the maximum Booster rigidity, schemes for performing resonant extraction, and describe the modifications required to perform bunched beam extraction to the BAF facility.

  13. New beam instrumentation in the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS Booster was designed to accelerate beams from 2{times}10{sup 10} polarized protons to 1.5{times}10{sup 13} protons and heavy ions through Au{sup +33}. The range of beam parameters and the high vacuum, and radiation environment presented challenges for the beam instrumentation. Some interesting beam monitors in the Booster and transport lines, will be described. Where available, results will be presented. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Results from the AGS Booster transverse damper

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, D.; Brennan, M.; Meth, M.; Roser, T.

    1993-06-01

    To reach the design intensity of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse in the AGS Booster, transverse coupled bunch instabilities with an estimated growth rate of 1500s{sup {minus}1} have to be dampened. A prototype transverse damper has been tested successfully using a one turn digital delay and closed orbit suppression implemented in a programmable gate array. An updated damper, which includes an algorithm to optimize damping for a changing betatron rune, will also be presented.

  15. Results from the AGS Booster transverse damper

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, D.; Brennan, M.; Meth, M.; Roser, T.

    1993-01-01

    To reach the design intensity of 1.5 [times] 10[sup 13] protons per pulse in the AGS Booster, transverse coupled bunch instabilities with an estimated growth rate of 1500s[sup [minus]1] have to be dampened. A prototype transverse damper has been tested successfully using a one turn digital delay and closed orbit suppression implemented in a programmable gate array. An updated damper, which includes an algorithm to optimize damping for a changing betatron rune, will also be presented.

  16. Harmonic analysis of the AGS Booster imperfection

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji, Y.; Gardner, C.

    1993-12-31

    The harmonic content of magnetic field imperfections in the AGS Booster has been determined through careful measurements of the required field corrections of transverse resonances. An analysis of the required correction yielded amplitude and phase information which points to possible sources of imperfections. Dipole and quadrupole imperfections, which are proportional to the field of bending magnets (B), are mainly driven by any misalignment of the magnets. Quadrupole and sextupole imperfections, which are proportional to dB/dt, are driven by imperfections of the eddy-current correction system. The observations also suggest the presence of a remnant field.

  17. Modeling Longitudinal Dynamics in the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, Jean-Francois; Bhat, Chandra; Lebedev, Valeri

    2016-06-01

    The PIP-II project will replace the existing 400 MeV linac with a new, CW-capable, 800 MeV superconducting one. With respect to current operations, a 50% increase in beam intensity in the rapid cycling Booster synchrotron is expected. Booster batches are combined in the Recycler ring; this process limits the allowed longitudinal emittance of the extracted Booster beam. To suppress eddy currents, the Booster has no beam pipe; magnets are evacuated, exposing the beam to core laminations and this has a substantial impact on the longitudinal impedance. Noticeable longitudinal emittance growth is already observed at transition crossing. Operation at higher intensity will likely necessitate mitigation measures. We describe systematic efforts to construct a predictive model for current operating conditions. A longitudinal only code including a laminated wall impedance model, space charge effects, and feedback loops is developed. Parameter validation is performed using detailed measurements of relevant beam, rf and control parameters. An attempt is made to benchmark the code at operationally favorable machine settings.

  18. Results from commissioning the AGS Booster orbit system

    SciTech Connect

    Bleser, E.

    1993-06-01

    This note reports results from the commissioning of three systems in the AGS Booster. The beam position monitor system, which works to a relative accuracy of 0.36 millimeters; the uncorrected Booster orbit, which has quite large excursions; and the passive eddy current correction system, which eliminates all but a few percent of the eddy current dipole effect.

  19. Object-oriented programming techniques for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.F.

    1991-12-31

    The applications software developed for the control system of the AGS Booster Project was written in the object-oriented language, C++. A the start of the Booster Project, the programming staff of the AGS Controls Section comprised some dozen programmer/analysts, all highly fluent in C but novices in C++. During the coarse of this project, nearly the entire staff converted to using C++ for a large fraction of their assignments. Over 100 C++ software modules are now available for Booster and general AGS use, of which a large fraction are broadly applicable tools. The transition from C to C++ from a managerial perspective is discussed and an overview is provided of the ways in which object classes have been applied in Booster software development.

  20. Object-oriented programming techniques for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The applications software developed for the control system of the AGS Booster Project was written in the object-oriented language, C++. A the start of the Booster Project, the programming staff of the AGS Controls Section comprised some dozen programmer/analysts, all highly fluent in C but novices in C++. During the coarse of this project, nearly the entire staff converted to using C++ for a large fraction of their assignments. Over 100 C++ software modules are now available for Booster and general AGS use, of which a large fraction are broadly applicable tools. The transition from C to C++ from a managerial perspective is discussed and an overview is provided of the ways in which object classes have been applied in Booster software development.

  1. The Booster to AGS beam transfer fast kicker systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Bunicci, J.; Soukas, A.V.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1992-08-01

    The Brookhaven AGS Booster has a very successful commissioning period in June 1991. The third phase of that commissioning was a beam extraction test. The Booster extraction fast kicker (F3) deflected a 1.2 GeV proton beam from the Booster circulating orbit into the extraction septum aperture, partially down the extraction line to a temporary beam stop. Now, the Booster is committed to the AGS operations program for both heavy ion and proton beams. Thus, the Booster extraction and the corresponding AGS injection systems must operate routinely up to a pulse repetition frequency of 7.5 Hertz, and up to a beam energy of 1.5 Gev. The injection fast kicker is located in the A5 section of the AGS ring and is used to deflect the proton or heavy ion beam into its final AGS closed orbit. A distinctive feature of the AGS injection fast kicker modulators is the tail-bitting function required for proton beam injection. This enables the system to produce a fast current fall time to go along with the high current pulse amplitude with a fast rise time. The AGS injection fast kicker system has three pulse modulators, and each modulator consists of two thyratrons. The main PFN thyratrons switch on the current, and the tail bitting thyratrons are used to force the magnet current to decrease rapidly. Two digital pulse delay generators are used to align the main thyratrons and the tail bitting thyratrons respectively. The system has been tested and installed. The final commissioning of the Booster to AGS beam transfer line and injection is currently being undertaken. In this article, the system design, realization techniques and performance data will be presented.

  2. The RF beam control system for the Brookhaven AGS synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    The new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron completes the injector chain for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. It enables the AGS to accelerate all heavy ions to 14 GeV/c for collider operation and also in the intensity of the AGS for fixed-target experiments by a factor of four. The ultra-high vacuum enables acceleration of partially stripped ions from the Tandem Van de Graaff to energies sufficient for complete stripping. For high intensities, it accelerates the 200 MeV linac beam in four batches of three bunches per AGS cycle. At 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per batch, it has the same space charge tune spread as the AGS at 200 MeV. This variety of applications means the Booster must accommodate a very wide range of particle masses and intensities. Since it operates in a Pulse-by-Pulse Modulation mode at 7.5 Hz, the computer controlled functions of time and magnetic field, and the 64 timing triggers of the beam control system take on unique values for each of four PPM users. Beams of {sup 197}Au{sup +33} ions and protons have been accelerated in the same PPM cycle.

  3. The RF beam control system for the Brookhaven AGS synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron completes the injector chain for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. It enables the AGS to accelerate all heavy ions to 14 GeV/c for collider operation and also in the intensity of the AGS for fixed-target experiments by a factor of four. The ultra-high vacuum enables acceleration of partially stripped ions from the Tandem Van de Graaff to energies sufficient for complete stripping. For high intensities, it accelerates the 200 MeV linac beam in four batches of three bunches per AGS cycle. At 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per batch, it has the same space charge tune spread as the AGS at 200 MeV. This variety of applications means the Booster must accommodate a very wide range of particle masses and intensities. Since it operates in a Pulse-by-Pulse Modulation mode at 7.5 Hz, the computer controlled functions of time and magnetic field, and the 64 timing triggers of the beam control system take on unique values for each of four PPM users. Beams of {sup 197}Au{sup +33} ions and protons have been accelerated in the same PPM cycle.

  4. Analysis of resonance-driving imperfections in the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.; Shoji, Y.; Danby, G.; Glenn, J.W.; Jackson, G.J.; Soukas, A.; van Asselt, W.; Whalen, C.

    1994-08-01

    At the design intensity of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the space charge tune shift in the AGS Booster at injection has been estimated to be about 0.35. The beam tunes are therefore spread over many lower order resonance lines and the associated stopbands must be corrected in order to minimize the amplitude growth due to resonance excitation. This requires proper compensation of the resonance-driving harmonics which result from random magnetic field errors. The observation and correction of second and third order resonance stopbands in the AGS Booster is reviewed, and an analysis of magnetic field imperfections based on the required corrections is given.

  5. Observation and correction of resonance stopbands in the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.; Shoji, Y.; Ahrens, L.; Glenn, J.W.; Lee, Y.Y.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-06-01

    At the design intensity of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the space charge tune shift in the AGS Booster at injection has been estimated to be about 0.35. Therefore, the beam is spread over may lower order resonance lines and the stopbands have to be corrected to minimize the amplitude growth by proper compensation of the driving harmonics resulting from random errors. The observation and correction of second and third order resonance stopbands in the AGS Booster, and the establishment of a favorable operating point at high intensity are discussed.

  6. Preliminary study of AC power feeders for AGS booster

    SciTech Connect

    Meth, M.

    1992-07-17

    It has been proposed that the AGS Heavy Ion/Proton Booster be excited directly from the electric power distribution system without intervening an energy storage buffer such as an MG set or a magnetic energy buffer. The average power requirement of the AGS Booster is less than many single-loads presently housed on the lab site. However, the power swing will be the largest single pulsating load on the lab site. The large power swings will impact on the power grid producing utility-line disturbances such as voltage fluctuations and harmonic generation. Thus, it is necessary to carefully evaluate the quality of the electric power system resulting from the interconnection, such that the utility system is not degraded either on the lab site or at LILCO's substation.

  7. Preliminary study of AC power feeders for AGS booster

    SciTech Connect

    Meth, M.

    1992-07-17

    It has been proposed that the AGS Heavy Ion/Proton Booster be excited directly from the electric power distribution system without intervening an energy storage buffer such as an MG set or a magnetic energy buffer. The average power requirement of the AGS Booster is less than many single-loads presently housed on the lab site. However, the power swing will be the largest single pulsating load on the lab site. The large power swings will impact on the power grid producing utility-line disturbances such as voltage fluctuations and harmonic generation. Thus, it is necessary to carefully evaluate the quality of the electric power system resulting from the interconnection, such that the utility system is not degraded either on the lab site or at LILCO`s substation.

  8. Status of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) upgrade project

    SciTech Connect

    Sluyters, T.

    1988-01-01

    The upgrade of BNL's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron progresses parallel with the construction of the 1.5 GeV Booster with a view to completion of its major components in 1991. The initial goals of the upgrade program are: to prepare the AGS ring for acceleration of at least 5 /times/ 10/sup 13/ protons per pulse, to accelerate heavy ions up to gold, to accelerate polarized protons in the 10/sup 12/-10/sup 13/ intensity range, and to improve the reliability and flexibility of the present machine operation. Figure 1 shows the AGS complex as it will operate in 1991. There are several major systems in the AGS complex which have to be upgraded in order to accelerate the higher intensity beams and heavier ions. These systems are: the RFQ preinjector, the rf cavities, the vacuum, the transverse dampers, the correction magnets, extraction equipment, and the Siemens main magnet power supply. Additional major projects, which will keep the ring activation within /open quotes/acceptable/close quotes/ limits despite a four-fold increase in beam intensity, are a fast beam chopper, a gamma-transition jump system, and a high frequency dilution cavity. These last projects have received high priority because they benefit as well the present operation of the AGS.

  9. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  10. Single bunch and multi-bunch injection schemes for Iranian Light Source Facility booster synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghipanah, A.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Rahighi, J.; Ghasem, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the design proposal for the Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF) chopper is presented and the expected performance of both single bunch and multi-bunch modes of beam injection into the booster synchrotron is described. For the multi-bunch mode, a 100 MHz sub-harmonic pre-buncher is proposed to be employed next to the electron gun particularly to reduce the particle loss during the energy ramp of the booster. The results indicated significant improvement of the injection efficiency into the booster. The total particle loss rate for the multi-bunch injection is reduced from 35% to 4%.

  11. Booster Synchrotron RF System Upgrade for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sanghyun; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    Recent progress at the SPEAR3 includes the increase in stored current from 100 mA to 200 mA and top-off injection to allow beamlines to stay open during injection. Presently the booster injects 3.0 GeV beam to SPEAR3 three times a day. The stored beam decays to about 150 mA between the injections. The growing user demands are to increase the stored current to the design value of 500 mA, and to maintain it at a constant value within a percent or so. To achieve this goal the booster must inject once every few minutes. For improved injection efficiency, all RF systems at the linac, booster and SPEAR3 need to be phase-locked. The present booster RF system is basically a copy of the SPEAR2 RF system with 358.5 MHz and 40 kW peak RF power driving a 5-cell RF cavity for 1.0 MV gap voltage. These requirements entail a booster RF system upgrade to a scaled down version of the SPEAR3 RF system of 476.3 MHz with 1.2 MW cw klystron output power capabilities. We will analyze each subsystem option for their merits within budgetary and geometric space constraints. A substantial portion of the system will come from the decommissioned PEP-II RF stations.

  12. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  13. Dipole power supply for National Synchrotron Light Source Booster upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.; Dabrowski, J.; Murray, J.

    1992-12-31

    The booster at the NSLS is being upgraded from .75 to 2 pulses per second. To accomplish this, new power supplies for the dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets have been designed and are being constructed. This paper will outline the design of the dipole power supply and control system, and will present results obtained thus far.

  14. Dipole power supply for National Synchrotron Light Source Booster upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.; Dabrowski, J. ); Murray, J. )

    1992-01-01

    The booster at the NSLS is being upgraded from .75 to 2 pulses per second. To accomplish this, new power supplies for the dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets have been designed and are being constructed. This paper will outline the design of the dipole power supply and control system, and will present results obtained thus far.

  15. Magnetic properties of the ALS (Advanced Light Source) booster synchrotron engineering model magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.; Green, M.I.; Hoyer, E.; Koo, Y.M.; Luchini, K.; Marks, S.; Milburn, J.; Nelson, D.H.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is designed to be a third-generation electron storage ring producing high-brightness VUV and X-ray radiation from wiggler and undulator insertion devices. Engineering models of all lattice magnets that are to be installed in the storage ring and its booster synchrotron have been built and are being tested to verify their performance. This paper is concerned with the magnets that form the booster lattice: dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles, and corrector dipoles (steerers). After a brief outline of measurement techniques and equipment, the major design parameters of these magnets are listed. Measured effective lengths and multipole field errors are then given for each type. All engineering models meet the specifications, and tracking studies including the measured systematic field errors show acceptable performance of the booster synchrotron; hence the designs are qualified for production. 3 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-06-01

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  17. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  18. THE BOOSTER APPLICATION FACILITY (BAF) BEAM TRANSPORT LINE OF BNL-AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    TSOUPAS,N.; BROWN,K.A.; CULLEN,J.R.; LEE,Y.Y.; MCNERNEY,A.J.; PILE,P.H.; ROSER,T.; SOUKAS,A.; TUOZZOLO,J.E.

    1999-03-29

    An experimental facility, to irradiate materials with energetic ion beams, has been proposed to be built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The BAF facility will mainly consist of the AGS-Booster slow extraction, of a beam transport line, and a target room. The beam transport line will transport the slow extracted beam of the AGS-Booster to the target location for the irradiation of various materials and specimens. A variety of ion beams like (p, {sup 28}Si, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 63}Cu, {sup 197}Au) in the energy range of 0.04 to 3.07 GeV/nucleon will be transported by the BAF line which is designed to provide variable beam spot sizes on the BAF target with sizes varying from 2.0 cm to 20.0 cm in diameter. The beam spot sizes will include 95% of the beam intensity with the beam distributed normally (Gaussian) on the target area. It is also possible by introducing magnetic octupoles at specified locations along the beam transport line, to modify the distribution on the BAF target and provide well confined beams with rectangular cross section and with uniform distribution on the target.

  19. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC gold run

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    2014-08-18

    This note describes longitudinal emittance measurements that were made in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC Gold run. It also contains an overview of the longitudinal aspects of their setup during this run. Each bunch intended for RHIC is composed of beam from 4 Booster cycles, and there are two of them per AGS cycle. For each of the 8 Booster cycles required to produce the 2 bunches in the AGS, a beam pulse from EVIS is injected into the Booster and captured in four h=4 buckets. Then those bunches are accelerated to a porch where they are merged into 2 bunches and then into 1 bunch.

  20. Electron cooling system in the booster synchrotron of the HIAF project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, L. J.; Yang, J. C.; Xia, J. W.; Yang, X. D.; Yuan, Y. J.; Li, J.; Ma, X. M.; Yan, T. L.; Yin, D. Y.; Chai, W. P.; Sheng, L. N.; Shen, G. D.; Zhao, H.; Tang, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    The High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) is a new accelerator complex under design at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The facility is aiming at the production of high intensity heavy ion beams for a wide range of experiments in high energy density physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics and other applications. It consists of a superconducting electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source and an intense proton ion source, a linear accelerator, a 34 Tm booster synchrotron ring, a 43 Tm multifunction compression synchrotron ring, a 13 Tm high precision spectrometer ring and several experimental terminals. A magnetized electron cooling device is supposed to be used in the booster ring for decreasing the transverse emittance of injected beams. The conceptual design and main parameters of this cooler are presented in this paper.

  1. Design and operation of the AGS Booster Ionization Profile Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Stillman, A.N.; Thern, R.E.; Van Zwienen, W.H.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    The AGS Booster Ionization Profile Monitor (IPM) must operate in a vacuum of about 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} Torr. The ultra-high vacuum imposes certain requirements on detector gain and restrictions on construction techniques. Each detector is a two-stage micro-channel plate with an integral substrate containing sixty-four printed anodes. Formed electrodes provide uniform collection fields without the use of resistors, which would be unacceptable in these vacuum conditions. An ultra-violet light calibrates the detector in its permanent mounting. An extra set of electrodes performs a first order correction to the perturbations imposed by the horizontal and vertical collection electrodes. This paper will present details of the design of the profile monitor and recent operational results. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Design and operation of the AGS Booster Ionization Profile Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Stillman, A.N.; Thern, R.E.; Van Zwienen, W.H.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS Booster Ionization Profile Monitor (IPM) must operate in a vacuum of about 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} Torr. The ultra-high vacuum imposes certain requirements on detector gain and restrictions on construction techniques. Each detector is a two-stage micro-channel plate with an integral substrate containing sixty-four printed anodes. Formed electrodes provide uniform collection fields without the use of resistors, which would be unacceptable in these vacuum conditions. An ultra-violet light calibrates the detector in its permanent mounting. An extra set of electrodes performs a first order correction to the perturbations imposed by the horizontal and vertical collection electrodes. This paper will present details of the design of the profile monitor and recent operational results. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Processing and evaluation of the AGS Booster ultra-high vaccum system

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, H.C.; Mapes, M.; Schnitzenbaumer, P.; Shen, B.; Sikora, R.; Stattel, P.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS Booster is a synchrotron for the acceleration of both protons and heavy ions. To minimize the beam loss due to charge exchange of the partially stripped, low {Beta} very heavy ions with the residual gas molecules, pressure of low 10{sup {minus}11} Torr is required for the 200 m booster ring. To achieve this ultra high vacuum, chemical cleaning, vacuum furnace degassing and insitu bake were employed for all chambers and beam components. Using these procedures, vacuums of low 10{sup {minus}11} Torr have been routinely achieved during the testing of individual half cells and beam components, and during the commissioning of the vacuum sectors. In this paper, the design and layout of chambers, flanges and bakeout hardware is briefly described. The vacuum processing of different components and the results of bakeout and evaluation are summarized. The experience gained during the construction and commissioning of this ultra-high vacuum system is also given. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Vacuum chamber eddy current correction coil for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.; Jackson, J.

    1988-01-01

    The AGS Booster injector will perform a variety of functions. Heavy ion acceleration requires a bakeable, ultra-high vacuum system (VC). Acceleration for intense proton beams requires rapid cycling (B /preceq/ 10T/sec). If straight forward heavy walled VC are used, the field perturbations due to eddy currents are large. The state of the art lattice has highly distributed lumped sextupoles capable of substantially correcting the induced field nonlinearity. Nevertheless, for the very highest space charge-intensity limits, it is desirable to have the capability to remove eddy current fields at the source. Correction coils attached to the outside of the VC cancel its current aberrations over the required good field aperture. These can be passively powered by transformer action, using two turn windings around the magnet yoke. Programmed power supplies can also be used. This inexpensive additional correction option uses a three turn per quadrant coil which follows the local contour of the VC. Transverse movements of several mms of the VC will have no beam optical effect since the large field aberrations and their corrections have the same displaced coordinates. Experimental and computer studies will be presented, as well as mechanical and electrical design of a simple method of construction. 6 figs.

  5. An overview of Booster and AGS polarized proton operation during Run 15

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    2015-10-20

    This note is an overview of the Booster and AGS for the 2015 Polarized Proton RHIC run from an operations perspective. There are some notable differences between this and previous runs. In particular, the polarized source intensity was expected to be, and was, higher this year than in previous RHIC runs. The hope was to make use of this higher input intensity by allowing the beam to be scraped down more in the Booster to provide a brighter and smaller beam for the AGS and RHIC. The RHIC intensity requirements were also higher this run than in previous runs, which caused additional challenges because the AGS polarization and emittance are normally intensity dependent.

  6. Instabilities related with RF cavity in the booster synchrotron for NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Y.; Cupolo, J.; Ma, H.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2010-12-01

    The booster synchrotron for NSLS-II accepts beam with 200 MeV from a linac and raises its energy up to 3 GeV. In order to raise beam energy up to 3 GeV, a 7-cell PETRA cavity is installed. Beam instabilities related to the cavity impedances are discussed. In particular, in order to avoid coupled-bunch instability, we consider that cooling water temperature for the cavity should be changed to shift frequencies of higher order modes (HOM) to avoid beam revolution lines. To obtain the relation between the temperature dependence of amount of frequency shift in each HOM and cavity body temperature, we carried out the measurement by changing cavity body temperature. From the measurement data, we calculate the required temperature variation. We summarize the results and describe the system design.

  7. Using the transverse digital damper as a real-time tune monitor for the Booster synchrotron at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, N.; Lysenko, O.; /FERMILAB

    2011-08-01

    The Fermilab Booster is a fast ramping (15Hz) synchrotron which accelerates protons from 400MeV to 8GeV. During commissioning of a transverse digital damper system, it was shown that the damper could provide a measurement of the machine tune throughout the cycle by exciting just 1 of the 84 bunches with minimal impact on the machine operation. The algorithms used to make the measurement have been incorporated into the damper FPGA firmware allowing for real-time tune monitoring of all Booster cycles. A new Booster tune monitor was implemented in the digital damper which has minimal impact on the Booster operation. The tune measures the tunes in two planes over the energy ramping cycle with an accuracy of 0.01 in real time.

  8. MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT EFFECTS IN BNL'S AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, K.A.; AHRENS, L.; GARDNER, C.; GLENN, J.W.; HARVEY, M.; MENG, W.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23

    Recent beam experiments at BNL's AGS Booster have enabled us to study in more detail the effects of eddy currents on the lattice structure and our control over the betatron tune. The Booster is capable of operating at ramp rates as high as 9 T/sec. At these ramp rates eddy currents in the vacuum chambers significantly alter the fields and gradients seen by the beam as it is accelerated. The Booster was designed with these effects in mind and to help control the field uniformity and linearity in the Booster Dipoles special vacuum chambers were designed with current windings to negate the affect of the induced eddy currents. In this report results from betatron tune measurements and eddy current simulations will be presented. We will then present results from modeling the accelerator using the results of the magnetic field simulations and compare these to the measurements.

  9. AGS BOOSTER BEAM POSITION, TUNE, AND LONGITUDINAL PROFILE DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,K.A.AHRENS,L.SEVERINO,FSMITH,K.WILINSKI,M

    2003-05-12

    In this paper we will describe a data acquisition system designed and developed for the AGS Booster. The system was motivated by the need to get high quality beam diagnostics from the AGS Booster. This was accomplished by locating the electronics and digital data acquisition close to the Booster ring, to minimize loss of bandwidth in the original signals. In addition we had to develop the system rapidly and at a low cost. The system consists of a Lecroy digital oscilloscope which is interfaced through a National Instruments LabView{trademark} server application, developed for this project. This allows multiple client applications to time share the scope without interfering with each other. We will present a description of the system design along with example clients that we have implemented.

  10. FY2014 Parameters for Gold Ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2014-07-30

    The nominal parameters for gold ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC are given for the FY2014 running period. The parameters are worked out using various formulas to derive mass, kinetic parameters, RF parameters, ring parameters, etc.. The ''standard setup'', ''medium-energy'', and ''low-energy'' parameters are summarized in separate sections.

  11. FY2014 Parameters for Helions and Gold Ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2014-08-15

    The nominal parameters for helions (helion is the bound state of two protons and one neutron, the nucleus of a helium-3 atom) and gold ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC are given for the FY2014 running period. The parameters are found using various formulas to derive mass, helion anomalous g-factor, kinetic parameters, RF parameters, ring parameters, etc..

  12. Measurement and simulations of intensity-dependent effects in the Fermilab Booster synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarron, Daniel

    The Fermilab Booster is a nearly 40-year-old proton synchrotron, designed to accelerate protons from 0.4 to 8 GeV kinetic energy for extraction into the Main Injector, and currently operating with a typical intensity of 4.5 x 1012 particles per beam, roughly twice the design value, because of requirements for high particle flux in various experiments. Its relatively low injection energy provides certain challenges in maintaining beam quality/stability under such demands. Quantification of effects limiting intensity could provide enhanced beam stability and reduced downtime. Future accelerator design may also benefit from this better understanding of intensity-limiting effects near injection. Chapter 1 summarizes 20th-century accelerator research up to modern synchrotrons. Chapter 2 introduces some accelerator-physics terminology, and briefly describes the Booster. Synergia, a space-charge modeling tool, is presented with relevant benchmarks. Emittance is discussed in Chapter 3. Space-charge fields couple particle motion, leading to interplanar emittance exchange, necessitating simultaneous measurements to obtain adequate descriptions at higher intensities. Measurements are described and results are given. RMS emittances agree with known values at nominal intensities and emittance exchange is accounted for. Correlation terms between the planes are quantified using Synergia, and shown to be at most an 8% effect. Studies of coherent and incoherent betatron-frequency intensity dependence near injection are presented. In Chapter 4 coherent frequency shifts are shown to be from dipole- and quadrupole-wakefield effects. Asymmetry of the laminated, magnetic chambers are responsible for the magnitudes and opposing signs of horizontal and vertical wakefield tune shifts. Chapter 5 details procedures for obtaining a coherent-shift intensity dependence, yielding -0.009/1012 and +0.001/10 12 in the vertical and horizontal planes respectively, accumulating to maximal values over

  13. Overview and analysis of the 2016 Gold Run in the Booster and AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    2016-09-16

    Run 16 differed from preceding Au runs in that during most of it a 12:6:2 merge was employed in the AGS instead of an 8:4:2 merge. This was done to provide higher bunch intensities for RHIC. Since the approach to providing higher bunch intensities is, and has been, to merge more Booster bunches of the same intensity into one final bunch, detailing the longitudinal aspects of this setup seems quite relevant. So, aside from providing an overview of the Au portion of Run 16, this note also contains a series of emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS. Comparisons of these to similar measurements in previous runs are also made in hopes of gaining a better understanding of what factors contribute to the emittance of a bunch at AGS extraction. The note also tries to provide some context in which to understand the various merge schemes and describes a potential 8 to 1 type merge.

  14. Proposal of a beam study in the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Chen, S.

    1991-10-01

    IN order to achieve the design luminosity, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) parameter choices emphasize the preservation of the transverse emittance requiring in the collider a normalized transverse emittance of 1 {pi}.mm.mrad. A stringent accelerator chain emittance budget must be maintained to achieve the final value. Budgeted emittance specifications for the Low Energy Booster (LEB) include 0.4 {pi}.mm.mrad at injection and {le} 0.6 {pi}.mm.mrad at extraction. The space-charge tune shift is expected to be more than 0.5 when the rms normalized emittance of 0.4 {pi}.mm.mrad at injection and the total number of particles is 1.1 {times} 10{sup 12} with 1 {times} 10{sup 10} particles per bunch. Therefore, it is necessary to cope with a large tune shift and avoid emittance deterioration. We have been studying the beam emittance evolution in the LEB by a multi-particle simulation code with space-charge effects. As reported in the several papers we have obtained from the simulation some new insights into the effects which seem to explain qualitatively a cause of the emittance growth. Even quantitatively, we believe that the simulation can predict the emittance growth as a function of time quite accurately because the code includes most details of the physics processes, such as the adiabatic bunching process and acceleration in the fully 6-D phase space treatment, transverse as well as longitudinal space-charge calculations in a self-consistent manner, and intensity decrease due to particle loss. The purpose of this study is to determine quantitatively the emittance deterioration due to space-charge effects, not to find the maximum current an accelerator could accommodate. Since the charge distribution itself may not remain the same, an accurate measurement of the beam profile is an essential factor of the beam study.

  15. Vacuum chamber eddy current self-correction for the AGS Booster Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The large sextupole and other multipoles induced by eddy currents in the vacuum chamber (VC) designed for the AGS Booster dipoles have been cancelled by simple coils attached to the VC surface. A two turns per pole back leg winding provides the mmf required to power the correction coil by transformer action, automatically correcting even for the variable {dot B} magnet excitation. Much larger VC positional errors of translation and rotation are acceptable because the coils follow the VC contour: the aberrations and their corrections locally have the same misplaced coordinate system. The self-correction concept could be applied to quadrupoles. However, Booster quadrupole measurements show that induced higher harmonics from VC and other eddy current sources are very small. Thus, with self-correction of the dipole VC eddy current fields, {dot B} effects on the proton rapid cycling Booster optics are reduced to tracking of the fundamental dipole and quadrupole fields. This can be automatically controlled using field monitoring transducers located in a dipole and quadrupole operated in series with the Booster magnets. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-01-01

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven's Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  17. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-12-31

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven`s Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  18. TOPOLOGY FOR A DSP BASED BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM IN THE AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    DELONG,J.BRENNAN,J.M.HAYES,T.LE,T.N.SMITH,K.

    2003-05-12

    The AGS Booster supports beams of ions and protons with a wide range of energies on a pulse-by-pulse modulation basis. This requires an agile beam control system highly integrated with its controls. To implement this system digital techniques in the form of Digital Signal Processors, Direct Digital Synthesizers, digital receivers and high speed Analog to Digital Converters are used. Signals from the beam and cavity pick-ups, as well as measurements of magnetic field strength in the ring dipoles are processed in real time. To facilitate this a multi-processor topology with high bandwidth data links is being designed.

  19. COMMISSIONING RESULTS OF SLOW EXTRACTION OF HEAVY IONS FROM THE AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K A; Bellavia, S; Binello, S; Brelsford, B; Dumont, D; Eng, W; Gardner, G; Gassner, D; Glenn, J W; Hammons, L; Hock, J; Hoff, L; Hutchinson, E; Jamilkowski, J; Kling, N; Kotlyar, Y; Krishock, A; Lockey, R; Mapes, M; Marneris, I; Marr, G; McNerney, A; Meyer, A; Morris, J; Naylor, C; Nemesure, S; Phillips, D; Rusek, A; Ryan, J; Shrey, T; Snydstrup, L; Tsoupas, N; Vankuik, B; Zahariou-Cohen, K; Zeno, K

    2003-05-12

    Brookhaven's AGS Booster has been modified to deliver slow extracted beam to a new beam line, the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). This facility was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The design of the resonant extraction system has been described in [1]. A more detailed description, which includes predictions of the slow extracted beam time structure has been described in [2]. In this report we will present results of the system commissioning and performance.

  20. EDDY CURRENT EFFECT OF THE BNL-AGS VACUUM CHAMBER ON THE OPTICS OF THE BNL-AGS SYNCHROTRON.

    SciTech Connect

    TSOUPAS,N.; AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.A.; GLENN,J.W.; GARDNER,K.

    1999-03-29

    During the acceleration cycle of the AGS synchrotron, eddy currents are generated within the walls of the vacuum chambers of the AGS main magnets. The vacuum chambers have elliptical cross section, are made of inconel material with a wall thickness of 2 mm and are placed within the gap of the combined-function main magnets of the AGS synchrotron. The generation of the eddy currents in the walls of the vacuum chambers, creates various magnetic multipoles, which affect the optics of the AGS machine. In this report these magnetic multipoles are calculated for various time interval starting at the acceleration cycle, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is {approx}0.1 T, and ending before the beam extraction process, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is almost constant at {approx}1.1 T. The calculations show that the magnetic multipoles generated by the eddy-currents affect the optics of the AGS synchrotron during the acceleration cycle and in particular at low magnetic fields of the main magnet. Their effect is too weak to affect the optics of the AGS machine during beam extraction at the nominal energies.

  1. Booster and AGS transverse emittance during the 2006 and 2009 polarized proton runs

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    2010-09-01

    This note is an overview of issues relating to transverse polarized proton emittance in the Booster and AGS. It also compares the transverse emittance during the FY09 polarized proton run with it during the FY06 run as several changes were made for the FY09 run in an attempt to reduce the transverse emittance coming out of the AGS. The FY06 run is used for comparison because it was relatively long, and it's believed that the performance of the injectors for polarized protons, up until FY09, was best during that run. Over the shutdown just before the FY09 run work was done in LEBT and MEBT to reduce the emittance coming out of the Linac. Measurements of the beam coming out of Linac1 indicate that the horizontal normalized emittance was reduced from 11.0 {pi} to 4.5 {pi}mm mrad, and that the vertical normalized emittance was reduced from 12.1 {pi} to 5.5 {pi} mm mrad going from FY06 to FY09. There were 2 new types of stripping foil installed in the Booster, called descriptively the 'strip' (No.6) and 'stamp' (No.2) foil, both nominally 100 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}. Both foils are composed of a diamond like material, and designed to reduce the number of times the beam goes through the foil. Other than those, there are two standard 100 {micro}g/cm carbon foils (No.3 and 5), and one 200 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} carbon foil (No.4). Of the two 100 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} foils, one has shown some deterioration (No.3) in stripping efficiency. During the FY06 run a standard 100 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} foil was generally used, and during the FY09 run the strip foil was generally used, though the stamp foil was also used for the last 3-4 weeks of the run. Both the FY06 and FY09 runs were about 5 months long, starting in late January, FY06 ending in late June, and FY09 ending in early July. A new injection setup was used for about the last 3 months of FY09, from the beginning of April to the end of the run. This setup uses 1/2 integer stopband correctors with the tunes near, but slightly greater

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of a booster dose of a 3-antigen Staphylococcus aureus vaccine (SA3Ag) in healthy adults: A randomized phase 1 study.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Helen; Nissen, Michael; Richmond, Peter; Shakib, Sepehr; Jiang, Qin; Cooper, David; Rill, Denise; Baber, James; Eiden, Joseph; Gruber, William C; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S; Zito, Edward T; Girgenti, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    A 2-stage, phase 1, randomized, placebo-controlled study in healthy adults to assess immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose at three dose levels of a 3-antigen Staphylococcus aureus vaccine (SA3Ag) containing recombinant clumping factor A (ClfA) and capsular polysaccharides 5 and 8 (CP5 and CP8) conjugated to a diphtheria toxoid. Six months after initial single vaccination, in Stage 2, SA3Ag recipients were randomized (1:1) to booster vaccination or placebo, while Stage 1 placebo recipients received placebo again. Pre- and post-vaccination blood samples were analyzed. In Stage 2 (n = 345), pre-booster CP5 and CP8 titers remained high with no increase post-booster. ClfA titers remained high after initial vaccination and increased post-booster, approaching the peak response to the initial dose. Post-booster local reactions were more frequent and of greater severity than reported after the initial vaccination, particularly for the high-dose level recipients. Post hoc analysis showed no dose-response pattern and no obvious association between diphtheria toxoid titers and local reactions after initial or booster vaccination. Immune responses after the initial vaccination persisted for the 12 months studied, with little additional response after the booster dose at 6 months. Post-booster injection site reactions were more frequent and more severe but self-limiting. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT01018641. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synchrotron Study of Ag-Doped Mg2Si: Correlation Between Properties and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytuliak, Anastasiia; Godlewska, Elzbieta; Mars, Krzysztof; Berthebaud, David

    2014-10-01

    The crystal structure of Ag-doped Mg2Si was investigated using synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction analysis, including in situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction patterns, recorded during a thermal cycle from room temperature up to 600°C. Rietveld refinement of diffraction patterns indicated that Ag doping results in partial substitution at Si sites. During heating, the Mg2Si lattice parameters exhibited a shift in the temperature dependence at 300°C to 350°C, which was attributed to Ag precipitation out of Mg2Si1- x Ag x solid solution. In turn, an increase of the Ag present in the Mg2Si lattice after 350°C could be linked to thermally activated diffusion of Ag from β-AgMg phase. The Ag-dopant migration may explain previously outlined instabilities in the thermopower of Ag-doped Mg2Si, e.g., the drop of the Seebeck coefficient value after heating to 150°C to 200°C and its subsequent increase after 350°C to 450°C.

  4. The effects of booster vaccination on hepatitis B vaccine in anti-HBs negative infants of HBsAg-positive mothers after primary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hua; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Wei; Lv, Huakun; Cheng, Suyun; Ling, Luoya; Xia, Shichang; Chen, Yongdi

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in anti-HBs IgG levels after booster vaccinations in anti-HBs negative infants of HBsAg-positive mothers. After primary vaccination, the immunization effects of different dosages of booster vaccinations of hepatitis B vaccine (CHO) were compared. A group of 472 newborns were vaccinated with three-dose hepatitis B vaccine at birth, 1 mo and 6 mo of age. Blood serum was collected within 6-12 mo after the third dose, and HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HBc levels were determined. Of this group, 101 infants who were both anti-HBs and HBsAg negative were revaccinated with 20 μg hepatitis B vaccine (CHO), and their antibody titers were monitored. Among these 101 infants, the anti- HBs positive rates (defined as anti-HBs ≥ 100 mIU/ml) differed after the first and the third dose (79% and 90%, respectively (p<0.05), while differences in the corresponding geometric mean titers (GMTs) were not statistically significant (629 ± 3 mIU/ml and 572 ± 3 mIU/ml respectively, p<0.05). The anti-HBs GMTs after booster vaccination were 10-fold larger than those before booster vaccination. We conclude that a single booster dose is generally adequate for infants of HBsAg-positive mothers, whereas a further booster dose should be given for non-responders.

  5. Pore size dependent behavior of hydrated Ag+ ions confined in mesoporous MCM-41 materials under synchrotron X-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kanae; Yoshida, Koji; Kittaka, Shigeharu; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of hydrated Ag+ ions in a 1.5 mol dm(-3) AgNO3 aqueous solution confined in mesoporous silica MCM-41 with different pore sizes was characterized by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The hydrated Ag+ ions are stabilized in 4-fold coordination down to 195 K in the pores (21 Å in diameter), whereas in the larger pores (28 Å) the hydrated Ag+ ions are reduced to Ag0 to form nano clusters with the Ag-Ag interactions of 2.80 Å.

  6. Production of radioactivity in local soil at AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) fast neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gollon, P.J.; Rohrig, N.; Hauptmann, M.G.; McIntyre, K.; Miltenberger, R.; Naidu, J.

    1989-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has constructed a new neutrino production target station at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). A study has been conducted in the vicinity of the old target area to determine the radiological consequences of operating this experimental facility. Results from all areas of the study are presented along with estimates of the potential environmental impact of the old and new facilities. 12 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Run 16 Tandem gold performance in the injectors and possible improvement with AGS type 6:3:1 bunch merge in the Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, Keith

    2016-10-21

    During Run 16 the Tandem was used as the Gold pre-injector for a brief time so that RHIC could continue running while EBIS was down for repairs. Given the time constraints, the setup was largely derived from the EBIS Au setup. The EBIS Au setup used a 4:2:1 bunch merge in the Booster and a 12:6:2 bunch merge in the AGS.1 This note will describe the Tandem Au setup and compare it to that used for EBIS Au. The bunch merge in the Booster for Tandem Au did not work well, and it seems likely that the performance would’ve been significantly better if it did. An AGS type 6:3:1 merge in the Booster is described which might improve matters.2 Somewhat speculative estimates for the AGS bunch intensity and emittance, if that merge were successful in reducing the Booster extraction emittance to EBIS Au levels, are also given for several potential setups. Using 6 Booster loads from the Tandem, the AGS bunch intensity at extraction reached about 2.5e9 ions with a longitudinal emittance (ε) of about 0.59 eV·s/n.3 Using 12 Booster loads from EBIS, the peak bunch intensity and ε was about 3.1e9 ions and 0.75 eV·s/n, respectively. A 6.4 sec supercycle was used for both at the time, but the Tandem Au supercycle (barring any potential issues with Tandem) could probably have been reduced to about 4.6 sec.

  8. Eddy current control in the AGS rapid cycling booster accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.; Spataro, C.

    1994-07-01

    The Booster requires highly variable magnet cycles. When B is large, eddy current induced sextupole, etc., in the dipole vacuum chamber (VC) is large, with a much smaller contribution from magnet ends. Simple passive coils excited automatically by transformer action cancel the B induced sextupole. A self correction coil is not required for the quadrupoles, since B induced aberrations are very small (< 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} at full aperture). Iron magnetization does not produce dipole or quadrupole magnet multipole aberrations, so these magnets have been effectively made independent of unwanted multipoles for all cycles. However, variations in the transfer functions and thus the Booster tune have not been automatically eliminated. Iron magnetization contributions are almost matched, but the B induced field retardation in the dipoles VC is larger than in the quadrupoles. Results of measurements will be presented, plus a simple system to overcome the mismatch and make the tune independent of B. Properties of special lattice magnets and their corrections will also be described.

  9. Eddy current control in the AGS rapid cycling booster accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.; Spataro, C.

    1993-11-01

    The Booster requires highly variable magnet cycles. When B is large, eddy current induced sextupole, etc., in the dipole vacuum chamber (VC) is large, with a much smaller contribution from magnet ends. Simple passive coils excited automatically by transformer action cancel the B induced sextupole. A self correction coil is not required for the quadrupoles, since g induced aberrations are very small (< 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} at full aperture). Iron magnetization does not produce dipole or quadrupole magnet multipole aberrations, so these magnets have been effectively made independent of unwanted multipoles for all cycles. However, variations in the transfer functions and thus the Booster tune have not been automatically eliminated. Iron magnetization contributions are almost matched, but the B induced field retardation in the dipoles VC is larger than in the quadrupoles. Results of measurements will be presented, plus a simple system to overcome the mismatch and make the tune independent of B. Properties of special lattice magnets and their corrections will also be described.

  10. On the polarized beam acceleration in medium energy synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1992-12-31

    This lecture note reviews physics of spin motion in a synchrotron, spin depolarization mechanisms of spin resonances, and methods of overcoming the spin resonances during acceleration. Techniques used in accelerating polarized ions in the low/medium energy synchrotrons, such as the ZGS, the AGS, SATURNE, and the KEK PS and PS Booster are discussed. Problems related to polarized proton acceleration with snakes or partial snake are also examined.

  11. DESIGN OF A THIN QUADRUPOLE TO BE USED IN THE AGS SYNCHROTRON

    SciTech Connect

    TSOUPAS,N.; AHRENS, L.; ALFORQUE, R.; BAI, M.; BROWN, K.; COURANT, E.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) employs two partial helical snakes[l] to preserve the polarization of the proton beam during acceleration. In order to compensate for the focusing effect of the partial helical snakes on the beam optics in the AGS during acceleration of the beam, we introduced eight quadrupoles in straight sections of the AGS at the proximity of the partial snakes. At injection energies, the strength of each quad is set at a high value, and is ramped down to zero as the effect of the snakes diminishes by the square of beam's rigidity. Four of the eight compensation quadrupoles had to be placed in very short straight sections -30 cm in length, therefore the quadruples had be thin with an overall length of less than 30 cm. In this paper we will discus: (a) the mechanical and magnetic specifications of the ''thin'' quadrupole. (b) the method to minimize the strength of the dodecapole harmonic, (c) the method to optimize the thickness of the laminations that the magnet iron is made, (d) mechanical tolerances of the magnet, (e) comparison of the measured and calculated magnetic multipoles of the quadrupole.

  12. Relativistic heavy ions from the BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) booster medical research and technological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.

    1990-05-01

    The BNL Booster, now nearing completion, was designed to inject protons and heavy ions into the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) for further acceleration. In the future, ion beams from the AGS will in turn be further accelerated in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Given the wide range of ion masses, energies and beam intensities the Booster will generate, other important applications should be considered. Dedicated use of the Booster for such applications may be possible during limited periods. However shared use would be preferable from the points of view of availability, affordability and efficiency. While heavy ions of a given isotope are injected into the AGS, the same or other ion species from the Booster could be simultaneously delivered to a new irradiation area for treatment of patients, testing of electronic devices or other applications and research. To generate two different beam species, ion sources on both Tandem accelerators would be used; one for AGS injection and the other one for a time-sharing application. Since the beam transport from the Tandems to the Booster can not be rapidly adjusted, it will be necessary to select beams of identical magnetic rigidity. The present study was performed to determine to what extent this compatibility requirement imposes limitations on the available ion species, energies and/or intensities.

  13. Comparison of the luminescent properties of LuAG:Pr nanopowders, crystals and films using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, V.; Zych, E.; Voznyak, T.; Nizankovskiy, S.; Zorenko, T.; Zorenko, Yu.

    2017-04-01

    Comparison of the luminescent properties of nanopowder, single crystal and single crystalline film of Pr3+ doped Pr-doped Lu3Al5O12 garnet (LuAG:Pr) prepared by the different technological methods is performed in this work using the time-resolved emission spectroscopy under excitation by synchrotron radiation with an energy of 3.7-25 eV at 300 K and 10 K. The notable differences in the properties of the Pr3+ luminescence are observed in LuAG:Pr crystals and films caused by involving the LuAl antisite defects and oxygen vacancies in crystals and Pb2+ flux related dopant in films in the excitation processes of the Pr3+ luminescence. At the same time, we have also found that the influence of host defects on the Pr3+ luminescence is significantly smaller in the LuAG:Pr nanopowders.

  14. Imaging the heterogeneity of mineral surface reactivity using Ag(I) and synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Heald, Steve M.; Russell, Colleen K.

    2003-10-01

    Microscopic-scale imaging of reduced zones on the surfaces of minerals can be achieved by reaction with dilute Ag(I) solutions and subsequent analysis using synchrotron X-ray microscopy (XRM) above the Ag K-edge (25.5 keV). The principal reductant is Fe(II), but other reductants such as sulfide may contribute. Reduced zones may exist instrinsically, as in the structure of biotite and augite, or may be generated by reaction with chemical agents such as dithionite or treatment with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We demonstrate the method on flakes of specular hematite and biotite, as well as on thin sections of different rocks (arfvedsonitic granite, oolitic hematite, diabase, and quartz conglomerate) treated with SRB, and discuss possible artifacts that can occur. To our knowledge, this is the only microscopic technique that can image Fe(II) zones on the surface of an Fe-bearing mineral with monolayer sensitivity.

  15. The Booster Applications Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, David P.

    2001-02-01

    In support of the human exploration program, NASA is providing $33 million to the U.S. Department of Energy to construct a radiation simulator, known as the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The BAF justification is briefly reviewed (e.g., to reduce the radiation risk uncertainties from its present factor of 4 to 15). The BAF beam specifications are provided, as are discussions of the BAF construction schedule and anticipated operating schedules (e.g., initial operation anticipated for October 1, 2002). A breakdown of the BAF construction costs is included and the operating costs are discussed (e.g., $5 to $6 million per year). The BAF laboratory layout and the various types of DOE support for the BAF are summarized, as are the peer reviews of the project. The characteristic parameters of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron are also included. .

  16. Ram booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, Vance D. (Inventor); Morgan, Walter Ray (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is a space launch system and method to propel a payload bearing craft into earth orbit. The invention has two, or preferably, three stages. The upper stage has rocket engines capable of carrying a payload to orbit and provides the capability of releasably attaching to the lower, or preferably, middle stage. Similar to the lower stage, the middle stage is a reusable booster stage that employs all air breathing engines, is recoverable, and can be turned-around in a short time between missions.

  17. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-03-01

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented.

  18. BOOSTER MAIN MAGNET POWER SUPPLY IMPROVEMENTS FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY AT BNL

    SciTech Connect

    MARNERIS,I.BROWN,K.A.GLENN,J.W.MCNERNEY,A., MORRIS, J., SANDBERG,J., SAVATTERI, S.

    2003-05-12

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, under contract from NASA, is a new experimental facility, taking advantage of heavy-ion beams from the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) Booster accelerator, to study radiation effect on humans, for prolonged space missions beyond the protective terrestrial magnetosphere. This paper describes the modifications and operation of the Booster Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) for NSRL applications. The requirement is to run up to 1 sec flattops as high as 5000 Amps with 25% duly cycle. The controls for the Main Magnet Power Supply were modified, including the Booster Main Magnet application program, to enable flattop operation with low ripple and spill control. An active filter (AF) consisting of a {+-}120 volts, {+-}700 Amps power supply transformer coupled through a filter choke, in series with the Main Magnet voltage, was added to the system to enable further ripple reduction during the flattops. We will describe the spill servo system, designed to provide a uniform beam current, during the flattop. Results from system commissioning will be presented.

  19. Matching the BtA line to the bare-AGS (Part 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas,N.; Glenn, J. W.; Huan, H.; MacKay, W. W.; Raparia, D.; Zeno, K.

    2008-11-01

    The Booster to AGS (BtA) transfer line [Ref for BtA line] transports the beam bunches from the AGS-Booster to the AGS synchrotron, and also matches the beam parameters ({beta}{sub x,y}, {alpha}{sub x,y}) and dispersion functions ({eta}{sub x,y}, {eta}{prime}{sub x,y}) of the transported beam to the corresponding quantities of the circulating beam in AGS, at the AGS injection point. In this technical note we describe in details, the calculations of the matching procedure of the BtA line to the bare-AGS, and provide magnet settings for the MAD-model of the BtA transfer line which is 'matched' to the bare-AGS. In a separate but more concise technical note (Part II) we will present results on the beam optics of the BtA beam line which is 'matched' to the AGS with two helical snakes.

  20. History of the ZGS 500 MeV booster.

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.; Martin; R.; Kustom, R.

    2006-05-09

    The history of the design and construction of the Argonne 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron from 1969 to 1982 is described. This accelerator has since been in steady use for the past 25 years to power the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS).

  1. Tracking study of hadron collider boosters

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Huang, Y.; Mahale, N.

    1992-07-01

    A simulation code SIMPSONS (previously called 6D-TEASE T) of single- and multi-particle tracking has been developed for proton synchrotrons. The 6D phase space coordinates are calculated each time step including acceleration with an arbitrary ramping curve by integration of the rf phase. Space-charge effects are modelled by means of the Particle In Cell (PIC) method. We observed the transverse emittance growth around the injection energy of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) with and without second harmonic rf cavities which reduce peak line density. We also employed the code to see the possible transverse emittance deterioration around the transition energy in the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) and to estimate the emittance dilution due to an injection error of the MEB.

  2. Booster separation motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, testing, evaluation and flight qualification of the space shuttle booster separation motor is discussed. Delivery of flight hardware to support the research and development flights of the space shuttle is discussed.

  3. Heavy ion acceleration at the AGS: Present and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is alternating gradient synchrotron, 807 meters in circumference, which was originally designed for only protons. Using the 15 MV Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff as an injector, the AGS started to accelerate heavy ions of mass lighter than sulfur. Because of the relatively poor vacuum (/approximately/10/sup /minus/8/ Torr), the AGS is not able to accelerate heavier ions which could not be fully stripped of electrons at the Tandem energy. When the AGS Booster, which is under construction, is completed the operation will be extended to all species of heavy ions including gold and uranium. Because ultra-high vacuum (/approximately/10/sup /minus/11/ Torr) is planned, the Booster can accelerate partially stripped elements. The operational experience, the parameters, and scheme of heavy ion acceleration will be presented in detail from injection to extraction, as well as future injection into the new Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). A future plan to improve intensity of the accelerator will also be presented. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Commissioning and Early Operation for the NSLS-II Booster RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, C.; Cupolo, J.; Davila, P.; Gao, F.; Goel, A.; Holub, B.; Kulpin, J.; McDonald, K.; Oliva, J.; Papu, J.; Ramirez, G.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Sorrentino, C.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a third generation 3GeV, 500mA synchrotron light source. We discuss the booster synchrotron RF system responsible for providing power to accelerate an electron beam from 200MeV to 3GeV. The RF system design and construction are complete and is currently in the operational phase of the NSLS-II project. Preliminary operational data is also discussed.

  5. Design of the transfer line from booster to storage ring at 3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bayar, C. Ciftci, A. K.

    2016-03-25

    The Synchrotron Booster Ring accelerates the e-beam up to 3 GeV and particles are transported from booster to storage ring by transfer line. In this study, two options are considered, the first one is a long booster which shares the same tunnel with storage ring and the second one is a compact booster. As a result, two transfer line are designed based on booster options. The optical design is constrained by the e-beam Twiss parameters entering and leaving the transfer line. Twiss parameters in the extraction point of booster are used for the entrance of transfer line and are matched in the exit of transfer line to the injection point of the storage ring.

  6. AN UPGRADE OF MAGNET-FIELD-DRIVEN TIMING SYSTEMS AT THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    TIAN, Y.; OERTER, B.

    2005-10-10

    An upgrade of the main magnet-field-driven timing systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and Booster accelerators will be described in this paper. A novel approach using content addressable memory (CAM) is applied to overcome a weakness in the previous systems, which required a reproducible dwell field for proper operation. Upgraded from a multibus-based system to a VME-based system, the new timing system also proves easier to maintain and to diagnose. Details of the system architecture, as well as its application in other timing systems will be discussed.

  7. Booster Interface Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentz, Steve; Wood, Bill; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between shock waves and the wake shed from the forward booster/core attach hardware results in unsteady pressure fluctuations, which can lead to large buffeting loads on the vehicle. This task investigates whether computational tools can adequately predict these flows, and whether alternative booster nose shapes can reduce these loads. Results from wind tunnel tests will be used to validate the computations and provide design information for future Space Launch System (SLS) configurations. The current work combines numerical simulations with wind tunnel testing to predict buffeting loads caused by the boosters. Variations in nosecone shape, similar to the Ariane 5 design (fig. 1), are being evaluated with regard to lowering the buffet loads. The task will provide design information for the mitigation of buffet loads for SLS, along with validated simulation tools to be used to assess future SLS designs.

  8. Solid Rocket Booster Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The towing ship, Liberty, towed a recovered solid rocket booster (SRB) for the STS-3 mission to Port Canaveral, Florida. The recovered SRB would be inspected and refurbished for reuse. The Shuttle's SRB's and solid rocket motors (SRM's) are the largest ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds. The requirement for reusability dictated durable materials and construction to preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. The SRB contains a complete recovery subsystem that includes parachutes, beacons, lights, and tow fixture.

  9. Solid Rocket Booster Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The towing ship, Liberty, towed a recovered solid rocket booster (SRB) for the STS-5 mission to Port Canaveral, Florida. The recovered SRB would be inspected and refurbished for reuse. The Shuttle's SRB's and solid rocket motors (SRM's) are the largest ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds. The requirement for reusability dictated durable materials and construction to preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. The SRB contains a complete recovery subsystem that includes parachutes, beacons, lights, and tow fixture.

  10. Solid Rocket Booster Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The towing ship, Liberty, towed a recovered solid rocket booster (SRB) for the STS-5 mission to Port Canaveral, Florida. The recovered SRB would be inspected and refurbished for reuse. The Shuttle's SRB's and solid rocket motors (SRM's) are the largest ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds. The requirement for reusability dictated durable materials and construction to preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. The SRB contains a complete recovery subsystem that includes parachutes, beacons, lights, and tow fixture.

  11. Solid Rocket Booster Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The towing ship, Liberty, towed a recovered solid rocket booster (SRB) for the STS-3 mission to Port Canaveral, Florida. The recovered SRB would be inspected and refurbished for reuse. The Shuttle's SRB's and solid rocket motors (SRM's) are the largest ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds. The requirement for reusability dictated durable materials and construction to preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. The SRB contains a complete recovery subsystem that includes parachutes, beacons, lights, and tow fixture.

  12. Programmed improvements of the alternating gradient synchrotron complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-01

    The purpose and need for DOE to undertake the actions described in this document are to improve the efficiency of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) complex. Benefits would include optimization of the AGS scientific program, increased high-energy and nuclear physics experimentation, improved health and safety conditions for workers and users, reduced impact on the environment and the general public, energy conservation, decreased generation of hazardous and radioactive wastes, and completion of actions required to permit the AGS to be the injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)., Improved efficiency is defined as increasing the AGS`s capabilities to capture and accelerate the proton intensity transferred to the AGS from the AGS booster. Improved capture of beam intensity would reduce the beam losses which equate to lost scientific opportunity for study and increased potential for radiation doses to workers and the general public. The action would also refurbish magnets used in the transfer tunnel which connects the AGS complex to RHIC to permit smooth injection of beam into the RHIC accelerator. These magnets were previously used to direct beam to fixed targets for high energy physics studies but have hot received proper maintenance to be reliable as injectors to RHIC. The document describes alternative actions, the affected environment, and environmental impacts.

  13. Effects of Booster Scraping in Polarized Proton Runs 2006 and 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,S.Y.; Ahrens, L.; Huang, H.; Zeno, K.

    2009-01-02

    Effects of the Booster vertical scraping on the RHIC beam polarization, the RHIC beam emittance, and on the Booster to AGS transfer efficiency and AGS transmission as well, are further studied. In [1], the strong dependence of the RHIC beam polarization and emittance on bunch intensity in proton run 2008 (pp08) is compared with the proton run 2006 (pp06), where the dependence is much weaker. The setting in the AGS Booster, mainly the vertical scraping, is suspected to having played a role in the different patterns in the two runs. In this note, we further study the effects of the Booster vertical scraping on the RHIC beam polarization, and on the RHIC beam emittance as well. With the improvement of the RHIC bunch intensity in mind, the Booster scraping effects on the Booster to AGS transfer (BtA) efficiency and the AGS transmission are also studied. For simplicity and to be more useful, only the RHIC fills after the one-week shutdown in pp06 and the fills using the AGS User 2 in pp08 are shown. For these fills, the machine settings in AGS are similar in pp06 and pp08 runs. Furthermore, this setting might be used for next polarized proton run, at least at the beginning of the run.

  14. Gullfaks multiphase booster project

    SciTech Connect

    Vangen, G.; Carstensen, C.; Bakken, L.E.

    1995-12-31

    A Poseidon Multiphase Pump has been Installed and is presently running on Statoil`s Gullfaks A platform in the North Sea, giving additional pressure to one of the wells. The main objective of this work has been to qualify the Poseidon Booster Technology, technically and operationally, and to provide a reliable and industrialized tool for multiphase boosting, either sub sea or installed topside a platform. The paper gives a brief summary of the project and describes the Poseidon pump, the platform installation and outlines the experience and results from the ongoing qualification test. The Gullfaks booster, as delivered by Framo Engineering AS, has up to January 1995 accumulated 2,400 running hours. The booster is fully integrated into the production systems on the platform. The daily operations are carried out from the central control room by the ordinary platform staff. The objectives of the test program have so far been successfully fulfilled. Multiphase booster technology combined with progress in multiphase flow technology will have a significant impact on development and production of smaller oil and gas fields that today are assumed to be non-profitable.

  15. Beam Diagnosis and Lattice Modeling of the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2005-09-01

    A realistic lattice model is a fundamental basis for the operation of a synchrotron. In this study various beam-based measurements, including orbit response matrix (ORM) and BPM turn-by-turn data are used to verify and calibrate the lattice model of the Fermilab Booster. In the ORM study, despite the strong correlation between the gradient parameters of adjacent magnets which prevents a full determination of the model parameters, an equivalent lattice model is obtained by imposing appropriate constraints. The fitted gradient errors of the focusing magnets are within the design tolerance and the results point to the orbit offsets in the sextupole field as the source of gradient errors. A new method, the independent component analysis (ICA) is introduced to analyze multiple BPM turn-by-turn data taken simultaneously around a synchrotron. This method makes use of the redundancy of the data and the time correlation of the source signals to isolate various components, such as betatron motion and synchrotron motion, from raw BPM data. By extracting clean coherent betatron motion from noisy data and separates out the betatron normal modes when there is linear coupling, the ICA method provides a convenient means to measure the beta functions and betatron phase advances. It also separates synchrotron motion from the BPM samples for dispersion function measurement. The ICA method has the capability to separate other perturbation signals and is robust over the contamination of bad BPMs. The application of the ICA method to the Booster has enabled the measurement of the linear lattice functions which are used to verify the existing lattice model. The transverse impedance and chromaticity are measured from turn-by-turn data using high precision tune measurements. Synchrotron motion is also observed in the BPM data. The emittance growth of the Booster is also studied by data taken with ion profile monitor (IPM). Sources of emittance growth are examined and an approach to cure

  16. HIGH INTENSITY BEAM OPERATION OF THE BROOKHAVEN AGS

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    1999-06-28

    For the last few years the Brookhaven AGS has operated at record proton intensities. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of several high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the AGS Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. The intensity is presently limited by space charge effects at both Booster and AGS injection and transverse instabilities in the AGS.

  17. Factors Affecting Booster Seat Use.

    PubMed

    Aita-Levy, Jerussa; Henderson, Lauren

    2016-10-01

    Objective To identify general awareness of booster seats as well as reasons for use and nonuse in an urban pediatric emergency room. Methods A total of 100 questionnaires were completed consisting of 24 questions each. Questions included knowledge of booster seat guidelines, source of knowledge, awareness of risks, and confidence in booster seats. Afterward, participants were provided an educational handout. Results Majority of parents reported currently using or having used a booster seat. The most popular reason was to protect from injury (78%), and reason for nonuse was size (44%). Majority of parents agreed that motor vehicle crashes were the leading cause of death in children. However, 56% of parents prematurely transitioned child out of a booster seat. Only 20% reported learning about booster seats from their pediatrician. Conclusion Parents continue to transition their children prematurely from booster seats. Current state laws need revision as well as further education using simplified illustrated guidelines. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Operando Synchrotron XRD Investigation of Silver Metal Formation upon Electrochemical Reduction of Silver Iron Pyrophosphate (Ag7Fe3(P2O7)4)

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yiman; Kirshenbaum, Kevin C.; Marschilok, Amy C.; ...

    2017-05-11

    The formation of conductive metallic silver upon electrochemical reduction and lithiation of Ag7Fe3(P2O7)4 is investigated. Alternating current impedance spectroscopy measurements show a 34% decrease in charge transfer resistance upon one electron equivalent (ee) of reduction, which is coincident with the formation of a Ag metal conductive network evidenced by both ex situ and operando X-ray diffraction. Quantitative assessment of Ag metal formation derived from operando XRD shows that only Ag+ ions are reduced during the first 3ee, followed by simultaneous reduction of Ag+ and Fe3+ reduction for the next 5ee (3ee to 8ee), culminating in reduction of the remaining Ag+.more » Scanning electron microscopy images show smaller Ag metal crystallite size and shorter nearest neighbor distance between and among Ag particles with higher depth of discharge. A high rate intermittent pulsatile discharge test is conducted where the cell delivers 12 total pulses during full discharge to probe the effect of Ag metal formation on the Li/Ag7Fe3(P2O7)4 cell electrochemistry. The Ohmic resistance is derived from the voltage drop of each pulse. The resistance is 65 Ω initially, reaches its minimum of 26 Ω at 4.5 ee discharge, and levels off at 35 Ω after 7.0 ee reduction. In conclusion, the initial Ag reduction is more significant for the conductive network formation indicated by the decrease of both Rct and Ohmic resistance, which facilitates the high power output of the cell.« less

  19. Atomic nature of the Schottky barrier height formation of the Ag/GaAs(001)-2 × 4 interface: An in-situ synchrotron radiation photoemission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Chen, Wan-Sin; Lin, Keng-Yung; Wei, Guo-Jhen; Cheng, Yi-Ting; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Wan, Hsien-Wen; Pi, Tun-Wen; Tung, Raymond T.; Kwo, Jueinai; Hong, Minghwei

    2017-01-01

    The Interface of Ag with p-type α2 GaAs(001)-2 × 4 has been studied to further understand the formation mechanism of the Schottky barrier height (SBH). In the initial phase of Ag deposition, high-resolution core-level data show that Ag adatoms effectively passivate the surface As-As dimers without breaking them apart. The Ag(+)-As(-) dipoles are thus generated with a maximal potential energy of 0.26 eV; a SBH of 0.38 eV was measured. Greater Ag coverage causes elemental segregation of As/Ga atoms, reversing the direction of the net dipole. The band bending effect near the interface shows a downward shift of 0.08 eV, and the final SBH is similar to the value as measured at the initial Ag deposition. Both parameters are secured at 0.25 Å of Ag thickness prior to the observation of metallic behavior of Ag. Inadequacy of the metal-induced gap-state model for explaining SBH is evident.

  20. Synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamed of just a decade or so ago. Here we will discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others.

  1. Booster dose vaccination for preventing hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Poorolajal, Jalal; Hooshmand, Elham

    2016-06-07

    Antibodies against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) wane over time following hepatitis B immunisation; hence, it is unclear whether people vaccinated in three-dose or four-dose schedules of the hepatitis B vaccine are still immune when the hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) level in their body is undetectable, or lower than the level usually considered protective. This question may potentially be answered indirectly by measuring the anamnestic immune response to a booster dose of vaccine. The term 'booster' (or revaccination) refers to an additional dose of hepatitis B vaccine (HBV) given some time post-primary vaccination to induce immune memory and improve protection against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. To assess the benefits and harms of booster dose hepatitis B vaccination, more than five years after the primary vaccination, for preventing HBV infection in healthy individuals previously vaccinated with the hepatitis B vaccine, and with hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) levels below 10 mIU/mL. We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, conference databases, and reference lists of articles to January 2016. We also contacted authors of articles. In addition, we searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials (May 2016). Randomised clinical trials addressing anamnestic immune response to a booster dose of hepatitis B vaccine, more than five years after the primary vaccination, in apparently healthy participants, vaccinated in a three-dose or four-dose schedule of the hepatitis B vaccine during the primary vaccination, without receiving an additional dose or immunoglobulin. Both review authors decided if the identified studies met the inclusion criteria or not. Primary outcomes included the proportion of participants

  2. Synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Craievich, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Several developed countries such as the USA, URSS, England, France, Italy, Sweden and Japan have one or more of these synchrotron light facilities operating or under construction. Some developing countries have constructed (China) or are building (Taiwan, India, Korea, Brazil) synchrotron light facilities. The construction of the Brazilian synchrotron source began in June, 1987. After two years of activities, the injector linac for the electron storage ring is in its final stage of construction. These Proceedings contain the Invited Lectures presented at the Workshop by specialists working on synchrotron light applications and related instrumentation and by members of LNLS regarding technical details of the Brazilian project. The II Workshop Synchrotron Light: Applications and Related Instrumentation was dedicated to oral presentations about applications of synchrotron light, most of which were not covered during the I Workshop, organized by LNLS in 1988, and the Proceedings of which were published by World Scientific. The II Workshop included discussions on the application possibilities for the newly designed LNLS 1.15 GeV storage ring, and on the modifications which would eventually be necessary for the work-station and instrumentation projects currently in progress at LNLS and at various external user laboratories.

  3. Mysterious dipole synchrotron oscillations during and after adiabatic capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    Strong synchrotron oscillations were observed during and after the 2.5-MHz rf adiabatic capture of a debunched booster batch in the Main Injector. Analysis shows two possible sources for the synchrotron oscillations. One is the frequency drift of the 2.5-MHz rf after the turning off of the 53-MHz rf voltage, thus resulting in an energy mismatch with the debunched beam. The second source is the energy mismatch of the injected booster beam with the frequency of the 53-MHz rf. We have been able to rule out the first possibility.

  4. Booster biocides and microfouling.

    PubMed

    Faÿ, Fabienne; Linossier, Isabelle; Carteau, David; Dheilly, Alexandra; Silkina, Alla; Vallée-Rééhel, Karine

    2010-10-01

    Antifouling (AF) paints are used to prevent the attachment of living organisms to the submerged surfaces of ships, boats and aquatic structures, usually by the release of biocides. Apart from copper, organic booster biocides are the main active components in AF paints, but their use can have a negative impact on the marine environment. The direct effects of biocides on marine bacteria are poorly known. This work investigates the impact of two biocides, viz. diuron and tolylfluanid, on the growth and the viability of marine microorganisms and on their ability to form biofilms. The biocides in solution were found to inhibit growth of two strains of marine bacteria, viz. Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio vulnificus, at a high concentration (1000 microg ml(-1)), but only a small effect on viability was observed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that the booster biocides decreased biofilm formation by both bacteria. At a concentration of 10 microg ml(-1), the biocides inhibited cell attachment and reduced biofilm thickness on glass surfaces. The percentage of live cells in the biofilms was also reduced. The effect of the biocides on two diatoms, Fragilaria pinnata and Cylindrotheca closterium, was also evaluated in terms of growth rate, biomass, chlorophyll a content and attachment to glass. The results demonstrate that diuron and tolylfluanid are more active against diatoms than bacteria.

  5. Status of SESAME Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarawneh, Hamed

    2013-04-01

    During this presentation, I will talk about the current status of the SESAME synchrotron radiation source (SESAME: Synchrotron light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East). SESAME is an international research center located in Allan, Jordan and the accelerator complex consists of new storage ring of an energy of 2.5 GeV injected at 800 MeV and the injector is based on the upgraded 22.5 MeV Microtron and 800 MeV booster from the BESSY-I machine donated by Germany. The results of the design work and the optimizations of the beam optics for the SESAME storage ring and booster accelerators' lattices will be presented. I will also report on the status of the storage ring main sub-systems and the scientific case of the SESAME facility with the planned day-one beamlines.

  6. Design and Evaluation of a Clock Multiplexing Circuit for the SSRL Booster Accelerator Timing System - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, Million

    2015-08-25

    SPEAR3 is a 234 m circular storage ring at SLAC’s synchrotron radiation facility (SSRL) in which a 3 GeV electron beam is stored for user access. Typically the electron beam decays with a time constant of approximately 10hr due to electron lose. In order to replenish the lost electrons, a booster synchrotron is used to accelerate fresh electrons up to 3GeV for injection into SPEAR3. In order to maintain a constant electron beam current of 500mA, the injection process occurs at 5 minute intervals. At these times the booster synchrotron accelerates electrons for injection at a 10Hz rate. A 10Hz 'injection ready' clock pulse train is generated when the booster synchrotron is operating. Between injection intervalswhere the booster is not running and hence the 10 Hz ‘injection ready’ signal is not present-a 10Hz clock is derived from the power line supplied by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) to keep track of the injection timing. For this project I constructed a multiplexing circuit to 'switch' between the booster synchrotron 'injection ready' clock signal and PG&E based clock signal. The circuit uses digital IC components and is capable of making glitch-free transitions between the two clocks. This report details construction of a prototype multiplexing circuit including test results and suggests improvement opportunities for the final design.

  7. Design and Evaluation of a Clock Multiplexing Circuit for the SSRL Booster Accelerator Timing System - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, Million

    2015-08-21

    SPEAR3 is a 234 m circular storage ring at SLAC’s synchrotron radiation facility (SSRL) in which a 3 GeV electron beam is stored for user access. Typically the electron beam decays with a time constant of approximately 10hr due to electron lose. In order to replenish the lost electrons, a booster synchrotron is used to accelerate fresh electrons up to 3GeV for injection into SPEAR3. In order to maintain a constant electron beam current of 500mA, the injection process occurs at 5 minute intervals. At these times the booster synchrotron accelerates electrons for injection at a 10Hz rate. A 10Hz 'injection ready' clock pulse train is generated when the booster synchrotron is operating. Between injection intervals-where the booster is not running and hence the 10 Hz ‘injection ready’ signal is not present-a 10Hz clock is derived from the power line supplied by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) to keep track of the injection timing. For this project I constructed a multiplexing circuit to 'switch' between the booster synchrotron 'injection ready' clock signal and PG&E based clock signal. The circuit uses digital IC components and is capable of making glitch-free transitions between the two clocks. This report details construction of a prototype multiplexing circuit including test results and suggests improvement opportunities for the final design.

  8. Induction synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Ken; Kishiro, Junichi

    2000-08-01

    A novel proton synchrotron employing induction cells instead of radio frequency cavities is proposed. The major feature of the barrier bucket acceleration, where acceleration and longitudinal focusing are independently achieved is theoretically discussed with the help of multi-particle simulations. It is proved that barrier bucket acceleration allows ultimate use of longitudinal phase-space and is quite effective to substantially increase the beam intensity in synchrotrons. Engineering aspects of key devices to realize the novel synchrotron, a ferri/ferro-magnetic material loaded induction cell and a modulator being rapidly switched in synchronization with beam acceleration are described in detail. The idea is applied to an existing machine (the KEK 12 GeV-PS) and high-intensity proton rings such as JHF, ESS, and SNS and their predicted improvement in machine performance is given with numerical values for each case.

  9. OCO-2 Booster Offload

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-20

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Workers secure the Delta first-stage booster for NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, or OCO-2, onto a transportation hardware cradle in the Building 836 hangar at Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. OCO-2 is scheduled to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket in July. The observatory will collect precise global measurements of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere and provide scientists with a better idea of the chemical compound's impacts on climate change. Scientists will analyze this data to improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that regulate the abundance and distribution of this important atmospheric gas. To learn more about OCO-2, visit http://oco.jpl.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

  10. OCO-2 Booster Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-20

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – A worker surveys the Delta first-stage booster for NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, or OCO-2, secured in a transportation hardware cradle, that he delivered to the Horizontal Processing Facility at Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. OCO-2 is scheduled to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket in July. The observatory will collect precise global measurements of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere and provide scientists with a better idea of the chemical compound's impacts on climate change. Scientists will analyze this data to improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that regulate the abundance and distribution of this important atmospheric gas. To learn more about OCO-2, visit http://oco.jpl.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

  11. OCO-2 Booster Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-20

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – The Delta first-stage booster for NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, or OCO-2, secured in a transportation hardware cradle, is towed to the Horizontal Processing Facility at Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. OCO-2 is scheduled to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket in July. The observatory will collect precise global measurements of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere and provide scientists with a better idea of the chemical compound's impacts on climate change. Scientists will analyze this data to improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that regulate the abundance and distribution of this important atmospheric gas. To learn more about OCO-2, visit http://oco.jpl.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

  12. OCO-2 Booster Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-20

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – The Delta first-stage booster for NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, or OCO-2, is towed to the Horizontal Processing Facility at Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. OCO-2 is scheduled to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket in July. The observatory will collect precise global measurements of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere and provide scientists with a better idea of the chemical compound's impacts on climate change. Scientists will analyze this data to improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that regulate the abundance and distribution of this important atmospheric gas. To learn more about OCO-2, visit http://oco.jpl.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

  13. OCO-2 Booster Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-20

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – The Delta first-stage booster for NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, or OCO-2, arrives at the Horizontal Processing Facility at Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. OCO-2 is scheduled to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket in July. The observatory will collect precise global measurements of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere and provide scientists with a better idea of the chemical compound's impacts on climate change. Scientists will analyze this data to improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that regulate the abundance and distribution of this important atmospheric gas. To learn more about OCO-2, visit http://oco.jpl.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

  14. OCO-2 Booster Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-20

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – A worker maneuvers the transporter towing the Delta first-stage booster for NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, or OCO-2, at the Horizontal Processing Facility at Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. OCO-2 is scheduled to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket in July. The observatory will collect precise global measurements of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere and provide scientists with a better idea of the chemical compound's impacts on climate change. Scientists will analyze this data to improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that regulate the abundance and distribution of this important atmospheric gas. To learn more about OCO-2, visit http://oco.jpl.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

  15. FFAG ACCELERATOR AS A NEW INJECTOR FOR THE BNL-AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO, A.G.

    2004-10-13

    It has been proposed recently to upgrade the Alternating-Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to an average proton beam power of one MWatt at the top energy of 28 GeV. This is to be accomplished primarily by raising the AGS repetition rate from the present {approx} 1/3 to 2.5 pulses per second, and by a relatively modest increase of beam intensity from the present 0.7 to about 1.0 x 10{sup 14} protons per cycle. The present injector, the 1.5 GeV Booster, has a circumference a quarter of that of the AGS, and four successive beam pulses are required for a complete fill of the AGS. The filling time at injection is thus at least 0.5 seconds, and it ought to be eliminated if one desires to shorten the AGS cycle period. Moreover, holding the beam for such a long period of time during injection causes its quality to deteriorate and beam losses. This report is the summary of the results of a feasibility study of a 1.5 GeV Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator as a new possible injection to the AGS.

  16. Space charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Mahale, N.K.; Mehta, N.; Pilat, F.; Talman, R.; York, R.C.

    1991-05-01

    By means of multi-particle tracking, we explore space charge effects in the Low Energy Booster (LEB) which has a strong requirement for small transverse emittance. Macro-particles are tracked in a self-consistent manner in six dimensional phase space with transverse space charge kicks so that the emittance evolution as well as the particle distribution are simulated as a function of time. Among recent improvements of the code, the longitudinal motion, i.e. synchrotron oscillations as well as acceleration, makes it possible to simulate the capture process of linac microbunches. The code was calibrated by comparing with the experimental results at the Fermilab Booster. Preliminary results of the LEB show slow emittance growth due to the space charge. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Booster rocket range safety system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renzi, John R.

    1992-06-01

    In response to an abort command, fragmentation of a propellant booster rocket carried on a missile is limited by positioning of annular shaped charges at axially spaced locations on the outer shell of the booster rocket. Detonation of the charges thereby severs an intermediate section of the rocket from forward and aft sections which remain attached to the missile. The intermediate section is separated from the missile by such severing action to prevent further fragmenting forces from being imparted thereto.

  18. Status of the AGC Booster project

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    To meet the needs of new experiments in high energy and nuclear physics, a rapid-cycling Booster for the AGS has been under construction at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues that need special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. And finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The conceptual design of a new transfer line from booster to recycler for the Fermilab Proton plan phase 2 campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Xiao, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Upon the termination of the Fermilab Collider program, the current Recycler anti-proton storage ring (RR) will be converted to a proton pre-injector for the Main Injector (MI) synchrotron. This is scheduled to increase the beam power for the 120 GeV Neutrino program to upwards of 700KW. A transport line that can provide direct injection from the Booster to the Recycler while preserving direct injection from the Booster into the Main Injector and the 8 GeV Booster Neutrino program will be discussed, and its concept design will be presented.

  20. Integrable RCS as a proposed replacement for Fermilab Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Valishev, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Integrable optics is an innovation in particle accelerator design that potentially enables a greater betatron tune spread and damps collective instabilities. An integrable rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS) would be an effective replacement for the Fermilab Booster, as part of a plan to reach multi-MW beam power at 120 GeV for the Fermilab high-energy neutrino program. We provide an example integrable lattice with features of a modern RCS - dispersion-free drifts, low momentum compaction factor, superperiodicity, chromaticity correction, bounded beta functions, and separate-function magnets.

  1. Solid Rocket Booster-Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This illustration is a cutaway of the solid rocket booster (SRB) sections with callouts. The Shuttle's two SRB's are the largest solids ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds, augmenting the Shuttle's main propulsion system during liftoff. The major design drivers for the solid rocket motors (SRM's) were high thrust and reuse. The desired thrust was achieved by using state-of-the-art solid propellant and by using a long cylindrical motor with a specific core design that allows the propellant to burn in a carefully controlled marner. At burnout, the boosters separate from the external tank and drop by parachute to the ocean for recovery and subsequent refurbishment. The boosters are designed to survive water impact at almost 60 miles per hour, maintain flotation with minimal damage, and preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. Under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the SRB's are assembled and refurbished by the United Space Boosters. The SRM's are provided by the Morton Thiokol Corporation.

  2. Fibroma induction in rat skin following single or multiple doses of 1.0 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions from the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. J.; Zhao, P.; Xu, G.; Roy, N.; Loomis, C.

    2001-01-01

    Rat skin was exposed to the plateau region of the 1.0 GeV/nucleon 56Fe beam at the Brookhaven AGS. Rats were irradiated or not with single of split doses of 56Fe or argon; some 56Fe-exposed rats were fed 250 ppm retinyl acetate continuously in the lab chow beginning 1 week before irradiation. All lesions were noted, photographed and identified for eventual histological diagnosis. The preponderance of the tumors so far are fibromas. The data show that single doses of 56Fe ions are 2 or 3 fold more effective than argon in producing tumors at 4.5 Gy but are about equally effective at 3.0 Gy and 9.0 Gy. The presence of 250 ppm retinyl acetate in the lab chow reduced the incidence of tumors by about 50-60% in comparison to groups exposed only to the radiation. These are preliminary findings based on only about one-fourth the eventual number of tumors expected.

  3. Fibroma induction in rat skin following single or multiple doses of 1.0 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions from the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. J.; Zhao, P.; Xu, G.; Roy, N.; Loomis, C.

    2001-01-01

    Rat skin was exposed to the plateau region of the 1.0 GeV/nucleon 56Fe beam at the Brookhaven AGS. Rats were irradiated or not with single of split doses of 56Fe or argon; some 56Fe-exposed rats were fed 250 ppm retinyl acetate continuously in the lab chow beginning 1 week before irradiation. All lesions were noted, photographed and identified for eventual histological diagnosis. The preponderance of the tumors so far are fibromas. The data show that single doses of 56Fe ions are 2 or 3 fold more effective than argon in producing tumors at 4.5 Gy but are about equally effective at 3.0 Gy and 9.0 Gy. The presence of 250 ppm retinyl acetate in the lab chow reduced the incidence of tumors by about 50-60% in comparison to groups exposed only to the radiation. These are preliminary findings based on only about one-fourth the eventual number of tumors expected.

  4. Booster Applications Facility report, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes studies and planning performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) personnel at the request of NASA for the design, construction and operation of experimental areas and facilities for utilization of ion beams from the BNL Booster synchrotron particle accelerator. These facilities would be primarily utilized to simulate space radiation for radiobiological research, shielding studies and detector calibrations. The feasibility of such a project has been established, preliminary designs and cost estimates have been developed and a formal proposal can be submitted pending DOE concurrence. The main body of this report consists of the material presented by BNL during the meeting with a NASA appointed Panel on December 10 and 11, 1990. The individual speakers have provided brief summaries of their talks and explanations of their figures. In addition there are two appendices. One, contains detailed discussion of the shared mode of operation and the corresponding beam compatibility tables. The second appendix contains cost estimate details. An executive summary on budgets and schedules has been added, containing possible phased construction and outfitting scenarios and the corresponding expense and commitment profiles as well as new operational cost estimates. Material contained in the executive summary reflects the correction of some errors and new studies performed in response to the NASA Panel suggestions.

  5. Booster Applications Facility report, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes studies and planning performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) personnel at the request of NASA for the design, construction and operation of experimental areas and facilities for utilization of ion beams from the BNL Booster synchrotron particle accelerator. These facilities would be primarily utilized to simulate space radiation for radiobiological research, shielding studies and detector calibrations. The feasibility of such a project has been established, preliminary designs and cost estimates have been developed and a formal proposal can be submitted pending DOE concurrence. The main body of this report consists of the material presented by BNL during the meeting with a NASA appointed Panel on December 10 and 11, 1990. The individual speakers have provided brief summaries of their talks and explanations of their figures. In addition there are two appendices. One, contains detailed discussion of the shared mode of operation and the corresponding beam compatibility tables. The second appendix contains cost estimate details. An executive summary on budgets and schedules has been added, containing possible phased construction and outfitting scenarios and the corresponding expense and commitment profiles as well as new operational cost estimates. Material contained in the executive summary reflects the correction of some errors and new studies performed in response to the NASA Panel suggestions.

  6. Booster Applications Facility report, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieberger, P.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes studies and planning performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) personnel at the request of NASA for the design, construction and operation of experimental areas and facilities for utilization of ion beams from the BNL Booster synchrotron particle accelerator. These facilities would be primarily utilized to simulate space radiation for radiobiological research, shielding studies and detector calibrations. The feasibility of such a project has been established, preliminary designs and cost estimates have been developed and a formal proposal can be submitted pending DOE concurrence. The main body of this report consists of the material presented by BNL during the meeting with a NASA appointed Panel on December 10 and 11, 1990. The individual speakers have provided brief summaries of their talks and explanations of their figures. In addition there are two appendices. One, contains detailed discussion of the shared mode of operation and the corresponding beam compatibility tables. The second appendix contains cost estimate details. An executive summary on budgets and schedules has been added, containing possible phased construction and outfitting scenarios and the corresponding expense and commitment profiles as well as new operational cost estimates. Material contained in the executive summary reflects the correction of some errors and new studies performed in response to the NASA Panel suggestions.

  7. Integrated Booster-Rocket Propulsion Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Russell E.; Dickinson, William J.; Wong, George S.; Waldrop, Glen

    1994-01-01

    Report summarizes study of conceptual integrated booster propulsion module for use in launching spacecraft. Substitution of integrated propulsion modules for multiple engines of present booster rockets intended to simplify ground operations and reduce costs.

  8. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  9. A rookie's guide to Booster operations. Booster technical note no. 231

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    1998-09-29

    The purpose of the Booster is to act as an injector for the AGS. It accelerates both protons and other ions. Proton acceleration is distinguished from the acceleration of other ions for several reasons. First, the experimental physics associated with protons, called High Energy Physics is different than that associated with other Ions, called Heavy Ion Physics. From the machine perspective, the process of injection of so called Heavy Ions (ions which are not protons), is distinctly different, from that of protons. A different preinjector, or injector for the Booster, is used for each case. For Protons, a 200 MeV Linear accelerator (The Linac) serves as a preinjector; for Heavy Ions, the Tandem Van De Graaf (The Tandem) is the preinjector. An attribute of the circulating beam which determines to a large degree what problems and what type of machine setup is involved is the beam intensity. The author's focus in this guide is on trying to convey the knowledge and experience involved in the operation of the Booster. Many of the problems encountered can be traced back to equipment failures, often power supplies. Although diagnostics are used, there can also be issues with the controls system itself. Problems with the controls system and prevent fixing or even finding a problem with a machine. The issue of improving a machines' performance can often involve trial and error and observations. The hard part is finding the relationships between things in the day to day operation of the machine. Abstractions about physics, information about controls and instrumentation, and purely empirical observations of how the machine behaves are all part of it.

  10. 47 CFR 22.527 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal boosters. 22.527 Section 22.527... Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.527 Signal boosters. Licensees may install and operate signal boosters on channels listed in § 22.531 only in accordance with the provisions of § 22.165 governing...

  11. 47 CFR 22.527 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Signal boosters. 22.527 Section 22.527... Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.527 Signal boosters. Licensees may install and operate signal... additional transmitters for existing systems. Licensees must not allow any signal booster that they operate...

  12. 47 CFR 22.527 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Signal boosters. 22.527 Section 22.527... Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.527 Signal boosters. Licensees may install and operate signal... additional transmitters for existing systems. Licensees must not allow any signal booster that they operate...

  13. 47 CFR 22.527 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Signal boosters. 22.527 Section 22.527... Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.527 Signal boosters. Licensees may install and operate signal... additional transmitters for existing systems. Licensees must not allow any signal booster that they operate...

  14. 47 CFR 22.527 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signal boosters. 22.527 Section 22.527... Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.527 Signal boosters. Licensees may install and operate signal... additional transmitters for existing systems. Licensees must not allow any signal booster that they operate...

  15. 47 CFR 20.21 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CMRS spectrum bands. (8) Wideband Consumer Signal Boosters. A Wideband Consumer Signal Booster will... uplink mid-band frequency of the supported spectrum bands in MHz. (ii) Mobile booster maximum noise power... prohibited. Spectrum block filtering may be used provided the uplink filter attenuation is not less than...

  16. Fox-7 for Insensitive Boosters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Sensitivity RDX. Current research interests include the characterisation of multiphase blast explosives, and the effect of ageing on properties of...momentum. Rounding of this nature is highly desirable in terms of both compaction and flow properties. Application of continuous ultrasound with...1989) An Evaluation of Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Copolymers as Desensitizers for RDX in Insensitive Booster Compositions Prepared by Slurry Coating

  17. The linac and booster RF systems for a dedicated injector for SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.N.; Baird, S., Baltay, M.; Borland, M.; Nuhn, H.D.; Safranek, J.; Chavis, C.; Emery, L.; Genin, R.D.; Hettel, R.; Morales, H.; Sebek, J.; Voss, J.; Wang, H.; Wiedemann, H.; Youngmann, B. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Miller, R.H. )

    1991-05-01

    A 120 MeV, 2856 MHz, TW linac, with a microwave gun, alpha magnet, and chopper, has been built at SSRL as a preinjector for and along with a 3 GeV booster synchrotron ring. The resulting injector will be available on demand to fill SPEAR, which is a storage ring now dedicated to synchrotron light production. The linac sections were purchased from China, the XK-5 klystrons were obtained surplus from SLAC, the modulators are a variation on those at SLAC and were built by SSRL, the alpha magnet and chopper were designed and built at SSRL and the microwave gun was designed and built in collaboration with Varian Associates. The rf system for the booster ring is similar to those at SPEAR and PEP and was built by SSRL. Some of the interesting mechanical and electrical details are discussed and the operating characteristics of the linac and ring rf system are highlighted. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Synchronization of the Fermilab Booster and Main Injector for multiple batch injection

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Zwaska et al.

    2004-07-09

    To date, the 120 GeV Fermilab Main Injector accelerator has accelerated a single batch of protons from the 8 GeV rapid-cycling Booster synchrotron for production of antiprotons for Run II. In the future, the Main Injector must accelerate 6 or more Booster batches simultaneously; the first will be extracted to the antiproton source, while the remaining are extracted for the NuMI/MINOS (Neutrinos at the Main Injector/Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) neutrino experiment. Performing this multi-batch operation while avoiding unacceptable radioactivation of the beamlines requires a previously unnecessary synchronization between the accelerators. We describe a mechanism and present results of advancing or retarding the longitudinal progress of the Booster beam by active feedback radial manipulation of the beam during the acceleration period.

  19. System overview for the multi-element corrector magnets and controls for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Drennan, C.; Ball, M.; Franck, A.R.; Harding, D.J.; Kasley, P.A.; Krafczyk, G.E.; Kucera, M.J.; Lackey, J.; McArthur, D.; Misek, J.; Pellico, W.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    To better control the beam position, tune, and chromaticity in the Fermilab Booster synchrotron, a new package of six corrector elements has been designed, incorporating both normal and skew orientations of dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets. The devices are under construction and will be installed in 48 locations in the Booster accelerator. Each of these 288 corrector magnets will be individually powered. Each of the magnets will be individually controlled using operator programmed current ramps designed specifically for each type of Booster acceleration cycle. This paper provides an overview of the corrector magnet installation in the accelerator enclosure, power and sensor interconnections, specifications for the switch-mode power supplies, rack and equipment layouts, controls and interlock electronics, and the features of the operator interface for programming the current ramps and adjusting the timing of the system triggers.

  20. Model Calibration and Optics Correction Using Orbit Response Matrix in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.A.; Prebys, E.; Petrenko, A.V.; Kopp, S.E.; McAteer, M.J.; /Texas U.

    2012-05-01

    We have calibrated the lattice model and measured the beta and dispersion functions in Fermilab's fast-ramping Booster synchrotron using the Linear Optics from Closed Orbit (LOCO) method. We used the calibrated model to implement ramped coupling, dispersion, and beta-beating corrections throughout the acceleration cycle, reducing horizontal beta beating from its initial magnitude of {approx}30% to {approx}10%, and essentially eliminating vertical beta-beating and transverse coupling.

  1. Adolescent booster with hepatitis B virus vaccines decreases HBV infection in high-risk adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuting; Chen, Taoyang; Lu, Ling-Ling; Wang, Minjie; Wang, Dongmei; Yao, Hongyu; Fan, Chunsun; Qi, Jun; Zhang, Yawei; Qu, Chunfeng

    2017-02-15

    Neutralizing antibodies (anti-HBs) after immunization with hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines against HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) wane after 10-15years. We analyzed the effect of an adolescent booster given to vaccination-protected children born to mothers with different HBsAg-carrying status against HBV infection in their mature adulthood. A total of 9793 individuals, who were HBsAg-negative at childhood (baseline) and donated blood samples, both during childhood and adulthood, from the vaccination group in "Qidong Hepatitis B Intervention Study", were enrolled. Among them 7414 received a one-dose, 10μg-recombinant HBV vaccine booster at 10-14years of age. At endpoint (23-28years of age), we determined the HBV serological markers and quantified their serum HBV-DNA in each of the chronic HBV-infected adults. Fifty-seven adults were identified as chronic HBV infection, indicated by HBsAg(+)&anti-HBc(+) for more than 6months. The individuals who were born to HBsAg-positive mothers (high-risk adults) had significantly increased risk of developing chronic HBV infections in adulthood compared with those who were born to HBsAg-negative mothers; the adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 12.56, 95%CI:7.14-22.08. The seronegative status of anti-HBs at 10-11years of age significantly increased the risk of HBV infections among the high-risk adults. When HBsAg(-)&anti-HBc(+) children who were born to HBsAg-positive mothers 70% of them remained as the status and 10% of them developed HBsAg(+)&anti-HBc(+). While when they were born to HBsAg-negative mothers 1.05% HBsAg(-)&anti-HBc(+) children developed HBsAg(+)&anti-HBc(+) and 24.74% of them remained as the status in 12-18years. One dose of adolescent booster showed significant protection on high-risk adults from chronic HBV infection; P for trend was 0.015. Maternal HBsAg-positive status was an independent risk factor for vaccination-protected children to develop HBV breakthrough infection in adulthood. Adolescent boosters might be

  2. Booster aerodynamic heating: Test support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, C. D.; Reardon, J. E.; Fuller, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    Several technical areas were encompassed in providing support for booster thermal environment test work. These areas included: (1) cavity flow heating, (2) rarefied flow heating, and (3) impulse operated model research and testing. Cavity flow heating problems were studied with respect to the proposed altitude control motors for the space shuttle. Available literature on this subject was reviewed and analytical predictive methods were summarized for use in planning testing work. Rarefied flow heating data was reviewed and correlated. The study showed the importance of considering rarefied flow conditions in launch thermal environment prediction. Impulse operated model research and testing was conducted to provide a basis for understanding and designing such models for booster thermal environment testing.

  3. Conceptual design of the Argonne 6-GeV synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Khoe, T.; Knott, M.; Kramer, S.; Kustom, R.; Lari, R.; Martin, R.; Mavrogenes, G.; Moenich, J.

    1985-10-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 X 10/sup -9/ m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different rf systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. The higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target.

  4. Rf power systems for the national synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, T.; Rheaume, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The booster synchrotron and the two storage rings at the NSLS are provided with rf power systems of 3 kW, 50 kW, and 500 kW nominal output power, all at 53 MHz. This power is supplied by grounded grid tetrode amplifiers designed for television broadcast service. These amplifiers and associated power supplies, control and interlock systems, rf controls, and computer interface are described.

  5. Physical design study of the CEPC booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang

    2016-09-01

    A physical design study of the Circular Electron-Positron Collider (CEPC) booster is reported. The booster provides 120 GeV electron and positron beams for the CEPC collider with top-up injection. The booster is mounted above the collider in the same tunnel. To save cost, the energy of the linac injector for the booster is chosen as 6 GeV, corresponding to a magnetic field of 30.7 Gs. In this paper, the booster lattice is described and optimization of the cell length is discussed. A novel scheme of bypass near the detector of the collider is designed. The extremely low magnetic field caused by low injection energy is studied, and a new ideal of wiggling bands is proposed to mitigate the low-field problem. Beam transfer and injection from the linac to the booster are considered.

  6. Status of the IUCF Cooler Injector Synchrotron Construction Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesel, D. L.; Lee, S. Y.

    1997-05-01

    Construction of a 2.24 T-m, rapid-cycling booster synchrotron is nearing completion at IUCF. The synchrotron is designed to accelerate protons to 220 MeV and will replace the IUCF isochronous cyclotrons as an injector of polarized light ion beams into the 3.6 T-m electron-cooled storage ring. CIS (Cooler Injector Synchrotron), with a circumference of 1/5th the Cooler ring, will fill the Cooler to about 10^11 protons via ``boxcar" stacking in a few seconds for research. The compact booster design, which can accelerate protons to energies between 60 and 220 MeV, is also well suited for use in proton therapy applications. At 28 months into the construction program, all major ring elements (dipoles, quads, injector linac, RF system) are fabricated, assembled, installed and in some cases, commissioned. Ring beam injection and ramping studies are scheduled to start in May, 1997 and Cooler injection studies are planned for late 1997. The booster design properties, component commissioning results and construction completion schedule will be summarized.

  7. Response to booster doses of hepatitis B vaccine among young adults who had received neonatal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chan, Paul K S; Ngai, Karry L K; Lao, Terence T; Wong, Martin C S; Cheung, Theresa; Yeung, Apple C M; Chan, Martin C W; Luk, Scotty W C

    2014-01-01

    Newborns who have received hepatitis B immunization in 1980s are now young adults joining healthcare disciplines. The need for booster, pre- and post-booster checks becomes a practical question. The aim of this study is to refine the HBV vaccination policy for newly admitted students in the future. A prospective study on medical and nursing school entrants to evaluate hepatitis B serostatus and the response to booster doses among young adults. Among 212 students, 17-23-year-old, born after adoption of neonatal immunization, 2 (0.9%) were HBsAg positive, 40 (18.9%) were anti-HBs positive. At 1 month after a single-dose booster for anti-HBs-negative students, 14.5% had anti-HBs <10 mIU/mL, 29.0% and 56.5% were 10-100 and >100 mIU/mL, respectively. The anti-HBs levels were significantly higher for females than males (mean [SD]: 431 [418] vs. 246 [339] mIU/mL, P = 0.047). At 2-4 month after the third booster dose, 97.1% had anti-HBs >100 mIU/mL and 2.9% had 10-100 mIU/mL. Pre-booster check is still worthwhile to identify carriers among newly recruited healthcare workers born after adoption of neonatal immunization. A 3-dose booster, rather than a single dose, is required for the majority to achieve an anti-HBs level >100 mIU/mL, as memory immunity has declined in a substantial proportion of individuals. Cost-effectiveness of post-booster check for anti-HBs is low and should be further evaluated based on contextual specific utilization of results.

  8. Application of independent component analysis to Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.B.; Lee, S.Y.; Prebys, E.; Tomlin, R.; /Indiana U. /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Autocorrelation is applied to analyze sets of finite-sampling data such as the turn-by-turn beam position monitor (BPM) data in an accelerator. This method of data analysis, called the independent component analysis (ICA), is shown to be a powerful beam diagnosis tool for being able to decompose sampled signals into its underlying source signals. They find that the ICA has an advantage over the principle component analysis (PCA) used in the model-independent analysis (MIA) in isolating independent modes. The tolerance of the ICA method to noise in the BPM system is systematically studied. The ICA is applied to analyze the complicated beam motion in a rapid-cycling booster synchrotron at the Fermilab. Difficulties and limitations of the ICA method are also discussed.

  9. GRYPHON: Air launched space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-06-01

    The project chosen for the winter semester Aero 483 class was the design of a next generation Air Launched Space Booster. Based on Orbital Sciences Corporation's Pegasus concept, the goal of Aero 483 was to design a 500,000 pound air launched space booster capable of delivering 17,000 pounds of payload to Low Earth Orbit and 8,000 pounds of payload to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit. The resulting launch vehicle was named the Gryphon. The class of forty senior aerospace engineering students was broken down into eight interdependent groups. Each group was assigned a subsystem or responsibility which then became their field of specialization. Spacecraft Integration was responsible for ensuring compatibility between subsystems. This group kept up to date on subsystem redesigns and informed those parties affected by the changes, monitored the vehicle's overall weight and dimensions, and calculated the mass properties of the booster. This group also performed the cost/profitability analysis of the Gryphon and obtained cost data for competing launch systems. The Mission Analysis Group was assigned the task of determining proper orbits, calculating the vehicle's flight trajectory for those orbits, and determining the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle. The Propulsion Group chose the engines that were best suited to the mission. This group also set the staging configurations for those engines and designed the tanks and fuel feed system. The commercial satellite market, dimensions and weights of typical satellites, and method of deploying satellites was determined by the Payloads Group. In addition, Payloads identified possible resupply packages for Space Station Freedom and identified those packages that were compatible with the Gryphon. The guidance, navigation, and control subsystems were designed by the Mission Control Group. This group identified required tracking hardware, communications hardware telemetry systems, and ground sites for the location of the Gryphon

  10. Booster Double Harmonic Setup Notes

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-02-17

    The motivation behind implementing a booster double harmonic include the reduced transverse space charge force from a reduced peak beam current and reduced momentum spread of the beam, both of which can be achieved from flattening the RF bucket. RF capture and acceleration of polarized protons (PP) is first set up in the single harmonic mode with RF harmonic h=1. Once capture and acceleration have been set up in the single harmonic mode, the second harmonic system is brought on and programmed to operate in concert with the single harmonic system.

  11. GRYPHON: Air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The project chosen for the winter semester Aero 483 class was the design of a next generation Air Launched Space Booster. Based on Orbital Sciences Corporation's Pegasus concept, the goal of Aero 483 was to design a 500,000 pound air launched space booster capable of delivering 17,000 pounds of payload to Low Earth Orbit and 8,000 pounds of payload to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit. The resulting launch vehicle was named the Gryphon. The class of forty senior aerospace engineering students was broken down into eight interdependent groups. Each group was assigned a subsystem or responsibility which then became their field of specialization. Spacecraft Integration was responsible for ensuring compatibility between subsystems. This group kept up to date on subsystem redesigns and informed those parties affected by the changes, monitored the vehicle's overall weight and dimensions, and calculated the mass properties of the booster. This group also performed the cost/profitability analysis of the Gryphon and obtained cost data for competing launch systems. The Mission Analysis Group was assigned the task of determining proper orbits, calculating the vehicle's flight trajectory for those orbits, and determining the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle. The Propulsion Group chose the engines that were best suited to the mission. This group also set the staging configurations for those engines and designed the tanks and fuel feed system. The commercial satellite market, dimensions and weights of typical satellites, and method of deploying satellites was determined by the Payloads Group. In addition, Payloads identified possible resupply packages for Space Station Freedom and identified those packages that were compatible with the Gryphon. The guidance, navigation, and control subsystems were designed by the Mission Control Group. This group identified required tracking hardware, communications hardware telemetry systems, and ground sites for the location of the Gryphon

  12. Solid rocket booster retrieval operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Solid Rocket Booster Retrieval operations are discussed in detail. The recovery of expended boosters and associated hardware without damage attributable to retrieval procedures is the main goal. The retrieval force consists tof ship's personnel and retrieval team members, each of whom has been trained and is highly skilled in multi-faceted operations. The retrieval force is equipped with two specially-built, highly maneuverable ships outfitted with parachute reels, retrieval cranes, towing winches, large volume-low pressure air compressors, SCUBA diving gear, inflatable boats with outboard motors and diver-operated SRB dewatering devices. The two ships are deployed in sufficient time to conduct an electronic and visual search of the impact area prior to launch. Upon search completeion, each ship takes station a safe distance from the predetermined impact point initiating both visual and electronic search in the direction of flight path, ensuring SRB acquisition at splashdown. When safe, the ships enter the impact area and commence recovery of all floating flight hardware which is subsequently returned to the Disassembly Facility for refurbishment and reuse. Retrieval techniques have evolved in parallel with equipment and flight hardware configuration changes. Additional changes have been initiated to improve personnel safety.

  13. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  14. Booster Separation Motor (BSM) Test Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This photograph depicts a hot fire test of the Shuttle Booster Separation Motor (BSM) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) test stand 116. The objective of the test was to test the aft heat seal in flight configuration. The function of the motor is to separate the Shuttle vehicle from the boosters that carry it into space.

  15. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  16. NASA's Space Launch System Advanced Booster Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Kimberly F.; Crumbly, Christopher M.; May, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, is making progress toward delivering a new capability for human space flight and scientific missions beyond Earth orbit. NASA is executing this development within flat budgetary guidelines by using existing engines assets and heritage technology to ready an initial 70 metric ton (t) lift capability for launch in 2017, and then employing a block upgrade approach to evolve a 130-t capability after 2021. A key component of the SLS acquisition plan is a three-phased approach for the first-stage boosters. The first phase is to expedite the 70-t configuration by completing development of the Space Shuttle heritage 5-segment solid rocket boosters (SRBs) for the initial flights of SLS. Since no existing boosters can meet the performance requirements for the 130-t class SLS, the next phases of the strategy focus on the eventual development of advanced boosters with an expected thrust class potentially double the current 5-segment solid rocket booster capability of 3.88 million pounds of thrust each. The second phase in the booster acquisition plan is the Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) effort, for which contracts were awarded beginning in 2012 after a full and open competition, with a stated intent to reduce risks leading to an affordable advanced booster. NASA has awarded ABEDRR contracts to four industry teams, which are looking into new options for liquid-fuel booster engines, solid-fuel-motor propellants, and composite booster structures. Demonstrations and/or risk reduction efforts were required to be related to a proposed booster concept directly applicable to fielding an advanced booster. This paper will discuss the status of this acquisition strategy and its results toward readying both the 70 t and 130 t configurations of SLS. The third and final phase will be a full and open

  17. Booster Long 13 irradiation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Moore, C.D.; /Fermilab

    1998-06-01

    Extraction from the Booster to the Main Ring occurred at Long Straight 13. The nature of the extraction process was such that 1% to 2% of the beam was lost in this region. There was an appreciable amount of beam extracted as shown in Table 1, which gives the yearly integrated intensities from 1973 to 1997. A simple model of the extraction losses was set up by Chandra Bhat utilizing the program CASIM. A sample output I shown in figure 1 which gives contours of stars/cm3 in the dirt, also schematically depicted are the three six feet deep sampling holes which were drilled to map out this cascade. One aspect of this study has been the study of the production of non-migrating nuclides and further study may in fact yield better values for the K parameter, the probability per star that an atom of the particular nuclide will be produced. Also the results of this study can give experimental numbers for the production of other nuclides when the amount of Na22 has been calculated. However, the most important part of this study has been the determination of the amount of tritium produced by extraction from the Booster and the experimentally determined migration rate. If we look at the top sample result in hole S2 of 777 pCi/ml of tritium and use the experimentally determined rate of migration and the depth to the aquifer of 13.1m, they calculate that the concentration will have decayed away to 1.1E-8 pCi/ml. If we look at the bottom sample, which is 11.3 m away from the aquifer, they calculate that the 116 pCi/ml will have decayed to 5.2E-8 pCi/ml. The conclusions is that the rate of migration determined over the 24 year irradiation history of the Booster extraction point is small enough that there is no problem with migration of tritium to the aquifer.

  18. A dedicated infrared synchrotron ring at the ALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, W.; Biocca, A.; Byrd, J. M.; Byrne, W.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Nishimura, H.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Rex, K.; Robin, D.; Stover, G.; Thur, W.; Wu, Y.

    2002-03-01

    We present preliminary plans for a storage ring dedicated to and optimized for the production of synchrotron radiation over the infrared wavelength range from 1 micron to > 1 mm. The site for the 66 m circumference ring is atop the existing ALS booster synchrotron shielding. This area provides enough floor space for both the ring and beamlines, and hutches. We plan to operate the ring in two modes: as a conventional light source and as a superradiant source in the far-IR. In the conventional mode, our design allows greater transmission of light in the far-infrared than typical light sources, and significantly improves beam stability. In the superradiant mode, we hope to achieve very intense coherent emission of synchrotron radiation over the 0.2 - 10 mm wavelength range by shortening the electron bunches. This mode will generate much higher flux & brightness than conventional far-IR and coherent THz sources.

  19. A Project for synchrotron with electron cooling for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrikov, V. A.; Kiselev, V. A.; Levichev, E. B.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Reva, V. B.; Sinyatkin, S.

    2012-07-01

    A project for a new generation of proton and ion accelerator facilities for cancer therapy has been developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (SB RAS). This facility includes an electrostatic injector, a booster with a 10-Hz repetition rate, and a main synchrotron with electron cooling and beam transport lines for delivering the beam to treatment rooms. The application of electron cooling makes it possible to increase the beam intensity and reduce the apertures of both the synchrotron and the high-energy transport lines, as well as save construction costs and energy consumption as required by the accelerator complex. This paper describes the main features of the synchrotron and the requirements for its main systems and their parameters.

  20. Bunch shortening experiments in the Fermilab booster and the AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lee, S. Y.; Ng, K. Y.; Popovic, M.; Brennan, M.; Roser, T.; Wei, J.; Trbojevic, D.; High Energy Physics; FNAL; BNL

    1998-01-01

    The proton driver for a muon collider must be capable of producing 2.5 x 10{sup 13} p/bunch on target (in 4 bunches) in order to reach the design luminosity in the collider ring. Additionally, the bunches are very short, with an rms of only {approx}1 ns, to match the longitudinal emittance requirements of downstream capture, cooling, and acceleration systems. This criterion along with the high intensity places constraints on the proton driver design which will require both theoretical and experimental verification. This paper will discuss the bunch shortening techniques to be tested experimentally, the impact of longitudinal space charge, and potential instabilities in such an accelerator.

  1. Performance and measurements of the AGS and Booster beams

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1995-12-31

    Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGSC) ashes and descriptions of filter performance were made to address the problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to the collected ash. This task is designed to generate data base of the key properties of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Activities including initial formatting of the data base and entry, modification of the permeability model, and initial design of a high-temperature test device for measuring uncompacted bulk porosity of ash aggregates (indicator of relative cohesivity of the ash, filter cake porosity/permeability). Chemical analyses of hopper and filter cake ashes from Tidd showed that the consolidation degree could not be accounted for by condensation/adsorption from the flue gas; the mechanism is likely physical rearrangement of the ash particles.

  2. Hepatitis B virus vaccination booster does not provide additional protection in adolescents: a cross-sectional school-based study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Chieh; Wang, Jen-Hung; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Jun-Song; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Chu, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-09-23

    Current consensus does not support the use of a universal booster of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine because there is an anamnestic response in almost all children 15 years after universal infant HBV vaccination. We aimed to provide a booster strategy among adolescents as a result of their changes in lifestyle and sexual activity. This study comprised a series of cross-sectional serological surveys of HBV markers in four age groups between 2004 and 2012. The seropositivity rates of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and its reciprocal antibody (anti-HBs) for each age group were collected. There were two parts to this study; age-specific HBV seroepidemiology and subgroup analysis, including effects of different vaccine types, booster response for immunogenicity at 15 years of age, and longitudinal follow-up to identify possible additional protection by HBV booster. Within the study period, data on serum anti-HBs and HBsAg in a total of 6950 students from four age groups were collected. The overall anti-HBs and HBsAg seropositivity rates were 44.3% and 1.2%, respectively. The anti-HBs seropositivity rate in the plasma-derived subgroup was significantly higher in both 15- and 18-year age groups. Overall response rate in the double-seronegative recipients at 15 years of age was 92.5% at 6 weeks following one recombinant HBV booster dose. Among the 24 recipients showing anti-HBs seroconversion at 6 weeks after booster, seven subjects (29.2%) had lost their anti-HBs seropositivity again within 3 years. Increased seropositivity rates and titers of anti-HBs did not provide additional protective effects among subjects comprehensively vaccinated against HBV in infancy. HBV booster strategy at 15 years of age was the main contributor to the unique age-related phenomenon of anti-HBs seropositivity rate and titer. No increase in HBsAg seropositivity rates within different age groups was observed. Vaccination with plasma-derived HBV vaccines in infancy provided higher

  3. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, G. B.

    1979-01-01

    Details of the design, operation, testing and recovery procedures of the reusable solid rocket boosters (SRB) are given. Using a composite PBAN propellant, they will provide the primary thrust (six million pounds maximum at 20 s after ignition) within a 3 g acceleration constraint, as well as thrust vector control for the Space Shuttle. The drogues were tested to a load of 305,000 pounds, and the main parachutes to 205,000. Insulation in the solid rocket motor (SRM) will be provided by asbestos-silica dioxide filled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber ('asbestos filled NBR') except in high erosion areas (principally in the aft dome), where a carbon-filled ethylene propylene diene monomer-neopreme rubber will be utilized. Furthermore, twenty uses for the SRM nozzle will be allowed by its ablative materials, which are principally carbon cloth and silica cloth phenolics.

  4. Boosters, anyone? Exploring the added value of booster sessions in a self-management intervention.

    PubMed

    Kroese, F M; Adriaanse, M A; De Ridder, D T D

    2012-10-01

    The current study explored the benefits of adding booster sessions to a validated and successful self-management intervention for type 2 diabetes patients (i.e. Beyond Good Intentions). Although the addition of booster sessions to self-management interventions is often recommended, it has not been empirically established to what extent booster sessions are in fact appreciated by participants. Participants in the current study (N = 129) followed the Beyond Good Intentions program and were offered a series of three booster sessions at 1, 3 and 5 months afterwards. Primary outcome variables included participants' attendance and evaluations of the booster phase. In addition, self-management behavior was assessed at baseline (T1), after the initial phase (T2) and after the booster phase (T3). Results showed that more than one-fourth of participants who completed the initial phase dropped out during the booster phase, and those who did complete both phases evaluated the booster phase significantly less positive as compared to the initial phase. With regard to the behavioral outcomes, we replicated previous findings showing positive effects on all measures during the initial phase. The booster phase, however, did not result in further improvements. It was concluded that the added value of booster sessions was, at best, questionable.

  5. Shuttle Upgrade Using 5-Segment Booster (FSB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvageau, Donald R.; Huppi, Hal D.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In support of NASA's continuing effort to improve the over-all safety and reliability of the Shuttle system- a 5-segment booster (FSB) has been identified as an approach to satisfy that overall objective. To assess the feasibility of a 5-segment booster approach, NASA issued a feasibility study contract to evaluate the potential of a 5-segment booster to improve the overall capability of the Shuttle system, especially evaluating the potential to increase the system reliability and safety. In order to effectively evaluate the feasibility of the 5-segment concept, a four-member contractor team was established under the direction of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). MSFC provided the overall program oversight and integration as well as program contractual management. The contractor team consisted of Thiokol, Boeing North American Huntington Beach (BNA), Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems (LMMSS) and United Space Alliance (USA) and their subcontractor bd Systems (Control Dynamics Division, Huntsville, AL). United Space Alliance included the former members of United Space Booster Incorporated (USBI) who managed the booster element portion of the current Shuttle solid rocket boosters. Thiokol was responsible for the overall integration and coordination of the contractor team across all of the booster elements. They were also responsible for all of the motor modification evaluations. Boeing North American (BNA) was responsible for all systems integration analyses, generation of loads and environments. and performance and abort mode capabilities. Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems (LMMSS) was responsible for evaluating the impacts of any changes to the booster on the external tank (ET), and evaluating any design changes on the external tank necessary to accommodate the FSB. USA. including the former USBI contingent. was responsible for evaluating any modifications to facilities at the launch site as well as any booster component design modifications.

  6. Simulations of RF capture with barrier bucket in booster at injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.J.

    2012-01-23

    As part of the effort to increase the number of ions per bunch in RHIC, a new scheme for RF capture of EBIS ions in Booster at injection has been developed. The scheme was proposed by M. Blaskiewicz and J.M. Brennan. It employs a barrier bucket to hold a half turn of beam in place during capture into two adjacent harmonic 4 buckets. After acceleration, this allows for 8 transfers of 2 bunches from Booster into 16 buckets on the AGS injection porch. During the Fall of 2011 the necessary hardware was developed and implemented by the RF and Controls groups. The scheme is presently being commissioned by K.L. Zeno with Au32+ ions from EBIS. In this note we carry out simulations of the RF capture. These are meant to serve as benchmarks for what can be achieved in practice. They also allow for an estimate of the longitudinal emittance of the bunches on the AGS injection porch.

  7. 30 CFR 57.8518 - Main and booster fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Main and booster fans. 57.8518 Section 57.8518... and Underground § 57.8518 Main and booster fans. (a) All mine main and booster fans installed and used..., or adjustments. (b) In the event of main or booster fan failure due to a malfunction, accident, power...

  8. Crucial Booster Test Fires Up in Utah

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A booster for the most powerful rocket in the world, NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS), successfully fired up Tuesday for its second qualification ground test at Orbital ATK's test facilities in Pro...

  9. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  10. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, J.; /Argonne

    2004-12-01

    Since a wider aperture has been obtained along the Booster beam line, this opens the opportunity for Booster running a higher intensity beam than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate can achieve the similar goal. The motivation for the 6-GeV study is to gain the relative accelerating voltage via a slower acceleration.

  11. A 50 Hz dipole magnet for the TRIUMF KAON Factory booster ring

    SciTech Connect

    Otter, A.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The 3 GeV Booster synchrotron for TRIUMF's KAON Factory will need 24 dipole magnets each 3.0 m long operating with a resonant power system designed to give a 50 Hz ac field superimposed onto a dc field. The maximum and minimum field levels are 1.118 and 0.295 T respectively. In this paper the magnet design is presented and compared with measured results from a prototype which was constructed to evaluate fabrication procedures and to verify the ac loss calculations. The experiences gained from this fabrication are described.

  12. [Influence of natural boosters on long-term immunity against hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Pokorska-Lis, Maria; Marczyńska, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Incidence of hepatitis B in Poland decreased significantly after implementation of routine immunization in infants. Natural boosters may influence the long-term post vaccination immunity in countries, where endemicity is high. In areas of low incidence this influence may be limited. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of risk factors for HBV infection (potential natural boosters) on long-term post vaccination immunity against hepatitis B and the possibilityof HBVinfection in previously vaccinated individuals. In 130 children aged 10-12years, vaccinated with 4 doses ofrecombinantvaccine against hepatitis B in infancy, exposure to risk factors for HBV infection (infection in family members including mother, hospitalization, surgical interventions, blood transfusion, dental treatment, piercing, tattooing) was analyzed. Markers of HBVinfection (anti-HBc and HBsAg) and humoral immunity against hepatitis B were determined. Protective level of anti-HBs antibodies was defined as > or =10 IU/1. Statistically significant influence of dental treatment (p<0.02) andsurgicalinterventions (p<0.05) on possessing very high anti-HBs titer (> or = 1000 IU/) was revealed, which indicates that these factors act as natural boosters. Children, who previously received blood transfusion, statistically more frequently did not have protective level of anti-HBs (p<0.0 I). In all 6 children with confirmed HBV infection there was exposure to risk factors for infection in anamnesis. In children with chronic hepatitis B (positive HBsAg) statistically significantly more frequently surgical interventions were performed (p<0.05). I. Despite of low incidence of hepatitis B in Poland, natural boosters, especially dental and surgical treatment, may stimulate the post vaccination immunity. 2. Blood transfusion is currently not a source of infection, however, children who received blood transfusion in the neonatal period, may require control of immunization efficacy or a booster dose. 3

  13. Synchrotron Polarization in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for γ-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by >~ 180°, as observed in connection with γ-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  14. EBIS, an option for medical synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Prelec, K.

    1993-12-31

    Light ion beams have been used for cancer therapy for about twenty years; several dedicated facilities are presently either planned or under construction. In addition, several synchrotrons designed for other purposes are now considered for medical applications as well. A medical synchrotron needs a preaccelerator to produce and inject a range of different light ions, preferably fully stripped, into the ring. The size, cost and complexity of the preaccelerator depend on the performance of its first element, the ion source, and these features will be optimized if the source itself produces fully stripped ions. An EBIS (Electron Beam Ion Source) is capable of producing fully stripped light ions up to argon with intensities sufficient for medical applications. As it has been pointed out in the past, this source option may require just one stage of preacceleration, an RFQ linac, thus making it very simple and compact. The AGS Department has a separate project already under way to develop a very high intensity EBIS for our nuclear physics program. It is, however, our plan first to construct and test an intermediate size device and then to proceed to the design of the final, full scale device. Parameters of that intermediate model are close to those that would be needed for a medical synchrotron. This paper describes the BNL program and considers parameters of EBIS devices for possible use in synchrotron facilities serving as sources of high energy light ions for cancer therapy.

  15. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-10

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  17. Uses of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence has long been used as a technique for elemental analysis. X-ray fluorescence techniques have a number of features that make them attractive for application to biomedical samples. In the past few years synchrotron radiation x-ray sources have been developed and, because of their properties, their use can improve the sensitivity for trace element analysis by two to three orders of magnitude. Also, synchrotron radiation will make possible an x-ray microprobe with resolution in the micrometer range. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation source recently built at Brookhaven National Laboratory, will have a facility for trace element analysis by x-ray fluorescence and will be available to all interested users.

  18. Energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system for Taiwan light source operated in top-up mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Meng-Shu; Wang, Chaoen; Chang, Lung-Hai; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Yu, Tsung-Chi; Lin, Ming-Chyuan; Chen, Ling-Jhen; Yang, Tz-Te; Chang, Mei-Hsia; Lin, Yu-Han; Tsai, Ming-Hsun; Lo, Chih-Hung; Liu, Zong-Kai

    2015-03-01

    Contemporary light sources operate in a top-up mode to maintain their photon intensity quasi-constant so as to improve significantly the thermal stability of the photon beam and to maximize ultimately the average photon flux at a designed maximum operational beam current. Operating in a top-up mode requires frequent beam injection from the synchrotron booster to the storage ring of the light source, but the injection intervals occupy only a tiny portion of the operational time of the integrated machine. To maintain a high operational reliability, the booster RF system practically operates necessarily under injection conditions around the clock and consumes full electric power whether during top-up injection or not. How to decrease the power consumption of the booster RF system during its stand-by time but not to sacrifice the reliability and availability of the RF system is obviously of fundamental interest for routine operation of the light source in a top-up mode. Here, an energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system adaptive to top-up operation of a light source is proposed that has been developed, realized and integrated into the booster RF system of the Taiwan Light Source (TLS), and routinely operated since the end of year 2008. The klystron cathode current and RF gap voltage of the booster's accelerating RF cavity are both periodically modulated to adapt the injection rhythm during top-up operation, which results in decreased consumption of electric power of the booster RF system by more than 78%. The impact on the reliability and availability of the booster RF system has been carefully monitored during the past five operational years, delivering more than 5000 h scheduled user beam time per year. The booster RF system retains its excellent reliability and availability as previously. Neither a decrease of the service time nor an induced reliability issue from the klystron or any high-power high-voltage component of the transmitter has been experienced

  19. Solid Rocket Motor/Booster-Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This image illustrates the solid rocket motor (SRM)/solid rocket booster (SRB) configuration. The Shuttle's two SRB's are the largest solids ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds, augmenting the Shuttle's main propulsion system during liftoff. The major design drivers for the SRM's were high thrust and reuse. The desired thrust was achieved by using state-of-the-art solid propellant and by using a long cylindrical motor with a specific core design that allows the propellant to burn in a carefully controlled marner. At burnout, the boosters separate from the external tank and drop by parachute to the ocean for recovery and subsequent refurbishment. The boosters are designed to survive water impact at almost 60 miles per hour, maintain flotation with minimal damage, and preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. Under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the SRB's are assembled and refurbished by the United Space Boosters. The SRM's are provided by the Morton Thiokol Corporation.

  20. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

  1. Charge - dependent increase in coherence of synchrotron oscillation at injection

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Because of coupled bunch instability and/or because of some unidentified mechanism, bunches from the 8 GeV Booster accelerator at Fermilab arrive in the Main Injector synchrotron with a complicated centroid distribution in phase and energy. The currently installed broad band kicker provides a maximum of 2 kV, insufficient to remove injection errors before the oscillations would de-cohere, ignoring the influence of bunch charge. Perhaps surprisingly, for sufficient but generally modest charge, the effect of potential well distortion is to maintain bunch integrity. This talk illustrates the phenomenon for injection into the Fermilab Main Injector and offers an explanation sufficiently general to apply elsewhere.

  2. Active influenza immunization in hemodialysis patients: comparison between single-dose and booster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Ha, Seok Hoon; Kee, Sae Yoon; Jeong, Hye Won; Kim, Woo Joo

    2006-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients are recommended to be immunized against influenza annually, but the immune response after vaccination is known to be weakened in these patients. We intended to compare the efficacy of influenza vaccines in HD patients with that in healthy people, and we also evaluated the additive effect of a booster vaccination in HD patients. During the 2003-2004 influenza season, 100 patients on HD and 50 age-matched healthy controls were recruited from the Korea University Guro Hospital. The HD patients were divided into two groups: single-dose group (50 patients) and booster group (50 patients). Eight weeks following the influenza vaccination, the serum antibody responses were compared. Although the antibody response of the HD patients was impaired in comparison with that of healthy controls, more than 90% of the HD patients showed protective antibody levels. Booster vaccination did not significantly increase the immune response in HD patients. Influenza vaccination in HD patients should be encouraged, but the immune response was comparatively impaired in subpopulations, including patients with a long-term HD history (>2.5 years), with a higher urea reduction rate, or with underlying diabetes. There was no effect of a booster vaccine dose on the antibody titers. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Summary of Booster Development and Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Elizabeth G.; Harry, Herbert H.; Hartline, Ernest L.; Hooks, Daniel E.; Johnson, Carl E.; Morris, John S.; Novak, Alan M.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Sanders, Victor E.; Scovel, Christina A.; Lorenz, Thomas; Wright, Mark; Botcher, Tod; Marx, Erin; Gibson, Kevin

    2012-06-21

    This report outlines booster development work done at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 2007 to present. The booster is a critical link in the initiation train of explosive assemblies, from complex devices like nuclear weapons to conventional munitions. The booster bridges the gap from a small, relatively sensitive detonator to an insensitive, but massive, main charge. The movement throughout the explosives development community is to use more and more insensitive explosive components. With that, more energy is needed out of the booster. It has to initiate reliably, promptly, powerfully and safely. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides a summary of a collaborative effort between LANL, LLNL, and AWE to identify candidate materials and uniformly develop a testing plan for new boosters. Important parameters and the tests required to measure them were defined. The nature of the collaboration and the specific goals of the participating partners has changed over time, but the booster development plan stands on its own merit as a complete description of the test protocol necessary to compare and qualify booster materials, and is discussed in its entirety in this report. The second section describes a project, which began in 2009 with the Department of Defense to develop replacement booster formulations for PBXN-7. Replacement of PBXN-7 was necessary because it contained Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), which was becoming unavailable to the DoD and because it contained Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), which was sensitive and toxic. A LANL-developed explosive, Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF), was an important candidate. This project required any replacement formulation be a drop-in replacement in existing munitions. This project was timely, in that it made use of the collaborative booster development project, and had the additional constraint of matching shock sensitivity. Additionally it needed to be a safety improvement, and a performance

  4. Soviets ready new boosters at Tyuratam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-08-01

    The capabilities and design characteristics of two new launch vehicles and Shuttle-type vehicles believed to be under preparation at the Soviet Tyuratam launch site are described. The boosters, photographed on launch pads, are Saturn 5 and 1B class vehicles. Indications have been detected that a heavy Shuttle vehicle equipped to use strap-on boosters and slush H2 fuel is being readied for launch. A mini-Shuttle is also being tested, and has two flights behind it that culminated in water landings. NASA-Langley wind tunnel tests of the small spaceplane configuration suggested that it reenters the atmosphere in its own bow shock, thus exposing it to temperatures much lower than vehicles with wings which extend beyond the shock wave. The small spaceplane may have a sublimating plastic coating to shed reentry heat. The boosters have 30,000 and 330,000 lb payload-to-orbit capabilities.

  5. Overcoming an intrinsic depolarizing resonance with a partial snake at the Brookhaven AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K. A.; Glenn, W.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zeno, K.; Ranjbar, V.; Cadman, R. V.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.; High Energy Physics; BNL; Indiana Univ.

    2004-06-01

    An 11.4% partial Siberian snake was used to successfully accelerate polarized protons through a strong intrinsic depolarizing spin resonance in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). No noticeable depolarization was observed. This opens up the possibility of using a 20% to 30% partial Siberian snake in the AGS or other medium energy proton synchrotrons to overcome all weak and strong depolarizing spin resonances.

  6. CIRCE: A Ring-based Source of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Munson, D.V.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.D.; Thur, W.G.; Jung, J.Y.; Wan, W.

    2004-05-12

    We present the concepts for an electron storage ring dedicated to and optimized for the production of stable coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) over the far-infrared terahertz wavelength range from 200 {mu}m to about one cm. CIRCE (Coherent InfraRed CEnter) will be a 66 m circumference ring located on top of the ALS booster synchrotron shielding tunnel and using the existing ALS injector. This location provides enough floor space for both the CIRCE ring, its required shielding, and numerous beamlines. We present the calculated CIRCE photon flux where a gain of 6 - 9 orders of magnitude is shown compared to existing far-IR sources. Additionally, the particular design of the dipole vacuum chamber has been optimized to allow an excellent transmission of these far-infrared wavelengths. We believe that the CIRCE source can be constructed for a modest cost.

  7. SLS Booster Engine Service Platforms Delivery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-31

    A flatbed truck carrying one of two new service platforms for NASA's Space Launch System booster engines makes its way along the NASA Causeway to the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The platforms were transported from fabricator Met-Con Inc. in Cocoa, Florida. They will be delivered to the Vehicle Assembly Building, where they will be stored and used for processing and checkout of the engines for the rocket's twin five-segment solid rocket boosters for Exploration Mission-1. EM-1 will launch an uncrewed Orion spacecraft to a stable orbit beyond the Moon and bring it back to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

  8. SLS Booster Engine Service Platforms Delivery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-31

    New service platforms for NASA's Space Launch System booster engines, secured on two flatbed trucks, are on their way to the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. They are being transported from fabricator Met-Con Inc. in Cocoa, Florida. The platforms will be delivered to the Vehicle Assembly Building, where they will be stored and used for processing and checkout of the engines for the rocket's twin five-segment solid rocket boosters for Exploration Mission-1. EM-1 will launch an uncrewed Orion spacecraft to a stable orbit beyond the Moon and bring it back to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

  9. Booster propulsion/vehicle impact study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, Vincent; Dunn, Michael; Fink, Lawrence; Phillips, Dwight; Wetzel, Eric

    1988-01-01

    The use of hydrogen RP-1, propane, and methane as fuels for booster engines of launch vehicles is discussed. An automated procedure for integrated launch vehicle, engine sizing, and design optimization was used to define two stage and single stage concepts for minimum dry weight. The two stage vehicles were unmanned and used a flyback booster and partially reusable orbiter. The single stage designs were fully reusable, manned flyback vehicles. Comparisons of these vehicle designs, showing the effects of using different fuels, as well as sensitivity and trending data, are presented. In addition, the automated design technique utilized for the study is described.

  10. Developing the World's Most Powerful Solid Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priskos, Alex S.; Frame, Kyle L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Journey to Mars has begun. Indicative of that challenge, this will be a multi-decadal effort requiring the development of technology, operational capability, and experience. The first steps are underway with more than 15 years of continuous human operations aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and development of commercial cargo and crew transportation capabilities. NASA is making progress on the transportation required for deep space exploration - the Orion crew spacecraft and the Space Launch System (SLS) heavy-lift rocket that will launch Orion and large components such as in-space stages, habitat modules, landers, and other hardware necessary for deep-space operations. SLS is a key enabling capability and is designed to evolve with mission requirements. The initial configuration of SLS - Block 1 - will be capable of launching more than 70 metric tons (t) of payload into low Earth orbit, greater mass than any other launch vehicle in existence. By enhancing the propulsion elements and larger payload fairings, future SLS variants will launch 130 t into space, an unprecedented capability that simplifies hardware design and in-space operations, reduces travel times, and enhances two solid propellant five-segment boosters, both based on space shuttle technologies. This paper will focus on development of the booster, which will provide more than 75 percent of total vehicle thrust at liftoff. Each booster is more than 17 stories tall, 3.6 meters (m) in diameter and weighs 725,000 kilograms (kg). While the SLS booster appears similar to the shuttle booster, it incorporates several changes. The additional propellant segment provides additional booster performance. Parachutes and other hardware associated with recovery operations have been deleted and the booster designated as expendable for affordability reasons. The new motor incorporates new avionics, new propellant grain, asbestos-free case insulation, a redesigned nozzle, streamlined manufacturing

  11. THE LINAC LASER NOTCHER FOR THE FERMILAB BOOSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, David E,; Duel, Kevin; Gardner, Matthew; Johnson, Todd; Slimmer, David; Patil, Screenvias; Tafoya, Jason

    2016-09-27

    In synchrotron machines, the beam extraction is accomplished by a combination of septa and kicker magnets which deflect the beam from an accelerator into another. Ideally the kicker field must rise/fall in between the beam bunches. However, in reality, an intentional beam-free time region (aka "notch") is created on the beam pulse to assure that the beam can be extracted with minimal losses. In the case of the Fermilab Booster, the notch is created in the ring near injection energy by the use of fast kickers which deposit the beam in a shielded collimation region within the accelerator tunnel. With increasing beam power it is desirable to create this notch at the lowest possible energy to minimize activation. The Fermilab Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) initiated an R&D project to build a laser system to create the notch within a linac beam pulse at 750 keV. This talk will describe the concept for the laser notcher and discuss our current status, commissioning results, and future plans.

  12. 9. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3 INTERIOR, FACING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3 INTERIOR, FACING NORTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  13. 8. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3, FACING SOUTHEAST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3, FACING SOUTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  14. 13. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 CHLORINATOR INTERIOR, FACING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 CHLORINATOR INTERIOR, FACING NORTH - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  15. 7. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3, FACING NORTHWEST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3, FACING NORTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  16. 1. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1, FACING SOUTHWEST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1, FACING SOUTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  17. 10. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4, FACING NORTHWEST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4, FACING NORTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  18. 3. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1 INTERIOR, FACING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1 INTERIOR, FACING EAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  19. 11. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4, FACING SOUTHEAST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4, FACING SOUTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  20. 6. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2 INTERIOR, FACING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2 INTERIOR, FACING WEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  1. 5. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2, FACING SOUTHEAST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2, FACING SOUTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  2. 4. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2, FACING NORTHWEST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2, FACING NORTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  3. 2. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1, FACING NORTHEAST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1, FACING NORTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  4. 12. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 INTERIOR, FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 INTERIOR, FACING SOUTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  5. Credit BG. Interior of Deluge Water Booster Station displaying highcapacity ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Interior of Deluge Water Booster Station displaying high-capacity electrically driven water pumps for fire fighting service - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Deluge Water Booster Station, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Acquisition of Diagnostic Screen and Synchrotron Radiation Images Using IEEE1394 Digital Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, G.

    2004-11-01

    In the LINAC, booster synchrotron and transfer lines of DIAMOND a number of screens (YAG:Ce and OTR) as well as synchrotron radiation ports will be used to acquire information about the transverse beam distribution. Digital IEEE1394 cameras have been selected for their range of sensor sizes and resolutions available, their easy triggering to single events, and their noise-free transmission of the images into the control system. Their suitability for use under influence of high-energy radiation has been verified. Images from preliminary tests at the SRS Daresbury are presented.

  7. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose Cap assembly undergoing preparations and close-out procedures in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The Nose Cap contains the Pilot and Drogue Chutes and the Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  8. Explosive Testing of Class 1.3 Rocket Booster Propellant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    solids HTPB /Al/AP propellant similar to what could be used in space launch boosters. The program tested propellant charges as large as 22 inches in...Since solid propellants used in large space boosters have an explosive nature, studying explosive characteristics of the ever more popular HTPB type of...hazards alone. Emerging space boosters and upper stages use HTPB propellants . In the future all solid propellant space boosters may use HTPB

  9. EVENT DRIVEN AUTOMATIC STATE MODIFICATION OF BNL'S BOOSTER FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY SOLAR PARTICLE SIMULATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, D.; BINELLO, S.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2005-05-16

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. NASA is interested in reproducing the energy spectrum from a solar flare in the space environment for a single ion species. To do this we have built and tested a set of software tools which allow the state of the Booster and the NSRL beam line to be changed automatically. In this report we will describe the system and present results of beam tests.

  10. 47 CFR 24.9 - Operation of certificated signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of certificated signal boosters. 24.9... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES General Information § 24.9 Operation of certificated signal boosters. Individuals and non-individuals may operate certificated Consumer Signal Boosters on frequencies regulated...

  11. 47 CFR 24.9 - Operation of certificated signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of certificated signal boosters. 24.9... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES General Information § 24.9 Operation of certificated signal boosters. Individuals and non-individuals may operate certificated Consumer Signal Boosters on frequencies regulated...

  12. 47 CFR 22.9 - Operation of certificated signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of certificated signal boosters. 22.9... PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Scope and Authority § 22.9 Operation of certificated signal boosters. Individuals and non-individuals may operate certificated Consumer Signal Boosters on frequencies regulated under...

  13. 47 CFR 22.9 - Operation of certificated signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of certificated signal boosters. 22.9... PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Scope and Authority § 22.9 Operation of certificated signal boosters. Individuals and non-individuals may operate certificated Consumer Signal Boosters on frequencies regulated under...

  14. What A Booster Club Can Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidinger, George

    This speech was presented at the 1976 American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation national convention by the principal of an Iowa high school. It discusses the development and effectiveness of the Jefferson High School Booster Club which was developed by an interested parent and has been quite successful. The club has assisted…

  15. Athena: Advanced air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Corey G.; Ziemer, John; Plonka, John; Henderson, Scott; Copioli, Paul; Reese, Charles; Ullman, Christopher; Frank, Jeremy; Breslauer, Alan; Patonis, Hristos

    1994-01-01

    The infrastructure for routine, reliable, and inexpensive access of space is a goal that has been actively pursued over the past 50 years, but has yet not been realized. Current launch systems utilize ground launching facilities which require the booster vehicle to plow up through the dense lower atmosphere before reaching space. An air launched system on the other hand has the advantage of being launched from a carrier aircraft above this dense portion of the atmosphere and hence can be smaller and lighter compared to its ground based counterpart. The goal of last year's Aerospace Engineering Course 483 (AE 483) was to design a 227,272 kg (500,000 lb.) air launched space booster which would beat the customer's launch cost on existing launch vehicles by at least 50 percent. While the cost analysis conducted by the class showed that this goal could be met, the cost and size of the carrier aircraft make it appear dubious that any private company would be willing to invest in such a project. To avoid this potential pitfall, this year's AE 483 class was to design as large an air launched space booster as possible which can be launched from an existing or modification to an existing aircraft. An initial estimate of the weight of the booster is 136,363 kg (300,000 lb.) to 159,091 kg (350,000 lb.).

  16. 47 CFR 20.21 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... marketing materials, (2) In any print or on-line owner's manual and installation instructions, (3) On the... with the licensee providing service to the subscriber; (3) The subscriber only operates the Consumer...) Uses an Industrial Signal Booster which complies with paragraph (f) of this section. (d) Operation on a...

  17. Spacecraft and their Boosters. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coard, E. A.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education I, provides a description of some of the discoveries that spacecraft have made possible and of the experience that American astronauts have had in piloting spacecraft. The basic principles behind the operation of spacecraft and their boosters are explained. Descriptions are also included on…

  18. Advanced space transportation systems, BARGOUZIN booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prampolini, Marco; Louaas, Eric; Prel, Yves; Kostromin, Sergey; Panichkin, Nickolay; Sumin, Yuriy; Osin, Mikhail; Iranzo-Greus, David; Rigault, Michel; Beaurain, André; Couteau, Jean-Noël

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of Advanced Space Transportation Systems Studies sponsored by CNES in 2006, a study called "BARGOUZIN" was performed by a joint team led by ASTRIUM ST and TSNIIMASH. Beyond these leaders, the team comprised MOLNIYA, DASSAULT AVIATION and SNECMA as subcontractors. The "BARGOUZIN" concept is a liquid fuelled fly-back booster (LFBB), mounted on the ARIANE 5 central core stage in place of the current solid rocket booster. The main originality of the concept lies in the fact that the "BARGOUZIN" features a cluster of VULCAIN II engines, similar to the one mounted on the central core stage of ARIANE 5. An astute permutation strategy, between the booster engines and central core engine is expected to lead to significant cost reductions. The following aspects were addressed during the preliminary system study: engine number per booster trade-off/abort scenario analysis, aerodynamic consolidation, engine reliability, ascent controllability, ground interfaces separation sequence analysis, programmatics. These topics will be briefly presented and synthesized in this paper, giving an overview of the credibility of the concept.

  19. What A Booster Club Can Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidinger, George

    This speech was presented at the 1976 American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation national convention by the principal of an Iowa high school. It discusses the development and effectiveness of the Jefferson High School Booster Club which was developed by an interested parent and has been quite successful. The club has assisted…

  20. 78 FR 29062 - Signal Booster Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... evaluation for mobile devices. The document amended a number of FCC rules concerning signal boosters for... radiation exposure evaluation: mobile devices. * * * * * (c) Mobile devices that operate in the Commercial Mobile Radio Services pursuant to part 20 of this chapter; the Cellular Radiotelephone Service pursuant...

  1. Multiple Partial Siberian Snakes in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Hattori, T.; Lin, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized protons are accelerated up to 24.3 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). To accelerate the beam with preserving the polarization, two different types of helical dipole partial Siberian snake have been installed to the AGS. One is a superconducting magnet (Cold Snake, CSNK), and the other is a normal conducting one (Warm Snake, WSNK). With these snake magnets, the polarization at the AGS extraction achieved 65%. However, the AGS has spin mismatches at the injection and extraction. This description shows calculated results to have better spin matching with using two or three snakes.

  2. Multiple Partial Siberian Snakes in the AGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Hattori, T.; Huang, H.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2007-06-01

    Polarized protons are accelerated up to 24.3 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). To accelerate the beam with preserving the polarization, two different types of helical dipole partial Siberian snake have been installed to the AGS. One is a superconducting magnet (Cold Snake, CSNK), and the other is a normal conducting one (Warm Snake, WSNK). With these snake magnets, the polarization at the AGS extraction achieved 65%. However, the AGS has spin mismatches at the injection and extraction. This description shows calculated results to have better spin matching with using two or three snakes.

  3. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  4. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 2: Technical summary. Book 3: Booster vehicle modifications and ground systems definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A definition of the expendable second stage and space shuttle booster separation system is presented. Modifications required on the reusable booster for expendable second stage/payload flight and the ground systems needed to operate the expendable second stage in conjuction with the space shuttle booster are described. The safety, reliability, and quality assurance program is explained. Launch complex operations and services are analyzed.

  5. Spin dynamics simulations at AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    To preserve proton polarization through acceleration, it is important to have a correct model of the process. It has been known that with the insertion of the two helical partial Siberian snakes in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the MAD model of AGS can not deal with a field map with offset orbit. The stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi provides a tool to represent the real electromagnetic fields in the modeling of the optics and spin dynamics for the AGS. Numerical experiments of resonance crossing, including spin dynamics in presence of the snakes and Q-jump, have been performed in AGS lattice models, using Zgoubi. This contribution reports on various results so obtained.

  6. Space Launch System Accelerated Booster Development Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arockiam, Nicole; Whittecar, William; Edwards, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, NASA is seeking to reinvigorate the national space program and recapture the public s interest in human space exploration by developing missions to the Moon, near-earth asteroids, Lagrange points, Mars, and beyond. The would-be successor to the Space Shuttle, NASA s Constellation Program, planned to take humans back to the Moon by 2020, but due to budgetary constraints was cancelled in 2010 in search of a more "affordable, sustainable, and realistic" concept2. Following a number of studies, the much anticipated Space Launch System (SLS) was unveiled in September of 2011. The SLS core architecture consists of a cryogenic first stage with five Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs), and a cryogenic second stage using a new J-2X engine3. The baseline configuration employs two 5-segment solid rocket boosters to achieve a 70 metric ton payload capability, but a new, more capable booster system will be required to attain the goal of 130 metric tons to orbit. To this end, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center recently released a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) entitled "Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction." The increased emphasis on affordability is evident in the language used in the NRA, which is focused on risk reduction "leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS" and "enabling competition" to "enhance SLS affordability. The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to perform an independent assessment of the elements that make up an affordable and realistic path forward for the SLS booster system, utilizing advanced design methods and technology evaluation techniques. The goal is to identify elements that will enable a more sustainable development program by exploring the trade space of heavy lift booster systems and focusing on affordability, operability, and reliability at the system and subsystem levels5. For this study

  7. Synchrotron Radiation II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a unique form of radiation that spans the electro-magnetic spectrum from X-rays through the ultraviolet and visible into the infrared. Tunable monochromators enable scientists to select a narrow band of wavelengths at any point in the spectrum. (Author/BB)

  8. Synchrotron Radiation II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a unique form of radiation that spans the electro-magnetic spectrum from X-rays through the ultraviolet and visible into the infrared. Tunable monochromators enable scientists to select a narrow band of wavelengths at any point in the spectrum. (Author/BB)

  9. Synchrotron radiation in biosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Gupta, Sayan; Zhan, Chenyang; Chance, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    The Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB) operates five beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Infrared (IR) micro-spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, structural proteomics and macromolecular footprinting are among the major technologies available through the Center. IR micro-spectroscopy is used to examine protein-folding in the microsecond time regime, image bone, neurons, seeds and other biological tissues, as well as image samples of interest in the chemical and environmental sciences. Structural proteomics research of New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) is steadily increasing the number of solved protein structures, with a goal to solve 100-200 structures per year. To speed up the research, a high-throughput method called 'metallomics' was implemented for NYSGRC crystallographers to detect intrinsic anomalous scatterers using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radical mediated X-ray footprinting is capable of resolving folding events of RNA, at single base resolution on millisecond timescales using a synchrotron white beam. The high brightness of synchrotron source is essential for CSB projects as it permits the use of smaller sample sizes and/or concentration, and allows studies of more complicated biological systems than with conventional sources.

  10. Pressure-Equalizing Cradle for Booster Rocket Mounting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutan, Elbert L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A launch system and method improve the launch efficiency of a booster rocket and payload. A launch aircraft atop which the booster rocket is mounted in a cradle, is flown or towed to an elevation at which the booster rocket is released. The cradle provides for reduced structural requirements for the booster rocket by including a compressible layer, that may be provided by a plurality of gas or liquid-filled flexible chambers. The compressible layer contacts the booster rocket along most of the length of the booster rocket to distribute applied pressure, nearly eliminating bending loads. Distributing the pressure eliminates point loading conditions and bending moments that would otherwise be generated in the booster rocket structure during carrying. The chambers may be balloons distributed in rows and columns within the cradle or cylindrical chambers extending along a length of the cradle. The cradle may include a manifold communicating gas between chambers.

  11. Toxicokinetics of Ag in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus exposed to Ag NPs and AgNO₃ via soil and food.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Svendsen, Claus; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been used in numerous consumer products and may enter the soil through the land application of biosolids. However, little is known about the relationship between Ag NP exposure and their bioavailability for soil organisms. This study aims at comparing the uptake and elimination kinetics of Ag upon exposures to different Ag forms (NPs and ionic Ag (as AgNO3)) in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus. Isopods were exposed to contaminated Lufa 2.2 soil or alder leaves as food. Uptake and elimination rate constants for soil exposure did not significantly differ between Ag NPs and ionic Ag at 30 and 60 mg Ag/kg. For dietary exposure, the uptake rate constant was up to 5 times higher for Ag NPs than for AgNO3, but this was related to feeding activity and exposure concentrations, while no difference in the elimination rate constants was found. When comparing both routes, dietary exposure resulted in lower Ag uptake rate constants but elimination rate constants did not differ. A fast Ag uptake was observed from both routes and most of the Ag taken up seemed not to be eliminated. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence showed Ag in the S-cells of the hepatopancreas, thus supporting the observations from the kinetic experiment (i.e. low elimination). In addition, our results show that isopods have an extremely high Ag accumulation capacity, suggesting the presence of an efficient Ag storage compartment.

  12. AGS polarized proton operation in run 8.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,H.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.A.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A.U.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.

    2008-06-23

    Dual partial snake scheme has been used for the Brookhaven AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) polarized proton operation for several years. It has provided polarized proton beams with 1.5 x 10{sup 11} intensity and 65% polarization for RHIC spin program. There is still residual polarization loss. Several schemes such as putting horizontal tune into the spin tune gap, and injection-on-the-fly were tested in the AGS to mitigate the loss. This paper presents the experiment results and analysis.

  13. Synchrotron radiation sources and research

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1995-12-31

    This is an introduction and a review of Synchrotron Radiation sources and the research performed using synchrotron radiation. I will begin with a brief discussion of the two principal uses of particle storage rings: for colliding beams (Collider) and for synchrotron radiation (Radiator). Then I will concentrate on discussions of synchrotron radiation topics, starting with a historical account, followed by descriptions of the features of the storage ring and the features of the radiation from the simplest source -- the bending magnet. I will then discuss the special insertion device sources -- wigglers and undulators -- and their radiations, and end with a brief general account of the research and other applications of synchrotron radiation.

  14. Shuttle Liquid Fly Back Booster Configuration Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, T. J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This paper surveys the basic configuration options available to a Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB), integrated with the Space Shuttle system. The background of the development of the LFBB concept is given. The influence of the main booster engine (BME) installations and the Fly Back Engine (FBE) installation on the aerodynamic configurations are also discussed. Limits on the LFBB configuration design space imposed by the existing Shuttle flight and ground elements are also described. The objective of the paper is to put the constrains and design space for an LFBB in perspective. The object of the work is to define LFBB configurations that significantly improve safety, operability, reliability and performance of the Shuttle system and dramatically lower operations costs.

  15. Space shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlin, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The system is described which is used to separate the solid rocket boosters from the space shuttle after they have expended most of their propellant and their thrust is near burnout. The dynamics of the separation are simulated in a computer program so that the separation system can be analyzed. The assumptions and ground rules used in analyzing this system are explained and the method of analysis is delineated. The capability of the separation system is presented together with data which may be used to aid in the design of the external tank and solid rocket booster interface. The results of a parameter study to determine the sensitivity of the separation to the initial state of the space shuttle are also presented.

  16. Shuttle Liquid Fly Back Booster Configuration Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, Thomas J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This paper surveys the basic configuration options available to a Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB), integrated with the Space Shuttle system. The background of the development of the LFBB concept is given. The influence of the main booster engine (BME) installations and the fly back engine (FBE) installation on the aerodynamic configurations are also discussed. Limits on the LFBB configuration design space imposed by the existing Shuttle flight and ground elements are also described. The objective of the paper is to put the constrains and design space for an LFBB in perspective. The object of the work is to define LFBB configurations that significantly improve safety, operability, reliability and performance of the Shuttle system and dramatically lower operations costs.

  17. Development of Cogging at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, K.; Chaurize, S.; Drennan, C.; Pellico, W.; Triplett, A. K.; Waller, A.

    2015-01-30

    The development of magnetic cogging is part of the Fermilab Booster upgrade within the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). The Booster is going to send 2.25E17 protons/hour which is almost double the present flux, 1.4E17 protons/hour to the Main Injector (MI) and Recycler (RR). The extraction kicker gap has to synchronize to the MI and RR injection bucket in order to avoid a beam loss at the rising edge of the extraction and injection kickers. Magnetic cogging is able to control the revolution frequency and the position of the gap using the magnetic field from dipole correctors while radial position feedback keeps the beam at the central orbit. The new cogging is expected to reduce beam loss due to the orbit changes and reduce beam energy loss when the gap is created. The progress of the magnetic cogging system development is going to be discussed in this paper.

  18. Booster Test for Space Launch System Rocket

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-26

    The test area where the second and final qualification motor (QM-2) test for the Space Launch System’s booster is seen Sunday, June 26, 2016, at Orbital ATK Propulsion Systems test facilities in Promontory, Utah. The test is scheduled for Tuesday, June 28 at 10:05 a.m. EDT (8:05 a.m. MDT). Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Digital LLRF controller for NICA booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatkin, G. A.; Batrakov, A. M.; Ilyin, I. V.; Vasilyev, M. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The digital LLRF controller based on embedded microcontroller for the booster of the Dubna superconducting accelerator complex NICA is presented. It allows setting the frequency in accordance with the magnetic field value in the 0.5-5 MHz range with an inaccuracy ± 110 Hz. A novel method of frequency calculation based on the derivative is proposed. The specialized tester module allows tuning up and checking the RF system during comissioning and operation.

  20. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  1. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, James; /Argonne

    2005-05-01

    A wider aperture, which has been obtained along the Booster beam line recently, brings the opportunity to run beams with the intensity higher than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Extra accelerating voltages can be achieved either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate via a slower acceleration, and this motivates the 6-GeV study.

  2. Comparing hydrogen and hydrocarbon booster fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of the consequences of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels as the basis of launch vehicle booster rocket-stage performance notes that hydrocarbon fuels lead to lower vehicle dry mass, for low-velocity requirements, while hydrogen fuel furnishes lower dry mass. Vehicles employing both types of fuel attempt to take advantage of the low intercept and slope of hydrocarbon fuel at low velocity, and subsequently, of the slope of the hydrogen curves at higher velocities.

  3. Booster Test for Space Launch System Rocket

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-26

    The test area where the second and final qualification motor (QM-2) test for the Space Launch System’s booster is seen through the window of a camera bunker, Sunday, June 26, 2016, at Orbital ATK Propulsion Systems test facilities in Promontory, Utah. The test is scheduled for Tuesday, June 28 at 10:05 a.m. EDT (8:05 a.m. MDT). Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Booster Test for Space Launch System Rocket

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-26

    The quench system arm and nozzle are seen at the test area where the second and final qualification motor (QM-2) test for the Space Launch System’s booster will take place, Sunday, June 26, 2016, at Orbital ATK Propulsion Systems test facilities in Promontory, Utah. The test is scheduled for Tuesday, June 28 at 10:05 a.m. EDT (8:05 a.m. MDT). Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Solid rocket booster water impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F.

    1982-01-01

    Water impact drop tests were performed on the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB). Peak water impact pressures and pressure/time traces were measured for various impact velocities using a two-dimensional, full-scale SRB aft skirt internal ring model. Passive burst disc-type pressure transducers were calibrated for use on flight SRB's. The effects on impact pressure of small ring configuration changes and application of thermal protection system cork layers were found to be negligible.

  6. Engine protection system for recoverable rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelby, Jr., Jerry A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A rocket engine protection system for a recoverable rocket booster which is arranged to land in a salt water body in substantially a nose down attitude. The system includes an inflatable bag which is stowed on a portion of a flat annular rim of the aft skirt of the booster. The bag is hinged at opposing sides and is provided with springs that urge the bag open. The bag is latched in a stowed position during launch and prior to landing for recovery is unlatched to permit the bag to be urged open and into sealing engagement with the rim. A source of pressurized gas further inflates the bag and urges it into sealing engagement with the rim of the skirt where it is locked into position. The gas provides a positive pressure upon the interior of the bag to preclude entry of salt water into the skirt and into contact with the engine. A flotation arrangement may assist in precluding the skirt of the booster from becoming submerged.

  7. Conceptual design of the Argonne 6-GeV synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Khoe, T.; Knott, M.; Kramer, S.; Kustom, R.; Lari, R.; Martin, R.; Mavrogenes, G.; Moenich, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 x 10/sup -9/ m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different rf systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. The higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target. A conceptual layout is shown. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Radiometry using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saloman, E. B.; Ebner, S. C.; Hughey, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    It is possible to use synchrotron radiation from electron synchrotrons and electron storage rings as an absolute source, especially in the VUV and soft X-ray regions where other standards are difficult to find. At the NBS, an electron storage ring (SURF-II) has been used to calibrate spectrometers and photometers utilized in solar and aeronomy research and in fusion plasma diagnostics. The radiation incident on these spectrometers can be calculated to uncertainties of 3%, and a technique to exactly determine the number of electrons orbiting in the ring is currently being developed to reduce this uncertainty. Detector calibrations between 5 and 55 nm are routinely performed at SURF-II and transfer standard detectors with 6-10% uncertainties over the range 5-254 nm are supplied.

  9. Multiturn injection of EBIS ions in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.J.

    2010-09-01

    Ions from EBIS are injected into Booster after acceleration by an RFQ and a Linac. The velocity of the ions at Booster injection is c{beta} where c is the velocity of light and (1) {beta} = 0.0655. The kinetic energy is (2) W = mc{sup 2}({gamma}-1) where m is the ion mass and (3) {gamma} = (1-{beta}{sup 2}){sup -1/2}. Putting in numbers one gets a kinetic energy of approximately 2 MeV per nucleon for each ion. The revolution period at injection is 10.276 {micro}s. The ions in the EBIS trap are delivered in a beam pulse that ranges from 10 to 40 {micro}s in length. This amounts to 1 to 4 turns around the machine. The transverse emittance (un-normalized) of EBIS beams just prior to injection into Booster is 11{pi} mm milliradians in both planes. This is an order of magnitude larger than the nominal 1{pi} mm milliradians for Tandem beams. Injection proceeds by means of an electrostatic inflector in the C3 straight section and four programmable injection dipoles in the C1, C3, C7, and D1 straights. These devices have been in use for many years for the injection of ions from Tandem as described in [1] and [2]. The inflector brings the incoming beam to the edge of the Booster acceptance and the dipoles produce a closed orbit bump that initially places the closed orbit near the septum at the in ector exit. During injection the orbit bump must be collapsed at a rate that keeps the injected beam from hitting the septum while continuing to allow beam to be injected into the machine acceptance. The process is discussed in [2] and [3]. There it is assumed that the injected beam moves with the closed orbit as the bump collapses. In the present report this is shown to be a valid approximation if the bump collapses sufficiently slowly. It is also shown that by judiciously choosing the horizontal tune and the initial distance of the closed orbit from the septum one can inject up to 4 turns of EBIS beams without loss on the septum. The reason for wanting to inject over a period of

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  11. The upgraded rf system for the AGS and high intensity proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    The AGS has been upgraded over the past three years to produce a record beam intensity of 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse for the fixed-target physics program. The major elements of the upgrade are: the new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron, the main magnet power supply, a high frequency longitudinal dilution cavity, a feedback damper for transverse instabilities, a fast gamma transition jump system, and a new high-power rf system. The new rf system and its role in achieving the high intensity goal are the subjects of this report. The rf system is heavily beam loaded, with 7 Amps of rf current in the beam and a peak power of 0.75 MW delivered to the beam by ten cavities. As an example of the scale of beam loading, at one point in the acceleration cycle the cavities are operated at 1.5 kV/gap; whereas, were it not for the new power amplifiers, the beam-induced voltage on the cavities would be over 25 kV/gap. The upgraded rf system, comprising: new power amplifiers, wide band rf feedback, improved cavities, and new low-level beam control electronics, is described. Results of measurements with beam, which characterize the system`s performance, are presented. A typical high intensity acceleration cycle is described with emphasis on the key challenges of beam loading.

  12. Design of 3 GeV booster ring lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Etisken, O. Ciftci, A. K.

    2016-03-25

    The aim of this study is to design of a 3 GeV booster ring for the 3 GeV storage ring. Electrons are needed to be accelerated to 3.0 GeV from 0.15 GeV energy. In this frame, we studied on two options for booster ring; a compact booster and the booster that shares the same tunnel with the storage ring. The lattice type has been chosen FODO for both options, lattice parameters are calculated, sextupole magnets are used to decrease dynamic aperture problem and dynamic aperture calculations are also made with considering of the necessary conditions. After designing and calculating of the parameters, these designs have been compared with each other. In addition to this comparison, these booster design parameters have been compared with some world centers design parameters and the reliability of the booster design is seen. Beam optics, OPA and Elegant simulation programs have been used in the study calculations.

  13. CIRCE: A dedicated storage ring for coherent THz synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, W.R.; Munson, D.V.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.D.; Thur, W.G.; Jung, J.Y.; Wan, W.

    2003-08-12

    We present the concepts for an electron storage ring dedicated to and optimized for the production of stable coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) over the far-infrared terahertz wavelength range from 200 mm to about one cm. CIRCE (Coherent InfraRed CEnter) will be a 66 m circumference ring located on top of the ALS booster synchrotron shielding tunnel and using the existing ALS injector. This location provides enough floor space for both the CIRCE ring, its required shielding, and numerous beamlines. We briefly outline a model for CSR emission in which a static bunch distortion induced by the synchrotron radiation field is used to significantly extend the stable CSR emission towards higher frequencies. This model has been verified with experimental CSR results. We present the calculated CIRCE photon flux where a gain of 6-9 orders of magnitude is shown compared to existing far-IR sources. Additionally, the particular design of the dipole vacuum chamber has been optimized to allow an excellent transmission of these far-infrared wavelengths. We believe that the CIRCE source can be constructed for a modest cost.

  14. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, Frustum and Nose Cap mated assembly undergoing final preparations in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. In this view the access panel on the Forward Skirt is removed and you can see a small portion of the interior of the Forward Skirt. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  15. Space Shuttle Five-Segment Booster (Short Course)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Stanley R.; Rudolphi, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA is considering upgrading the Space Shuttle by adding a fifth segment (FSB) to the current four-segment solid rocket booster. Course materials cover design and engineering issues related to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) raised by the addition of a fifth segment to the rocket booster. Topics cover include: four segment vs. five segment booster, abort modes, FSB grain design, erosive burning, enhanced propellant burn rate, FSB erosive burning model development and hardware configuration.

  16. STS-26 solid rocket booster post flight structural assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herda, David A.; Finnegan, Charles J.

    1988-01-01

    A post flight assessment of the Space Shuttle's Solid Rocket Boosters was conducted at the John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida after the launch of STS-26. The two boosters were inspected for structural damage and the results of this inspection are presented. Overall, the boosters were in good condition. However, there was some minor damage attributed to splash down. Some of this damage is a recurring problem. Explanations of these problems are provided.

  17. StarBooster Demonstrator Cluster Configuration Analysis/Verification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeTurris, Dianne J.

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the flight dynamics of the cluster configuration of two first stage boosters and upper-stage, flight-testing of subsonic sub-scale models has been undertaken using two glideback boosters launched on a center upper-stage. Three high power rockets clustered together were built and flown to demonstrate vertical launch, separation and horizontal recovery of the boosters. Although the boosters fly to conventional aircraft landing, the centerstage comes down separately under its own parachute. The goal of the project has been to collect data during separation and flight for comparison with a six degree of freedom simulation. The configuration for the delta wing canard boosters comes from a design by Starcraft Boosters, Inc. The subscale rockets were constructed of foam covered in carbon or fiberglass and were launched with commercially available solid rocket motors. The first set of boosters built were 3-ft tall with a 4-ft tall centerstage, and two additional sets of boosters were made that were each over 5-ft tall with a 7.5 ft centerstage. The rocket cluster is launched vertically, then after motor bum out the boosters are separated and flown to a horizontal landing under radio-control. An on-board data acquisition system recorded data during both the launch and glide phases of flight.

  18. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose Cap assembly undergoing preparations and assembly procedures in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The Nose Cap contains the Pilot and Drogue Chutes and the Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. In this view the assembly is rotated so that the four Separation Motors are in view and aligned with the approximate centerline of the image. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. Design of the KHIMA synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Heejoong; An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon; Kim, Geun-Beom

    2015-10-01

    The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator project (KHIMA) has been proposed as an ion-beam synchrotron facility for cancer therapy. The facility will be installed at Gijang, Busan with completion in 2017. The proposed maximum energy of the ions is 430 MeV/u (for carbon) to cover various tumor depths up to 30 cm. For the synchrotron design, we optimized the lattice configuration to fit the therapy. We discuss here the status of the synchrotron's design.

  20. Diphtheria boosters for adults: balancing risks.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Claire; White, Joanne; Power, Deirdre; Crowcroft, Natasha

    2007-01-01

    Combined tetanus-diphtheria vaccines are now the only means of protecting adults from tetanus or diphtheria. When advising on the benefits and risk of vaccinating for one disease, clinicians now have to consider the other vaccine component, and questions have arisen about where the balance of risk lies for different patients. Five doses of diphtheria-toxoid containing vaccine are probably sufficient protection for individuals who remain in low-incidence countries such as those in most of Western Europe. Adults who remain in the UK are extremely unlikely to be exposed to diphtheria and this needs to be taken into account when assessing the balance of risk where individuals have received fewer than five doses of diphtheria toxoid but five or more doses of tetanus toxoid. In contrast to diphtheria, if someone has received fewer than five doses of tetanus toxoid but is up to date for diphtheria toxoid, the balance of lifelong risk is probably in favour of giving tetanus toxoid irrespective of the individual's diphtheria status. For travellers to diphtheria endemic countries boosters are recommended if more than 10 years has elapsed since the last dose. For individuals who have already received five or more doses of tetanus vaccine in the past, receiving further boosters of tetanus in combination with diphtheria toxoid is unlikely to cause any significant reactions. The only absolute contraindication to such boosters is a previously documented anaphylactic reaction to either diphtheria or tetanus toxoid. Individuals who have a history of such a reaction should be well advised regarding probable risk of infection, symptoms of the disease and the need to seek early treatment.

  1. Launch site integration of Liquid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Leland P.; Dickinson, William J.

    1989-01-01

    The impacts of introducing Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRB) into the STS/KSC launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Pre-launch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated.

  2. Transition crossing simulation at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Pellico, W.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The demand in high intensity and low emittance of the beam extracted from the Booster requires a better control over the momentum spread growth and bunch length shortening at transition crossing, in order to prevent beam loss and coupled bunch instability. Since the transition crossing involves both longitudinal and transverse dynamics, the recently modified 3-D STRUCT code provides an opportunity to numerically investigate the different transition crossing schemes in the machine environment, and apply the results of simulation to minimize the beam loss and emittance growth operationally.

  3. Fermilab booster modeling and space charge study

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    The Fermilab Booster is a bottleneck limiting the proton beam intensity in the accelerator complex. A study group has been formed in order to have a better understanding of this old machine and seek possible improvements. The work includes lattice modeling, numerical simulations, bench measurements and beam studies. Based on newly obtained information, it has been found that the machine acceptance is severely compromised by the orbit bump and dogleg magnets. This, accompanied by emittance dilution from space charge at injection, is a major cause of the large beam loss at the early stage of the cycle. Measures to tackle this problem are being pursued.

  4. Pegasus air-launched space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Robert E.; Mosier, Marty R.

    The launching of small satellites with the mother- aircraft-launched Pegasus booster yields substantial cost improvements over ground launching and enhances operational flexibility, since it allows launches to be conducted into any orbital inclination. The Pegasus launch vehicle is a three-stage solid-rocket-propelled system with delta-winged first stage. The major components of airborne support equipment, located on the mother aircraft, encompass a launch panel operator console, an electronic pallet, and a pylon adapter. Alternatives to the currently employed B-52 launch platform aircraft have been identified for future use. Attention is given to the dynamic, thermal, and acoustic environments experienced by the payload.

  5. Hybrid boosters for future launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargies, E.; Lo, R. E.

    1987-10-01

    Hybrid rocket propulsion systems furnish the advantages of much higher safety levels, due both to shut-down capability in case of ignition failure to one unit and the potential choice of nontoxic propellant combinations, such as LOX/polyethylene; they nevertheless yield performance levels comparable or superior to those of solid rocket boosters. Attention is presently given to the results of DFVLR analytical model studies of hybrid propulsion systems, with attention to solid fuel grain geometrical design and propellant grain surface ablation rate. The safety of hybrid rockets recommends them for use by manned spacecraft.

  6. Delta Mariner arrival with EFT-1 Booster

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-03

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The United Launch Alliance barge Delta Mariner enters Port Canaveral in Florida. The barge is carrying two of the booster stages for the Delta IV Heavy rocket slated for Orion's Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep-space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion is scheduled to launch in September 2014 atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System

  7. Solid rocket booster thermal protection system materials development. [space shuttle boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1978-01-01

    A complete run log of all tests conducted in the NASA-MSFC hot gas test facility during the development of materials for the space shuttle solid rocket booster thermal protection system are presented. Lists of technical reports and drawings generated under the contract are included.

  8. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  9. Synchrotrons for Hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullia, Marco G.

    Since 1990, when the world's first hospital-based proton therapy center opened in Loma Linda, California, interest in dedicated proton and carbon ion therapy facilities has been growing steadily. Today, many proton therapy centers are in operation, but the number of centers offering carbon ion therapy is still very low. This difference reflects the fact that protons are well accepted by the medical community, whereas radiotherapy with carbon ions is still experimental. Furthermore, accelerators for carbon ions are larger, more complicated and more expensive than those for protons only. This article describes the accelerator performance required for hadrontherapy and how this is realized, with particular emphasis on carbon ion synchrotrons.

  10. HIGH INTENSITY PERFORMANCE AND UPGRADES AT THE BROOKHAVEN AGS

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    1998-05-04

    Fig. 1 shows the present layout of the AGS-RHIC accelerator complex. The high intensity proton beam of the AGS is used both for the slow-extracted-beam (SEB) area with many target station to produce secondary beams and the fast-extracted-beam (FEB) line used for the production of muons for the g-2 experiment and for high intensity target testing for the spallation neutron sources and muon production targets for the muon collider. The same FEB line will also be used for the transfer of beam to RHIC. The proton beam intensity in the AGS has increased steadily over the 35 year existence of the AGS, but the most dramatic increase occurred over the last couple of years with the addition of the new AGS Booster[1]. In Fig. 2 the history of the AGS intensity improvements is shown and the major upgrades are indicated. The AGS Booster has one quarter the circumference of the AGS and therefore allows four Booster beam pulses to be stacked in the AGS at an injection energy of 1.5--1.9 GeV. At this increased energy, space charge forces are much reduced and this in turn allows for the dramatic increase in the AGS beam intensity. The 200 MeV LINAC is being used both for the injection into the Booster as well as an isotope production facility. A recent upgrade of the LINAC rf system made it possible to operated at an average H{sup {minus}} current of 150 {micro}A and a maximum of 12 x 10{sup 13} H{sup {minus}} per 500 {micro}s LINAC pulse for the isotope production target. Typical beam currents during the 500 {micro}s pulse are about 80 mA at the source, 60 mA after the 750 keV RFQ, 38 mA after the first LINAC tank (10 MeV), and 37 mA at end of the LINAC at 200 MeV. The normalized beam emittance is about 2 {pi} mm mrad for 95% of the beam and the beam energy spread is about {+-}1.2 MeV. A magnetic fast chopper installed at 750 keV allows the shaping of the beam injected into the Booster to avoid excessive beam loss.

  11. Capture, acceleration and bunching rf systems for the MEIC booster and storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. The electron collider ring accepts electrons from CEBAF at energies from 3 to 12 GeV. Protons and ions are delivered to a booster and captured in a long bunch before being ramped and transferred to the ion collider ring. The ion collider ring accelerates a small number of long ion bunches to colliding energy before they are re-bunched into a high frequency train of very short bunches for colliding. Two sets of low frequency RF systems are needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping in the booster and ion collider ring. Another two sets of high frequency RF cavities are needed for re-bunching in the ion collider ring and compensating synchrotron radiation energy loss in the electron collider ring. The requirements from energy ramping, ion beam bunching, electron beam energy compensation, collective effects, beam loading and feedback capability, RF power capability, etc. are presented. The preliminary designs of these RF systems are presented. Concepts for the baseline cavity and RF station configurations are described, as well as some options that may allow more flexible injection and acceleration schemes.

  12. Compensation of dogleg effect in Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaobiao Huang; Sho Ohnuma

    2003-10-06

    The edge focusing of dogleg magnets in Fermilab Booster has been causing severe distortion to the horizontal linear optics. The doglegs are vertical rectangular bends, therefore the vertical edge focusing is canceled by body focusing and the overall effect is focusing in the horizontal plane. The maximum horizontal beta function is changed from 33.7m to 46.9m and maximum dispersion from 3.19m to 6.14m. Beam size increases accordingly. This is believed to be one of the major reasons of beam loss. In this technote we demonstrate that this effect can be effectively corrected with Booster's quadrupole correctors in short straight sections (QS). There are 24 QS correctors which can alter horizontal linear optics with negligible perturbation to the vertical plane. The currents of correctors are determined by harmonic compensation, i.e., cancellation of dogleg's harmonics that are responsible for the distortion with that of QS correctors. By considering a few leading harmonics, the ideal lattice can be partly restored. For the current dogleg layout, maximum {beta}{sub x} is reduced to 40.6m and maximum D{sub x} is reduced to 4.19m. This scheme can be useful after the dogleg in section No.3 is repositioned. In this case it can bring {beta}{sub x} from 40.9m down to 37.7m, D{sub x} from 4.57m to 4.01m.

  13. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  14. General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket Motor Segments in the Surge Building of the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility at Kennedy Space Center awaiting transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building and subsequent mounting and assembly on the Mobile Launch Platform. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  15. STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, solid rocket booster (SRB) inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Engineers, kneeling inside a hollow solid rocket booster (SRB), closely inspect the SRB segments and seams in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) rotation and processing facility. The SRB will be used on STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. The booster segments were transported via rail car from Morton Thiokol's Utah manufacturing plant. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-492.

  16. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... one or more specific channels. A signal booster is deemed to be a Class A signal booster if none of..., tunnels, shielded outdoor areas and other locations where these signals would otherwise be too weak for... components. (b) Authority to operate. PLMRS licensees for stations operating on assigned channels higher than...

  17. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... one or more specific channels. A signal booster is deemed to be a Class A signal booster if none of..., tunnels, shielded outdoor areas and other locations where these signals would otherwise be too weak for... components. (b) Authority to operate. PLMRS licensees for stations operating on assigned channels higher than...

  18. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of signal boosters. 101.151 Section 101.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.151 Use of signal boosters. Private operational-fixed licensees...

  19. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of signal boosters. 101.151 Section 101.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.151 Use of signal boosters. Private operational-fixed licensees...

  20. Study of solid rocket motor for a space shuttle booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster was directed toward definition of a parallel-burn shuttle booster using two 156-in.-dia solid rocket motors. The study effort was organized into the following major task areas: system studies, preliminary design, program planning, and program costing.

  1. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... narrowband channel that the booster is designed to amplify. Class B broadband signal boosters must meet the..., tunnels, underground areas, etc., or in remote areas, i.e., areas where there is little or no risk of... equipment may cause to other systems. Normal co-channel transmissions will not be considered as...

  2. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... narrowband channel that the booster is designed to amplify. Class B broadband signal boosters must meet the..., tunnels, underground areas, etc., or in remote areas, i.e., areas where there is little or no risk of... equipment may cause to other systems. Normal co-channel transmissions will not be considered as...

  3. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... narrowband channel that the booster is designed to amplify. Class B broadband signal boosters must meet the..., tunnels, underground areas, etc., or in remote areas, i.e., areas where there is little or no risk of... equipment may cause to other systems. Normal co-channel transmissions will not be considered as...

  4. Thiokol Corporation's Castor 120 solid propulsion booster program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilden, J.

    1992-07-01

    The Castor 120 program aimed at developing a solid propulsion booster for expandable launch vehicles is discussed. The booster is based on a light weight epoxy case, HTPB propellant, and flexible bearing nozzle. The Castor 120 will be capable of satisfying multiple launch vehicle functions for use as a strap-on, a first- or a second stage.

  5. General view of a fully assembled Solid Rocket Booster sitting ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of a fully assembled Solid Rocket Booster sitting atop the Mobile Launch Platform in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. Credit BG. Northwest facade of Building 4504 (Deluge Water Booster ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Northwest facade of Building 4504 (Deluge Water Booster Station) is in view at left, with 500,000 gallon water tank (Building 4503) at right. Fenced electrical substation in view between the above structures is Building 4510. Building 4505 is in background - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Deluge Water Booster Station, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRBs) replacing Solid Rocket Boosters on the Space Shuttle program. The major findings are given. The most significant conclusion is that LRBs offer significantly safety and performance advantages over the SRBs currently used by the STS without major impact to the ongoing program.

  8. Mars Science Laboratory Atlas V First Stage Booster

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-07

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, stands in front of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V first stage booster while taking questions from the media, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011, at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The booster will help send NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover to Mars later this year. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Synchrotron Radiation Sources and Optical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, D.; Zangrando, M.

    This chapter will briefly describe the photon transport system, from the sources to the experimental stations, including an overview of the characteristics of the synchrotron radiation (SR). The target of this chapter is to give, to an occasional user of the SR source, a general overview on the possible different available sources and the different possible optical systems, with particular emphasis to the soft X-ray region, without entering too much into details. If one wish to have a deep knowledge on the subjects treated here, there are four books that can answer almost all the possible questions on SR sources and optical devices, and they are reported in the references [W.B. Peatman, Gratings, Mirrors, and Slits (Gordon and Breach Science Publishers, New York, 1997); D. Attwood, Soft X-rays and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999); H. Wiedemann, Synchrotron Radiation (Springer, Heidelberg, 2002); A. Erko, M. Idir, T. Krist, A.G. Michette, Modern Developments in X-ray and Neutron Optics, Springer Series in Optical Science, vol. 137 (Springer, Heidelberg, 2008)].

  10. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, Herman

    2003-07-09

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, microfabrication, archaeometry and medical diagnostics. These rings span electron energies from a few hundred MeV to 8 GeV. Several facilities serve 2000 or more users on 30-60 simultaneously operational experimental stations. The largest rings are more than 1 km in circumference, cost about US$1B to build and have annual budgets of about US$100M. This growth is due to the remarkable properties of synchrotron radiation, including its high intensity, brightness and stability; wide spectral range extending from the infra-red to hard x-rays; variable polarization; pulsed time structure; and high vacuum environment. The ever-expanding user community and the increasing number of applications are fueling a continued growth in the number of facilities around the world. In the past few years new types of light sources have been proposed based on linear accelerators. Linac-based sources now being pursued include the free-electron laser (FEL) and energy recovery linac (ERL

  11. Booster recovery following premature space shuttle stage separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Abort criteria necessary to satisfy space shuttle program requirements to include intact vehicle abort capability are discussed. Intact abort implies the ability of the booster and orbiter to separate and both continue flight to a safe landing, with a full payload aboard the orbiter. Obviously, the requirement to separate early along the ascent trajectory presupposes critical operational problems that are probably booster problems and may preclude booster recovery. On the other hand, some critical problems while mated can become manageable when separated and should result in full booster recovery. All critical orbiter problems fall into this category; since stage separation without orbiter thrust is a capability of some separation system concepts, booster stage recovery following separation is a requirement.

  12. A Method for Sizing Booster Charges in Pyrotechnic Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1998-01-01

    Since no generally accepted guidelines exist on sizing booster charges to assure functional margins in pyrotechnically actuated devices, a study was conducted to provide an approach to meet this need. An existing pyrovalve was modified from a single cartridge input to a dual-cartridge input with a booster charge. The objectives of this effort were to demonstrate an energy-based functional margin approach for sizing booster charges, and to determine booster charge energy delivery characteristics in this valve. Functional margin was demonstrated by determining the energy required to actuate the valve through weight drop tests for comparison to the energy delivered by the cartridge and booster charge in firings in the modified valve. The results of this study indicated that this energy-based approach fully met the study objectives, showing its usefulness for this and possibly other pyrotechnic devices.

  13. Superconducting racetrack booster for the ion complex of MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Yu; Kondratenko, A. M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kovalenko, A.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2016-02-01

    The current design of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) project at Jefferson lab features a single 8 GeV/c figure-8 booster based on super-ferric magnets. Reducing the circumference of the booster by switching to a racetrack design may improve its performance by limiting the space charge effect and lower its cost. We consider problems of preserving proton and deuteron polarizations in a superconducting racetrack booster. We show that using magnets based on hollow high-current NbTi composite superconducting cable similar to those designed at JINR for the Nuclotron guarantees preservation of the ion polarization in a racetrack booster up to 8 GeV/c. The booster operation cycle would be a few seconds that would improve the operating efficiency of the MEIC ion complex.

  14. Pediatric injury prevention: methods of booster seat education.

    PubMed

    Philbrook, Julie K; Kiragu, Andrew W; Geppert, Joni S; Graham, Patricia R; Richardson, Laura M; Kriel, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Sixty elementary schools in Minneapolis were asked to participate in a study to evaluate the most effective education method to increase booster seat knowledge and use in kindergarten-age children. School personnel selected one of the following interventions: (1) written information, (2) parent education class and a free booster seat, or (3) student education and a free booster seat. Twenty schools participated, with 132 parents completing the telephone interview 3 to 6 months post-survey. Providing instructions to parent groups and teaching children in the classroom, along with providing an incentive booster seat, was shown to increase booster seat use. Providing information only was found to be ineffective. Pediatric and school nurses should focus their injury prevention efforts beyond written materials. Results indicate that presentations for children and their parents, along with incentives, can result in changes in behavior.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of pertussis booster vaccination in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, Mark H; De Cao, Elisabetta; Postma, Maarten J

    2012-11-26

    The aim of the current study is to estimate the epidemiological and economical consequences of several extended pertussis booster vaccination strategies and to explore the impact of parameters surrounded by large uncertainty on the cost-effectiveness. We developed an age structured transmission dynamic model to evaluate the impact of programs targeting (i) adolescents or adults using a single booster dose, (ii) a combination of adolescent and adult vaccination, and (iii) an every 10 years booster dose. The base case analysis, that is a single adolescent booster administered at the age of 12 years, resulted in a reduction of pertussis infections. However, due to an increase in the number of symptomatic infections in adults, the benefits in terms of QALYs gained and costs saved in children were partly offset. Despite these negative indirect effects in the adult population, administering an additional booster dose could still be considered cost effective with an ICER of €4200 per QALY gained. Combining an adolescent booster dose at the age of 10 (most cost-effective age for a single adolescent booster dose) with an adult (18-30 years) booster dose always resulted in favorable ICERs (<€10,000/QALY). Finally the every 10 year booster dose resulted in an ICER of €16,900 per QALY. The impact of different assumptions regarding the disease epidemiology, disease-related parameters, and vaccination program-related issues was limited. To conclude, we show that extended pertussis booster vaccination strategies are likely to be considered as cost-effective. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence and predictors of booster seat use in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Golonka, Richard P; Dobbs, Bonnie M; Rowe, Brian H; Voaklander, Don

    2016-08-15

    To determine the prevalence of booster seat misuse in a Canadian province and identify determinants of non-use. A cross-sectional study using parking lot interviews and in-vehicle restraint inspections by trained staff was conducted at 67 randomly selected childcare centres across Alberta. Only booster-eligible children were included in this analysis. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported using unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression. Overall, 23% of children were not in a booster seat, and in 31.8% of cases there was evidence of at least one misuse. Non-use increased significantly by age, from 22.2% for children 2 years of age to 47.8% for children 7 years of age (p = 0.02). Children who were at significantly increased risk of booster seat non-use were those in vehicles with drivers who could not recall the booster seat to seatbelt transition point (OR: 4.54; 95% CI: 2.05-10.06) or drivers who were under the age of 30 (OR: 3.54; 95% CI: 1.45-8.62). A front row seating position was also associated with significantly higher risk of nonuse (OR: 18.00; 95% CI: 2.78-116.56). Children in vehicles with grandparent drivers exhibited significantly decreased risk of booster seat non-use (OR: 0.21; 95% CI: 0.05-0.85). Messaging should continue to stress that the front seat is not a safe place for any child under the age of 9 as well as remind drivers of the booster seat to seatbelt transition point, with additional emphasis placed on appealing to parents under the age of 30. Future research should focus on the most effective means of communicating booster seat information to this group. Enacting mandatory booster seat legislation would be an important step to increase both awareness and proper use of booster seats in Alberta.

  17. Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprangle, Philip; Ting, Antonio; Esarey, Eric; Fisher, Amon; Mourou, Gerald

    1993-02-01

    The Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS) utilizes a high peak power or high average power laser to generate within a vacuum chamber a laser beam travelling in one direction to interact with an electron beam traveling in an opposite direction in order to generate high-power x-rays. A ring resonator formed by a plurality of mirrors directs the laser beam in a closed loop to impact with the electron beam to produce x-rays. Concave mirrors in the ring resonator focus the laser beam upon the point where the laser beam interacts with the electron beam to intensify the laser energy at that point. When a Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator (RF linac) is used to produce the electron beam, x-rays having a short pulse length are generated. When a betatron is used as an electron source, x-rays having a long pulse length are generated.

  18. Synchrotron emission in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafat, M. Z.; Melrose, D. B.

    2015-05-01

    A conventional astrophysical treatment of synchrotron emission is modified to include the refractive index of air, written as n = 1 + 1/(2γ 02), with γ0 ≫ 1. The angular distribution of emission by an electron with Lorentz factor γ is broadened, from a range of |θ - α| ≈ 1/γ in vacuo (θ = emission angle, α = pitch angle) to |θ - α| ≈ max{1/γ, 1/γ0} in air. The emission spectrum in air is almost unchanged from that in vacuo at sufficiently low frequencies and it is modified by extending to higher frequencies with increasing γ/γ0 < 1, and to arbitrarily high frequencies for γ/γ0 ≥ 1. We estimate the frequency at which this enhancement starts, and show that it decreases with increasing γ/γ0 > 1. We interpret the enhanced high-frequency emission as Cerenkov-like, and attribute it to the formation of caustic surfaces that sweep across the observer; we use a geometric model based on Huygens construction to support this interpretation. The geometric model predicts that the so-called Cerenkov ring present at high frequencies may be circular, elliptical, or crescent shaped. In the astrophysical treatment of synchrotron emission, the dependence on azimuthal angle is lost in the expression for emissivity. A motivation for this investigation is the application to extensive air showers, and for this purpose the loss of azimuthal dependence is a limitation. We comment on methods to overcome this limitation. We show that when an observer can see emission from inside the Cerenkov cone, emission from outside the Cerenkov cone, on either side of it, arrives simultaneously; there are three emission times for a given observation time.

  19. TDRS-M Atlas V Booster and Centaur Stages Arrival, Offload, and Transport (Booster) to ASOC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-26

    The United Launch Alliance (ULA) Mariner arrives at Port Canaveral in Florida carrying an Atlas V rocket booster and centaur upper stage bounded for Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The centaur upper stage is transported from the company's Mariner ship to the Delta Operations Center. The booster stage is transported to the Atlas Spaceflight Operations Center. The rocket is scheduled to launch the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-M. It will be the latest spacecraft destined for the agency's constellation of communications satellites that allows nearly continuous contact with orbiting spacecraft ranging from the International Space Station and Hubble Space Telescope to the array of scientific observatories. Liftoff atop the ULA Atlas V rocket is scheduled to take place from Cape Canaveral's Space Launch Complex 41 on Aug. 3, 2017 at 9:02 a.m. EDT.

  20. Delta II SIRTF Booster Lift & Mate

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-05

    One of nine solid rocket boosters is lifted on Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the Delta II rocket in the background. The second stage will later be hoisted atop the first stage. The Delta rocket is the launch vehicle for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground. Consisting of an 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF is scheduled for launch April 15 at 4:34:07 a.m. EDT.

  1. Shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Park, O. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Additional results and a revised and improved computer program listing from the shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics formulations are presented. Numerical calculations for the flame zone of solid propellants are carried out using the Galerkin finite elements, with perturbations expanded to the zeroth, first, and second orders. The results indicate that amplification of oscillatory motions does indeed prevail in high frequency regions. For the second order system, the trend is similar to the first order system for low frequencies, but instabilities may appear at frequencies lower than those of the first order system. The most significant effect of the second order system is that the admittance is extremely oscillatory between moderately high frequency ranges.

  2. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster dewatering system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishel, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    After the launch of the Space Shuttle, the two solid rocket boosters (SRB's) are jettisoned into the ocean where they float in a spar (vertical) mode. It is cost effective to recover the SRB's. A remote controlled submersible vehicle has been developed to aid in their recovery. The vehicle is launched from a support ship, maneuvered to the SRB, then taken to depth and guided into the rocket nozzle. It then dewaters the SRB, using compressed air from the ship, and seals the nozzle. When dewatered, the SRB floats in a log (horizontal) mode and can be towed to port for reuse. The design of the remote controlled vehicle and its propulsion system is presented.

  3. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster dewatering system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishel, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    After the launch of the Space Shuttle, the two solid rocket boosters (SRB's) are jettisoned into the ocean where they float in a spar (vertical) mode. It is cost effective to recover the SRB's. A remote controlled submersible vehicle has been developed to aid in their recovery. The vehicle is launched from a support ship, maneuvered to the SRB, then taken to depth and guided into the rocket nozzle. It then dewaters the SRB, using compressed air from the ship, and seals the nozzle. When dewatered, the SRB floats in a log (horizontal) mode and can be towed to port for reuse. The design of the remote controlled vehicle and its propulsion system is presented.

  4. Delta Mariner arrival with EFT-1 Booster

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-03

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The United Launch Alliance barge Delta Mariner approaches the mouth of Port Canaveral in Florida. The barge is carrying two of the booster stages for the Delta IV Heavy rocket slated for Orion's Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep-space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion is scheduled to launch in September 2014 atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

  5. Power flow control using quadrature boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanandan, Sandeep N.

    A power system that can be controlled within security constraints would be an advantage to power planners and real-time operators. Controlling flows can lessen reliability issues such as thermal limit violations, power stability problems, and/or voltage stability conditions. Control of flows can also mitigate market issues by reducing congestion on some lines and rerouting power to less loaded lines or onto preferable paths. In the traditional control of power flows, phase shifters are often used. More advanced methods include using Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) Controllers. Some examples include Thyristor Controlled Series Capacitors, Synchronous Series Static Compensators, and Unified Power Flow Controllers. Quadrature Boosters (QBs) have similar structures to phase-shifters, but allow for higher voltage magnitude during real power flow control. In comparison with other FACTS controllers QBs are not as complex and not as expensive. The present study proposes to use QBs to control power flows on a power system. With the inclusion of QBs, real power flows can be controlled to desired scheduled values. In this thesis, the linearized power flow equations used for power flow analysis were modified for the control problem. This included modifying the Jacobian matrix, the power error vector, and calculating the voltage injected by the quadrature booster for the scheduled real power flow. Two scenarios were examined using the proposed power flow control method. First, the power flow in a line in a 5-bus system was modified with a QB using the method developed in this thesis. Simulation was carried out using Matlab. Second, the method was applied to a 30-bus system and then to a 118-bus system using several QBs. In all the cases, the calculated values of the QB voltages led to desired power flows in the designated line.

  6. Boosters and barriers for direct cardiac reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Talkhabi, Mahmood; Zonooz, Elmira Rezaei; Baharvand, Hossein

    2017-06-01

    Heart disease is currently the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, which accounts for approximately 33% of all deaths. Recently, a promising and alchemy-like strategy has been developed called direct cardiac reprogramming, which directly converts somatic cells such as fibroblasts to cardiac lineage cells such as cardiomyocytes (CMs), termed induced CMs or iCMs. The first in vitro cardiac reprogramming study, mediated by cardiac transcription factors (TFs)-Gata4, Tbx5 and Mef2C-, was not enough efficient to produce an adequate number of fully reprogrammed, functional iCMs. As a result, numerous combinations of cardiac TFs exist for direct cardiac reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts. However, the efficiency of direct cardiac reprogramming remains low. Recently, a number of cellular and molecular mechanisms have been identified to increase the efficiency of direct cardiac reprogramming and the quality of iCMs. For example, microgrooved substrate, cardiogenic growth factors [VEGF, FGF, BMP4 and Activin A], and an appropriate stoichiometry of TFs boost the direct cardiac reprogramming. On the other hand, serum, TGFβ signaling, activators of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and some epigenetic factors (Bmi1 and Ezh2) are barriers for direct cardiac reprogramming. Manipulating these mechanisms by the application of boosters and removing barriers can increase the efficiency of direct cardiac reprogramming and possibly make iCMs reliable for cell-based therapy or other potential applications. In this review, we summarize the latest trends in cardiac TF- or miRNA-based direct cardiac reprogramming and comprehensively discuses all molecular and cellular boosters and barriers affecting direct cardiac reprogramming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Booster Vaccination: The Role of Reduced Antigen Content Vaccines as a Preschool Booster

    PubMed Central

    Conversano, Michele; Zivelonghi, Giambattista; Zoppi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The need for boosters for tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, and polio, starting from preschool age, is related to the waning immune protection conferred by vaccination, the elimination/reduction of natural boosters due to large-scale immunization programs, and the possibility of reintroduction of wild agents from endemic areas. Taking into account the relevance of safety/tolerability in the compliance with vaccination among the population, it have been assessed whether today enough scientific evidences are available to support the use of dTap-IPV booster in preschool age. The review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed search engine. A total of 41 works has been selected; besides, the documentation produced by the World Health Organization, the European Centre for Disease Control, and the Italian Ministry of Health has been consulted. Many recent papers confirm the opportunity to use a low antigenic dose vaccine starting from 4 to 6 years of age. There is also evidence that 10 years after immunization the rate of seroprotected subjects against diphtheria does not differ significantly between those vaccinated with paediatric dose (DTaP) or reduced dose (dTaP or dTap) product. The dTpa vaccine is highly immunogenic for diphtheria toxoids regardless of prior vaccination history (2 + 1 and 3 + 1 schedules). PMID:24678509

  8. Predictors of poor response after primary immunization of hepatitis B vaccines for infants and antibody seroprotection of booster in a metropolis of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Hu, Jiayu; Liang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Fuzhen; Li, Yanting; Yuan, Zheng-an

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate proportion and predictors of poor response in infants and appraise booster seroprotection, we surveyed 2047 infants in Shanghai and detected antibody to hepatitis B (HB) surface antigen (anti-HBs). Poor responders were randomized into 2 groups, given booster with 5 µg and 10 µg hepatitis B vaccine (HepB), respectively. Proportion of infants with titer <10 mIU/mL and 10 to 99 mIU/mL was 1.86% and 15.14%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression suggested infants of male, aged 13 to 18 months, premature, administered with 5 µg HepB or mother positive for HB surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBe antigen (HBeAg) would more likely develop worse response. Difference of geometric mean concentration between the first and full booster was not statistically significant both for 5 µg and for 10 µg HepB groups. The seroprotective rate were higher for infants with 10 µg HepB than those with 5 µg HepB (P > .05). Therefore, it is concluded that booster for poor vaccinees with 10 µg HepB could achieve satisfactory seroprotection. © 2013 APJPH.

  9. NASA SLS Booster Nozzle Plug Pieces Fly During Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-28

    On June 28, a test version of the booster that will help power NASA's new rocket, the Space Launch System, fired up at nearly 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit for a successful, two-minute qualification test at Orbital ATK's test facilities in Promontory, Utah. This video shows the booster's nozzle plug intentionally breaking apart. The smoky ring coming off the booster is condensed water vapor created by a pressure difference between the motor gas and normal air. The nozzle plug is an environmental barrier to prevent heat, dust and moisture from getting inside the booster before it ignites. The plug isn't always part of a static test but was included on this one due to changes made to the hardware. The foam on the plug is denser than previous NASA launch vehicles, as the engines are now in the same plane as the boosters. A numbered grid was placed on the exterior of the plug before the test so the pieces retrieved could support plug breakup assessment and reconstruction. Along with video, collecting the pieces helps determine the size and speed of them when they break apart. Nozzle plug pieces were found as far as 1,500 to 2,000 feet away from the booster. This is the last full-scale qualification test for the booster before the first, uncrewed flight of SLS with the Orion spacecraft in 2018.

  10. Pain Assessment and Management After a Knowledge Translation Booster Intervention.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Bonnie J; Yamada, Janet; Promislow, Sara; Barwick, Melanie; Pinard, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Inadequate pain treatment leaves hospitalized children vulnerable to immediate and long-term sequelae. A multidimensional knowledge translation intervention (ie, the Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality [EPIQ]) improved pain assessment, management, and intensity outcomes in 16 units at 8 Canadian pediatric hospitals. The sustained effectiveness of EPIQ over time is unknown, however. The goals of this study were to determine the following: (1) sustainability of the impact of EPIQ on pain assessment, management, and intensity outcomes 12, 24, and 36 months after EPIQ; (2) effectiveness of a pain practice change booster (Booster) intervention to sustain EPIQ outcomes over time; and (3) influence of context on sustainability. A prospective, repeated measures, cluster randomized controlled trial was undertaken in the 16 EPIQ units, 12 months after EPIQ completion, to determine the effectiveness of a practice change booster (Booster) to sustain EPIQ outcomes. Generalized estimating equation models examined outcomes controlling for child and unit contextual factors. Outcomes achieved during EPIQ were sustained in the use of any pain assessment measure (P = .01) and a validated pain assessment measure in the EPIQ units (P = .02) up to 36 months after EPIQ. Statistically significant improvements in pain management practices persisted in EPIQ units; results varied across time. There were no significant differences in outcomes after implementation of the Booster between the Booster and Nonbooster groups. Improved pain assessment and management practices were sustained after EPIQ; however, the Booster did not seem to provide additional impact. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Booster Seat Effectiveness Among Older Children: Evidence From Washington State.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D Mark; Carlson, Lindsay L; Rees, Daniel I

    2017-08-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended that children as old as 12 years use a booster seat when riding in motor vehicles, yet little is known about booster seat effectiveness when used by older children. This study estimated the association between booster use and injuries among children aged 8-12 years who were involved in motor vehicle crashes. Researchers analyzed data on all motor vehicle crashes involving children aged 8-12 years reported to the Washington State Department of Transportation from 2002 to 2015. Data were collected in 2015 and analyzed in 2016. Children who were in a booster seat were compared with children restrained by a seat belt alone. Logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. In unadjusted models, booster use was associated with a 29% reduction in the odds of experiencing any injury versus riding in a seat belt alone (OR=0.709, 95% CI=0.675, 0.745). In models adjusted for potential confounders, booster use was associated with a 19% reduction in the odds of any injury relative to riding in a seat belt alone (OR=0.814, 95% CI=0.749, 0.884). The risk of experiencing an incapacitating/fatal injury was not associated with booster use. Children aged 8-12 years involved in a motor vehicle crash are less likely to be injured if in a booster than if restrained by a seat belt alone. Because only 10% of U.S. children aged 8-12 years use booster seats, policies encouraging their use could lead to fewer injuries. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Synchrotron Radiation Research--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienenstock, Arthur; Winick, Herman

    1983-01-01

    Discusses expanding user community seeking access to synchrotron radiation sources, properties/sources of synchrotron radiation, permanent-magnet technology and its impact on synchrotron radiation research, factors limiting power, the density of synchrotron radiation, and research results illustrating benefit of higher flux and brightness. Also…

  13. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, Frustum and Nose Cap mated assembly undergoing final preparations in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The prominent feature in this view is the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting which mates up with the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting of the External Tank (ET) at the ends of the SRB Beam that runs through the ET's Inter Tank Assembly. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  14. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Nose Caps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Nose Caps mounted on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center as they are being prepared for attachment to the SRB Frustum. The Nose Cap contains the Pilot and Drogue Chutes that are deployed prior to the main chutes as the SRBs descend to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean where they are recovered refurbished and reused. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  15. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt sitting on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center while being prepared for mating with the Frustum-Nose Cap Assembly and the Forward Rocket Motor Segment. The prominent feature in this view is the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting which mates up with the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting of the External Tank (ET) at the ends of the SRB Beam that runs through the ET's Inter Tank Assembly. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  16. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt sitting on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center while being prepared for mating with the Frustum-Nose Cap Assembly and the Forward Rocket Motor Segment. The prominent feature in this view is the electrical, data, telemetry and safety systems terminal which connects to the Aft Skirt Assembly systems via the Systems Tunnel that runs the length of the Rocket Motor. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  17. The StarBooster System: A Cargo Aircraft for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Hubert P.; Dula, Arthur M.; McLaughlin, Don; Frassanito, John; Andrews, Jason (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Starcraft Boosters has developed a different approach for lowering the cost of access to space. We propose developing a new aircraft that will house an existing expendable rocket stage. This vehicle, termed StarBooster, will be the first stage of a family of launch vehicles. By combining these elements, we believe we can reduce the cost and risk of fielding a new partially reusable launch system. This report summarizes the work performed on the StarBooster concept since the company's inception in 1996. Detailed analyses are on-going and future reports will focus on the maturation of the vehicle and system design.

  18. Space transportation booster engine configuration study. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study is to contribute to the Advanced Launch System (ALS) development effort by providing highly reliable, low cost booster engine concepts for both expendable and reusable rocket engines. The objectives of the Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study were to identify engine configurations which enhance vehicle performance and provide operational flexibility at low cost, and to explore innovative approaches to the follow-on full-scale development (FSD) phase for the STBE.

  19. Qualitative investigation of booster recovery in open sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Limited tests were conducted using 1/27 scale model of a Titan 3C booster plus 1/32.9 and 1/15.6 scale models of a solid rocket booster case to establish some of the characteristics that will effect recovery operations in open seas. This preliminary effort was designed to provide additional background information for conceptual development of a waterborne recovery system for space shuttle boosters, pending initiation of comprehensive studies. The models were not instrumented; therefore, all data are qualitative (approximations) and are based on observations plus photographic coverage.

  20. 39. VIEW OF CHRYSLER WORKERS LOADING A SATURN IB BOOSTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. VIEW OF CHRYSLER WORKERS LOADING A SATURN IB BOOSTER INTO THE EAST POSITION ON THE STATIC TEST TOWER. AS THE MAIN CONTRACTOR OF THE SATURN IB BOOSTER, CHRYSLER TOOK OVER OPERATIONS OF THE EAST POSITION OF THE STATIC TEST TOWER IN 1963. THAT SAME YEAR, THE WEST POSITION OF THE TEST TOWER WAS MODIFIED (AS SEEN IN THE PHOTO) FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT TESTS OF THE SATURN V BOOSTER'S ENGINE, THE F-1. MARCH 1963, MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. Synchrotron light source data book

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''Synchrotron Light Source Data Book'' is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-ray Data Booklet, edited by D. Vaughan (LBL PUB-490), address the 'use' of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in 'practical units' and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  2. Single-bunch synchrotron shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; Tang, Jau-Huei; Chen, Lin; Thurnauer, M.

    1991-12-31

    An apparatus for selecting a single synchrotron pulse from the millions of pulses provided per second from a synchrotron source includes a rotating spindle located in the path of the synchrotron pulses. The spindle has multiple faces of a highly reflective surface, and having a frequency of rotation f. A shutter is spaced from the spindle by a radius r, and has an open position and a closed position. The pulses from the synchrotron are reflected off the spindle to the shutter such that the speed s of the pulses at the shutter is governed by: s=4 {times} {pi} {times} r {times} such that a single pulse is selected for transmission through an open position of the shutter.

  3. Cataclysmic Variables as Synchrotron Sources?

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.

    2008-05-23

    Evidence is mounting that cataclysmic variables are weak sources of synchrotron emission. If true, it demonstrates that accretion powered interacting binaries produce such emission whether their primaries are white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes.

  4. Single-bunch synchrotron shutter

    DOEpatents

    Norris, James R.; Tang, Jau-Huei; Chen, Lin; Thurnauer, Marion

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for selecting a single synchrotron pulse from the millions of pulses provided per second from a synchrotron source includes a rotating spindle located in the path of the synchrotron pulses. The spindle has multiple faces of a highly reflective surface, and having a frequency of rotation f. A shutter is spaced from the spindle by a radius r, and has an open position and a closed position. The pulses from the synchrotron are reflected off the spindle to the shutter such that the speed s of the pulses at the shutter is governed by: s=4.times..pi..times.r.times.f. such that a single pulse is selected for transmission through an open position of the shutter.

  5. Mossbauer spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.; Sturhahn, W.

    1993-07-01

    The principles underlying observation of the Mossbauer effect with synchrotron radiation are explained. The current status of the field is reviewed, and prospects for dedicated experimental stations on third generation machines are discussed.

  6. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  7. Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility Project-(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Takashima, Y.; Katoh, M.; Hosaka, M.; Takami, K.; Morimoto, H.; Hori, Y.; Sasaki, S.; Koda, S.; Ito, T.; Sakurai, I.; Hara, H.; Okamoto, W.; Watanabe, N.; Takeda, Y.

    2010-06-01

    A synchrotron radiation facility that is used not only for basic research, but also for engineering and industrial research and development has been proposed to be constructed in the Central area of Japan. The key equipment of this facility is a compact electron storage ring that is able to supply hard X-rays. The circumference of the storage ring is 72 m with the energy of 1.2 GeV, the beam current of 300 mA, and the natural emittance of about 53 nm-rad. The configuration of the storage ring is based on four triple bend cells, and four of the twelve bending magnets are 5 T superconducting ones. The bending angle and critical energy are 12 degree and 4.8 keV, respectively. For the top-up operation, the electron beam will be injected from a booster synchrotron with the full energy. Currently, six beamlines are planned for the first phase starting from 2012.

  8. Angiography by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, E.; Brown, G. S.; Giacomini, J. C.; Gordon, H. J.; Hofstadter, R.; Kernoff, R. S.; Otis, J. N.; Thomlinson, W.; Thompson, A. C.; Zeman, H. D.

    1987-01-01

    Because coronary disease represents the principal health problem in the Western, industrialized world, and because of the risks and costs associated with conventional methods of visualizing the coronary arteries, an effort has been underway at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory to develop a less invasive coronary imaging procedure based on iodine K-edge dichromography. A pair of line images, recorded within a few milliseconds of each other, is taken with two monochromatic X-ray beams whose energy closely brackets the K-edge of iodine, 33.17 keV. The logarithmic subtraction of the images produced by these beams results in an image which greatly enhances signals arising from attenuation by iodine and almost totally suppresses signals arising from attenuation by soft tissue and bone. The high sensitivity to iodine allows the visualization of arterial structures after an intravenous injection of contrast agent and its subsequent 20-30 fold dilution. The experiments began in 1979, with initial studies done on phantoms and excised pig hearts. The first images of anesthetized dogs were taken in 1982. The results of experiments on dogs will be reviewed, showing the stepwise evolution of the imaging system, leading to the use of the system on human subjects in 1986. The images recorded on human subjects will be described and the remaining problems discussed.

  9. Emittance growth saturation effect in synchrotron machines due to point-like perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, G.; Chen, S.

    1993-11-01

    Analytical estimation of the transverse emittance growth due to a point-like perturbation is performed for a proton synchrotron machine. This emittance growth is caused by the tune spread within the bunch. However, the emittance growth suffers a saturation effect caused by the same tune spread. Computer simulations on the emittance growth due to resistive wall instabilities and feedback systems verify qualitatively this emittance growth saturation effect. These simulations were accomplished in the Medium Energy Booster of the Superconducting Super Collider using the TADIMMI computer code.

  10. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  11. Manufacturability of compact synchrotron mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Gary M.

    1997-11-01

    While many of the government funded research communities over the years have put their faith and money into increasingly larger synchrotrons, such as Spring8 in Japan, and the APS in the United States, a viable market appears to exist for smaller scale, research and commercial grade, compact synchrotrons. These smaller, and less expensive machines, provide the research and industrial communities with synchrotron radiation beamline access at a portion of the cost of their larger and more powerful counterparts. A compact synchrotron, such as the Aurora-2D, designed and built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. of japan (SHI), is a small footprint synchrotron capable of sustaining 20 beamlines. Coupled with a Microtron injector, with 150 MeV of injection energy, an entire facility fits within a 27 meter [88.5 ft] square floorplan. The system, controlled by 2 personal computers, is capable of producing 700 MeV electron energy and 300 mA stored current. Recently, an Aurora-2D synchrotron was purchased from SHI by the University of Hiroshima. The Rocketdyne Albuquerque Operations Beamline Optics Group was approached by SHI with a request to supply a group of 16 beamline mirrors for this machine. These mirrors were sufficient to supply 3 beamlines for the Hiroshima machine. This paper will address engineering issues which arose during the design and manufacturing of these mirrors.

  12. Update on Risk Reduction Activities for a Liquid Advanced Booster for NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Andy; Greene, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Goals of NASA's Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) are to: (1) Reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS. (2) Enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability. SLS Block 1 vehicle is being designed to carry 70 mT to LEO: (1) Uses two five-segment solid rocket boosters (SRBs) similar to the boosters that helped power the space shuttle to orbit. Evolved 130 mT payload class rocket requires an advanced booster with more thrust than any existing U.S. liquid-or solid-fueled boosters

  13. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center as it is being prepared to be mated with the Nose Cap and Forward Skirt. The Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. The Separation Motors burn for one second to ensure the SRBs drift away from the External Tank and Orbiter at separation. The three main parachutes are deployed to reduce speed as the SRBs descend to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean where they are recovered refurbished and reused. In this view the assembly is rotated so that the four Separation Motors are in view and aligned with the approximate centerline of the image. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  14. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center as it is being prepared to be mated with the Nose Cap and Forward Skirt. The Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. The Separation Motors burn for one second to ensure the SRBs drift away from the External Tank and Orbiter at separation. The three main parachutes are deployed to reduce speed as the SRBs descend to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean where they are recovered refurbished and reused. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  15. Tracking booster and multiple mirror concentrator floating collector

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.

    1981-10-27

    A water-borne tracking solar energy collecting and converting system employing booster and multiple mirror concentrator collectors for concentrating sunlight on either photovoltaic cells and/or flat plate collectors.

  16. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 4: Program listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    All subprograms or routines associated with the solid rocket booster performance evaluation model are indexed in this computer listing. An alphanumeric list of each routine in the index is provided in a table of contents.

  17. High explosives reaction model and its application to booster performance

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    Initiation of insensitive high explosives requires a boosting system using more sensitive and usually more energetic explosives. However, problems arise if the booster material is too energetic. The initiability of some insensitive but less energetic high explosives can be enhanced by lowering the density and decreasing the grain size or by adding a sensitive component; thus these explosives can be used as booster materials. This paper presents a unified initiation and detonation reaction model and then the simulation of the development of the detonation wave in a PBX-9502 main charge using three booster explosives: low-density superfine TATB, low-density ultrafine TATB, and X-0407. The last two are found to be acceptable for booster application. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  18. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... meet the out-of-band emission limits of § 101.111 for each narrowband channel that the booster is... be used only in confined or indoor areas such as buildings, tunnels, underground areas, etc.,...

  19. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... meet the out-of-band emission limits of § 101.111 for each narrowband channel that the booster is... be used only in confined or indoor areas such as buildings, tunnels, underground areas, etc.,...

  20. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... meet the out-of-band emission limits of § 101.111 for each narrowband channel that the booster is... be used only in confined or indoor areas such as buildings, tunnels, underground areas, etc.,...

  1. Hepatitis A and B booster recommendations: implications for travelers.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Connor, Bradley A; von Sonnenburg, Frank

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis A and B are serious vaccine-preventable diseases with a predominantly overlapping epidemiological distribution. Travelers, a term encompassing a range of individuals, are at risk of contracting these diseases if they are unvaccinated. Although the benefits of the primary vaccination course of hepatitis A and B vaccines are clear, the administration of hepatitis A and B boosters varies worldwide. Recommendations on the need for booster vaccinations have recently been published, and the implications of these recommendations for travelers are discussed in this review. Until a greater understanding is reached on the immunogenicity of hepatitis A and B vaccines in certain special groups (e.g., immunocompromised persons), there will be a need to monitor antibody levels to assess whether booster vaccinations are required. However, for the majority of immunocompetent travelers, the full primary vaccination course will provide protection from both hepatitis A and B infection in the long term, without the need for boosters.

  2. 38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, LANCES, AND FUME HOODS IN THE GAS WASHER PUMP HOUSE LOOKING EAST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  3. 21. VIEW OF CLARK OXYGEN BOOSTER COMPRESSOR IN THE HIGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW OF CLARK OXYGEN BOOSTER COMPRESSOR IN THE HIGH PURITY OXYGEN BUILDING LOOKING SOUTH. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  4. Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter monitors Booster System Console in MCC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-12

    S66-51794 (12 Sept. 1966) --- Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter monitors the Booster Systems Console in the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Mission Control Center during launch of the Gemini-11 spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Reusable, flyback liquid rocket booster for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, Mark G.

    1989-08-01

    This paper outlines a preliminary design for an unmanned, reusable, flyback liquid rocket booster (LRB) as an evolutionary follow-on to the Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB). Previous Shuttle liquid-propellant booster concepts are reviewed in order to gain insight into these designs. The operating costs, environmental impacts, and abort options of the SRB are discussed. The LRB flight profile and advantages of LRB use are discussed. The preliminary design for the LRB is outlined in detail using calculations and drawings. This design maximizes the use of existing hardware and proven technology to minimize cost and development time. The LRB design is presented as a more capable, more environmentally acceptable, and safer Shuttle booster.

  6. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Joins Propulsion Park Display

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A crane lifts a space shuttle solid rocket booster into its final position in the “propulsion park” outside Building 4205, the Propulsion Research & Development Laboratory at the Marshall Cente...

  7. Child booster seats and lethal seat belt injury.

    PubMed

    Byard, R W; Noblett, H

    2004-11-01

    A 7-year-old boy travelling in the rear seat of a sedan car was wearing a lap-shoulder seat belt and sitting on a booster seat. Following a collision the boy 'submarined' under the seat belt sustaining trauma to the anterior aspect of his neck, cardiac arrest and subsequent death from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. This case demonstrates a potential problem with unsecured older-style booster seats. Movement of a seat in a collision may cause a child to slip under a seat belt and sustain significant neck injuries. Seatbelts for children must be correctly fitted, booster seats or capsules must be securely fastened and manufacturer's recommendations for size and weight limits should be followed. Unfortunately older booster seats may not have attached instructions for installation and use, may not fit later model vehicles, may not conform to current safety recommendations and may have worn webbing. For these reasons their use should be discouraged.

  8. For 'Preemies,' Human Touch May Be a Brain Booster

    MedlinePlus

    ... html For 'Preemies,' Human Touch May Be a Brain Booster Diminished response seen in premature infants who ... 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Underscoring the link between brain development and touch, new research suggests premature babies ...

  9. The effect of a booster intervention to promote hearing protection behavior in operating engineers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Oisaeng; Chin, Dal Lae; Fiola, Lauren A; Kazanis, Anamaria S

    2013-02-01

    Booster interventions may be useful in promoting workers' hearing protection device (HPD) use. Previous research on the effectiveness and the optimal timeframe for boosters is limited and inconsistent. In this randomized controlled trial, 403 workers were assigned to receive an individually tailored booster, a control booster, or no booster. The booster intervention groups were further divided by timeframe. Frequency of HPD use was measured 12 months post-intervention. The booster intervention groups significantly accounted for the variance in HPD use in Year 2. Workers in middle-term booster (67-94 days) group reported a significantly greater increase in HPD use in Year 2 than those in other timeframes, when potential covariates were controlled for. Booster intervention letters mailed between 67 and 94 days post-initial intervention may promote HPD use among participants. Future research should explore additional factors associated with optimal booster design, including more innovative mobile and internet-based approaches. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. SIMULATIONS OF TRANSVERSE STACKING IN THE NSLS-II BOOSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III, R.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac and a 3 GeV booster. The linac needs to deliver 15 nC in 80 - 150 bunches to the booster every minute to achieve current stability goals in the storage ring. This is a very stringent requirement that has not been demonstrated at an operating light source. We have developed a scheme to transversely stack two bunch trains in the NSLS-II booster in order to alleviate the charge requirements on the linac. This scheme has been outlined previously. In this paper we show particle tracking simulations of the tracking scheme. We show simulations of the booster ramp with a stacked beam for a variety of lattice errors and injected beam parameters. In all cases the performance of the proposed stacking method is sufficient to reduce the required charge from the linac. For this reason the injection system of the NSLS-II booster is being designed to include this feature. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac and a 3 GeV booster. The injectors must provide 7.5nC in bunch trains 80-150 bunches long every minute for top off operation of the storage ring. Top off then requires that the linac deliver 15nC of charge once losses in the injector chain are taken into consideration. This is a very stringent requirement that has not been demonstrated at an operating light source. For this reason we have developed a method to transversely stack two bunch trains in the booster while maintaining the charge transport efficiency. This stacking scheme has been discussed previously. In this paper we show the simulations of the booster ramp with a single bunch train in the booster. Then we give a brief overview of the stacking scheme. Following, we show the results of stacking two bunch trains in the booster with varying beam emittances and train separations. The behavior of the beam through the ramp is examined showing that it is possible to stack two bunch trains in the booster.

  11. POST-LAUNCH (SOLID ROCKET BOOSTER [SRB]) - STS-1 - FL

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-04-14

    S81-30953 (13 April 1981) --- With one of the two expended solid rocket boosters from the launch of the space shuttle Columbia in tow, the recovery ship UTC Liberty heads toward the Trident Submarine Basin at Port Canaveral, south of NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The ship, built especially for the task of recovering expended boosters and their parachutes, is bound for ran overnight berth in the submarine basin, before continuing tomorrow toward recovery facilities at KSC. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Status of the JAERI tandem accelerator and its booster

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Suehiro; Abe, Shinichi; Hanashima, Susumu; Horie, Katsuzo; Ishizaki, Nobuhiro; Kanda, Susumu; Matsuda, Makoto; Ohuchi, Isao; Tayama, Hidekazu; Tsukihashi, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Tadashi

    1999-04-26

    The JAERI tandem accelerator has been operating effectively since 1982 and heavy ions from the tandem has been boosted in energy by the superconducting independently phased booster linac for the experiments at higher bombarding energies since 1994. Present operating status of the tandem accelerator and its booster, status of their use for experiments and an on-going improvement project with an ECR ion source are described.

  13. Pediatricians' knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors regarding car booster seats.

    PubMed

    Yingling, Faith; Stombaugh, Heather A; Jeffrey, James; LaPorte, Frankie B; Oswanski, Michael F

    2011-02-01

    Pediatricians are a recognized primary resource and advocate for injury prevention. The purpose of this study was to examine pediatricians' knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors regarding car booster seats and their willingness to use resources for parent education. Investigators implemented an anonymous, mailed survey to a national random sample of 1,041 US office-based pediatricians with 464 respondents: 53% female, 63% Caucasian, 52% parents of children under 12 years, and 87% board-certified. Fifty-two percent have counseled at least half of their families about booster seats. Sixty-nine percent rely on American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) resources for counseling, and 87% agreed that counseling parents improves child outcomes in a motor vehicle crash. Fifty-seven percent said there were no barriers to booster seat counseling; 39% did not counsel parents about booster seats unless it is the reason for the office visit. Forty-seven percent lacked the time to counsel, and 81% were confident they were counseling according to AAP guidelines. Twelve percent were unsure of their state's booster seat laws. Significant relationships were found between responses to knowledge questions and suburban location, gender, race, length of time in pediatric practice. Many pediatricians are not counseling their patients' parents on booster seats but believe counseling is important; many are confident in their counseling but do not rely on AAP-recognized counseling resources. Education about state booster seat laws and AAP guidelines may be useful in increasing the cues to action pediatricians convey to parents regarding booster seat use.

  14. Orion EM-1 Booster Preps - Aft Skirt Preps/Painting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-28

    A technician with Orbital ATK, prime contractor for the Space Launch System (SLS) Booster, preps a section of the right hand aft skirt for primer and paint in a support building at the Hangar AF facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The space shuttle-era aft skirt will be used on the right hand booster of NASA's SLS rocket for Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). NASA is preparing for EM-1, deep space missions, and the Journey to Mars.

  15. Mars Science Laboratory Atlas V First Stage Booster

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-07

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden walks around the United Launch Alliance Atlas V first stage booster with United Launch Alliance Vice President of Mission operations Jim Sponnick, NASA Mission Manager for Launch Services Wanda Harding, NASA Senior Advisor Mike French, and White House Fellow Debra Kurshan, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011, at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The booster will help send NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover to Mars later this year. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Picosecond pump-probe using an FEL and a synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.; Straub, K.D.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Two color pump-probe experiments using both the Duke Storage Ring as a synchrotron light source for visible light the Mark III FEL as a tunable, high peak power IR source are possible. The visible synchrotron source can be used as a probe of vibrational excitation from the FEL in an experiment using vibrationally-assisted fluorescence as an indicator of overlap of the IR and the visible pulses. An optical delay line in the FEL beam will allow adjustment of the arrival time of the IR pulse relative to the visible probe. The storage ring RF booster and the Mark III FEL RF sources will be both driven by the same master oscillator with a timing jitter between sources of less than 20 psec. Exploration of coupling between electronic excitation and lifetimes of vibrational excitation of fluorescent compounds in solution can be carried out with this configuration.

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  18. Glide back booster wind tunnel model testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricop, M. V.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Stoica, C. I.; Niculescu, M. L.; Neculaescu, A. M.; Persinaru, A. G.; Boscoianu, M.

    2017-07-01

    Affordable space access requires partial or ideally full launch vehicle reuse, which is in line with clean environment requirement. Although the idea is old, the practical use is difficult, requiring very large technology investment for qualification. Rocket gliders like Space Shuttle have been successfullyoperated but the price and correspondingly the energy footprint were found not sustainable. For medium launchers, finally there is a very promising platform as Falcon 9. For very small launchers the situation is more complex, because the performance index (payload to start mass) is already small, versus medium and heavy launchers. For partial reusable micro launchers this index is even smaller. However the challenge has to be taken because it is likely that in a multiyear effort, technology is going to enable the performance recovery to make such a system economically and environmentally feasible. The current paper is devoted to a small unitary glide back booster which is foreseen to be assembled in a number of possible configurations. Although the level of analysis is not deep, the solution is analyzed from the aerodynamic point of view. A wind tunnel model is designed, with an active canard, to enablea more efficient wind tunnel campaign, as a national level premiere.

  19. CT Scan of NASA Booster Nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Schneberk, D; Perry, R; Thompson, R

    2004-07-27

    We scanned a Booster Nozzle for NASA with our 9 meV LINAC, AmSi panel scanner. Three scans were performed using different filtering schemes and different positions of the nozzle. The results of the scan presented here are taken from the scan which provided the best contrast and lowest noise of the three. Our inspection data shows a number of indications of voids in the outer coating of rubber/carbon. The voids are mostly on the side of the nozzle, but a few small voids are present at the ends of the nozzle. We saw no large voids in the adhesive layer between the Aluminum and the inner layer of carbon. This 3D inspection data did show some variation in the size of the adhesive layer, but none of the indications were larger than 3 pixels in extent (21 mils). We have developed a variety of contour estimation and extraction techniques for inspecting small spaces between layers. These tools might work directly on un-sectioned nozzles since the circular contours will fit with our tools a little better. Consequently, it would be useful to scan a full nozzle to ensure there are no untoward degradations in data quality, and to see if our tools would work to extract the adhesive layer.

  20. Booster propulsion/vehicle impact study, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P.; Satterthwaite, S.; Carson, C.; Schnackel, J.

    1988-01-01

    This is the final report in a study examining the impact of launch vehicles for various boost propulsion design options. These options included: differing boost phase engines using different combinations of fuels and coolants to include RP-1, methane, propane (subcooled and normal boiling point), and hydrogen; variable and high mixture ratio hydrogen engines; translating nozzles on boost phase engines; and cross feeding propellants from the booster to second stage. Vehicles examined included a fully reusable two stage cargo vehicle and a single stage to orbit vehicle. The use of subcooled propane as a fuel generated vehicles with the lowest total vehicle dry mass. Engines with hydrogen cooling generated only slight mass reductions from the reference, all-hydrogen vehicle. Cross feeding propellants generated the most significant mass reductions from the reference two stage vehicle. The use of high mixture ratio or variable mixture ratio hydrogen engines in the boost phase of flight resulted in vehicles with total dry mass 20 percent greater than the reference hydrogen vehicle. Translating nozzles for boost phase engines generated a heavier vehicle. Also examined were the design impacts on the vehicle and ground support subsystems when subcooled propane is used as a fuel. The most significant cost difference between facilities to handle normal boiling point versus subcooled propane is 5 million dollars. Vehicle cost differences were negligible. A significant technical challenge exists for properly conditioning the vehicle propellant on the ground and in flight when subcooled propane is used as fuel.

  1. Fully reusable launch vehicle with airbreathing booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.

    1983-10-01

    The performance of a two-stage, fully reusable scramjet-Shuttle launch vehicle is examined analytically. The first stage of the hybrid vehicle would be a hydrocarbon/hydrogen fueled air breathing hypersonic aircraft. The winged booster, in one configuration, would be equipped with both turbojets and scramjets, and the Orbiter would be a scaled-up version of the present STS Orbiter. The nominal mission would involve placing a 65,000 lb payload into a 92.5 x 185 km orbit. The size of the manned first stage is dictated by the ventricle gross weight, density, and contents, with the fuel carried in integrated tanks. A delta planform is presented, with an elliptical cone forebody, an elliptical cross-section afterbody, and a smooth transition surface from the end of the forebody to the straightline leading edge. Formulations are defined for the wing loading, gross density, fatness ratio, and breadpoint ratio, as well as for the propulsion, aerodynamics, and trajectories.

  2. [Booster vaccination against Bordella pertussis during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Esteves-Jaramillo, Alejandra; Gómez Altamirano, César Misael; Esparza Aguilar, Marcelino; López-Collada, Vesta L Richardson

    2012-05-01

    During the last decades, the incidence of whopping cough, has been rising worldwide, despite the high coverage of the immunization programs. The highest mortality is found among children under 6 month of age, who are too young to have completed a primary vaccination series with three doses the pertussis vaccine, nevertheless this disease also affects adolescents and adults, who may only manifest mild symptomatology. Hence they do not get diagnosed or treated, becoming a potential community source of infection for young children. In order to prevent this transmission, the recommendation of vaccinating adolescents and adults, including of women in child bearing age, was issued. Nevertheless the immunization coverage among these populations was low. Postpartum vaccination was also recommended, but recent evidence have shown that the antibody levels in breast milk are detectable at least a week after immunization, allowing a window of opportunity for the infection in the newborn. Finally, it has been suggested that a booster dose against Bordetella pertussis, given to pregnant women is safe and immunogenic. Therefore, the antibody transferred across the placenta and through breast milk, could protect the product in the early stages of life.

  3. NSRL Extraction Bump Control in the Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,L.

    2008-10-01

    Due to inadequacies in the user interface of the booster orbit control system, a number of new tools were developed. The first priority was an accurate calculation of the winding currents given specific displacements at each extraction septa. Next, the physical limits of the power supplies ({+-}600 amps) needed to be taken into account. In light of this limit, a system is developed that indicates to the user what the allowed values of one bump parameter are once the other two have been specified. Finally, techniques are developed to account for the orbit behavior once power supplies are requested to exceed their {+-}600 amp limit. This includes a recalculation of bump parameters and a calculation of the amplitude of the residuals. Following this, possible areas for further development are outlined. These techniques were computationally developed in Mathematica and tested in the Methodical Accelerator Design (MAD) program before they were implemented into the control system. At the end, a description of the implementation of these techniques in a new interface is described. This includes a depiction of the appearance and functionality of the graphical user interface, a description of the input and output flow, and an outline of how each important calculation is performed.

  4. Siberian Snake solenoid for the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Recent experiments at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) have demonstrated that Siberian Snakes'' can be used to preserve the polarization of an accelerated polarized beam in a circular accelerator. Retrofitting full snakes into accelerators such as the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven is almost impossible due to space limitations, but a partial snake that can correct depolarization due to imperfection resonances with 1/20 to 1/30 of a full strength snake seems to present a viable option. We describe such a device for the AGS and give the design criteria in terms of simplicity of accelerator operation and level of achievable polarization. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Analysis of delayed TBE-vaccine booster after primary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Aerssens, Annelies; Cochez, Christel; Niedrig, Matthias; Heyman, Paul; Kühlmann-Rabens, Ilona; Soentjens, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    An open, uncontrolled single centre study was conducted in the Travel Clinic at the Military Hospital, Brussels. Eighty-eight subjects were recruited who had a primary series of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccine more than 5 years ago and who never received a booster dose afterwards. Response rate after booster vaccination was very high: 84 out of 88 subjects (95.5%) had neutralizing antibodies on plaque reduction neutralization test and all (100%) had IgG antibodies on ELISA, on Day 21-28 after booster vaccination. This study adds valuable information to the common situation of delayed booster interval. The results of our study indicate that in young healthy travellers (<50 years), one booster vaccination after a primary series of TBE vaccine in the past is sufficient to obtain protective antibodies, even if primary vaccination is much longer than the recommended booster interval of 5 years. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved.For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Perpendicular Biased Ferrite Tuned Cavities for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Awida, Mohamed; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Pellico, William; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Terechkine, Iouri; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-07-01

    The aging Fermilab Booster RF system needs an upgrade to support future experimental program. The important feature of the upgrade is substantial enhancement of the requirements for the accelerating cavities. The new requirements include enlargement of the cavity beam pipe aperture, increase of the cavity voltage and increase in the repetition rate. The modification of the present traditional parallel biased ferrite cavities is rather challenging. An alternative to rebuilding the present Fermilab Booster RF cavities is to design and construct new perpendicular biased RF cavities, which potentially offer a number of advantages. An evaluation and a preliminary design of the perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavities for the Fermilab Booster upgrade is described in the paper. Also it is desirable for better Booster performance to improve the capture of beam in the Booster during injection and at the start of the ramp. One possible way to do that is to flatten the bucket by introducing second harmonic cavities into the Booster. This paper also looks into the option of using perpendicularly biased ferrite tuners for the second harmonic cavities.

  7. Counterrotatable booster compressor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniz, Thomas Ory (Inventor); Orlando, Robert Joseph (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A counterrotatable booster compressor assembly for a gas turbine engine having a counterrotatable fan section with a first fan blade row connected to a first drive shaft and a second fan blade row axially spaced from the first fan blade row and connected to a second drive shaft, the counterrotatable booster compressor assembly including a first compressor blade row connected to the first drive shaft and a second compressor blade row interdigitated with the first compressor blade row and connected to the second drive shaft. A portion of each fan blade of the second fan blade row extends through a flowpath of the counterrotatable booster compressor so as to function as a compressor blade in the second compressor blade row. The counterrotatable booster compressor further includes a first platform member integral with each fan blade of the second fan blade row at a first location so as to form an inner flowpath for the counterrotatable booster compressor and a second platform member integral with each fan blade of the second fan blade row at a second location so as to form an outer flowpath for the counterrotatable booster compressor.

  8. HLA-DPB1 and anti-HBs titer kinetics in hepatitis B booster recipients who completed primary hepatitis B vaccination during infancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, T-W; Chu, C-C; Liao, H-W Chang; Lin, S-K; Ho, T-Y; Lin, M; Lin, H H; Wang, L-Y

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported significant associations of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DPB1 05:01 with memory against hepatitis B (HB) vaccination. However, the effects of HLA-DPB1 on antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) kinetics were not explored. We followed up a cohort of 1974 HB booster recipients and quantified their 1-month and 1-year post-booster anti-HBs titers. A total of 681 subjects were randomly selected and typed for HLA-DPB1. We found that male subjects, undetectable pre-booster titers, and 05:01 homozygotes led to significantly lower post-booster anti-HBs titers. The geometric means (95% confidence interval (CI)) of 1-month post-booster anti-HBs titers were 4.68 (2.69-8.12), 23.01 (14.96-35.40) and 50.06 (27.20-92.13) mIU ml(-1) for subjects carrying two, one and no HLA-DPB1 05:01 allele. The corresponding figures for 1-year post-booster anti-HBs titers were 1.26 (0.73-2.18), 4.72 (3.08-7.25) and 7.32 (3.75-13.56) mIU ml(-1). There were significant associations of post-booster anti-HBs titers with the number of HLA-DPB1 risk and protective alleles. Among booster responders, anti-HBs decay rates were significantly reduced in subjects who had detectable pre-booster anti-HBs titers and the HLA-DPB1 05:01 allele. Our results indicated that HLA-DPB1 influences the kinetics of anti-HBs. The long-term memory against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and the residual serum titers of anti-HBs after HB vaccination may be influenced by different mechanisms as evidenced by their inverse trend of associations with the 05:01 allele.

  9. Booster Main Engine Selection Criteria for the Liquid Fly-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Richard M.; Rothschild, William J.; Christensen, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Liquid Fly-Back Booster (LFBB) Program seeks to enhance the Space Shuttle system safety, performance and economy of operations through the use of an advanced, liquid propellant Booster Main Engine (BME). There are several viable BME candidates that could be suitable for this application. The objective of this study was to identify the key Criteria to be applied in selecting among these BME candidates. This study involved an assessment of influences on the overall LFBB utility due to variations in the candidate rocket-engines characteristics. This includes BME impacts on vehicle system weight, performance, design approaches, abort modes, margins of safety, engine-out operations, and maintenance and support concepts. Systems engineering analyses and trade studies were performed to identify the LFBB system level sensitivities to a wide variety of BME related parameters. This presentation summarizes these trade studies and the resulting findings of the LFBB design teams regarding the BME characteristics that most significantly affect the LFBB system. The resulting BME choice should offer the best combination of reliability, performance, reusability, robustness, cost, and risk for the LFBB program.

  10. Booster Main Engine Selection Criteria for the Liquid Fly-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Richard M.; Rothschild, William J.; Christensen, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Liquid Fly-Back Booster (LFBB) Program seeks to enhance the Space Shuttle system safety performance and economy of operations through the use of an advanced, liquid propellant Booster Main Engine (BME). There are several viable BME candidates that could be suitable for this application. The objective of this study was to identify the key criteria to be applied in selecting among these BME candidates. This study involved an assessment of influences on the overall LFBB utility due to variations in the candidate rocket engines' characteristics. This includes BME impacts on vehicle system weight, perfortnance,design approaches, abort modes, margins of safety, engine-out operations, and maintenance and support concepts. Systems engineering analyses and trade studies were performed to identify the LFBB system level sensitivities to a wide variety of BME related parameters. This presentation summarizes these trade studies and the resulting findings of the LFBB design teams regarding the BME characteristics that most significantly affect the LFBB system. The resulting BME choice should offer the best combination of reliability, performance, reusability, robustness, cost, and risk for the LFBB program.

  11. Spin echo in synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.

    2007-01-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency Δνspin of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time τ between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference-overlap effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference-overlap effect occurs when Δνspin is too small, or when τ is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings overlap each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive interference patterns depending on the exact value of τ. Typically, the beam’s energy spread is large and this interference-overlap effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time τ after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when τ is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an analysis

  12. Spin Echo in Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.; /Brookhaven

    2006-12-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time {tau} between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference effect occurs when {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} is too small, or when {tau} is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings interfere with each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive patterns depending on the exact value of {tau}. Typically, the beam's energy spread is large and this interference effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time {tau} after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when {tau} is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an

  13. Optimized IR synchrotron beamline design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Synchrotron infrared beamlines are powerful tools on which to perform spectroscopy on microscopic length scales but require working with large bending-magnet source apertures in order to provide intense photon beams to the experiments. Many infrared beamlines use a single toroidal-shaped mirror to focus the source emission which generates, for large apertures, beams with significant geometrical aberrations resulting from the shape of the source and the beamline optics. In this paper, an optical layout optimized for synchrotron infrared beamlines, that removes almost totally the geometrical aberrations of the source, is presented and analyzed. This layout is already operational on the IR beamline of the Brazilian synchrotron. An infrared beamline design based on a SOLEIL bending-magnet source is given as an example, which could be useful for future IR beamline improvements at this facility.

  14. Limitation of the synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jialu; Yang, Jianming

    2001-06-01

    In recent years, owing to the great success of the synchrotron radiation in contemporary astrophysical research, the abusive use of synchrotron radiation has been emerged. In this paper, we show that the traditional idea, "electrons with a power-law energy distribution certainly yield a power-law radiation spectrum", should be changed. If the magnetic field of the radiation region is not flat and straight, the synchro-curvature radiation, instead of the synchrotron radiation, should be used to get a real description. In a curved magnetic field, the resulting spectrum of electrons could obviously distinct from a power-law one. This means that the way of only adding many other mechanisms to a pure power-law spectrum to get the expected spectrum might not be reasonable.

  15. Synchrotron radiation techniques for nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Jiating; Qu, Ying; Gao, Yuxi; Guo, Zhenghang; Liu, Zuoliang; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying

    2015-08-01

    Nanotoxicology studies the interactions of engineered nanomaterials with biological systems. Traditional in vitro and in vivo toxicological assays have been successfully employed. However, the toxicological mechanisms of nanoparticles might not be the same as those incurred in traditional molecular toxicology. Furthermore, how to realize in situ and real time measurements especially in the biological microenvironment is still a challenge. Synchrotron radiation, which is highly polarized and tunable, has been proved to play an indispensible role for nanotoxicology studies. In this review, the role of synchrotron radiation techniques is summarized in screening physicochemical characteristics, in vitro and in vivo behaviors, and ecotoxicological effects of engineered nanomaterials. The rapid gain in popularity of nanomaterials has also raised the concern of nanotoxicity, which needs to be assessed and addressed. In this comprehensive review, the authors outlined the underlying principles of using synchrotron radiation techniques for nanotoxicology studies and also in other scientific fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Towards synchrotron-based nanocharacterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuet, Pierre; Arnaud, Lucile; Biquard, Xavier; Cloetens, Peter; Doyen, Lise; Gergaud, Patrice; Lamontagne, Patrick; Lavayssière, Maylis; Micha, Jean-Sébastien; Renault, Olivier; Rieutord, François; Susini, Jean; Ulrich, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    The advent of 3rd generation synchrotron sources coupled with high efficiency x-ray focusing optics opened new nanocharacterization possibilities. This paper is an overview of synchrotron-based techniques that may be of interest for nanotechnology researchers. Although not exhaustive, it includes a general background of synchrotron principle and main x-ray interactions before addressing nanoimaging possibilities. Three-dimensional (3D) hard x-ray multimodal tomography is now doable that allows producing 3D morphological, chemical and crystalline images with a sub-100 nm resolution. Although the resolution is still limited with respect to electron imaging, it presents attractive features like depth resolution and non-destructive exam. Besides imaging, diffraction also allows strain determination within microstructures and is illustrated here on 100 nm copper lines. Surface analysis is illustrated through X-ray Photoelectron Emission Microscopy (XPEEM).

  17. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  18. The AGS with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-02-25

    The idea of using multiple partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron, to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This modification provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. First, it provides a larger 'spin tune gap' for the placement of the vertical betatron tune of the AGS during acceleration, second, the vertical spin direction during the beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, third, the symmetric placement of the snakes allows for a better control of the AGS optics, and for reduced values of the beta and eta functions, especially near injection, fourth, the optical properties of the helical magnets also favor the placement of the horizontal betatron tune in the 'spin tune gap', thus eliminating the horizontal spin resonances. In this paper we provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and we compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  19. APS injector synchrotron low-level RF system design and test

    SciTech Connect

    Stepp, J.D.; Bridges, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    We describe the control of the RF system for the injector synchrotron (booster) of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source. The rf system consists of one klystron and four 5-cell cavities of the LEP type. A block diagram of the system is shown and the low power rf circuitry is described. Voltage and phase feedback are discussed, along with accelerating the beam to 7 GeV. The accelerating voltage is programmed with a waveform generator. Although the acceleration is constant, the power at injection is almost zero and at extraction it is near 600 kW. The power increases with beam energy to replace synchrotron radiation losses. Stability of the rf phase between the two sides of the ring are discussed. Control signals are described which synchronize the bunch during injection from an accumulator ring and for extraction to the 352-MHz bucket in the storage ring. Timing for injection into any bucket in the Storage Ring is accomplished in the rf controls interface located on the VM cards. There is only one bunch accelerated in the booster at a time, so the beam loading of the cavities is negligible. Operating experience during early commissioning efforts will also be outlined.

  20. PERFORMANCE OF THE AGS TRANSITION JUMP SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    AHRENS,L.A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; VAN ASSELT,W.K.

    1999-03-29

    The transition jump system has been indispensable to the high intensity proton operation of the AGS complex. Nevertheless, transition crossing remains one of the major hurdles as the accelerator complex intensity is pushed upward. To enhance the performance of the system ''quadrupole pumping'' in the Booster is used to minimize the necessary longitudinal dilution of the beam on the AGS injection porch. During the transition jump sextupole correctors at strategic locations are pulsed to minimize the effects of the chromatic non-linearity of the jump system. The available instrumentation for diagnosing the performance of the system will be described, along with installed hardware to counter the non-linear effects of the transition jump system.

  1. Long-term/strategic scenario for reusable booster stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippel, Martin; Manfletti, Chiara; Burkhardt, Holger

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the final design status of a partially reusable space transportation system which has been under study for five years within the German future launcher technology research program ASTRA. It consists of dual booster stages, which are attached to an advanced expendable core. The design of the reference liquid fly-back boosters (LFBB) is focused on LOX/LH2 propellant and a future advanced gas-generator cycle rocket motor. The preliminary design study was performed in close cooperation between DLR and the German space industry. The paper's first part describes recent progress in the design of this reusable booster stage. The second part of the paper assesses a long-term, strategic scenario of the reusable stage's operation. The general idea is the gradual evolution of the above mentioned basic fly-back booster vehicle into three space transportation systems performing different tasks: Reusable First Stage for a small launcher application, successive development to a fully reusable TSTO, and booster for a super-heavy-lift rocket to support an ambitious space flight program like manned Mars missions. The assessment addresses questions of technical sanity, preliminary sizing and performance issues and, where applicable, examines alternative options.

  2. A Unique Hybrid Propulsion System Design for Large Space Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Frederick C.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the application of hybrid rocket propulsion technology to large space boosters. Safety, reliability, cost, and performance comprised the evaluation criteria, in order of relative importance, for this study. The effort considered the so called classic hybrid design approach versus a novel approach which utilizes a fuel-rich gas generator for the fuel source. Other trades included various fuel/oxidizer combinations, pressure-fed versus pump fed oxidizer delivery systems, and reusable versus expandable booster systems. Following this initial trade study, a point design was generated. A gas generated-type fuel grain with pump fed liquid oxygen comprised the basis of this point design. This design study provided a mechanism for considering the means of implementing the gas generator approach for further defining details of the design. Subsequently, a system trade study was performed which determined the sensitivity of the design to various design parameters and predicted optimum values for these same parameters. The study concluded that a gas generator hybrid booster design offers enhanced safety and reliability over current of proposed solid booster designs while providing equal or greater performance levels. These improvements can be accomplished at considerably lower cost than for the liquid booster designs of equivalent capability.

  3. High intensity performance and upgrades at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    1998-12-01

    The high intensity proton beam of the AGS is used both for the slow-extracted-beam (SEB) area with many target station to produce secondary beams and the fast-extracted-beam (FEB) line used for the production of muons for the g-2 experiment and for high intensity target testing for the spallation neutron sources and muon production targets for the muon collider. The same FEB line will also be used for the transfer of beam to RHIC. The proton beam intensity in the AGS has increased steadily over the 35 year existence of the AGS, but the most dramatic increase occurred over the last couple of years with the addition of the new AGS Booster. All modifications associated with this are discussed.

  4. Short-term response to a booster dose of hepatitis B vaccine in anti-HBs negative adolescents who had received primary vaccination 16 years ago.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Yu; Lin, Hans Hsienhong

    2007-10-10

    We conducted a revaccination study to investigate the short-term response to booster hepatitis B (HB) vaccination in seronegative adolescents who had received primary infantile HB vaccination. A booster dose of recombinant HB vaccine was administered to 395 adolescents 15-18 years of age whose serum titers of antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (anti-HBs) were <10 mIU/mL. Seventy-seven percent of the booster recipients converted to anti-HBs seropositivity (postbooster titers> or =10 mIU/mL). As compared with adolescents who had undetectable prebooster anti-HBs titers (<0.1 mIU/mL), the seropositive rates and geometric mean titers (GMTs) of 2-month and 1-year postbooster were significantly higher for those of prebooster titers of 0.1-0.9 and 1.0-9.9 mIU/mL (all p<0.0001). Postbooster titers declined significantly more rapidly for those with undetectable prebooster anti-HBs titers than for those with prebooster titers of 0.1-0.9 and 1.0-9.9 mIU/mL. Our observations indicate that a booster dose of HB vaccine maybe unable to induce sufficient immunological response in adolescents who had undetectable residual anti-HBs titers.

  5. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1986-08-01

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs.

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, John; Dooryhee, Eric; Wilkins, Stuart; Miller, Lisa; Chu, Yong

    2016-04-25

    NSLS-II is a synchrotron light source helping researchers explore solutions to the grand energy challenges faced by the nation, and open up new regimes of scientific discovery that will pave the way to discoveries in physics, chemistry, and biology — advances that will ultimately enhance national security and help drive the development of abundant, safe, and clean energy technologies.

  7. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezado, Yolanda; Martínez-Rovira, Immaculada

    This chapter describes the state-of-art of synchrotron radiation therapies in the treatment of radioresistant tumors. The tolerance of the surrounding healthy tissue severely limits the achievement of a curative treatment for some brain tumors, like gliomas. This restriction is especially important in children, due to the high risk of complications in the development of the central nervous system. In addition, the treatment of tumors close to an organ at risk, like the spinal cord, is also restrained. One possible solution is the development of new radiotherapy techniques would exploit radically different irradiation modes, as it is the case of synchrotron radiotherapies. Their distinct features allow to modify the biological equivalent doses. In this chapter the three new approaches under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), in Grenoble (France), will be described, namely: stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy, microbeam radiation therapy and minibeam radiation therapy. The promising results obtained in the treatment of high grade brain tumors in preclinical studies have paved the way to the forthcoming clinical trials, currently in preparation.

  8. Synchrotron Radiation Mammography: Clinical Experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Longo, Renata; Rokvic, Tatjana; Castelli, Edoardo; Abrami, Alessandro; Chenda, Valentina; Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Quai, Elisa; Tromba, Giuliana; Bregant, Paola; De Guarrini, Fabio; Cova, Maria A.; Tonutti, Maura; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2007-01-19

    For several years a large variety of in-vitro medical imaging studies were carried out at the SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for Medical Physics) beamline of the synchrotron radiation facility ELETTRA (Trieste, Italy) utilizing phase sensitive imaging techniques. In particular low dose Phase Contrast (PhC) in planar imaging mode and computed tomography were utilized for full field mammography. The results obtained on in-vitro samples at the SYRMEP beamline in PhC breast imaging were so encouraging that a clinical program on a limited number of patients selected by radiologists was launched to validate the improvements of synchrotron radiation in mammography. PhC mammography with conventional screen-film systems is the first step within this project. A digital system is under development for future applications. During the last years the entire beamline has been deeply modified and a medical facility dedicated to in-vivo mammography was constructed. The facility for PhC synchrotron radiation mammography is now operative in patient mode. The system reveals a prominent increase in image quality with respect to conventional mammograms even at lower delivered dose.

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Dierker

    2008-03-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema

    Steve Dierker

    2016-07-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema

    Hill, John; Dooryhee, Eric; Wilkins, Stuart; Miller, Lisa; Chu, Yong

    2016-07-12

    NSLS-II is a synchrotron light source helping researchers explore solutions to the grand energy challenges faced by the nation, and open up new regimes of scientific discovery that will pave the way to discoveries in physics, chemistry, and biology — advances that will ultimately enhance national security and help drive the development of abundant, safe, and clean energy technologies.

  12. Tandems as injectors for synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-08-01

    This is a review on the use of Tandem electrostatic accelerators for injection and filling of synchrotrons to accelerate intense beams of heavy-ions to relativistic energies. The paper emphasizes the need of operating the Tandems in pulsed mode for this application. It has been experimentally demonstrated that at the present this type of accelerators still provides the most reliable and best performance.

  13. RCMS - A SECOND GENERATION MEDICAL SYNCHROTRON.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; CARDONA,J.; BRENNAN,M.; KEWISCH,J.; MCINTYRE,G.; TSOUPAS,N.; SCHILLO,M.; TOD,A.; LUDEWIG,B.; LOCKYER,N.; PENN

    2001-06-18

    The Loma Linda University Medical Center treats more than 100 patients per day using a weak focusing slow cycling synchrotron with passive scattering nozzles at the end of rotatable gantries [1,2,3]. The Rapid Cycling Medical Synchrotron (RCMS) is a second generation synchrotron which will achieve the performance listed in Table 1, including rapid 3-D Pulsed Beam Scanning [4,5].

  14. The Solid Rocket Booster Auxiliary Power Unit: Meeting the Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The thrust vector control systems of the solid rocket boosters are turbine-powered, electrically controlled hydraulic systems which function through hydraulic actuators to gimbal the nozzles of the solid rocket boosters and provide vehicle steering for the Space Shuttle. Turbine power for the thrust vector control systems is provided through hydrazine fueled auxiliary power units which drive the hydraulic pumps. The solid rocket booster auxiliary power unit resulted from trade studies which indicated significant advantages would result if an existing engine could be found to meet the program goal of 20 missions reusability and adapted to meet the seawater environments associated with ocean landings. During its maturation, the auxiliary power unit underwent many design iterations and provided its flight worthiness through full qualification programs both as a component and as part of the thrust vector control system. More significant, the auxiliary power unit has successfully completed six Shuttle missions.

  15. New frontiers in water purification: highly stable amphopolycarboxyglycinate-stabilized Ag-AgCl nanocomposite and its newly discovered potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyakov, Yurii A.; Zherebin, Pavel M.; Kudrinskiy, Alexey A.; Zubavichus, Yan V.; Presniakov, Mikhail Yu; Yapryntsev, Alexey D.; Karabtseva, Anastasia V.; Mikhaylov, Dmitry M.; Lisichkin, Georgii V.

    2016-09-01

    A simple synthetic procedure for high-stable dispersions of porous composite Ag/AgCl nanoparticles stabilized with amphoteric surfactant sodium tallow amphopolycarboxyglycinate has been proposed for the first time. The prepared samples were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, small area electron diffraction (SAED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron probe micro-analysis. In addition, measurements (carried out at the Kurchatov synchrotron radiation source stations) of the Ag K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra and XRD of the prepared nanoparticles have been performed. The obtained results suggest that small-sized Ag clusters are homogeneously distributed in the mass of the AgCl nanoparticle (~80 nm) formed during the synthesis. The Ag/AgCl dispersion demonstrates photocatalytic activity (with respect to methyl orange) and high bactericidal activity against E. coli. This activity is superior to the activity of both Ag and AgCl nanoparticles stabilized by the same surfactant. Thus, porous composite Ag/AgCl nanoparticles can be used as a multifunctional agent that is able to remove both pollutants and bacterium from water.

  16. Space Launch System Booster Passes Major Ground Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-11

    The largest, most powerful rocket booster ever built successfully fired up Wednesday for a major-milestone ground test in preparation for future missions to help propel NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft to deep space destinations, including an asteroid and Mars. The booster fired for two minutes, the same amount of time it will fire when it lifts the SLS off the launch pad, and produced about 3.6 million pounds of thrust. The test was conducted at the Promontory, Utah test facility of commercial partner Orbital ATK.

  17. Electron cloud and space charge effects in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space charge making Landau damping appear impossible. Simulations reveal a substantial buildup of electron cloud in the whole Booster ramping cycle, both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, whenever the secondary-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on the space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is investigated.

  18. Multi-Physics Analysis of the Fermilab Booster RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, M.; Reid, J.; Yakovlev, V.; Lebedev, V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    After about 40 years of operation the RF accelerating cavities in Fermilab Booster need an upgrade to improve their reliability and to increase the repetition rate in order to support a future experimental program. An increase in the repetition rate from 7 to 15 Hz entails increasing the power dissipation in the RF cavities, their ferrite loaded tuners, and HOM dampers. The increased duty factor requires careful modelling for the RF heating effects in the cavity. A multi-physic analysis investigating both the RF and thermal properties of Booster cavity under various operating conditions is presented in this paper.

  19. Optics Corrections with LOCO in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; Prost, Lionel; Seiya, Kiyomi; Triplett, A. Kent

    2016-06-01

    The optics of the Fermilab Booster has been corrected with LOCO (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). However, the first corrections did not show any improvement in capture efficiency at injection. A detailed analysis of the results showed that the problem lay in the MADX optics file. Both the quadrupole and chromatic strengths were originally set as constants independent of beam energy. However, careful comparison between the measured and calculated tunes and chromatcity show that these strengths are energy dependent. After the MADX model was modified with these new energy dependent strengths, the LOCO corrected lattice has been applied to Booster. The effect of the corrected lattice will be discussed here.

  20. Space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The performance requirements, preliminary designs, and development program plans for an airborne recovery system for the space shuttle solid rocket booster are discussed. The analyses performed during the study phase of the program are presented. The basic considerations which established the system configuration are defined. A Monte Carlo statistical technique using random sampling of the probability distribution for the critical water impact parameters was used to determine the failure probability of each solid rocket booster component as functions of impact velocity and component strength capability.

  1. Orion EM-1 Booster Preps - Aft Skirt Preps/Painting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-28

    A paint technician with Orbital ATK, prime contractor for the Space Launch System (SLS) Booster, uses an air gun to apply paint to the right hand aft skirt for NASA’s SLS rocket inside a support building at the Hangar AF facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The space shuttle-era aft skirt, was inspected and resurfaced to prepare it for primer and paint. The aft skirt will be used on the right hand booster of the SLS rocket for Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). NASA is preparing for EM-1, deep-space missions, and the journey to Mars.

  2. Orion EM-1 Booster Preps - Aft Skirt Preps/Painting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-28

    Technicians with Orbital ATK, prime contractor for the Space Launch System (SLS) Booster, prepare the right hand aft skirt for NASA’s SLS rocket for primer and painting inside a support building at the Hangar AF facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The space shuttle-era aft skirt, was inspected and resurfaced and will be primed and painted for use on the right hand booster of the SLS rocket for Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). NASA is preparing for EM-1, deep-space missions, and the journey to Mars.

  3. Orion EM-1 Booster Preps - Aft Skirt Preps/Painting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-28

    Technicians with Orbital ATK, prime contractor for the Space Launch System (SLS) Booster, prepare a paint mixture for the right hand aft skirt for NASA’s SLS in a support building at the Hangar AF facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The space shuttle-era aft skirt, was inspected and resurfaced, and will be primed and painted for use on the right hand booster of the SLS rocket for Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). NASA is preparing for EM-1, deep-space missions, and the Journey to Mars.

  4. Mars Science Laboratory Atlas V First Stage Booster

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-07

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, second from left, talks with United Launch Alliance Vice President of Mission operations Jim Sponnick, along with NASA Mission Manager for Launch Services Wanda Harding, left, White House Fellow Debra Kurshan, right, and NASA Senior Advisor Mike French, background, in front of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V first stage booster, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011, at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The booster will help send NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover to Mars later this year. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Debris control design achievements of the booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stringent debris control requirements imposed on the design of the Space Shuttle booster separation motor are described along with the verification program implemented to ensure compliance with debris control objectives. The principal areas emphasized in the design and development of the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) relative to debris control were the propellant formulation and nozzle closures which protect the motors from aerodynamic heating and moisture. A description of the motor design requirements, the propellant formulation and verification program, and the nozzle closures design and verification are presented.

  6. Fabrication of a prototype dipole for the SSC Low Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, C.M.

    1993-12-01

    The Low Energy Booster of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will be a synchrotron containing 96 dipoles operating between 0.13 T and 1.35 T at 10 Hz. Each dipole`s 1.865 m-long core is made from {approximately}2900 steel laminations (lams), each 52 {times} 66 cm and 0.635 mm thick. A need to minimize power supply costs and stringent field specifications led to a straight core with very tight mechanical tolerances of the order of 0.05 mm. To satisfy these tolerances, we decided to stack the core in a vertical position; i.e., with the laminations laid horizontally. We designed and built an unusual vertical stacking fixture that pivots into a horizontal position after all the laminations have been stacked and compressed and four support angles welded onto the laminations. The stacking fixture, our experience using it, and conclusions as to the merits of stacking such a long core vertically will be described. The methods of insulating and potting the pancake coils and their installation into the unsplittable core is also described.

  7. Space shuttle with common fuel tank for liquid rocket booster and main engines (supertanker space shuttle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    An operation and schedule enhancement is shown that replaces the four-body cluster (Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO), external tank, and two solid rocket boosters) with a simpler two-body cluster (SSO and liquid rocket booster/external tank). At staging velocity, the booster unit (liquid-fueled booster engines and vehicle support structure) is jettisoned while the remaining SSO and supertank continues on to orbit. The simpler two-bodied cluster reduces the processing and stack time until SSO mate from 57 days (for the solid rocket booster) to 20 days (for the liquid rocket booster). The areas in which liquid booster systems are superior to solid rocket boosters are discussed. Alternative and future generation vehicles are reviewed to reveal greater performance and operations enhancements with more modifications to the current methods of propulsion design philosophy, e.g., combined cycle engines, and concentric propellant tanks.

  8. Initiation Capacity of a Specially Shaped Booster Pellet and Numerical Simulation of Its Initiation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Shuang; Hu, Shuang-Qi; Cao, Xiong; Zhang, Jian-Ren

    2014-01-01

    The insensitive main charge explosive is creating new requirements for the booster pellet of detonation trains. The traditional cylindrical booster pellet has insufficient energy output to reliably initiate the insensitive main charge explosive. In this research, a concave spherical booster pellet was designed. The initiation capacity of the concave spherical booster pellet was studied using varied composition and axial steel dent methods. The initiation process of the concave spherical booster pellet was also simulated by ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The results showed that using a concave spherical booster allows a 42% reduction in the amount of explosive needed to match the initiation capacity of a conventional cylindrical booster of the same dimensions. With the other parameters kept constant, the initiation capacity of the concave spherical booster pellet increases with decreased cone angle and concave radius. The numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  10. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  11. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-08-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic X-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of X-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotheraphy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatc needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  12. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  13. View of the booster recover ship UTC Freedom approaching its berth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    View of the booster recover ship UTC Freedom approaching its berth at the booster disassembly facility on Cape Canaveral after towing in one of the two STS-3 solid rocket boosters (SRB). The ship is framed by a life preserver on the dock.

  14. 47 CFR 95.1311 - Repeater operations and signal boosters prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater operations and signal boosters... § 95.1311 Repeater operations and signal boosters prohibited. MURS stations are prohibited from operating as a repeater station or as a signal booster. This prohibition includes store-and-forward packet...

  15. View of the booster recover ship UTC Freedom approaching its berth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    View of the booster recover ship UTC Freedom approaching its berth at the booster disassembly facility on Cape Canaveral after towing in one of the two STS-3 solid rocket boosters (SRB). The ship is framed by a life preserver on the dock.

  16. Evaluation of the static belt fit provided by belt-positioning booster seats.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew P; Ebert, Sheila M; Sherwood, Christopher P; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A

    2009-05-01

    Belt-positioning booster seats are recommended for children who use vehicle seat belts as primary restraints but who are too small to obtain good belt fit. Previous research has shown that belt-positioning boosters reduce injury risk, but the belt fit produced by the wide range of boosters in the US market has not previously been assessed. The present study describes the development of a method for quantifying static belt fit with a Hybrid-III 6-year-old test dummy. The measurement method was applied in a laboratory seat mockup to 31 boosters (10 in both backless and highback modes) across a range of belt geometries obtained from in-vehicle measurements. Belt fit varied widely across boosters. Backless boosters generally produced better lap belt fit than highback boosters, largely because adding the back component moved the dummy forward with respect to the lap belt routing guides. However, highback boosters produced more consistent shoulder belt fit because of the presence of belt routing guides near the shoulder. Some boosters performed well on both lap belt and shoulder belt fit. Lap belt fit in dedicated boosters was generally better than in combination restraints that also can be used with an integrated harness. Results demonstrate that certain booster design features produce better belt fit across a wide range of belt geometries. Lap belt guides that hold the belt down, rather than up, and shoulder belt guides integrated into the booster backrest provided better belt fit.

  17. Space Launch System Booster Test- Behind the Scenes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-24

    Get a sneak peek behind the scenes of how engineers and technicians at Orbital ATK in Promontory, Utah, are coming together to test the most powerful booster for NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System. SLS will make missions possible to an asteroid and the journey to Mars. For more information on SLS, visit www.nasa.gov/sls.

  18. Digital signal array processor for NSLS booster power supply upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.; Dabrowski, J.; Murray, J.

    1993-07-01

    The booster at the NSLS is being upgraded from 0.75 to 2 pulses per second. To accomplish this, new power supplied for the dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole have been installed. This paper will outline the design and function of the digital signal processor used as the primary control element in the power supply control system.

  19. Anger and Violence Prevention: Enhancing Treatment Effects through Booster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alysha; McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of booster sessions on the maintenance of intervention gains following an anger management prevention program: "Student Created Aggression Replacement Education Program" ("SCARE"). Participants who had completed the "SCARE" program a year earlier were randomly…

  20. Year 5 Booster Units. The National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England).

    The eight units of work in this document are designed to complement existing literacy booster units. Each unit is based on teaching objectives from the National Literacy Strategy Framework. They have been produced with the help of Year 5 teachers and have been trialled with pupils in a range of schools. The units support teachers' work with Year 5…

  1. Orbit decay analysis of STS upper stage boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, O. F., Jr.; Mueller, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    An orbit decay analysis of the space transportation system upper stage boosters is presented. An overview of the computer trajectory programs, DSTROB, algorithm is presented. Atmospheric drag and perturbation models are described. The development of launch windows, such that the transfer orbit will decay within two years, is discussed. A study of the lifetimes of geosynchronous transfer orbits is presented.

  2. Structural Dynamics of Filament-Wound Booster Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    Report summarizes program of measurements and calculations of vibrations in filament-wound composite models of Space Shuttle solid-rocket boosters. Vibrational behavior predicted by finite-element computer model of structural dynamics correlates well with data from tests on full- and quarter-scale models. Computer model developed with NASTRAN general-purpose structural-analysis computer code.

  3. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J., Jr. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Major Solid Rocket Booster-Thrust Vector Control (SRB-TVC) subsystem components and subcomponents used in the Space Transportation System (STS) are identified. Simplified schematics, detailed schematics, figures, photographs, and data are included to acquaint the reader with the operation, performance, and physical layout as well as the materials and instrumentation used.

  4. Simulation of the capture process in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.

    1987-09-01

    A progress report on efforts to understand and improve adiabatic capture in the Fermilab Booster by experiment and simulation is presented. In particular, a new RF voltage program for capture which ameliorates transverse space-charge effects is described and simulated. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  5. OPTIMAL SCHEDULING OF BOOSTER DISINFECTION IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster disinfection is the addition of disinfectant at locations distributed throughout a water distribution system. Such a strategy can reduce the mass of disinfectant required to maintain a detectable residual at points of consumption in the distribution system, which may lea...

  6. Structural Dynamics of Filament-Wound Booster Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    Report summarizes program of measurements and calculations of vibrations in filament-wound composite models of Space Shuttle solid-rocket boosters. Vibrational behavior predicted by finite-element computer model of structural dynamics correlates well with data from tests on full- and quarter-scale models. Computer model developed with NASTRAN general-purpose structural-analysis computer code.

  7. Effectiveness of an Electronic Booster Session Delivered to Mandated Students.

    PubMed

    Linowski, Sally A; DiFulvio, Gloria T; Fedorchak, Diane; Puleo, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    College student drinking continues to be a problem in the United States. Students who have violated campus alcohol policy are at particularly high risk for dangerous drinking. While Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) has been found to be an effective strategy in reducing high-risk drinking and associated consequences, questions remain about ways to further reduce risk or sustain changes associated with a face-to face intervention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a computer-delivered personalized feedback (electronic booster) delivered to policy violators who completed a mandated BASICS program. At 3-month post-intervention, 346 participants (60.4% male and 39.6% female) were randomized to one of two conditions: assessment only (n = 171) or electronic booster feedback (n = 175). Follow-up assessments were given to all participants at 3, 6, and 12-month post-initial intervention. Both groups showed reductions in drinking after the in-person BASICS intervention, but no additional reductions were seen with the addition of an electronic booster session. Findings suggest that although brief motivational interventions delivered in person to mandated students have been shown to be effective with mandated students, there is no additional benefit from an electronic booster session delivered 3-month post-intervention for this population. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Control system for NSLS booster power supply upgrade II

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.; Dabrowski, J.; Murray, J.

    1993-07-01

    The booster at the NSLS is being upgraded from 0.75 to 2 pulses per second by means of the installation of new dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole power supplies. Here the authors outline the design of the power supply control system.

  9. 47 CFR 27.9 - Operation of certificated signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of certificated signal boosters. 27.9 Section 27.9 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES General Information § 27.9 Operation of certificated...

  10. 47 CFR 27.9 - Operation of certificated signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of certificated signal boosters. 27.9 Section 27.9 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES General Information § 27.9 Operation of certificated...

  11. Closeup view of the External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters at the Launch Pad at Kennedy Space Center. Note the Hydrogen Vent Arm extending out from the Fixed Service Structure at attached to the Intertank segment of the External Tank. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  12. Anger and Violence Prevention: Enhancing Treatment Effects through Booster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alysha; McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of booster sessions on the maintenance of intervention gains following an anger management prevention program: "Student Created Aggression Replacement Education Program" ("SCARE"). Participants who had completed the "SCARE" program a year earlier were randomly…

  13. Space transportation booster engine configuration study. Addendum: Design definition document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Gas generator engine characteristics and results of engine configuration refinements are discussed. Updated component mechanical design, performance, and manufacturing information is provided. The results are also provided of ocean recovery studies and various engine integration tasks. The details are provided of the maintenance plan for the Space Transportation Booster Engine.

  14. OPTIMAL SCHEDULING OF BOOSTER DISINFECTION IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster disinfection is the addition of disinfectant at locations distributed throughout a water distribution system. Such a strategy can reduce the mass of disinfectant required to maintain a detectable residual at points of consumption in the distribution system, which may lea...

  15. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This users manual for the solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-II) contains descriptions of the model, the program options, the required program inputs, the program output format and the program error messages. SRB-II is written in FORTRAN and is operational on both the IBM 370/155 and the MSFC UNIVAC 1108 computers.

  16. Liquid flyback booster pre-phase: A study assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W.; Ankney, W.; Bell, J.; Berning, M.; Bryant, L.; Bufkin, A.; Cain, L.; Caram, J.; Cockrell, B.; Curry, D.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a flyback booster has been around since early in the shuttle program. The original two-stage shuttle concepts used a manned flyback booster. These boosters were eliminated from the program for funding and size reasons. The current shuttle uses two Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM's), which are recovered and refurbished after each flight; this is one of the major cost factors of the program. Replacement options have been studied over the past ten years. The conclusion reached by the most recent study is that the liquid flyback booster (LFBB) is the only competitive option from a life-cycle cost perspective. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and practicality of LFBB's. The study provides an expansion of the recommendations made during the aforementioned study. The primary benefits are the potential for enhanced reusability and a reduction of recurring costs. The potential savings in vehicle turnaround could offset the up-front costs. Development of LFBB's requires a commitment to the shuttle program for 20 to 30 years. LFBB's also offer enhanced safety and abort capabilities. Currently, any failure of an RSRM can be considered catastrophic, since there are no intact abort capabilities during the burn of the RSRM's. The performance goal of the LFBB's was to lift a fully loaded orbiter under optimal conditions, so as not to be the limiting factor of the performance capability of the shuttle. In addition, a final benefit is the availability of growth paths for applications other than shuttle.

  17. Solid rocket booster thermal radiation model. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    A user's manual was prepared for the computer program of a solid rocket booster (SRB) thermal radiation model. The following information was included: (1) structure of the program, (2) input information required, (3) examples of input cards and output printout, (4) program characteristics, and (5) program listing.

  18. Injection of large transverse emittance EBIS beams in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.

    2011-10-10

    During the commissioning of EBIS beams in Booster in November 2010 and in April, May and June 2011, it was found that the transverse emittances of the EBIS beams just upstream of Booster were much larger than expected. Beam emittances of 11{pi} mm milliradians had been expected, but numbers 3 to 4 times larger were measured. Here and throughout this note the beam emittance, {pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}, is taken to be the area of the smallest ellipse that contains 95% of the beam. We call this smallest ellipse the beam ellipse. If the beam distribution is gaussian, the rms emittance of the distribution is very nearly one sixth the area of the beam ellipse. The normalized rms emittance is the rms emittance times the relativistic factor {beta}{gamma} = 0.06564. This amounts to 0.12{pi} mm milliradians for the 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse. In [1] we modeled the injection and turn-by-turn evolution of an 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse in the horizontal plane in Booster. It was shown that with the present injection system, up to 4 turns of this beam could be injected and stored in Booster without loss. In the present note we extend this analysis to the injection of larger emittance beams. We consider only the emittance in the horizontal plane. Emittance in the vertical plane and the effects of dispersion are treated in [2].

  19. MULTIPLE SINGLE BUNCH EXTRACTION TO THE AGS SWITCHYARD.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,K.A.; AHRENS,L.; GASSNER,D.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; SMITH,G.; TSOUPAS,N.; VAN ASSELT,W.; ZENO,K.

    2001-06-18

    In this report we will describe the multiple single bunch extraction system as utilized to deliver beams to the Brookhaven's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) switchyard area. We will describe modifications of the AGS switchyard, necessary to allow it to accept bunched beam, and results of the first commissioning of this system. The AGS Switchyard has for many years been used to simultaneously deliver (unbunched) resonant extracted beam to a set of fixed target experiments. In order to accommodate new fixed target experiments which require bunched beams, a method of sending the bunched beams to the AGS Switchyard was required. In addition, by using the AGS switchyard instead of the upstream section of the Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) injection line the accelerators can be reconfigured quickly and efficiently for filling RHIC. We will present results of the commissioning of this system, which was done in January 2001.

  20. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  1. Laser undulated synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baine, Michael A. J.

    2000-07-01

    This work will address the practicality of using lasers to undulate electron beams for the production of tunable, short pulsed, monochromatic, synchrotron radiation. An x-ray source based on this mechanism, referred to as a Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS), has several attractive features: (1)x-rays can be generated with an electron beam whose energy is a factor of 100 smaller than competing synchrotron sources that use magnetic undulators, (2)the pulse length can be made extremely short (<100fs) by using short pulsed lasers, (3)the polarization can be controlled by changing the polarization of the incident laser, (4)the bandwidth can be quite narrow (<1%), and (5)the resultant x-rays are well collimated (θ < .1 rad for γ > 10) in the direction of the electron beam. These factors combine to produce one of the brightest (>1018 J/s mrad mm2 1%BW) sources of x-rays available. The most attractive feature, however, is its compact size and low cost, which suit it well for applications in Medicine, Biology, and Physics. The problem will be treated in two parts: analysis of nonlinear Thomson scattering for arbitrary interaction geometry of intense lasers and relativistic electron beams, and description of a proof-of-principle experiment carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  2. Proposals for synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1985-06-01

    Ever since it was first applied in the 1960's synchrotron radiation from an accelerating electron beam has been gaining popularity as a powerful tool for research and development in a wide variety of fields of science and technology. By now there are some 20 facilities operating either parasitically or dedicatedly for synchrotron radiation research in different parts of the world. In addition there are another 20 facilities either in construction or in various stages of proposal and design. The experiences gained from the operating facilities and the recent development of insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators as radiation sources led to a new set of requirements on the design of synchrotron radiation storage rings for optimum utility. The surprisingly uniform applicability and unanimous acceptance of these criteria give assurance that they are indeed valid criteria derived form mature considerations and experiences. Instead of describing the design of each of these new facilities it is, thus, more effective to discuss these desirable design features and indicate how they are incorporated in the design using machines listed as examples. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Synchrotron/crystal sample preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-01-01

    The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) prepared this final report entitled 'Synchrotron/Crystal Sample Preparation' in completion of contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order No. 53. Hughes Danbury Optical Systems (HDOS) is manufacturing the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) mirrors. These thin-walled, grazing incidence, Wolter Type-1 mirrors, varying in diameter from 1.2 to 0.68 meters, must be ground and polished using state-of-the-art techniques in order to prevent undue stress due to damage or the presence of crystals and inclusions. The effect of crystals on the polishing and grinding process must also be understood. This involves coating special samples of Zerodur and measuring the reflectivity of the coatings in a synchrotron system. In order to gain the understanding needed on the effect of the Zerodur crystals by the grinding and polishing process, UAH prepared glass samples by cutting, grinding, etching, and polishing as required to meet specifications for witness bars for synchrotron measurements and for investigations of crystals embedded in Zerodur. UAH then characterized these samples for subsurface damage and surface roughness and figure.

  4. Abdominal Injuries in Belt-Positioning Booster Seats

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Kristy B.; Ghati, Yoganand

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that booster seats reduce the risk of abdominal injuries by improving the fit of the seat belt on young children and encouraging better posture and compatibility with the vehicle seat. Recently, several studies have reported cases of abdominal injuries in booster seated children questioning the protective effects of these restraints. The objective of this study was to examine cases of abdominal injuries in booster seated children through parametric modeling to gain a thorough understanding of the injury causation scenarios. The Partners for Child Passenger Safety and CIREN in-depth crash investigation databases were queried to identify children in belt-positioning booster seats with abdominal injuries. The injury causation scenarios for these injuries were delineated using the CIREN Biotab method. The cases were modeled, using MADYMO with variations in key parameters, to determine the ranges of loads and loading rates for the abdomen and thorax. A parametric study was completed examining the influence of pretensioners and load limiters on the injury metrics obtained. Query of the two databases revealed three cases involving abdominal injuries to booster seated children. Children in two of the cases sustained a thoracic injury (AIS 3/AIS 4) in addition to their abdominal injuries (AIS 2) and review of these cases pointed to the role of shoulder belt loading in the injury causation. Modeling of these cases revealed chest compressions and accelerations of 30–53 mm and 41–89 g, respectively and abdominal deflection and velocity of 7.0–13.3 mm and 1.2–2.2 m/s, respectively. Parametric study suggested that coupling shoulder belt load limiting and lap belt buckle pretensioning resulted in improved chest and abdominal metrics while reducing head excursion, indicating that these technologies may provide injury reduction potential to pediatric rear seat occupants. PMID:20184845

  5. Mechanical Solitaire Thrombectomy with Low-Dose Booster Tirofiban Injection.

    PubMed

    Goh, Duck-Ho; Jin, Sung-Chul; Jeong, Hae Woong; Ha, Sam Yeol

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent has been associated with a high recanalization rate and favorable clinical outcome in intra-arterial thrombolysis. To achieve a higher recanalization rate for mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy, we used an intra-arterial low-dose booster tirofiban injection into the occluded segment after stent deployment. We report the safety and recanalization rates for mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with a low-dose booster tirofiban injection. Between February and March 2013, 13 consecutive patients underwent mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with low-dose booster tirofiban injection. The occlusion sites included the proximal middle cerebral artery (5 patients), the internal carotid artery (5 patients), the top of the basilar artery (2 patients) and the distal middle cerebral artery (M2 segment, 1 patient). Six patients underwent bridge treatment, including intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. Tirofiban of 250 µg was used in all patients except one (500 µg). All occluded vessels were recanalized after 3 attempts at stent retrieval (1 time, n=9; 2 times, n=2; 3 times, n=2). Successful recanalization was achieved in all patients (TICI 3, n=8; TICI 2b, n=5). Procedural complications developed in 3 patients (subarachnoid hemorrhage, n=2; hemorrhagic transformation, n=1). Mortality occurred in one patient with a basilar artery occlusion due to reperfusion brain swelling after mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with low-dose booster tirofiban injection. Favorable clinical outcome (mRS≤2) was observed in 8 patients (61.5%). Our modified mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy method using a low-dose booster tirofiban injection might enhance the recanalization rate with no additive hemorrhagic complications.

  6. Mechanical Solitaire Thrombectomy with Low-Dose Booster Tirofiban Injection

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Duck-Ho; Jeong, Hae Woong; Ha, Sam Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mechanical thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent has been associated with a high recanalization rate and favorable clinical outcome in intra-arterial thrombolysis. To achieve a higher recanalization rate for mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy, we used an intra-arterial low-dose booster tirofiban injection into the occluded segment after stent deployment. We report the safety and recanalization rates for mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with a low-dose booster tirofiban injection. Materials and Methods Between February and March 2013, 13 consecutive patients underwent mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with low-dose booster tirofiban injection. The occlusion sites included the proximal middle cerebral artery (5 patients), the internal carotid artery (5 patients), the top of the basilar artery (2 patients) and the distal middle cerebral artery (M2 segment, 1 patient). Six patients underwent bridge treatment, including intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. Tirofiban of 250 µg was used in all patients except one (500 µg). All occluded vessels were recanalized after 3 attempts at stent retrieval (1 time, n=9; 2 times, n=2; 3 times, n=2). Results Successful recanalization was achieved in all patients (TICI 3, n=8; TICI 2b, n=5). Procedural complications developed in 3 patients (subarachnoid hemorrhage, n=2; hemorrhagic transformation, n=1). Mortality occurred in one patient with a basilar artery occlusion due to reperfusion brain swelling after mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with low-dose booster tirofiban injection. Favorable clinical outcome (mRS≤2) was observed in 8 patients (61.5%). Conclusion Our modified mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy method using a low-dose booster tirofiban injection might enhance the recanalization rate with no additive hemorrhagic complications. PMID:27621948

  7. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Appendix C: Battery report for the liquid rocket booster TVC actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The actuators for control of engine valves and gimbals for a booster require 165 kW or more peak power at 270 volts direct current (VDC) during the 2 or 3 minutes of first stage ascent; other booster devices require much less power at 28 VDC. It is desired that a booster supply its own electrical power and satisfy redundancy requirements of the Solid Rocket Booster Shuttle, when applicable. The power of a Liquid Rocket Booster is therefore provided by two subsystems: Actuator Battery Power (270 VDC) Subsystem for the engine actuators, and Electrical Power and Distribution (28 VDC) Subsystem, to power everything else. Boosters will receive no electrical power from Orbiter, only commands and data, according to current plans. It was concluded that nine 30 volt silver-zinc batteries-in-series be used to provide the 270 volt, 37 kW average (165 kW peak).

  8. Refurbishment of the vacuum system of the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.M.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; McIntyre, G.T.; Skelton, R.; Brown, J.M.; Gill, S.M.; Barry, J.

    1989-01-01

    Three years ago a program was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory to upgrade the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) vacuum system. The three objectives of this work were to: (1) improve the vacuum system reliability; (2) improve its maintainability; and (3) improve its operating pressure from the present 2-3 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ Torr to < 10/sup /minus/8/ Torr. This paper discusses how these objectives can be met. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Transverse space-charge effects in the AGS booster during injection

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.; Shi, D.; Parsa, Z.

    1988-04-29

    We have analyzed the transverse motion for 200 MeV protons under strong space-charge conditions. We considered up to 5 /times/ 10/sup 12/ protons per bunch; for the assumed distribution this corresponds to a maximum tune shift of /minus/0.75. We utilized single particle tracking to study the motion in normalized phase space as a function of initial particle amplitude. Subsequent FFT analyses were used to obtain the fractional betatron tunes at different z values along the bunch. The motion shows x /minus/ y coupling due to the so-called Montague resonance (2Q/sub x//minus/2Q/sub y//equals/0). Perturbations arise when particles have tunes in the neighborhood of the 2Q /equals/ 9 half-integral resonances but losses do not occur. It appears that the motion is stabilized simply due to the strong amplitude dependence of the tunes. 2 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Booster-to-AGS Multiwires and an Evolution of the Application Profile Display

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens,L.

    2008-07-01

    Follow up on BtA multiwire beam measurements taken during the 2008 polarized proton run has led to a number of better understandings (for the author) associated with the beam instrumentation involved. This history will be reviewed--some 'beam-based' results noted--and the present state of the application for these monitors described. The BtA multiwire system seems to be fundamentally an excellent diagnostic for allowing us to get the BtA line well under control in a defendable way. When beam is available in BtA, carrying out some systematic measurements with the system can get us there.

  11. Space Launch System NASA Research Announcement Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumbly, Christopher M.; Craig, Kellie D.

    2011-01-01

    The intent of the Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) effort is to: (1) Reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS (2) Enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability. Key Concepts (1) Offerors must propose an Advanced Booster concept that meets SLS Program requirements (2) Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction must relate to the Offeror s Advanced Booster concept (3) NASA Research Announcement (NRA) will not be prescriptive in defining Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction

  12. Synchrotron Environmental Science-I Workshop Report.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-08

    Attendees of the Synchrotrons Environmental Science 1 (SES-1) workshop represented a broad spectrum of environmental science research areas and expertise in all of the current synchrotrons techniques (X-ray scattering and diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and two- and three-dimensional X-ray imaging). These individuals came together to discuss current measurement obstacles in environmental research and, more specifically, ways to overcome such obstacles by applying synchrotrons radiation techniques. Significant obstacles in measurement affect virtually all of the research issues described. Attendees identified synchrotrons approaches of potential value in their research. A number of the environmental research studies discussed are currently being addressed with some success by synchrotron-based approaches. Nevertheless, improvements in low-Z measurement capabilities are needed to facilitate the use of synchrotrons radiation methodologies in environmental research.

  13. Influence of booster size on the total energy of RBUL-1 explosive in underwater explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tongtang; Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Xiangrong; Wang, Jiming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the booster size on the total energy of DNAN-based insensitive melt-cast explosive RBUL-1, six groups of underwater explosion experiments with varied booster sizes were carried out to measure the total energy of RBUL-1 explosive. Experimental results show that the booster size especially the booster diameter has a great influence on the total energy of RBUL-1 explosive. An expression was proposed and calibrated to illustrate the relationship between the total energy of RBUL-1 explosive and the booster size. Besides, the booster size used in the underwater explosion experiments was optimized to achieve higher total energy results. The present investigation has practical significance for the design of the booster sequence and warhead.

  14. Ares I First Stage Booster Deceleration System: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ron; Hengel, John E.; Wolf, Dean

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Congressional NASA Authorization Act enacted a new space exploration program, the "Vision for Space Exploratien". The Constellation Program was formed to oversee the implementation of this new mission. With an intent not simply to support the International Space Station, but to build a permanent outpost on the Moon and then travel on to explore ever more distant terrains, the Constellation Program is supervising the development of a brand new fleet of launch vehicles, the Ares. The Ares lineup will include two new launch vehicles: the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle. A crew exploration vehicle, Orion, will be launched on the Ares I. It will be capable of docking with the Space Station, the lunar lander, Altair, and the Earth Departure Stage of Ares V. The Ares V will be capable of lifting both large-scale hardware and the Altair into space. The Ares First Stage Team is tasked with developing the propulsion system necessary to liftoff from the Earth and loft the entire Ares vehicle stack toward low Earth orbit. The Ares I First Stage booster is a 12-foot diameter, five-segment, reusable solid rocket booster derived from the Space Shuttle's four segment reusable solid rocket booster (SRB). It is separated from the Upper Stage through the use of a Deceleration Subsystem (DSS). Booster Tumble Motors are used to induce the pitch tumble following separation from the Upper Stage. The spent Ares I booster must be recoverable using a parachute deceleration system similar to that of the Shuttle SRB heritage system. Since Ares I is much heavier and reenters the Earth's atmosphere from a higher altitude at a much higher velocity than the SRB, all of the parachutes must be redesigned to reliably meet the operational requisites of the new launch vehicles. This paper presents an overview of this new booster deceleration system. It includes comprehensive detail of the parachute deceleration system, its design and deployment sequences

  15. Survey of Advanced Booster Options for Potential Shuttle Derivative Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackheim, Robert L.; Ryan, Richard; Threet, Ed; Kennedy, James W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A never-ending major goal for the Space Shuttle program is to continually improve flight safety, as long as this launch system remains in operational service. One of the options to improve system safety and to enhance vehicle performance as well, that has been seriously studied over the past several decades, is to replace the existing strap-on four segment solid rocket boosters (SRB's) with more capable units. A number of booster upgrade options have been studied in some detail, ranging from five segment solids through hybrids and a wide variety of liquid strap-ons (both pressure and pump fed with various propellants); all the way to a completely reusable liquid fly back booster (complete with air breathing engines for controlled landing and return). All of these possibilities appear to offer improvements in varying degrees; and each has their strengths and weaknesses from both programmatic and technical points of view. The most beneficial booster upgrade/design, if the shuttle program were to continue long enough to justify the required investment, would be an approach that greatly increased both vehicle and crew safety. This would be accomplished by increasing the minimum range/minimum altitude envelope that would readily allow abort to orbit (ATO), possibly even to zero/zero, and possibly reduce or eliminate the Return to Launch Site (RTLS) and even the Trans Atlantic Landing (TAL) abort mode requirements. This paper will briefly survey and discuss all of the various booster'upgrade options studied previously, and compare their relative attributes. The survey will explicitly discuss, in summary comparative form, options that include: five segment solids; several hybrid possibilities; pressure and/or pump-fed liquids using either LO2/kerosene, H2O/kerosene and LO2/J2, any of which could be either fully expendable, partly or fully reusable; and finally a fully reusable liquid fly back booster system, with a number of propellant and propulsion system options

  16. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

  17. Simulation of 6 to 3 to 1 merge and squeeze of Au77+ bunches in AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2016-05-09

    In order to increase the intensity per Au77+ bunch at AGS extraction, a 6 to 3 to 1 merge scheme was developed and implemented by K. Zeno during the 2016 RHIC run [1]. For this scheme, 12 Booster loads, each consisting of a single bunch, are delivered to AGS per AGS magnetic cycle. The bunch from Booster is itself the result of a 4 to 2 to 1 merge which is carried out on a at porch during the Booster magnetic cycle [2]. Each Booster bunch is injected into a harmonic 24 bucket on the AGS injection porch. In order to t into the buckets and allow for the AGS injection kicker rise time, the bunch width must be reduced by exciting quadrupole oscillations just before extraction from Booster [1]. The bunches are injected into two groups of six adjacent harmonic 24 buckets. In each group the 6 bunches are merged into 3 by bringing on RF harmonic 12 while reducing harmonic 24. This is a straightforward 2 to 1 merge (in which two adjacent bunches are merged into one). One ends up with two groups of three adjacent bunches sitting in harmonic 12 buckets. These bunches are accelerated to an intermediate porch for further merging. Doing the merge on a porch that sits above injection energy helps reduce losses that are believed to be due to the space-charge force acting on the bunched particles [3]. (The 6 to 3 merge is done on the injection porch because the harmonic 24 frequency on the intermediate porch would be too high for the AGS RF cavities.) On the intermediate porch each group of 3 bunches is merged into one by bringing on RF harmonics 8 and 4 and then reducing harmonics 12 and 8. One ends up with 2 bunches, each the result of a 6 to 3 to 1 merge and each sitting in a harmonic 4 bucket. This puts 6 Booster loads into each bunch. Each merged bunch needs to be squeezed into a harmonic 12 bucket for subsequent acceleration. This is done by again bringing on harmonic 8 and then harmonic 12.

  18. Fermilab Booster Transition Crossing Simulations and Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C. M.; Tan, C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Fermilab Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV at 15 Hz. In the PIP (Proton Improvement Plan) era, it is required that Booster deliver 4.2 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse to extraction. One of the obstacles for providing quality beam to the users is the longitudinal quadrupole oscillation that the beam suffers from right after transition. Although this oscillation is well taken care of with quadrupole dampers, it is important to understand the source of these oscillations in light of the PIP II requirements that require 6.5 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse at extraction. This paper explores the results from machine studies, computer simulations and solutions to prevent the quadrupole oscillations after transition.

  19. Ignition Transients of Large Segmented Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caveny, L. H.; Kuo, K. K.

    1976-01-01

    A model is described which provides a means for analyzing the complexities of ignition transients and pressure peaks of large, high performance, segmented solid rocket boosters. The method accounts for: (1) temporal and spatial development of the flow field set up by the head end igniter discharge, (2) ignition and flame spreading coupled to chamber flow, (3) the steep velocity, pressure, and temperature gradients that occur during the early phases of ignition, and (4) the interactions that produce ignition spikes (i.e., compression of chamber gases during pressurization, erosive burning, and mass added effect of igniter discharge). The technique differs from earlier models in that the flow interactions between the slots and main chamber are accounted for, and the original computer program for monolithic motors is improved. The procedures were used to predict the ignition transients of the current design for the space shuttle booster.

  20. Design optimization of gas generator hybrid propulsion boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, Vincent; Phillips, Dwight U.; Fink, Lawrence E.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology used in support of a contract study for NASA/MSFC to optimize the design of gas generator hybrid propulsion booster for uprating the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is presented. The objective was to compare alternative configurations for this booster approach, optimizing each candidate concept on different bases, in order to develop data for a trade table on which a final decision was based. The methodology is capable of processing a large number of independent and dependent variables, adjusting the overall subsystems characteristics to arrive at a best compromise integrated design to meet various specified optimization criteria subject to selected constraints. For each system considered, a detailed weight statement was generated along with preliminary cost and reliability estimates.

  1. Liquid Rocket Booster Study. Volume 2, Book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The recommended Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) concept is shown which uses a common main engine with the Advanced Launch System (ALS) which burns LO2 and LH2. The central rationale is based on the belief that the U.S. can only afford one big new rocket engine development in the 1990's. A LO2/LH2 engine in the half million pound thrust class could satisfy STS LRB, ALS, and Shuttle C (instead of SSMEs). Development costs and higher production rates can be shared by NASA and USAF. If the ALS program does not occur, the LO2/RP-1 propellants would produce slight lower costs for and STS LRB. When the planned Booster Engine portion of the Civil Space Transportation Initiatives has provided data on large pressure fed LO2/RP-1 engines, then the choice should be reevaluated.

  2. Design Optimization of Gas Generator Hybrid Propulsion Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, Vincent; Phillips, Dwight; Fink, Larry

    1990-01-01

    A methodology used in support of a study for NASA/MSFC to optimize the design of gas generator hybrid propulsion booster for uprating the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is presented. The objective was to compare alternative configurations for this booster approach, optimizing each candidate concept on different bases, in order to develop data for a trade table on which a final decision was based. The methodology is capable of processing a large number of independent and dependent variables, adjusting the overall subsystems characteristics to arrive at a best compromise integrated design to meet various specific optimization criteria subject to selected constraints. For each system considered, a detailed weight statement was generated along with preliminary cost and reliability estimates.

  3. Modelling of the AGS using Zgoubi - Status

    SciTech Connect

    Meot F.; Ahrens, L.; Dutheil, Y.; Glenn, J.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tsoupas, N.

    2012-05-20

    This paper summarizes the progress achieved so far, and discusses various outcomes, regarding the development of a model of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at the RHIC collider. The model, based on stepwise ray-tracing methods, includes beam and polarization dynamics. This is an on-going work, and a follow-on of code developments and particle and spin dynamics simulations that have been subject to earlier publications at IPAC and PAC [1, 2, 3]. A companion paper [4] gives additional informations, regarding the use of the measured magnetic field maps of the AGS main magnets.

  4. Space shuttle program solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The recovery of the Solid Rocket Boosters presented a major challenge. The SRB represents the largest payload ever recovered and presents the added complication that it is continually emitting hot gases and burning particles of insulation and other debris. Some items, such as portions of the nozzle, are large enough to burn through the nylon parachute material. The SRB Decelerator Subsystem program was highly successful in that no SRB has been lost as a result of inadequate performance of the DSS.

  5. Compensation for booster leakage field in the Duke storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Popov, Victor; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2017-01-01

    The High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at Duke University is an accelerator-driven Compton gamma-ray source, providing high flux gamma-ray beam from 1 MeV to 100 MeV for photo-nuclear physics research. The HIGS facility operates three accelerators, a linac pre-injector (0.16 GeV), a booster injector (0.16—1.2 GeV), and an electron storage ring (0.24—1.2 GeV). Because of the proximity of the booster injector to the storage ring, the magnetic field of the booster dipoles close to the ring can significantly alter the closed orbit in the storage ring being operated in the low energy region. This type of orbit distortion can be a problem for certain precision experiments which demand a high degree of energy consistency of the gamma-ray beam. This energy consistency can be achieved by maintaining consistent aiming of the gamma-ray beam, and therefore a steady electron beam orbit and angle at the Compton collision point. To overcome the booster leakage field problem, we have developed an orbit compensation scheme. This scheme is developed using two fast orbit correctors and implemented as a feedforward which is operated transparently together with the slow orbit feedback system. In this paper, we will describe the development of this leakage field compensation scheme, and report the measurement results, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the scheme. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  6. Landau damping of space-charge dominated Fermilab Booster beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space-charge making Landau damping impossible. However, it is shown that the bunching structure of the beam reduces the mean space-charge tune shift. As a result, the beam can be stabilized by suitable octupole-driven tune spread.

  7. Orion EM-1 Booster Preps - Aft Skirt Preps/Painting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-31

    The right hand aft skirt for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket has been refurbished and painted and is in a drying cell in a support building at the Hangar AF facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The space shuttle-era aft skirt will be used on the right hand booster of the SLS for Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). NASA is preparing for EM-1, deep space missions, and the Journey to Mars.

  8. Orion EM-1 Booster Preps - Aft Skirt Preps/Painting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-29

    The right hand aft skirt for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket has been painted and is in a drying cell in a support building at the Hangar AF facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The space shuttle-era aft skirt will be used on the right hand booster of NASA's Space Launch System rocket for Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). NASA is preparing for EM-1, deep space missions, and the Journey to Mars.

  9. Propellant Management in Booster and Upper Stage Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Mark F.

    1997-01-01

    A summary review of some of the technical issues which surround the design of the propulsion systems for Booster and Upper Stage systems are presented. The work focuses on Propellant Geyser, Slosh, and Orientation. A brief description of the concern is given with graphics which help the reader to understand the physics of the situation. The most common solutions to these problems are given with there respective advantages and disadvantages.

  10. The booster linac for the New Delhi Pelletron

    SciTech Connect

    Potukuchi, P.N.; Roy, A.; Ajith Kumar, B.P.; Ghosh, S.; Sarkar, A.; Changrani, T.; Mehta, R.; Muralidhar, S.; Mehta, G.K.; Shepard, K.W.

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes the heavy ion booster linac project for the New Delhi tandem Pelletron accelerator. The superconducting linac will consist of all niobium quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities. A prototype of the accelerating structure has been designed and a room temperature model is tested for the electromagnetic and mechanical properties. Three prototype niobium cavities are nearing completion at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  11. Thermal design of the space shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. R.; Vaniman, J. L.; Patterson, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal protection systems (TPS) to meet the quick turnaround and low cost required for reuse of the solid rocket booster (SRB) hardware. The TPS development considered the ease of application, changing ascent/reentry environments, and the problem of cleaning the residual insulation upon recovery. A sprayable ablator TPS material was developed. The challenges involved in design and development of this thermal system are discussed.

  12. Sirepo for Synchrotron Radiation Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler, Robert; Moeller, Paul; Rakitin, Maksim

    2016-10-25

    Sirepo is an open source framework for cloud computing. The graphical user interface (GUI) for Sirepo, also known as the client, executes in any HTML5 compliant web browser on any computing platform, including tablets. The client is built in JavaScript, making use of the following open source libraries: Bootstrap, which is fundamental for cross-platform web applications; AngularJS, which provides a model–view–controller (MVC) architecture and GUI components; and D3.js, which provides interactive plots and data-driven transformations. The Sirepo server is built on the following Python technologies: Flask, which is a lightweight framework for web development; Jinja, which is a secure and widely used templating language; and Werkzeug, a utility library that is compliant with the WSGI standard. We use Nginx as the HTTP server and proxy, which provides a scalable event-driven architecture. The physics codes supported by Sirepo execute inside a Docker container. One of the codes supported by Sirepo is the Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW). SRW computes synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons in arbitrary magnetic fields and propagates the radiation wavefronts through optical beamlines. SRW is open source and is primarily supported by Dr. Oleg Chubar of NSLS-II at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  13. Compact IR synchrotron beamline design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2017-03-01

    Third-generation storage rings are massively evolving due to the very compact nature of the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice which allows amazing decreases of the horizontal electron beam emittance, but leaves very little place for infrared (IR) extraction mirrors to be placed, thus prohibiting traditional IR beamlines. In order to circumvent this apparent restriction, an optimized optical layout directly integrated inside a SOLEIL synchrotron dipole chamber that delivers intense and almost aberration-free beams in the near- to mid-IR domain (1-30 µm) is proposed and analyzed, and which can be integrated into space-restricted MBA rings. Since the optics and chamber are interdependent, the feasibility of this approach depends on a large part on the technical ability to assemble mechanically the optics inside the dipole chamber and control their resulting stability and thermo-mechanical deformation. Acquiring this expertise should allow dipole chambers to provide almost aberration-free IR synchrotron sources on current and `ultimate' MBA storage rings.

  14. Anticrossing spectrometry with synchrotron light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Richter, R.; Coreno, M.; Kavčič, M.; Barba, Ž.; Mihelič, A.

    2017-07-01

    The anticrossing structure of the 1 s 7 l manifold of the helium atom in combined dc electric and magnetic fields is studied using a broadband photoexcitation with synchrotron light. The anticrossing signal is provided by the yield of atoms in the metastable 1 s 2 s states to which the 1 s 7 l states cascade. The mapping resolution depends solely on the homogeneity of the two fields in the target region, which is formed by the intersection of the synchrotron beam and the helium atom beam. The measured positions, as well as anticrossing intensities and widths, measured in the region of 1-1.5 kV/cm and 0-10 mT are in excellent agreement with the results of our extended theoretical simulations based on highly accurate zero-field wave functions. By centering the photoexcitation window to 65.110 and 65.130 eV, the same technique is applied to look for the anticrossings in the vicinity of the 7+1P1o-7 d 3D1o and 7 d 1P1o-8-1P1o pairs of doubly excited states, respectively.

  15. Computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.C.; Llacer, J.; Finman, L.C.; Hughes, E.B.; Otis, J.N.; Wilson, S.; Zeman, H.D.

    1983-09-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a widely used method of obtaining cross-sectional views of objects. The high intensity, natural collimation, monochromaticity and energy tunability of synchrotron x-ray sources could potentially be used to provide CT images of improved quality. The advantages of these systems would be that images could be produced more rapidly with better spatial resolution and reduced beam artifacts. In addition, images, in some cases, could be acquired with elemental sensitivity. As a demonstration of the capability of such a system, CT images were obtained of four slices of an excised pig heart in which the arteries and the cardiac chambers were filled with an iodinated medium. Images were taken with incident x-rays tuned successively to energies just above and below the iodine K edge. Iodine specific images were obtained by logarithmically subtracting the low energy image data from the high energy data and then reconstructing the image. CT imaging using synchrotron radiation may become a convenient and non-destructive method of imaging samples difficult to study by other methods.

  16. Space shuttle booster multi-engine base flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. H.; Gardiner, C. R.; Anderson, W. A.; Navickas, J.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive review of currently available techniques pertinent to several prominent aspects of the base thermal problem of the space shuttle booster is given along with a brief review of experimental results. A tractable engineering analysis, capable of predicting the power-on base pressure, base heating, and other base thermal environmental conditions, such as base gas temperature, is presented and used for an analysis of various space shuttle booster configurations. The analysis consists of a rational combination of theoretical treatments of the prominent flow interaction phenomena in the base region. These theories consider jet mixing, plume flow, axisymmetric flow effects, base injection, recirculating flow dynamics, and various modes of heat transfer. Such effects as initial boundary layer expansion at the nozzle lip, reattachment, recompression, choked vent flow, and nonisoenergetic mixing processes are included in the analysis. A unified method was developed and programmed to numerically obtain compatible solutions for the various flow field components in both flight and ground test conditions. Preliminary prediction for a 12-engine space shuttle booster base thermal environment was obtained for a typical trajectory history. Theoretical predictions were also obtained for some clustered-engine experimental conditions. Results indicate good agreement between the data and theoretical predicitons.

  17. Space shuttle booster multi-engine base flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. H.; Gardiner, C. R.; Anderson, W. A.; Navickas, J.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive review of currently available techniques pertinent to several prominent aspects of the base thermal problem of the space shuttle booster is given along with a brief review of experimental results. A tractable engineering analysis, capable of predicting the power-on base pressure, base heating, and other base thermal environmental conditions, such as base gas temperature, is presented and used for an analysis of various space shuttle booster configurations. The analysis consists of a rational combination of theoretical treatments of the prominent flow interaction phenomena in the base region. These theories consider jet mixing, plume flow, axisymmetric flow effects, base injection, recirculating flow dynamics, and various modes of heat transfer. Such effects as initial boundary layer expansion at the nozzle lip, reattachment, recompression, choked vent flow, and nonisoenergetic mixing processes are included in the analysis. A unified method was developed and programmed to numerically obtain compatible solutions for the various flow field components in both flight and ground test conditions. Preliminary prediction for a 12-engine space shuttle booster base thermal environment was obtained for a typical trajectory history. Theoretical predictions were also obtained for some clustered-engine experimental conditions. Results indicate good agreement between the data and theoretical predicitons.

  18. BERLinPro Booster Cavity Design, Fabrication and Test Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Burrill, Andrew; Anders, W; Frahm, A.; Knobloch, Jens; Neumann, Axel; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Turlington, Larry D.

    2014-12-01

    The bERLinPro project, a 100 mA, 50 MeV superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under construction at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for the purpose of studying the technical challenges and physics of operating a high current, c.w., 1.3 GHz ERL. This machine will utilize three unique SRF cryomodules for the injector, booster and linac module respectively. The booster cryomodule will contain three 2-cell SRF cavities, based on the original design by Cornell University, and will be equipped with twin 115 kW RF power couplers in order to provide the appropriate acceleration to the high current electron beam. This paper will review the status of the fabrication of the 4 booster cavities that have been built for this project by Jefferson Laboratory and look at the challenges presented by the incorporation of fundamental power couplers capable of delivering 115 kW. The test plan for the cavities and couplers will be given along with a brief overview of the cryomodule design.

  19. Synchrotron applications in wood preservation and deterioration

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Illman

    2003-01-01

    Several non-intrusive synchrotron techniques are being used to detect and study wood decay. The techniques use high intensity synchrotron-generated X-rays to determine the atomic structure of materials with imaging, diffraction, and absorption. Some of the techniques are X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFS), X-ray...

  20. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines policy update: booster dose recommendations.

    PubMed

    2011-12-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics approved updated recommendations for the use of quadravalent (serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y) meningococcal conjugate vaccines (Menactra [Sanofi Pasteur, Swiftwater, PA] and Menveo [Novartis, Basel, Switzerland]) in adolescents and in people at persistent high risk of meningococcal disease. The recommendations supplement previous Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for meningococcal vaccinations. Data were reviewed pertaining to immunogenicity in high-risk groups, bactericidal antibody persistence after immunization, current epidemiology of meningococcal disease, meningococcal conjugate vaccine effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of different strategies for vaccination of adolescents. This review prompted the following recommendations: (1) adolescents should be routinely immunized at 11 through 12 years of age and given a booster dose at 16 years of age; (2) adolescents who received their first dose at age 13 through 15 years should receive a booster at age 16 through 18 years or up to 5 years after their first dose; (3) adolescents who receive their first dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine at or after 16 years of age do not need a booster dose; (4) a 2-dose primary series should be administered 2 months apart for those who are at increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease because of persistent complement component (eg, C5-C9, properdin, factor H, or factor D) deficiency (9 months through 54 years of age) or functional or anatomic asplenia (2-54 years of age) and for adolescents with HIV infection; and (5) a booster dose should be given 3 years after the primary series if the primary 2-dose series was given from 2 through 6 years of age and every 5 years for persons whose 2-dose primary series or booster dose was given at 7 years of age or older who are at

  1. Workshop on detectors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2000-11-22

    Forefront experiments in many scientific areas for which synchrotron sources provide sufficient flux are nonetheless hindered because detectors cannot collect data fast enough, do not cover sufficiently solid angle, or do no have adequate resolution. Overall, the synchrotron facilities, each of which represents collective investments from funding agencies and user institutions ranging from many hundreds of millions to more than a billion dollars, are effectively significantly underutilized. While this chronic and growing problem plagues facilities around the world, it is particularly acute in the United States, where detector research often has to ride on the coat tails of explicitly science-oriented projects. As a first step toward moving out of this predicament, scientists from the U.S. synchrotron facilities held a national workshop in Washington, DC, on October 30-31, 2000. The Workshop on Detectors for Synchrotron Research aimed to create a national ''roadmap'' for development of synchrotron-radiation detectors.

  2. The minicomputer network for control of the dedicated synchrotron radiation storage ring BESSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan-Krieger, G. V.; Klotz, W.-D.; Maier, R.

    The architecture and the system software aspects of the BESSY-control system are presented. The network consists of four minicomputers (HP 1000F) which control the 800 MeV storage ring, the booster, a separated function alternating gradient synchrotron, and the preinjector, a 20 MeV microtron. All machines with their magnet-, vacuum-, rf- and interlock-, as well as their beam diagnostic components are connected via a simple bit-parallel byte-serial electronic interface system to the mini-computers. The software system handles about 1000 bytes of I/O-channels. With the exception of the producer's software the largest part of programming (about 90%) was done in FORTRAN. A description and summary of the organization and the features of the control system software is given.

  3. The effects of booster vaccination of hepatitis B vaccine on anti-HBV surface antigen negative children 11-15 years after primary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Ren, Jingjing; Shen, Lingzhi; Chen, Yongdi; Liang, Xiaofeng; Cui, Fuqiang; Li, Qian; Jiang, Zhenggang; Wang, Fuzhen

    2011-10-01

    The twin aims of this study were to investigate the changes in anti-HBs IgG levels after booster vaccinations and to compare the effects of different vaccine doses in children aged 11-15 years who were both negative for HBsAg and had an Anti-HBs < 10.0 mIU/mL after primary vaccination. Children who were born between 1993 and 1998 and who had completed their Hepatitis B vaccination program in infancy were randomly recruited to the study. The participants were divided into three groups according to their anti-HBs IgG levels: group I had a level < 0.1 mIU/mL; group II 0.1 - < 1.0 mIU/mL, and group III 1.0 - < 10.0 mIU/mL. The booster vaccination program comprised three (20μg) doses of HepB (CHO) vaccine administered at zero, one and six months after they are join this program: anti-HBs levels were measured one month after the first and third vaccinations. Among 448 HBsAg-negative infants, anti-HBs seroconversion rates (defined as an anti-HBs >= 10 mIU/mL) after the first and third vaccinations were 85.5% and 98.6% respectively - these observed differences were statistically significant (χ2 [1dof] = 50.11, p< 0.05). Seroconversion rates and GMTs after the first and third doses were significantly lower for group I children than the other two groups (p< 0.05). Compared, the OR of being negative (anti-HBs< 10mIU/ml) in group I after the first and the third dose were 7.66 (95%CI: 4.35-13.47, P< 0.05) and 20.48 (95% CI: 2.36-177.67, P< 0.05). So the anti-HBs titer levels decay to 10mIU/ml in 11-15 years of age children completed HepB Basic immunization, which need for booster immunization. The effect is better for those children with a relatively higher antibody titer before booster, and the effect of three doses booster is best.

  4. The one year effects of three doses of hepatitis B vaccine as a booster in anti-HBs-negative children 11-15 years after primary immunization; China, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Shan, Huan; Chen, Yongdi; Jiang, Zheng-gang; Dai, Xue-wei; Ren, Jing-jing; Xu, Kai-jin; Ruan, Bing; Yang, Shi-gui; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) levels one year after hepatitis B booster vaccination in anti-HBs-negative (<10 mIU/mL) children 11-15 y after primary vaccination. Anti-HBs titers were examined in 235 children who were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HBs, and hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc). The children were then divided into 3 groups based on their anti-HBs levels pre-booster: Group I, <0 .1 mIU/mL; Group II, 0.1 to <1 .0 mIU/mL; and Group III, 1.0 to <10 .0 mIU/mL. They were vaccinated with 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (0-1-6 month, 20 ug), and anti-HBs levels were measured. One month after the first dose, the anti-HBs positive rates (≥ 10 mIU/mL) in Groups I-III were 56.14%, 83.61% and 100%. One month after the third dose, the anti-HBs-positive rates in Groups I-III were 96.49%, 98.36% and 100%. One year after the third dose, the anti-HBs-positive rates in Groups I-III were 73.68%, 75.41% and 98.29%, respectively. Protective levels declined more rapidly for those with lower titers. Children with pre-booster anti-HBs titers of 1-9.9 mIU/mL might not need any booster dose, and the children with pre-booster titers of 0.1-0.9 and <0 .1 mIU/mL might need more than one dose booster vaccination.

  5. The one year effects of three doses of hepatitis B vaccine as a booster in anti-HBs-negative children 11–15 years after primary immunization; China, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Shan, Huan; Chen, Yongdi; Jiang, Zheng-gang; Dai, Xue-wei; Ren, Jing-jing; Xu, Kai-jin; Ruan, Bing; Yang, Shi-gui; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) levels one year after hepatitis B booster vaccination in anti-HBs-negative (<10 mIU/mL) children 11–15 y after primary vaccination. Anti-HBs titers were examined in 235 children who were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HBs, and hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc). The children were then divided into 3 groups based on their anti-HBs levels pre-booster: Group I, <0 .1 mIU/mL; Group II, 0.1 to <1 .0 mIU/mL; and Group III, 1.0 to <10 .0 mIU/mL. They were vaccinated with 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (0–1–6 month, 20 ug), and anti-HBs levels were measured. One month after the first dose, the anti-HBs positive rates (≥10 mIU/mL) in Groups I–III were 56.14%, 83.61% and 100%. One month after the third dose, the anti-HBs-positive rates in Groups I–III were 96.49%, 98.36% and 100%. One year after the third dose, the anti-HBs-positive rates in Groups I–III were 73.68%, 75.41% and 98.29%, respectively. Protective levels declined more rapidly for those with lower titers. Children with pre-booster anti-HBs titers of 1–9.9 mIU/mL might not need any booster dose, and the children with pre-booster titers of 0.1–0.9 and <0 .1 mIU/mL might need more than one dose booster vaccination. PMID:25692413

  6. Synchrotron radiation and industrial research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Rodney P.

    1995-05-01

    Fundamental studies on the properties of many different materials are of prime importance to most industrial concerns. For Unilever, solids (crystalline and amorphous), soft solids and complex fluids are the materials of primary interest. Synchrotron radiation has proved of great value for the analysis of a variety of such materials, because the intense and highly collimated radiation source has enabled us to obtain structural information rapidly as well as in time-resolved mode. In this paper are outlined the types of materials problems faced, and how we use different techniques to elucidate structure (both short and long range order) in zeolites, amorphous solids, as well as in biomaterials such as skin and hair containing lipid phases. Both equilibrium and time-resolved studies are described.

  7. A study of two statistical methods as applied to shuttle solid rocket booster expenditures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlmutter, M.; Huang, Y.; Graves, M.

    1974-01-01

    The state probability technique and the Monte Carlo technique are applied to finding shuttle solid rocket booster expenditure statistics. For a given attrition rate per launch, the probable number of boosters needed for a given mission of 440 launches is calculated. Several cases are considered, including the elimination of the booster after a maximum of 20 consecutive launches. Also considered is the case where the booster is composed of replaceable components with independent attrition rates. A simple cost analysis is carried out to indicate the number of boosters to build initially, depending on booster costs. Two statistical methods were applied in the analysis: (1) state probability method which consists of defining an appropriate state space for the outcome of the random trials, and (2) model simulation method or the Monte Carlo technique. It was found that the model simulation method was easier to formulate while the state probability method required less computing time and was more accurate.

  8. Long-term persistence in protection and response to a hepatitis B vaccine booster among adolescents immunized in infancy in the western region of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Zi; Gao, Yu-Hua; Lu, Wei; Jin, Cun-Duo; Zeng, Ying; Yan, Ling; Ding, Feng; Li, Tong; Liu, Xue-En; Zhuang, Hui

    2017-04-03

    To evaluate the persistence of protection from hepatitis B (HB) vaccination among adolescents immunized with a primary series of HB vaccine as infants, and the immune response to booster doses. Healthy adolescents aged 15-17 y vaccinated with HB vaccine only at birth were enrolled. Baseline serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) and antibody against hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) were detected by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and anti-HBs level was measured using Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immunoassay (CMIA). The rate of HBV infection was calculated. The seroprotection rate of anti-HBs (≥ 10 mIU/ml) and GMC level were used to evaluate the persistence of immunity from HB vaccination. Those with anti-HBs < 10 mIU/ml were immunized with booster doses of HB vaccine and the anamnestic response was assessed. Of 180 adolescents who received a primary series of HB vaccinations as infants, 3 (1.7%) had HBV infection and 74 (41.1%) had anti-HBs ≥ 10 mIU/ml with a GMC of 145.11 mIU/ml. The remaining 103 (57.2%) with anti-HBs < 10 mIU/ml received a booster dose of 20 μg HB vaccine and achieved the seroprotection rate of 84% (84/100) and a GMC of 875.19 mIU/ml at one month post-booster. An additional dose of 60 μg HB vaccine was administered to the 16 adolescents with anti-HBs < 10 mIU/ml after the first booster. All of them obtained anti-HBs seroprotection with a GMC of 271.02 mIU/ml at 1.5 months after an additional dose. Vaccine-induced immunity persisted for up to 15-17 y in 89.3% (158/177) of participants after a primary HB vaccination in infancy. Administering a booster dose of 20μg HB vaccine elicited an anamnestic immune responses in the majority of individuals with baseline anti-HBs <10 mIU/ml.

  9. Helical dipole partial Siberian snake for the AGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Alforque, R.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Hattori, T.; Huang, H.; Jain, A.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Tepikian, S.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wood, J.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2006-11-01

    Overcoming depolarization resonances in medium class synchrotrons (3 to 50 GeV) is one of the key issues in accelerating a highly polarized proton beam up to very high energies. Since such synchrotrons, including the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and the J-PARC Main Ring, generally do not have sufficiently long straight sections to accommodate full Siberian snakes with reasonable beam excursions, the practical solution is to use partial Siberian snakes that rotate the particle spin about a horizontal axis by a fraction of 180 degrees. For the AGS, we designed and installed a new partial Siberian snake consisting of a helical dipole magnet with a double pitch structure. The helical structure reduced the amount of transverse coupling as compared to that achieved by the previous solenoidal partial snake. This coupling led to partial depolarization at certain energies from horizontal betatron oscillations. The helical magnetic field in the snake magnet was calculated using a 3D magnetic field code TOSCA, and was optimized by segmenting the helical pitch and varying the lengths of the segments. Fabrication errors were checked and verified to be within required tolerances. Finally, the transverse field was measured by rotating harmonic coils. After installation, we achieved a 37.5% improvement in polarization - from 40% with the old solenoid to 55% with the new helical snake, thereby demonstrating that the helical partial snake is an effective device to suppress depolarization resonances in medium-sized synchrotrons.

  10. Ag nanoprisms with Ag2S attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shenglin; Xi, Baojuan; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Yifei; Jiang, Jianwen; Hu, Jiangyong; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2013-07-01

    Triangular Ag nanoprisms are a type of most-studied noble-metal nanostructures over the past decade owing to their special structural architecture and outstanding optical and catalytic properties for a wide range of applications. Nevertheless, in contrast to active research for the synthesis of phase-pure Ag nanoprisms, no asymmetric heterodimers containing Ag prisms have been developed so far, probably due to lack of suitable synthetic methods. Herein, we devise a simple ion-exchange method to synthesize Ag2S/Ag heterodimers at room temperature, through which Ag nanoprisms with controllable size and thickness can be fabricated. Formation chemistry and optical properties of the heterodimers have been investigated. These semiconductor/metal heterodimers have exhibited remarkable bactericidal activity to E. coli cells under visible light illumination.

  11. Lessons for increasing awareness and use of booster seats in a Latino community

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J; Fitzgerald, K; Ebel, B

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Two focus groups were conducted with Spanish speaking parents. Information was obtained through a written survey and moderated discussions. Results: Parents were widely misinformed about recommended guidelines for booster seat use, and the majority of participants did not own a booster seat. Parents identified a lack of information, the cost of booster seats, resistance to use by the child or the father, limited space in the vehicle, and unavailability of shoulder belts as barriers to booster seat use. Participants felt that learning more about the new Washington state booster seat law and its consequences would increase booster seat use. Public health messages felt to be effective were those in Spanish, delivered by credible spokespeople such as physicians and teachers, and utilizing the Spanish media. Conclusions: Campaigns to promote booster seats in the Latino community should be culturally specific, and clear guidelines for booster seat use should be given in Spanish. Legislation may be an important incentive for using booster seats, though reducing their cost and providing strategies to address child resistance and physical constraints of some vehicles are also important. PMID:12966019

  12. Application of synchrotron radiation to elemental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Hastings, J.B.; Howells, M.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Chen, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The use of a synchrotron storage ring as a high brightness source for production of monoergic, variable energy, and highly polarized x-ray beams promises to revolutionize the field of elemental analysis. The results of exploratory work using the Cornell synchrotron facility, CHESS, will be described. Design considerations and features of the new X-Ray Microprobe Facility now under construction at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source will be presented. This facility will be used for bulk analysis and for microanalysis with an initial spatial resolution of the order of 30 ..mu..m.

  13. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well.

  14. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Lightweight Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Dean; Runkle, Roy E.

    1995-01-01

    The cancellation of the Advanced Solid Rocket Booster Project and the earth-to-orbit payload requirements for the Space Station dictated that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) look at performance enhancements from all Space Transportation System (STS) elements (Orbiter Project, Space Shuttle Main Engine Project, External Tank Project, Solid Rocket Motor Project, & Solid Rocket Booster Project). The manifest for launching of Space Station components indicated that an additional 12-13000 pound lift capability was required on 10 missions and 15-20,000 pound additional lift capability is required on two missions. Trade studies conducted by all STS elements indicate that by deleting the parachute Recovery System (and associated hardware) from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBS) and going to a lightweight External Tank (ET) the 20,000 pound additional lift capability can be realized for the two missions. The deletion of the parachute Recovery System means the loss of four SRBs and this option is two expensive (loss of reusable hardware) to be used on the other 10 Space Station missions. Accordingly, each STS element looked at potential methods of weight savings, increased performance, etc. As the SRB and ET projects are non-propulsive (i.e. does not have launch thrust elements) their only contribution to overall payload enhancement can be achieved by the saving of weight while maintaining adequate safety factors and margins. The enhancement factor for the SRB project is 1:10. That is for each 10 pounds saved on the two SRBS; approximately 1 additional pound of payload in the orbiter bay can be placed into orbit. The SRB project decided early that the SRB recovery system was a prime candidate for weight reduction as it was designed in the early 1970s and weight optimization had never been a primary criteria.

  15. Thermally stable booster explosive and process for manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Quinlin, William T.; Thorpe, Raymond; Lightfoot, James M.

    2006-03-21

    A thermally stable booster explosive and process for the manufacture of the explosive. The product explosive is 2,4,7,9-tetranitro-10H-benzo[4,5]furo[3,2-b]indole (TNBFI). A reactant/solvent such as n-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) or dimethyl formamide (DMF) is made slightly basic. The solution is heated to reduce the water content. The solution is cooled and hexanitrostilbene is added. The solution is heated to a predetermined temperature for a specific time period, cooled, and the product is collected by filtration.

  16. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 5, part 1: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the appendices of the five volume series.

  17. Solid rocket booster thermal radiation model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. H.; Lee, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    A solid rocket booster (SRB) thermal radiation model, capable of defining the influence of the plume flowfield structure on the magnitude and distribution of thermal radiation leaving the plume, was prepared and documented. Radiant heating rates may be calculated for a single SRB plume or for the dual SRB plumes astride the space shuttle. The plumes may be gimbaled in the yaw and pitch planes. Space shuttle surface geometries are simulated with combinations of quadric surfaces. The effect of surface shading is included. The computer program also has the capability to calculate view factors between the SRB plumes and space shuttle surfaces as well as surface-to-surface view factors.

  18. Liquid Rocket Booster Integration Study. Volume 2: Study synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the study summary of the five volume series.

  19. Laser-plasma booster for ion post acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Kawata, S.; Takahashi, K.; Izumiyama, T.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.; Li, Y. T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    A remarkable ion energy increase is demonstrated for post acceleration by a laser-plasma booster. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when this intense short-pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field, a longitudinal inductive electric field is induced for the forward ion acceleration by the Faraday law. Our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by several tens of MeV.

  20. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem drop test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moog, R. D.; Sheppard, J. D.; Kross, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    An air drop test program was conducted as part of the development of a decelerator subsystem for recovering the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. This development test program consisted of six drops performed over the period from June 1977 to September 1978 at a parachute test center in California. The testing concerned a 48,000-lb drop test vehicle released from the B-52 mothership. The drop test program is described and pertinent test results are discussed. Data include snatch loads, inflation characteristics, peak inflation and disreef loads, and drag performance. Performance characteristics of the drogue parachute and the main parachute are established.